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Sample records for nonerosive gastro-esophageal reflux

  1. Novel therapeutics for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, Frank; Simon, Mireille

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms report inadequate symptom relief while on proton-pump inhibitor therapy. The mechanisms involved are failure of the antireflux barrier (transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations), high proximal extent of the refluxate, esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity. Persisting acid or nonacid reflux can be demonstrated in 40-50% of cases, suggesting that there is room for antireflux therapy in these patients. New antireflux compounds have been shown to decrease the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. The most promising classes of compounds are GABA type B agonists and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists, which can reduce both reflux episodes and symptoms, but the development of these compounds has been abandoned for either safety issues or lack of efficacy. Esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity may prove to be relevant therapeutic targets in the future.

  2. An updated review on gastro-esophageal reflux in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Hauser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and GER disease (GERD) were developed by the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. GERD is reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The recognition of GER and GERD is relevant to implement best management practices. A conservative management is indicated in infants with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. Children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment. Since the publications of the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines in 2009, no important novelties in drug treatment have been reported. Innovations are mainly restricted to the management of regurgitation in infants. During the last 5 years, pros and cons of multichannel intraluminal impedance have been highlighted. However, overall 'not much has changed' in the diagnosis and management of GER and GERD in infants and children.

  3. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  4. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Hallas, Jesper; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We applied a multivariable Cox regression analysis with adjustment for well-established risk factors associated with COPD exacerbations or gastro-esophageal reflux disease, including COPD severity, and symptoms. Individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease had more chronic bronchitis (31 vs 21%, P = 0.004), more breathlessness (39 vs 22%, P < 0.001), and more of them had a history of respiratory infections (6.8 vs 1.4%, P < 0.001) than individuals with COPD but without gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Among individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, those who did not use acid inhibitory treatment regularly had an increased risk of COPD exacerbations during follow-up, hazards ratio (HR): HR = 2.7 (1.3-5.4, P = 0.006). Individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease, using acid inhibitory treatment regularly did not have an increased risk of exacerbations, HR = 1.2 (0.6-2.7, P = 0.63). Gastro-esophageal reflux disease was associated with an increased risk of medically treated exacerbations of COPD, but only in those individuals who did not use acid inhibitory treatment regularly. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease in Healthy Older Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kie Young

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in otherwise healthy older children and adolescents is commonly encountered in pediatric clinics and poses a complex treatment problem involving changes of diets and lifestyle. After an initial history taking and a physical examination, typical symptoms of GERD in older children and adolescenct are initially treated with the trials of acid suppressants. With an increase of severe cases, more and more GERD children have been evaluated with endoscopy, which helps to delineate an erosive esophagitis from a non-erosive reflux disease as they are presumed to have different pathogenesis. For the pediatric patients without a significant underlying disease, a reflux esophagitis can be treated adequately with acid suppressants. Recently, the rapid increase of children who are taking anti-reflux medication has brought up a serious alarm among pediatricians. Some at risk pediatric patients with recurrent and/or chronic GERD have been linked to adulthood GERD. In this paper, pediatric GERD with and without erosive esophagitis was reviewed along with treatment options and issues specifically for the otherwise healthy older children and adolescents in the primary clinics or the secondary hospitals. PMID:24010091

  6. Proton pump inhibitor resistance, the real challenge in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Michele; Emerenziani, Sara; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Ribolsi, Mentore

    2013-10-21

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases. Although proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent the mainstay of treatment both for healing erosive esophagitis and for symptom relief, several studies have shown that up to 40% of GERD patients reported either partial or complete lack of response of their symptoms to a standard PPI dose once daily. Several mechanisms have been proposed as involved in PPIs resistance, including ineffective control of gastric acid secretion, esophageal hypersensitivity, ultrastructural and functional changes in the esophageal epithelium. The diagnostic evaluation of a refractory GERD patients should include an accurate clinical evaluation, upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring, which allows to discriminate non-erosive reflux disease patients from those presenting esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn. Treatment has been primarily based on doubling the PPI dose or switching to another PPI. Patients with proven disease, not responding to PPI twice daily, are eligible for anti-reflux surgery.

  7. Transoral incisionless fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto; Mazzoleni, Giorgia; Testoni, Sabrina Gloria Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common disorder that results primarily from the loss of an effective antireflux barrier, which forms a mechanical obstacle to the retrograde movement of gastric content. GERD can be currently treated by medical therapy, surgical or endoscopic transoral intervention. Medical therapy is the most common approach, though concerns have been increasingly raised in recent years about the potential side effects of continuous long-term medication, drug intolerance or unresponsiveness, and the need for high dosages for long periods to treat symptoms or prevent recurrences. Surgery too may in some cases have consequences such as long-lasting dysphagia, flatulence, inability to belch or vomit, diarrhea, or functional dyspepsia related to delayed gastric emptying. In the last few years, transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) has proved an effective and promising therapeutic option as an alternative to medical and surgical therapy. This review describes the steps of the TIF technique, using the EsophyX® device and the MUSETM system. Complications and their management are described in detail, and the recent literature regarding the outcomes is reviewed. TIF reconfigures the tissue to obtain a full-thickness gastro-esophageal valve from inside the stomach, by serosa-to-serosa plications which include the muscle layers. To date the procedure has achieved lasting improvement of GERD symptoms (up to six years), cessation or reduction of proton pump inhibitor medication in about 75% of patients, and improvement of functional findings, measured by either pH or impedance monitoring. PMID:27158533

  8. A study of pathophysiological factors associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins discordant for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Mohammed, I; Anggiansah, A; Anggiansah, R; Cherkas, L F; Spector, T D; Trudgill, N J

    2013-08-01

    Differences in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and peristaltic function and in transient LES relaxations (TLESR) have been described in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some of these differences may be the result of chronic GERD rather than being an underlying contributory factor. Twins discordant for GERD symptoms, i.e., only one twin had GERD symptoms, underwent standard LES and esophageal body manometry, and then using a sleeve sensor prolonged LES and pH monitoring, 30 min before and 60 min after a 250 mL 1200 kcal lipid meal. Eight monozygotic and 24 dizygotic female twins were studied. Although there was no difference in preprandial LES pressure (symptomatic 13.2 ± 7.1 mmHg vs asymptomatic 15.1 ± 6.2 mmHg, P = 0.4), LES pressure fell further postprandially in symptomatic twins (LES pressure area under the curve 465 ± 126 vs 331 ± 141 mmHg h, P < 0.01). 12/37 (32%) of acid reflux episodes in symptomatic twins occurred due to low LES pressure or deep inspiration/strain and 0/17 in asymptomatic twins (P = 0.01). There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic twins in: peristaltic amplitude, ineffective esophageal body motility, hiatus hernia prevalence, or LES length. There was also no difference in TLESR frequency preprandially (symptomatic median 1(range 0-2) vs asymptomatic 0(0-2), P = 0.08) or postprandially (2.5(1-8) vs 3(1-6), P = 0.81). Twins with GERD symptoms had lower postprandial LES pressure and given the close genetic link between the twins, it is possible that such differences are caused by GERD. Acid reflux episodes associated with a hypotensive LES were seen in symptomatic, but not in asymptomatic twins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy. PMID:16718803

  10. The impact of illness in patients with moderate to severe gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Dika, Samer; Guyatt, Gordon H; Armstrong, David; Degl'innocenti, Alessio; Wiklund, Ingela; Fallone, Carlo A; Tanser, Lisa; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Wahlqvist, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Barkun, Alan N; Austin, Peggy; Schünemann, Holger J

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease. It impairs health related quality of life (HRQL). However, the impact on utility scores and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe GERD is not well known. Methods We analyzed data from 217 patients with moderate to severe GERD (mean age 50, SD 13.7) across 17 Canadian centers. Patients completed three utility instruments – the standard gamble (SG), the feeling thermometer (FT), and the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI 3) – and several HRQL instruments, including Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) and the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (SF-36). All patients received a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole 40 mg daily, for four to six weeks. Results The mean scores on a scale from 0 (dead) to 1 (full health) obtained for the FT, SG, and HUI 3 were 0.67 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.70), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.80), and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.82) respectively. The mean scores on the SF-36 were lower than the previously reported Canadian and US general population mean scores and work productivity was impaired. Conclusion GERD has significant impact on utility scores, HRQL, and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe disease. Furthermore, the FT and HUI 3 provide more valid measurements of HRQL in GERD than the SG. After treatment with esomeprazole, patients showed improved HRQL. PMID:16004616

  11. Laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus anterior 180° fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xing; Wu, Ji-Min; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has been the gold standard for the surgical management of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic anterior 180° fundoplication (180° LAF) is reported to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications while obtaining similar control of reflux. The present meta-analysis was conducted to confirm the value of the 2 techniques. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Springerlink, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Platform databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and 180° LAF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of 2 techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Results: Six eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 266) and 180° LAF (n = 265) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and 180° LAF with regard to operating time, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, willingness to undergo surgery again, quality of life, postoperative heartburn, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, postoperative DeMeester scores, postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, postoperative gas-bloating, unable to belch, diarrhea, or overall reoperation. LNF was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative dysphagia compared with 180° LAF, while 180° LAF was followed by more reoperation for recurrent reflux symptoms. Conclusion: LNF and 180° LAF are equally effective in controlling reflux symptoms and obtain a comparable prevalence of patient satisfaction. 180° LAF can reduce the incidence of postoperative dysphagia while this is offset by a higher risk of reoperation for recurrent symptoms. The risk of recurrent symptoms should need to be balanced against the risk of dysphagia when surgeons choose surgical procedures for each individual with GERD. PMID:28906412

  12. Gastro esophageal reflux disease is associated with absence from work: results from a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Leodolter, Andreas; Nocon, Marc; Kulig, Michael; Willich, Stefan N; Malfertheiner, Peter; Labenz, Joachim

    2005-12-07

    To study the association of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with the absence from work and to estimate the extent of loss in gross domestic product due to inability to work. Analysis was based on the prospectively gathered data of a large European cohort study involving 6 215 symptomatic GERD patients (ProGERD). Among these patients, 2 871 were initially employed. The calculation of the loss of gross domestic product was based on the assumption that the prevalence of GERD was about 15% in Germany. According to the German Federal Statistical Office, the mean gross wage of employees was 150 EUR/d in 2002. The data of 2 078 employed patients who were prospectively followed up for over 2 years were analyzed. At study entry, the patients reported a mean of 1.8 d per year of inability to work. During the prospective follow-up under routine clinical care, the proportion of patients reporting days with inability to work decreased from 14% to 6% and the mean number of days per year with inability to work decreased to 0.9 d. Assuming a prevalence of troublesome GERD of 15% in the employed German population, the loss of gross domestic product amounted to 668 million EUR/year in Germany. GERD causes a relevant impairment on the national economics by absence from work. The presented data demonstrate the importance of GERD, not only for patients and health insurance companies, but also for the community at large.

  13. [Clinical observation on treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux with modified zhizhu pill].

    PubMed

    Ghen, Jian-yong; Qiu, Jian-rong; Pan, Feng

    2004-01-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of modified Zhizhu pill (ZZP) in treating gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to explore its mechanism. Sixty-three GERD patients were randomly divided into the treated group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 33). The treated group was treated with ZZP 100 ml, twice daily by orally taking half an hour before meal. The control group was treated with Ranitidine 0.15 g, twice daily and Cisapride 10 mg, three times a day by orally taking before meal. The therapeutic course for both groups was 8 weeks. The changes of symptom scoring, endoscopic examination, esophageal pressure, 24 hrs monitoring on pH and blood level of motilin in the two groups were recorded and compared. After treatment, the symptom scoring, esophageal pressure, 24 hrs monitoring on pH and blood motilin level were improved in both groups (P < 0.05), and the improvement in the treated group was more significant than that in the control group (P < 0.05). ZZP has good effect in treating GERD.

  14. Dietary nitrate may have a role in development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Mofid, Azadeh; Razjouyan, Hadie

    2011-09-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) has become very common in the past three decades. The reason for this, as well as its exact pathophysiologic mechanisms are yet unknown. In this ecologic study we assessed the relation between water nitrate content and prevalence of GERD in Tehran, Iran. We determined the prevalence of acid regurgitation, heartburn or any of them occurring on a frequent (at least weekly) or infrequent basis in areas with different water nitrate. The areas for nitrate were defined as below: <50 mg nitrate/L, 50-74 mg/L, 75-100 mg/L, and >100 mg/L. Frequency of each symptom was assessed in each area and compared. Adjustment for age, sex, education, NSAID-consumption, BMI, smoking, history of GERD in first degree relatives and spouse was done in a multivariate model. People living in areas with water nitrate content more than 100mg/L had a higher chance of suffering from frequent AR than those living in areas with water nitrate less than 100mg/L (25.5% vs. 12.0%, OR: 2.53, 95% CI: 1.36-4.73, P=0.006). After adjustment for the named factors, the relationship remained significant (OR: 3.65, 95% CI: 1.32-10.09). The relation for frequent heartburn or infrequent symptoms was not significant. In this ecologic study, we found a relation between experiencing frequent AR and drinking or cooking with water containing more than 100mg nitrate/L. Considering our current knowledge, if we put dietary nitrate into the puzzle of increased prevalence and/or pathophysiology of GERD, it can theoretically answer several questions. Hence we propose a nitrate-hypothesis for GERD pathogenesis.

  15. Gastro esophageal reflux disease is associated with absence from work: Results from a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Leodolter, Andreas; Nocon, Marc; Kulig, Michael; Willich, Stefan N; Malfertheiner, Peter; Labenz, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the association of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with the absence from work and to estimate the extent of loss in gross domestic product due to inability to work. METHODS: Analysis was based on the prospectively gathered data of a large European cohort study involving 6 215 symptomatic GERD patients (ProGERD). Among these patients, 2 871 were initially employed. The calculation of the loss of gross domestic product was based on the assumption that the prevalence of GERD was about 15% in Germany. According to the German Federal Statistical Office, the mean gross wage of employees was 150 €/d in 2002. RESULTS: The data of 2 078 employed patients who were prospectively followed up for over 2 years were analyzed. At study entry, the patients reported a mean of 1.8 d per year of inability to work. During the prospective follow-up under routine clinical care, the proportion of patients reporting days with inability to work decreased from 14% to 6% and the mean number of days per year with inability to work decreased to 0.9 d. Assuming a prevalence of troublesome GERD of 15% in the employed German population, the loss of gross domestic product amounted to 668 million €/year in Germany. CONCLUSION: GERD causes a relevant impairment on the national economics by absence from work. The presented data demonstrate the importance of GERD, not only for patients and health insurance companies, but also for the community at large. PMID:16437662

  16. Clinical usefulness of adherence to gastro-esophageal reflux disease guideline by Spanish gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Mearin, Fermín; Ponce, Julio; Ponce, Marta; Balboa, Agustín; González, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate usefulness of adherence to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) guideline established by the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology. METHODS: Prospective, observational and multicentre study of 301 patients with typical symptoms of GERD who should be managed in accordance with guidelines and were attended by gastroenterologists in daily practice. Patients (aged > 18 years) were eligible for inclusion if they had typical symptoms of GERD (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) as the major complaint in the presence or absence of accompanying atypical symptoms, such as dyspeptic symptoms and/or supraesophageal symptoms. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions should be made based on specific recommendations of the Spanish clinical practice guideline for GERD which is a widely disseminated and well known instrument among Spanish in digestive disease specialists. RESULTS: Endoscopy was indicated in 123 (41%) patients: 50 with alarm symptoms, 32 with age > 50 years without alarm symptom. Seventy-two patients (58.5%) had esophagitis (grade A, 23, grade B, 28, grade C, 18, grade D, 3). In the presence of alarm symptoms, endoscopy was indicated consistently with recommendations in 98% of cases. However, in the absence of alarm symptoms, endoscopy was indicated in 33% of patients > 50 years (not recommended by the guideline). Adherence for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy was 80%, but doses prescribed were lower (half) in 5% of cases and higher (double) in 15%. Adherence regarding duration of PPI therapy was 69%; duration was shorter than recommended in 1% (4 wk in esophagitis grades C-D) or longer in 30% (8 wk in esophagitis grades A-B or in patients without endoscopy). Treatment response was higher when PPI doses were consistent with guidelines, although differences were not significant (95% vs 85%). CONCLUSION: GERD guideline compliance was quite good although endoscopy was over indicated in patients > 50 years without alarm symptoms; PPIs were

  17. Long-term medical management of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: how long and when to consider surgery?

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Jayanthi; Krishnan, Arunkumar

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a chronic, long standing disease. Spontaneous remission of GERD is rare and conservative management including life style modification measures is unlikely to relieve symptoms. Majority of patients with reflux disease require long-term acid suppressants. Proton pump inhibitors are the choice of drugs in management of these patients. The end point of treatment is not clear. Duration of treatment is individual based. The symptoms may be intermittent or on most days of the week. The treatment is therefore either a short course which may be for 8 to 12 weeks or 6 months, or continuous, intermittent or 'on-demand' basis. The maintenance therapy is with the lowest proton pump inhibitor (PPI) dose necessary for adequate symptom relief. Whether long-term PPI actually alters the natural history of reflux disease other than to reduce the incidence of peptic stricture is not known. Reported adverse effects due to PPI include Clostridium difficile colitis and bacterial gastroenteritis, osteoporosis, and vitamin B12 deficiency. Anti-reflux surgery is indicated for youngsters, those not willing for long-term PPI i.e. for years, large volume refluxers, especially the supine refluxers and bile refluxers.

  18. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819).

  19. [Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease and malignant progression--equal risk for men and women?].

    PubMed

    Pech, O

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in the Western world. Patients with GERD have a 10 fold increased risk to develop a Barrett's esophagus. Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a higher risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma. Men have more severe reflux with a higher grade of inflammation and acid reflux. This seems to be the reason why men develop a Barrett's esophagus more frequently--the risk is approximately 2 to 3 fold and the risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma is even 3 to 6 times higher. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Risk of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Kuei; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This large-scale, controlled cohort study estimated the risks of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Taiwan. We conducted this population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan during the period from 1997 to 2010. Patients with GERD were diagnosed using endoscopy, and controls were matched to patients with GERD at a ratio of 1:4. We identified 15,412 patients with GERD and 60,957 controls. Compared with the controls, the patients with GERD had higher rates of osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, depression, anxiety, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic liver disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease (all P < .05). A total of 85 patients had lung cancer among patients with GERD during the follow-up of 42,555 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0020 per person-year. By contrast, 232 patients had lung cancer among patients without GERD during the follow-up of 175,319 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0013 per person-year. By using stepwise Cox regression model, the overall incidence of lung cancer remained significantly higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (hazard ratio, 1.53; 95% CI [1.19–1.98]). The cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (P = .0012). In conclusion, our large population-based cohort study provides evidence that GERD may increase the risk of lung cancer in Asians. PMID:28028458

  1. Risk of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-Kuei; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Kun; Chen, Likwang

    2016-01-01

    This large-scale, controlled cohort study estimated the risks of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Taiwan. We conducted this population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan during the period from 1997 to 2010. Patients with GERD were diagnosed using endoscopy, and controls were matched to patients with GERD at a ratio of 1:4. We identified 15,412 patients with GERD and 60,957 controls. Compared with the controls, the patients with GERD had higher rates of osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, depression, anxiety, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic liver disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease (all P < .05). A total of 85 patients had lung cancer among patients with GERD during the follow-up of 42,555 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0020 per person-year. By contrast, 232 patients had lung cancer among patients without GERD during the follow-up of 175,319 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0013 per person-year. By using stepwise Cox regression model, the overall incidence of lung cancer remained significantly higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (hazard ratio, 1.53; 95% CI [1.19-1.98]). The cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (P = .0012). In conclusion, our large population-based cohort study provides evidence that GERD may increase the risk of lung cancer in Asians.

  2. [The place of speech therapy in the dysfunctional dysphonias with gastro-esophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Yana, M; Renard, M C; Stroebel, V

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the association between dysfunctional dysphonia and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Joint medical and speech therapy management, adapted daily, would seem to be necessary. The authors report the results of a clinical assessment by questionnaire in six patients.

  3. The Study of Oral Liquid Microcrystallization in Children with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    SPINEI, AURELIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; ROMANCIUC, INA; BERAR, ANTONELA; MIHAILESCU, ANA MARIA

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim. Patients with disabilities have a higher prevalence of caries and dental erosions than general population. This particularity may be assessed by the study of microcrystallization of saliva. We investigated the oral liquid microcrystallization in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition associated with dental erosions. Material and methods. 54 children have been clinically examined: 27 children suffering from GERD with ages between 13 and 15, were included in the study group, and 27 healthy children - the control group. The study of crystallographic changes of the oral liquid was performed using the method developed by Shatohina, Razumov SN, Shabalin VN (2006) with the scanning electron microscope VEGA TESCAN TS 5130 MM. Results The degree of microcrystalization of the oral liquid in children with GERD was considerably reduced, (1.73±0.11 points) and was lower than in children in the control group (3.22±0.16 points) (p<0.01, RR=2). The degree of microcrystallization of oral liquid in children with GERD was 1.86 times lower than in healthy children. This was correlated with the duration of gastroesophageal reflux. Conclusion The study of structural particularities of dehydrated droplet of oral liquid in children with GERD has elucidated a number of markers of the changes produced in the oral cavity. These can be used in the screening research in prevention of caries and dental erosions. PMID:26528035

  4. [Laparoscopic fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux. Multicenter study of 1,470 cases].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, J P; Pessaux, P; Ghavami, B; Flament, J B; Trébuchet, G; Meyer, C; Hutten, N; Champault, G

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to evaluate the immediate and 2-year results of the laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). From 1992 to 1996, 1,470 laparoscopic fundoplications were performed for symptomatic GERD. Preoperative workup included upper GI tract endoscopy in 1,437 patients (97.7%), 24-hour pHmetry in 799 patients (54.3%) and esophageal manometry in 934 patients (63.5%). Four procedures were performed: Nissen, Nissen-Rossetti, Toupet and Toupet with cardiopexy. The results were estimated at 1 month and 3 months. The patients were examined or called 2 years after surgery in order to evaluate the functional results with Visick classification. Mean length of hospital stay was 4.6 days (range 2-48 days). Morbidity and mortality rates were 3.2% (47 patients) and 0.07% (1 patient) respectively. Conversion rate into laparotomy was 6.5% (96 patients). After 3 months, 87 patients (5.9%) had severe dysphagia and 91.9% of the patients were satisfied. At 2 years, 78 patients (5.6%) had a clinical recurrence. Five patients (0.35%) had a persistent dysphagia, 90 patients (6.5%) had secondary side effects; 38 patients had been reoperated; 92.7% of the patients were satisfied. There was no significant difference between the results of the four procedures, 3 months and 2 years after surgery. Laparoscopic fundoplication for treatment of GERD is a safe and effective procedure; 92.7% of the patients were satisfied 2 years after surgery.

  5. Self-reported Halitosis and Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Struch, Franziska; Wallaschofski, Henri; Grabe, Hans J.; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M.; Meisel, Peter; Kocher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with halitosis contact primary care practitioners, dentists, and gastroenterologists alike. Objectives It is unclear whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a risk factor for halitosis. Design and Patients/Participants We studied this possible relationship in the general population using the cross-sectional Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Employing structured interviews, self-reported halitosis was assessed among 417 edentulous (toothless) subjects aged 40 to 81 years and among 2,588 dentate subjects aged 20 to 59 years. The presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation (GERD-related symptoms) at 4 levels (absent, mild, moderate, severe) was taken as exposure and used for logistic regression. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders, such as age, sex, depressive symptoms, history of chronic gastritis, history of gastric or duodenal ulcer, smoking, school education, and dental status. Measurements and Main Results We found a strong positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 12.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.66–63.09, P = 0.002 for severe compared to no GERD-related symptoms) in denture-wearing subjects and a moderate, positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 2.24, 95% CI 1.27–3.92, P = 0.005) in dentate subjects with a clear dose–effect relationship. Conclusions The present study provides clear evidence for an association between GERD and halitosis. As there are effective treatments for GERD, these results suggest treatment options, such as proton pump inhibitors, for halitosis. These should be studied in randomized controlled trials. PMID:18196351

  6. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  7. Laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus anterior 180° fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Wu, Ji-Min; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has been the gold standard for the surgical management of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic anterior 180° fundoplication (180° LAF) is reported to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications while obtaining similar control of reflux. The present meta-analysis was conducted to confirm the value of the 2 techniques. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Springerlink, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Platform databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and 180° LAF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of 2 techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Six eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 266) and 180° LAF (n = 265) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and 180° LAF with regard to operating time, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, willingness to undergo surgery again, quality of life, postoperative heartburn, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, postoperative DeMeester scores, postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, postoperative gas-bloating, unable to belch, diarrhea, or overall reoperation. LNF was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative dysphagia compared with 180° LAF, while 180° LAF was followed by more reoperation for recurrent reflux symptoms. LNF and 180° LAF are equally effective in controlling reflux symptoms and obtain a comparable prevalence of patient satisfaction. 180° LAF can reduce the incidence of postoperative dysphagia while this is offset by a higher risk of reoperation for recurrent symptoms. The risk of recurrent symptoms should need to be balanced against the risk of dysphagia when surgeons choose surgical procedures for each individual with GERD.

  8. Greater loss of productivity among Japanese workers with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that persist vs resolve on medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Matsuzaki, J; Masaoka, T; Inadomi, J M

    2014-06-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) impairs quality of life; however, the association between GERD and work productivity has not been well investigated in Japan. This study was designed to compare the impact of GERD on productivity between Japanese workers with GERD symptoms that persisted vs resolved on medical therapy. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was conducted in workers. The impact of GERD on work and daily productivity was evaluated using a Web-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD and a GERD symptom severity Questionnaire. Demographic information, clinical history, and satisfaction with GERD medication were also ascertained. A total of 20 000 subjects were invited to the survey. After the exclusion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancy, peptic ulcer, upper GI surgery, and unemployment, 650 participants were included in the analysis. Participants with persistent GERD symptoms reported a significantly greater losses of work productivity (11.4 ± 13.4 h/week), absenteeism (0.7 ± 3.1 h/week), presenteeism (10.7 ± 12.6 h/week), costs (20 100 ± 26 800 JPY/week), and lower daily productivity (71.3% [95% confidence interval, 69.0-73.7]) than those whose symptoms were alleviated with medications. The level of dissatisfaction with GERD medications among participants with persistent GERD symptoms was significantly correlated with loss of work and daily productivity (p < 0.001). GERD places a significant burden on work and daily productivity despite medical therapy. Ineffective GERD therapy is associated with greater productivity loss. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Long-term evolution of esophago-gastric junctions surgically treated to correct gastro-esophageal reflux. 111 cases].

    PubMed

    Vaysse, P; Baunin, C; Guitard, J; Moscovici, J; Visentin, M; Chansou, A; Fedacou, F; Juskiewenski, S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred eleven patients underwent a surgical procedure for correction of intractable gastroesophageal reflux. Twenty children were severely mentally retarded. The range of follow up was 6 months to 15 years. Upper gastro-intestinal series was realised at tenth post-operative day for 111 children, then during the first year for 97 children, between the first and fifth year for 62 children and after the fifth year for 25 children. The first upper gastro-intestinal control (at tenth day) was normal for 111 patients. Next controls revealed, usually during the first post-operative year, an esophago-gastric junction anomaly for 49 patients (44%). Most of them are light (41/111 = 37%): occasional reflux (9 children; more frequent without pyloroplasty) of little paraesophageal hernia (32 children; more frequent with closure of esophageal hiatus by two suture lines, with esophageal fixation on median arcuatum ligament or without esophageal fixation on esophageal hiatus); these light anomalies are symptom free and sometimes transitories. Rarely, anomalies are important (8/111 = 7%): big paraesophageal hernia of recurrence (more frequent with partial posterior fundoplication and in children severely mentally retarded); five patients were symptomatic and had to be reoperated. Also now, we don't use partial posterior fundoplication and in mentally retarded children we prefer a Collis procedure.

  10. Challenges of Correlating pH Change with Relief of Clinical Symptoms in Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Phase III, Randomized Study of Zegerid versus Losec

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Dave; Ng Kwet Shing, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Gruss, Hans-Jurgen; Reguła, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Background Zegerid (on demand immediate-release omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate combination therapy) has demonstrated earlier absorption and more rapid pH change compared with Losec (standard enteric coated omeprazole), suggesting more rapid clinical relief of heartburn. This Phase III, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized study assessed the clinical superiority of Zegerid versus Losec for rapid relief of heartburn associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods Patients with a history of frequent (2 3 days/week) uncomplicated GERD, were randomized to receive Zegerid (20mg) or Losec (20mg) with corresponding placebo. Study medication was self-administered on the first episode of heartburn, and could be taken for up to 3 days within a 14 day study period. Heartburn severity was self assessed up to 180 minutes post dose (9 point Likert scale). Primary endpoint was median time to sustained response (≥3 point reduction in heartburn severity for ≥45 minutes). Results Of patients randomized to Zegerid (N=122) or Losec (N=117), 228/239 had recorded ≥1 evaluable heartburn episodes and were included in the modified intent-to-treat population. No significant between-group differences were observed for median time to sustained response (60.0 vs. 52.2 minutes, Zegerid [N=117] and Losec [N=111], respectively), sustained partial response (both, 37.5 minutes) and sustained total relief (both, 105 minutes). Significantly more patients treated with Zegerid reached sustained total relief within 0–30 minutes post dose in all analysis sets (p<0.05). Both treatments were well tolerated and did not raise any safety concerns. Conclusions Superiority of Zegerid over Losec for rapid heartburn relief was not demonstrated; both treatments were equally effective however the rapid onset of action of Losec was unexpected. Factors, including aspects of study design may have contributed to this. This study supports previously reported difficulty in

  11. Non-Erosive Reflux Disease Manifested Exclusively by Protracted Hiccups

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Edgar A; Cervantes-Sodi, María

    2010-01-01

    Hiccups are a benign physiological feature affecting almost everyone at one time or another. They tend to be short-lived and do not affect quality of life; however, there are various pathologies that may present with long-lasting hiccups. These are grouped into 3 categories according to their duration: acute, persistent and intractable or protracted hiccups. Intractable hiccups last longer than 2 months and are usually associated with more severe conditions. The association between intractable hiccups and reflux disease has not been previously documented by objective methods. This report describes the case of a 23-year-old female who presented with protracted hiccups; all other organic pathologies were ruled out, and endoscopy and conventional pH-metry confirmed a diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease as the unique cause. PMID:21103425

  12. A meta-analysis of long follow-up outcomes of laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus Toupet (270°) fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease based on randomized controlled trials in adults.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Zhonggao; Wu, Jimin

    2016-08-02

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) is the most common surgical procedure for the surgical management of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) has been reported to have a lower prevalence of postoperative complications yet still obtain a similar level of reflux control. We conducted a meta-analysis to confirm the value of LNF and LTF. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Springerlink were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and LTF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of two techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Eight eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 625) and LTF (n = 567) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and LTF with regard to hospitalization duration, perioperative complications, patient satisfaction, postoperative heartburn, regurgitation, postoperative DeMeester scores, or esophagites. A shorter operative time and higher postoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure were associated with LNF. Prevalence of postoperative dysphagia, gas-bloating, inability to belch, dilatation for dysphagia and reoperation were higher after LNF, but subgroup analyses showed that differences with respect to dysphagia between LNF and LTF disappeared over time. Subgroup analyses did not support "tailored therapy" according to preoperative esophageal motility. LNF and LTF have equivalently good control of GERD and result in a similar prevalence of patient satisfaction. Based on current evidence, it is not rational or advisable to abandon LNF when choosing a surgical procedure for GERD.

  13. A cystic fibrosis patient homozygous for 621 + 1G-->T mutation has a severe pulmonary disease, mild pancreatic insufficiency and a gastro-esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Witt, M; Pogorzelski, A; Zebrak, J; Rutkiewicz, E

    1996-09-01

    A cystic fibrosis patient homozygous for 621 + 1G-->T mutation of the CFTR gene has been identified during a molecular screening program of Polish CF families. The patient is currently a 21-year-old female with severe pulmonary involvement, mild pancreatic insufficiency and complicated gastroesophageal reflux.

  14. Dose-Finding Study of Omeprazole on Gastric pH in Neonates with Gastro-Esophageal Acid Reflux Using a Bayesian Sequential Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Alberti, Corinne; Biran, Valerie; Bourdon, Olivier; Farnoux, Caroline; Zohar, Sarah; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered on clinical symptoms in neonates but benefit remains controversial. Clinical trials validating omeprazole dosage in neonates are limited. The objective of this trial was to determine the minimum effective dose (MED) of omeprazole to treat pathological acid reflux in neonates using reflux index as surrogate marker. Design Double blind dose-finding trial with continual reassessment method of individual dose administration using a Bayesian approach, aiming to select drug dose as close as possible to the predefined target level of efficacy (with a credibility interval of 95%). Setting Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris, France. Patients Neonates with a postmenstrual age ≥ 35 weeks and a pathologic 24-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring defined by a reflux index ≥ 5% over 24 hours were considered for participation. Recruitment was stratified to 3 groups according to gestational age at birth. Intervention Five preselected doses of oral omeprazole from 1 to 3 mg/kg/day. Main outcome measures Primary outcome, measured at 35 weeks postmenstrual age or more, was a reflux index <5% during the 24-h pH monitoring registered 72±24 hours after omeprazole initiation. Results Fifty-four neonates with a reflux index ranging from 5.06 to 27.7% were included. Median age was 37.5 days and median postmenstrual age was 36 weeks. In neonates born at less than 32 weeks of GA (n = 30), the MED was 2.5mg/kg/day with an estimated mean posterior probability of success of 97.7% (95% credibility interval: 90.3–99.7%). The MED was 1mg/kg/day for neonates born at more than 32 GA (n = 24). Conclusions Omeprazole is extensively prescribed on clinical symptoms but efficacy is not demonstrated while safety concerns do exist. When treatment is required, the daily dose needs to be validated in preterm and term neonates. Optimal doses of omeprazole to increase gastric pH and decrease reflux

  15. How to differentiate non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Ke, Mei Yun

    2012-12-01

    Heartburn is a common symptom in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Endoscopic examination can differentiate between reflux esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), but not between NERD and functional heartburn. With the development of new techniques, more NERD patients could be identified among those previously diagnosed with functional heartburn. Most patients with NERD, however, could be identified based on their clinical characteristics and response to proton pump inhibitors and/or integrated anti-gastroesophageal reflux therapy. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2012 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P < 0.001). With liquid acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P < 0.001). With mixed liquid-gas acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  17. Usefulness of baseline impedance in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory nonerosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kohata, Yukie; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    Approximately more than half of patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) do not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Although NERD is a heterogeneous entity, previous study showed that multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring could distinguish reflux-related disease from PPI-refractory NERD. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of baseline impedance in PPI-refractory NERD patients. We used MII-pH monitoring to analyze reflux parameters, symptom index (SI), and baseline impedance in 37 PPI-refractory NERD patients on PPI. Reflux was divided into acid (nadir pH ≤ 4) and non-acid (nadir pH > 4). Subjects were classified as having reflux-related disease based on abnormal reflux parameters or positive SI (≥ 50%), or non-reflux-related disease, including functional heartburn, based on negative SI with normal reflux parameters. A total of 26 of the 37 subjects were diagnosed with reflux-related disease, including eight with acid-reflux type and 18 with non-acid-reflux type, and nine with functional heartburn and two with pseudohypersalivation. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of the acid-reflux type, non-acid-reflux type, and functional heartburn groups. The baseline impedance value in the acid-reflux type (1245 ± 392 Ω) was significantly lower than that in the non-acid-reflux type (2824 ± 1160 Ω) and functional heartburn (3546 ± 1353 Ω) groups. Baseline impedance values inversely correlated with reflux percent time, acid-reflux time, and acid exposure time. Among patients with PPI-refractory NERD, acid-reflux type was associated with lower baseline impedance compared with non-acid-reflux type and functional heartburn. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Functional dyspepsia and nonerosive reflux disease: clinical interactions and their implications.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2007-08-08

    Functional dyspepsia or nonulcer dyspepsia, and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) or endoscopy-negative reflux disease, are common reasons for referral to a gastroenterologist. Although there is much confusion with regard to definition, recent research would suggest that these 2 conditions are linked and may represent components in the spectrum of the same disease entity, in terms of both symptoms and pathophysiology. Several theories have been proposed regarding the etiology of these disorders, including acid exposure, visceral hypersensitivity, impaired fundal accommodation, delayed gastric emptying, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

  20. An open-label, non-comparative, non-interventional, multi-center, post-authorization safety study on the administration of rabeprazole to adults with gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Zouboulis-Vafiadis, Irini; Paraskevas, Emmanuel; Tzourmakliotis, Dimitrios; Hatzikyriakou, Maria; Mestoussi, Angeliki; Vasdekis, Vassilios; Katsilabros, Nikolaos; Arhimandritis, Athanasios; Papadokostopoulou, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Rabeprazole produces a profound and long-lasting inhibition of gastric acid secretion. The aim of the study was to monitor the safety and efficacy of rabeprazole administered to patients with erosive or symptomatic non-erosive reflux disease, in real-life healthcare settings. Methods Male and female patients, aged ≥18 years, with endoscopy diagnosed GERD were included; patients received at least 8 weeks treatment with rabeprazole. Changes in severity of symptoms recorded on the Likert scale were analysed using marginal homogeneity tests. Results 186 patients were enrolled across 17 study sites; 127 patients (68.3%) completed the study. Almost 75% of patients had an initial diagnosis of GERD with Grade A or B esophagitis. The most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea, flatulence, dizziness, cough, abdominal pain, upper abdominal pain and somnolence. Over half of AEs were unrelated to study drug; 1 severe AE of diarrhea was possibly related to study drug. No new AEs were reported not included in the current version of Summary of Product Characteristics. Rabeprazole was effective in reducing the symptoms of GERD; the Likert scale scores of symptoms decreased significantly for all patients from 0-4 weeks and 4-8 weeks. Conclusions In our study, rabeprazole was safe and effective in reducing the symptoms of GERD. PMID:24732963

  1. A novel optical probe for pH sensing in gastro-esophageal apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Ghini, G.; Giannetti, A.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring gastric pH for long periods, usually 24 h, may be essential in analyzing the physiological pattern of acidity, in obtaining information on changes in activity during peptic ulcer disease, and in assessing the effect of antisecretory drugs. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which causes a pH decrease in the esophagus content from pH 7 even down to pH 2, can determine esophagitis with possible strictures and Barrett's esophagus. One of the difficulties of the optical measurement of pH in the gastro-esophageal apparatus lies in the required extended working range from 1 to 8 pH units. The present paper deals with a novel optical pH sensor, using methyl red as optical pH indicator. Contrary to all acidbase indicators characterized by working ranges limited to 2-3 pH units, methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a wide working range which fits with the clinical requirements. The novel probe design here described is suitable for gastro-esophageal applications and allows the optimization of the performances of the CPG with the immobilised indicator. This leads to a very simple configuration characterized by a very fast response time.

  2. Functional heartburn has more in common with functional dyspepsia than with non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, E; Pohl, D; Zentilin, P; Dulbecco, P; Sammito, G; Sconfienza, L; Vigneri, S; Camerini, G; Tutuian, R; Savarino, V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Functional dyspepsia and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are prevalent gastrointestinal conditions with accumulating evidence regarding an overlap between the two. Still, patients with NERD represent a very heterogeneous group and limited data on dyspeptic symptoms in various subgroups of NERD are available. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with NERD subclassified by using 24 h impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH). Methods: Patients with typical reflux symptoms and normal endoscopy underwent impedance-pH monitoring off proton pump inhibitor treatment. Oesophageal acid exposure time (AET), type of acid and non-acid reflux episodes, and symptom association probability (SAP) were calculated. A validated dyspepsia questionnaire was used to quantify dyspeptic symptoms prior to reflux monitoring. Results: Of 200 patients with NERD (105 female; median age, 48 years), 81 (41%) had an abnormal oesophageal AET (NERD pH-POS), 65 (32%) had normal oesophageal AET and positive SAP for acid and/or non-acid reflux (hypersensitive oesophagus), and 54 (27%) had normal oesophageal AET and negative SAP (functional heartburn). Patients with functional heartburn had more frequent (p<0.01) postprandial fullness, bloating, early satiety and nausea compared to patients with NERD pH-POS and hypersensitive oesophagus. Conclusion: The increased prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with functional heartburn reinforces the concept that functional gastrointestinal disorders extend beyond the boundaries suggested by the anatomical location of symptoms. This should be regarded as a further argument to test patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in order to separate patients with functional heartburn from patients with NERD in whom symptoms are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:19460766

  3. Disease progression in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): impact of initial esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Liu, T T; Yi, C H

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the 5-year clinical course in a cohort of patients with typical reflux symptoms and negative endoscopy. Prospective follow-up was conducted in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) for at least 5 years after initial evaluation with esophageal pH monitoring and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Within the last year of follow-up, reflux symptoms occurred in 27 of the 30 patients (90%). Twenty-five of twenty-seven symptomatic patients (93%) were on acid suppression therapy. The majority of our patients (70%) remained unchanged regarding their endoscopic status over 5 years. Progression to erosive esophagitis occurred in four patients with Los Angeles (LA) A (13%), three patients with LA B (10%), and two patients with LA C (7%). The presence of pathological acid exposure did not alter the presence of reflux symptoms over 5 years. Disease progression to erosive esophagitis occurred more frequently in patients with pathological acid exposure than those without pathological acid exposure (P= 0.025). Most NERD patients have symptoms and require acid suppression therapy 5 years after their initial diagnosis. Initial pathological acid exposure does not influence the use of acid suppression; however, it does influence the progression of NERD within 5 years of follow-up.

  4. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), symptomatic and asymptomatic erosive reflux disease (ERD): from hypersensitive to hyposensitive esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Juanda L; Qua, Choon-Seng; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2011-01-01

    To compare the esophageal sensitivity to acid and saline in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic erosive reflux disease (ERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and controls, and to assess the response to proton-pump inhibitors in patients with symptomatic ERD and NERD. Patients with GERD and a control group of healthy asymptomatic volunteers were recruited. All subjects underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and the acid-saline perfusion test. Symptomatic ERD and NERD patients were given rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily for 2 weeks and their response to treatment assessed. A total of 105 subjects were recruited: ERD=37 (symptomatic=24, asymptomatic=13), NERD=34 and controls=34. During saline perfusion, only the NERD group recorded a significantly higher sensitivity score compared to controls (2.74±7.28 vs. 0) (p=0.035). During acid perfusion, symptomatic ERD (15.42±13.42) and NERD (16.71±15.04) had significantly higher scores versus controls and asymptomatic ERD patients (both p<0.001). The mean %∆ reflux symptom score following treatment was significantly higher in symptomatic ERD patients compared to NERD patients (89.08±21.67 vs. 58.53±32.54; p<0.001). Patients with NERD were a generally hypersensitive group while asymptomatic ERD patients represent a hyposensitive group of patients which merits further study.

  5. Response to air insufflation in patients with non-erosive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (NERD).

    PubMed

    Kira, F; Suzuki, T; Suyama, Y; Nishimura, S; Ogura, K

    2011-01-01

    This study compared changes in intragastric pressure (IGP) in response to a gastric distension stimulus caused by air insufflation in 25 patients with non-erosive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (NERD) and 34 healthy volunteers (controls). In four NERD patients, IGP responses were also measured before and after oral treatment with 10 mg rabeprazole daily for 2 weeks. The rate of increase in IGP at the start of insufflation was significantly higher in NERD patients than in controls. The time to appearance of symptoms (i.e. time to threshold) was significantly shorter in NERD patients than in controls. Direct measurement of IGP showed that visceral hypersensitivity and impaired fundal relaxation are both characteristic of NERD. Administration of rabeprazole led to a marked prolonging of time to threshold, indicating that treatment could alleviate this hypersensitivity.

  6. The pathogenesis of heartburn in nonerosive reflux disease: a unifying hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, William J; Orlando, Roy C

    2005-03-01

    Heartburn is a symptom complex that has traditionally been accepted as an acid-mediated event and a reliable indicator of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recently, however, these concepts have been questioned because patients with endoscopy-negative "heartburn" have lower response rates to acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors than do patients with endoscopy-positive "heartburn," ie, erosive esophagitis. As explanation for this, 3 different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the occurrence of heartburn in the endoscopy-negative setting. They are: esophageal visceral hypersensitivity, sustained esophageal contractions, and abnormal tissue resistance. In this report, we review the observations in support of each concept and propose a means for reconciling them under one hypothesis: abnormal tissue resistance. Essential to this review and to the conclusions drawn about the pathogenesis of heartburn in nonerosive reflux disease is a reaffirmation of the definition of reflux-associated "heartburn" as an acid-mediated event requiring "relief by antacids" as a necessary component of the history.

  7. Role of Saliva in Esophageal Defense: Implications in Patients With Nonerosive Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapu, Harathi; Marcinkiewicz, Marek; Poplawski, Cezary; Han, Kyung; Zbroch, Tomasz; Goldin, George; Sarosiek, Irene; Namiot, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: It has been previously demonstrated that patients with reflux esophagitis exhibit a significant impairment in the secretion of salivary protective components versus controls. However, the secretion of salivary protective factors in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is not explored. The authors therefore studied the secretion of salivary volume, pH, bicarbonate, nonbicarbonate glycoconjugate, protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) and prostaglandin E2 in patients with NERD and compared with the corresponding values in controls (CTRL). Methods: Salivary secretion was collected during basal condition, mastication and intraesophageal mechanical (tubing, balloon) and chemical (initial saline, acid, acid/pepsin, final saline) stimulations, respectively, mimicking the natural gastroesophageal reflux. Results: Salivary volume, protein and TGF-α outputs in patients with NERD were significantly higher than CTRL during intraesophageal mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulations (P < 0.05). Salivary bicarbonate was significantly higher in NERD than CTRL group during intraesophageal stimulation with both acid/pepsin (P < 0.05) and saline (P < 0.01). Salivary glycoconjugate secretion was significantly higher in the NERD group than the CTRL group during chewing (P < 0.05), mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulation (P < 0.01). Salivary EGF secretion was higher in patients with NERD during mechanical stimulation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients with NERD demonstrated a significantly stronger salivary secretory response in terms of volume, bicarbonate, glycoconjugate, protein, EGF and TGF-α than asymptomatic controls. This enhanced salivary esophagoprotection is potentially mediating resistance to the development of endoscopic mucosal changes by gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:25789686

  8. Characteristics of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Nishino, Masafumi; Kodaira, Chise; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Umemura, Kazuo; Furuta, Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether potent acid inhibition is effective in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) refractory to standard rabeprazole (RPZ) treatment. METHODS: We treated 10 Japanese patients with NERD resistant to standard dosages of RPZ: 10 mg or 20 mg od, 20 mg bid, or 10 mg qid for 14 d. All patients completed a frequency scale for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG); and underwent 24 h pH monitoring on day 14. RESULTS: With increased dosages and frequency of administration of RPZ, median intragastric pH significantly increased, and FSSG scores significantly decreased. With RPZ 10 mg qid, potent acid inhibition was attained throughout 24 h. However, five subjects were refractory to RPZ 10 mg qid, although the median intragastric pH in these subjects (6.6, range: 6.2-7.1) was similar to that in the remaining five responsive subjects (6.5, range: 5.3-7.3). With baseline RPZ 10 mg od, FSSG scores in responsive patients improved by > 30%, whereas there was no significant decrease in the resistant group. CONCLUSION: NERD patients whose FSSG score fails to decrease by > 30% after treatment with RPZ 10 mg od for 14 d are refractory to higher dosage. PMID:21528060

  9. Exploration of the Esophageal Mucosal Barrier in Non-Erosive Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Rinsma, Nicolaas F; Farré, Ricard; Troost, Fred J; Elizalde, Montserrat; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Masclee, Ad A; Conchillo, José M

    2017-05-19

    In the absence of visible mucosal damage, it is hypothesized that the esophageal mucosal barrier is functionally impaired in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aim of the present study was to perform an exploratory analysis of the mucosal barrier in NERD compared to erosive esophagitis (EE) and controls. A second aim was to explore TRPV1 gene transcription in relation to the mucosal barrier function and heartburn symptoms. In this prospective study, 10 NERD patients, 11 patients with active erosive esophagitis and 10 healthy volunteers were included. Biopsies from non-eroded mucosa were obtained for (1) ex vivo analyses (Ussing chamber) of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability (2) gene transcription of tight-junction proteins and transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). No differences in TEER or permeability were found between NERD and healthy volunteers, whereas TEER was lower in patients with erosive esophagitis. TRPV1 gene transcription was not significantly different between EE, NERD and controls. esophageal mucosal barrier function and TRPV1 transcription is not significantly altered in NERD patients. Future research is needed to explore other potential mechanisms that may account for the high symptom burden in these patients.

  10. Effect of amiloride on experimental acid-induced heartburn in non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bulsiewicz, William J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Hansen, Mark B; Pruitt, Amy; Orlando, Roy C

    2013-07-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are esophageal nociceptors that are candidates to mediate heartburn in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Amiloride, a diuretic, is known to inhibit ASICs. For this reason, we sought a role for ASICs in mediating heartburn by determining whether amiloride could block heartburn in NERD induced by esophageal acid perfusion. In a randomized double-blind crossover study, we perfused the esophagus with amiloride or (saline) placebo prior to eliciting acid-induced heartburn in patients with a history of proton pump inhibitor-responsive NERD. Those with NERD and positive modified Bernstein test were randomized to perfusion with amiloride, 1 mmol/l, or placebo for 5 min, followed by repeat acid-perfusion. Heartburn severity and time to onset was measured and the process repeated following crossover to the alternative agent. 14 subjects completed the study. Amiloride did not reduce the frequency (100 vs. 100 %) or severity of acid-induced heartburn (Mean 2.50 ± SEM 0.33 vs. 2.64 ± 0.45), respectively. There was a trend towards longer time to onset of heartburn for amiloride versus placebo (Mean 2.93 ± SEM 0.3 vs. 2.36 ± 0.29 min, respectively), though these differences did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Amiloride had no significant effect on acid-induced heartburn frequency or severity in NERD, although there was a trend towards prolonged time to onset of symptoms.

  11. Responsiveness of measures of heartburn improvement in non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Junghard, Ola; Halling, Katarina

    2007-01-01

    Background When measuring treatment effect on symptoms, the treatment success variable should be as responsive as possible. The aim of the study was to investigate the responsiveness of various treatment success variables in patients with symptoms of heartburn. Methods A total of 1640 patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) were treated with proton pump inhibitors for 4 weeks. Treatment success variables were based on a symptom questionnaire (Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale) and on investigator-assessed heartburn, measured at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. The rates of treatment success were compared with patients' perceived change in symptoms, assessed by the Overall Treatment Effect questionnaire. Results Generally, more stringent treatment success criteria (i.e., those demanding the better response) translated into more responsive treatment success variables. For example, the treatment success variable 'no heartburn' at 4 weeks was more responsive than the variable 'at most mild heartburn' at 4 weeks. Treatment success variables based on change from baseline to 4 weeks were, in general, less responsive than those based on the week 4 assessments only. Conclusion In patients with NERD, responsiveness varied among different treatment success definitions, with more demanding definitions (based on the 4-week assessment) giving better responsiveness. PMID:17562006

  12. Autofluorescence imaging endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Guo, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Li-Hua; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Uedo, Noriya

    2016-04-14

    To investigate whether autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) from functional heartburn (FH). In this prospective observational trial, 127 patients presenting with typical reflux symptoms for > 6 mo were screened. All the participants underwent endoscopy, during which white light imaging (WLI) was followed by AFI. Finally 84 patients with normal esophageal appearance on WLI were enrolled. It was defined as being suggestive of NERD if one or more longitudinal purple lines longer than one centimeter were visualized in the distal part of the esophagus during AFI endoscopy. Ambulatory 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring was also performed. After standard proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) tests, subjects were divided into an NERD group and an FH group and the diagnostic performance of AFI endoscopy to differentiate NERD from FH was evaluated. Of 84 endoscopy-negative patients, 36 (42.9%) had a normal pH/impedance test. Of these, 26 patients with favorable responses to PPI tests were classified as having NERD. Finally 10 patients were diagnosed with FH and the others with NERD. Altogether, 68 (81.0%) of the 84 patients were positive on AFI endoscopy. In the NERD group, there were 67 (90.5%) patients with abnormal esophageal findings on AFI endoscopy while only 1 (10%) patient was positive on AFI endoscopy in the FH group. The sensitivity and specificity of AFI in differentiating NERD from FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 81.5%-96.1%) and 90.0% (95%CI: 55.5%-99.7%), respectively. Meanwhile, the accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of AFI in differentiating between NERD and FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 84.2%-96.8%), 98.5% (95%CI: 92.1%-99.9%) and 56.3% (95%CI: 30.0%-80.2%), respectively. Autofluorescence imaging may serve as a complementary method in evaluating patients with NERD and FH.

  13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, reflux oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease in a multiracial Asian population: a prospective, endoscopy based study.

    PubMed

    Rosaida, Modh Said; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2004-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), reflux oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) amongst Malaysian patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination. A cross-sectional study on consecutive patients with dyspepsia undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A large general hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopy for upper abdominal discomfort were examined for the presence of reflux oesophagitis, hiatus hernia and Barrett's oesophagus. The diagnosis and classification of reflux oesophagitis was based on the Los Angeles classification. Patients with predominant symptoms of heartburn or acid regurgitation of at least one per month for the past 6 months in the absence of reflux oesophagitis were diagnosed as having NERD. The prevalence of GORD, reflux oesophagitis and NERD were analysed in relation to age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), presence of hiatus hernia, Helicobacter pylori status, alcohol intake, smoking and level of education. One thousand patients were studied prospectively. Three hundred and eighty-eight patients (38.8%) were diagnosed as having GORD based on either predominant symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation and/or findings of reflux oesophagitis. One hundred and thirty-four patients (13.4%) had endoscopic evidence of reflux oesophagitis. Two hundred and fifty-four (65.5%) were diagnosed as having NERD. Hiatus hernia was found in 6.7% and Barrett's oesophagus in 2% of patients. Of our patients with reflux oesophagitis 20.1% had grade C and D oesophagitis. No patients had strictures. Following logistic regression analysis, the independent risk factors for GORD were Indian race (odds ratio (OR), 3.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.38-4.45), Malay race (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.16-2.38), BMI > 25 (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.04-1.92), presence of hiatus hernia (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 2.41-7.36), alcohol consumption (OR, 2.42; 95

  14. [On-demand treatment of nonerosive reflux disease: omeprazole plus bicarbonate powder versus omeprazole capsules].

    PubMed

    Soifer, Luis; Pedrana, Rodolfo; Parrota, Marisa; Gadea, Oscar; Naisberg, Gabriela; Caruso, Norberto

    2010-09-01

    Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) has a chronic and benign course. On-demand therapy would constitute a useful strategy for its management. To assess efficacy of on-demand treatment with omeprazole powder (OBA: omeprazole 20 mg, sodium bicarbonate 1680 mg, alginic acid 250 mg) versus omeprazole capsules 20 mg (OMZ) in the control of symptoms. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized, crossover study, patients with NERD, of both genders and 21 to 65 years old, were included. They underwent alternate treatments, 42 days with each pharmaceutical form (PF), wash out 6 days, beginning with a cycle of 7 consecutive days after the first symptomatic manifestation and repeating the same cycles in the event of similar circumstances. Efficacy was assessed with patient global impression (PGI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for heartburn and time to relieve symptoms. Tolerability was assessed. Forty-eight patients (40 women, average age 37 years old) entered the study. Both PF were effective according to PGI: 98% with OBA and 92% with OMZ. VAS for heartburn was: baseline 7.29 +/- 1.51; post-OMZ 2.82 +/- 1.85; post-OBA 2.25 +/- 1.61. The percentage of patients who received 7 days' cycles with each treatment were: OMZ 1-2: 29.17%; 3-4: 58.33%; 5-6: 12.5%; OBA 1-2: 43.75%; 3-4: 52.08%; 5-6: 4.17%. Dose was doubled in 35% of cases. OBA acted faster than OMZ for 83% of the patients (87 min versus 140 min, P < 0.01). Both PF were well tolerated. On-demand treatment of NERD with omeprazole in cycles of 7 days was equally effective for both PE OBA acted faster to relieve symptoms.

  15. Central Obesity as a Risk Factor for Non-Erosive Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Ju; Lee, Ban Seok

    2017-07-01

    Although central obesity is a risk factor for erosive esophagitis, information regarding the association between central obesity and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is still scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors for NERD by comparing NERD patients and healthy controls. Comprehensive clinical data from 378 patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy from December 2012 to May 2013 and had no visible esophageal mucosal breakage were analyzed. The Korean version of GerdQ questionnaire was used to diagnose NERD. The association between central obesity and NERD was assessed after matching subjects according to propensity scores. There were 119 NERD patients and 259 controls. In multivariate analysis, central obesity, female gender, and younger age were significantly associated with NERD [odds ratio (OR)=2.55, 1.93, and 1.80; p=0.001, 0.005, and 0.011, respectively]. After adjusting for 12 clinical variables using propensity score matching, 114 NERD patients were matched to 114 controls. All variables were well balanced between the two groups (average D before matching: 0.248, after matching: 0.066). Patients with NERD were more likely to have central obesity than healthy controls (28.1% vs. 7.9%). After adjusting for propensity scores and all covariates in multivariable logistic regression analyses, central obesity was still found to be a significant risk factor for NERD (OR=4.55, p<0.001). Central obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for NERD. This result supports the presence of an association between GERD and central obesity, even in the absence of esophageal erosion (NERD).

  16. Autofluorescence imaging endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xi; Guo, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Li-Hua; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Uedo, Noriya

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) from functional heartburn (FH). METHODS: In this prospective observational trial, 127 patients presenting with typical reflux symptoms for > 6 mo were screened. All the participants underwent endoscopy, during which white light imaging (WLI) was followed by AFI. Finally 84 patients with normal esophageal appearance on WLI were enrolled. It was defined as being suggestive of NERD if one or more longitudinal purple lines longer than one centimeter were visualized in the distal part of the esophagus during AFI endoscopy. Ambulatory 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring was also performed. After standard proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) tests, subjects were divided into an NERD group and an FH group and the diagnostic performance of AFI endoscopy to differentiate NERD from FH was evaluated. RESULTS: Of 84 endoscopy-negative patients, 36 (42.9%) had a normal pH/impedance test. Of these, 26 patients with favorable responses to PPI tests were classified as having NERD. Finally 10 patients were diagnosed with FH and the others with NERD. Altogether, 68 (81.0%) of the 84 patients were positive on AFI endoscopy. In the NERD group, there were 67 (90.5%) patients with abnormal esophageal findings on AFI endoscopy while only 1 (10%) patient was positive on AFI endoscopy in the FH group. The sensitivity and specificity of AFI in differentiating NERD from FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 81.5%-96.1%) and 90.0% (95%CI: 55.5%-99.7%), respectively. Meanwhile, the accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of AFI in differentiating between NERD and FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 84.2%-96.8%), 98.5% (95%CI: 92.1%-99.9%) and 56.3% (95%CI: 30.0%-80.2%), respectively. CONCLUSION: Autofluorescence imaging may serve as a complementary method in evaluating patients with NERD and FH. PMID:27076770

  17. Microscopic esophagitis distinguishes patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Mastracci, Luca; Dulbecco, Pietro; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; de Bortoli, Nicola; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Fiocca, Roberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Microscopic esophagitis (ME) is common in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and dilation of intercellular spaces (DIS) has been regarded as the potential main mechanism of symptom generation. We aimed to compare these histological abnormalities in healthy volunteers (HVs) and patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), NERD, and functional heartburn (FH). Consecutive patients with heartburn prospectively underwent upper endoscopy and impedance-pH off-therapy. Twenty EE patients and fifty-seven endoscopy-negative patients (NERD), subclassified as 22 with pH-POS (positive for abnormal acid exposure), 20 with hypersensitive esophagus (HE; normal acid/symptom association probability [SAP]+ or symptom index [SI]+), and 15 with FH (normal acid/SAP-/SI-/ proton pump inhibitor [PPI] test-), were enrolled. Twenty HVs were also included. In each patient/control, multiple specimens (n = 5) were taken from the distal esophagus and histological alterations were evaluated. ME was diagnosed when the global histological score was >0.35. The prevalence of ME was higher (p < 0.0001) in EE (95 %), pH-POS (77 %), and HE (65 %) NERD patients than in FH patients (13 %) and HVs (15 %). Also, basal cell hyperplasia (p < 0.0023), DIS (p < 0.0001), and papillae elongation (p < 0.0002) showed similar rates of prevalence in the above populations (p < 0.0001). ME, including each histological lesion, had similar low frequencies in FH and HVs (p = 0.9990). Considering the histological abnormalities together, they permitted us to clearly differentiate EE and NERD from FH and HVs (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The lack of ME in the esophageal distal biopsies of FH patients indicates a limited role of these histological abnormalities in symptom generation in them. ME can be considered as an accurate and reliable diagnostic marker for distinguishing FH patients from GERD patients and has the potential to be used to guide the correct therapy.

  18. Proton pump inhibitor for non-erosive reflux disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Ji, Meng-Yao; Song, Jia; Lei, Hong-Bo; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Jing; Ai, Ming-Hua; Wang, Jun; Lv, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and influential factors of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched up to April 2013 to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that probed into the efficacy, safety and influential factors of PPI treatment for NERD. The rates of symptomatic relief and adverse events were measured as the outcomes. After RCT selection, assessment and data collection, the pooled RRs and 95%CI were calculated. This meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, United States). The level of evidence was estimated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. RESULTS: Seventeen RCTs including 6072 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of the meta-analysis showed that PPI treatment was significantly superior to H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) treatment (RR = 1.629, 95%CI: 1.422-1.867, P = 0.000) and placebo (RR = 1.903, 95%CI: 1.573-2.302, P = 0.000) for the symptomatic relief of NERD. However, there were no obvious differences between PPI and H2RA (RR = 0.928, 95%CI: 0.776-1.110, P = 0.414) or PPI and the placebo (RR = 1.000, 95%CI: 0.896-1.116, P = 0.997) regarding the rate of adverse events. The overall rate of symptomatic relief of PPI against NERD was 51.4% (95%CI: 0.433-0.595, P = 0.000), and relief was influenced by hiatal hernia (P = 0.030). The adverse rate of PPI against NERD was 21.0% (95%CI: 0.152-0.208, P = 0.000), and was affected by hiatal hernia (P = 0.081) and drinking (P = 0.053). CONCLUSION: PPI overmatched H2RA on symptomatic relief rate but not on adverse rate for NERD. Its relief rate and adverse rate were influenced by hiatal hernia and drinking. PMID:24363534

  19. A study on the efficacy of rebamipide for patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Miwa, Hiroto; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miki, Masaharu; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Furuta, Takahisa; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-06-01

    Reflux symptoms in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) cannot be easily controlled by treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The anti-inflammatory function of rebamipide may be effective for protecting the esophageal mucosa. This prospective randomized multicenter placebo-controlled study was performed to clarify the efficacy of rebamipide for NERD patients whose reflux symptoms were refractory to PPI treatment. One hundred forty-nine patients were enrolled on the basis of a QUEST score of over 6 and absence of endoscopically proven esophageal mucosal breaks. All the patients were initially administered 15 mg of lansoprazole for 4 weeks, and the symptoms were then assessed using QUEST and GSRS. PPI-refractory patients were randomly assigned to administration of rebamipide or placebo t.i.d. for 4 weeks. Three of the 149 patients were lost to follow-up, and 60 among the remaining 146 patients were found to be PPI-refractory. Among these PPI-refractory patients, 31 were randomly assigned to a rebamipide group and 29 to a placebo group. At the end of drug administration, the QUEST and GSRS scores did not differ between the rebamipide and placebo groups, although a significantly higher proportion of patients in the rebamipide group showed amelioration of abdominal pain and diarrhea. Administration of rebamipide cannot effectively control reflux symptoms in NERD patients whose symptoms are refractory to PPI therapy.

  20. Tailored therapy guided by multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring for refractory non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ranaldo, Nunzio; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Iannone, Andrea; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Barone, Michele; De Carne, Massimo; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2017-09-07

    A relevant percentage of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) treatment. Multichannel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) monitoring should give useful pathophysiological information about refractoriness. Therefore, our aim was to assess whether this technique could be useful to guide a 'tailored' therapy in refractory NERD. We retrospectively recruited NERD patients undergoing MII-pH monitoring for unsuccessful treatment. All patients had undergone upper endoscopy, and those with erosive esophagitis were excluded. No patient received PPI during MII-pH monitoring. Subjects were subgrouped into three categories: acid reflux, non-acid reflux and functional heartburn. MII-pH-guided therapy was performed for 4 weeks as follows: patients with acid reflux received PPI at double dose, patients with non-acid reflux PPI at full dose plus alginate four times a day and patients with functional heartburn levosulpiride 75 mg per day. A visual analog scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 100 mm was administered before and after such tailored therapy to evaluate overall symptoms. Responders were defined by VAS improvement of at least 40%. Sixty-nine patients with refractory NERD were selected (female-male ratio 43 : 26, mean age 47.6±15.2 years). Overall effectiveness of tailored therapy was 84% without statistical difference among subgroups (88.5% acid reflux, 92% non-acid reflux, 66.6% functional heartburn; P=0.06). Univariate analysis showed that therapy failure directly correlated with functional heartburn diagnosis (OR=4.60) and suggested a trend toward a negative correlation with smoking and a positive one with nausea. However, at multivariate analysis, these parameters were not significant. Functional heartburn experienced a lower median percent VAS reduction than acid reflux (52.5% versus 66.6%, P<0.01) even if equal to non-acid reflux (66.6%). In conclusion, a tailored approach to refractory NERD, guided by MII-pH monitoring

  1. Differences in Clinical Characteristics between Patients with Non-Erosive Reflux Disease and Erosive Esophagitis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Na Rae; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon; Hahm, Joon Soo; Ahn, You Hern; Koh, Dong Hee

    2010-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused by abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. GERD can be divided into two groups, erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of patients with erosive esophagitis to those with NERD. All participating patients underwent an upper endoscopy during a voluntary health check-up. The NERD group consisted of 500 subjects with classic GERD symptoms in the absence of esophageal mucosal injury during upper endoscopy. The erosive esophagitis group consisted of 292 subjects with superficial esophageal erosions with or without typical symptoms of GERD. Among GERD patients, male gender, high body mass index, high obesity degree, high waist-to-hip ratio, high triglycerides, alcohol intake, smoking and the presence of a hiatal hernia were positively related to the development of erosive esophagitis compared to NERD. In multivariated analysis, male gender, waist-to-hip ratio and the presence of a hiatal hernia were the significant risk factors of erosive esophagitis. We suggest that erosive esophagitis was more closely related to abdominal obesity. PMID:20808675

  2. Histomorphological differentiation of non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn in patients with PPI-refractory heartburn.

    PubMed

    Kandulski, A; Jechorek, D; Caro, C; Weigt, J; Wex, T; Mönkemüller, K; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory heartburn may be due to persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn (FH). The differentiation between non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and FH may be very difficult. However, this differentiation is important for appropriate therapeutic management. Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS), papillary elongation (PE) and basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) can be all assessed by light microscopy. Whether these mucosal abnormalities allow the differentiation of NERD from FH in PPI-refractory patients is uncertain. To assess histopathological findings by light microscopy in patients with refractory heartburn to differentiate NERD from FH. Sixty-two patients with PPI-refractory symptoms underwent EGD and MII-pH after pausing PPI medication for 2 weeks before investigation. Twenty-five subjects without upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included as controls. Symptom assessment was based on the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ). Biopsies were taken 3-5 cm above the gastro-oesophageal junction. DIS, PE, BCH and infiltration of immune cells were evaluated and a sum score was calculated. Based on endoscopy and MII-pH, GERD was diagnosed in 43 patients (NERD: 20; ERD: 23) and FH in 19 patients. There was no difference in symptoms between the groups. Each individual histopathological item was different between the groups (P < 0.0001). Between NERD and FH, the most significant difference was found for DIS and the histopathological sum score (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that oesophageal biopsies are useful to differentiate NERD from FH. Increased DIS and a histological sum score are the most significant histopathological abnormalities in NERD as compared with FH. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Irsogladine maleate and rabeprazole in non-erosive reflux disease: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takayoshi; Matsushima, Masashi; Masui, Aya; Tsuda, Shingo; Imai, Jin; Nakamura, Jun; Tsukune, Yoko; Uchida, Tetsufumi; Yuhara, Hiroki; Igarashi, Muneki; Koike, Jun; Mine, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of adding irsogladine maleate (IM) to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) treatment. METHODS: One hundred patients with NERD were recruited and randomized to receive rabeprazole plus IM (group I) or rabeprazole plus placebo (group P). The efficacy of the treatment was assessed using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (FSSG) and the short form (SF)-36 quality of life questionnaires after four weeks of treatment. We also assessed whether patients with NERD with minimal changes (grade M) had different responses to the therapies compared with patients who did not have minimal changes (grade N). RESULTS: Group I and group P showed significant improvements in their FSSG scores after the treatment (from 17.9 ± 7.9 to 9.0 ± 7.6, and from 17.7 ± 7.3 to 11.2 ± 7.9, respectively, P = 0.0001), but there was no statistically significant difference between the FSSG scores in group I and those in group P. Subgroup analysis showed that significant improvements in the FSSG scores occurred in the patients in group I who had NERD grade N (modified Los Angeles classification) (7.8 ± 7.4 vs 12.5 ± 9.8, P = 0.041). The SF-36 scores for patients with NERD grade N who had received IM and rabeprazole were significantly improved in relation to their vitality and mental health scores. CONCLUSION: The addition of IM to rabeprazole significantly improves gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the quality of the lives of patients with NERD grade N. PMID:25945018

  4. Irsogladine maleate and rabeprazole in non-erosive reflux disease: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takayoshi; Matsushima, Masashi; Masui, Aya; Tsuda, Shingo; Imai, Jin; Nakamura, Jun; Tsukune, Yoko; Uchida, Tetsufumi; Yuhara, Hiroki; Igarashi, Muneki; Koike, Jun; Mine, Tetsuya

    2015-04-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of adding irsogladine maleate (IM) to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) treatment. One hundred patients with NERD were recruited and randomized to receive rabeprazole plus IM (group I) or rabeprazole plus placebo (group P). The efficacy of the treatment was assessed using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (FSSG) and the short form (SF)-36 quality of life questionnaires after four weeks of treatment. We also assessed whether patients with NERD with minimal changes (grade M) had different responses to the therapies compared with patients who did not have minimal changes (grade N). Group I and group P showed significant improvements in their FSSG scores after the treatment (from 17.9 ± 7.9 to 9.0 ± 7.6, and from 17.7 ± 7.3 to 11.2 ± 7.9, respectively, P = 0.0001), but there was no statistically significant difference between the FSSG scores in group I and those in group P. Subgroup analysis showed that significant improvements in the FSSG scores occurred in the patients in group I who had NERD grade N (modified Los Angeles classification) (7.8 ± 7.4 vs 12.5 ± 9.8, P = 0.041). The SF-36 scores for patients with NERD grade N who had received IM and rabeprazole were significantly improved in relation to their vitality and mental health scores. The addition of IM to rabeprazole significantly improves gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the quality of the lives of patients with NERD grade N.

  5. Efficacy of adding sodium alginate to omeprazole in patients with nonerosive reflux disease: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Manabe, N; Haruma, K; Ito, M; Takahashi, N; Takasugi, H; Wada, Y; Nakata, H; Katoh, T; Miyamoto, M; Tanaka, S

    2012-07-01

    Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is the most common form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with NERD have a lower response rate to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than patients with erosive esophagitis when gauged from relief of heartburn. Sodium alginate decreases the acidity of refluxate and protects the esophageal mucosa. However, whether the addition of sodium alginate to PPI therapy can improve NERD symptoms remains unknown. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adding sodium alginate to basal PPI therapy for NERD. Patients who had experienced heartburn on at least 2 days per week during the 1-month period before entering the study and had no endoscopic mucosal breaks (grade M or N according to Hoshihara's modification of the Los Angeles classification) were randomized to one of two treatments for 4 weeks: omeprazole (20 mg once daily) plus sodium alginate (30 mL four times a day) (group A) or omeprazole (20 mg once daily) alone (group B). Eighty-seven patients were enrolled, and 76 patients were randomly assigned to group A (n = 36) or group B (n = 40). Complete resolution of heartburn for at least 7 consecutive days by the end of treatment was significantly more common in group A (56.7%) than in group B (25.7%). One patient from group A had mild drug-related diarrhea that was not clinically serious. In conclusion, omeprazole combined with sodium alginate was better than omeprazole alone in Japanese patients with NERD. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Is it possible to clinically differentiate erosive from nonerosive reflux disease patients? A study using an artificial neural networks-assisted algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pace, Fabio; Riegler, Gabriele; de Leone, Annalisa; Pace, Marina; Cestari, Renzo; Dominici, Patrizia; Grossi, Enzo

    2010-10-01

    The use of either symptom questionnaires or artificial neural networks (ANNs) has proven to improve the accuracy in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the differentiation between the erosive and nonerosive reflux disease based upon symptoms at presentation still remains inconclusive. To assess the capability of a combined approach, that is, the use of a novel GERD questionnaire - the QUestionario Italiano Diagnostico (QUID) questionnaire - and of an ANNs-assisted algorithm, to discriminate between nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) patients. Five hundred and fifty-seven adult outpatients with typical GERD symptoms and 94 asymptomatic adult patients, were submitted to the QUID questionnaire. GERD patients were then submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to differentiate them between EE and NERD patients. The QUID score resulted significantly (P<0.001) higher in GERD patients versus controls, but it was not statistically significantly different between EE and NERD patients. ANNs assisted diagnosis had greater specificity, sensitivity and accuracy compared with the linear discriminant analysis only to differentiate GERD patients from controls. However, no single technique was able to satisfactorily discriminate between EE and NERD patients. Our study suggests that the combination between QUID questionnaire and an ANNs-assisted algorithm is useful only to differentiate GERD patients from healthy individuals but fails to further discriminate erosive from nonerosive patients.

  7. More severe upper gastrointestinal symptoms associated with non-erosive reflux disease than with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease during maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawamura, Osamu; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Yasuoka, Hidetoshi; Mizuide, Masafumi; Tomizawa, Taku; Sagawa, Toshihiko; Sato, Ken; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-03-01

    During maintenance proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) sometimes complain of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. To evaluate upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients on maintenance PPI therapy for erosive GERD or non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) without endoscopic mucosal breaks by using a new questionnaire. At Gunma University Hospital over a 12-month period during 2011-2012, we enrolled 30 consecutive patients with erosive GERD and 46 patients with NERD. All patients had been on maintenance PPI therapy for more than 1 year. We used the modified frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (mFSSG) questionnaire to assess upper gastrointestinal symptoms. We also asked patients about their satisfaction with maintenance therapy and whether they wished to change their current PPI. The NERD patients had significantly higher symptom scores than the erosive GERD patients. There was no difference in the treatment satisfaction rate between patients with erosive GERD and NERD, but more patients with NERD wanted to change their PPI therapy. There was no difference in the mFSSG score between NERD patients who wished to change their current PPI therapy and those who were satisfied with it. During maintenance PPI therapy, upper gastrointestinal symptoms were more severe in NERD patients than in patients with erosive GERD. NERD patients often wished to change their PPI therapy, but this was not dependent on the severity of their upper GI symptoms.

  8. The prevalence of and risk factors for erosive oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease: a nationwide multicentre prospective study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, N; Lee, S W; Cho, S I; Park, C G; Yang, C H; Kim, H S; Rew, J S; Moon, J S; Kim, S; Park, S H; Jung, H C; Chung, I S

    2008-01-15

    Prospective nationwide multicentre studies that have evaluated endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms using a well-designed questionnaire are very rare. To compare the prevalence rates of and risk factors for erosive oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) in the Korean population. A gastroscopic examination was performed on 25 536 subjects who visited 40 Healthcare Centers for a health check-up. A gastro-oesophageal reflux questionnaire and multivariate analysis were used to determine the risk factors for erosive oesophagitis and NERD. 2019 (8%) and 996 subjects (4%) had erosive oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease, respectively; only 58% of subjects with erosive oesophagitis had reflux symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for erosive oesophagitis and NERD differed, i.e. those of erosive oesophagitis were male, a Helicobacter pylori eradication history, alcohol, body mass index > or =25 and hiatal hernia. In contrast, the risk factors for NERD were female, age <40 and > or =60 vs. 40-59 years, body mass index <23 and a monthly income <$1000, glucose > or =126 mg/dL, smoking, a stooping posture at work and antibiotic usage. The prevalence rates of erosive oesophagitis and NERD were 8% and 4%, respectively, in Korean health check-up subjects. The risk factors for erosive oesophagitis and NERD were found to differ, which indicates that their underlying pathogeneses are distinct.

  9. Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Zentilin, Patrizia; Martinucci, Irene; Bruzzone, Luca; Furnari, Manuele; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms. METHODS: In this prospective, open-label study, 40 patients reporting heartburn and regurgitation with proven reflux disease (i.e., positive impedance-pH test/evidence of erosive esophagitis at upper endoscopy) underwent 2 h impedance-pH testing after eating a refluxogenic meal. They were studied for 1 h under basal conditions and 1 h after taking 10 mL Faringel. In both sessions, measurements were obtained in right lateral and supine decubitus positions. Patients also completed a validated questionnaire consisting of a 2-item 5-point (0-4) Likert scale and a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) in order to evaluate the efficacy of Faringel in symptom relief. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very good (1) to very poor (6). RESULTS: Faringel decreased significantly (P < 0.001), in both the right lateral and supine decubitus positions, esophageal acid exposure time [median 10 (25th-75th percentil 6-16) vs 5.8 (4-10) and 16 (11-19) vs 7.5 (5-11), respectively] and acid refluxes [5 (3-8) vs 1 (1-1) and 6 (4-8) vs 2 (1-2), respectively], but increased significantly (P < 0.01) the number of nonacid reflux events compared with baseline [2 (1-3) vs 3 (2-5) and 3 (2-4) vs 6 (3-8), respectively]. Percentage of proximal migration decreased in both decubitus positions (60% vs 32% and 64% vs 35%, respectively; P < 0.001). Faringel was significantly effective in controlling heartburn, based on both the Likert scale [3.1 (range 1-4) vs 0.9 (0-2); P < 0.001] and VAS score [7.1 (3-9.8) vs 2 (0.1-4.8); P < 0.001], but it had less success against regurgitation, based on both the Likert scale [2.6 (1-4) vs 2.2 (1-4); P = not significant (NS)] and VAS score [5.6 (2-9.6) vs 3.9 (1-8.8); P = NS]. Overall, the tolerability of Faringel was very good 5 (2-6), with only two patients reporting modest adverse

  10. Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Zentilin, Patrizia; Martinucci, Irene; Bruzzone, Luca; Furnari, Manuele; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2012-08-28

    To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms. In this prospective, open-label study, 40 patients reporting heartburn and regurgitation with proven reflux disease (i.e., positive impedance-pH test/evidence of erosive esophagitis at upper endoscopy) underwent 2 h impedance-pH testing after eating a refluxogenic meal. They were studied for 1 h under basal conditions and 1 h after taking 10 mL Faringel. In both sessions, measurements were obtained in right lateral and supine decubitus positions. Patients also completed a validated questionnaire consisting of a 2-item 5-point (0-4) Likert scale and a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) in order to evaluate the efficacy of Faringel in symptom relief. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very good (1) to very poor (6). Faringel decreased significantly (P < 0.001), in both the right lateral and supine decubitus positions, esophageal acid exposure time [median 10 (25th-75th percentil 6-16) vs 5.8 (4-10) and 16 (11-19) vs 7.5 (5-11), respectively] and acid refluxes [5 (3-8) vs 1 (1-1) and 6 (4-8) vs 2 (1-2), respectively], but increased significantly (P < 0.01) the number of nonacid reflux events compared with baseline [2 (1-3) vs 3 (2-5) and 3 (2-4) vs 6 (3-8), respectively]. Percentage of proximal migration decreased in both decubitus positions (60% vs 32% and 64% vs 35%, respectively; P < 0.001). Faringel was significantly effective in controlling heartburn, based on both the Likert scale [3.1 (range 1-4) vs 0.9 (0-2); P < 0.001] and VAS score [7.1 (3-9.8) vs 2 (0.1-4.8); P < 0.001], but it had less success against regurgitation, based on both the Likert scale [2.6 (1-4) vs 2.2 (1-4); P = not significant (NS)] and VAS score [5.6 (2-9.6) vs 3.9 (1-8.8); P = NS]. Overall, the tolerability of Faringel was very good 5 (2-6), with only two patients reporting modest adverse events (i.e., nausea and

  11. Efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Hojo, Mariko; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Ueyama, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Kohei; Izumi, Kentaro; Takeda, Tsutomu; Komori, Hiroyuki; Akazawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Yuji; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker (PCAB) named vonoprazan (VPZ) for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and functional dyspepsia (FD). A hospital-based, retrospective study of outpatients in our department (Department of Gastroenterology, University of Juntendo, Tokyo, Japan) between March 2015 and August 2016 was performed. The patients who were experiencing heartburn, acid regurgitation, gastric pain, and/or a heavy feeling in the stomach of at least moderate severity at baseline were treated with 20 mg VPZ once daily for 4 weeks. The patients completed the global overall symptom (GOS) scale to determine their symptom severity at baseline and after the 4 week treatment period. The proportions of patients with RE, NERD, and FD achieving improvement of their symptoms, defined as a GOS scale score of 1 (‘no problem’) or 2 (‘minimal problem’), were evaluated. During 4 weeks of VPZ therapy, changes in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) score, which was defined as the total points for heartburn and acid regurgitation on the GOS scale in patients with RE and NERD, and in the FD score, which was defined as the total points for gastric pain and a heavy feeling in the stomach on the GOS scale in patients with FD, were also evaluated. A total of 88 eligible cases were included in the present study, comprising 20 patients with RE, 25 patients with NERD, and 43 patients with FD. The rates of symptomatic improvement in patients with RE, NERD, and FD were 75.0, 60.0, and 48.8%, respectively. For the patients who were first administered VPZ, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 90.9, 66.7, and 58.8% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD, respectively. For those patients who were resistant to 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor therapy, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 55.6, 53.8, and 42.3% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD

  12. The added value of quantitative analysis of on-therapy impedance-pH parameters in distinguishing refractory non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, M; Conigliaro, R; Mirante, V G; Melotti, G

    2012-02-01

    By analysis of symptom-reflux association, endoscopy-negative refractory heartburn can be related to acid/non-acid refluxes with impedance-pH monitoring. Unfortunately, patients frequently do not report symptoms during the test. We aimed to assess the contribution of quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association in evaluating patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to high-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The symptom association probability (SAP), the symptom index (SI), the esophageal acid exposure time and the number of distal and proximal refluxes were assessed at on-therapy impedance-pH monitoring. Relationships with hiatal hernia and manometric findings were also evaluated. Eighty patients were prospectively studied. Refractory heartburn was more frequently related to reflux by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters (52/80 cases) (65%) than by a positive SAP/SI only (38/80 cases) (47%) (P = 0.038). In patients with refractory non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) defined by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters, the prevalence of hiatal hernia was significantly higher (56%vs 21%, P = 0.007) and the mean lower esophageal sphincter tone was significantly lower (18.7 vs 25.8 mmHg, P = 0.005) than in those (35%) with reflux-unrelated, i.e., functional heartburn (FH). On the contrary, no significant difference was observed subdividing patients according to a positive SAP/SI only. Quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association allows a subdivision of refractory-heartburn patients into refractory NERD and FH which is substantiated by pathophysiological findings and which restricts the diagnosis of FH to one third of cases. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Miniaturised optical fiber pH sensor for gastro-esophageal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Chiavaioli, F.; Cosi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Tombelli, S.; Trono, C.

    2013-05-01

    Monitoring pH for long periods, usually 24 h, in the stomach and in the esophagus may be essential in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal diseases. The clinical range of interest is quite extended, between 1 to 8 pH units. Methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a working range which fits well with the clinical one. A novel probe, suitable for gastro-esophageal applications, was designed in order to optimize the performances of the colored CPG. This leads to a very simple probe configuration characterized by a very fast response.

  14. Randomized, multicenter study: on-demand versus continuous maintenance treatment with esomeprazole in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bayerdörffer, Ekkehard; Bigard, Marc-Andre; Weiss, Werner; Mearin, Fermín; Rodrigo, Luis; Dominguez Muñoz, Juan Enrique; Grundling, Hennie; Persson, Tore; Svedberg, Lars-Erik; Keeling, Nanna; Eklund, Stefan

    2016-04-14

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience symptomatic relapse after stopping acid-suppressive medication. The aim of this study was to compare willingness to continue treatment with esomeprazole on-demand versus continuous maintenance therapy for symptom control in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) after 6 months. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel-group study enrolled adults with NERD who were heartburn-free after 4 weeks' treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg daily. Patients received esomeprazole 20 mg daily continuously or on-demand for 6 months. The primary variable was discontinuation due to unsatisfactory treatment. On-demand treatment was considered non-inferior if the upper limit of the one-sided 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the difference between treatments was <10 %. Of 877 patients enrolled, 598 were randomized to maintenance treatment (continuous: n = 297; on-demand: n = 301). Discontinuation due to unsatisfactory treatment was 6.3 % for on-demand and 9.8 % for continuous treatment (difference -3.5 % [90 % CI: -7.1 %, 0.2 %]). In total, 82.1 and 86.2 % of patients taking on-demand and continuous therapy, respectively, were satisfied with the treatment of heartburn and regurgitation symptoms, a secondary variable (P = NS). Mean study drug consumption was 0.41 and 0.91 tablets/day, respectively. Overall, 5 % of the on-demand group developed reflux esophagitis versus none in the continuous group (P < 0.0001). The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale Reflux dimension was also improved for continuous versus on-demand treatment. Esomeprazole was well tolerated. In terms of willingness to continue treatment, on-demand treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg was non-inferior to continuous maintenance treatment and reduced medication usage in patients with NERD who had achieved symptom control with initial esomeprazole treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02670642 ; Date of registration: December

  15. Predicting the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease before therapy using dual-channel 24-h esophageal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shimatani, Tomohiko; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Nishino, Masafumi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Ito, Masanori; Kurosawa, Susumu; Manabe, Noriaki; Mannen, Kotaro; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to determine whether reflux- and symptom-related parameters can predict the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Twenty-seven NERD patients who had experienced heartburn more than once a week within the previous month were enrolled. Intraesophageal pH before therapy was measured simultaneously at 5 and 15 cm above the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) for 24 h. The PPI rabeprazole was administered at a dose of 10 mg once daily for 4 weeks. In the event that heartburn was not relieved, the dose was increased to 10 mg twice daily for an additional 2 weeks, and again to 20 mg twice daily for another 2 weeks. Univariate analysis demonstrated no significant associations between any reflux- or symptom-related parameters at either site and complete heartburn relief after 4 weeks, or cumulative complete heartburn relief after 8 weeks. However, post-hoc analysis demonstrated more satisfactory heartburn relief after 4 weeks in patients with a high symptom index compared with those with a low symptom index, at 5 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.009). Cumulative satisfactory heartburn relief after 8 weeks was also greater in patients with a high total number of acid reflux episodes compared with those with a low total number of episodes, at 15 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.037). Pre-therapeutic pH monitoring in the lower and mid-esophagus is useful for predicting the efficacy of PPI in NERD patients. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. The epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a survey on the prevalence and the associated factors in a random sample of the general population in the Northern part of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Atshani, Seyed Mehrbod; Chagharvand, Sepideh; Souti, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Many people with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms do not consult a physician; therefore studies on gastro-esophageal reflux in general practice or in hospitals may not accurately describe the burden of gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms in the general population. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its association with some life-style parameters in Rasht-Iran. A telephone survey was performed. Phone numbers was randomly collected from the telecommunication service center of Rasht. 1473 people (Mean age: 38.31 ± 13.09) were included in the study. People who didn’t answer the phone after three times or didn’t have consent to enter the study were excluded. Data were collected by an examiner using a GerdQ questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire was tested by translation and retranslation and a pilot study was performed to assess its appropriateness. The prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux was achieved 2.4% daily, 9.1% weekly and 11.3% monthly. Among the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux, 69.5% were female. There was a significant positive association between gastro-esophageal reflux prevalence and body mass index, smoking habits, eating salted or smoked foods, lying down immediately after the meal, taking certain drugs as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/Amino salicylic acid and the age group of 30-45 year old. Overall, the prevalence of the weekly gastro-esophageal reflux in the present survey was 9.1% which was less than other similar studies in Iran and some other countries. PMID:24046810

  17. The efficacy and safety of proton-pump inhibitors in treating patients with non-erosive reflux disease: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiao; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been proved as safe and effective ways to treat patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). However, less is known about the comparisons among different PPIs and their best dosage. We aimed to synthesize the available evidence through network meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of different PPIs in treating patients with NERD. Fifteen studies with 6309 patients were included in the meta-analyses. For the rate of symptomatic relief, compared with control groups, all interventions except rabeprazole 5 mg significantly increased rate of symptomatic relief. Among the comparisons of different interventions, omeprazole 20 mg group was associated with a higher rate of symptomatic relief in contrast to omeprazole 10 mg group (odds ratio, OR: 1.89, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.34, 2.67; p-value: 0.0005) or rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.16, 5.42; p-value: 0.019); dexlansoprazole 30 mg therapy significantly improved the rate of symptomatic relief compared with rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.64, 95%CI: 1.08, 6.43; p-value: 0.03). For the rate of adverse events, there was no significant difference among all interventions.

  18. The efficacy and safety of proton-pump inhibitors in treating patients with non-erosive reflux disease: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingxiao; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been proved as safe and effective ways to treat patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). However, less is known about the comparisons among different PPIs and their best dosage. We aimed to synthesize the available evidence through network meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of different PPIs in treating patients with NERD. Fifteen studies with 6309 patients were included in the meta-analyses. For the rate of symptomatic relief, compared with control groups, all interventions except rabeprazole 5 mg significantly increased rate of symptomatic relief. Among the comparisons of different interventions, omeprazole 20 mg group was associated with a higher rate of symptomatic relief in contrast to omeprazole 10 mg group (odds ratio, OR: 1.89, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.34, 2.67; p-value: 0.0005) or rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.16, 5.42; p-value: 0.019); dexlansoprazole 30 mg therapy significantly improved the rate of symptomatic relief compared with rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.64, 95%CI: 1.08, 6.43; p-value: 0.03). For the rate of adverse events, there was no significant difference among all interventions. PMID:27581096

  19. Clinical characteristics of elderly patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease from the G-PRIDE study who responded to rikkunshito

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence and severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Japan tends to increase in elderly women. Rikkunshito (RKT), a traditional Japanese medicine, acts as a prokinetic agent and improves gastric emptying and gastric accommodation. Our previous prospective randomized placebo-controlled study showed that RKT combined with a standard-dose of rabeprazole (RPZ) significantly improved the acid-related dysmotility symptoms (ARD) in elderly patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aimed to evaluate clinical characteristics of elderly PPI-refractory NERD patients with ARD symptoms who responded to RKT. Methods Two hundred forty-two patients with PPI-refractory NERD were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of either RPZ (10 mg/q.d.) + RKT (7.5 g/t.i.d.) (RKT group) or RPZ + placebo (PL group). Among them, 95 were elderly (≥65 years) with ARD (RKT group: n = 52; PL group: n = 43). We analyzed the changes using the 12 subscale score of frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and 15 items of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale at 4 and 8 weeks and compared the therapeutic efficacy between the 2 groups. Results There were no marked differences in baseline demographic or clinical characteristics in the 2 groups except for rate of current smoking. The FSSG score (mean ± SD at 0, 4, and 8 weeks) in both the RKT (16.0 ± 7.0; 9.9 ± 8.4; 7.0 ± 6.4) and PL (15.1 ± 6.4; 10.9 ± 6.7, 11.1 ± 8.5) groups significantly decreased after treatment. However, the degree of improvement of total and ARD scores of FSSG after the 8-week treatment was significantly greater in the RKT group than in the PL group. Combination therapy with RKT for 8 weeks showed significant improvement in 3 subscale scores (abdominal bloating, heavy feeling in stomach and sick feeling after meals) of the ARD domain and 1 subscale score (heartburn after meals) of the reflux symptom domain

  20. Comparison of risk factors and clinical responses to proton pump inhibitors in patients with erosive oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, E S; Kim, N; Lee, S H; Park, Y S; Kim, J W; Jeong, S H; Lee, D H; Jung, H C; Song, I S

    2009-07-01

    There has been no report on the response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and on-demand or the relapse rate of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive oesophagitis in Korea. To compare the risk factors, clinical symptoms and PPI responses between patients with erosive oesophagitis and NERD patients. A survey was performed prospectively in the erosive oesophagitis (205 patients) and NERD group (200 patients). Clinical symptoms, risk factors and PPI responses were analysed. On-demand therapy and the relapse rate of GERD symptoms were investigated during a one-year follow-up. BMI > or = 25 (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.3), alcohol use (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.0-8.3), hiatal hernia (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.2-20) and triglyceride > or =150 mg/dL (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-10) were more common in the erosive oesophagitis group than in the NERD group by multivariate analysis. The ratio of oesophageal to extra-oesophageal symptoms was higher in the erosive oesophagitis group compared with the NERD group (P < 0.001). The PPI response rates at 8 weeks were different (P = 0.02); refractory rates were higher in the NERD group (16.7%) compared with the erosive oesophagitis group (6.0%). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in on-demand therapy or the relapse rate. These results suggest that the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of erosive oesophagitis and NERD are distinct.

  1. No association of coffee consumption with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis, and non-erosive reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of 8,013 healthy subjects in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. No Association of Coffee Consumption with Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal Ulcer, Reflux Esophagitis, and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of 8,013 Healthy Subjects in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23776588

  3. MAGIC in practice: experience of peri-operative ECF/X chemotherapy in gastro-esophageal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reece-Smith, A M; Saha, S; Cunnell, M L; Hameed, K; Bessell, E M; Duffy, J P; Madhusudan, S; Parsons, S L

    2012-11-01

    The MAGIC trial demonstrated the perioperative regimen of Epirubicin (E), Cisplatin (C) and 5-Fluorouracil (F) to have an overall survival benefit for patients with gastro-esophageal adenocarcinomas. We present our experience of the peri-operative regimen of ECF/ECX(X = Capecitabine) in operable gastro-esophageal adenocarcinoma. Analysis of retrospective data of patients treated with MAGIC style therapy between May 2006 and August 2008 with potentially operable gastro-esophageal adenocarcinoma. One hundred patients underwent peri-operative chemotherapy according to the MAGIC protocol. Median age was 66 years, with 39% above the age of 70 years. The tumours were evenly distributed between the lower esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and stomach. Seventy-nine percent completed all pre-operative cycles of chemotherapy and 81% proceeded to surgery, whilst 24% did not receive curative surgery. The median survival on an intention to treat analysis is 31.7 months from diagnosis. The median survival of patients who underwent resection has not yet been reached after a median follow-up of 41.4 months. Our patient population is older than the patients in the MAGIC trial (age 66 years vs. 62 years) with a much higher proportion of esophageal and GEJ tumours. Overall, curative resection rate was comparable to the MAGIC trial. Overall survival is superior to that found in the MAGIC trial. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Gastroesophageal reflux in premature: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ndour, Daouda

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common problem in neonatology. Various physiological protective reflex responses provide a plausible biological link between gastro-esophageal reflux and apnea and bradycardia in premature. It is uncertain whether or not there is a causal relationship between the two diseases. However there is no consensus about the clinical and paraclinical diagnosis. Further explorations and treatment offered to premature infants with symptoms are discussed. We report the case of a preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and with apnea and bradycardia. Clinical examination and exploration results were normal. We retained the gastrointestinal reflux diagnosis complicated of apnea and bradycardia. Pharmacological therapy for gastro-esophageal reflux disease has not definitively been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and should be reserved especially for infants with treatment refractory apnea and bradycardia episodes suspected as being gastro-esophageal reflux in premature infants. From a case report we made a literature review to discuss at length the different aspects of the problem.

  5. High-definition endoscopy with iScan and Lugol's solution for the detection of inflammation in patients with nonerosive reflux disease: histologic evaluation in comparison with a control group.

    PubMed

    Rey, J W; Deris, N; Marquardt, J U; Thomaidis, T; Moehler, M; Kittner, J M; Nguyen-Tat, M; Dümcke, S; Tresch, A; Biesterfeld, S; Goetz, M; Mudter, J; Neurath, M F; Galle, P R; Kiesslich, R; Hoffman, A

    2016-03-01

    Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is commonly diagnosed in patients with symptoms of reflux. The aim of the present study was to determine whether high-definition endoscopy (HD) plus equipped with the iScan function or chromoendoscopy with Lugol's solution might permit the differentiation of NERD patients from those without reflux symptoms, proven by targeted biopsies of endoscopic lesions. A total of 100 patients without regular intake of proton pump inhibitors and with a normal conventional upper endoscopy were prospectively divided into NERD patients and controls. A second upper endoscopy was performed using HD+ with additional iScan function and then Lugol's solution was applied. Biopsy specimens were taken from the gastroesophageal junction in all patients. A total of 65 patients with reflux symptoms and 27 controls were included. HD+ endoscopy with iScan revealed subtle mucosal breaks in 52 patients; the subsequent biopsies confirmed esophagitis in all cases. After Lugol's solution, 58 patients showed mucosal breaks. Sensitivity for the iScan procedure was 82.5%, whereas that for Lugol's solution was 92.06%. Excellent positive predictive values of 100% and 98.3%, respectively, were noted. The present study suggests that the majority of patients with NERD and typical symptoms of reflux disease can be identified by iScan or Lugol's chromoendoscopy as minimal erosive reflux disease (ERD) patients. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. High-definition endoscopy with iScan and Lugol's solution for the detection of inflammation in patients with nonerosive reflux disease: histologic evaluation in comparison with a control group.

    PubMed

    Rey, J W; Deris, N; Marquardt, J U; Thomaidis, T; Moehler, M; Kittner, J M; Nguyen-Tat, M; Dümcke, S; Tresch, A; Biesterfeld, S; Goetz, M; Mudter, J; Neurath, M F; Galle, P R; Kiesslich, R; Hoffman, A

    2016-01-01

    Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is commonly diagnosed in patients with symptoms of reflux. The aim of the present study was to determine whether high-definition endoscopy (HD) plus equipped with the iScan function or chromoendoscopy with Lugol's solution might permit the differentiation of NERD patients from those without reflux symptoms, proven by targeted biopsies of endoscopic lesions. A total of 100 patients without regular intake of proton pump inhibitors and with a normal conventional upper endoscopy were prospectively divided into NERD patients and controls. A second upper endoscopy was performed using HD+ with additional iScan function and then Lugol's solution was applied. Biopsy specimens were taken from the gastroesophageal junction in all patients. A total of 65 patients with reflux symptoms and 27 controls were included. HD(+) endoscopy with iScan revealed subtle mucosal breaks in 52 patients; the subsequent biopsies confirmed esophagitis in all cases. After Lugol's solution, 58 patients showed mucosal breaks. Sensitivity for the iScan procedure was 82.5%, whereas that for Lugol's solution was 92.06%. Excellent positive predictive values of 100% and 98.3%, respectively, were noted. The present study suggests that the majority of patients with NERD and typical symptoms of reflux disease can be identified by iScan or Lugol's chromoendoscopy as minimal erosive reflux disease (ERD) patients.

  7. Impact of coexisting irritable bowel syndrome and non-erosive reflux disease on postprandial abdominal fullness and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Futagami, Seiji; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Izumi, Nikki; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Shindo, Tomotaka; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-01-01

    The association between clinical symptoms and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia (FD)-overlap syndrome has not been studied in detail. The subjects were 139 patients with FD, 14 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 12 with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), and 41 healthy volunteers. Gastric motility was evaluated with the (13)C-acetate breath test. We used Rome III criteria to evaluate upper abdominal symptoms, and Self-Rating Questionnaire for Depression (SRQ-D) scores to determine depression status. Sleep disorders were evaluated with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores. There were no significant differences in age, body-mass index, alcohol intake, and smoking rate between patients with FD alone and those with FD-overlap syndrome. The postprandial abdominal fullness score in patients with FD-NERD-IBS was significantly greater than that in patients with FD-NERD overlap syndrome (p<0.001) or FD alone (p<0.001). The score for the feeling of hunger in patients with FD-NERD-IBS was significantly greater than that in patients with FD alone (p=0.0025), FD-NERD overlap syndrome (p=0.0088), or FD-IBS overlap syndrome (p=0.0057). The heartburn score in subjects with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome was significantly greater than that in subjects with FD alone (p=0.0035) or FD-IBS overlap syndrome (p=0.0026). The Tmax in patients with FD-overlap syndrome or FD alone was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score in subjects with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome was significantly greater than that in subjects with FD alone. Symptom scores, such as those for postprandial abdominal fullness, heartburn, and the feeling of hunger, in patients with FD-overlap syndromes are significantly greater than those in patients with FD alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether various symptoms are related to sleep disorders in patients with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome.

  8. The promise of PD-1 inhibitors in gastro-esophageal cancers: microsatellite instability vs. PD-L1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhaohui; Yoon, Harry H

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary clinical studies of anti-programmed cell death-1 (anti-PD-1) therapy in gastro-esophageal cancers have suggested promising single-agent activity. In patients who received prior treatment for advanced disease, pembrolizumab has been associated with a response rate of 20% in programmed cell death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive tumors, and nivolumab with a response rate of 12% in unselected tumors. Both agents yielded a median duration of response lasting ~6-7 months. PD-L1 expression and microsatellite instability (MSI) have emerged as potential predictive markers for PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. PD-L1 expression in tumor cells and in immune cells within the tumor microenvironment has been detected in 14-24% and ~35% of patients with gastro-esophageal cancer, respectively. PD-L1 tumor cell expression appears to be more common in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancers (GCs) and has been associated with an increased density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). To date, data are too sparse to determine whether PD-L1 expression predicts efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy in gastro-esophageal cancer, but data from other tumor types have not been consistent regarding its predictive value. MSI occurs in 10-20% of gastro-esophageal cancers and arises from deficient mismatch repair (MMR). MSI is highly correlated with non-synonymous mutation burden, as well as a dense accumulation of TILs. MSI has been associated with improved response to anti-PD-1 therapy in gastrointestinal cancers. Multiple studies are ongoing which examine therapeutic blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in unselected patients with gastro-esophageal cancer, as well as patients whose tumors express PD-L1 or exhibit MSI. These studies will clarify their activity in this disease and potentially can determine whether identify a strong predictive biomarker can be identified. Checkpoint inhibition is also being studied in combination with curative-intent chemo (radio) therapy and surgery.

  9. The promise of PD-1 inhibitors in gastro-esophageal cancers: microsatellite instability vs. PD-L1

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary clinical studies of anti-programmed cell death-1 (anti-PD-1) therapy in gastro-esophageal cancers have suggested promising single-agent activity. In patients who received prior treatment for advanced disease, pembrolizumab has been associated with a response rate of 20% in programmed cell death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive tumors, and nivolumab with a response rate of 12% in unselected tumors. Both agents yielded a median duration of response lasting ~6–7 months. PD-L1 expression and microsatellite instability (MSI) have emerged as potential predictive markers for PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. PD-L1 expression in tumor cells and in immune cells within the tumor microenvironment has been detected in 14–24% and ~35% of patients with gastro-esophageal cancer, respectively. PD-L1 tumor cell expression appears to be more common in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancers (GCs) and has been associated with an increased density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). To date, data are too sparse to determine whether PD-L1 expression predicts efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy in gastro-esophageal cancer, but data from other tumor types have not been consistent regarding its predictive value. MSI occurs in 10–20% of gastro-esophageal cancers and arises from deficient mismatch repair (MMR). MSI is highly correlated with non-synonymous mutation burden, as well as a dense accumulation of TILs. MSI has been associated with improved response to anti-PD-1 therapy in gastrointestinal cancers. Multiple studies are ongoing which examine therapeutic blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in unselected patients with gastro-esophageal cancer, as well as patients whose tumors express PD-L1 or exhibit MSI. These studies will clarify their activity in this disease and potentially can determine whether identify a strong predictive biomarker can be identified. Checkpoint inhibition is also being studied in combination with curative-intent chemo (radio) therapy and surgery. PMID

  10. Primary esophageal and gastro-esophageal junction cancer xenograft models: clinicopathological features and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Sun, Bin; Panchal, Devang; Patel, Devalben; Tse, Alvina; Chen, Zhuo; Faluyi, Olusola O; Renouf, Daniel J; Girgis, Hala; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Darling, Gail E; Ailles, Laurie E; El-Zimaity, Hala; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    There are very few xenograft models available for the study of esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Using a NOD/SCID model, we implanted 90 primary E and GEJ tumors resected from patients and six endoscopic biopsy specimens. Of 69 resected tumors with histologically confirmed viable adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, 22 (32%) was engrafted. One of 11 tumors, considered to have had a complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, also engrafted. Of the 23 patients whose tumors were engrafted, 65% were male; 30% were early stage while 70% were late stage; 22% received neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation; 61% were GEJ cancers. Engraftment occurred in 18/54 (33%) adenocarcinomas and 5/16 (31%) squamous cell carcinomas. Small endoscopic biopsy tissue had a 50% (3/6) engraftment rate. Of the factors analyzed, pretreatment with chemo-radiation and well/moderate differentiation showed significantly lower correlation with engraftment (P<0.05). In the subset of patients who did not receive neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, 18/41 (44%) engrafted compared with those with pretreatment where 5/29 (17%, P=0.02) engrafted. Primary xenograft lines may be continued through 4-12 passages. Xenografts maintained similar histology and morphological characteristics with only minor variations even after multiple passaging in most instances.

  11. Treatment of Post-Stent Gastroesophageal Reflux by Anti-Reflux Z-Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Roger Philip; Kew, Jacqueline; Byrne, Peter D.

    2000-11-15

    Severe symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain consistent with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) developed in a patient following placement of a conventional self-expanding 16-24-mm-diameter x 12-cm-long esophageal stent across the gastroesophageal junction to treat an obstructing esophageal carcinoma. A second 18-mm-diameter x 10-cm-long esophageal stent with anti-reflux valve was deployed coaxially and reduced symptomatic GER immediately. Improvement was sustained at 4-month follow-up. An anti-reflux stent can be successfully used to treat significant symptomatic GER after conventional stenting.

  12. Prognostic influence of Barrett's oesophagus and Helicobacter pylori infection on healing of erosive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and symptom resolution in non-erosive GORD: report from the ProGORD study.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P; Lind, T; Willich, S; Vieth, M; Jaspersen, D; Labenz, J; Meyer-Sabellek, W; Junghard, O; Stolte, M

    2005-06-01

    Adequacy of acid suppression is a critical factor influencing healing in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The European prospective study ProGORD was set up to determine the endoscopic and symptomatic progression of GORD over five years under routine care, after initial acid suppression with esomeprazole. We report on factors influencing endoscopic healing and symptom resolution during the acute treatment phase. Patients with symptoms suggestive of GORD underwent endoscopy and biopsies were obtained from the oesophagus for diagnosis of abnormalities, including Barrett's oesophagus (BO). Data from 6215 patients were included in the "intention to treat" analysis, 3245 diagnosed as having erosive reflux disease (ERD) and 2970 non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). ERD patients were treated with esomeprazole 40 mg for 4-8 weeks for endoscopic healing while NERD patients received 20 mg for 2-4 weeks for resolution of heartburn symptoms. Endoscopic healing occurred overall in 87.7% of ERD patients although healing was significantly lower in those with more severe oesophagitis (76.9%) and in those with BO (72.4%), particularly in Helicobacter pylori negative BO patients (70.1%). Age, sex, and body mass index appeared to have no significant impact on healing. Complete heartburn resolution was reported by 70.4% of ERD patients and by 64.8% of NERD patients at the last visit. Only H pylori infection had a significant influence on complete heartburn resolution in the NERD group (68.1% and 63.7% for H pylori positive and H pylori negative, respectively; p = 0.03). The presence of Barrett's mucosa, as well as severe mucosal damage, exerts a negative impact on healing. H pylori infection had a positive influence on healing in ERD patients with coexistent BO but no influence on those without BO.

  13. Clinical role of ramucirumab alone or in combination with paclitaxel for gastric and gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Cunningham, David

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the stomach and gastro-esophageal junction represent a significant challenge in oncology. Despite some recent advances in genetic categorization and the development of novel agents, outcomes remain poor. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 monoclonal antibody ramucirumab is the first targeted therapy to improve survival in a molecularly unselected population, and represents a valuable new treatment option. This review describes the current treatment landscape for advanced disease, evaluates existing and ongoing research into ramucirumab, and discusses its current and potential future therapeutic role. PMID:27524910

  14. The added value of impedance-pH monitoring to Rome III criteria in distinguishing functional heartburn from non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Marabotto, Elisa; Zentilin, Patrizia; Frazzoni, Marzio; Sammito, Giorgio; Bonfanti, Daria; Sconfienza, Luca; Assandri, Lorenzo; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Malesci, Alberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2011-07-01

    Functional heartburn is defined by Rome III criteria as an endoscopy-negative condition with normal oesophageal acid exposure time, negative symptom association to acid reflux and unsatisfactory response to proton pump inhibitors. These criteria underestimated the role of non-acid reflux. To assess the contribution of impedance-pH with symptom association probability (SAP) analysis in identifying endoscopy-negative patients with reflux disease and separating them from functional heartburn. Consecutive endoscopy-negative patients treated with proton pump inhibitors (n=219) undergoing impedance-pH monitoring off-therapy were analysed. Distal acid exposure time, reflux episodes, SAP and symptomatic response to proton pump inhibitors were measured. Based on impedance-pH/SAP, 67 (31%) patients were pH+/SAP+, 6 (2%) pH+/SAP-, 83 (38%) hypersensitive oesophagus and 63 (29%) functional heartburn. According to pH-metry alone/response to proton pump inhibitors, 62 (28%) were pH+/SAP+, 11 (5%) pH+/SAP-, 61 (28%) hypersensitive oesophagus and 85 (39%) functional heartburn. In the normal-acid exposure population the contribution of impedance-pH/SAP compared to pH-metry alone/response to proton pump inhibitors in identifying patients with reflux disease and functional heartburn resulted to be 10%. In patients with abnormal-acid exposure, the contribution of impedance-pH/SAP increased by 3%. Comparing impedance-pH testing with pH-metry alone plus the response to proton pump inhibitor therapy demonstrated that the latter ones cause underestimation of reflux disease patients and overestimation of functional heartburn patients. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomised clinical trial: mucosal protection combined with acid suppression in the treatment of non-erosive reflux disease - efficacy of Esoxx, a hyaluronic acid-chondroitin sulphate based bioadhesive formulation.

    PubMed

    Savarino, V; Pace, F; Scarpignato, C

    2017-03-01

    Several studies have shown that patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are less responsive to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with erosive disease as they belong to different subgroups, in whom factors other than acid can trigger symptoms. To evaluate whether combined therapy (mucosal protection plus acid suppression) would improve symptom relief compared to PPI treatment alone. In a multicenter, randomised, double-blind trial, 154 patients with NERD were randomised to receive Esoxx (Alfa Wassermann, Bologna, Italy), a hyaluronic acid-chondroitin sulphate based bioadhesive formulation, or placebo, in addition to acid suppression with standard dose PPIs for 2 weeks. Symptoms (heartburn, acid regurgitation, retrosternal pain and acid taste in the mouth) and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were evaluated before and after treatment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with at least a 3-point reduction in the total symptom score. At the end of treatment, the primary endpoint was reached by 52.6% of patients taking Esoxx compared to 32.1% of those given placebo (P < 0.01). The same was true also for HRQL, evaluated by means of the Short Form-36 questionnaire, which improved with both treatments, but some items were significantly better after Esoxx plus PPI therapy. The synergistic effect of Essox with PPI treatment suggests that mucosal protection added to acid suppression could improve symptoms and HRQL in NERD patients. © 2017 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ambulatory 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and high resolution endoscopy distinguish patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chuanlian; Du, Quanlin; Li, Changqing; Zhang, Linlu; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zuo, Fang; Zhang, Yanmin; Li, Fang; Xie, Guofeng; Li, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    To assess the contribution of 24-h esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) monitoring and high resolution endoscopy (HRE) with i-scan imaging in differentiating non erosive reflux disease (NERD) from functional heartburn (FH). This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with heartburn from the Endoscopy Unit. NERD patients and FH patients were defined by 24-h MII-pH monitoring and white light endoscopy. Minimal mucosal changes were assessed by HRE with i-scan imaging. Total of 156 consecutive patients with heartburn but without esophageal mucosal erosions were studied. Forty-eight of these subjects had NERD, with increased acid exposure time (AET) and positive SAP and/or SI. Eighteen had FH with normal AET and negative SAP and SI. When compared to FH patients and healthy controls, NERD patients had significantly increased number of total acid reflux episodes, as well as increased number of weakly acidic reflux episodes (p<0.01). The rate of proximal reflux episodes in NERD patients was higher than that of FH patients and healthy controls (p<0.01). Irregular or blurring of the Z-line (58.3%) and white mucosal turbidity (47.9%) were the most common endoscopic findings of minimal mucosal changes observed in this study. NERD patients had more prevalent minimal changes than FH patients and the controls (87.5%vs. 66.6%vs. 61.9%; p = 0.004) with sensitivity of 87.5%. Histopathological evaluation showed that NERD patients had significantly higher average scores of intercellular spaces dilation (2.82±0.9 vs. 1.2±0.6, p = 0.005) and papillae elongation (2.65±1.0 vs. 1.5±0.8, p = 0.014), but not for basal cell proliferation (1.6±1.3 vs. 1.0±0.9, p = 0.070). The histological scores of the NERD patients were 7.1±1.2, which were higher than those of FH patients (3.4±1.0, p = 0.004). Minimal mucosal changes could be useful markers to support clinical diagnosis of NERD. Combination of 24-h MII-pH monitoring and i-scan high resolution endoscopy

  17. Randomized clinical trial: inhibition of the TRPV1 system in patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and a partial response to PPI treatment is not associated with analgesia to esophageal experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Ny, Lars; Gunnarsson, Jenny; Hvid-Jensen, Frederik; Zetterstrand, Sofia; Simrén, Magnus; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Hansen, Mark Berner; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-03-01

    Many patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) have insufficient relief on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Some patients have a hypersensitive esophagus and may respond to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists. Aim. To investigate the effect of the TRPV1 antagonist AZD1386 on experimental esophageal pain in NERD patients. Enrolled patients had NERD and a partial PPI response (moderate-to-severe heartburn or regurgitation ≥3 days/week before enrolment despite ≥6 weeks' PPI therapy). Fourteen patients (21-69 years, 9 women) were block-randomized into this placebo-controlled, double-blinded, crossover study examining efficacy of a single dose (95 mg) of AZD1386. On treatment days, each participant's esophagus was stimulated with heat, distension, and electrical current at teaching hospitals in Denmark and Sweden. Heat and pressure pain served as somatic control stimuli. Per protocol results were analyzed. Of 14 randomized patients, 12 were treated with AZD1386. In the esophagus AZD1386 did not significantly change the moderate pain threshold for heat [-3%, 95% confidence interval (CI), -22;20%], distension (-11%, 95% CI, -28;10%), or electrical current (6%, 95% CI, -10;25%). Mean cutaneous heat tolerance increased by 4.9°C (95% CI, 3.7;6.2°C). AZD1386 increased the maximum body temperature by a mean of 0.59°C (95% CI, 0.40-0.79°C), normalizing within 4 h. AZD1386 had no analgesic effect on experimental esophageal pain in patients with NERD and a partial PPI response, whereas it increased cutaneous heat tolerance. TRPV1 does not play a major role in heat-, mechanically and electrically evoked esophageal pain in these patients. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: D9127C00002.

  18. Is Metabolic Syndrome Considered to Be a Risk Factor for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (Non-Erosive or Erosive Esophagitis)?: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ramezani Jolfaie, Nahid; Alipour, Rooya; Zarrati, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Context The incidences of both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) have increased in recent years, and it has been suggested that there is a probable association between the two. The aim of this review is to clarify whether or not MetS is a risk factor for the incidence of GERD. Evidence Aquisition We searched the PubMed, ProQuest, Ovid, Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases up to February 2015 regarding the relationship between GERD and MetS as found in observational studies. Any studies that evaluated the association between the components of MetS and GERD, as well as any studies examining the association of MetS with Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal carcinoma, were excluded. Results Thirteen studies met the eligibility criteria. The results of nine studies suggested that there was a higher prevalence of MetS among patients with GERD (P < 0.05) and, thus, it could be considered as an independent risk factor for the incidence of GERD. However, in the one study was not observed significant association between GERD and MetS (P = 0.71). Two studies in which the prevalence of GERD was compared between individuals with and without MetS showed a higher prevalence of GERD in patients with MetS (P < 0.05). However, this finding was not observed in a similar study conducted among female participants, which reported that the different types of MetS were not important factors with regard to the prevalence of erosive esophagitis (P = Not significant). Conclusions It can be concluded that MetS may increase the risk of GERD. Consequently, there might be potential benefits to treating the metabolic abnormalities in these patients. PMID:28191340

  19. Poorly Differentiated Medullary Phenotype Predicts Poor Survival in Early Lymph Node-Negative Gastro-Esophageal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro; Grabowski, Patricia; Berg, Erika; Bläker, Hendrik; Kruschewski, Martin; Haase, Oliver; Hummel, Michael; Daum, Severin

    2016-01-01

    Background 5-year survival rate in patients with early adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction or stomach (AGE/S) in Caucasian patients is reported to be 60–80%. We aimed to identify prognostic markers for patients with UICC-I without lymph-node involvement (N0). Methods Clinical data and tissue specimen from patients with AGE/S stage UICC-I-N0, treated by surgery only, were collected retrospectively. Tumor size, lymphatic vessel or vein invasion, grading, classification systems (WHO, Lauren, Ming), expression of BAX, BCL-2, CDX2, Cyclin E, E-cadherin, Ki-67, TP53, TP21, SHH, Survivin, HIF1A, TROP2 and mismatch repair deficiency were analyzed using tissue microarrays and correlated with overall and tumor related survival. Results 129 patients (48 female) with a mean follow-up of 129.1 months were identified. 5-year overall survival was 83.9%, 5-year tumor related survival was 95.1%. Poorly differentiated medullary cancer subtypes (p<0.001) and positive vein invasion (p<0.001) were identified as risk factors for decreased overall—and tumor related survival. Ki-67 (p = 0.012) and TP53 mutation (p = 0.044) were the only immunohistochemical markers associated with worse overall survival but did not reach significance for decreased tumor related survival. Conclusion In the presented study patients with AGE/S in stage UICC-I-N0 had a better prognosis as previously reported for Caucasian patients. Poorly differentiated medullary subtype was associated with reduced survival and should be considered when studying prognosis in these patients. PMID:28030564

  20. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Roy C

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease remains incompletely understood. Its hallmark symptom is "heartburn" and, on the basis of endoscopy, those with heartburn are subdivided into nonerosive reflux disease and erosive esophagitis. Although subjects with nonerosive reflux disease have no gross damage on endoscopy, a characteristic histopathologic feature of this disease is present on endoscopic biopsy. This lesion is known as "dilated intercellular spaces," a finding present within squamous epithelium. This report details how acid in contact with a damaged esophageal epithelium leads to heartburn and to the progression of nonerosive reflux disease to erosive esophagitis. It also addresses the fact that esophageal pH monitoring may be normal in a significant number of subjects with heartburn, particularly with nonerosive reflux disease, and details how this observation suggests that in addition to defects in the antireflux barrier, for example, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, defects in tissue resistance created by contact with ingested products may also be etiologic in some subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  1. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    PubMed

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  2. Causal diagrams, gastroesophageal reflux and erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eyal

    2013-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and its consequences have inspired numerous research questions in recent years: are non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive oesophagitis phenotypic expressions of gastroesophageal reflux disease? Why do patients with NERD not respond to treatment as well as patients with erosive oesophagitis? What is the natural history of NERD? Causal diagrams, coupled with conditional probabilities, offer clear and surprising answers. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux. About a pH metric series].

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Nour; Hefaiedh, Rania; Karoui, Sami; Fekih, Monia; Zouiten, Lilia; Matri, Samira; Filali, Azza

    2015-04-01

    Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux has been shown to be associated with the more severe forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly with extraesophageal manifestations as well as complications of mucosal damage. To determine the frequency of nocturnal gastro esophageal reflux disease on 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring in patients with digestives or extra-digestives symptoms and to evaluate the clinical and pHmetric characteristics of nocturnal reflux in these patients. We conducted a retrospective study based on results of 24- hour esophageal pH monitoring during a 11-year period in patients with or without digestive symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The nocturnal gastroesophgeal reflux was defined. We studied 696 patients (299 men, 397 women; mean age: 34.05 years). Gastroesophageal reflux was found in 350 patients (50%). Nocturnal reflux was observed in 240 patients (34.3%), mostly in association with pathological reflux in the total period (223 cases). Compared to the diurnal period, the nocturnal period was characterized by fewer number of reflux episodes (21.9±27.4 vs 67.4±5.,1 ; p<0.0001), more longer duration of reflux episodes (24.4±37.9 minutes vs 13.9± 17.5 minutes ; p<0.001), and a lower symptomatic correlation (26% vs 45% ; p=0.0005). Nocturnal reflux is associated with overall reflux on the 24 hour examination. Nocturnal period is characterized by longer reflux episodes, less number of reflux episodes and less symptomatic correlation.

  4. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Fixed combination of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-sulphate oral formulation in a randomized double blind, placebo controlled study for the treatment of symptoms in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, B; Merighi, A; Corbascio, D; Rottigni, V; Fistetto, G; Esposito, A

    2013-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a major breakthrough in the medical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In several patients with non erosive reflux disease symptoms (NERD) the response to PPIs is partial or limited and symptoms relief needs the administration of additional medications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new medical device, based on an oral fixed combination of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-sulphate (HA+CS), in a bioadhesive carrier, in adults with symptoms of non erosive gastroesophageal reflux and with a low response to PPIs. Twenty patients who had experienced heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 days during a 7 day run-in period, without endoscopic mucosal breaks, were randomized in a double blind crossover study to receive four daily doses of a fixed oral combination of HA+CS and placebo for 14 days. Relief of cardinal symptoms of GERD was evaluated at the end of each period. A significant greater Sum of Symptoms Intensity Difference, compared to placebo, was observed after HA+CS treatment (-2.7 vs 0.5 - p < 0.01), being both heartburn (-1.6 vs 0.5 - p < 0.03) and acid regurgitation (-1.1 vs 0.1 - p < 0.03) significantly improved by the medical device. A speed of action ≤ 30 min was significantly more frequently reported by patients during HA+CS administration than with placebo (60% vs 30% - p = 0.05). Total disappearance of symptoms was observed in 50% of the patients compared to 10% during placebo administration (p = 0.01 between group comparison). A fixed combination of HA+CS has demonstrated to be effective in gastroesophageal reflux control, with a rapid onset of action.

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction, and cardia: phase II trial (E8296) of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Armanios, Mary; Xu, Ronghui; Forastiere, Arlene A; Haller, Daniel G; Kugler, John W; Benson, Al B

    2004-11-15

    To evaluate the effect of postoperative paclitaxel and cisplatin on 2-year survival in patients with completely resected adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, gastro-esophageal (GE) junction, and cardia. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial. Patients had pathologically staged T2 node-positive to T3-4, any node status adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, GE junction, or gastric cardia with negative margins (R0). Treatment consisted of four cycles of paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 intravenously (i.v.) over 3 hours followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m2 i.v. every 21 days. A positive outcome was considered to be an improvement in 2-year survival rate by > or = 20% compared to historic controls. Fifty-nine patients were recruited from 20 centers. Of 55 eligible patients, 49 (89%) had lymph node involvement. Forty-six patients (84%) completed all four cycles. Of the total 59 patients, 31 (56%) developed grade 3 or 4 toxicity with leukopenia/neutropenia, nausea/vomiting, and metabolic toxicities were most common. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 4 years. At 2 years, 33 patients were alive and 22 were dead, with a survival rate of 60% (95% CI, 46% to 73%; one-sided P = .0008 compared with the historic controls). Our data suggest that adjuvant paclitaxel and cisplatin may improve survival in R0 resected patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, GE junction, and cardia. These results warrant further testing in randomized trials.

  7. Appropriateness of Using Patient-Derived Xenograft Models for Pharmacologic Evaluation of Novel Therapies for Esophageal/Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Starmans, Maud H. W.; Navab, Roya; Chen, Zhuo; Girgis, Hala; Eng, Lawson; Espin-Garcia, Osvaldo; Shen, Xiaowei; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Tsao, Ming-Sound; El-Zimaity, Hala; Der, Sandy D.; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G.; Darling, Gail E.; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs) as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR), and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55) in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32). Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04) and older patients (p=0.01). Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers. PMID:25826681

  8. S-1 in combination with docetaxel and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced gastro-esophageal adenocarcinoma: two parallel phase 1/2a studies.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Krogh, Merete; Schoennemann, Katrine; Vestermark, Lene W; Jensen, Helle A; Bjerregaard, Jon K

    2017-01-01

    Docetaxel in combination with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of several standard chemotherapy regimens for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal adenocarcinoma (aGEA) in Europe. To enable outpatient treatment, we evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and safety of docetaxel in combination with oxaliplatin (O) and S-1 (DOS) in Caucasian patients with aGEA. We present final results of two parallel phase 1/2a studies (3 + 3 design). Escalating doses of docetaxel and S-1 with fixed dose O were given for 18 weeks every second week (DOS2w) or every third week (DOS3w) followed by S-1 maintenance therapy. Thirty-four patients (18 in DOS2w and 16 in DOS3w) were enrolled between October 2013 and June 2015. Median age was 65 years (range 49-78). DLT was most often febrile neutropenia. Most common severe non-hematological adverse events were diarrhea (9%) and fatigue (6%). The RD of DOS3w was: docetaxel 50 mg/m(2), O 100 mg/m(2) and S-1 25 mg/m(2) twice daily and of DOS2w was: docetaxel 40 mg/m(2), O 70 mg/m(2) and S-1 35 mg/m(2) twice daily. Overall, response rate was 56%; median progression-free survival was 9.1 months; and median overall survival was 13.2 months in 34 patients. At the RD, DOS2w and DOS3w showed an acceptable safety profile in patients with aGEA. Clinical trials ID: NCT-01928524 and EudraCT 2012-005187-10.

  9. The gastro-esophageal malignancies in Northern Iran research project: impact on the health research and health care systems in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Etemadi, Arash; Kamangar, Farin; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Islami, Farhad; Sadjadi, Alireza; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian; Ponder, Bruce; Pharoh, Paul; day, Nick; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Since 2000, considerable progress has been made in health research in Iran. An example of this progress has been the Gastro- Esophageal Malignancies in Northern Iran (GEMINI). The original aim of this project was to identify etiologic factors and prevention measures for upper gastrointestinal cancers in Northern provinces of Iran, but its achievements have gone much beyond the initial goal. This project is one of the largest studies in the Middle East and North African region, has helped build and strengthen research capacity at both individual and institutional levels in Iran, and has provided international credibility to research institutes and the wider research system in Iran. The success of GEMINI reveals the feasibility of large-scale studies in developing countries and serves as a successful model not only for health research institutes within Iran, but also for research systems in other developing countries. The outcomes of the project are numerous, including establishment of research networks, development of efficient methods for planning and implementation of research projects, and introduction of methodologies for project management, data management and usage of health technology. Finally and perhaps most importantly, GEMINI is among the few projects that has had a significant impact on the attitudes and concerns of decision makers in the health sector in Iran. It signifies the importance of investment in human resources and has proved that health policies should be health-based rather than patient-based. Here we review the impact of GEMINI on the health research system and the broader health care system of Iran and put these into a more global perspective. PMID:23273237

  10. Effects of Morinda citrifolia aqueous fruit extract and its biomarker scopoletin on reflux esophagitis and gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahattanadul, Sirima; Ridtitid, Wibool; Nima, Sawpheeyah; Phdoongsombut, Narubodee; Ratanasuwon, Pranee; Kasiwong, Srirat

    2011-03-24

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dried mature unripe Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae) fruit, commonly known as "Noni", in an aqueous extract preparation (AFE) as used in Thai traditional medicine and its biomarker scopoletin on gastro-esophageal inflammatory models that are related to the claimed pharmacological properties of AFE and/or resembled the human esophagitis or gastric ulcer. The powder of dried mature unripe Noni fruit was boiled in water until it became a sticky paste and was then dried into a powder by lyophilization. The pharmacological activity of AFE and pure scopoletin at the same equivalent dose present in AFE was investigated in rat on gastro-esophageal inflammatory models (acid reflux esophagitis, acute gastritis induced by ethanol and serotonin, and chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid); gastric biochemical parameters and gastrointestinal motility. AFE (0.63-2.50 g/kg) significantly prevented the formation of acid reflux esophagitis, reduced the formation of ethanol-induced acute gastric lesions, suppressed the development of gastric lesions in response to serotonin, and accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats with equal potency to those obtained by standard antisecretory agents (ranitidine and lansoprazole). AFE also significantly inhibited gastric acid secretion and pepsin activity in pylorus ligated rats. Additionally, AFE strongly increased the gastrointestinal transit of charcoal meal with a higher potency than cisapride. Pure scopoletin, when compared at the same equivalent dose containing in AFE, possessed similar antiulcer and antisecretory properties to that of AFE although it exerted a less prokinetic activity than AFE. The findings indicated that AFE as well as its biomarker: scopoletin may be beneficial as a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for gastro-esophageal inflammatory diseases, mainly through its antisecretory and prokinetic activities

  11. Clinical symptoms of FSSG in gastroesophageal reflux disease are critical for PPI treatment: Japanese multi-centers with 185 patients.

    PubMed

    Komatsu-Tanaka, Mio; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Inamori, Masahiko; Tanaka, Junji; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Junichi; Ando, Takashi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kinjo, Fukunori; Deguchi, Ryuzo; Kusano, Motoyasu

    2012-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine whether questionnaire evaluations of clinical symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease were useful to assess proton pump inhibitor therapy. A total of 185 Japanese patients (men, 88; women, 97; age: 55.7 ± 16.1 years) with gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled. The patients were divided based on the frequency scale for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease: severe symptoms with scores ≥8 and mild symptoms with scores ≤7. Quality of life was evaluated with the Medical Outcomes Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey. All patients were treated with a proton pump inhibitor, rabeprazole (10 mg/day), for 8 weeks. Patients were classified into four groups: reflux esophagitis with severe symptoms (n = 92, 49.7%); reflux esophagitis with mild symptoms (n = 17, 9.2%); non-erosive reflux disease with severe symptoms (n = 66, 35.7%); and non-erosive reflux disease with mild symptoms (n = 10, 5.4%). The dysmotility score was high in non-erosive reflux disease with severe symptoms compared with reflux esophagitis with severe symptoms (9.1 ± 0.5 vs 6.8 ± 0.5, P < 0.05). The symptom score and quality of life in the severe symptoms groups for both reflux esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease were significantly improved by rabeprazole treatment. Only the reflux score was improved by rabeprazole in the reflux esophagitis with mild symptoms group; no therapeutic effect was observed for the non-erosive reflux disease with mild symptoms group. Low scores on the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease indicate poor responsiveness to proton pump inhibitor treatment, and high scores indicate good responsiveness. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  12. Cytoprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Novel Rat Models of Non-Erosive Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Zayachkivska, Oksana; Havryluk, Olena; Hrycevych, Nazar; Bula, Nazar; Grushka, Oksana; Wallace, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Non-erosive esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus and is a form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are limited treatment options for non-erosive esophagitis, and it often progresses to Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. Hydrogen sulfide has been demonstrated to be a critical mediator of gastric and intestinal mucosal protection and repair. However, roles for H2S in esophageal mucosal defence, inflammation and responses to injury have not been reported. We therefore examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous H2S in rat models of non-erosive esophagitis. Mild- and moderate-severity non-erosive esophagitis was induced in rats through supplementation of drinking water with fructose, plus or minus exposure to water-immersion stress. The effects of inhibitors of H2S synthesis or of an H2S donor on severity of esophagitis was then examined, along with changes in serum levels of a pro- and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-17 and IL-10, respectively). Exposure to water-immersion stress after consumption of the fructose-supplemented water for 28 days resulted in submucosal esophageal edema and neutrophil infiltration and the development of lesions in the muscular lamina and basal cell hyperplasia. Inhibition of H2S synthesis resulted in significant exacerbation of inflammation and injury. Serum levels of IL-17 were significantly elevated, while serum IL-10 levels were reduced. Treatment with an H2S donor significantly reduced the severity of esophageal injury and inflammation and normalized the serum cytokine levels. The rat models used in this study provide novel tools for studying non-erosive esophagitis with a range of severity. H2S contributes significantly to mucosal defence in the esophagus, and H2S donors may have therapeutic value in treating esophageal inflammation and injury. PMID:25333941

  13. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [< 1%]). Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  14. Reflux Incidence among Exclusively Breast Milk Fed Infants: Differences of Feeding at Breast versus Pumped Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yourkavitch, Jennifer; Zadrozny, Sabrina; Flax, Valerie L.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of feeding infants expressed breast milk is increasing in the United States, but the impacts on infant and maternal health are still understudied. This study examines the monthly incidence of regurgitation (gastro-esophageal reflux) in exclusively breast milk fed infants from ages two to six months. Among infants whose mothers participated in the Infant Feeding Practices II Study (IFPS II; 2005–2007), data on reflux and feeding mode were collected by monthly questionnaires. A longitudinal, repeated measures analysis was used, with feeding mode lagged by one month in order to compare reflux incidence among infants fed directly at the breast to infants receiving pumped breast milk. Mothers in both feeding groups had similar characteristics, although a greater proportion feeding at least some pumped milk were primiparous. The number of exclusively breastfed infants decreased steadily between months 2 and 6, although the proportion fed at the breast remained similar over time. An association between feeding mode and reflux incidence was not found; however, the analyses were limited by a small number of reported reflux cases. More studies are needed to further explain the relationship between different feeding modes and infant reflux. PMID:27754430

  15. Reflux Incidence among Exclusively Breast Milk Fed Infants: Differences of Feeding at Breast versus Pumped Milk.

    PubMed

    Yourkavitch, Jennifer; Zadrozny, Sabrina; Flax, Valerie L

    2016-10-14

    The practice of feeding infants expressed breast milk is increasing in the United States, but the impacts on infant and maternal health are still understudied. This study examines the monthly incidence of regurgitation (gastro-esophageal reflux) in exclusively breast milk fed infants from ages two to six months. Among infants whose mothers participated in the Infant Feeding Practices II Study (IFPS II; 2005-2007), data on reflux and feeding mode were collected by monthly questionnaires. A longitudinal, repeated measures analysis was used, with feeding mode lagged by one month in order to compare reflux incidence among infants fed directly at the breast to infants receiving pumped breast milk. Mothers in both feeding groups had similar characteristics, although a greater proportion feeding at least some pumped milk were primiparous. The number of exclusively breastfed infants decreased steadily between months 2 and 6, although the proportion fed at the breast remained similar over time. An association between feeding mode and reflux incidence was not found; however, the analyses were limited by a small number of reported reflux cases. More studies are needed to further explain the relationship between different feeding modes and infant reflux.

  16. Effect of low-proof alcoholic beverages on duodenogastro-esophageal reflux in health and GERD.

    PubMed

    Seidl, H; Gundling, F; Schepp, W; Schmidt, T; Pehl, C

    2011-02-01

    Alcoholic beverages are known to increase acidic gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and the risk of esophagitis. Moreover, duodenogastro-esophageal reflux (DGER), containing bile acids, was shown to harmfully alter the esophageal mucosa, alone and synergistically with HCl and pepsin. However, studies directly addressing potential effects of different low proof alcoholic beverages on DGER in health and disease are missing. Bilitec readings for beer and white, rose, and red wine were obtained in vitro from pure and from mixtures with bile. One-hour DGER monitoring and pH-metry were performed in 12 healthy subjects and nine reflux patients with DGER after ingestion of a standardized liquid meal together with 300 mL of water, white wine, and in the volunteers, beer and rose wine. Bilitec measurement was found to be feasible in the presence of beer, white wine, and using a threshold of 0.25, rose wine. However, the presence of red wine resulted in extinction values above this threshold. The consumption of all investigated alcoholic beverages, especially of white wine, triggered increased acidic GER, both in healthy participants and patients with reflux disease. In contrast, no relevant DGER was found after intake of alcoholic beverages. Fiber-optic bilirubin monitoring can be used for DGER monitoring in combination with alcoholic beverages, except with red wine. Low-proof alcoholic beverages are a strong trigger of GER, but not of DGER, both in healthy subjects and patients with reflux disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Impaired visceral sensitivity to acid reflux in patients with Barrett's esophagus. The role of esophageal motility*.

    PubMed

    Byrne, P J; Mulligan, E D; O'Riordan, J; Keeling, P W N; Reynolds, J V

    2003-01-01

    Patients with Barrett's esophagus have been reported to have impaired visceral sensitivity to acid perfusion and distension compared with non-Barrett's refluxers, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Esophageal motility and clearance mechanisms may be important, and this study explored the relationship of motility with symptoms. Seventy-four patients with Barrett's esophagus were compared with 216 patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with abnormal acid reflux scores, and 50 symptomatic patients who had normal acid exposure. All patients had esophageal manometry and 24-h pH monitoring. Thirty-six Barrett's patients also had 24-h bile reflux monitoring. Symptoms were assessed by Symptom Index (SI) during 24-h pH monitoring. Barrett's patients with normal motility had a significantly lower SI than GERD patients for similar acid exposure (P < 0.001). Barrett's patients with abnormal motility had higher acid exposure than those with normal motility (P < 0.05), but the SI values for this group was not significantly different from the GERD patients. SI and Bile reflux in Barrett's esophagus was not significantly different in patients with normal or abnormal motility. Barrett's patients had less sensitivity than GERD patients for similar acid exposure. Normal motility in Barrett's esophagus is associated with the poorest sensitivity and the presence of increased acid exposure is required in order to achieve sensitivity levels comparable with GERD patients.

  18. Randomized clinical trial: effect of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist revexepride on reflux parameters in patients with persistent reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Zerbib, F; Blondeau, K; des Varannes, S B; Piessevaux, H; Borovicka, J; Mion, F; Fox, M; Bredenoord, A J; Louis, H; Dedrie, S; Hoppenbrouwers, M; Meulemans, A; Rykx, A; Thielemans, L; Ruth, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately, 20–30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience persistent symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These patients may have underlying dysmotility; therefore, targeting gastric motor dysfunction in addition to acid inhibition may represent a new therapeutic avenue. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamic effect of the prokinetic agent revexepride (a 5-HT4 receptor agonist) in patients with GERD who have persistent symptoms despite treatment with a PPI. Methods This was a phase II, exploratory, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with GERD who experienced persistent symptoms while taking a stable dose of PPIs (http://ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01370863). Patients were randomized to either revexepride (0.5 mg, three times daily) or matching placebo for 4 weeks. Reflux events and associated characteristics were assessed by pH/impedance monitoring and disease symptoms were assessed using electronic diaries and questionnaires. Key Results In total, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. There were no significant differences between study arms in the number, the mean proximal extent or the bolus clearance times of liquid-containing reflux events. Changes from baseline in the number of heartburn, regurgitation, and other symptom events were minimal for each treatment group and no clear trends were observed. Conclusions & Inferences No clear differences were seen in reflux parameters between the placebo and revexepride groups. PMID:25530111

  19. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  20. Is the use of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease a cost-effective option in Poland?

    PubMed

    Petryszyn, Pawel; Staniak, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej

    2016-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esomeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in Poland. Studies comparing esomeprazole with other PPIs in the treatment of erosive esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease maintenance therapy were systematically reviewed. 9 randomized clinical trials were selected, meta-analyses were conducted. Cost data derived from Polish Ministry of Health and Pharmacies in Wroclaw. In the treatment of erosive esophagitis esomeprazole was significantly more effective than other PPIs. Both for 4- and 8-week therapy respective incremental cost-effectiveness ratio values were acceptably low. Differences in effectiveness of non-erosive reflux disease therapy were not significant. The replacement of pantoprazole 20 mg with more effective esomeprazole 20 mg in the 6-month maintenance therapy was associated with a substantially high incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  1. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Hadi, Mustafa; Birch, Daniel W.; Gill, Richdeep S.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic that is known to play a role in the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Studies have shown that increasing body mass index plays a role in the incompetence of the gastroesophageal junction and that weight loss and lifestyle modifications reduce the symptoms of GERD. As a method of producing effective and sustainable weight loss, bariatric surgery plays a major role in the treatment of obesity. We reviewed the literature on the effects of different types of bariatric surgery on the symptomatic relief of GERD and its complications. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was considered an effective method to alleviate symptoms of GERD, whereas laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appeared to increase the incidence of the disease. Adjustable gastric banding was seen to initially improve the symptoms of GERD; however, a subset of patients experienced a new onset of GERD symptoms during long-term follow-up. The literature suggests that different surgeries have different impacts on the symptomatology of GERD and that careful assessment may be needed before performing bariatric surgery in patients with GERD. PMID:24666452

  2. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients.

  3. Bile Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile can wash back into the esophagus. What leads to bile reflux? Bile reflux may be caused ... it should. Stagnant food in the stomach can lead to increased gastric pressure and allow bile and ...

  4. Prevalence of Psychiatric Comorbidity in Symptomatic Gastroesophageal Reflux Subgroups.

    PubMed

    Bilgi, Mustafa Melih; Vardar, Rukiye; Yıldırım, Esra; Veznedaroğlu, Baybars; Bor, Serhat

    2017-04-01

    Limited data exist regarding the psychosocial aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some GERD subgroups, such as functional heartburn and hypersensitive esophagus, might show different psychiatric comorbidities than others. We aimed to evaluate the psychiatric comorbidities of GERD subgroups using a cross-sectional design. A group of GERD patients at a tertiary outpatient clinic were evaluated via upper GIS (gastrointestinal system) endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24-h impedance-pH monitoring. Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with erosive reflux disease, 44 with non-erosive reflux disease, 20 with functional heartburn, 11 with hypersensitive esophagus, and 44 healthy controls participated. Psychiatric diagnoses were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV. Psychometric measurements of the patients were performed using the Somatosensory Amplification Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Short-Form 36. Healthy controls were evaluated with the same psychometric scales except for the Short-Form 36. All of the GERD subgroups were significantly more depressed than the control group. Depressive disorders were significantly more prevalent in the functional heartburn group than in the non-erosive reflux disease and erosive reflux disease groups. The trait anxiety level of the functional heartburn group was significantly higher than those of the control and non-erosive reflux disease groups. The quality of life scores of the GERD subgroups were significantly lower than the population standards. Depressive disorders were frequently comorbid in the GERD subgroups studied (30-65 %). It is essential to consider the high prevalence rates of comorbid depression when managing GERD.

  5. Influence of exercise testing in gastroesophageal reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Filho, Antonio Moreira; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado Pinto; Nasi, Ary; Eisig, Jaime Natan; Rodrigues, Tomas Navarro; Barbutti, Ricardo Correa; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Chinzon, Decio

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a worldwide prevalent condition that exhibits a large variety of signs and symptoms of esophageal or extra-esophageal nature and can be related to the esophagic adenocarcinoma. In the last few years, greater importance has been given to the influence of physical exercises on it. Some recent investigations, though showing conflicting results, point to an exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux during physical exercises. To evaluate the influence of physical activities in patients presenting with erosive and non erosive disease by ergometric stress testing and influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and body mass index during this situation. Twenty-nine patients with erosive disease (group I) and 10 patients with non-erosive disease (group II) were prospectively evaluated. All the patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, followed by upper digestive endoscopy, manometry and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. An ergometric testing was performed 1 h before removing the esophageal pH probe. During the ergometric stress testing, the following variables were analyzed: test efficacy, maximum oxygen uptake, acid reflux duration, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and influence of body mass index in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux during these physical stress. Maximum oxigen consumption or VO 2 max, showed significant correlation when it was 70% or higher only in the erosive disease group, evaluating the patients with or without acid reflux during the ergometric testing (p=0,032). The other considered variables didn't show significant correlations between gastroesophageal reflux and physical activity (p>0,05). 1) Highly intensive physical activity can predispose the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux episodes in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with erosive disease; 2) light or short sessions of physical activity have no influence on reflux, regardless of body

  6. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the therapeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, maintenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett’s esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any future development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the aforementioned areas of unmet need. PMID:26130628

  7. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  8. GPR84 and TREM-1 Signaling Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Reflux Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Schneider, Mathias; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kassem, Abdel Meguid; Khailah, Saleem; Müller, Jürgen; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Khairy, Ahmed; Khayyal, Mohamed T; Shcherbakova, Anastasiia; Efferth, Thomas; Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders in gastroenterology. Patients present with or without increased acid exposure indicating a nonuniform etiology. Thus, the common treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) fails to control symptoms in up to 40% of patients. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of the condition and explore new treatment targets, transcriptomics, proteomics and histological methods were applied to a surgically induced subchronic reflux esophagitis model in Wistar rats after treatment with either omeprazole (PPI) or STW5, a herbal preparation shown to ameliorate esophagitis without affecting refluxate pH. The normal human esophageal squamous cell line HET-1A and human endoscopic biopsies were used to confirm our findings to the G-protein–coupled receptor (GPR) 84 in human tissue. Both treatments reduced reflux-induced macroscopic and microscopic lesions of the esophagi as well as known proinflammatory cytokines. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses identified CINC1–3, MIP-1/3α, MIG, RANTES and interleukin (IL)-1β as prominent mediators in GERD. Most regulated cyto-/chemokines are linked to the TREM-1 signaling pathway. The fatty acid receptor GPR84 was upregulated in esophagitis but significantly decreased in treated groups, a finding supported by Western blot and immunohistochemistry in both rat tissue and HET-1A cells. GPR84 was also found to be significantly upregulated in patients with grade B reflux esophagitis. The expression of GPR84 in esophageal tissue and its potential involvement in GERD are reported for the first time. IL-8 (CINC1–3) and the TREM-1 signaling pathway are proposed, besides GPR84, to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GERD.org PMID:26650186

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  10. [Reflux nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Sabra, R

    1990-08-01

    A corticopapillary scar is a frequent finding on urography in patients with vesicoureteral reflux. It is considered a typical sign of so-called reflux nepropathy. It develops most frequently in children aged 5-7 years and has a negative impact on the growth of the kidney. In its development three factors participate: ureterovesical reflux, intrarenal reflux associated with so-called refluxing papillas and urinary infection. The inflammatory cicatrical process may affect the whole kidney--small shrivelled kidney--or only a portion of the kidney. The development of scars is explained by the so-called bing-bang theory according to which all refluxing papillae are affected at the same time by the first urinary infection. This position develops in particular in case of inadequate treatment of acute pyelonephritis, Deformity of normal papillae caused by various factors explains, however, the development of renal scars in children aged 8-12 years or even in adults. The growing kidney tolerates poorly not only urinary infections and scar formation but also hydrodynamic disorders associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore it is important to diagnose and treat vesicoureteral reflux already at an early age. For the time being it is important o consider asymptomatic bacteriuria and any urinary infection in children a clinical marker calling for examination for the possible presence of vesicoureteral reflux.

  11. Acid and non-acid reflux during physiotherapy in young children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Doumit, Michael; Krishnan, Usha; Jaffé, Adam; Belessis, Yvonne

    2012-02-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GOR) may contribute to lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of chest physiotherapy (CPT) in the head-down position on GOR. Furthermore, there is currently no evidence on the impact of physiotherapy on GOR as assessed by pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII). (1) To characterize GOR in young children with CF. (2) To determine whether the head-down position during physiotherapy exacerbates GOR. Children were studied using pH-MII monitoring over 24-hr, during which they received two 20-min sessions of CPT. One session was performed in "modified" drainage positions with no head-down tilt and the alternate session in "gravity-assisted" drainage positions, which included 20° head-down tilt. Twenty children with CF (8 males), median age 12 months (range 8-34) were recruited. A total of 1,374 reflux episodes were detected in all children, of which 869 (63%) were acid and 505 (37%) were non-acid. Seventy-two percent of the episodes migrated proximally. During CPT, there was no significant difference between total number of reflux episodes in the modified or gravity-assisted positions, median [inter-quartile range (IQR)] 1 (0-2.5) compared to 1 (0.75-3) episode, respectively, P = 0.63. There was also no significant difference between the number of reflux episodes which migrated proximally, median (IQR) 1 (0-2) compared to 0 (0-2) episodes, respectively, P = 0.75. In young children with CF, GOR is primarily acidic and proximal migration is common. Physiotherapy in the head-down position does not appear to exacerbate GOR. The impact of GOR on lung disease remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  13. 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring on therapy to select patients with refractory reflux symptoms for antireflux surgery. A single center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Desjardin, M; Luc, G; Collet, D; Zerbib, F

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux refractory symptoms is challenging. This monocenter retrospective study assessed the value of preoperative pH-impedance monitoring 'on' therapy to predict functional outcome after laparoscopic fundoplication in patients with refractory reflux symptoms. Patients with a preoperative pH-impedance monitoring 'on' proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) twice daily were assessed at least 6 months after a laparoscopic fundoplication for refractory reflux symptoms. Failure of fundoplication was defined by a Visick score > 2. Postoperative symptoms were assessed by the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ). The pH-impedance parameters analyzed were the number of reflux events (total, acid, non-acid), esophageal acid exposure time, esophageal bolus exposure time, and symptom-reflux association defined by symptom index (SI) >50% and symptom association probability (SAP) >95%. Thirty-three patients (18 female patients, median age 46 years) were assessed after a mean follow-up of 41.3 (range 7-102.2) months. Seven (21.2%) patients were considered as failures. Compared to patients with favorable outcome, these patients were more often 'on' PPI therapy (86% vs 23%, p < 0.05) and had higher RDQ scores in each domain: heartburn (p < 0.05), regurgitation (p < 0.05) and dyspepsia (p < 0.05). A positive SAP was the only pH-impedance parameter statistically associated with successful postoperative outcome (p = 0.004). On therapy, a preoperative positive symptom association probability is the only pH-impedance parameter associated with favorable outcome after laparoscopic fundoplication for refractory reflux symptoms. These results should be confirmed by prospective studies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Reflux nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or other nervous system (neurological) conditions Reflux nephropathy can also occur from swelling of the ureters after a kidney transplant or from injury to the ureter. Risk factors ...

  15. Is there any mediterranean diet not affecting bilitec assessment of bile reflux?

    PubMed

    Zacharioudakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel; Athanasakis, Elias; Tsiaoussis, John; Karmoiris, Konstandinos; Xynos, Evaghelos

    2004-01-01

    Colored food substances may interfere with Bilitec system that uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux, causing false positive results. Therefore, diets have been suggested for consumption during Bilitec studies that contain minimal amounts of pigments. To enrich the list of suitable foods for Bilitec measurements with dishes common in Mediterranean diets, and improve subject's compliance. Ninety substances were in vivo tested for 'bilirubin absorbance'. 'Dry' substances were blended after being diluted in water, while 'floppy' substances and cooked foods were blended undiluted. Blended mixtures and 'liquids' were tested for bilirubin without further dilution and after being mixed with hydrochloric acid. The procedure was repeated to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Measurements are highly reproducible. Thirty five foods exhibited 'bilirubin absorbance' values safely below the threshold, and are considered to be suitable for Bilitec studies. On the contrary some vegetables and fruits, legumes, tomato sauce preparations, red wine, coffee, tea and jams showed high absorbance values, and are not recommended. Menus containing part of the variety of Mediterranean food preparations are safely recommended for consumption during Bilitec studies, enriching food lists available at present. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  17. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. PMID:27499583

  18. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and the majority of reflux episodes remains asymptomatic. This review aims to address the question how reflux causes symptoms, focussing on factors leading to enhanced reflux perception. We will highlight esophageal sensitivity variance between subtypes of GERD, which is influenced by peripheral sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons, impaired mucosal barrier function and genetic factors. We will also discuss the contribution of specific refluxate characteristics to reflux perception, including acidity, and the role of bile, pepsin and gas and proximal extent. Further understanding of reflux perception might improve GERD treatment, especially in current partial responders to therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Randomised clinical trial: sodium alginate oral suspension is non-inferior to omeprazole in the treatment of patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, C-T; Hsu, C-M; Wang, C-C; Chang, J-J; Sung, C-M; Lin, C-J; Chen, L-W; Su, M-Y; Chen, T-H

    2013-11-01

    The burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in the Asia area and the majority of GERD patients have non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium alginate suspension compared to omeprazole in adult subjects with NERD. In this 4-week, double-blind, parallel study, 195 NERD subjects were randomised to one of two treatment groups: sodium alginate suspension 20 mL three times a day and omeprazole 20 mg once daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving adequate heartburn or regurgitation relief at day 28 assessed by patient diary. The secondary efficacy endpoints included percentage of patients achieving adequate heartburn or regurgitation relief, change from baseline of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire total score at day 14 and 28 from baseline, and patients' overall satisfaction. In this study, 183 subjects were included in the intent-to-treat population, and 172 subjects were included in the per-protocol population. Non-inferiority of sodium alginate to omeprazole was demonstrated in the intent-to-treat population [difference, 2.7% (53.3% vs. 50.5%, P = 0.175), 95% lower confidence interval -11.9%, above the preset margin of -19%]. All of the secondary efficacy endpoints were comparable between two groups. The incidence of adverse event was relatively low and there was no difference between the two groups (5.4% vs. 5.5% for sodium alginate vs. omeprazole). No severe adverse event was noted in this study. The study showed that sodium alginate was as effective as omeprazole for symptomatic relief in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01338077). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Inconsistency in the Diagnosis of Functional Heartburn: Usefulness of Prolonged Wireless pH Monitoring in Patients With Proton Pump Inhibitor Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Penagini, Roberto; Sweis, Rami; Mauro, Aurelio; Domingues, Gerson; Vales, Andres; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    The diagnosis of functional heartburn is important for management, however it stands on fragile pH monitoring variables, ie, acid exposure time varies from day to day and symptoms are often few or absent. Aim of this study was to investigate consistency of the diagnosis of functional heartburn in subsequent days using prolonged wireless pH monitoring and its impact on patients' outcome. Fifty proton pump inhibitotor refractory patients (11 male, 48 years [range, 38-57 years]) with a diagnosis of functional heartburn according to Rome III in the first 24 hours of wireless pH monitoring were reviewed. pH variables were analysed in the following 24-hour periods to determine if tracings were indicative of diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (either acid exposure time > 5% or normal acid exposure time and symptom index ≥ 50%). Outcome was assessed by review of hospital files and/or telephone interview. Fifteen out of 50 patients had a pathological acid exposure time after the first day of monitoring (10 in the second day and 5 in subsequent days), which changed their diagnosis from functional heartburn to non-erosive reflux disease. Fifty-four percent of non-erosive reflux disease vs 11% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.003) increased the dose of proton pump inhibitors or underwent fundoplication after the pH test. Outcome was positive in 77% of non-erosive reflux disease vs 43% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.05). One-third of patients classified as functional heartburn at 24-hour pH-monitoring can be re-classified as non-erosive reflux disease after a more prolonged pH recording period. This observation has a positive impact on patients' management.

  2. Inconsistency in the Diagnosis of Functional Heartburn: Usefulness of Prolonged Wireless pH Monitoring in Patients With Proton Pump Inhibitor Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penagini, Roberto; Sweis, Rami; Mauro, Aurelio; Domingues, Gerson; Vales, Andres; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis of functional heartburn is important for management, however it stands on fragile pH monitoring variables, ie, acid exposure time varies from day to day and symptoms are often few or absent. Aim of this study was to investigate consistency of the diagnosis of functional heartburn in subsequent days using prolonged wireless pH monitoring and its impact on patients’ outcome. Methods Fifty proton pump inhibitotor refractory patients (11 male, 48 years [range, 38–57 years]) with a diagnosis of functional heart-burn according to Rome III in the first 24 hours of wireless pH monitoring were reviewed. pH variables were analysed in the following 24-hour periods to determine if tracings were indicative of diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (either acid exposure time > 5% or normal acid exposure time and symptom index ≥ 50%). Outcome was assessed by review of hospital files and/or telephone interview. Results Fifteen out of 50 patients had a pathological acid exposure time after the first day of monitoring (10 in the second day and 5 in subsequent days), which changed their diagnosis from functional heartburn to non-erosive reflux disease. Fifty-four percent of non-erosive reflux disease vs 11% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.003) increased the dose of proton pump inhibitors or underwent fundoplication after the pH test. Outcome was positive in 77% of non-erosive reflux disease vs 43% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.05). Conclusions One-third of patients classified as functional heartburn at 24-hour pH-monitoring can be re-classified as non-erosive reflux disease after a more prolonged pH recording period. This observation has a positive impact on patients’ management. PMID:25843078

  3. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms.Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen.The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them.Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes.

  4. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms. Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen. The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them. Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  5. Hypersensitivity to acid is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with and without esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Smout, André J P M; Verseijden, Caroline; van Veen, Henk A; Verheij, Joanne; de Jonge, Wouter J; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2014-08-01

    Increased esophageal sensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity have both been described in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, but the relationship between hypersensitivity and mucosal integrity is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate acid sensitivity in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease and control subjects to determine the relation with functional esophageal mucosal integrity changes as well as to investigate cellular mechanisms of impaired mucosal integrity in these patients. In this prospective experimental study, 12 patients with nonerosive reflux disease, 12 patients with esophagitis grade A or B, and 11 healthy control subjects underwent an acid perfusion test and upper endoscopy. Mucosal integrity was measured during endoscopy by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and biopsy specimens were analyzed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial electrical resistance, transepithelial permeability and gene expression of tight junction proteins and filaggrin. Patients with nonerosive reflux disease and esophagitis were more sensitive to acid perfusion compared with control subjects, having a shorter time to perception of heartburn and higher perceived intensity of heartburn. In reflux patients, enhanced acid sensitivity was associated with impairment of in vivo and vitro esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity was significantly impaired in patients with esophagitis, displaying higher transepithelial permeability and lower extracellular impedance. Although no significant differences in the expression of tight junction proteins were found in biopsies among patient groups, mucosal integrity parameters in reflux patients correlated negatively with the expression of filaggrin. In conclusion, sensitivity to acid is enhanced in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, irrespective of the presence of erosions, and is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity of the esophagus

  6. Reflux and Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Eating Reflux and Lung Disease Reflux and Lung Disease Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find a Doctor Many people with chronic lung disease also suffer from gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). In this ...

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the bladder wall, which can cause vesicoureteral reflux. Vesicoureteral reflux is a condition that allows urine to go ... and kidneys causing repeated urinary tract infections. The reflux of urine exposes the ureters and kidney to ...

  8. Physicochemical basis for dilated intercellular spaces in non-erosive acid-damaged rabbit esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tobey, N A; Gambling, T M; Vanegas, X C; Carson, J L; Orlando, R C

    2008-01-01

    Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) within esophageal epithelium (EE) is a histopathologic feature of non-erosive reflux disease and early lesion in acid-damaged rabbit EE associated with increased paracellular permeability. Its cause remains unknown, but the lesion's morphology suggests a significant fluid shift into the intercellular spaces (ICS). Since water follows osmotic forces and consequently ion movements, we explored the role of active (ion) transport and ion gradients in its pathogenesis. This was done by quantifying the effect of inhibited active transport and altered ion gradients on electrical resistance (R(T)) and ICS diameter in acid-exposed Ussing-chambered rabbit EE. Compared with normal Ringer, pH 7.5, 30 minutes of luminal HCl (100 mmol/L), pH 1.1, increased permeability (R(T): +5 +/- 4% vs-52 +/- 4%) and ICS diameter (0.25 +/- 0.01 microm vs 0.42 +/- 0.02 microm), but had no effect on cell morphology or diameter. Ouabain pretreatment significantly reduced active transport but had no effect on the acid-induced changes. However, negating the chloride gradient created by luminal HCl either by adding choline chloride, 100 mmol/L, serosally or by replacing luminal HCl, pH 1.1, with luminal H(2)SO(4), pH 1.1, prevented the development of DIS while maintaining the increase in permeability. DIS was also prevented in the presence of a 100 mmol/L (choline) chloride gradient by luminal exposure at neutral pH. DIS in HCl-damaged EE is caused by an H(+)-induced increase in epithelial permeability; this enables Cl(-) to diffuse along its gradient into the ICS, creating an osmotic force for water movement into and (hydrostatic) dilation of the ICS.

  9. Impairment of chemical clearance is relevant to the pathogenesis of refractory reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Bertani, Helga; Manta, Raffaele; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Conigliaro, Rita; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2014-07-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux oesophagitis has been scarcely studied. To assess impedance-pH parameters relevant to the pathogenesis of refractory reflux oesophagitis. Cases referred for heartburn/regurgitation refractory to high-dosage proton pump inhibitors between January 2008 and December 2012 were reviewed and subdivided into refractory oesophagitis (29 patients, 72% males, median age 50 years), healed oesophagitis (18 patients, 67% males, median age 54 years), and non-erosive reflux disease (49 patients, 53% males, median age 42 years). On-therapy impedance-pH tracings were blindly re-analysed by one observer to assess gastric and oesophageal acid exposure time and chemical clearance as expressed by the post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave index. The median gastric and oesophageal acid exposure time did not differ among the three groups (35%, 34%, 41% and 1.2%, 0.7%, 0.8%, respectively; P>0.05 for all comparisons). A normal oesophageal acid exposure time was found in two thirds of patients with refractory oesophagitis. The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave index was significantly lower in refractory oesophagitis (16%) than in healed oesophagitis (30%) and non-erosive reflux disease (29%) (P=0.003). Refractory reflux oesophagitis is characterized by impairment of chemical clearance. Adequate acid suppression is found in the majority of patients who would likely not benefit from further proton pump inhibitor dose escalation. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Slater, Bethany J; Rothenberg, Steven S

    2017-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common condition and affects approximately 7-20% of the pediatric population. Symptoms from pathological GERD include regurgitation, irritability when feeding, respiratory problems, and substernal pain. Treatment typically starts with dietary modifications and postural changes. Antireflux medications may then be added. Indications for operative management in the pediatric population include failure of medical therapy with poor weight gain or failure to thrive, continued respiratory symptoms, and complications such as esophagitis. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has become the standard of care for surgical treatment of children with GERD. The key technical aspects of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication include creation of an adequate intra-abdominal esophagus, minimal dissection of the hiatus with exposure of the right crus to identify the gastroesophageal junction, crural repair, and creation of floppy, 360° wrap that is oriented at the 11 o׳clock position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  12. Esophageal Body Motility for Clinical Assessment in Patients with Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Little data exists about esophageal body dysmotility and reflux patterns in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD) patients off therapy. We aimed to evaluate effects of esophageal body dysmotility on reflux parameters in RGERD patients by combining impedance-pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry (HRM). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data and HRM metrics in patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Impedance-pH monitoring and manometric data were compared between 2 groups: ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and normal motility. Results Forty-eight patients (30 males, mean age 54.5 years) were included (16 erosive esophagitis, 24 non-erosive reflux disease, and 8 functional heartburn), amongst which 24 subjects showed IEM, and others had normal motility. Number of patients who had a large break in the IEM group was significantly higher than that of normal motility patients. IEM group had more patients with weakly acid reflux and long term acid reflux than the normal group (P = 0.008, P = 0.004, respectively). There was no statistical difference in baseine impedance levels from z4 to z6 between the 2 groups (2911 ± 1160 Ω vs 3604 ± 1232 Ω, 2766 ± 1254 Ω vs 3752 ± 1439 Ω, 2349 ± 1131 Ω vs 3038 ± 1254 Ω, all P > 0.05). Acid exposure time, numbers of long term acid reflux and weakly acid reflux showed strong negative correlation with esophageal body motility and/or lower esophageal sphincter function. Conclusions IEM was associated more with acid exposure, abnormal weakly acid reflux, and long term acid reflux in RGERD patients. These data suggested the role of esophageal body dysmotility in the pathophysiological mechanisms of RGERD patients. PMID:27599539

  13. The association of insomnia with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Hiroyoshi; Sumida, Yoshio; Tanaka, Saiyu; Imajo, Kento; Yoneda, Masato; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Ono, Masafumi; Fujii, Hideki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Kanemasa, Kazuyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    It is suggested that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), can be associated with insomnia and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The relationship between GERD and insomnia in subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD was investigated. This study enrolled 123 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Insomnia was assessed by the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), a self-assessment psychometric instrument designed to quantify sleep difficulty based on ICD-10 criteria; AIS scores ≥ 6 were considered positive for insomnia. GERD symptoms were evaluated using a frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG); FSSG scores ≥ 8 were considered positive. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of insomnia with GERD, after adjusting for potential confounders. Thirteen patients with GERD were treated with the proton pump inhibitor rabeprazole (RPZ; 10 mg/day), for 12 weeks. Of the 123 patients, 76 (62%) were female and 87 (71%) were obese, with 34 (28%) having AIS scores ≥ 6 and 31 (25%) having FSSG scores ≥ 8. Liver biopsy revealed that 40 patients (33%) had NAFL and 83 (67%) had NASH. FSSG and AIS scores were similar in the two groups. HOMA-IR, FSSG scores and γGT (GGT) concentrations were significantly higher in insomniacs than in non-insomniacs. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that FSSG score and GGT concentration were independently associated with insomnia. RPZ treatment resulted in significantly reductions in both AIS and FSSG scores. Nearly 30% of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD had insomnia, which was related to GGT and GERD and could be relieved by RPZ treatment.

  14. Reflux revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, I.; Moore, C.H.; Aharon, P.

    1988-01-01

    The samples and data for this project are derived from 22 test holes drilled to a maximum depth of 91 m, and from rock exposures representing the carbonate section through the Miocene. Dolomite on St. Croix exists in a highly localized region of outcrops and subsurface occurrences in a Miocene-Pliocene reef tract and its related facies. Bioclasts in the dolomitic strata commonly show surprisingly good preservation of microstructure, particularly in large benthic forams and coralline algal clasts. The dolomite is stoichiometrically calcium-rich and exists as euhedral rhombs ranging from 2 to 30 ..mu..m in diameter. The surficial dolomitization occurs in reef, lagoonal, and platform facies that rim the predevelopment shoreline of a coastal lagoon. In the subsurface, dolomitized rock follows the lithifield undersurface of the same lagoon. This spatial distribution of dolomitization suggests a causal relationship between the lagoon hydrology and the process of the dolomitization. The preliminary Sr/sup 87//Sr/sup 86/ isotopic composition of the dolomite is 0.70888, which corresponds to Miocene-Pliocene seawater values, and suggests a Miocene-Pliocene age for the dolomitization event. Stable isotopic values average +2.3 o/oo for delta/sup 13/C and +4.1 o/oo for delta/sup 18/O, both relative to the PDB standard. These data imply that dolomitization took place by reflux of Pliocene fluids enriched in /sup 18/O. The dolomitization was confined to a fault-bounded region, and affected reef, lagoonal, and platform carbonates.

  15. Esophageal motility in nonacid reflux compared with acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Victor S; Feldman, Natan; Maurer, Rie; Burakoff, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Esophageal motility has been well studied in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and acid reflux, but not in nonacid reflux. Consecutive patients who had both 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) and esophageal motility tests for suspected GERD were studied. Patients were grouped into nonacid refluxers, acid refluxers, and nonrefluxers based on positive symptom correlation and objective findings of acid reflux. Of 96 patients enrolled, 21 patients (22%) were nonacid refluxers, 44 patients (46%) were acid refluxers, and 31 patients (32%) had no objective evidence of reflux. Normal motility was recorded in 86% of nonacid refluxers, 71% of acid refluxers, and 60% of nonrefluxers. Ineffective esophageal motility was seen in 24% of acid refluxers, and 5% of nonacid refluxers (P = 0.11). Symptomatic nonacid reflux events comprised 22% of patients studied for GERD symptoms by MII-pH. Esophageal motility in nonacid reflux is normal 86% of the time.

  16. Adam, Eve and the reflux enigma: age and sex differences across the gastro-oesophageal reflux spectrum.

    PubMed

    Royston, Christine; Bardhan, Karna D

    2017-06-01

    We present demographic differences across the gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) spectrum in a UK District General Hospital. Data were prospectively collected over 37 years. At endoscopy patients were categorized as: erosive oesophagitis (EO), Barrett's oesophagus (BO) or nonerosive reflux disease (NER). Analysis 1: comparison of EO, BO and NER 1977-2001 when the database for GORD without BO closed. Analysis 2: demographic differences in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in total BO population diagnosed 1977-2011. GORD 1977-2001 (n=11 944): sex, male predominance in EO and BO but not NER; male : female ratios, 1.81, 1.65, 0.87, respectively (P<0.0001); mean age at presentation, EO 54 years, BO 62 years, NER 50 years; women were older than men by 10, 7 and 6 years, respectively.BO 1977-2011: prevalent OAC, 87/1468 (6%); male : female ratio, 4.1 (P<0.0001); incident OAC, 54/1381 (3.9%); male : female ratio, 3.5 (P<0.0001). Among all BO, more men developed OAC (3 vs. 0.9%). Within each sex, proportion of OAC higher among men (4.9 vs. 2.3%); at OAC diagnosis women were slightly but not significantly older (69.9 vs. 72.3 years, P=0.322). Two views may explain our findings. First, women have either milder reflux, or reduced mucosal sensitivity hence reflux remains silent for longer. Alternatively, women genuinely develop reflux later, that is, are more protected and for longer from developing GORD and its complications. Early evidence is emerging that female sex hormones may indeed have a protective role in GORD during the reproductive period. We suggest reflux and its consequences may be an example of 'protection' conferred on Eve.

  17. Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: an update focusing on refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Talley, Nicholas; Goh, Khean Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Katelaris, Peter; Holtmann, Gerald; Pandolfino, John E; Sharma, Prateek; Ang, Tiing Leong; Hongo, Michio; Wu, Justin; Chen, Minhu; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Law, Ngai Moh; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek Yu; Sollano, Jose; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Bhatia, Shobna

    2016-09-01

    Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific consensus on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 2008, there has been further scientific advancement in this field. This updated consensus focuses on proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus. A steering committee identified three areas to address: (1) burden of disease and diagnosis of reflux disease; (2) proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; (3) Barrett's oesophagus. Three working groups formulated draft statements with supporting evidence. Discussions were done via email before a final face-to-face discussion. We used a Delphi consensus process, with a 70% agreement threshold, using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria to categorise the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. A total of 32 statements were proposed and 31 were accepted by consensus. A rise in the prevalence rates of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asia was noted, with the majority being non-erosive reflux disease. Overweight and obesity contributed to the rise. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease was recognised to be common. A distinction was made between refractory symptoms and refractory reflux disease, with clarification of the roles of endoscopy and functional testing summarised in two algorithms. The definition of Barrett's oesophagus was revised such that a minimum length of 1 cm was required and the presence of intestinal metaplasia no longer necessary. We recommended the use of standardised endoscopic reporting and advocated endoscopic therapy for confirmed dysplasia and early cancer. These guidelines standardise the management of patients with refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus in the Asia-Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can also damage the lining of the esophagus. ... following tests: A test that measures how often stomach acid enters the tube that leads from the mouth ...

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) KidsHealth > For Teens > Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) ... foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like spaghetti sauce, chili, and pizza ...

  20. Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD. Methods Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)]. Results Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and −2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD. Conclusions Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD. PMID:22994974

  1. GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux) and LPR (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux)

    MedlinePlus

    ... persist. What role does an ear, nose, and throat specialist have in treating GERD and LPR? A ... for GERD. But there are ear, nose, and throat problems that are caused by reflux reaching beyond ...

  2. The role of dexlansoprazole modified-release in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Fass, Ronnie; Frazier, Rosita

    2017-01-01

    Dexlansoprazole modified-release (MR) is the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole and is currently the only proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) with a novel dual delayed release (DDR) formulation. Overall, dexlansoprazole MR demonstrates a similar safety and side-effect profile as lansoprazole. Dexlansoprazole MR has been shown to be highly efficacious in healing erosive esophagitis, maintaining healed esophageal mucosa in patients with erosive esophagitis and controlling symptoms of patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). Recent studies have also demonstrated that dexlansoprazole MR is highly effective in improving nocturnal heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) related sleep disturbances and bothersome regurgitation. Dexlansoprazole MR is well tolerated and can be taken without regard to food. PMID:28203282

  3. [Reflux nephropathy in absence of obvious vesicoureteral reflux].

    PubMed

    Vino, L; Pedrolli, A; Portuese, A; Dal Cerè, M; Pizzini, C; Sinaguglia, G; Fanos, V

    2000-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with vesicoureteric reflux presents DMSA scan alterations, parenchimal renal scars are found also in children without vesicoureteric reflux. Two clinical cases of reflux nephropathy without evidence of reflux are presented. Several explanations could be advocated to justify this picture, including haematogenous source of infection, inadequate timing and/or procedure of cystouretrography, intermittency of reflux, ascending bacteria, previous presence of reflux, and appearance of controlateral reflux during the natural history of a monolateral documented reflux. Tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategy should discussed for each patient.

  4. Reflux and GERD in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Reflux & GERD in Infants Symptoms & Diagnosis ... Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  5. Reflux and GERD (in Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Reflux & GERD in Infants GERD in ... Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  6. Effects of carob-bean gum thickened formulas on infants' reflux and tolerance indices.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Miglena; Manios, Yannis; Rasheva, Niya; Pancheva, Ruzha; Dimitrova, Elena; Schaafsma, Anne

    2016-02-08

    To examine the effect of carob-bean gum (CBG) thickened-formulas on reflux and tolerance indices in infants with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). Fifty-six eligible infants (1-6 mo old) were randomly allocated to receive for two weeks a formula with either 0.33 g/100 mL (Formula A) or 0.45 g/100 mL (Formula B) of cold soluble CBG galactomannans respectively, or a formula with 0.45 g/100 mL of hot soluble CBG galactomannans (Formula C). No control group receiving standard formula was included in the study. Data on the following indices were obtained both at baseline and follow-up from all study participants: 24 h esophageal pH monitoring indices, anthropometrical indices (i.e., body weight and length) and tolerance indices (i.e., frequency of colics; type and frequency of defecations). From the eligible infants, forty seven were included in an intention-to-treat analysis to examine the effects of the two-week trial on esophageal 24 h pH monitoring, growth and tolerance indices. Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to examine the research hypothesis. Regarding changes in 24 h pH monitoring indices, significant decreases from baseline to follow-up were observed in the "Boix Ochoa Score" (i.e., an index of esophageal acid exposure), in the total number of visible refluxes and in all symptoms related indices due to acid reflux only for infants provided with Formula A, while no significant changes were observed for infants provided with Formulas B and C. In addition, the significant decreases observed in two symptoms related pH monitoring indices (i.e., "Symptom index for reflux" and "Percentage of all reflux") for infants provided with Formula A were also found to differentiate significantly compared to the changes observed in the other two groups (P = 0.048 and P = 0.014 respectively). Concerning changes in anthropometric indices, body weight significantly increased among infants provided with Formulas A and C, but not for infants provided with Formula B. As far as

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed Central

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy.

  9. Diagnostic value of dilated intercellular space and histopathologic scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, R; Zhang, H; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Xue, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, X; Lin, L; Lin, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the diagnostic value of histopathologic score and the dilated intercellular space (DIS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and functional heartburn (FH). Participants with GERD symptoms including reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), Barrett's esophagus (BE), functional heartburn (FH), along with a control group with atypical GERD-like symptom (Sym-C), and asymptomatic healthy volunteers (H-C) were administered GERD questionnaire, and subjected to endoscopy and biopsies, as well as 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring. Biopsies were evaluated using standards from the 2011 Esohisto Project after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. DIS was measured quantitatively under light microscopy. Among the total of 565 participants with qualified biopsy specimens, the mean DIS of the reflux esophagitis (RE) group was significantly wider compared with the other five groups. DIS in patients with GERD-like symptoms was significantly wider compared with the H-C. No significant differences were observed between NERD and FH. Results from 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring indicated that only the DIS of patients with acid reflux or the amount of acid reflux episodes in patients with DIS was significantly wider compared with patients with nonacid reflux or patients without DIS (P < 0.001). With DIS = 0.9 μm as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.6% and 54.1%, respectively. Using the total histopathologic score > 3 as the diagnostic criterion, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.7% and 47.4%. DIS is closely associated with GERD and acid reflux. The diagnostic value of histological scores in lower esophagus in GERD is very similar to that of the quantitative measurement of DIS.

  10. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflux disease. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, ... surgery - children - discharge Anti-reflux surgery - discharge ...

  11. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P < 0.001). Central obesity, female, and younger age were also risk factors for frequent belching during EGD. Subgroup analyses were performed in subjects without erosive reflux disease (n = 378) and NERD (n = 293). NERD was also a predictive factor for frequent belching during EGD (odds ratio = 6.61, P < 0.001), and the frequency of belching was significantly correlated with GERD severity according to the Los Angeles classification (P < 0.05). Frequent belching during EGD was associated with GERD, including NERD. Future research should focus on its adjuvant role in the diagnosis of GERD/NERD and the necessity for applying differentiated endoscopy strategies for GERD patients, leading to less discomfort during EGD in patients at risk for intolerability.

  12. Is reflux cough due to gastroesophageal reflux disease or laryngopharyngeal reflux?

    PubMed

    Morice, Alyn H

    2008-01-01

    Reflux is a common cause of chronic cough. Surveys of patients with chronic cough point to a high association with gastroesophageal disease. Because of our bipedalism and speech, humans are prone to both reflux and aspiration. Whether the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus alone is sufficient to cause cough or whether reflux into the upper airway is required is unknown. In 50 consecutive patients with chronic cough, symptoms of laryngopharangeal reflux (LPR) paralleled those of gastroesophageal reflux, suggesting no unique syndrome of LPR but that it is part of the protean manifestations of reflux disease.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease involves medical treatment. Anti-acid medications can neutralize acid that refluxes into the esophagus and prevent ... to the eophagus. If these medications do not eliminate symptoms, surgery may be necessary. The primary surgical ...

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop complications from GER. The constant reflux of stomach acid can lead to: breathing problems (if the stomach ... blockers, which can help block the production of stomach acid, or proton pump inhibitors, which reduce the amount ...

  15. Reflux in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... notice reflux. But some children taste food or stomach acid at the back of the mouth. In children, ... pump inhibitors (PPIs), which lower the amount of acid the stomach makes Prokinetics, which help the stomach empty faster ...

  16. Validation and Diagnostic Usefulness of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire in a Primary Care Level in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Gonzáles, Miguel Angel; Azamar-Jacome, Amyra Ali; Meixueiro-Daza, Arturo; de la Medina, Antonio Ramos; Reyes-Huerta J, Job; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Different non-invasive diagnostics strategies have been used to assess patients with gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire (GerdQ) is a 6-item, easy to use questionnaire that was developed primarily as a diagnostic tool for GERD in primary care. Our aim was to validate and assess diagnostic utility of GerdQ questionnaire in Mexican patients in the primary care setting. Methods The study was performed in 3 phases: (1) a questionnaire translation and comprehension study (n = 20), (2) are a reproducibility and validation study (50 patients and 50 controls) and (3) a study to assess the clinical utility in 252 subjects with GERD symptoms. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated using endoscopy and/or pH-metry as the gold standard. Results Internal consistency measured by the Cronbach’s α coefficient was 0.81 for patients and 0.90 for healthy controls, with a mixed coefficient of 0.93. Reproducibility for GerdQ was very good and its discriminating validity was 88%. Most of the patients with erosive reflux and non-erosive reflux with abnormal pH-metry had scores > 8, meanwhile most of the patients with functional heartburn and hypersensitive esophagus had < 8. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of GerdQ com -pared to the gold standard were 72%, 72% and 87%, respectively. Conclusions In Mexico, the GerdQ questionnaire Spanish validated version is useful for GERD diagnosis in the primary care setting. PMID:25273118

  17. Reflux and cough.

    PubMed

    Merati, Albert L

    2010-02-01

    Reflux is a significant contributor to cough in otolaryngology practice; cough is just one marker of its many negative effects on the upper aerodigestive tract. Reflux causes cough both by direct irritation/inflammation and by increasing sensitivities to other noxious agents. Detailed and diligent clinical evaluation, including laryngoscopy, is useful in advancing the working diagnosis of reflux-associated cough. Supplemental testing, including impedance monitoring of esophageal refluxate, can be important to evaluate for both acidic and nonacidic reflux exposure. The mainstay of treatment continues to be dietary and other lifestyle interventions and drug therapy. Although proton-pump inhibitor therapy is effective in most patients, especially those with acid reflux disease, prokinetic therapy is probably very important with those with combined acid and nonacid disease and those with pure nonacid disease. It is likely that failure to improve can be due to behavioral and drug compliance issues. Antireflux surgery can yield long-lasting positive outcomes in carefully selected patients despite the lower efficacy of treatment for primary upper aerodigestive tract symptoms (cough, hoarseness, sore throat) compared with heartburn and regurgitation.

  18. Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Anders; Blomgren, Kerstin; Alfredsson, Lars; Wiholm, Bengt-Erik

    2006-03-01

    To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments. Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews. Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively. Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.

  19. [Use of health resources and loss of productivity in gastroesophageal reflux disease: results of a cross-sectional study in a primary care setting in Spain].

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Javier; Tafalla, Mónica; Zapardiel, Javier; Gisbert, J P

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate healthcare resource use and productivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the influence of disease severity on these two factors. Sub-analysis of the Spanish population of a multinational study with a 4-month retrospective period for the identification and selection of patients, and a clinical visit to obtain clinical information and data on use of healthcare resources, carried out between October 2007 and January 2008. A total of 477 patients attending a Primary Care centre, with a medical consultation for GERD. Use of healthcare resources, changes in productivity based on the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for GERD patients (WPAI-GERD). Despite having received pharmacological treatment at the baseline visit, after a median of 5.1 months follow-up (range 2.1-8.1), up to 15.9% (95% CI; 12.8-19.5) patients still showed clinically relevant GERD symptoms. Direct medical costs per year associated with diagnostic tests and medical consultations in patients with or without clinically relevant GERD symptoms were 666 € (SD: 2,097 €) and 370 € (SD: 2,060 €), respectively. The mean annual cost of reduced productivity (17%) was 5,316 € (SD: 8,615 €). This cost was 4 times higher for patients with clinically relevant GERD symptoms than for patients with no relevant symptoms (15,188 € [SD: 11,206 €] vs 3,926 € [SD: 7,232 €]). Patients with GERD use significant healthcare resources, attributable to associated medical costs and marked reduction in productivity, even though they receive pharmacological treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of carob-bean gum thickened formulas on infants’ reflux and tolerance indices

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Miglena; Manios, Yannis; Rasheva, Niya; Pancheva, Ruzha; Dimitrova, Elena; Schaafsma, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of carob-bean gum (CBG) thickened-formulas on reflux and tolerance indices in infants with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). METHODS: Fifty-six eligible infants (1-6 mo old) were randomly allocated to receive for two weeks a formula with either 0.33 g/100 mL (Formula A) or 0.45 g/100 mL (Formula B) of cold soluble CBG galactomannans respectively, or a formula with 0.45 g/100 mL of hot soluble CBG galactomannans (Formula C). No control group receiving standard formula was included in the study. Data on the following indices were obtained both at baseline and follow-up from all study participants: 24 h esophageal pH monitoring indices, anthropometrical indices (i.e., body weight and length) and tolerance indices (i.e., frequency of colics; type and frequency of defecations). From the eligible infants, forty seven were included in an intention-to-treat analysis to examine the effects of the two-week trial on esophageal 24 h pH monitoring, growth and tolerance indices. Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to examine the research hypothesis. RESULTS: Regarding changes in 24 h pH monitoring indices, significant decreases from baseline to follow-up were observed in the “Boix Ochoa Score” (i.e., an index of esophageal acid exposure), in the total number of visible refluxes and in all symptoms related indices due to acid reflux only for infants provided with Formula A, while no significant changes were observed for infants provided with Formulas B and C. In addition, the significant decreases observed in two symptoms related pH monitoring indices (i.e., “Symptom index for reflux” and “Percentage of all reflux”) for infants provided with Formula A were also found to differentiate significantly compared to the changes observed in the other two groups (P = 0.048 and P = 0.014 respectively). Concerning changes in anthropometric indices, body weight significantly increased among infants provided with Formulas A and C, but not for infants provided

  1. Typical symptoms rather than extraesophageal symptoms affect the quality of life in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Hoon; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jie, Byung-Soo; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Seok; Jeon, Jin-Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Compared with the general population, the quality of life of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease has been known to be impaired. The aim of this study was to assess and compare how typical esophageal symptoms and extraesophageal symptoms affect quality of life. This study was performed in patients who had visited the Health Promotion Center of St. Paul's Hospital and undergone an endoscopy. Two instruments were used to assess quality of life: a questionnaire on the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and the Korean version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale, Abbreviated Version. For comparison purposes, data from an age-matched healthy control group were obtained. In this study, 262 health check-up subjects were classified with gastroesophageal reflux disease. An additional 447 health check-up subjects, who had shown normal and asymptomatic results from endoscopy, were assigned to the control group. The quality of life in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients was lower than that of the control group (81.7 vs. 87.5, p < 0.05). Compared to the group with asymptomatic erosive reflux disease and the control group, the quality of life was also lower in the group that manifestedboth typical symptoms and extraesophageal symptoms (79.9 vs. 84.5, p < 0.05). Compared with the control group, the quality of life was lower in the group with typical symptoms than in the group with extraesophageal symptoms (79.6 vs. 87.5, p < 0.05). Regardless of whether the esophagitis was erosive or non-erosive, the quality of life was deteriorated to a greater extent in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease patients than in the control group, and the quality of life was even lower among patientswho had typical symptoms than among patients with extraesophageal manifestations.

  2. Food and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Surdea-Blaga, Teodora; Negrutiu, Dana E; Palage, Mariana; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2017-05-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic condition with a high prevalence in western countries. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation episodes and a decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure are the main mechanisms involved. Currently used drugs are efficient on reflux symptoms, but only as long as they are administered, because they do not modify the reflux barrier. Certain nutrients or foods are generally considered to increase the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, therefore physicians recommend changes in diet and some patients avoid bothering foods. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding food and gastroesophageal reflux. For example, fat intake increases the perception of reflux symptoms. Regular coffee and chocolate induce gastroesophageal reflux and increase the lower esophageal exposure to acid. Spicy foods might induce heartburn, but the exact mechanism is not known. Beer and wine induce gastroesophageal reflux, mainly in the first hour after intake. For other foods, like fried food or carbonated beverages data on gastroesophageal reflux is scarce. Similarly, there is few data about the type of diet and gastroesophageal reflux. Mediterranean diet and a very low carbohydrate diet protect against reflux. Regarding diet-related practices, consistent data showed that a "short-meal-to-sleep interval" favors reflux episodes, therefore some authors recommend that dinner should be at least four hours before bedtime. All these recommendations should consider patient's weight, because several meta-analysis showed a positive association between increased body mass index and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Complications of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul H.; Ippoliti, Andrew F.; Simmons, Daniel H.; Maloney, James V.

    1988-01-01

    An edited summary of an Interdepartmental Conference arranged by the Department of Medicine of the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles. The Director of Conferences is William M. Pardridge, MD, Professor of Medicine. Several specialists have recently recognized that gastrointestinal reflux causes complications resulting in significant disease. It causes discomfort, indigestion, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and carcinoma of the esophagus. Pediatricians attribute many early pulmonary problems, and even some sudden deaths in infants, to the reflux of gastric contents. Otolaryngologists now recognize that many cases of nonbacterial, nonspecific pharyngitis and laryngitis are due to the reflux of gastrc acid secretions. Contact granuloma and cancer of the larynx may, in some instances, be secondary to nocturnal reflux. Thoracic surgeons and pulmonologists believe chronic tracheobronchitis and some cases of pulmonary disease are attributable to recurrent bathing of the respiratory epithelium by aspirated gastric contents. An awareness of the many complications of gastrointestinal reflux should lead to a multidisciplined attack on the factors responsible for these diseases. Images PMID:3043898

  4. The Many Faces of Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Alvin

    1991-01-01

    While gastroesophageal reflux frequently presents as heartburn, other symptoms can dominate the clinical picture. This article describes recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux and in diagnosing and treating it. PMID:21229095

  5. Infant Reflux: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    Infant reflux Diagnosis Your doctor will start with a physical exam and questions about your baby's symptoms. If your baby is ... or eggs from your diet if you're breast-feeding, to test if your baby has an allergy. ...

  6. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... much stomach acid is coming back into your esophagus). Upper endoscopy. Almost all people who have this anti-reflux surgery have already had this test. If you have not had this test, ... of the esophagus. Always tell your provider if: You could be ...

  7. Vesicoureteral Reflux in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Robson, William Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Hyndman, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common anatomical predisposition to pyelonephritis. A retrograde voiding cystourethrogram is the preferred study to assess the severity of VUR. Most children with VUR will respond to medical management. The prevention of urinary tract infections is fundamental to the management of children with VUR. PMID:21221285

  8. Changing epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the Asian-Pacific region: an overview.

    PubMed

    Goh, K L

    2004-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease in the West, which now appears to be also increasing in prevalence in the Asian Pacific region. The reasons for this changing epidemiology are two-fold: an increased awareness among doctors and patients, and/or a true increase in the prevalence of the disease. Prevalence rates of reflux esophagitis (RE) of up to 16% and prevalence of GERD symptoms of up to 9% have been reported in the Asian population. However, the frequency of strictures and Barrett's esophagus remain very low. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) appears to be the most common form of GERD among Asian patients accounting for 50-70% of cases with GERD. Among Asian patients differences can also be discerned among different ethnic groups. For example, in Malaysia where a multiracial society exists, RE is significantly more common among Indians compared to Chinese and Malays whereas NERD is more frequently seen in the Indian and Malays compared to the Chinese. The reasons for these differences are not known but may indicate both genetic factors and environmental factors peculiar to the particular racial group. GERD has also been increasing in the region demonstrating a time-lag phenomenon compared to the West. Differing predisposition to GERD among different ethnic groups would mean that such an increase would be more prominent among certain racial groups.

  9. Dilated intercellular spaces and chronic cough as an extra-oesophageal manifestation of gastrooesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Roy C

    2011-06-01

    Chronic cough is one of the extra-oesophageal manifestations of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). It is presumed to occur either directly by microaspiration of acidic gastric contents into the airway or indirectly by a reflex triggered by contact of acidic refluxates with the oesophageal epithelium in GORD. How contact of the oesophageal epithelium with acidic refluxates promotes sensitization for chronic cough is unknown, but like heartburn, which is a necessary accompaniment, it requires acid activation of nociceptors within the oesophageal mucosa. Dilated intercellular spaces within the oesophageal epithelium, a reflection of an increase in paracellular permeability, is a histopathologic feature of both erosive and non-erosive forms of GORD. Since it correlates with the symptom of heartburn, it is hypothesized herein that the increase in paracellular permeability to acid reflected by dilated intercellular spaces in oesophageal epithelium also serves as mediator of the signals that produce the reflex-induced sensitization for cough--a sensitization that can occur centrally within the medullary Nucleus Tractus Solitarius or peripherally within the tracheobronchial tree.

  10. The Effect of Zinc Supplementationon the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghi, Afshin; Hasanzadeh, Jalal; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Yaseri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Currently, it has been demonstrated that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most important disorders of the digestive system and the commixture of regular diet has a significant influence on its incidence, symptoms, and prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of zinc supplementation, in combination with PPIs(Proton pump inhibitors), on the improvement of GERD symptoms. METHODS In a randomized double blind clinical trial, patients with reflux symptoms, who had obtained Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) score more than 8, were included and all the demographic features were recorded. Then, using upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, all the patients were divided into two groups as having non-erosive reflux disorder (NERD),or erosive reflux disorder (ERD). At the next step, based on random block statistical method, we divided the two groups into two subgroups; the drug subgroup [treated with PPIs (40 mg pantoprazole/daily), changing life style, and 220 mgzinc capsules daily] and the placebo subgroup [treated with PPIs, changing life style, and placebo]. After 3 months, we analyzed all data and the RDQ questionnaire was filled out for each patient. This project has been registered in Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT) and all data were analyzed using SPSS software version 2. RESULTS A total of 140 patients (81 women and 59 men) with mean age of 42.78±11.5 years were included with 70 patients in each group. The most frequent presentations were heart burn (45.7%), and acid regurgitation (39.3%). The RDQ scores decreased after intervention in both drug (p<0.001) and placebo groups (p<0.001), which were statistically significant. But the difference of RDQ scores between the drug group and placebo group was not statistically significant (p=0.086). CONCLUSION Zinc supplementation cannot improve the severity of GERD. PMID:27957292

  11. Evaluation of the serum zinc level in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, N; Mehdipour, M; Najafi, Sh; Bahramian, A; Garjani, Sh; Khoeini Poorfar, H

    2014-06-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immunologic-based disease involving skin and mucosa. This disease is generally divided into two categories: erosive and non-erosive. Many etiologic factors are deliberated regarding the disease; however, the disorders of immune system and the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and monocytes are more highlighted. Zinc is an imperative element for the growth of epithelium and its deficiency induces the cytotoxic activity of T-helper2 cells, which seems to be associated with lichen planus. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of serum zinc in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) and to compare it with the healthy control group to find out any feasible inference. A total of 22 patients with erosive oral lichen planus, 22 patients with non erosive OLP and 44 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited in this descriptive-comparative study. All the participants were selected from the referees to the department of oral medicine, school of dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Serum zinc level was examined for all the individuals with liquid-stat kit (Beckman Instruments Inc.; Carlsbad, CA). Data were analyzed by adopting the ANOVA and Tukey tests, using SPSS 16 statistical software. The mean age of patients with erosive and non-erosive LP was 41.7 and 41.3 years, respectively. The mean age of the healthy control group was 34.4 years .The mean serum zinc levels in the erosive and non erosive lichen planus groups and control groups were 8.3 (1.15), 11.15 (0.92) and 15.74 (1.75) μg/dl respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05). The serum zinc levels were decreased in patients with erosive oral lichen planus. This finding may probably indicate the promising role of zinc in development of oral lichen planus.

  12. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Nuevo, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD]) study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. Methods RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK). All subjects (aged ≥18 years) who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit). From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism) and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD). Results Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%); 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week) and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week), with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from €55/week per employed patient in the UK to €273/patient in Sweden). Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. Conclusion GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily

  13. Biomarkers of Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Kia, Leila; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) encompasses an array of disorders unified by the reflux of gastric contents. Because there are many potential disease manifestations, esophageal and extraesophageal, there is no single biomarker of the entire disease spectrum; a set of GERD biomarkers that each quantifies specific aspects of GERD-related pathology might be needed. We review recent reports of biomarkers of GERD, specifically in relation to endoscopically negative esophageal disease and excluding conventional pH-impedance monitoring. We consider histopathologic biomarkers, baseline impedance, and serologic assays to determine that most markers are based on manifestations of impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which is based on increased ionic and molecular permeability, and/or destruction of tight junctions. Impaired mucosal integrity quantified by baseline mucosal impedance, proteolytic fragments of junctional proteins, or histopathologic features has emerged as a promising GERD biomarker.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, M D

    1991-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease, usually manifested by frequent heartburn, occurs in approximately 10% of our adult population. The presence of a hiatal hernia is usually associated with, but does not necessarily cause, LES dysfunction, allowing acid reflux to produce esophageal and aerodigestive symptoms. The mucosa can be extensively damaged and, ultimately, a columnar lining, termed Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition, can develop. Treatment with H2-antagonists has been nirvana to some patients, but has proved only partially helpful to others. Adjunctive agents may increase relief and may help heal erosive esophagitis in some patients, but side effects and cost limit their use. Maintenance therapy with full doses is required, as the relapse rate for this chronic condition is high. Omeprazole temporarily heals almost everyone with otherwise resistant GERD, but it is currently used only on a short-term basis unless surgery, eminently successful in well-selected patients, is contraindicated.

  15. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  16. Comparison of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms and Proton Pump Inhibitor Response Using Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jo, So Young; Lim, Ji Hwan; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims To compare gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) or functional heartburn (FH) using GERD impact scale (GIS) questionnaire. Methods Total 126 patients with GERD symptoms were diagnosed as EE (n = 62), NERD (n = 34) and FH (n = 30) by endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH testing and Bernstein test, prospectively. Analysis of risk factors and GIS questionnaire for GERD symptoms and quality of life were performed before and 8 weeks after PPI treatment. Results EE group had a higher proportion of men, frequent alcohol consumption, smoking, hiatal hernia, body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 and triglyceride levels (≥ 150 mg/dL) than the other groups (all P < 0.05). On the other hand, both psychiatric treatment and psychopharmacotherapy were more frequent in patients with FH than in those with EE and NERD (both P < 0.05). Among GERD symptoms, chest pain was more frequent in FH group than in EE and NERD groups (P < 0.05). Eating problems and limitation of productive daily activities occurred frequently in FH group and NERD group, respectively. GIS after 8 week PPI treatment showed improvement in all of the GERD symptoms in EE (all P < 0.05) and in acid regurgitation, epigastric pain and hoarseness in NERD group (all P < 0.05). In terms of quality of life, PPI treatment improved sleep disturbance in EE (P = 0.031) and limitation of productive activity in the NERD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions GIS questionnaire showed that different characteristics and symptoms improved after PPI therapy among patients with EE, NERD and FH, demonstrating the usefulness of the GIS questionnaire. PMID:23350049

  17. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  18. [Complex vesicoureteral reflux. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Argüelles Salido, E; García Merino, F; Millán López, A; Fernández Hurtado, M; Borrero Fernández, J

    2005-01-01

    To analize the proportion of complex reflux in the whole amount of patients treated endoscopically of vesicoureteral reflux in our hospital. To determine the endoscopic treatment success in complex reflux, and the influence of reflux grade in it. We present our experience between 1992 and 2003 with three kinds of substances (polytetrafluoroethylene, polydimethylsiloxane and dextranomer-hyaluronic acid copolymer). We treated complex reflux in 74 patients with endoscopic injection. All patients were scheduled to have voiding cystourethrogram 3 and 9 moths after injection. A positive response was defined as grade 0 or I reflux. Reflux was solved using the endoscopic procedure in 86.25% after first injection, 93.75% after second and 96.25% after third. The corresponding results for reflux grade II, III and IV were 88.9%, 83.3% and 100%. We conclude that subureteral injection of different sustances (Teflon, Macroplastique or Deflux) is a useful treatment for most cases of vesicoureteral reflux. We propose it as first step of treatment.

  19. Proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of patients with erosive esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease: current evidence and safety of dexlansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Mermelstein, Alanna Chait; Chait, Maxwell M

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common upper gastroenterology disorder in the US. It is associated with a variety of complications and significantly impacts quality of life. Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective treatment. Dexlansoprazole modified release (MR) is a proton pump inhibitor that employs a novel release formulation that prolongs its absorption and allows for more flexibility in dosing. Dexlansoprazole MR can be dosed without regard to food intake or time of day, and once-daily dosing may replace twice-daily dosing of other agents. Dexlansoprazole MR is effective for healing and maintenance of erosive esophagitis, and for the treatment of nonerosive disease, including nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease. Dexlansoprazole MR is safe and well tolerated, and can improve quality of life.

  20. Analyses of the Post-reflux Swallow-induced Peristaltic Wave Index and Nocturnal Baseline Impedance Parameters Increase the Diagnostic Yield of Impedance-pH Monitoring of Patients With Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Furnari, Manuele; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Bertani, Helga; Marchi, Santino; Conigliaro, Rita; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of impedance parameters such as the post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and the mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) have been proposed to increase the accuracy of diagnosis of reflux disease. We assessed whether these improve the diagnostic yield of impedance pH monitoring of reflux disease. We performed a prospective study of consecutive patients with proton pump inhibitor-responsive heartburn who underwent 24-hour impedance pH monitoring at hospitals in Italy from January 2011 through December 2013. Reviewers blindly analyzed off-therapy impedance pH tracings from 289 patients with proton pump inhibitor-responsive heartburn, 68 with erosive reflux disease and 221 with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), along with 50 healthy individuals (controls). The PSPW index, the MNBI, the esophageal acid exposure time, the number of total refluxes, and the bolus exposure were calculated, as well as the symptom association probability (SAP) and the symptom index (SI). In receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under curve of the PSPW index (0.977; 95% confidence interval, 0.961-0.993) was significantly greater than that of the other impedance pH parameters in identifying patients with reflux disease (P < .001). The PSPW index and the MNBI identified patients with erosive reflux disease with the highest level of sensitivity (100% and 91%, respectively), as well as the 118 pH-positive (99% and 86%) and 103 pH-negative (77% and 56%) cases of NERD. The PSPW index and the MNBI identified pH-negative NERD with the highest level of sensitivity; values were 82% and 52% for the 65 SAP-positive and/or SI-positive cases and 68% and 63% for the 38 SAP-negative and SI-negative cases. Diagnoses of NERD were confirmed by pH-only criteria, including those that were positive on the basis of the SAP or SI, for 165 of 221 cases (75%) and by impedance pH criteria for 216 of 221 cases (98%) (P = .001). The PSPW index and the MNBI increase the

  1. An analysis of 342 patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms using questionnaires, high-resolution manometry, and impedance-pH monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Li, Ping; Ji, Guo-Zhong; Miao, Lin; Fan, Zhining; You, Sihong; Pan, Xueqin; Chen, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Symptoms of refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are commonly encountered in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the data obtained from questionnaires, high-resolution manometry (HRM), and ambulatory impedance-pH monitoring in patients with persisting GERD symptoms and to explore the possible underlying causes for this clinical presentation. After completing the questionnaires, the selected patients underwent endoscopy, HRM, and ambulatory impedance-pH monitoring. Based on the results of these investigations, we divided the patients into 4 groups: reflux esophagitis (RE), hypersensitive esophagus (HE), functional heartburn (FH), and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). The data from 342 patients were analyzed. One hundred twenty-nine (37.72%) patients experienced refractory GERD symptoms related to acid reflux. The scores on some scales in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaire differed significantly among groups (all P < 0.05). Liquid reflux occurred more frequently in patients with GERD (RE and NERD), while gas reflux was more common in non-GERD patients (FH and HE; all P < 0.05). The RE and NERD groups showed more percent bolus exposure time (BET) when upright (all P < 0.05). Acid exposure time (AET) in the RE and NERD groups was longer than that in the HE and FH groups (all P < 0.05). Fewer than half of the patient symptoms were related to acid reflux. The GSRS questionnaire may be an optimal indicator for patients with refractory GERD symptoms. BET and AET are useful indices to distinguish GERD from other diseases. Gas reflux is probably related to persisting symptoms in FH and HE patients. PMID:28151867

  2. An analysis of 342 patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms using questionnaires, high-resolution manometry, and impedance-pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Li, Ping; Ji, Guo-Zhong; Miao, Lin; Fan, Zhining; You, Sihong; Pan, Xueqin; Chen, Xia

    2017-02-01

    Symptoms of refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are commonly encountered in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the data obtained from questionnaires, high-resolution manometry (HRM), and ambulatory impedance-pH monitoring in patients with persisting GERD symptoms and to explore the possible underlying causes for this clinical presentation. After completing the questionnaires, the selected patients underwent endoscopy, HRM, and ambulatory impedance-pH monitoring. Based on the results of these investigations, we divided the patients into 4 groups: reflux esophagitis (RE), hypersensitive esophagus (HE), functional heartburn (FH), and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). The data from 342 patients were analyzed. One hundred twenty-nine (37.72%) patients experienced refractory GERD symptoms related to acid reflux. The scores on some scales in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaire differed significantly among groups (all P < 0.05). Liquid reflux occurred more frequently in patients with GERD (RE and NERD), while gas reflux was more common in non-GERD patients (FH and HE; all P < 0.05). The RE and NERD groups showed more percent bolus exposure time (BET) when upright (all P < 0.05). Acid exposure time (AET) in the RE and NERD groups was longer than that in the HE and FH groups (all P < 0.05). Fewer than half of the patient symptoms were related to acid reflux. The GSRS questionnaire may be an optimal indicator for patients with refractory GERD symptoms. BET and AET are useful indices to distinguish GERD from other diseases. Gas reflux is probably related to persisting symptoms in FH and HE patients.

  3. [Vesicoureteral reflux in adults].

    PubMed

    Rollino, Cristiana; D'Urso, Leonardo; Beltrame, Giulietta; Ferro, Michela; Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Quarello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) may be congenital or acquired. The most frequent form of congenital VUR is primary VUR. Its prevalence in adults is not exactly known, but it is higher in women, whose greater propensity for urinary tract infections increases the likelihood of an instrumental examination leading to the diagnosis of less severe cases. In men, even severe VUR may go undiagnosed for a long time. Primary VUR is due to a defect in the valve mechanism of the ureterovesical junction. In physiological conditions, the terminal ureter enters the bladder wall obliquely and bladder contraction leads to compression of this intravesical portion. Abnormal length of the intravesical portion of the ureter due to a genetic mutation (whose location is yet to be established) leads to VUR. In its less severe forms VUR may be asymptomatic, but in 50-70% of cases it manifests with recurrent cystitis or pyelonephritis. The manifestations leading to a diagnosis of VUR in adults, besides urinary tract infections, are proteinuria, renal failure and hypertension. The gold-standard diagnostic examination is a micturating cystourethrogram. Reflux nephropathy develops as a result of a pathogenetic mechanism unrelated to high cavity pressure or urinary tract infections but due to reduced formation of the normal renal parenchyma (hypoplasia or dysplasia). Abnormal renal parenchyma development is attributable to the same genes that control the development of the ureters and ureterovesical junction. VUR is considered only a marker of this abnormal development, playing no role in scar formation. There is no conclusive evidence regarding the indications for VUR correction. However, the risk that VUR leads to recurrent pyelonephritis and reflux nephropathy must be kept in mind. VUR certainly has to be corrected in women who contemplate pregnancy.

  4. Nebulization reflux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, V. G.; Cofer, W. R., III

    1986-01-01

    A nebulization reflux concentrator for removing trace gas contaminants from a sample gas is described. Sample gas from a gas supply is drawn by a suction source into a vessel. The gas enters the vessel through an atomizing nozzle, thereby atomizing and entraining a scrubbing liquid solvent drawn through a siphon tube from a scrubbing liquid reservoir. The gas and entrained liquid rise through a concentrator and impinge upon a solvent phobic filter, whereby purified gas exits through the filter housing and contaminated liquid coalesces on the solvent phobic filter and falls into the reservoir.

  5. Nebulization Reflux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Collins, V. G.

    1986-01-01

    Nebulization reflux concentrator extracts and concentrates trace quantities of water-soluble gases for subsequent chemical analysis. Hydrophobic membrane and nebulizing nozzles form scrubber for removing trace quantities of soluble gases or other contaminants from atmosphere. Although hydrophobic membrane virtually blocks all transport of droplets, it offers little resistance to gas flow; hence, device permits relatively large volumes of gas scrubbed efficiently with very small volumes of liquid. This means analyzable quantities of contaminants concentrate in extracting solutions in much shorter times than with conventional techniques.

  6. Current Trends in the Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disorder of the upper gastrointestinal tract with global distribution. The incidence is on the increase in different parts of the world. In the last 30 to 40 years, research findings have given rise to a more robust understanding of its pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management. The current definition of GERD (The Montreal definition, 2006) is not only symptom-based and patient-driven, but also encompasses esophageal and extraesophageal manifestations of the disease. The implication is that the disease can be confidently diagnosed based on symptoms alone. Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) remains the predominant form of GERD. Current thinking is that NERD and erosive reflux disease (ERD) are distinct phenotypes of GERD rather than the old concept which regarded them as components of a disease spectrum. Non erosive reflux disease is a very heterogeneous group with significant overlap with other functional gastrointestinal disorders. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD. Esophageal pH monitoring and intraluminal impedance monitoring have thrown some light on the heterogeneity of NERD. A substantial proportion of GERD patients continue to have symptoms despite optimal PPI therapy, and this has necessitated research into the development of new drugs. Several safety concerns have been raised about chronic use of proton pump inhibitors but these are yet to be substantiated in controlled studies. The debate about efficacy of long-term medical treatment compared to surgery continues, however, recent data indicate that modern surgical techniques and long-term PPI therapy have comparable efficacy. These and other issues are subjects of further research. PMID:22844607

  7. Duodenogastric reflux and foregut carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, K; Hattori, T; Miyazaki, I

    1995-03-15

    Epidemiologic cohort studies have established that after distal gastric resection, there is a higher risk of gastric carcinoma. It is likely that a main factor of this higher risk is the excessive duodenogastric reflux induced by surgery, because the incidence of stump carcinomas is higher in Billroth II than in Billroth I, and most of the stump carcinomas are located near the stoma. In addition, several groups of investigators have suggested that duodenogastric reflux per se induces stump carcinomas in rats. There is another human duodenogastric reflux, the primary duodenogastric reflux, through the pylorus. Experiments in animals have demonstrated that this type of duodenal reflux also induces gastric carcinomas in the antrum of the stomach that has not undergone surgery. Recent clinical attention has focused on the role of duodenogastric reflux in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus and subsequent esophageal adenocarcinomas. Experimentally, reflux of duodenal contents into the esophagus can cause not only Barrett's esophagus and subsequent adenocarcinomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas. These findings suggest that duodenogastric reflux may be implicated in gastric and esophageal, that is, foregut carcinogenesis.

  8. Infant Reflux: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Infant reflux Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Infant reflux generally isn't a cause for concern. It's very unusual for the stomach contents ... to irritate the throat or esophagus and to cause signs and symptoms. When to see a doctor ...

  9. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls.

  10. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Larrosa Haro, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Physiological gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and occurs up 2/3 of normal infants; and, it resolves spontaneously around 9-12 months of age. When GER causes symptoms or complications is considered gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and it is associated to growth impairment, anemia, apnea, wheezing or other chronic respiratory symptoms, asthma, recurrent pneumonia or sleeping problems. Diagnosis of GERD implies studies as upper gastrointestinal series, upper endoscopy and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring; special cases may require motility and nuclear medicine studies. GER may be successfully treated with prone elevated position (30-45 degrees), shortening the feeding intervals to 3 h and anti-GER high-viscosity formulas. The regular use of prokinetic drugs is not recommended. The efficacy of proton pump inhibitors and H2 histamine receptor antagonists in the treatment of GERD has been demonstrated in children by diminishing de acid secretion of parietal cells, lowering the gastric contents and decreasing its ability to cause peptic-acid damage to the esophagus or to the respiratory tract. Surgical treatment is indicated in chronic recurrent GERD, usually in children 5 years or older with dependent proton pump inhibitor erosive esophagitis, chronic respiratory disease and in risk-selected cases.

  11. EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Although esophageal hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux often occur together, they can occur separately. Reflux of digestive juice into the...causes symptoms or complications. A standardized measurement of reflux is valuable in many clinical situations. Rational treatment for gastroesophageal reflux can be either medical or surgical. (Author)

  12. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    PubMed

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned.

  13. Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance differentiates gastroesophageal reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Kandulski, Arne; Weigt, Jochen; Caro, Carlos; Jechorek, Doerthe; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal integrity can be assessed in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by measuring intraluminal baseline impedance (BI). However, it is not clear whether BI is abnormal in patients with functional heartburn (FH), or can be used to distinguish them from patients with GERD. We compared differences in BI between patients with FH vs GERD. We performed a prospective study of 52 patients (16 men; mean age, 55 y; range, 23-78 y) seen at a tertiary university hospital from February 2009 through December 2012. Thirty-five patients had GERD (19 had nonerosive reflux disease [NERD], 16 had erosive reflux disease [ERD]) and 17 had FH. All patients discontinued proton pump inhibitor therapy and then underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. BI was assessed at 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, and 17 cm proximal to the lower esophageal sphincter in recumbent patients. Biopsy specimens were taken from 3 cm above the gastroesophageal junction; histology analysis was performed to identify and semiquantitatively score (scale, 0-3) dilated intercellular spaces. Baseline impedance in the distal esophagus was significantly lower in patients with NERD or erosive reflux disease (ERD) than FH (P = .0006). At a cut-off value of less than 2100 Ω, BI measurements identified patients with GERD with 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity, with positive and negative predictive values of 75%. Also in the proximal esophagus, reduced levels of BI levels were found only in patients with ERD. There were negative correlations between level of BI and acid exposure time (r = -0.45; P = .0008), number of acidic reflux episodes (r = -0.45; P = .001), and proximal extent (r = -0.40; P = .004). Biopsy specimens from patients with NERD or ERD had significant increases in dilation of intercellular spaces, compared with those from patients with FH; there was an inverse association between dilated intercellular spaces and BI in the distal esophagus

  14. [The characteristics of esophagogastric junction contractile index in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or functional heartburn].

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Duan, L P; Ge, Y; Xia, Z W; Xu, Z J

    2016-04-01

    To study the role of esophagogastric junction contractile index (EGJ-CI) in evaluating the function of anti-reflux barrier, and in differentiating patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) from those with functional heartburn (FH). A total of 115 patients presenting heartburn were enrolled in the study from January 2012 to June 2015.All subjects had completed Gerd-Q questionnaire and undergone gastroscopy, 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring and esophageal high-resolution manometry. GERD patients were divided into as reflux esophagitis, acid-nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and weakly acid-NERD groups. Patients with normal esophageal mucosa, normal acid exposure and negative proton pump inhibitor test were enrolled in FH group. EGJ-CI (mmHg·cm) as well as EGJ rest pressure and 4s integrated relaxation pressure (IRP 4s) were measured. Among the 115 patients, 18 were reflux esophagitis [(49.0±18.9) years, M∶F=10∶8], 25 were acid-NERD [(48.7±14.4) years, M∶F=13∶12], 37 were weakly acid-NERD [(52.0±14.8) years, M∶F=15∶22] and 35 were FH [(53.6±14.8), M∶F=8∶27]. No differences of Gerd-Q scores were noticed between the four groups. (1)Negative correlations were demonstrated between EGJ-CI and esophageal acid exposure time (r=-0.283, P=0.002), EGJ-CI and acid reflux events (r=-0.233, P=0.012), EGJ-CI and weakly acid reflux events (r=-0.213, P=0.022), EGJ-CI and non-acid reflux events (r=-0.200, P=0.032). (2)The value of EGJ-CI was significantly higher in FH patients than in the three subgroups of GERD(all P<0.01). EGJ rest pressure of FH group was higher than that of acid-NERD (P<0.01). IRP 4s in acid-NERD group was lower than that of FH and weakly acid-NERD (P<0.05). (3)The area under curve (AUC) of EGJ-CI was higher than that of EGJ-CIT, EGJ rest pressure or IRP 4s(0.686 vs 0.678, 0.641 and 0.578). The cut-off value of EGJ-CI to differentiate GERD from FH was 9.74 mmHg·cm with sensitivity 82.86% and specificity 51.52%. The EGJ-CI values are

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raja Affendi Raja; Egan, Laurence J

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease during pregnancy is common. Altered structure and function of the normal physiological barriers to reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus explain the high incidence of this problem in pregnant women. For the majority of patients, life-style modifications are helpful, but are not sufficient to control symptoms and medication is required. The optimum management of reflux in pregnant patients requires special attention and expertise, since the safety of the mother, foetus and neonate remain the primary focus. Gastroenterologists and obstetricians should work together to optimise treatment. Typically, one utilises a step-up program that starts with life-style modifications and antacids. If those methods fail, histamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors are tried. Rarely, promotility agents are used. Initiation of these medications must be undertaken after a careful discussion of risks and benefits with patients. In patients without a prior history of reflux, symptoms usually abate after delivery.

  16. [Subglottic stenosis and gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Fligny, I; François, M; Aigrain, Y; Polonovski, J M; Contencin, P; Narcy, P

    1989-01-01

    The authors report the cases of ten children treated for sub-glottic laryngeal stenosis, in the Department of Pr. Narcy in Hospital Robert-Debre. Medical treatment of the laryngeal stenosis had failed in these cases. Treatment, most often surgical, of the gastro-oesophageal reflux present in these ten cases enabled these children to be cured. A review of the literature stresses the role and responsibility of gastro-oesophageal reflux in laryngeal pathology. Based on their experience, the authors suggest: systematic investigation for gastro-oesophageal reflux during management of laryngeal stenosis, especially when laryngeal inflammation is encountered; the adoption of an interventionist attitude vis-a-vis gastro-oesophageal reflux which would seem to have an important pathogenic role in certain laryngeal stenoses.

  17. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Taner; Bajin, Münir Demir; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Özer, Serdar; Sözen, Tevfik

    2014-01-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs when gastric contents pass the upper esophageal sphincter, causing symptoms such as hoarseness, sore throat, coughing, excess throat mucus, and globus. The pattern of reflux is different in LPR and gastroesophageal reflux. LPR usually occurs during the daytime in the upright position whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease more often occurs in the supine position at night-time or during sleep. Ambulatory 24-h double pH-probe monitoring is the gold standard diagnostic tool for LPR. Acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor on a long-term basis is the mainstay of treatment. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is found in many sites including laryngeal mucosa and interarytenoid region. In this paper, we aim to present the relationship between LPR and H. pylori and review the current literature. PMID:25083069

  18. Weak peristalsis with large breaks is associated with higher acid exposure and delayed reflux clearance in the supine position in GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Mentore; Balestrieri, Paola; Emerenziani, Sara; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility is frequently observed in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients but its clinical relevance remains controversial. In healthy subjects and in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia, it has been demonstrated, by means of high-resolution manometry (HRM), that long breaks of esophageal peristalsis predict delayed bolus clearance. HRM and 24-h multichannel impedance-pH (MI-pH) monitoring were performed in 40 GERD patients with no evidence of hiatal hernia. Total bolus clearing time (BCT) in upright and supine position and acid exposure time (AET) were calculated. Of the 40 patients, 23 showed a pathological AET and 15 erosive reflux disease (ERD). Patients with a pathological number of large breaks were characterized by a significantly lower BCT value in the supine position and higher AET. In all, 10/15 ERD patients (67%) and 5/25 nonerosive reflux disease patients (20%) were characterized by an abnormal number of small or large breaks (P<0.05). ERD patients were characterized by significantly higher AET and BCT in the supine position. GERD patients with a pathological number of large breaks, assessed by HRM, are characterized by a significantly prolonged reflux clearance in the supine position and higher AET. ERD patients display a higher number of esophageal breaks that might explain the development of erosions.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vesicoureteral reflux in the primate IV: does reflux harm the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.A.; Fischman, N.H.; Thomas, R.

    1982-09-01

    It has been said that vesicoureteral reflux causes renal scarring because of intrarenal reflux. We studied reflux in the monkey because of its similarity to man, especially in regard to the incidence of vesicoureteral reflux and chronic pyelonephritis. High pressure moderate grade reflux was produced and renal function followed by means of quantitative renal camera studies using /sup 131/I hippuran. There was no change in renal function from sterile reflux even when intrarenal reflux occurred. When, however, infection was introduced, renal function decreased. We concluded that sterile moderate vesicoureteral or intrarenal reflux does not harm the kidney.

  1. Halimeter ppb Levels as the Predictor of Erosive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Gon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, So Jung; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Min Ho; Park, Dong Kyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2010-09-01

    In a previous issue published in Gut and Liver, we found that erosive changes in the esophagogastroduodenal mucosa were strongly correlated with increased levels of volatile sulfur-containing compounds (VSC), suggesting that halitosis could be a symptom reflecting the erosive status of the upper gut mucosa. Together with other studies showing a possible association between halitosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), under the premise that halitosis could be one of extraesophageal manifestations of erosive GERD (ERD), we investigated the significance of Halimeter ppb levels on ERD compared to non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Subjects were assigned to the NERD group if there was no evidence of esophageal erosive changes on endoscopy, despite reflux symptoms, and to the ERD group if they had GERD A, B, C, or D (according to the Los Angeles classification). The VSC levels were measured in all patients with either a Halimeter (before endoscopy) or by gas chromatography of the gastric juices aspirated during endoscopy. The VSC level differed significantly between the NERD and ERD groups (p<0.0001), suggesting that this can be used to discriminate between NERD and ERD. However, the VSC level did not differ significantly with the severity of GERD. Even though hiatal hernia and a body mass index of >24 kg/m(2) was significantly associated with ERD, there was no correlation with Halimeter ppb levels. Minimal-change lesions exhibited the highest VSC levels, signifying that minimal change lesions can be classified as ERD based on our finding that halimeter ppb levels were descrimitive of erosive change. Erosive changes in the esophageal mucosa were strongly associated with VSC levels, supporting the hypothesis that halitosis can be a potential biomarker for the discrimination between ERD and NERD, reflecting the presence of erosive change in the lower esophagogastric junction.

  2. Halimeter ppb Levels as the Predictor of Erosive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Gon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, So Jung; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Min Ho; Park, Dong Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims In a previous issue published in Gut and Liver, we found that erosive changes in the esophagogastroduodenal mucosa were strongly correlated with increased levels of volatile sulfur-containing compounds (VSC), suggesting that halitosis could be a symptom reflecting the erosive status of the upper gut mucosa. Together with other studies showing a possible association between halitosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), under the premise that halitosis could be one of extraesophageal manifestations of erosive GERD (ERD), we investigated the significance of Halimeter ppb levels on ERD compared to non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Methods Subjects were assigned to the NERD group if there was no evidence of esophageal erosive changes on endoscopy, despite reflux symptoms, and to the ERD group if they had GERD A, B, C, or D (according to the Los Angeles classification). The VSC levels were measured in all patients with either a Halimeter (before endoscopy) or by gas chromatography of the gastric juices aspirated during endoscopy. Results The VSC level differed significantly between the NERD and ERD groups (p<0.0001), suggesting that this can be used to discriminate between NERD and ERD. However, the VSC level did not differ significantly with the severity of GERD. Even though hiatal hernia and a body mass index of >24 kg/m2 was significantly associated with ERD, there was no correlation with Halimeter ppb levels. Minimal-change lesions exhibited the highest VSC levels, signifying that minimal change lesions can be classified as ERD based on our finding that halimeter ppb levels were descrimitive of erosive change. Conclusions Erosive changes in the esophageal mucosa were strongly associated with VSC levels, supporting the hypothesis that halitosis can be a potential biomarker for the discrimination between ERD and NERD, reflecting the presence of erosive change in the lower esophagogastric junction. PMID:20981207

  3. Influence of irritable bowel syndrome on treatment outcome in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Mönnikes, Hubert; Heading, Robert C; Schmitt, Holger; Doerfler, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms on treatment outcomes with pantoprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a real life setting. METHODS: For this prospective, open-label, multinational, multicentre study, 1888 patients assessed by the investigators as suffering from GERD were recruited. The patients were additionally classified as with or without IBS-like symptoms at baseline. They were treated with pantoprazole 40 mg once daily and completed the Reflux Questionnaire™ (ReQuest™) short version daily. Response rates and symptom scores were compared after 4 and 8 wk of treatment for subgroups defined by the subclasses of GERD [erosive (ERD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD)] and the presence of IBS-like symptoms. RESULTS: IBS-like symptoms were more prevalent in NERD than in ERD (18.3% vs 12.7%, P = 0.0015). Response rates after 4 and/or 8 wk of treatment were lower in patients with IBS-like symptoms than in patients without IBS-like symptoms in both ERD (Week 4: P < 0.0001, Week 8: P < 0.0339) and NERD (Week 8: P = 0.0088). At baseline, ReQuest™ “lower abdominal complaints” symptom scores were highest in NERD patients with IBS-like symptoms. Additionally, these patients had the strongest symptom improvement after treatment compared with all other subgroups. CONCLUSION: IBS-like symptoms influence treatment outcome and symptom burden in GERD and should be considered in management. Proton pump inhibitors can improve IBS-like symptoms, particularly in NERD. PMID:21912473

  4. Influence of irritable bowel syndrome on treatment outcome in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mönnikes, Hubert; Heading, Robert C; Schmitt, Holger; Doerfler, Hubert

    2011-07-21

    To investigate the influence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms on treatment outcomes with pantoprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a real life setting. For this prospective, open-label, multinational, multicentre study, 1888 patients assessed by the investigators as suffering from GERD were recruited. The patients were additionally classified as with or without IBS-like symptoms at baseline. They were treated with pantoprazole 40 mg once daily and completed the Reflux Questionnaire™ (ReQuest™) short version daily. Response rates and symptom scores were compared after 4 and 8 wk of treatment for subgroups defined by the subclasses of GERD [erosive (ERD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD)] and the presence of IBS-like symptoms. IBS-like symptoms were more prevalent in NERD than in ERD (18.3% vs 12.7%, P = 0.0015). Response rates after 4 and/or 8 wk of treatment were lower in patients with IBS-like symptoms than in patients without IBS-like symptoms in both ERD (Week 4: P < 0.0001, Week 8: P < 0.0339) and NERD (Week 8: P = 0.0088). At baseline, ReQuest™ "lower abdominal complaints" symptom scores were highest in NERD patients with IBS-like symptoms. Additionally, these patients had the strongest symptom improvement after treatment compared with all other subgroups. IBS-like symptoms influence treatment outcome and symptom burden in GERD and should be considered in management. Proton pump inhibitors can improve IBS-like symptoms, particularly in NERD.

  5. Predictive Factors of Response to Proton Pump Inhibitors in Korean Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Sooyeon; Kim, Hee Man; Park, Moo In; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some patients fail to respond to PPI therapy. We investigated the efficacy of response to PPI therapy in patients with GERD symptoms. Methods A total of 179 subjects with GERD symptoms were prospectively enrolled and diagnosed with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, n = 100) and erosive reflux disease (n = 79) by gastroscopy and Bernstein test and/or 24-hour esophageal pH testing. Subjects then received a standard dose of daily PPI therapy for at least 4 weeks. PPI therapy response was evaluated using questionnaires including questions about demographics, GERD symptoms, GERD impact scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), hospital anxiety and depression scale, and abbreviated version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale. Results The rates of complete (≥ 80%), satisfactory (≥ 50%), partial (< 50%), and refractory response in the 179 participants were 41.3%, 30.2%, 18.4%, and 10.1%, respectively. Thus, overall response rate (complete and satisfactory responses) was 71.5%. Multivariate analysis showed body mass index < 23 kg/m2 (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.12–4.34), higher total PSQI score (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05–1.35), history of psychotherapy or neuropsychiatric medication (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.23–4.85), and NERD (OR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.54–7.11) were associated with poor response to PPI therapy. Conclusions Psychological factors, sleep dysfunction, body mass index < 23 kg/m2, and NERD seem to be the major factors that lead to a poor response to PPI treatment in patients with GERD symptoms. PMID:25537676

  6. Recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlated with a short dinner-to-bedtime interval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae Hoon; Kang, Ho Suk; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Jin, Choon Jo

    2014-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be classified into erosive reflux disease (ERD) and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). We aimed to compare the recurrence rates of ERD and NERD and determine the risk factors related to the recurrence. This prospective study comprised 337 consecutive adults who completed questionnaires on their GERD symptoms, height, weight, sleeping position, dinner time, and bedtime. During upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the presence of a hiatal hernia and mucosal breaks in the low esophagus, esophageal length (the distance between the Z-line and the incisors), and the esophageal length-to-height ratio were recorded. Recurrence was diagnosed when the patient required additional proton pump inhibitor medication after initial recovery with 4-8 weeks of treatment. Recurrence was experienced by 47 (26.0%) of 181 GERD patients. The recurrence rate did not differ between the 48 ERD (27.1%) and 133 NERD (25.6%) patients (P = 0.849). Of the various factors studied, recurrence was found to be correlated with a dinner-to-bedtime interval of less than 3 h (P = 0.002), globus sensation (P = 0.031), and old age (P = 0.047). Logistic regression analysis revealed that a short interval between dinner and bedtime was the only factor significantly related to the recurrence (P = 0.002). Both ERD and NERD patients who sleep within 3 h after eating have a higher risk of GERD recurrence. Our findings highlight the impact of a short dinner-to-bedtime interval on the recurrence of GERD (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: KCT0000134). © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and their effect on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Hong-Mei; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Song, Jun

    2015-04-14

    To explore the role of psychological factors in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and their effect on quality of life (QoL) of GERD patients. A total of 279 consecutive patients with typical symptoms and 100 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All of the participants were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (ZSAS), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS) and the SF-36 questionnaire. The scores for anxiety, depression and QoL of the two groups were analyzed. The correlation between psychological factors and QoL was also analyzed. Compared with healthy controls (34.70 ± 8.00), the scores of ZSAS in the non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) group (48.27 ± 10.34) and the reflux esophagitis (RE) group (45.38 ± 10.27) were significantly higher (P < 0.001). The mean ZSAS score of the NERD group was significantly higher than that of the RE group (P = 0.01). Compared with healthy controls (37.61 ± 8.44), the mean ZSDS scores were significantly higher in the NERD group (49.65 ± 11.09, P < 0.001) and the RE group (46.76 ± 11.83, P < 0.001). All dimensions of the SF-36 form were negatively correlated with the SAS and SDS scores in patients with NERD and RE (P < 0.05). According to the SF-36 form, vitality, mental health and social functioning were significantly correlated with symptoms of depression in patients with NERD and RE. General health was obviously affected by symptoms of depression in patients with NERD (P < 0.05). Anxiety and depression may play an important role in the occurrence of GERD and especially that of NERD. The QoL of patients with GERD is reduced by anxiety and depression.

  8. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. METHODS The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. RESULTS The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients’ GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P < 0.005). In erosive esophagitis patients, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers (RMs) were significantly higher than the scores of the poor metabolizers and intermediate metabolizers (total scores: 16.7 ± 8.6 vs 7.8 ± 5.4, P < 0.05; acid reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P < 0.005). In contrast, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 RMs in the non-erosive reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms. PMID:28373773

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and pulmonary function: A potential role of the dead space extension

    PubMed Central

    Bonacin, Damir; Fabijanić, Damir; Radić, Mislav; Puljiz, Željko; Trgo, Gorana; Bratanić, Andre; Hozo, Izet; Tocilj, Jadranka

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the differences in the existence and size of dead space in patients with and without Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD and non-GERD) expressed through the size of intrapulmonary shunt (QS/QT). Material/Methods The study enrolled 86 subjects – 43 patients referred for endoscopy because of symptoms of GERD (heartburn, acid regurgitation, dysfagia) and 43 healthy subjects with similar anthropometric characteristics without GERD symptoms. Based on endoscopy findings, patients were classified into the erosive reflux disease (ERD) group and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) group. Spirometry values, single-breath diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and intrapulmonary shunt (venous shunt – QS/QT) determined by the oxygen method were measured in all participants. Results Statistically significant differences between GERD and non-GERD groups in FVC (p=0.034), FEV1 (p=0.002), FEV1/FVC (p=0.001), and PEF (p=0.001) were observed. There were no statistically significant differences in FEF 25% (p=0.859), FEF 50% (p=0.850), and FEF 75% (p=0.058). Values of DLCO (p=0.006) and DLCO/VA (p=0.001) were significantly lower and QS/QT was significantly higher (p=0.001) in the GERD group than in the non-GERD group. However, in both groups the average values of DLCO and DLCO/VA expressed as a percentage of predictive values were within normal range, while the value of QS/QT in the GERD group showed pathological (6.0%) mean value (normal value ≤5.0%). There were no significant differences in respiratory function test results between patients with ERD and NERD. Conclusions Our results suggest that microaspiration of stomach contents may cause surfactant damage, development of microatelectasis, and dead space expansion with consequent increase of intrapulmonary (venous) shunt. PMID:22534705

  10. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ninoa, F.; Ilaria, M.; Noviello, C.; Santoro, L.; Rätsch, I.M.; Martino, A.; Cobellis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  11. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestive tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.

  12. Demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics of the heartburn groups classified using the Rome III criteria and factors associated with the responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors in the gastroesophageal reflux disease group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae; Kwon, Heok Chun; Cheong, Jae Yeon; Cho, Sung Won

    2009-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and functional heartburn (FH) have been changed. We investigated demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics of the heartburn groups classified using the Rome III criteria and factors associated with the responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) group. Ninety-five patients with heartburn underwent endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH-metry and then a PPI test. NERD was diagnosed when % time with pH <4 was >4%, a symptom index (SI) >or=50% or a positive PPI test in patients without erosive esophagitis. Patients without such findings were classified as FH. Thirty-six patients had erosive reflux disease (ERD), 36 had NERD, and 23 had FH. The proportion of males was significantly higher in ERD than in FH. Atypical symptoms and IBS were more prevalent in FH than in ERD. Anxiety was more prevalent in FH than in NERD. The prevalence of pathologic acid reflux, a positive SI and a positive PPI test was similar between ERD and NERD patients. In the ERD and NERD groups, depression was independently associated with nonresponsiveness to PPIs. FH is a different entity from ERD or NERD, particularly in terms of gender, acid reflux patterns, psychological profiles, and the responsiveness to PPIs.

  13. Substernal goiter and laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mariana Gonçalves; Araujo, Vergilius José Furtado de; Matos, Leandro Luongo de; Hojaij, Flávio Carneiro; Simões, Cesar Augusto; Araujo, Vergilius José Furtado de; Ramos, Daniel Marin; Mahmoud, Renata Lorencetti; Mosca, Letícia de Moraes; Manta, Gustavo Borges; Volpi, Erivelto Martinho; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Cernea, Claudio Roberto

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to compare the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux signs between two groups of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for voluminous goiter: substernal goiters and voluminous cervical goiter without thoracic extension. A retrospective case-control study was performed with data retrieved of the charts of the patients submitted to thyroidectomies occurred at a tertiary care center (Head and Neck Surgery Department, University of São Paulo Medical School) between 2010 and 2014. The selected thyroidectomies were allocated in two groups for study: patients with substernal goiters and patients with voluminous cervical goiter without thoracic extension. Cervical goiters were selected by ultrasonography mensuration. Clinical criterion was used to define substernal goiter. The average thyroid volume in patients with substernal goiter was significantly greater than the average volume in patients with only cervical goiter (p < 0.001). The prevalence of signs of reflux laryngitis at laryngoscopy was significantly greater in substernal goiter patients (p = 0.036). Moreover, substernal goiter was considered as the unique independent variable for high reflux laryngitis signs at laryngoscopy (OR = 2.75; CI95%: 1.05-7.20; p = 0.039) when compared to only cervical goiter patients. This study shows a significant association between substernal goiters and signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux at preoperative laryngoscopy. Therefore, when compared with voluminous cervical goiters, the substernal goiters increase the chance of reflux laryngitis signs in patients.

  14. Positive effect of abdominal breathing exercise on gastroesophageal reflux disease: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Eherer, A J; Netolitzky, F; Högenauer, C; Puschnig, G; Hinterleitner, T A; Scheidl, S; Kraxner, W; Krejs, G J; Hoffmann, Karl Martin

    2012-03-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES), surrounded by diaphragmatic muscle, prevents gastroesophageal reflux. When these structures become incompetent, gastric contents may cause gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). For treatment, lifestyle interventions are always recommended. We hypothesized that by actively training the crura of the diaphragm as part of the LES using breathing training exercises, GERD can be positively influenced. A prospective randomized controlled study was performed. Patients with non-erosive GERD or healed esophagitis without large hernia and/or previous surgery were included. Patients were randomized and allocated either to active breathing training program or to a control group. Quality of life (QoL), pH-metry, and on-demand proton pump inhibitor (PPI) usage were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of training. For long-term follow-up, all patients were invited to continue active breathing training and were further assessed regarding QoL and PPI usage after 9 months. Paired and unpaired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Nineteen patients with non-erosive GERD or healed esophagitis were randomized into two groups (10 training group and 9 control group). There was no difference in baseline patient characteristics between the groups and all patients finished the study. There was a significant decrease in time with a pH<4.0 in the training group (9.1±1.3 vs. 4.7±0.9%; P<0.05), but there was no change in the control group. QoL scores improved significantly in the training group (13.4±1.98 before and 10.8±1.86 after training; P<0.01), but no changes in QoL were seen in the control group. At long-term follow-up at 9 months, patients who continued breathing exercise (11/19) showed a significant decrease in QoL scores and PPI usage (15.1±2.2 vs. 9.7±1.6; 98±34 vs. 25±12 mg/week, respectively; P<0.05), whereas patients who did not train had no long-term effect. We show that actively training the diaphragm by breathing exercise

  15. [Therapeutic principles in gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Elkharrat, D; Bergmann, J F; Segrestaa, J M

    1995-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common disease. Its chronic course, even if mild, is sometimes complicated by erosive oesophagitis. Drug therapy acts against gastric acidity and motility disorders. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease has three aims: improvement of symptoms and quality of life, healing erosive lesions and prevention of symptomatic and endoscopic relapses. Non-drug measures are always useful, even if their efficacy is not well established. Initial therapy of a symptomatic reflux or mild oesophagitis is most of the time effective (antacids, prokinetics, H2 receptor antagonists). Proton-pump inhibitors are also effective in healing and preventing severe oesophagitis. Questions about long-term treatment adverse events with powerful acid inhibitors, such as hypergastrinemia and the risk of gastric carcinoid tumours seem to be resolved. Studies are requested to define the optimal long-term maintenance treatment with cisapride, H2 receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors at low doses in prevention of symptomatic and mild oesophagitis relapses.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  17. Anti-reflux surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflux disease (GERD). GERD is a condition that causes food or liquid to come up from your stomach into your esophagus (the tube that carries food ... surgery. Avoid cold liquids. DO NOT drink carbonated beverages. DO ... can bring air into your stomach). Crush pills, and take them with liquids for ...

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing evidence that gastroesophageal reflux disease is related to several upper gastrointestinal cancers, mainly the esophageal adenocarcinoma and a certain type of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Currently, the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is rapidly increasing in Korea. Therefore, there is a possibility of such increasing cancerous incidents, similar to the western worlds. In this article, the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease and several upper gastrointestinal cancers, the components of refluxate which has possible causal relationship with carcinogenesis, and the clinical implications of such relationship in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease patients are discussed through the review of literature. PMID:23844321

  19. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and dysphagia in children.

    PubMed

    Putnam, P E

    1997-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common problem in children that is sometimes associated with dysphagia. Choking, food refusal, and food "getting stuck" are non-specific symptoms that may arise consequent to reflux and esophagitis. Swallowing plays a role in reflux physiology, functioning as a major clearance mechanism after reflux episodes. Therefore, failure of swallowing to effectively perform that function contributes to reflux pathophysiology. The diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children must be carried out systematically and thoroughly. Multiple interacting factors are common, thus complicating the process.

  1. Combined esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII -pH) in the diagnostics and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Masiak, Wioletta; Wallner, Grzegorz; Wallner, Jan; Pedowski, Tomasz; Solecki, Michał

    2011-09-01

    The technique of 24-hour esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring combined with pH-metry (MII-pH) is currently considered to be the golden standard in the diagnostics of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The technique allows for differentiation of gas and liquid reflux as well as detection of non-acid reflux, which cannot be detected with other techniques that are based only on measuring the pH of gastric contents.THE AIM OF THE STUDY was to assess the usefulness of MII-pH in the diagnostics and treatment of GERD and its complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A group of 213 patients referred to II Katedra i Klinika Chirurgii Ogólnej, Gastroenterologicznej i Nowotworów Układu Pokarmowego Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Lublinie [the Second Faculty and Clinic of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery and Gastrointestinal Oncology at Medical University of Lublin] due to persistent symptoms of GERD and 21 volunteers without any clinical evidence of GERD underwent esophageal monitoring via MII-pH. The results were correlated with those of upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. The data gathered during MII-pH and endoscopy as well as information from questionnaires were entered into an MS Excel spreadsheet and subsequently analyzed with STATISTICA PL software. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS. MII-pH proved to be considerably more useful than conventional pHmetry in recording acid reflux. The sensitivity of pH-metry based on the MII-pH technique was established at 74%. GERD-induced changes in the esophageal mucosa result in decreased impedance baseline. The presence and severity of inflammatory esophageal lesions was proven to be associated with acid reflux episodes and proximal reflux episodes. No direct relationship between the grade of GERD and the occurrence of non-acid reflux episodes was confirmed. Non-acid reflux episodes were shown to predispose to non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The results of this study confirm that MIIpH is an essential technique in

  2. Expression of Proteinase-activated Receptor-2 in the Esophageal Mucosa of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients: A Histomorphologic and Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Fath El-Bab, Hanaa K; Kamal, Enas M

    2015-10-01

    Data are limited regarding the role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) in the esophageal mucosa in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Our aim was to study PAR-2 expression and its relationship with different GERD-related clinical and pathologic parameters. Histomorphologic alterations in eosophageal mucosa in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD) were also, evaluated. Endoscopic biopsies of the esophageal mucosa were obtained from 94 GERD patients and 20 participants for histopathologic analysis and PAR-2 immunohistochemical staining. The present study demonstrated significantly higher PAR-2 expression in GERD patients compared with control, whereas no significant differences were seen between NERD and ERD groups. PAR-2 expression significantly correlated with histologic score (r=0.572, P<0.001) and severity of heartburn (r=0.541, P<0.001). PAR-2 expression was significantly associated with basal cell hyperplasia, and dilated intercellular spaces and inflammatory cell count (P<0.05). Histologic analysis revealed GERD-related histomorphologic alterations in the esophageal mucosa of GERD patients with significant differences (P<0.05) among groups. Total histologic score was significantly correlated with heartburn (r=0.299, P=0.025) and endoscopic severity (r=0.359, P=0.027) in NERD and ERD patients, respectively. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the major role of PAR-2 in the pathogenesis of GERD and GERD-associated mucosal alterations.

  3. LATE EVALUATION OF PATIENTS OPERATED FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE BY NISSEN FUNDOPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maxwel Capsy Boga; Araújo, Amanda Bueno de; Terra-Júnior, Juverson Alves; Crema, Eduardo; Andreollo, Nelson Adami

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of GERD by Nissen fundoplication is effective and safe, providing good results in the control of the disease. However, some authors have questioned the efficacy of this procedure and few studies on the long-term outcomes are available in the literature, especially in Brazil. To evaluate patients operated for gastro-esophageal reflux disease, for at least 10 years, by Nissen fundoplication. Thirty-two patients were interviewed and underwent upper digestive endoscopy, esophageal manometry, 24 h pH monitoring and barium esophagogram, before and after Nissen fundoplication. Most patients were asymptomatic, satisfied with the result of surgery (87.5%) 10 years after operation, due to better symptom control compared with preoperative and, would do it again (84.38%). However, 62.5% were in use of some type of anti-reflux drugs. The manometry revealed lower esophageal sphincter with a mean pressure of 11.7 cm H2O and an average length of 2.85 cm. The average DeMeester index in pH monitoring was 11.47. The endoscopy revealed that most patients had a normal result (58.06%) or mild esophagitis (35.48%). Barium swallow revealed mild esophageal dilatation in 25,80% and hiatal hernia in 12.9% of cases. After at least a decade, most patients were satisfied with the operation, asymptomatic or had milder symptoms of GERD, being better and with easier control, compared to the preoperative period. Nevertheless, a considerable percentage still employed anti-reflux medications. O tratamento cirúrgico para DRGE empregando a fundoplicatura à Nissen é eficaz e seguro, oferecendo bons resultados no controle da doença. Entretanto, alguns autores têm questionado quanto a sua eficácia, e poucos estudos com avaliação tardia destes doentes são encontrados na literatura, sobretudo no Brasil. Avaliar pacientes operados por doença do refluxo gastroesofágico há pelo menos 10 anos, pela técnica de Nissen. Trinta e dois pacientes foram entrevistados e submetidos

  4. Impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease before and after short-term potent acid suppression therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Jonsson, Andreas; Denison, Hans; Wernersson, Börje; Hughes, Nesta; Howden, Colin W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited data exist on the impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). We assessed the relationship between regurgitation frequency and HRQOL before and after acid suppression therapy in GORD. Method We used data from two randomised trials of AZD0865 25–75 mg/day vs. esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg/day in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (n=1415) or reflux oesophagitis (RO) (n=1460). The Reflux Disease Questionnaire was used to select patients with frequent and intense heartburn for inclusion and to assess treatment response. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire was used to assess HRQOL. Results At baseline, 93% of patients in both the NERD and RO groups experienced regurgitation. Mean QOLRAD scores were similar for NERD and RO at baseline and at week 4 and disclosed decremental HRQOL with increasing frequency of regurgitation; a clinically relevant difference of >0.5 in mean QOLRAD scores was seen with regurgitation ≥4 days/week vs. <4 days/week. The prevalence of frequent, persistent regurgitation (≥4 days/week) at week 4 among heartburn responders (≤1 day/week of mild heartburn) was 28% in NERD and 23% in RO. QOLRAD scores were higher amongst heartburn responders. There was a similar pattern of impact related to regurgitation frequency in heartburn responders as in the group as a whole. Conclusion Frequent regurgitation was associated with a clinically relevant, incremental decline in HRQOL beyond that associated with heartburn before and after potent acid suppression, in both NERD and RO. Clinical trial numbers NCT00206284 and NCT00206245. PMID:23831734

  5. Impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease before and after short-term potent acid suppression therapy.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Jonsson, Andreas; Denison, Hans; Wernersson, Börje; Hughes, Nesta; Howden, Colin W

    2014-05-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). We assessed the relationship between regurgitation frequency and HRQOL before and after acid suppression therapy in GORD. We used data from two randomised trials of AZD0865 25-75 mg/day versus esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg/day in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (n=1415) or reflux oesophagitis (RO) (n=1460). The Reflux Disease Questionnaire was used to select patients with frequent and intense heartburn for inclusion and to assess treatment response. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire was used to assess HRQOL. At baseline, 93% of patients in both the NERD and RO groups experienced regurgitation. Mean QOLRAD scores were similar for NERD and RO at baseline and at week 4 and disclosed decremental HRQOL with increasing frequency of regurgitation; a clinically relevant difference of >0.5 in mean QOLRAD scores was seen with regurgitation ≥4 days/week versus <4 days/week. The prevalence of frequent, persistent regurgitation (≥4 days/week) at week 4 among heartburn responders (≤1 day/week of mild heartburn) was 28% in NERD and 23% in RO. QOLRAD scores were higher among heartburn responders. There was a similar pattern of impact related to regurgitation frequency in heartburn responders compared with the group as a whole. Frequent regurgitation was associated with a clinically relevant, incremental decline in HRQOL beyond that associated with heartburn before and after potent acid suppression in both NERD and RO. NCT00206284 and NCT00206245.

  6. Esomeprazole regimens for reflux symptoms in Chinese patients with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Zou, Duo-Wu; Lu, Bin; Chen, Min-Hu; Liu, Fei; Wu, Kai-Chun; Zou, Xiao-Ping; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhou, Li-Ya

    2015-06-14

    To compare symptom control with esomeprazole regimens for non-erosive reflux disease and chronic gastritis in patients with a negative endoscopy. This randomized, open-label study was designed in line with clinical practice in China. Patients with typical reflux symptoms for ≥ 3 mo and a negative endoscopy who had a Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire score ≥ 8 were randomized to initial treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg once daily either for 8 wk or for 2 wk. Patients with symptom relief could enter another 24 wk of maintenance/on-demand treatment, where further courses of esomeprazole 20 mg once daily were given if symptoms recurred. The primary endpoint was the symptom control rate at week 24 of the maintenance/on-demand treatment period. Secondary endpoints were symptom relief rate, success rate (defined as patients who had symptom relief after initial treatment and after 24 wk of maintenance treatment), time-to-first-relapse and satisfaction rate. Based on the data collected in the modified intention-to-treat population (MITT; patients in the ITT population with symptom relief after initial esomeprazole treatment, n = 262), the symptom control rate showed a small but statistically significant difference in favor of the 8-wk regimen (94.9% vs 87.3%, P = 0.0473). Among the secondary endpoints, based on the data collected in the ITT population (n = 305), the 8-wk group presented marginally better results in symptom relief after initial esomeprazole treatment (88.3% vs 83.4%, P = 0.2513) and success rate over the whole study (83.8% vs 72.8%, P = 0.0258). The 8-wk regimen was found to provide a 46% reduction in risk of relapse vs the 2-wk regimen (HR = 0.543; 95%CI: 0.388-0.761). In addition, fewer unscheduled visits and higher patient satisfaction supported the therapeutic benefits of the 8-wk regimen over the 2-wk regimen. Safety was comparable between the two groups, with both regimens being well tolerated. Chinese patients diagnosed with chronic

  7. Esophagogastric junction contractile integral and morphology: Two high-resolution manometry metrics of the anti-reflux barrier.

    PubMed

    Ham, Hyoju; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, Han Hee; Yoon, Seung Bae; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Jae Myung; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated associations of esophagogastric junction (EGJ) metrics as an anti-reflux barrier with impedance-pH, endoscopic esophagitis, and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) metrics. We reviewed high-resolution manometry data from consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms who underwent impedance-pH and endoscopy, and asymptomatic volunteers. The EGJ contractile integral (CI) was calculated as the mean contractile integral/second during three respiratory cycles. EGJ morphology was classified according to LES-crural diaphragm (CD) separation. In total, 137 patients (65 male, age 55 years) and 23 (9 male, age 33 years) controls were enrolled. Twenty-five patients had erosive reflux disease (ERD), 16 had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), 5 had reflux hypersensitivity, and 91 were not GERD. EGJ-CI were lower in patients with GERD (22.6 [13.8-29.2] mmHg cm) than non-GERD (50.3 [31-69.9] mmHg cm, P < 0.01) and controls (67 [26.7-78.7] mmHg cm). With an EGJ-CI cut-off value of 30 mmHg cm, the area under the curve was 0.814 (0.762-0.896), with 77.8% sensitivity and 81.7% specificity for the prediction of GERD. LES-CD separation was greatest in patients with ERD, followed the NERD, non-GERD, and controls. EGJ morphology type III was associated with a higher DeMeester score (7.9 [1.6-12.6]) than were type II (3.25 [0.9-5.975]) and I (1.75 [0.8-6.2]; P < 0.01). EGJ-CI values were lower in patients with GERD than in others in each EGJ morphology subgroup. Esophagogastric junction contractile integral showed good diagnostic accuracy with high specificity in predicting GERD. LES-CD separation is associated with an increase in acid reflux, but EGJ-CI was associated more strongly with GERD than was EGJ morphology. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Time Covering Eradication for All Patients Infected with Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Andoh, Akira; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in Japan since the end of the 20th century due to changes in environmental factors, such as a decreased infection rate of Helicobacter pylori and increased ability of acid secretion in the Japanese population. In 2013, the Japanese health insurance system started to cover eradication treatment for all patients infected with H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer, suggesting we may soon be able to completely eradicate this infection in Japan. Re-clarification of the clinical characteristics of GERD in Japan is therefore required in time covering the eradication for all patients infected with H. pylori. In Japan, more than half of GERD patients exhibit non-erosive reflux disease, and a majority of erosive esophagitis (RE) cases have mild severity of GERD (Los Angeles classification of grades A and B). The prevalence of RE in H. pylori-positive patients is relatively low (4.1%) compared to the general Japanese population (7.6-10.6%). In multivariate analysis to evaluate a risk of RE development, a risk in H. pylori-positive patients is elevated in those with mild gastric mucosal atrophy (C-I and C-II according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification, OR 12.14, 95% CI 1.28-115.26, p = 0.03) or with hiatal hernia (OR 5.24, 95% CI 1.80-15.22, p < 0.01). Here, we provide a comprehensive review of GERD in Japan, including associations between GERD and H. pylori infection, low-dose-aspirin-induced GERD, and pharmacological treatment for GERD. The recent decrease in the rate of H. pylori infection and increase in the proportion of elderly persons might have increased the prevalence of GERD in Japan. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Heartburn and regurgitation have different impacts on life quality of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lien, Han-Chung; Lee, Teng-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Jeh; Chang, Chi-Sen

    2014-09-14

    To investigate the impact of heartburn and regurgitation on the quality of life among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Data from patients with GERD, who were diagnosed according to the Montreal definition, were collected between January 2009 and July 2010. The enrolled patients were assigned to a heartburn or a regurgitation group, and further assigned to an erosive esophagitis (EE) or a non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) subgroup, depending on the predominant symptoms and endoscopic findings, respectively. The general demographic data, the scores of the modified Chinese version of the GERDQ and the Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire scores of these groups of patients were compared. About 108 patients were classified in the heartburn group and 124 in the regurgitation group. The basic characteristics of the two groups were similar, except for male predominance in the regurgitation group. Patients in the heartburn group had more sleep interruptions (22.3% daily vs 4.8% daily, P = 0.021), more eating or drinking problems (27.8% daily vs 9.7% daily, P = 0.008), more work interferences (11.2% daily vs none, P = 0.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs 64.69, P = 0.042), than patients in the regurgitation group did. Individuals with NERD in the regurgitation group had more impaired daily activities than those with EE did. GERD patients with heartburn or regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but those with heartburn predominant had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores. The NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did.

  10. Heartburn and regurgitation have different impacts on life quality of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lien, Han-Chung; Lee, Teng-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Jeh; Chang, Chi-Sen

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of heartburn and regurgitation on the quality of life among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: Data from patients with GERD, who were diagnosed according to the Montreal definition, were collected between January 2009 and July 2010. The enrolled patients were assigned to a heartburn or a regurgitation group, and further assigned to an erosive esophagitis (EE) or a non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) subgroup, depending on the predominant symptoms and endoscopic findings, respectively. The general demographic data, the scores of the modified Chinese version of the GERDQ and the Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire scores of these groups of patients were compared. RESULTS: About 108 patients were classified in the heartburn group and 124 in the regurgitation group. The basic characteristics of the two groups were similar, except for male predominance in the regurgitation group. Patients in the heartburn group had more sleep interruptions (22.3% daily vs 4.8% daily, P = 0.021), more eating or drinking problems (27.8% daily vs 9.7% daily, P = 0.008), more work interferences (11.2% daily vs none, P = 0.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs 64.69, P = 0.042), than patients in the regurgitation group did. Individuals with NERD in the regurgitation group had more impaired daily activities than those with EE did. CONCLUSION: GERD patients with heartburn or regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but those with heartburn predominant had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores. The NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did. PMID:25232262

  11. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; de Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Methods Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. Conclusion The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors. PMID:25295447

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: new treatments.

    PubMed

    Katz, Philip O

    2002-01-01

    The primary therapeutic endpoint for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease is complete relief of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. The withdrawal of cisapride has created a vacuum in the prokinetic market, with few promising drugs in the pipeline. Reflux inhibitors are being considered for clinical trials, but as of yet are unavailable. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) continue to be the backbone of therapy for acid suppression, providing excellent relief of symptoms and healing of erosive esophagitis. Isomeric technology with esomeprazole as the prototype represents an advance in PPI pharmacology. Antireflux surgery is now more patient-friendly, with shorter hospitalization and less major morbidity compared to open fundoplication, but surgery is at best equal to medical therapy when optimal doses of antisecretory therapy are used. Two endoscopic procedures were recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: radiofrequency energy delivery to the gastroesophageal junction, and transoral flexible endoscopic suturing. These techniques should be used selectively until we have more data and until results are compared to the safe and highly effective medical therapies.

  13. Guidelines on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Niaz, Saad Khalid; Quraishy, Muhammed Saeed; Taj, Muhammad Ali; Abid, Shahab; Alam, Altaf; Nawaz, Arif Amir; Ali Shah, Syed Hasnain; Khan, Ijaz Muhammed; Memon, Abdul Rauf; Zuberi, Bader Fiaz; Tayyab, Ghayasun Nabi; Malik, Kashif; Mirza, Shakeel; Abbas, Zaigham

    2015-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common acid-related disorder encountered during clinical practice in Pakistan and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. A number of guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GERD have been published in different countries, but a Pakistani accepted directive by the standards of evidence-based medicine is still lacking. Our aim was to create an understanding of the natural history and presentations of reflux disease; evaluating possible treatment options available for the patients with complex and uncomplicated reflux ailments with the development of current and up to date evidence based endorsement, relevant to the needs of Pakistani health care providers in order to treat oesophageal manifestations of GERD. In order to make such guidelines, a comprehensive literature search was conducted with pertinent evidence reviewed, and quality of relevant data assessed. The resultant conclusions were based on the best available evidence and expert opinion of the authors of technical review panel.

  14. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring for Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Hayat M.; Rosen, Rachel; Woodley, Frederick W.; Orsi, Marina; Armas, Daneila; Faure, Christophe; Fortunato, John; O'Connor, Judith; Skaggs, Beth; Nurko, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Dual pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) is a sensitive tool for evaluating overall gastroesophageal reflux disease, and particularly for permitting detection of nonacid reflux events. pH-MII technology is especially useful in the postprandial period or at other times when gastric contents are nonacidic. pH-MII was recently recognized by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition as being superior to pH monitoring alone for evaluation of the temporal relation between symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux. In children, pHMII is useful to correlate symptoms with reflux (particularly nonacid reflux), to quantify reflux during tube feedings and the postprandial period, and to assess efficacy of antireflux therapy. This clinical review is simply an evidence-based overview addressing the indications, limitations, and recommended protocol for the clinical use of pH-MII in children. PMID:21240010

  15. Effect of reflux time on nanoparticle shape.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Chandan; Sushma, K V L

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, Pt nanoparticles were produced from a reaction mixture containing a trace amount of cobalt carbonyl salt acting as a shape inducer. Nanoparticle shape evolution during reaction mixture reflux was monitored by characterizing particles extracted from the reaction mixture at different times. It was observed that 5 min of reflux produced spherical nanoparticles, 30 min of reflux produced cube shaped nanoparticles, and 60 min of reflux produced truncated octahedron morphology nanoparticles. It is illustrated that during nanoparticle synthesis the reflux process can provide energy needed for shape transformation from a metastable cube morphology to a truncated octahedron morphology which is thermodynamically the most stable geometry for fcc crystals. An optimization of the reaction reflux is thus needed for isolating metastable shapes.

  16. The value of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in diagnosing functional heartburn in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Meonggi; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jinsu; Cho, Yukyung; Park, Jaemyung; Lee, Inseok; Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Kyuyong

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to differentiate functional heartburn from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) failure. The aims of this study were to assess the role of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in patients referred with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to identify differences in the clinical spectrum among GERD subtypes. We enrolled consecutive referred patients with suspected GERD. After endoscopy on the first visit, all underwent wireless esophageal pH monitoring when off the PPI. Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled. These patients were classified into a reflux esophagitis group (20, 8.7 %) and a normal endoscopic findings group (210, 91.3 %). Among the 210 patients in the normal endoscopic findings group, 63 (27.4 %) were diagnosed with pathological reflux, 35 (15.2 %) with hypersensitive esophagus, 87 (37.8 %) with normal acid exposure with negative symptom association, and 25 (10.9 %) with test failure. These groups did not differ in age, body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, symptom severity, quality of life, presence of atypical symptoms, overlap with irritable bowel syndrome, and the frequency of somatization, depression, and anxiety. PPI responses were evaluated in 135 patients. Fifty patients (37.0 %) were not responsive to the 4-week treatment; 26 (19.3 %) were diagnosed with refractory non-erosive gastroesophageal disease, and 24 (17.8 %) with functional heartburn. The demographics and clinical and psychological characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Demographic characteristics and symptom patterns alone cannot differentiate functional heartburn from various subtypes of GERD. Wireless esophageal pH monitoring should be considered for the initial evaluation of GERD in the tertiary referral setting.

  17. Smoking and Gastro-oesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Stanciu, C.; Bennett, John R.

    1972-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal sphincter pressure and intraoesophageal pH has been studied in 25 chronic smokers who complained of heartburn. Smoking a cigarette invariably caused a fall in sphincter pressure, and pH measurements showed an increased tendency for reflux to occur while smoking. When lower oesophageal pH was measured overnight one-third of all reflux episodes occurred while the patients were smoking, and reflux was seen during the smoking of two-thirds of all the cigarettes consumed. It is concluded that cigarette smoking is a common reversible cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:5076250

  18. [Vesico-renal reflux and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Barbe, Y P; Ratajczak, A; Coadou, Y; Guille, F; Lobel, B

    1985-01-01

    By modifying the anatomical location of the bladder and ureter, and by favoring urinary stasis and pyuria, pregnancy may reveal or aggravate an existing vesico-renal reflux. In reporting six cases of vesico-renal reflux in pregnant women, revealed by attacks of feverish lombalgia, or mictional disorders associated with pyuria, and confirmed postpartum by intravenous urography, retrograde cystography and cystoscopy, the authors recall the factors associated with pregnancy which favor the appearance of a reflux, mechanical, hormonal and metabolic action. Surgical correction of refluxes associated with pyuria and detected during pregnancy would seem indicated.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: radionuclide gastroesophagography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, J.D.; Rudd, T.G.; Christie, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    Sixty-five symptomatic infants and children underwent radionuclide gastroesophagography, acid reflux testing, and barium esophagography with water-siphon testing to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the scintigraphic technique in detecting gastroesophageal reflux. After ingesting /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid in fruit juice, patients rested beneath the gamma camera for 30 to 60 min while esophageal activity was monitored continuously. By using the acid reflux test as a standard of comparison, the senstivity of radionuclide gastroesophagography was 75%. Because of its physiologic nature, low radiation exposure, and convenience, radionuclide gastroesophagography warrants further evaluation as a screening test for gastroesophageal reflux.

  20. Interplay between vesicoureteric reflux and kidney infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Samantha E; Watt, Christine L; Murawski, Inga J; Gupta, Indra R; Abraham, Soman N

    2013-07-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital defect of the urinary tract that is usually discovered after a child develops a urinary tract infection. It is associated with reflux nephropathy, a renal lesion characterized by the presence of chronic tubulointersitial inflammation and fibrosis. Most patients are diagnosed with reflux nephropathy after one or more febrile urinary tract infections, suggesting a potential role for infection in its development. We have recently shown that the C3H mouse has a 100% incidence of VUR. Here, we evaluate the roles of VUR and uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in the C3H mouse. We find that VUR in combination with sustained kidney infection is crucial to the development of reflux nephropathy, whereas sterile reflux alone fails to induce reflux nephropathy. A single bout of kidney infection without reflux fails to induce reflux nephropathy. The host immune response to infection was examined in two refluxing C3H substrains, HeN and HeJ. HeJ mice, which have a defect in innate immunity and bacterial clearance, demonstrate more significant renal inflammation and reflux nephropathy compared with HeN mice. These studies demonstrate the crucial synergy between VUR, sustained kidney infection and the host immune response in the development of reflux nephropathy in a mouse model of VUR.

  1. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, F; Palmiero, M; Esposito, I; Mosca, F; Cuomo, R

    2006-01-01

    Summary Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a condition in which the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus provokes symptoms or complications and impairs quality of life. Typical symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are heartburn and regurgitation but gastro-oesophageal reflux disease has also been related to extra-oesophageal manifestations, such as asthma, chronic cough and laryngitis. The pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is multifactorial, involving transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and other lower oesophageal sphincter pressure abnormalities. As a result, reflux of acid, bile, pepsin and pancreatic enzymes occurs, leading to oesophageal mucosal injury. Other factors contributing to the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease include hiatal hernia, impaired oesophageal clearance, delayed gastric emptying and impaired mucosal defensive factors. Hiatal hernia contributes to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease by promoting lower oesophageal sphincter dysfunction. Impaired oesophageal clearance is responsible for prolonged acid exposure of the mucosa. Delayed gastric emptying, resulting in gastric distension, can significantly increase the rate of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations, contributing to postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The mucosal defensive factors play an important role against development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, by neutralizing the backdiffusion of hydrogen ion into the oesophageal tissue. While the pathogenesis of oesophageal symptoms is now well known, the mechanisms underlying extra-oesophageal airway manifestations are still poorly understood. Two hypotheses have been proposed: direct contact of gastric acid with the upper airway and a vago-vagal reflex elicited by acidification of the distal oesophagus, leading to bronchospasm. In conclusion, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be considered as the result of a complex interplay of factors

  2. [Gastro-oesophageal reflux--what if physiological? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weiser, H F; Pace, F; Lepsien, G; Müller-Lissner, S A; Blum, A L; Siewert, J R

    1982-03-12

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux was examined by taped long-term pH monitoring in 31 healthy subjects (16 men, 15 women; average age 28 years). The following was found: (1) reflux during the day is normal in health subjects, occurring predominantly after meals; (2) healthy persons have practically no reflux at night, after reaching the phase of deep sleep, the decisive difference between the healthy subject and those with reflux concerning the sleep phase, during which the patient with reflux has significantly increased reflux; (3) gastro-oesophageal reflux during the night is dependent upon depth of sleep, while position-dependent reflux was not observed.

  3. The Prevalence and Clinical Features of Non-responsive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease to Practical Proton Pump Inhibitor Dose in Korea: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Jun; Park, Soo Heon; Shim, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Kim, Yong Sik; Bang, Byoung Wook; Kim, Gwang Ha; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Hyung Hun; Park, Seon Young; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-07-25

    In Korea, there are no available multicenter data concerning the prevalence of or diagnostic approaches for non-responsive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) which does not respond to practical dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in Korea. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the symptom pattern of non-responsive GERD. A total of 12 hospitals who were members of a Korean GERD research group joined this study. We used the composite score (CS) as a reflux symptom scale which is a standardized questionnaire based on the frequency and severity of typical symptoms of GERD. We defined "non-responsive GERD" as follows: a subject with the erosive reflux disease (ERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after standard-dose PPIs for 8 weeks or a subject with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after half-dose PPIs for 4 weeks. A total of 234 subjects were analyzed. Among them, 87 and 147 were confirmed to have ERD and NERD, respectively. The prevalence of non-responsive GERD was 26.9% (63/234). The rates of non-responsive GERD were not different between the ERD and NERD groups (25.3% vs. 27.9%, respectively, p=0.664). There were no differences between the non-responsive GERD and responsive GERD groups for sex (p=0.659), age (p=0.134), or BMI (p=0.209). However, the initial CS for epigastric pain and fullness were higher in the non-responsive GERD group (p=0.044, p=0.014, respectively). In conclusion, this multicenter Korean study showed that the rate of non-responsive GERD was substantially high up to 26%. In addition, the patients with the non-responsive GERD frequently showed dyspeptic symptoms such as epigastric pain and fullness.

  4. Feeding and Reflux: A Parent & Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Martorana, Pamela; Vitello, Louise; Eicher, Peggy S.; LaCour, Tricia

    2008-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as a cause of an infant or child's refusal to eat is becoming better recognized. However, the many more subtle influences that reflux can have on feeding are less often recognized. Although vomiting after meals is the classic presentation, infants and children may present with a variety of more subtle symptoms less…

  5. Experimental intrarenal reflux and blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    The effect on the blood pressure of experimental vesico-ureteric reflux was investigated in adult female Wistar rats. In 6 rats, reflux with isotonic saline produced a transient rise in systemic blood pressure followed by a fall, with return to normal within 2 min (mean BP readings: 121-130-93 mmHg). In 6 rats during water diuresis, reflux with distilled water produced similar changes (114-120-79 mmHg). In 6 rats in which the ureters were divided before reflux, no rise in blood pressure occurred although in 2 of these the pressure showed a marked fall. The pattern of blood pressure changes which occurred as a result of reflux was similar to that produced by a rapid i.v. injection of a corresponding volume of saline and it was concluded that the changes accompanying reflux are due to pyelovenous backflow. This was confirmed by producing reflux with 5% lissamine green which appeared in the peripheral capillaries within 4 s of the reflux in 3 rats. Slow dilatation of the pelvis with saline in 9 rats showed that rupture of the pelvic epithelium occurred at a mean pressure of 99 mmHg. PMID:607990

  6. Feeding and Reflux: A Parent & Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Martorana, Pamela; Vitello, Louise; Eicher, Peggy S.; LaCour, Tricia

    2008-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as a cause of an infant or child's refusal to eat is becoming better recognized. However, the many more subtle influences that reflux can have on feeding are less often recognized. Although vomiting after meals is the classic presentation, infants and children may present with a variety of more subtle symptoms less…

  7. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: advances and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ates, Fehmi; Francis, David O; Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    'Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease' is one of the most common misnomers in the area of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The term implies reflux as the underlying etiology despite unresponsiveness to aggressive proton pump inhibitor therapy. The term should be replaced with 'refractory symptoms.' We must acknowledge that in many patients symptoms of reflux often overlap with non-GERD causes such as gastroparesis, dyspepsia, hypersensitive esophagus and functional disorders. Lack of response to aggressive acid suppressive therapy often leads to diagnostic testing. In majority of patients these tests are normal. The role of non-acid reflux in this group is uncertain and patients should not undergo surgical fundoplication based on this parameter. In patients unresponsive to acid suppressive therapy GERD is most commonly not causal and a search for non-GERD causes must ensue.

  8. [The novel approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and co-morbid pathology].

    PubMed

    Komleva, N E; Marjanovsky, A A; Danilov, A N; Agasarov, L G

    2017-01-01

    This paper was designed to discuss the problems of co-morbidity and approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and a concomitant pathology and to analyze the issues concerning the possible vertebro-visceral correlations inherent in the diseases of the internal organs. To evaluate the vertebro-neurological status of the thoracic segment of the vertebral column in the patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease and to further improve the methods for their treatment taking into consideration the concomitant pathology, if any. A total of 290 patients at the age varying from 25 to 60 (mean 44,3±11,3) years with the non-erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease were examined in the phase of its exacerbation. They included 132 (45.5%) men and 158 (54.5%) women. The duration of the disease averaged 13.1±3.3 years and that of the exacerbation period 1.2±0.5 months. All the patients underwent the vertebro-neurological examination. The visual analog scale was used to obtain the subjective characteristics of the pain syndrome associated with thoracalgia The quality of life of the patients was estimated based on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (scores of MOS SF-36). To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease, the 260 participants of the study were randomly allocated to two groups, the main and control ones. The latter group was comprised of 130 patients given the standard treatment including the use of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, stimulators of the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, alginates, and other drugs, as indicated. The former group consisted of the remaining 130 patients undergoing the standard course of pharmacopuncture to correct the functional disorders in the thoracic segment of the vertebral column. The medications of choice for the purpose were the anti-homotoxic agents, such as

  9. Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Revisited by Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Tack, Jan; Sifrim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Impedance-pH monitoring allows detailed characterization of gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal activity associated with reflux. We assessed the characteristics of nocturnal reflux and esophageal activity preceding and following reflux. Methods Impedance-pH tracings from 11 healthy subjects and 76 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease off acid-suppressive therapy were analyzed. Characteristics of nocturnal supine reflux, time distribution and esophageal activity seen on impedance at 2 minute intervals preceding and following reflux were described. Results Patients had more nocturnal reflux events than healthy subjects (8 [4-12] vs 2 [1-5], P = 0.002), with lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux (57% [35-78] vs 80% [60-100], P = 0.044). Nocturnal reflux was mainly liquid (80%) and reached the proximal esophagus more often in patients (6% vs 0%, P = 0.047). Acid reflux predominated in the first 2 hours (66%) and weakly acidic reflux in the last 3 hours (70%) of the night. Most nocturnal reflux was preceded by aboral flows and cleared by short lasting volume clearance. In patients, prolonged chemical clearance was associated with less esophageal activity. Conclusions Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux is as common as acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and predominates later in the night. Impedance-pH can predict prolonged chemical clearance after nocturnal acid reflux. PMID:21602991

  10. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    AIM OF THE REVIEW AND METHODS: This review brings together information on the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Published manuscripts were identified from Medline. The articles were then screened for relevance prior to inclusion in the review. Up to 40% of people in Western countries are estimated to regularly experience heartburn, the most characteristic symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Treatment options available for GERD range from over-the-counter (OTC) antacids to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and anti-reflux surgery. Many patients self-medicate with OTC medications such as antacids and low-dose histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RA) to relieve episodic or food-related symptoms of GERD, and may not seek medical advice unless symptoms persist or worsen. However, GERD is a chronic disease that frequently affects health-related quality of life and, if not properly managed, the complications of GERD may include erosive oesophagitis (EO), Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma. Adequate control of acid secretion is key to the successful treatment of the condition. OTC medications provide effective symptom relief to about one quarter of patients suffering from GERD. H2RAs can also provide effective symptomatic relief, particularly in patients with milder GERD, but become less-effective over time. PPIs are the agents of choice for the suppression of gastric acid production and have become the mainstay of therapy for acid-related diseases. PPIs produce significantly faster and more complete symptomatic relief, significantly faster and more complete healing of erosive GERD compared with H2RAs and are also significantly more effective at preventing relapse of EO. There are a number of existing guidelines for the treatment of GERD. Recommendation for initial therapy consist of general measures, such as lifestyle advice in combination with antacids and/or alginates. When general measures fail, the next step is empirical therapy. Two

  11. Endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Watson, David I; Immanuel, Arul

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is extremely common in Western countries. For selected patients, there is an established role for the surgical treatment of reflux, and possibly an emerging role for endoscopic antireflux procedures. Randomized trials have compared medical versus surgical management, laparoscopic versus open surgery and partial versus total fundoplications. However, the evidence base for endoscopic procedures is limited to some small sham-controlled studies, and cohort studies with short-term follow-up. Laparoscopic fundoplication has been shown to be an effective antireflux operation. It facilitates quicker convalescence and is associated with fewer complications, but has a similar longer term outcome compared with open antireflux surgery. In most randomized trials, antireflux surgery achieves at least as good control of reflux as medical therapy, and these studies support a wider application of surgery for the treatment of moderate-to-severe reflux. Laparoscopic partial fundoplication is an effective surgical procedure with fewer side effects, and it may achieve high rates of patient satisfaction at late follow-up. Many of the early endoscopic antireflux procedures have failed to achieve effective reflux control, and they have been withdrawn from the market. Newer procedures have the potential to fashion a surgical fundoplication. However, at present there is insufficient evidence to establish the safety and efficacy of endoscopic procedures for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and no endoscopic procedure has achieved equivalent reflux control to that achieved by surgical fundoplication.

  12. Part III – Treatment of Ureterovesical Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Duncan E.; Fair, William R.; Friedland, Gerald W.; Filly, Roy A.

    1974-01-01

    Of 134 girls with demonstrable ureterovesical reflux, 61 (105 ureters) had the reflux surgically corrected with an overall surgical cure rate of 97 percent. In the remaining 73 children (112 ureters), the reflux was treated conservatively with medical management alone. During the follow-up period no significant differences were demonstrated in the overall incidence of urinary tract infection; two years following corrective operation or medical treatment more than 50 percent of both medically and surgically treated children were still experiencing infections. A pronounced decrease, however, occurred in the incidence of clinical pyelonephritis among the surgically treated group. Following correction of reflux, the incidence of pyelonephritis was similar in both medically and surgically treated cases and was approximately the same as that found in a comparable group of children without reflux. In approximately two-thirds of refluxing renal units in which there was evidence of clubbing and scarring before medical or surgical therapy, deterioration progressed during the follow-up period. In most of these cases infection control was felt to be inadequate with episodes of clinical pyelonephritis occurring during the period of medical management, or, in the surgically treated group, occurring just before corrective operation and the scar appearing within two years after operation. The majority of renal units in which calyceal clubbing and parenchymal scarring was present had the most severe grades of reflux. PMID:4460380

  13. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  14. [Surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)].

    PubMed

    Iida, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2007-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is major treatment for acid reflux. It reduces major symptom of GERD and effective. However, the cause of GERD is the insufficiency of anti-reflux mechanism of cardia. Only surgical treatment can care for hiatal hernia as the main cause of the disruption. Redundant reflux against conservative treatment or obvious hiatal hernia is indication for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Late diagnosis might request radical operation, so we need to know the indication for laparoscopic treatment. For the safer laparoscopic procedure, we perform curtain retraction technique and Floppy Nissen -short cuff method. The former contribute to prevent hemorrhage or pneumothorax, and the latter can reduce the post-operative disphagia.

  15. Extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hom, Christopher; Vaezi, Michael F

    2013-03-01

    This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and pulmonary and ear/nose/throat manifestations of reflux and outlines the recent developments in the diagnostic and treatment strategies for this difficult group of patients. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and pH monitoring are poorly sensitive for diagnosing reflux in this group of patients. Instead it is recommended that in those without warning symptoms, an empiric trial of proton-pump inhibitors be the initial approach to diagnosing and treating the potential underlying cause of these extraesophageal symptoms.

  16. Fundoplication for laryngopharyngeal reflux despite preoperative dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Falk, G L; Van der Wall, H; Burton, L; Falk, M G; O'Donnell, H; Vivian, S J

    2017-03-01

    INTRODUCTION Fundoplication for laryngopharyngeal disease with oesophageal dysmotility has led to mixed outcomes. In the presence of preoperative dysphagia and oesophageal dysmotility, this procedure has engendered concern in certain regards. METHODS This paper describes a consecutive series of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) patients with a high frequency of dysmotility. Patients were selected for surgery with 24-hour dual channel pH monitoring, oesophageal manometry and standardised reflux scintigraphy. RESULTS Following careful patient selection, 33 patients underwent fundoplication by laparoscopy. Surgery had high efficacy in symptom control and there was no adverse dysphagia. CONCLUSIONS Evidence of proximal reflux can select a group of patients for good results of fundoplication for atypical symptoms.

  17. Can acid (pH) refluxes predict multichannel intraluminal impedance refluxes? A correlation study.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sudipta

    2010-04-01

    The present study aims to explore if and when acid (pH) refluxes can predict refluxes detected by multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) studies. This correlation may indicate whether pH probe-only and MII-pH studies are interchangeable. Prospective observational cross sectional study of symptomatic children (below 18 years) who had MII-pH studies done for gastroesophageal reflux. Clinical data were extracted from patient records. Non-parametric tests, Pearson's rho and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used for data analysis. A total of 153 children were included in the study and 62% were on acid suppression. Indices for acid and MII refluxes correlated with each other only in those without acid suppression. This correlation was lost in children on acid suppression. There was no statistically significant difference in acid or MII reflux indices in children with or without acid suppression. Like acid reflux, indices for MII refluxes had good correlation with each other irrespective of acid suppression. Liquid and mixed MII refluxes showed excellent correlation with respective types of proximally migrating refluxes. The values for MII reflux indices derived from our patient population were in broad agreement with available pediatric and adult data. A pH probe-only study in patients without acid suppression may reflect both acid and volume (MII) reflux activities adequately and can substitute for MII-pH study. The observed excellent correlation between acid and MII refluxes with proximal migration may justify using pH probe-only studies for extra esophageal symptoms in patients without acid suppression.

  18. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role.

  19. Vesicoureteral reflux in asymptomatic siblings of patients with known reflux: radionuclide cystography

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Treves, S.T.; Lebowitz, R.L.; Bauer, S.; Davis, R.T.; Retik, A.; Colodny, A.

    1987-01-01

    The familial nature of vesicoureteral reflux among siblings of patients with vesicoureteral reflux has been reported to be from 8% to 32%. These included both symptomatic and asymptomatic siblings. The incidence of vesicoureteral reflux in asymptomatic siblings, however, has not been studied extensively. Sixty asymptomatic siblings of patients known to have vesicoureteral reflux were studied with radionuclide voiding cystography. Their ages ranged from 2 months to 15 years (mean, 4.2 years). Vesicoureteral reflux was detected in 27 of 60 (45%) of the siblings. Vesicoureteral reflux was unilateral in 15 and bilateral in 12 of the siblings. Radionuclide cystography is more sensitive than radiographic cystography and results in a very low radiation dose to the patient. The gonadal dose with radionuclide cystography is only 1.0 to 2.0 mrads. Because of these features, radionuclide cystography is a nearly ideal technique for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux in siblings of patients with known vesicoureteral reflux. All siblings (symptomatic or asymptomatic) of patients with known vesicoureteral reflux should have a screening radionuclide cystography.

  20. Utility scores for vesicoureteral reflux and anti-reflux surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Caleb P; Routh, Jonathan C; Logvinenko, Tanya; Rosoklija, Ilina; Kokorowski, Paul J; Prosser, Lisa A; Schuster, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) continues to be controversial. In conditions of uncertainty, decision analytic techniques such as cost-utility analysis (CUA) can help to structure the decision-making process. However, CUA analyses require a "utility," a value between 0 (death) and 1 (perfect health) corresponding to the quality of life associated with a health state. Ideally, utility values are elicited directly from representative community samples, but utilities have not been rigorously measured for pediatric urology conditions. To elicit utility scores for VUR and open anti-reflux surgery (ARS) from a representative, well-characterized community sample of adults who have been parents. Cross-sectional survey of nationally representative adults who had ever been parents. Each respondent saw one of four descriptions of VUR, with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) and occurrence of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). A 6-week postoperative health state following ARS was also assessed. We used the time trade-off (TTO) method to elicit utility scores. Factors associated with utility score were assessed with a multivariate linear regression model. The survey was completed by 1200 individuals. Data were weighted to adjust for demographic differences between responders and non-responders. Mean age was 52 ± 15 years, 44% were male, and 68% were White. In terms of education, 29% had a college degree or higher. The mean utility score for VUR overall was 0.82 ± 0.28. VUR utility scores did not differ significantly based on inclusion of CAP or UTI in the health state description (p = 0.21). The 6-week postoperative period garnered a utility of 0.71 ± 0.43. Our results showed that VUR has a mean utility score of 0.82, which indicates that the community perceives this condition to be a substantial burden. For comparison, conditions with similar utility scores include compensated hepatitis B-related cirrhosis (0.80) and glaucoma (0.82); conditions

  1. Alginate therapy is effective treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leiman, D A; Riff, B P; Morgan, S; Metz, D C; Falk, G W; French, B; Umscheid, C A; Lewis, J D

    2016-09-26

    In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and erosive esophagitis, treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is highly effective. However, in some patients, especially those with non-erosive reflux disease or atypical GERD symptoms, acid suppressive therapy with PPIs is not as successful. Alginates are medications that work through an alternative mechanism by displacing the post-prandial gastric acid pocket. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the benefit of alginate-containing compounds in the treatment of patients with symptoms of GERD.PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane library electronic databases were searched through October 2015 for randomized controlled trials comparing alginate-containing compounds to placebo, antacids, histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) or PPIs for the treatment of GERD symptoms. Additional studies were identified through bibliography review. Non-English studies and those with pediatric patients were excluded. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects models to calculate odds ratios (OR). Heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the I(2) statistic. Analyses were stratified by type of comparator. The search strategy yielded 665 studies and 15 (2.3%) met inclusion criteria. Fourteen were included in the meta-analysis (N = 2095 subjects). Alginate-based therapies increased the odds of resolution of GERD symptoms when compared to placebo or antacids (OR: 4.42; 95% CI 2.45-7.97) with a moderate degree of heterogeneity between studies (I(2)  = 71%, P = .001). Compared to PPIs or H2RAs, alginates appear less effective but the pooled estimate was not statistically significant (OR: 0.58; 95% CI 0.27-1.22). Alginates are more effective than placebo or antacids for treating GERD symptoms.

  2. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Surgery for “Heartburn” If you suffer from moderate to ...

  3. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infants Related Topics Section Navigation Digestive Diseases Abdominal Adhesions Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dermatitis Herpetiformis Dermatitis ...

  4. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teens Related Topics Section Navigation Digestive Diseases Abdominal Adhesions Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dermatitis Herpetiformis Dermatitis ...

  5. Gelastic seizures misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Laura L; Ng, Yu-Tze; Kerrigan, John F

    2007-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can have variable manifestations including regurgitation, irritability, arching, choking, and apnea. The disorder is also frequently mistaken for seizures (Sandifer syndrome). We report 6 patients in whom the opposite phenomenon occurred: their seizures were mistaken for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Six of 77 patients (6.8%) with gelastic seizures and epilepsy symptomatic of hypothalamic hamartomas were noted to be misdiagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease in infancy. As is typical in these patients, gelastic seizures were not diagnosed until months, or often years, later. Delayed diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartomas can lead to a potentially deleterious syndrome involving refractory epilepsy, developmental problems, and precocious puberty. Gelastic seizures should be considered among the conditions that can mimic reflux symptoms.

  6. Cervical venous reflux in dynamic brain scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Perez, L A

    1976-01-01

    Cervical venous reflux, shown by dynamic brain scintigraphy, was investigated through three avenues of approach: (A) by reviewing 371 randomly chosen routine dynamic intracerebral bloodflow studies to estimate its incidence; (B) by correlative positive-contrast superior venacavography in patients with characteristic cervical venous reflux; and (C) by performing dynamic brain scintigraphy while utilizing various positional and physiologic maneuvers to attempt to produce cervical venous reflux in patients who did not exhibit this phenomenon on earlier examination. Although any obstruction of the superior vena cava or a properly timed Valsalva maneuver in selected patients can produce the scintigraphic picture of cervical venous reflux, in most cases it is a normal phenomenon due to incompetent or absent cervical venous valves.

  7. A family study of vesicoureteric reflux

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Aida De; Evans, Kathleen; Ransley, P.; Rosenberg, A. R.; Rothwell, D.; Sherwood, T.; Williams, D. I.; Barratt, T. M.; Carter, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux is now considered to be due essentially to congenital malformation of the vesicoureteric junction. It is also considered to be a major cause of renal failure in early adult life. The condition is associated with recurrent urinary tract infection and in some instances with renal scarring. When reflux is detected clinically, in the investigation of patients with recurrent urinary tract infection, renal scarring is often already present. The reflux tends to disappear in later childhood. A family study has been made based on 186 index patients with established primary reflux, with special attention to a history of genitourinary symptoms in the sibs and parents of these patients. There were 39 sibs under the age of 4 years. For these the parents were offered investigation by micturating cystogram. The parents of 20 accepted. Reflux was shown in 3, and in 2 of these there was already renal scarring. The proportion of all infants and young children who have reflux is not accurately known, but the few published surveys of screening of normal infants and young children by micturating cystogram suggest that the prevalence is of the order of 1%. The prevalence in sibs is, then, about 10 times higher. There was a main group of 214 sibs over the age of 4 years. For these the parents were offered investigation by intravenous pyelogram only for those sibs who had a history of recurrent urinary tract infection. If renal scarring was found then a micturating cystogram was done. Of 110 sisters, 12 were `symptomatic', renal scarring was found in 5 of these (1 was on haemodialysis), and reflux was still present in 3. Of 104 brothers 7 were `symptomatic', renal scarring was found in 2 and reflux was present in both. For comparison, the published reports of several surveys of schoolgirls indicate that about 2 in 100 have recurrent urinary tract infection, and in about a quarter of these (0·5%) reflux was present and in about one-eighth (0·25%) renal scarring was

  8. [Severe laryngitis associated to gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Botto, Hugo; Antonioli, Cintia; Nieto, Mary; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Cuestas, Giselle; Roques Revol, Magdalena; López Marti, Jessica; Rodríguez, Hugo

    2014-02-01

    There is a strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngolaryngeal reflux as factors leading to respiratory disease, manifested as dysphonia, wheezing, coughing, recurrent laryngitis, bronchial obstruction, laryngospasm and apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs). These manifestations can be mild or severe and may sometimes put the patient's life at risk. We present two cases of patients with severe laryngitis who required endotracheal intubation, one of which underwent tracheostomy. The diagnostic methods and their limitations and the patients outcomes are described.

  9. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for gastroesophageal reflux disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Habu, Yasuki; Oshima, Tadayuki; Manabe, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagahara, Akihito; Kawamura, Osamu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ozawa, Soji; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Ohara, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Adachi, Kyoichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miwa, Hiroto; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Haruma, Ken; Hongo, Michio; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-08-01

    As an increase in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported in Japan, and public interest in GERD has been increasing, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology published the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for GERD (1st edition) in 2009. Six years have passed since its publication, and there have been a large number of reports in Japan concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and Barrett's esophagus during this period. By incorporating the contents of these reports, the guidelines were completely revised, and a new edition was published in October 2015. The revised edition consists of eight items: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, internal treatment, surgical treatment, esophagitis after surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract, extraesophageal symptoms, and Barrett's esophagus. This paper summarizes these guidelines, particularly the parts related to the treatment for GERD. In the present revision, aggressive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy is recommended for severe erosive GERD, and on-demand therapy or continuous maintenance therapy is recommended for mild erosive GERD or PPI-responsive non-erosive GERD. Moreover, PPI-resistant GERD (insufficient symptomatic improvement and/or esophageal mucosal break persisting despite the administration of PPI at a standard dose for 8 weeks) is defined, and a standard-dose PPI twice a day, change in PPI, change in the PPI timing of dosing, addition of a prokinetic drug, addition of rikkunshito (traditional Japanese herbal medicine), and addition of histamine H2-receptor antagonist are recommended for its treatment. If no improvement is observed even after these treatments, pathophysiological evaluation with esophageal impedance-pH monitoring or esophageal manometry at an expert facility for diseases of the esophagus is recommended.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Zaheer; Reddy, D. Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined by the presence of troublesome symptoms resulting from the reflux of gastric contents. The prevalence of GERD is increasing globally. An incompetent lower esophageal sphincter underlies the pathogenesis of GERD. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) form the core of GERD management. However, a substantial number of patients do not respond well to PPIs. The next option is anti-reflux surgery, which is efficacious, but it has its own limitations, such as gas bloating, inability to belch or vomit, and dysphagia. Laparoscopic placement of magnetic augmentation device is emerging as a useful alternative to conventional anti-reflux surgery. However, invasiveness of a surgical procedure remains a concern for the patients. The proportion of PPI non-responders or partial responders who do not wish for anti-reflux surgery defines the ‘treatment gap’ and needs to be addressed. The last decade has witnessed the fall and rise of many endoscopic devices for GERD. Major endoscopic strategies include radiofrequency ablation and endoscopic fundoplication devices. Current endoscopic devices score high on subjective improvement, but have been unimpressive in objective improvement like esophageal acid exposure. In this review, we discuss the current endoscopic anti-reflux therapies and available evidence for their role in the management of GERD. PMID:27744659

  11. Surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux in children.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jennifer; Skoog, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common uropathy affecting children. Compared to children without VUR, those with VUR have a higher rate of pyelonephritis and renal scarring following urinary tract infection (UTI). Options for treatment include observation with or without antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical repair. Surgical intervention may be necessary in patients with persistent reflux, renal scarring, and recurrent or breakthrough febrile UTI. Both open and endoscopic approaches to reflux correction are successful and reduce the occurrence of febrile UTI. Estimated success rates of open and endoscopic reflux correction are 98.1% (95% CI 95.1, 99.1) and 83.0% (95% CI 69.1, 91.4), respectively. Factors that affect the success of endoscopic injection include pre-operative reflux grade and presence of functional or anatomic bladder abnormalities including voiding dysfunction and duplicated collecting systems. Few studies have evaluated the long-term outcomes of endoscopic injection, and with variable results. In patients treated endoscopically, recurrent febrile UTI occurred in 0-21%, new renal damage in 9-12%, and recurrent reflux in 17-47.6% of treated ureters with at least 1 year follow-up. These studies highlight the need for standardized outcome reporting and longer follow-up after endoscopic treatment.

  12. A Functional Assessment of Handmouthing among Persons with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swender, Stephen L.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mayville, Stephen B.; Gonzalez, Melissa L.; McDowell, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Background: The behavioural function of handmouthing has been assessed across various studies utilising analogue functional analyses. The aim of the current study was to expand upon research on this relatively understudied behaviour by examining the relationship between handmouthing and "Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disorder" (GERD), and the potential…

  13. A Functional Assessment of Handmouthing among Persons with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swender, Stephen L.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mayville, Stephen B.; Gonzalez, Melissa L.; McDowell, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Background: The behavioural function of handmouthing has been assessed across various studies utilising analogue functional analyses. The aim of the current study was to expand upon research on this relatively understudied behaviour by examining the relationship between handmouthing and "Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disorder" (GERD), and the potential…

  14. [Recommended diet for reflux spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Viebig, Ricardo Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    The spectrophotometric probe, which uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodenoesophagic reflux is subject to interference from strongly colored foods, which can cause erroneously high bilirubin absorbance readings. To overcome this problem it is necessary to ingest a diet that is free from such substances. To test the absorbance of 48 different food substances in an in vitro environment. Dry foods were blended with water or milk and non-dry solid foods were blended undiluted. It was utilized the proper calibration recipient to test them. The absorbance of weakly colored foods was usually lesser than the commonly accepted threshold of 0.14, and the absorbance of strongly colored foods was usually above this. Thirty-two from the 48 substances tested are suitable when the absorbance threshold is set at 0.14, but scrambled eggs, lacteous flour mush, green beans, beetroot, carrot, chayote, squash, "baroa" potato, boiled corn, orange, cashew, purple grape, avocado, mango, papaya and peach can alter the results and must be avoided. From the foods evaluated, enough are suitable at the 0.14 threshold to enable a suitable diet to be constructed for most patients during Bilitec studies.

  15. Vesicoureteral reflux, a benign condition.

    PubMed

    Venhola, Mika; Uhari, Matti

    2009-02-01

    The combination of urinary tract infection (UTI) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is commonly thought to predispose the child to pyelonephritis, renal scarring and, later in life, to hypertension or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This paradigm has led to the active search, follow-up and treatment of VUR, and also prevention of recurrent UTI in children. The causality of VUR and ESRD is controversial, however. According to recent meta-analyses it is uncertain whether we can prevent renal scarring or ESRD by treating VUR. Studies on VUR are abundant, but the findings and conclusions are confounding. Because of the lack of evidence of the role of VUR, reasonable doubt has recently been presented on the rationale of imaging all children with UTI and treating the children with VUR. The overall importance of VUR is confounded because of the natural tendency of VUR to resolve spontaneously, its dynamic nature, and its different grades in children. The historical studies showing that VUR is much more common, even among healthy children, than usually claimed, have been forgotten. Since it seems that we are referring too many healthy children to unpleasant and possibly unnecessary imaging tests for VUR, we are uncertain when and what kind of VUR-if any-we should treat, and whether our present rationale of addressing VUR truly makes any difference to renal scarring or ESRD in children, we should critically revisit the subject of VUR.

  16. The effect of decaffeination of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Pehl, C; Pfeiffer, A; Wendl, B; Kaess, H

    1997-06-01

    Patients with reflux disease often complain of heartburn after ingestion of coffee. Induction of gastro-oesophageal reflux has been demonstrated by pH-metry following the intake of coffee in healthy volunteers. The reflux was reduced when the coffee had undergone a decaffeination process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decaffeination of coffee on reflux in patients with reflux disease. Seventeen reflux patients underwent two osesophageal 3-h pH measurements. The patients received, in a double-blind study design in a randomized order, 300 mL of either regular or decaffeinated coffee together with a standardized breakfast. The fraction time oesophageal pH < 4 was calculated during the three postprandial hours. For regular coffee the fraction time was calculated to a median of 17.9% with a range of 0.7-56.6%. The fraction time was significantly reduced to 3.1% (0-49.9%) after ingestion of decaffeinated coffee. The amount of gastro-oesophageal reflux induced by the intake of regular coffee in patients with reflux disease can be reduce by the decaffeination of coffee.

  17. High incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with known reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Treves, S.T.; Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Davis, R.T.; Rosen, P.; Bauer, S.; Retik, A.; Colodny, A.

    1985-05-01

    A significant occurrence of vesicoureteric reflux in siblings of children with reflux has been previously suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with vesicoureteric reflux using radionuclide voiding cystography (RNC). A random group of 52 siblings was studied. Their ages were from 2 mos. to 13 yrs. (mean 4 yrs.). Seventy-one percent were female and 29% male, RNC was performed with the patients supine, and Tc-99m pertechnetate (2mCi/1) was infused into the bladder by catheter. A computerized gamma camera recorded the filling and voiding phase of the study at 1 frame/5 sec. Reflux was detected in 40% of the patients. It was bilateral in 17% and unilateral in 23% of the patients. Reflux was identified to the renal pelves in half of the patients. In two of these patients Tc-99m DMSA scans were obtained which revealed significant renal scarring. This study demonstrates the high incidence of reflux of various degrees in these asymptomatic siblings on high risk of developing significant renal disease. Identification and proper treatment of asymptomatic children with vesicoureteric reflux may help prevent the development of renal damage.

  18. Impedance signature of pharyngeal gaseous reflux.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Osamu; Bajaj, Shailesh; Aslam, Muhammad; Hofmann, Candy; Rittmann, Tanya; Shaker, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Pharyngeal impedance changes induced by various pharyngeal reflux events have not been characterized. To characterize pharyngeal impedance changes induced by participant-perceived belching events. We systematically evaluated pharyngeal impedance and pH changes related to 453 belch events in 11 gastroesophageal reflux disease, 10 reflux attributed-laryngitis patients and 16 controls. Of 453 belch events, 362 were analyzable. Of these, 72% occurred within 10 s, 93% within 20 s, 99% within 30 s and 100% within 40 s of the time that participants marked a belch event. In 15% impedance changes in the pharynx preceded, in 12% they were simultaneous and in 73% they occurred after the start of the impedance change in the proximal esophagus. Time interval between the two events ranged between 0.4+/-0.03 and 0.7+/-0.1 s. In all, there were three types of belch-induced impedance changes: (a) impedance increase, (b) impedance decrease and (c) multiphasic. Twenty percent of impedance events associated with belching had less than 50% change from baseline, whereas in 51% changes exceeded or were equal to 50%. Among events with a drop in pharyngeal impedance, only two satisfied the criteria for the liquid reflux event. Pharyngeal ventilation of gastric gaseous content seems to have a unique impedance signature. During pharyngeal gas reflux events, impedance changes may start before or after proximal esophageal changes. Belching may induce negative pharyngeal changes that do not meet the criteria for liquid reflux. These findings need to be taken into consideration in the analysis of pharyngeal reflux events.

  19. Vesicoureteral reflux and elimination disorders.

    PubMed

    Alova, I; Lottmann, H B

    2008-03-01

    Two kinds of elimination disorders can be associated with Vesico Ureteral Reflux (VUR): pure bladder elimination disorders or combination of bladder and bowel elimination disorders. An elimination disorder is always a factor which worsens the prognosis of VUR, as it increases the risk of infectious complications and thus presents a threat for the upper urinary tract. Regarding pure bladder elimination disorders, a chronic urine residue is observed in four clinical situations: the syndrome megacystis-mega ureter; the mega bladder without mega ureter, but with VUR; high grade massive VUR without a mega bladder; organic obstructions of the urethra (such as posterior urethral valves.). VUR associated with urine and fecal elimination disorders cover functional pelvi perineal dyscoordination, bladder sphincter dysynergia, disturbances of visceral motricity and anal sphincter function. The most characteristic type is represented by the neuropathic detrusor-sphincter dysfunction; also enter in this category neurogenic non-neurogenic bladders (Hinman's syndrome); However the vast majority of urine and fecal elimination disorders is represented by non neuropathic perineal dyscoordination associating at various degrees: voiding postponement, lack of sphincter relaxation during micturation, interrupted voiding, and constipation. The diagnosis of elimination disorders associated with VUR is based on non invasive investigations such as anamnesis and drinking/voiding chart in children and adolescents, and "four observation test" in infants. Ultrasound and uroflowmetry are also useful tools. Invasive investigations include mainly voiding cystourethrography and urodynamics, ideally combined in video urodynamic studies. The management of urinary and intestinal elimination disorders is based on the prevention of infections, the suppression of the post voiding residual urine and the treatment of an associated constipation. If surgical treatment of VUR is needed, it must be associated

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux in the patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, E; Entok, E; Metintas, M; Vardareli, E; Elbek, O

    2001-01-01

    Thirty one patients with asthma (mean age was 44.4 10.7; range 18-63) were investigated for gastroesophageal reflux (GER). The patients were separated into two groups according to presence of reflux and/or nocturnal symptoms. 13 patients had one of the reflux and/or nocturnal asthma symptoms (Group 1), whereas 18 patients had none of them (Group 2). To assess GER patients underwent to scintigraphy with Tc99m. GER was determined 4 of 13 patients in group 1 (30,7 %) and 1 of 18 patients in group 2 (5,5 %). There was significant difference between the group 1 and group 2 in that respect (p < 0,001). The patients with established GER (5 patients) were given Omeprazole (a proton pomp inhibitor) 40 mg daily for 4 weeks following a 2 week placebo period. The patients recorded their daily and nocturnal symptoms of asthma, additional salbutamol use, morning and evening peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) measurements in a daily chart during placebo and omeprazole treatment without changing their antiasthma treatment. Their PEFR, FEV1 values, daily and nocturnal symptoms and additional beta agonist use did not changed after omeprazole treatment except one. But their reflux symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation) were improved. As a consequence, we suggested that asthmatics which have some complaints of reflux should be searched for GER. Not the respiratory functions but GER symptoms can be improved w

  1. Association between follicular tracheitis and gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Duval, Melanie; Meier, Jeremy; Asfour, Fadi; Jackson, Daniel; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Muntz, Harlan R; Park, Albert H

    2016-03-01

    Follicular tracheitis (also known as tracheal cobblestoning) is an entity that is poorly described and of unclear significance. The objective of this study was to better define follicular tracheitis and determine the association between the clinical finding of follicular tracheitis on bronchoscopy and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Retrospective chart review of children with recurrent croup having undergone a rigid bronchoscopy and an investigation for gastroesophageal reflux between 2001 and 2013. 117 children with recurrent croup children age 6-144 months were included in the study. Follicular tracheitis was noted on 41% of all bronchoscopies. Fifty-nine percent of all children who underwent bronchoscopy were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux on at least one investigation. Forty-nine of 117 children underwent a pH probe study, and 51% were found to have evidence of reflux on this study. Nine children were diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis. Three patients underwent a biopsy of the follicular tracheitis lesions, which revealed chronic inflammation. There was no evidence of an association between findings of follicular tracheitis and a positive test for gastroesophageal reflux (p=0.52) or a positive pH probe study (p=0.64). There was no association between follicular tracheitis and subglottic stenosis (p=0.33) or an history of asthma and/or atopy (p=0.19). In children with recurrent croup, follicular tracheitis remains an unspecific finding associated with an inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reflux in Infants: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastroesophogeal Reflux Disease) (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Also in Spanish Reflux and GERD in Infants (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) Spitting Up in Babies (American ...

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    PubMed

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome.

  4. [Urethrovesical reflux in patients with chronic cystitis].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Astapov, A I; Zaĭtsev, A V; Gumin, L M

    2007-01-01

    We studied the role of urethrovesical reflux in the onset and maintenance of chronic inflammation in the urinary bladder in patients suffering from chronic cystitis combined with pseudopolyposis of the neck of the bladder and proximal part of the urethra. We modelled a simplified version of an urination fragment of a special computer graphic station. The original computer model theoretically proves the existance of urethrovesical reflux caused by pseudopolyposis in the zone of the urinary bladder cervix and/or proximal urethra. The data were confirmed by radionuclide investigation. Our studies proved the presence of urethrovesical reflux in patients with pseudopolyposis of the bladder cervix provoking retrograde infection of the lower urinary tract. We think it necessary to combine conventional conservative treatment of cystitis with endourethral surgical interventions aimed at reestablishment of normal urination.

  5. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens potential novel avenues of therapy to clinicians struggling to treat patients with apparently intractable respiratory complaints. This review provides a description of the airway reflux syndrome, its effects on the lung and current and future therapeutic options. PMID:23251752

  6. Randomised clinical trial: the clinical efficacy and safety of an alginate-antacid (Gaviscon Double Action) versus placebo, for decreasing upper gastrointestinal symptoms in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Yang, C; Zhao, H; Zheng, P; Wilkinson, J; Ng, B; Yuan, Y

    2015-10-01

    There is a paucity of large-scale studies evaluating the clinical benefit of the Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate-antacid formulation for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group study to evaluate efficacy and safety of Gaviscon DA in reducing heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia symptoms in individuals with mild-to-moderate GERD in China. Participants with symptomatic GERD (n = 1107) were randomised to receive Gaviscon DA or placebo (two tablets four times daily) for seven consecutive days. The primary endpoint compared the change in Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) score for the GERD (heartburn + regurgitation) dimension between Gaviscon DA and placebo. Secondary endpoints compared the change in RDQ scores for individual heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia dimensions, overall treatment evaluation (OTE) scores and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Mean RDQ GERD scores: 2.51 for Gaviscon DA and 2.50 for placebo at baseline; 1.25 for Gaviscon DA and 1.46 for placebo post treatment. Gaviscon DA was statistically superior to placebo in reducing GERD and dyspepsia RDQ scores [least-squares mean (LSM) difference: GERD -0.21, P < 0.0001; dyspepsia -0.18, P = 0.0004], despite a substantial placebo response. The Gaviscon DA group reported more favourable overall treatment responses than the placebo group across all OTE categories (P < 0.0001). Superior relief of GERD symptoms was observed both in those with non-erosive and those with erosive reflux disease (LSM difference -0.14 [P = 0.038] and -0.29 [P < 0.0001] respectively). Incidence of AEs was similar in both groups. Gaviscon DA tablets provide effective and safe reduction in acid reflux and dyspepsia symptoms in Chinese individuals with mild-to-moderate GERD. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01869491. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Association Between Nocturnal Acid Reflux and Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Sheng; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether there is a direct association between subjective sleep quality and esophageal acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We enrolled patients with classic reflux symptoms for endoscopy and ambulatory pH monitoring. The severity of esophageal mucosal injury was assessed by upper endoscopy. Distal esophageal acid exposure was determined by ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring. Sleep disturbance was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. In total, 103 patients (53 patients without sleep dysfunction and 50 patients with sleep dysfunction) were studied. Erosive esophagitis was found more in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (45% versus 31%, P = 0.04). Abnormal esophageal pH was found more in patients with dysfunction (22%) than in patients without sleep dysfunction (5.7%, P = 0.03). Recumbent acid contact time (%) was greater in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (3.7 ± 2.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.04). Sleep quality score positively correlated with acid contact time (r = 0.32, P = 0.02), prolonged reflux events (r = 0.45, P = 0.008) and longer reflux event (r = 0.28, P = 0.03) during recumbent period. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease along with sleep dysfunction are characterized with greater nocturnal acid reflux and more erosive esophagitis. Our study suggests that increased nocturnal acid reflux may play a role in inducing sleep disturbance in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporal Association Between Reflux-like Behaviors and Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm and Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Funderburk, Apryle; Nawab, Ursula; Abraham, Sheeja; DiPalma, Joan; Epstein, Michele; Aldridge, Heather; Aghai, Zubair H

    2016-04-01

    Multichannel intraluminal impedance studies (MII-pH) have become the criterion standard for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Several clinical signs and symptoms that are attributed to GER during infancy may not be related to true reflux. Our objective was to correlate the observed reflux-like behaviors to reflux events on MII-pH studies. This is a retrospective study on infants being evaluated for GER with MII. During the MII-pH study, the infants were observed for clinical behaviors. Symptom Index (SI), symptom sensitivity index (SSI), and symptom association probability were used to correlate symptoms with reflux events. Of 58 infants (40 preterm, 18 term) included in the study, only 6 infants (10%) had an abnormal MII-pH study. Irritability (32 infants), bradycardia (20), and desaturation (18) were the common signs and symptoms. A total of 2142 (755 acidic and 1386 nonacidic) reflux episodes and 953 clinical reflux behaviors were recorded. The incidence and pattern of GER was similar in preterm and term infants. There was no significant difference in GER episodes and acid exposure in preterm infants fed orally or via nasogastric tube. The symptom association probability was abnormal in only 6 (19%), 1 (5%), and 5 (28%) infants with irritability, bradycardia, and desaturation, respectively. The prevalence of GER as detected by MII-pH was low (10%) in symptomatic preterm and term infants. The incidence and pattern of GER was similar in preterm and term infants. The majority of suspected clinical reflux behaviors did not correlate with reflux events.

  9. Multimodality evaluation of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms who have failed empiric proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Galindo, G; Vassalle, J; Marcus, S N; Triadafilopoulos, G

    2013-07-01

    Patients with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), such as chest pain, heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia, are typically treated initially with a course of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The evaluation of patients who have either not responded at all or partially and inadequately responded to such therapy requires a more detailed history and may involve an endoscopy and esophageal biopsies, followed by esophageal manometry, ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring, and gastric emptying scanning. To assess the merits of a multimodality 'structural' and 'functional' assessment of the esophagus in patients who have inadequately controlled GERD symptoms despite using empiric PPI, a retrospective cohort study of patients without any response or with poor symptomatic control to empiric PPI (>2 months duration) who were referred to an Esophageal Studies Unit was conducted. Patients were studied using symptom questionnaires, endoscopy (+ or - for erosive disease, or Barrett's metaplasia) and multilevel esophageal biopsies (eosinophilia, metaplasia), esophageal motility (aperistalsis, dysmotility), 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring (+ if % total time pH < 4 > 5%), and gastric emptying scanning (+ if >10% retention at 4 hours and >70% at 2 hours). Over 3 years, 275 patients (147 men and 128 women) aged 16-89 years underwent complete multimodality testing. Forty percent (n= 109) had nonerosive reflux disease (esophagogastroduodenoscopy [EGD]-, biopsy-, pH+); 19.3% (n= 53) had erosive esophagitis (EGD+); 5.5% (n= 15) Barrett's esophagus (EGD+, metaplasia+); 5.5% (n= 15) eosinophilic esophagitis (biopsy+); 2.5% (n= 7) had achalasia and 5.8% (n= 16) other dysmotility (motility+, pH-); 16% (n= 44) had functional heartburn (EGD-, pH-), and 5.8% (n= 16) had gastroparesis (gastric scan+). Cumulative symptom scores for chest pain, heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were similar among the groups (mean range 1.1-1.35 on a 0-3 scale

  10. Vesicoureteric reflux and reflux nephropathy: from mouse models to childhood disease.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Marie-Lyne; Watt, Christine L; Gupta, Indra R

    2014-04-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital urinary tract defect that predisposes children to recurrent kidney infections. Kidney infections can result in renal scarring or reflux nephropathy defined by the presence of chronic tubulo-interstitial inflammation and fibrosis that is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure. The discovery of mouse models with VUR and with reflux nephropathy has provided new opportunities to understand the pathogenesis of these conditions and may provide insight on the genes and the associated phenotypes that need to be examined in human studies.

  11. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  13. Enterogastric reflux detection with technetium-99m IDA

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Pavia, J.; Loomena, F.; Abello, R.; Herranz, R.; Setoain, J.

    1985-08-01

    A Tc-99m IDA scan was performed in a patient with severe alkaline esophagitis subsequent to a Billroth I gastroenterostomy. The scan showed enterogastric reflux simultaneously with gastroesophageal reflux of bile. The study was recorded in a computer and the reflux quantitated.

  14. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  15. LINX® Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C.; DeMeester, Tom R.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant ‘therapy gap’ in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX® Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients. PMID:23814607

  16. Sexual activity does not predispose to reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Serhat; Valytova, Elen; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of sexual activity on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an under-recognized concern of patients, and one rarely assessed by physicians. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the influence of sexual activity on the intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events in GERD patients. Methods Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of GERD were prospectively enrolled. Intraesophageal pH monitoring was recorded for 48 hours with a Bravo capsule. All patients were instructed to have sexual intercourse or abstain in a random order two hours after the same refluxogenic dinner within two consecutive nights. Patients were requested to have sex in the standard “missionary position” and women were warned to avoid abdominal compression. The patients completed a diary reporting the time of the sexual intercourse and GERD symptoms. The percentage of reflux time and acid reflux events were compared in two ways: within 30 and 60 minutes prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and in the same time frame of the day without sexual intercourse. Results Fifteen of 21 GERD patients were analyzed. The percentage of reflux time and number of acid reflux events did not show a significant difference within the 30- and 60-minute periods prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and on the day without sexual intercourse, as well. Conclusion Sexual activity does not predispose to increased intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings in patients who define reflux symptoms during sexual intercourse. PMID:25452843

  17. [The clinical significance of typical reflux symptoms in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Zhou, Liya; Wang, Ye; Lu, Shifang; Zhang, Yaopeng; Ding, Shigang; Lin, Sanren

    2014-07-01

    To explore the clinical significance of typical reflux symptoms in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Consecutive patients older than 16 years, who initially visited department of gastroenterology at clinic of Peking University Third Hospital from May 9, 2012 to Dec 31, 2012, were required to complete a self-reported GERD questionnaire. Upper endoscopy was performed in some selected patients. A total of 18 987 patients were enrolled with a response rate of 91.5%. The prevalence of symptom-defined GERD was 13.6% (2 579/18 987). A total of 4 357 (22.9%) patients underwent the upper endoscopy, and the diagnostic rates of reflux esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, peptic ulcer disease, and upper gastrointestinal malignancy were 13.1% (572/4 357), 1.8% (78/4 357), 10.5% (456/4 357), and 1.7% (75/4 357), respectively. The incidence of reflux esophagitis was 22.7% (216/951) in patients with reflux symptoms and 10.5% (356/3 406) (P < 0.001) in patients without reflux symptoms, 2.7% (26/951) and 1.5% (52/3 406), respectively (P = 0.013) for Barrett's esophagus; 6.8% (65/951) and 11.5% (391/3 406), respectively (P < 0.001) for peptic ulcer disease; 1.7% (16/951) and 1.7% (59/3 406), respectively (P = 0.917) for upper gastrointestinal malignancy. GERD is one of the major diseases at gastroenterology clinic. Typical reflux symptoms suggest a diagnosis of GERD. But some patients with peptic ulcer disease or upper gastrointestinal malignancy can also present typical reflux symptoms. Upper endoscopy is valuable to avoid the misdiagnosis of other disorders.

  18. [Analysis of anti-reflux surgery failure].

    PubMed

    Cano Novillo, I; Benavent Gordo, M I; Portela Casalod, E; Delgado Muñoz, M D; Aguado Roncero, P; Vilariño Mosquera, A; Berchi García, F J

    2000-01-01

    Recurrent gastroesophageal reflux following fundoplication is a challenging problem, because it is usually refractory to medical treatment and a second, technically difficult, antireflux operation is required. Different factors that may contribute to surgery failure have been identified in children. We present 8 cases who underwent redofundoplication after failed procedures, from a total number of 96 patients operated on due to gastroesophageal reflux. Four patient's had their initial fundoplication performed at our institution. Six patients were neurologically impaired, six had chronic pulmonary disease, and two had esophageal atresia. The main presenting symptoms were recurrent vomiting (n = 8) and aspiration (n = 4). Gastroesophageal reflux was confirmed by barium swallow and endoscopy. Operative findings showed wrap breakdown in two cases, warp breakdown associated with hiatal hernia in five, wrap breakdown associated with paraesophageal hernia in two cases, and paraesophageal hernia with normal wrap in one. A second Nissen procedure were performed in five cases, whereas a Collis-Nissen gastroplasty was realized in three with a short esophagus. Six patients had a successful outcome remaining symptom free, one has severe disphagia, and one has recurrent vomiting. In our experience, patients with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux disease should undergo an antireflux procedure tailored to specific anatomic or functional abnormalities.

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... within two to three hours of eating • Decrease caffeine intake • Avoid theophylline (if possible) Your physician may also recommend medications to treat reflux or relieve symptoms. Over-the-counter antacids and H2 blockers may help decrease the effects of stomach acid. Proton pump inhibitors block acid ...

  20. Laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Piccoli, Micaela; Conigliaro, Rita; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2014-10-21

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leads to troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Heartburn is the cardinal symptom, often associated with regurgitation. In patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and when the diagnosis of GERD is in question, direct reflux testing by impedance-pH monitoring is warranted. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the standard surgical treatment for GERD. It is highly effective in curing GERD with a 80% success rate at 20-year follow-up. The Nissen fundoplication, consisting of a total (360°) wrap, is the most commonly performed antireflux operation. To reduce postoperative dysphagia and gas bloating, partial fundoplications are also used, including the posterior (Toupet) fundoplication, and the anterior (Dor) fundoplication. Currently, there is consensus to advise laparoscopic fundoplication in PPI-responsive GERD only for those patients who develop untoward side-effects or complications from PPI therapy. PPI resistance is the real challenge in GERD. There is consensus that carefully selected GERD patients refractory to PPI therapy are eligible for laparoscopic fundoplication, provided that objective evidence of reflux as the cause of ongoing symptoms has been obtained. For this purpose, impedance-pH monitoring is regarded as the diagnostic gold standard.

  1. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  3. [Fat, spices and gastro-oesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    v Schönfeld, J; Evans, D F

    2007-02-01

    In spite of poor evidence, many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux are advised to avoid fat and spices. We therefore measured gastro-oesophageal reflux after fatty and spicy meals. During three 24-h pH monitoring sessions, eight volunteers ate two identical, low fat and mild beef stews, or a hot and fatty Indian curry for lunch. Meals for dinner were the beef stew, the hot Indian curry or a mild curry. Day-time acid exposure was significantly longer after the hot curry (7.5 % [1.4 - 27.1]) than after the beef stews (2.3 % [0.4 - 9.8] and 2.5 % [0.7 - 15.7]). Night-time acid exposure was also significantly shorter after the beef stew (1.3 % [0 - 9]) than after the mild curry (2.9 % [0 - 19.1]) or the hot curry (4.6 % [0.2 - 22.5]). Within two hours postprandially, reflux was not different between the meals. The number of episodes, however, that occurred more than two hours after lunch was significantly lower after the beef stews (4 [2 - 14] and 4.5 [2 - 10]) than after the hot curry (9 [5 - 16]). The same phenomenon was observed after beef stew (0.5 [0 - 2]), mild curry (2 [0 - 4]) and hot curry (2 [1 - 9]) for dinner. We conclude that meals high in fat can provoke reflux, possibly through delayed gastric emptying. Additional spices, however, do not further increase reflux.

  4. Most asthmatics have gastroesophageal reflux with or without bronchodilator therapy.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J; O'Connell, S; Khandelwal, S; Miller, T; Nemchausky, B; Schnell, T G; Serlovsky, R

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and asthma has not been clearly defined. We measured the lower esophageal sphincter pressures and studied gastroesophageal reflux patterns over 24 hours using an ambulatory Gastroreflux Recorder (Del Mar Avionics, Irvine, CA) in 44 controls and 104 consecutive adult asthmatics. The presence or absence of reflux symptoms was not used as a selection criterion for asthmatics. All asthmatics had discrete episodes of diffuse wheezing and documented reversible airway obstruction of at least 20%. Patients underwent reflux testing while receiving, if any, their usual asthmatic medications: 71.2% required chronic bronchodilators and 28.8% required no bronchodilators. Compared with controls, asthmatics had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressures, greater esophageal acid exposure times, more frequent reflux episodes, and longer clearance times in both the upright and supine positions (P less than 0.0001 for all parameters tested). There were no differences in any of the measured reflux parameters between asthmatics who required bronchodilators and those who did not. Thus, the decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressures and increased levels of acid reflux in asthmatics were not entirely caused by the effects of bronchodilator therapy. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis generated reflux values that discriminated asthmatics from controls. More than 80% of adult asthmatics have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. We conclude that most adult asthmatics, regardless of the use of bronchodilator therapy, have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux manifested by increased reflux frequency, delayed acid clearance during the day and night, and diminished lower esophageal sphincter pressures.

  5. Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

  6. Nonerosive arthritis in lupus is mediated by IFN-α stimulated monocyte differentiation that is nonpermissive of osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Kofi A.; Mathian, Alexis; Ma, Lin; Xing, Lianping; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Jaccoud arthritis (JA) joint inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is nonerosive. Although the mechanism responsible is unknown, the anti-osteoclastogenic cytokine interferon-alpha (IFN-α), whose transcriptome is present in SLE monocytes, may be responsible. To test this, we examined effects of IFN-α versus lupus disease on osteoclasts and erosion in the NZBxNZW F1 SLE mouse model with K/BxN serum-induced arthritis (SIA). Methods Elevated systemic IFN-α levels were obtained by administration of an adenoviral vector expressing IFN-α (Ad-IFN-α). SLE disease was marked by anti-dsDNA antibody titer and proteinuria, and Ifi202 and Mx1 expression represented the IFN-α transcriptome. Micro-CT was used to evaluate bone erosions. Flow cytometry for CD11b and CD11c was used to evaluate the frequency of circulating osteoclast precursors (OCP) and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) in blood. Results Administration of Ad-IFN-α to NZBxNZW F1 mice induced osteopetrosis. Pre-autoimmune NZBxNZW F1 mice are fully susceptible to focal erosions in the setting of SIA. However, NZBxNZW F1 mice with high anti-dsDNA antibody titers and the IFN-α transcriptome were protected against bone erosions. Ad-IFN-α pre-treatment of NZW mice before K/BxN serum administration also resulted in protection against bone erosion (r2=0.4720, p<0.01), which was associated with a decrease in circulating CD11b+CD11c− OCP, and a concomitant increase in CD11b+CD11c+ cells (r2=0.6330, p<0.05) that are phenotypic of mDC. Conclusion These findings suggest that IFN-α in SLE shifts monocyte development toward mDC at the expense of osteoclastogenesis thereby resulting in decreased bone erosion. PMID:20131244

  7. Distinguishing the impact of dexlansoprazole on heartburn vs. regurgitation in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Peura, D A; Pilmer, B; Hunt, B; Mody, R; Perez, M C

    2013-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterised by symptomatic heartburn and regurgitation. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) effectively decreases heartburn symptoms, but their effects on symptomatic regurgitation are less clear. To determine the impact of PPI therapy on heartburn and regurgitation severity in patients with either non-erosive GERD (NERD) or erosive oesophagitis (EE). Endoscopically-confirmed NERD patients received dexlansoprazole 30 or 60 mg or placebo in a randomised, blinded, 4-week study. Endoscopically-confirmed EE patients received dexlansoprazole 60 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg in two 8-week, randomised, blinded healing studies. The Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity questionnaire, which includes a heartburn/regurgitation subscale, was administered to assess symptom severity at baseline, and at weeks 2 and 4 of the NERD study and at weeks 4 and 8 during the EE trials. We defined separate subscales for heartburn and regurgitation for this post-hoc analysis. Among patients with both symptoms at baseline, improvements in individual heartburn and regurgitation subscales along with the original combined heartburn/regurgitation subscale were determined. In the NERD and EE studies, 661 and 1909 patients, respectively, had both heartburn and regurgitation at baseline. NERD patients receiving dexlansoprazole 30 and 60 mg experienced significantly greater improvements in symptom severity for both heartburn and regurgitation compared with placebo. EE patients receiving dexlansoprazole 60 mg had significantly greater improvements in heartburn/regurgitation and heartburn-only subscales at week 4 compared with those receiving lansoprazole. Dexlansoprazole appears to be effective in improving both heartburn and regurgitation, and this improvement is maintained for the duration of treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A wireless sensor for detecting gastroesophageal reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ativanichayaphong, Thermpon; Huang, Wen-Ding; Wang, Jianqun; Rao, Smitha M. N.; Tibbals, H. F.; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Spechler, Stuart; Stephanou, Harry; Chiao, J.-C.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to detect gastroesophageal reflux wirelessly. Based on passive telemetry using inductive links, impedance of the refluxate can be determined. We have designed and fabricated planar coils integrated with electrodes on flexible substrates using standard photolithography processes. The device can be implanted in the esophagus using currently available clinical techniques. In vitro experiments were conducted by passing different acidic or non-acidic solutions onto the implanted electrodes and measuring the signal amplitudes with an external receiver. Air, drinking water and different concentrations of artificial stomach fluids were used to test the impedance sensor. System configuration, device designs, fabrication processes and measurement results will be presented in this paper.

  9. Microbiome in reflux disorders and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liying; Chaudhary, Noami; Baghdadi, Jonathan; Pei, Zhiheng

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in the United States and Europe since the 1970s without apparent cause. Although specific host factors can affect risk of disease, such a rapid increase in incidence must be predominantly environmental. In the stomach, infection with Helicobacter pylori has been linked to chronic atrophic gastritis, an inflammatory precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the role of H. pylori in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is not well established. Meanwhile, several studies have established that a complex microbiome in the distal esophagus might play a more direct role. Transformation of the microbiome in precursor states to esophageal adenocarcinoma-reflux esophagitis and Barrett metaplasia-from a predominance of gram-positive bacteria to mostly gram-negative bacteria raises the possibility that dysbiosis is contributing to pathogenesis. However, knowledge of the microbiome in esophageal adenocarcinoma itself is lacking. Microbiome studies open a new avenue to the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of reflux disorders.

  10. Endoluminal methods of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Roy-Shapira, A; Stein, H J; Scwartz, Doron; Fich, A; Sonnenschein, E

    2002-01-01

    Several endoluminal methods of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have either been approved, or are under investigation and development. This review outlines the two approved methods (Bard's endoluminal sewing machine and Curon's Stretta radiofrequency treatment), and describes the available data on new methods under investigation. The various methods can be divided into three broad categories: methods that create a controlled stricture, methods that bulk the gastroesophageal junction, and methods that attempt to create a fundoplication. The pros and cons of each method are discussed. Unlike medical treatment, these methods attack the reflux itself, not just the symptoms. This is a promising approach. However, the controlled stricture and bulking methods do not approach the success rate of a standard fundoplication.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  12. [Gastritis associated with duodeno-gastric reflux].

    PubMed

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Traore, C B; Drabo, M; Soukho, A espouse Diarra; Kalle, A; Dembele, M; Traore, H A; Maiga, M Y

    2007-01-01

    Our main objective was to study gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. It is about a longitudinal study case/witness, paired according to the sex and the age. It was unrolled from February 2005 to January 2006 in the digestive diseases department of the hospital Gabriél Touré, and endoscopic centers of Promenade des Angevins, and clinique Farako. The patients profited from an upper digestive endoscopy to appreciate endoscopic aspect of gastritis associated to bile in the stomach mucus lake. The gastric biopsies were systematic. This study included 50 patients having gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake compared to 50 patients having gastritis associated to clearly gastric mucus lake. The sex-ratio was 1.26 in favour of men. The average age of the patients was of 41.30 +/- 15.43 years. On the symptomatic hand, fetid breath was significantly met in duodeno-gastric reflux (p = 0.013). Potash consumption in the "tô" (millet cake) was significantly reported in gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake (p = 0.042). The endoscopic aspects were comparable. Histological aspects of nonatrophic chronic gastritis were significantly mint in witnesses as well into the antrum as into the fundus (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.00023). The reactional gastritis aspect was the prerogative of duodenogastric reflux (p ranging between 10(-6) and 3.10 (-6). Helicobacter pylori infection was found comparable in the two groups (p = 0.297). Dysplasia although rare was found only in gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. Gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus does not se,nm to have specific clinical, endoscopic and histological presentation. However the presence of dysplasia must have an attentive monitoring.

  13. Endoscopic therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Louis, H; Devière, J

    2005-12-01

    Endoscopic therapies aimed to reduce gastroesophageal reflux have gained an enormous enthusiasm during the last 5 years when several of them were approved by the regulatory agencies and released on the market. These novel therapies comprise 3 types of techniques: injection/bulking, plicating/suturing and radiofrequency thermal injury. Open-labelled trials performed on proton pump inhibitors-responding patients with typical gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms have shown an improvement in reflux symptoms during short term follow-up. Longer-term data are now available and show disappointing results with partial-thickness plications of the cardia. Randomized sham-controlled trials, which are essential to proof the efficacy of GERD endotherapy because of a known high placebo effect in the management of GERD patients, have been conducted, one with radiofrequency and one with polymer injection, and have confirmed the clinical efficacy of both techniques, although the clinical benefit was less impressive than suggested in open-labelled trials. While mechanistic studies have suggested that the compliance of the gastroesophageal junction might be altered by GERD endotherapy, objective assessment of acid reflux with ambulatory pH-metry has shown, however, minimal or no modification by the treatment. Concerns about the safety of these new techniques have raised when complications were reported as the number of treated cases increased. Currently, no definite indication is established for each technique, but numerous potential indications exist and should be addressed in the setting of carefully designed clinical trials. Physicians should be patient and wait for proof of efficacy and safety of these techniques before using them in their clinical practice. Specific and extensive warning should be obtained before starting clinical application. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical view of endoscopic therapy in GERD management.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical presentations, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, W E; Craven, M A; Allen, C J

    1986-01-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux occurs daily in an estimated 7% of adults and weekly or monthly in 29%. Untreated it can lead to esophageal erosions, ulceration and stricture formation. The pathogenesis is often multifactorial: defects in the function of the lower esophageal sphincter, esophageal clearance mechanisms and gastric emptying combine to produce frequent lengthy periods during which the lower esophagus is bathed in regurgitated acid. In most patients reflux disease is easily recognized as recurrent heartburn, regurgitation or dysphagia, or a combination. When acute chest pain or respiratory illness is the primary presenting complaint the patient needs particularly careful investigation to determine whether the symptoms are due to a primary cardiac or respiratory condition, are secondary to gastroesophageal reflux alone or represent a combination of disorders. Endoscopy with biopsy and long-term pH monitoring are the most reliable ways of determining whether reflux disease is present. Additional investigations, such as exercise testing, cardiac catheterization or inhalation challenge, may be needed in patients with cardiac or respiratory symptoms. Treatment should follow a stepped-care approach and in most patients should begin with changes in lifestyle, including dietary manipulation, reducing alcohol and cigarette consumption, and raising the head of the bed, together with appropriate use of antacids or alginate-antacid combinations. H2-receptor antagonists and agents to improve both gastric emptying and the tone of the lower esophageal sphincter may be added in sequence. Most patients will respond well to this regimen. Surgery should be considered only for those with intractable symptoms or with complications (e.g., stricture formation, bleeding, development of dysplastic epithelium in those with Barrett's esophagus, or secondary pulmonary disease that does not respond to medical management). It is successful in 85% of well-selected patients and

  15. Genetic Variations in Vesicoureteral Reflux Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Hains, David S.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common condition in children. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) represents a common associated condition with childhood UTI. UTI susceptibility appears to have a genetic component based on family and UTI cohort studies. Targeted analysis of innate immune system genetic variations indicate that these variations are important in UTI susceptibility. In this overview, we discuss how current cohorts and genetic strategies can be implemented to discover new susceptibility loci in patients with UTI. PMID:26848692

  16. [Morphology of the gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Daum, Ondřej; Kokošková, Bohuslava; Švajdler, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The present definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease is based on clinical criteria that are difficult to reproduce accurately. Pathologists are supposed to confirm the presence of morphological changes induced by gastroesophageal reflux. Traditional evaluation of injury, inflammatory and reactive changes of esophageal squamous epithelium lacks both sufficient sensitivity and specificity, and thus the modern diagnostic focuses on chronic metaplastic changes of esophageal mucosa defined as any mucosal type proximal to the upper border of oxyntic mucosa (also called fundic mucosa of the stomach). In the setting of gastroesophageal reflux the esophageal mucosa, under normal conditions lined with squamous epithelium, undergoes columnar metaplasia. According to morphology and immunophenotype of columnar cells, the columnar metaplasia may be further subdivided to oxyntocardiac mucosa, cardiac mucosa, intestinal metaplasia, and an intermediate type of cardiac mucosa expressing intestinal transcription factor CDX2, but devoid of goblet cells. The latter two mucosal types are currently thought to represent the most probable candidates for neoplastic transformation, whereas oxyntocardiac mucosa is believed to represent a stable compensatory change with no risk of further progression. An evaluation of dysplastic changes (intraepithelial neoplasia) in the setting of columnar lined esophagus necessitates correlation with the second opinion of a GI expert to prevent potentially harmful under- or over-treatment of the patient. Regarding invasive adenocarcinoma, the pathologist should avoid overdiagnosis of the infiltration of the space between the two layers of columnar lined esophagus - associated split muscularis mucosae as invasion of submucosa, as it is associated with different prognosis. Critical evaluation of the real impact of acid suppression on neoplastic transformation in the setting of gastroesophageal reflux disease may represent the greatest challenge for future

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio

    2006-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in about two thirds of children with asthma. It may simply represent a concomitant unrelated finding or it may be responsible for provoking or worsening asthma. GERD could also be a byproduct of asthma itself. In any case, aggressive treatment of GERD seems to improve asthma outcomes. GERD should be suspected in asthma patients who do not have any known risk factors or those who are becoming difficult to treat.

  18. Esophageal sphincter device for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Robert A; Peters, Jeffrey H; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A; Dunst, Christy M; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Lipham, John C; Luketich, James D; Melvin, W Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C; Smith, C Daniel; Smith, Christopher C; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A

    2013-02-21

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. We prospectively assessed 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease before and after sphincter augmentation. The study did not include a concurrent control group. The primary outcome measure was normalization of esophageal acid exposure or a 50% or greater reduction in exposure at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were 50% or greater improvement in quality of life related to gastroesophageal reflux disease and a 50% or greater reduction in the use of proton-pump inhibitors at 1 year. For each outcome, the prespecified definition of successful treatment was achievement of the outcome in at least 60% of the patients. The 3-year results of a 5-year study are reported. The primary outcome was achieved in 64% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 54 to 73). For the secondary outcomes, a reduction of 50% or more in the use of proton-pump inhibitors occurred in 93% of patients, and there was improvement of 50% or more in quality-of-life scores in 92%, as compared with scores for patients assessed at baseline while they were not taking proton-pump inhibitors. The most frequent adverse event was dysphagia (in 68% of patients postoperatively, in 11% at 1 year, and in 4% at 3 years). Serious adverse events occurred in six patients, and in six patients the device was removed. In this single-group evaluation of 100 patients before and after sphincter augmentation with a magnetic device, exposure to esophageal acid decreased, reflux symptoms improved, and use of proton-pump inhibitors decreased. Follow-up studies are needed to assess long-term safety. (Funded by Torax Medical; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00776997.).

  19. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Greenfield, Saul P; Mattoo, Tej K; Keren, Ron; Mathews, Ranjiv; Pohl, Hans G; Kropp, Bradley P; Skoog, Steven J; Nelson, Caleb P; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Chesney, Russell W; Carpenter, Myra A

    2014-06-19

    Children with febrile urinary tract infection commonly have vesicoureteral reflux. Because trial results have been limited and inconsistent, the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent recurrences in children with reflux remains controversial. In this 2-year, multisite, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 607 children with vesicoureteral reflux that was diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection, we evaluated the efficacy of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis in preventing recurrences (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes were renal scarring, treatment failure (a composite of recurrences and scarring), and antimicrobial resistance. Recurrent urinary tract infection developed in 39 of 302 children who received prophylaxis as compared with 72 of 305 children who received placebo (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.78). Prophylaxis reduced the risk of recurrences by 50% (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.74) and was particularly effective in children whose index infection was febrile (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.64) and in those with baseline bladder and bowel dysfunction (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.58). The occurrence of renal scarring did not differ significantly between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (11.9% and 10.2%, respectively). Among 87 children with a first recurrence caused by Escherichia coli, the proportion of isolates that were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 63% in the prophylaxis group and 19% in the placebo group. Among children with vesicoureteral reflux after urinary tract infection, antimicrobial prophylaxis was associated with a substantially reduced risk of recurrence but not of renal scarring. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; RIVUR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00405704.).

  20. Relationship between Depression and Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Young-Hoon; Song, Youn-Su

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between depression, somatization, anxiety, personality, and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). We prospectively analyzed 231 patients with symptoms with LPR using the laryngopharyngeal reflux symptom index and the reflux finding score. Seventy nine (34.2%) patients were diagnosed with LPR. A significant correlation was detected between the presence of LPR and total scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (5.6±5.3 vs. 4.0±4.6, p=0.017) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (4.3±4.9 vs. 3.0±4.5, p=0.041). LPR was significantly more frequent in those with depression than in those without (45.6% vs. 27.0%, p=0.004). A multivariate analysis confirmed a significant association between the presence of LPR and depression (odds ratio, 1.068; 95% confidence interval, 1.011–1.128; p=0.019). Our preliminary results suggest that patients with LPR may need to be carefully evaluated for depression. PMID:28326123

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  2. Extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J R; Aravapalli, A; Pohl, D; Freeman, J; Castell, D O

    2012-01-01

    Extraesophageal (EE) symptoms such as cough and throat clearing are common in patients referred for reflux testing, but are less commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with reflux associated EE symptoms often lack typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. Our aim was to compare the frequency of proximal esophageal reflux between esophageal (typical) symptoms and EE (atypical) symptoms. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) tracings were blinded by an investigator so that symptom markers were relabeled with a number without disclosure of symptom type. We selected 40 patients with at least five reflux-related symptom events for one of four symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, cough, or throat clearing). A blinded investigator analyzed all 200 reflux episodes, reporting the proximal esophageal extent of the reflux for all symptoms. The percentage of symptom-related reflux extending proximally to 17 cm above the LES was similar among all four symptom types. At least 50% of all symptoms were associated with proximal esophageal reflux to 17 cm, with regurgitation having the highest frequency at 60%. Our data indicate that EE symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical esophageal symptoms. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. [Gastroesophageal reflux and asthma--pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Gabriela, Jimborean; Ianosi, Edith Simona; Aberle, Emese; Comes, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and bronchial asthma are frequently encountered comorbidities that maintain an ambivalent relationship, generating a vicious circle where gastroesophageal reflux increases asthmatic symptoms or precipitates bronchial asthma and asthma can trigger or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. Pathogenetic mechanisms of these interrelation are imperfectly understood, despite intense concerns of specialists in both areas. There have been incriminated: eso-bronchial constrictor vagal mediated reflexes, bronchial hyperreactivity, neurogenic inflammation induced by hydrochloric acid penetration in the oesofagus, airways hydrochloric acid microaspiration with asthmatic trigger effects, increased bronchial resistance or increased immune response to antigens. Bronchial obstruction and some antiasthmatic medication can decrease lower esophageal sphincter pressure and thus triggering or aggravating gastroesophageal reflux. The diagnosis of the gastroesophageal reflux in asthmatics involves a careful clinical exam, digestive functional test (up to 24 hours monitoring esophageal pH) and esogastroscopy. Gastroesophageal reflux treatment in asthmatic patients claims elimination of both disease risk factors, diet, proton-pump inhibitors.

  4. Ambulatory oesophageal bile reflux monitoring in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, M T; Lawlor, P; Byrne, P J; Walsh, T N; Hennessy, T P

    1995-05-01

    Bile reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus but evaluation remains difficult. Bilitec 2000 is an ambulatory system that detects bilirubin based on its spectrophotometric properties. Oesophageal bile exposure was evaluated in three groups of patients. Group 1 (n = 11) were normal controls, group 2 (n = 13) were patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux and group 3 (n = 12) were patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Bile reflux was greater in patients with Barrett's mucosa than in controls or those with uncomplicated reflux. This difference was seen in the supine and interdigestive periods. The percentage of time at which gastric pH was greater than 4 and oesophageal pH was above 7 did not differ between the groups. Bilitec 2000 detects greater bile reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus. No corresponding gastric or oesophageal alkaline shift is found. This ambulatory bile reflux monitoring system may be a useful tool in clinical practice.

  5. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-07-01

    The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  6. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Objective  The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Methods  Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. Results  The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). Conclusion  The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests. PMID:27413402

  7. Bile reflux gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus: further evidence of a role for duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed

    Dixon, M F; Neville, P M; Mapstone, N P; Moayyedi, P; Axon, A T

    2001-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that reflux of bile plays a part in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. Bile injury to the gastric mucosa results in a "chemical" gastritis in which oedema and intestinal metaplasia are prominent. To determine if patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more bile related changes in antral mucosa than patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). Patients were identified by a retrospective search of pathology records and those with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of either Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis who had oesophageal and gastric biopsies taken at the same endoscopy and had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection entered the study. Control biopsies were taken from H pylori negative NUD patients. Antral biopsies were examined "blind" to clinical group and graded for a series of histological features from which the "reflux gastritis score" (RGS) and "bile reflux index" (BRI) could be calculated. The reproducibility of these histological scores was tested by a second pathologist. There were 100 patients with Barrett's, 61 with GORD, and 50 with NUD. The RGSs did not differ between groups. BRI values in the Barrett's group were significantly higher than those in GORD subjects (p=0.014) which in turn were higher than those in NUD patients (p=0.037). Similarly, the frequency of high BRI values (>14) was significantly greater in the Barrett's group (29/100; 29%) than in the GORD (9/61; 14.8%) or NUD (4/50; 8%) group. However, agreement on BRI values was "poor", indicating limited applicability of this approach. Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more evidence of bile related gastritis than subjects with uncomplicated GORD or NUD. The presence of bile in the refluxate could be a factor in both the development of "specialised" intestinal metaplasia and malignancy in the oesophagus.

  8. Complete duodenogastric reflux: A scintigraphic sign of significant duodenal pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Hanner, J.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Complete reflux of duodenal contents into the stomach with persistent retention on hepatobiliary scintigraphy or radionuclide gastrointestinal bleeding studies is a relatively rare occurrence. Two cases of complete duodenogastric reflux are reported: one case in a patient with a perforated duodenal diverticulum and the other in a patient with an inflamed, bleeding duodenal ulcer. The finding of complete duodenogastric reflux and persistent retention in the stomach should instigate a thorough evaluation for significant duodenal pathology.

  9. [Clinical effects of FUT-187 in reflux esophagitis after gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Toge, T; Hirai, T; Takiyama, W; Takashima, N; Kawano, K; Tamura, Y; Nishimawari, K; Iwamori, S; Nakanishi, K; Kono, H

    1995-03-01

    FUT-187 was orally administered to 38 patients with postgastrectomy reflux esophagitis for 4 weeks. The drug reduced the chief subjective symptoms of reflux esophagitis, such as heartburn, chest pain, precordial pain, and dysphagia for solids in 78.1% of patients. Redness, edema and erosion were also reduced in 53.3% of patients as determined endoscopically. Overall, FUT-187 exhibited an excellent therapeutic effect on the reflux esophagitis which was refractory to conventional treatments.

  10. Posterior urethral valves: relationship between vesicoureteral reflux and renal function.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Denis A; Morgante, Debora; Frediani, Simone; Iaconelli, Romina; Ceccanti, Silvia; Mele, Ermelinda; Cozzi, Francesco

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between renal function and vesicoureteral reflux before and after valve ablation in patients with posterior urethral valves. In these patients, back pressure may not be the only cause of renal damage. We conducted a retrospective review of 37 patients with valves consecutively treated between 1970 and 2002. Data were available for 31 patients, 19 of whom presented reflux at presentation. Grade of reflux was ascertained by voiding cystourethrography. Overall renal function was measured by serum creatinine, and split renal function was estimated by dimercaptosuccinic acid scan available for all patients but two. Before relief of obstruction, there was no correlation between split renal function and grade of reflux into 25 kidneys of the 17 patients (r = -.13; 95% CI, -.50 to .27; P = .51). High-grade reflux (grade IV-V) affected 6 of the 11 renal units, with split renal function >40% vs 11 of the 14 units with split renal function <40% (P = .38). After successful valve ablation, reflux resolved in all the 11 units with split renal function >40% vs 4 of the 14 units with split renal function <40% (P = .0005). The good renal function of more than half of the renal units with high-grade reflux at presentation, and the persistence of reflux mainly in nonfunctioning or poorly functioning kidneys after valve ablation, support the concept that in some patients with valves, reflux and renal damage are associated anomalies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese Patient.

    PubMed

    Duke, Meredith C; Farrell, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has mirrored the increase in obesity, and GERD is now recognized as an obesity-related comorbidity. There is growing evidence that obesity, specifically central obesity, is associated with the complications of chronic reflux, including erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. While fundoplication is effective in creating a competent gastroesophageal junction and controlling reflux in most patients, it is less effective in morbidly obese patients. In these patients a bariatric operation has the ability to correct both the obesity and the abnormal reflux. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred procedure.

  12. How many cases of laryngopharyngeal reflux suspected by laryngoscopy are gastroesophageal reflux disease-related?

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Nacci, Andrea; Savarino, Edoardo; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Fattori, Bruno; Ceccarelli, Linda; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Berrettini, Stefano; Marchi, Santino

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a laryngoscopic diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). METHODS: Between May 2011 and October 2011, 41 consecutive patients with laryngopharyngeal symptoms (LPS) and laryngoscopic diagnosis of LPR were empirically treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for at least 8 wk, and the therapeutic outcome was assessed through validated questionnaires (GERD impact scale, GIS; visual analogue scale, VAS). LPR diagnosis was performed by ear, nose and throat specialists using the reflux finding score (RFS) and reflux symptom index (RSI). After a 16-d wash-out from PPIs, all patients underwent an upper endoscopy, stationary esophageal manometry, 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) esophageal monitoring. A positive correlation between LPR diagnosis and GERD was supposed based on the presence of esophagitis (ERD), pathological acid exposure time (AET) in the absence of esophageal erosions (NERD), and a positive correlation between symptoms and refluxes (hypersensitive esophagus, HE). RESULTS: The male/female ratio was 0.52 (14/27), the mean age ± SD was 51.5 ± 12.7 years, and the mean body mass index was 25.7 ± 3.4 kg/m2. All subjects reported one or more LPS. Twenty-five out of 41 patients also had typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation). The most frequent laryngoscopic findings were posterior laryngeal hyperemia (38/41), linear indentation in the medial edge of the vocal fold (31/41), vocal fold nodules (6/41) and diffuse infraglottic oedema (25/41). The GIS analysis showed that 10/41 patients reported symptom relief with PPI therapy (P < 0.05); conversely, 23/41 did not report any clinical improvement. At the same time, the VAS analysis showed a significant reduction in typical GERD symptoms after PPI therapy (P < 0.001). A significant reduction in LPS symptoms. On the other hand, such result was not recorded for LPS. Esophagitis was

  13. The effect of the speed of eating on acid reflux and symptoms of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Elen R; Bayrakçı, Berna; Bor, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    There is a general belief that gastroesophageal reflux attacks appear more frequently after quick meal, which is without powerful scientific basis, and the general advise to patients is to eat slowly. We aimed to determine whether the speed of eating has an impact on reflux attacks and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed to 60 patients with frequent gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms (39 women) in a tertiary referral center. One hour after placing the pH probe, the patients were asked to have the same meal (744 kcal: 37,6% of carbohydrate, 21,2% of protein, and 41,2% of fat) within 5 or 30 minutes in random order for two consecutive days without extubating. The number of reflux episodes, acid exposure time, and the symptoms of 3-h postprandial period were analyzed. Thirty-eight patients had normal and 22 patients had pathologic pH monitoring for a total of 28 hours of measurement period. The number of reflux episodes increased in the 2 nd hour. The fast eating group had less reflux attacks and lower total reflux time in the 1 st hour and an insignificant increase in the 2 nd and 3 rd hours. The number of symptoms was higher following slow eating (113 vs. 100) without reaching significance. Speed of food intake has no significant impact on acidic reflux attacks in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The classical advice "eat slowly" may not have any scientific basis. However, a similar study on patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should be performed by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH to evaluate the place of nonacid or weak acid reflux.

  14. Dietary guideline adherence for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disease, and the cost of health care and lost productivity due to GERD is extremely high. Recently described side effects of long-term acid suppression have increased the interest in nonpharmacologic methods for alleviating GERD symptoms. We aimed to examine whether GERD patients follow recommended dietary guidelines, and if adherence is associated with the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California population, comparing 317 GERD patients to 182 asymptomatic population controls. All analyses adjusted for smoking and education. Results GERD patients, even those with moderate to severe symptoms or frequent symptoms, were as likely to consume tomato products and large portion meals as GERD-free controls and were even more likely to consume soft drinks and tea [odds ratio (OR) = 2.01 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-3.61; OR = 2.63 95% CI 1.24-5.59, respectively] and eat fried foods and high fat diet. The only reflux-triggering foods GERD patients were less likely to consume were citrus and alcohol [OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97 for citrus; OR = 0.41 95% CI 0.19-0.87 for 1 + drink/day of alcohol]. The associations were similar when we excluded users of proton pump inhibitors. Conclusions GERD patients consume many putative GERD causing foods as frequently or even more frequently than asymptomatic patients despite reporting symptoms. These findings suggest that, if dietary modification is effective in reducing GERD, substantial opportunities for nonpharmacologic interventions exist for many GERD patients. PMID:25125219

  15. Vesicoureteral reflux: From prophylaxis to surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Anne-Sophie; Bolduc, Stéphane; Moore, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is one of the most common pathologies encountered in pediatric urology. Better understanding of the evolution of VUR and new endoscopic surgical techniques in the last decades have led to major changes in the management of this pathology. However, the treatment algorithm remains complex and is composed of a wide variety of options, from active surveillance to surgical treatment. Herein, we propose to review treatment options for VUR in order to help clinicians make the right treatment decision for the right patient. PMID:28265309

  16. Investigation of extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukali, Emmanouela; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The most common extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include chronic cough, asthma and laryngitis. There are two mechanisms proposed to explain extraesophageal syndromes caused by GERD. The first one is a direct way via irritation and/or microaspiration and the second one is an indirect, vagally mediated way. The investigation of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD is difficult and the empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors usually double dose for at least three months is still the most common approach. PMID:24714277

  17. Role of Mixed Reflux and Hypomotility with Delayed Reflux Clearance in Patients with Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Mentore; Balestrieri, Paola; Biasutto, Dario; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Currently available data reveal a weak relationship between NCCP and dysmotility. Moreover, it is unclear why some refluxes are perceived as heartburn and others as NCCP. We aimed to evaluate the role of the reflux pattern and the esophageal motility in patients with NCCP. Methods Forty-eight patients with NCCP (Group 1) and 50 only typical GERD symptoms (Group 2) were included and underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) and multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. Results Impaired peristalsis was found in 60% of patients with NCCP and in 24% of patients with typical symptoms (P < 0.05). In patients belonging to Group 1, the majority of reflux episodes associated with chest pain were acid and mixed. The proportion of mixed refluxes was higher than that in Group 2. In Group 1, the reflux clearing time at 5, 9, and 15 cm, measured in reflux episodes associated to NCCP was longer than in reflux episodes associated to typical symptoms (mean ± 95% CI: 27.2 ± 5.6, 23.3 ± 4.4, and 14.6 ± 2.3 seconds vs 18.3 ± 3.5, 13.3 ± 2.2, and 11.1 ± 1.8 seconds; P < 0.01). Conclusions The presence of gas in the refluxate seems to be associated with NCCP. The impaired motility observed in NCCP patients may play a relevant role in delaying reflux clearing, hence increasing the time of contact between refluxate and esophageal mucosa. PMID:27095707

  18. [The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in agricultural workers].

    PubMed

    Komleva, N E; Spirin, V F; Trubetskov, A D; Zaikina, I V

    2012-01-01

    Among agricultural workers is common gastroesophageal reflux disease. On a professional factors affecting agricultural labor (physical activity, weight lifting, carrying heavy loads, frequent and/or long slopes). These factors contribute to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease and severe course.

  19. Endoscopic therapies of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Atif; Salinas, Vanessa; Filipi, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Western societies has accelerated the need for new modalities of treatment. Currently, medical and surgical therapies are widely accepted among patients and physicians. New potent antisecretory drugs and the development of minimally invasive surgery for the management of GERD are at present the pivotal and largely accepted approaches to treatment. The minimally invasive treatment revolution, however, has stimulated several new endoscopic techniques for GERD. Up to now, the data is limited and further studies are necessary to compare the advantages and disadvantages of the various endoscopic techniques to medical and laparoscopic management of GERD. New journal articles and abstracts are continuously being published. The Food and Drug Administration has approved 3 modalities, thus gastroenterologists and surgeons are beginning to apply these techniques. Further trials and device refinements will assist clinicians. This article will present an overview of the various techniques that are currently on study. This review will report the efficacy and durability of various endoscopic therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The potential for widespread use of these techniques will also be discussed. Articles and abstracts published in English on this topic were retrieved from Pubmed. Due to limited number of studies and remarkable differences between various trials, strict criteria were not used for the pooled data presented, however, an effort was made to avoid bias by including only studies that used off-PPI scoring as baseline and intent to treat. PMID:16718747

  20. Current Pharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Wang, Sophie S. W.; Lu, Chien-Yu; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a common disorder with troublesome symptoms caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus, has adverse impact on quality of life. A variety of medications have been used in GERD treatment, and acid suppression therapy is the mainstay of treatment for GERD. Although proton pump inhibitor is the most potent acid suppressant and provides good efficacy in esophagitis healing and symptom relief, about one-third of patients with GERD still have persistent symptoms with poor response to standard dose PPI. Antacids, alginate, histamine type-2 receptor antagonists, and prokinetic agents are usually used as add-on therapy to PPI in clinical practice. Development of novel therapeutic agents has focused on the underlying mechanisms of GERD, such as transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, motility disorder, mucosal protection, and esophageal hypersensitivity. Newer formulations of PPI with faster and longer duration of action and potassium-competitive acid blocker, a newer acid suppressant, have also been investigated in clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the current and developing therapeutic agents for GERD treatment. PMID:23878534

  1. Analytical Investigation of a Reflux Boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Young, Fred M.; Chambers, Terrence L.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model of a single Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) was constructed and tested against data for an array of such tubes tested in the NASA-JSC facility. Modifications to the single fin model were necessary to accommodate the change in radiation shape factors due to adjacent tubes. There was good agreement between the test data and data generated for the same cases by the thermal model. The thermal model was also used to generate single and linear array data for the lunar environment (the primary difference between the test and lunar data was due to lunar gravity). The model was also used to optimize the linear spacing of the reflux tubes in an array. The optimal spacing of the tubes was recommended to be about 5 tube diameters based on maximizing the heat transfer per unit mass. The model also showed that the thermal conductivity of the Nextel fabric was the major limitation to the heat transfer. This led to a suggestion that the feasibility of jacketing the Nextel fiber bundles with copper strands be investigated. This jacketing arrangement was estimated to be able to double the thermal conductivity of the fabric at a volume concentration of about 12-14%. Doubling the thermal conductivity of the fabric would double the amount of heat transferred at the same steam saturation temperature.

  2. Postmenopausal hormone use and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Brian C.; Moy, Beverly; Colditz, Graham A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Context Previous studies suggest that elevated levels of estrogen and progesterone, either through endogenous or exogenous sources, increase gastroesophageal reflux. Objective To evaluate the relationship between symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and postmenopausal hormone therapy, including the use of selective estrogen receptor modulators and over-the-counter hormone preparations. Design, setting, and participants Prospective cohort study of 51,637 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided data on the use of hormone therapy biennially since 1976, and information about symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux in 2002. Main outcome measure Self-reported symptoms of heartburn or acid-regurgitation occurring at least once a week in the previous year (reflux symptoms). Results Among eligible participants, 12,018 (23%) women reported reflux symptoms. Compared to women who never used postmenopausal hormones, the multivariate odds ratio (OR) for the risk of reflux symptoms was 1.46 (95% CI 1.36–1.56) for past hormone users, 1.66 (95% CI 1.54–1.79) for current users of estrogen only, and 1.41 (95% CI 1.29–1.54) for current users of combined estrogen and progesterone. The risk of reflux symptoms increased significantly with increasing estrogen dose (P < 0.001) and increasing duration of estrogen use (P < 0.001). Moreover, current selective estrogen receptor modulator users experienced an OR of 1.39 (95% CI 1.22–1.59) for reflux symptoms, and women currently using over-the-counter hormone preparations had an OR of 1.37 (95% CI 1.16–1.62). Conclusions Postmenopausal use of estrogens, selective estrogen receptor modulators, or over-the-counter hormone preparations is associated with an increased risk of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. This suggests a hormonal component to the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux in women. PMID:18779468

  3. Comparison of locoregional versus extended locoregional radiation volumes for patients with non-metastatic gastro-esophageal junction carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Milton, Denái R.; He, Liru; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Crane, Christopher H.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Thall, Peter F.; Lin, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To delineate an optimal clinical target volume (CTV) for gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers by comparing locoregional vs. extended locoregional radiation volumes. Materials This retrospective analysis examined 222 patients (111 matched pairs treated with locoregional vs. extended locoregional radiation) with non-metastatic GEJ carcinomas treated with concurrent chemoradiation +/- surgery. The CTV for locoregional volumes was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV) + elective coverage of first-echelon nodes and sometimes the celiac axis. The CTV for extended locoregional volumes was defined as GTV + elective coverage of celiac and splenic (+/- porta) nodes. Variables used for matching included gender, stage, performance status, histology, receipt of induction chemotherapy, type of concurrent chemotherapy, radiation modality, receipt of surgery, type of surgery, and Siewert classification. Regression models stratified by matched pairs were fit to estimate effect of radiation volume on clinical endpoints. Results Adjusting p-values for multiple testing, patients treated with extended locoregional vs. locoregional radiation had increased odds of grade 2+ acute chemoradiation-associated GI toxicity (OR 2.92, adj. p=0.0447). However, differing radiation volumes were not significantly associated with postoperative complication rates, pathologic T-stage, frequency of positive perigastric/regional nodes on surgical specimen, distant-metastases progression free survival, locoregional progression free survival, or overall survival (adj. p>0.05). Of the patients who did (N=124) and did not (N=72) receive elective celiac radiation, 2 (1.6%) and 2 (2.8%) patients, respectively, relapsed in the celiac nodes. No patients failed in the splenic or porta nodes. Conclusions Most GEJ cancers can be safely treated without elective inclusion of splenic/porta nodes. PMID:25695222

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and postlaryngectomy tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Cocuzza, Salvatore; Bonfiglio, Marco; Chiaramonte, Rita; Aprile, Giuseppe; Mistretta, Antonio; Grosso, Giuseppe; Serra, Agostino

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux in laryngectomized patient with phonatory prosthesis, analyzing potential related problems and appraising, at the same time, the effectiveness of a therapeutic protocol. A retrospective study was conducted on 43 phonatory prosthesis patients who had problems with regard to recurrent tracheoesophageal granulations, the need of frequent prosthesis replacement, within a 3-month period, and unsatisfactory vocal results. Such patients underwent physical examination of the fistula region and of the neopharynx and were submitted to esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Moreover the group of patients underwent a therapeutic protocol and were re-evaluated posttreatment, examining fistula region both on the tracheal side and on the esophageal side through videolaryngostroboscopy. Of the 43 recruited patients 13 (30%) presented tracheoesophageal granulations, 20 (46.5%) unsatisfactory vocal results and 10 (23.5%) frequent prosthesis replacement, within a 3-month period, due to abnormal biofilm development. In particular, of the 13 patients who had recurrent granulations, the evaluation results revealed the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 6 cases (46%). In the group of patients presenting unsatisfactory vocal results GERD was shown in 13 cases (65%). In the third group of patients GERD was found in two cases (20%). The overall analysis of the data gathered, allowed to identify GERD in 21 (49%) of the 43 patients submitted to the study. The results posttreatment indicated, in the first group, the disappearance or a significant (>75%) volume reduction of such formation in five cases (38%, p = 0.002). In the second group an overall improvement in the quality of voice was displayed at least for 12 patients (60%, p = 0.0001). Finally in the last group an increase of the prosthesis life was recorded in four (40%, p = 0.05) of the ten patients who had the need of prosthesis

  5. Natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, F; Santalucia, F; Bianchi Porro, G

    1991-01-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to characterise the clinical course and reflux pattern of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux without evidence of oesophagitis. We investigated 33 patients (12 women, 21 men; mean age 36 years) with typical symptoms, a negative oesophagoscopy, and a 24 hour oesophageal pH-metry indicative of pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux. All patients received antacids or prokinetic drugs or both for three to six months. Nineteen of 33 patients still had symptoms at the end of treatment, of whom five had developed erosive changes of the oesophageal mucosa. The other 14 discontinued treatment and remained asymptomatic during a six month follow up period. Comparison of the pretreatment pH-metry data of the 19 symptomatic patients and the 14 asymptomatic patients showed no differences in the pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the two groups. We conclude that in a substantial proportion of patients with pathological reflux without oesophagitis symptoms may persist and mucosal lesions may develop during conventional treatment without any apparent change in the reflux. Patients who developed endoscopic oesophagitis did not have a more severe pretreatment pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux when compared with those who did not develop oesophageal mucosal damage. PMID:1885063

  6. Usefulness of echocystography in the study of vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Escape, I; Martínez, J; Bastart, F; Solduga, C; Sala, P

    2001-02-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of contrast-enhanced sonography in detecting and staging vesicoureteral reflux in pediatric patients. Forty-nine children between birth and 5 years of age were studied for vesicoureteral reflux. Echocystography with the use of an endovesical signal enhancer was performed first, followed immediately by conventional voiding cystourethrography. The findings obtained by echocystography and voiding cystourethrography were consistent in 89 (90.8%) of 98 ureterorenal units (a ureterorenal unit is 1 kidney with its own ureter). Reflux was demonstrated by voiding cystourethrography in 13 cases; in 9 of these cases diagnosis had also been made by echocystography. Five cases of reflux detected by echocystography were not identified by voiding cystourethrography. With voiding cystourethrography as the standard of reference, sensitivity was 69%; specificity, 94%; positive predictive value, 64%; and negative predictive value, 95%. In conclusion, echocystography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux. Its ability to detect reflux is similar to that of cystography in cases of high-grade reflux, and it may be an appropriate complementary technique to voiding cystourethrography, because it avoids exposure to radiation.

  7. Respiratory disease and the oesophagus: reflux, reflexes and microaspiration.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Lesley A; Lee, Augustine S; Badri, Huda; DeVault, Kenneth R; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2016-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is associated with a wide range of respiratory disorders, including asthma, isolated chronic cough, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Reflux can be substantial and reach the proximal margins of the oesophagus in some individuals with specific pulmonary diseases, suggesting that this association is more than a coincidence. Proximal oesophageal reflux in particular has led to concern that microaspiration might have an important, possibly even causal, role in respiratory disease. Interestingly, reflux is not always accompanied by typical reflux symptoms, such as heartburn and/or regurgitation, leading many clinicians to empirically treat for possible gastro-oesophageal reflux. Indeed, costs associated with use of acid suppressants in pulmonary disease far outweigh those in typical GERD, despite little evidence of therapeutic benefit in clinical trials. This Review comprehensively examines the possible mechanisms that might link pulmonary disease and oesophageal reflux, highlighting the gaps in current knowledge and limitations of previous research, and helping to shed light on the frequent failure of antireflux treatments in pulmonary disease.

  8. Clinical Management of Infants and Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux refers to the passage of gastric contents including food, acid, and digestive enzymes up into the esophagus. Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as “spitting up,” and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal weight gain or development. Adults and adolescents may also have reflux, which is usually either asymptomatic or recognized as dyspepsia or “heartburn.” Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as symptoms or complications that result from reflux. Most evidence suggests the mechanism of reflux is due to transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter at inappropriate times. The diagnosis of suspected GERD in infants and children depends on the age and the presenting symptoms. A thorough history, physical examination, and growth charts are sufficient for the evaluation and diagnosis of GERD in most infants with recurrent vomiting or children with regurgitation and heartburn. Additional evaluation may include an upper gastrointestinal series, esophageal pH monitoring, or endoscopy. The goals of GERD management are eliminating symptoms, healing esophagitis, preventing complications, promoting normal weight gain and growth, and maintaining remission. Therapeutic options include lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapy, and anti-reflux surgery. Currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of GERD include antacids, mucosal protectants, prokinetic agents, and acid suppressants. PMID:23118703

  9. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastrooesophageal reflux disease in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a norma physiological process occurring daily in healthy infants with similar frequency in both breast- and bottle-fed infants. It is generally considered uncomplicated and self-limiting, resolving spontaneously by 12-14 months of age. In contrast, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is associated with more severe symptoms and, on occasions, oesophagitis. In the small percentage of cases that do not respond to simple feeding measures, a trial for 2-4 weeks using an extensively hydrolysed formula may be considered. Thickeners and antiregurgitation feeds may help with the frequency of overt regurgitation. Feeding difficulties can be a problem in infants with reflux, with some suffering extreme aversion to texture. In the small percentage of infants who experience faltering growth, high-calorie formulae can be used. In those with severe feeding difficulties or severe faltering growth, tube feeding may be required. Infants should ideally be managed within a multidisciplinary team including a speech and language therapist, psychologist, dietitian and paediatrician.

  10. LINX(™) Reflux Management System: magnetic sphincter augmentation in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; DeMeester, Tom R; Ganz, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly manifested by heartburn or regurgitation, is a chronic, progressive condition in which failed sphincter function allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways and the mouth. Chronic GERD affects 10% of Western society. The majority of patients receive adequate relief from proton pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms that cannot be addressed by increasing the dose of medications. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the surgical gold standard; however, the level of technical difficulty and its side effects have limited its use to less than 1% of the GERD population. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to persist with medical therapy, even when inadequate to control symptoms and complications of the disease. Consequently, a significant gap in the treatment continuum for GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(™) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the physiologic function of the sphincter barrier with a simple and reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and can be easily reversed if necessary.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease prevalence in the city of Sivas.

    PubMed

    Yönem, Özlem; Sivri, Bülent; Özdemir, Levent; Nadir, Işılay; Yüksel, Seçkin; Uygun, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data of gastroesophageal reflux disease from Turkey is scarce. For this reason, we aimed to determine the gastroesophageal reflux disease prevalence in our region and to compare it with both the Western part of Turkey and with other countries in the world. We used a previously validated reflux questionnaire and applied it to a random sample of 1345 subjects stratified by socio-economic status, who were older than 20 years and were living in the city center of Sivas. The questionnaire was conducted by medical students who were attending Public Health internship. We estimated a prevalence rate of 19.3% for gastroesophageal reflux disease, defined as heartburn and/or acid regurgitation at least once a week or more frequent. We found a significant association of gastroesophageal reflux disease with age, obesity, lying down within two hours after meals, and being under stress within the last one year, but not with smoking. Comorbid diseases associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease presence included recurrent pharyngitis, chronic cough, asthma, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but not coronary heart disease. 50.8% of our subjects had visited a physician for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms. The most common drug they used was proton pump inhibitors. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a city of the Middle Anatolian region of Turkey was similar to that in developed countries and also to the results of another study performed in the Western part of Turkey. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of environmental factors in the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  12. Airway Hypersensitivity, Reflux, and Phonation Contribute to Chronic Cough

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David O.; Slaughter, James C.; Ates, Fehmi; Higginbotham, Tina; Stevens, Kristin L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Vaezi, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Although chronic cough is a common, its etiology is often elusive, making patient management a challenge. Gastroesophageal reflux and airway hypersensitivity can cause chronic cough. We explored the relationship between reflux, phonation, and cough in patients with idiopathic chronic cough. Methods We performed a blinded, cross-sectional study of non-smoking patients with chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) refractory to reflux treatment referred to the Digestive Disease Center at Vanderbilt University. All underwent 24-hour acoustic recording concurrently and temporally synchronized with ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring. Cough, phonation, and pH-impedance events were recorded. We evaluated the temporal relationship between cough and phonation or reflux events using Poisson and logistic regression. Results Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria (88% female; 100% Caucasian; median age, 63 years and interquartile age range, 52–66 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 and interquartile range 27.9–34.0); there were 2048 analyzable coughing events. The probability of subsequent coughing increased with higher burdens of preceding cough, reflux, or phonation. Within the first 15 min after a cough event, the cough event itself was the main trigger of subsequent cough events. After this period, de novo coughing occurred with increases of 1.46-fold in association with reflux alone (95% confidence interval, 1.17–1.82; P<.001) and 1.71-fold in association with the combination of phonation and reflux events. Conclusion Antecedent phonation and reflux increased the rate of cough events in patients with idiopathic chronic cough. Reflux events were more strongly associated with increased rate of coughing. Our findings support the concept that airway hypersensitivity is a cause of chronic cough, and that the vocal folds may be an effector in chronic cough. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01263626. PMID:26492842

  13. Oral manifestations in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Preetha, A; Sujatha, D; Patil, Bharathi A; Hegde, Sushmini

    2015-01-01

    Many systemic diseases exert their influence on oral health. Among these, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common. In this study, 100 patients who were previously diagnosed with GERD were examined following a 12-hour fast and evaluated in terms of the severity (grade) of the disease as well as any oral, dental, and/or salivary pH changes. Results found 11 patients with tooth erosion. These patients were older, and their average mean duration of GERD was longer in comparison to those without erosion. There was an inverse relationship between salivary pH and the GERD duration and grade of severity. As the GERD grade increased, the severity of tooth erosion increased. Patients with erosion also exhibited oral mucosal changes. Thus severe, long-term GERD was found to be potentially detrimental to oral soft tissues, dental structures, and salivary pH, whereas milder forms of the disease did not necessarily cause dental side effects.

  14. Endoscopic Treatment of Refractory Gastroesohageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Hee; Park, Pil Won; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Though efficient acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) remains the mainstay of treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), some of the patients showed refractory response to PPIs, necessitating further intervention. After increasing dose of PPIs and other kinds of pharmacological intervention adopting prokinetics or others, variable endoscopic treatments are introduced for the treatment of these refractory cases. The detailed introduction regarding endoscopic treatment for GERD is forwarded in this review article. Implantation of reabsorbable or synthetic materials in the distal esophagus was tried in vain and is expelled from the market due to limited efficacy and serious complication. Radiofrequency energy delivery (Stretta) and transoral incisionless fundoplication (EsophyX) are actively tried currently. PMID:23767031

  15. Diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and esophageal pHmetry are the most sensitive

  16. Laparoscopic revision surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Celasin, Haydar; Genc, Volkan; Celik, Suleyman Utku; Turkcapar, Ahmet Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a frequently performed procedure for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in surgical clinics. Reflux can recur in between 3% and 30% of patients on whom antireflux surgery has been performed, and so revision surgery can be required due to recurrent symptoms or dysphagia in approximately 3% to 6% of the patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate the mechanism of recurrences after antireflux surgery and to share our results after revision surgery in recurrent cases. From 2001 to 2014, revision surgery was performed on 43 patients (31 men, 12 women) between the ages of 24 and 70 years. The technical details of the first operation, recurrence symptoms, endoscopy, and manometry findings were evaluated. The findings of revision surgery, surgical techniques, morbidity rates, length of hospitalization, and follow-up period were also recorded and evaluated. The first operation was Nissen fundoplication in 34 patients and Toupet fundoplication in 9 patients. Mesh hiatoplasty was performed for enforcement in 18 (41.9%) of these patients. The period between the first operation and the revision surgery ranged from 4 days to 60 months. The most common finding was slipped fundoplication and presence of hiatal hernia during revision surgery. Revision fundoplication and hernia repair with mesh reinforcement were used in 33 patients. The other techniques were Collis gastroplasty, revision fundoplication, and hernia repair without mesh. The range of follow-up period was from 2 to 134 months. Recurrence occurred in 3 patients after revision surgery (6.9%). Although revision surgery is difficult and it has higher morbidity, it can be performed effectively and safely in experienced centers. PMID:28072725

  17. [Gastroesophageal reflux as a cause of night sweating].

    PubMed

    Young, P; Finn, B C; Bruetman, J E; Trimarchi, H

    2007-06-01

    Night sweats has been defined as drenching sweats that require the patient to change bed clothes. In current studies night sweats appear in 30% of non-obstetric patients and affects approximately 60% of pregnant women. Differential diagnoses include infections, malignancy, medications, hot flashes and panic attacks, making of each patient a challenge. We present two patients with night sweating. After excluding systemic diseases the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux was made, with excellent response to anti-reflux treatment. The presentation of our two patients coupled with a deep literature review, underscores the importance of gastroesophageal reflux as a cause of night sweating.

  18. Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: double blind controlled study of intermittent treatment with omeprazole or ranitidine

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, K D; Müller-Lissner, S; Bigard, M A; Porro, G Bianchi; Ponce, J; Hosie, J; Scott, Mairi; Weir, D G; Gillon, K R W; Peacock, R A; Fulton, Claire

    1999-01-01

    Objective To assess intermittent treatment over 12 months in patients with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Design Randomised, multicentre, double blind, controlled study. Patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy results or mild erosive changes received omeprazole 10 mg or 20 mg daily or ranitidine 150 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. Patients remaining symptomatic had omeprazole 10 mg or ranitidine dose doubled for another 2 weeks while omeprazole 20 mg was continued for 2 weeks. Patients who were symptomatic or mildly symptomatic were followed up for 12 months. Recurrences of moderate or severe heartburn during follow up were treated with the dose which was successful for initial symptom control. Setting Hospitals and primary care practices between 1994 and 1996. Subjects 677 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Main outcome measures Total time off active treatment, time to failure of intermittent treatment, and outcomes ranked from best to worst. Results 704 patients were randomised, 677 were eligible for analyses; 318 reached the end of the study with intermittent treatment without recourse to maintenance antisecretory drugs. The median number of days off active treatment during follow up was 142 for the entire study (281 for the 526 patients who reached a treatment related end point). Thus, about half the patients did not require treatment for at least 6 months, and this was similar in all three treatment groups. According to outcome, 378 (72%) patients were in the best outcome ranks (no relapse or one (or more) relapse but in remission until 12 months); 630 (93%) had three or fewer relapses in the intermittent treatment phase. Omeprazole 20 mg provided faster relief of heartburn. The results were similar in patients with erosive and non-erosive disease. Conclusions Intermittent treatment is effective in managing symptoms of heartburn in half of patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. It is simple and

  19. How to Approach Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: An Otolaryngology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Vaninder K; Akst, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    In the otolaryngology practice, there is a rising concern with the current diagnosis and management of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The implication of LPR in many common head and neck symptoms, along with the rising cost of empiric therapy and no overall improvement in patient symptoms, has established a need to review what are indeed laryngopharyngeal complaints secondary to reflux and what are not. This article reviews the otolaryngologist's approach to LPR, the various ways diagnosis is made, and the guidelines that inform the current trends in otolaryngology management of LPR. The goal of this article is to recognize that reflux can be the cause of a variety of laryngopharyngeal complaints seen within an otolaryngology practice, but when empiric therapy does not improve symptoms, consideration should be given to other non-reflux causes.

  20. Atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux disease: From the cardiologist perspective.

    PubMed

    Floria, Mariana; Drug, Vasile Liviu

    2015-03-14

    We have read with interest the paper by Roman C. and colleagues discussing the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease and atrial fibrillation. The review is presenting the available evidence for the common pathogenic mechanisms. However, from a cardiologist perspective, some available data were not highlighted in the review, cardiovascular involvement in gastroesophageal reflux is less assessed. Hypertension, obesity or diabetes mellitus are substrate for left atrial remodeling that initiate and sustained atrial fibrillation development. One of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in atrial fibrillation is the presence of a trigger. Gastroesophageal reflux could be only a trigger for this arrhythmia. We believe that atrial fibrillation should be considered as possible extraesophageal syndrome in the gastroesophageal reflux classification.

  1. Vesicoureteral reflux and urinary tract infections in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hanevold, C D; Kaiser, B A; Palmer, J; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1987-09-01

    Fifty-six children who received kidney transplants were evaluated for postoperative vesicoureteral reflux and frequency of urinary tract infection. Two methods of ureteral implantation were compared: a nonantireflux extravesicular ureteroneocystostomy and an antireflux intravesicular ureteroneocystostomy. Reflux was found in 79% of children who had the nonantireflux procedure vs 19% of children who had the antireflux procedure. This disparity was present regardless of sex and age. Infections occurred at a rate of one per 11 patient-months after the nonantireflux procedure vs one per 40 patient-months after the antireflux procedure. Regardless of surgical technique, the incidence of infection was higher in children with reflux. The potentially harmful effect of infection with reflux warrants concern. Because of the need to maximize allograft function for a longer time period, an antireflux procedure is recommended in all pediatric kidney transplants.

  2. Design and testing of ultralite fabric reflux tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; King, L.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes intended to provide thermal control for a Lunar Colony. The Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes, under this phase of development, are constructed of thin-walled copper liners overwrapped with aluminoborosilicate fabric. These devices were constructed and tested in air at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and subsequently taken to the NASA Johnson Space Center for thermal vacuum experimentation.

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population.

  4. Is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Achalasia Coincident or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2017-01-01

    Achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are on opposite ends of the spectrum of lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction. Heartburn is the main symptom of GERD. However, heartburn and regurgitation are frequently observed in patients who have achalasia. The diagnosis of achalasia might be delayed because these symptoms are misinterpreted as gastroesophageal reflux. Here, we reviewed the clinical characteristics of patients with the erroneous diagnosis of GERD who actually had untreated achalasia. PMID:27771944

  5. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA) performed by a wearable watch-size stimulator for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD). Methods. Twenty patients diagnosed as RGERD were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into four groups: esomeprazole group (Group A), esomeprazole combined with TEA group (Group B), esomeprazole combined with sham-TEA group (Group C), and esomeprazole combined with domperidone group (Group D). HRM and 24 h pH-impedance monitoring and GerdQ score were used to measure related indexes before and after treatment. Results. (1) TEA significantly increased LESP, compared with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA. After pairwise comparison, LESP of Group B was increased more than Group A (P = 0.008) or Group C (P = 0.021). (2) PPI plus TEA decreased not only the number of acid reflux episodes but also the number of weak acid reflux episodes (P = 0.005). (3) Heartburn and reflux symptoms were improved more with PPI + TEA than with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA (GerdQ scores, P = 0.001). Conclusion. TEA can improve symptoms in RGERD patients by increasing LESP and decreasing events of weak acid reflux and acid reflux; addition of TEA to esomeprazole significantly enhances the effect of TEA. PMID:27648103

  6. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  7. Determination and comparison of mean random urine calcium between children with vesicoureteral reflux and those with improved vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Badeli, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Mehrdad; Shafe, Omid; Khoshnevis, Termeh; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2011-01-01

    Urinary reflux can cause irreversible complications such as reflux nephropathy and ESRD. Diagnostic imaging such as voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is invasive and causes irradiation. Several studies have shown that markers such as urine IL-8 or serum Procalcitonin might be useful for the diagnosis of vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) as a substitution for invasive methods. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the mean urine Ca/Cr ratio and hypercalciuria between two groups of children aged 2-10 years affected by VUR. This is a cross-sectional study in which 32 children having the following entrance criteria were included: children 2-10 years old not affected by urinary tract infection during the last three months and their reflux or recovery having been diagnosed by VCUG or direct radionuclide cystography, divided into two groups of affected by reflux and recovered from reflux. Then, the point urine specimens were collected with permission of their parents in a single laboratory and urine Ca and Cr for each specimen were measured. The Ca/Cr ratio was calculated for each child to evaluate Ca excretion from the urine, which was possible without collecting the 24-hours urine. The Ca/Cr ratio mean and the hypercalciuria were compared between the groups. To analyze our data, the Mann-Whiney test and the Chi-square test were used, using SPSS V.15. Thirty-two children, including 18 children recovered from reflux and 14 affected by reflux, were entered in our study. The Ca/Cr ratio mean was 0.692 ± 1.874 for the affected and 0.118 ± 0.187 for the recovered group. The Ca/Cr ratio mean for the affected male and female groups was 0.012 ± 0.008 and 0.805 ± 1.0913, respectively. This amount was 0.0175 ± 0.01767 for the recovered male and 0.131 ± 0.195 for the recovered female group. There was no significant statistical difference between the groups with respect to the Ca/Cr ratio mean, but there was a significant statistical difference between the two groups of

  8. Anaesthetic Management for Cataract Surgery in VACTERL Syndrome Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khatavkar, Sonal S; Jagtap, S R

    2009-02-01

    Eight year old girl, weighing 14 kg with VACTERL syndrome V: Vertebral anomalies, A: Anal malformation, C: Cardiovascular defect, TE: Tracheal and esophageal malformation, R: Renal agenesis, L: Limb anomalies. underwent cataract surgery under general anaesthesia. She had multiple congenital anomalies like esophageal atresia, imperforate anus (corrected), single kidney & radial aplasia. Anticipating problems of gastro-esophageal reflux & chronic renal failure, successful management was done.

  9. Reversible renal failure after treatment with omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Post, A T; Voorhorst, G; Zanen, A L

    2000-08-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor widely used in the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. In a 73-year-old man we describe renal failure due to acute interstitial nephritis after use of omeprazol during 4 months. Unexpected renal failure without signs of hydronephrosis should always provoke awareness of drug reaction, omeprazole being one of the possible drugs.

  10. Helicobacter pylori: Eradication or Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50% of the world’s population and inevitably results in the development of gastritis. Of those infected, about 10% develop peptic ulcer disease and roughly 1% develop gastric cancer. Conversely, some take the view that H. pylori infection provides some protection against gastro-esophageal reflux disease and possibly asthma. This review aims to explore the case for and against eradication of the bacterium using a “test and treat” approach amongst the general population. PMID:22500191

  11. Mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors in gastroesophageal reflux disease: physician knowledge, patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Solem, Caitlyn; Mody, Reema; Stephens, Jennifer; Macahilig, Cynthia; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe physicians' knowledge, patients' adherence, and perceptions of both regarding mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). DESIGN Chart review and survey of patients and physicians. SETTING United States, with data collected between January and July 2011. PARTICIPANTS Patients being treated for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with PPIs and their prescribing physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient- and physician-reported perception of PPI mealtime-related directions as important/inconvenient (seven-point Likert scale; 7 = very important/very inconvenient); physician-reported knowledge of PPI mealtime-related dosing directions based on whether the agent is labeled to be taken 30-60 minutes before eating (DIR-esomeprazole magnesium [Nexium-AstraZeneca], lansoprazole, and omeprazole) or labeled to be taken regardless of meals (NoDIR-dexlansoprazole [Dexilant-Takeda], rabeprazole, and pantoprazole); and patient-reported PPI mealtime-related directions received and adherence to directions. RESULTS Physicians (n = 262) recruited 501 patients who had been prescribed PPIs (262 DIR/239 NoDIR; mean age 51 years, 37% men, 56% nonerosive GERD [29% undocumented]). Across PPIs, physicians frequently reported incorrect directions or "did not know directions" (29% for esomeprazole to 69% for pantoprazole). While 98% of patients reported receiving directions from their physicians and 55% from their pharmacists, only 65% of DIR patients and 18% of NoDIR received directions consistent with product labeling. Physicians perceived greater inconvenience than patients (4.4 vs. 1.6, P < 0.001) and greater importance (5.2 vs. 4.5, P < 0.001) of mealtime-related directions. Overall, 81% of patients reported taking their PPI as directed. CONCLUSION While this patient cohort was adherent to directions given, physicians' directions were often inconsistent with product labeling. Understanding physician and patient knowledge gaps may

  12. Deep venous reflux definitions and associated clinical and physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Heng; Hill, Gerry; Tarr, Greg; van Rij, Andre

    2013-10-01

    Deep venous reflux (DVR) is often a poorly defined clinical entity. The extent of DVR that must occur for it to be clinically and hemodynamically important is not clear and is usually confounded by the presence of superficial venous reflux. This study aims to investigate the effect of the extent of DVR on clinical and hemodynamic parameters while controlling for the presence of superficial reflux. We performed a cross-sectional study, using a prospectively designed data set obtained from patients presenting to a vascular laboratory for lower limb venous assessment. Age, gender, duplex ultrasound assessment of the deep and superficial systems, CEAP clinical class, and venous filling index (VFI) measurements were obtained. A classification of axial DVR is described, based on the level of continuous reflux occurring in the vertical axis as detected by duplex ultrasound: axial 0 (no deep reflux), axial 1 (common femoral vein only), axial 2 (to any level of the femoral vein), axial 3 (to the level of the popliteal vein), and axial 4 (into the calf veins) A subset of segmental reflux is also defined. This study included 3122 limbs from 2349 subjects. Limbs with increasing axial level were more likely to have CEAP 4-6 (axial 0: 294 [37.2%]; axial 1: 520 [41.6%]; axial 2: 82 [41.2%]; axial 3: 92 [59.7%]; axial 4: 148 [64.9%], P value for trend <.0001). This relationship remained highly significant following adjustment for superficial reflux and demographic variables. Compared with limbs with no DVR, the adjusted odds ratio for having CEAP 4-6 was 2.10 (1.25-3.51; P < .0048) for limbs with axial level 3 and 3.07 (1.94-4.88, P < .0001) for limbs with axial level 4. Similarly after adjustment, predicted mL/s increases in VFI were significant (P < .0001) for level 1 (1.19 [1.08-1.31]), level 3 (1.53 [1.31-1.78]), and level 4 (1.74 [1.51-1.95]). Segmental reflux, when extensive, also contributed to the risk of more severe disease. Deep axial reflux to the level of the

  13. Health economics of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, D; Champion, M; Goeree, R; Leddin, D; Otten, N; Morris, G; Beck, I; Faloon, T; Fedorak, R N

    1997-09-01

    The present study provides an overview of the current state of health economics studies of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It indicates the strengths and weaknesses of individual studies, and the state of health economics analysis in general as they apply to GERD. Specifically, this study adopts a pharmacoeconomic perspective, which is a subsection of health economics analytical methods, to provide a comparative analysis of alternative courses of action based on cost and consequence. The pharmacoeconomic outlook is most effective when it considers a comprehensive societal perspective, with special consideration given to other relevant viewpoints, such as the payer, the primary provider and, most important, the patient. Pharmacoeconomics provides several specific analytical techniques for GERD-related health economics analysis. The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus conference on GERD in 1996 thought that a cost effective analysis was the most appropriate technique to assess the pharmacoeconomics of GERD. Six previous studies on GERD health economics have been performed comparing omeprazole with H2 receptor antagonists. These studies vary in cost data collected and in analytical techniques. In general, the existing outcome measurements of these previous health economics studies are not ideal. Namely, they combine various GERD grades, use randomized controls, are endoscopically based, assess pharmaceutical therapy only and are short term. More appropriate health economic trials in GERD, which focus on GERD management strategies and therapeutic treatment of GERD, need to be designed and conducted. These economic assessments, however, should not replace detailed thinking, careful observation, good judgement and common sense.

  14. Biomarkers for Gastroesophageal Reflux in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gíslason, Þórarinn; Olin, Anna-Carin; Janson, Christer; Ólafsson, Ísleifur

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly associated with respiratory symptoms, either through a vagal bronchoconstrictive reflex or through microaspiration of gastric contents. No diagnostic test is available, however, to diagnose when respiratory illnesses are caused by GER and when not, but research in this field has been moving forward. Various biomarkers in different types of biosamples have been studied in this context. The aim of this review is to summarize the present knowledge in this field. GER patients with respiratory diseases seem to have a different biochemical profile from similar patients without GER. Inflammatory biomarkers differ in asthmatics based on GER status, tachykinins are elevated in patients with GER-related cough, and bile acids are elevated in lung transplant patients with GER. However, studies on these biomarkers are often limited by their small size, methods of analysis, and case selections. The two pathogenesis mechanisms are associated with different respiratory illnesses and biochemical profiles. A reliable test to identify GER-induced respiratory disorders needs to be developed. Bronchoalveolar lavage is too invasive to be of use in most patients. Exhaled breath condensate samples need further evaluation and standardization. The newly developed particles in exhaled air measurements remain to be studied further. PMID:23653634

  15. TNXB Mutations Can Cause Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Patrick D.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hall, Gentzon; Gupta, Indra R.; Hains, David; Bartkowiak, Bartlomeij; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Homstad, Alison; Westreich, Katherine; Wu, Guanghong; Liu, Yutao; Holanda, Danniele; Clarke, Jason; Lavin, Peter; Selim, Angelica; Miller, Sara; Wiener, John S.; Ross, Sherry S.; Foreman, John; Rotimi, Charles; Winn, Michelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the kidney and the urinary tract, and it is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and CKD in children. Although twin studies support the heritability of VUR, specific genetic causes remain elusive. We performed a sequential genome-wide linkage study and whole-exome sequencing in a family with hereditary VUR. We obtained a significant multipoint parametric logarithm of odds score of 3.3 on chromosome 6p, and whole-exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous mutation (T3257I) in the gene encoding tenascin XB (TNXB in 6p21.3). This mutation segregated with disease in the affected family as well as with a pathogenic G1331R change in another family. Fibroblast cell lines carrying the T3257I mutation exhibited a reduction in both cell motility and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression, suggesting a defect in the focal adhesions that link the cell cytoplasm to the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the human uroepithelial lining of the ureterovesical junction expresses TNXB, suggesting that TNXB may be important for generating tensile forces that close the ureterovesical junction during voiding. Taken together, these results suggest that mutations in TNXB can cause hereditary VUR. PMID:23620400

  16. Imaging strategies for vesicoureteral reflux diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Constantinos J; Siomou, Ekaterini

    2007-07-01

    The prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), although reported to be low in the general population, is high in children with urinary tract infection (UTI), first degree relatives of patients with known VUR and children with antenatal hydronephrosis. In addition, it has been shown that VUR and UTIs are associated with renal scarring, predisposing to serious long-term complications, i.e., hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency and complications of pregnancy. Therefore, diagnostic imaging for the detection of VUR in the high-risk groups of children has been a standard practice. However, none of these associations has been validated with controlled studies, and recently the value of identifying VUR after a symptomatic UTI has been questioned. In addition, several studies have shown that renal damage may occur in the absence of VUR. On the other hand, some patients, mainly males, may have primary renal damage, associated with high-grade VUR, without UTI. Recently, increasing skepticism has been noted concerning how and for whom it is important to investigate for VUR. It has been suggested that the absence of renal lesions after the first UTI in children may rule out VUR of clinical significance and reinforces the redundancy of invasive diagnostic techniques. Therefore, the priority of imaging strategies should focus on early identification of renal lesions to prevent further deterioration.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  18. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity.

  19. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  20. LINX(®) Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C; Demeester, Tom R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant 'therapy gap' in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(®) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients.

  1. Symptoms with acid and nonacid reflux may be produced by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Roberts, J; Sharma, N; Tutuian, R; Vela, M; Castell, D O

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) esophageal monitoring detects both acid and nonacid gastroesophageal reflux episodes. The MII-pH catheter contains six impedance segments placed 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, and 17 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A pH electrode at 5 cm above the LES identifies the type of reflux, i.e. acid or nonacid. Patients with acid and nonacid reflux exhibit typical and atypical symptoms often within 5 min following a reflux episode. The aim of this study is to compare the timing of symptoms after reflux episodes in patients with acid and nonacid reflux. Methods include a review of 70 MII-pH tracings (42 females, mean age 40, range 18-85 years) either on (50 points) or off (20 points) acid suppression therapy. Typical (heartburn, regurgitation) and atypical (cough) symptoms with acid or nonacid reflux episodes detected by impedance were analyzed. Symptoms were considered positive with acid reflux if there was a pH drop to <4, plus an MII detected a reflux episode and with nonacid reflux if pH remained >4 and MII detected a reflux episode. The timing of the symptom after each reflux episode was recorded. Symptom perception occurred significantly sooner after acid versus nonacid reflux (P < 0.05). Acid reflux episodes are more likely to be perceived in the first 2 min following the reflux episode. Patients with acid reflux are likely to perceive symptoms earlier, and symptoms with acid and nonacid reflux may be produced by different mechanisms.

  2. The diagnostic utility of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, matrix metalloproteinase-3, rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein in patients with erosive and non-erosive rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shovman, O; Gilburd, B; Zandman-Goddard, G; Sherer, Y; Orbach, H; Gerli, R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2005-09-01

    To compare the diagnostic utility of laboratory variables, including matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), anticyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with erosive and non-erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assembled a training set, consisting of 60 patients with RA, all fulfilling the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. A commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used both to test for anti-CCP antibodies (second generation ELISA kit) and MMP; RF were detected by latex-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. CRP was measured by latex turbidimetric immunoassay. The levels of anti-CCP antibody titers and ESR were significantly higher in patients with erosive disease than those in non-erosive RA patients (p < 0.001 and 0.0341) respectively. Moreover, a higher frequency of elevated titers of anti-CCP antibodies was found in RA patients with erosions compared to patients with non-erosive RA (78.3% vs. 43.2% respectively). The ROC curves of anti-CCP passed closer to the upper left corner than those other markers and area under the curve (AUC) of anti-CCP was significantly larger than AUC of other markers (0.755 for anti-CCP, 0.660 for ESR, 0.611 for CRP, 0.577 for RF, and 0.484 for MMP-3 female). A positive predictive value was higher for anti-CCP antibodies in comparison to other markers. We did not find significant statistical correlation between anti-CCP antibody titers and inflammatory markers such as ESR or CRP. However, we confirmed the correlation of elevated titers of anti-CCP antibodies and RF in both groups of patients whereas the degree of correlation was more significant in non-erosive patients. The results of our study suggest that the presence of elevated anti-CCP antibody titers have better diagnostic performance than MMP-3, RF, CRP and ESR in patients with erosive RA.

  3. The Diagnostic Utility of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Matrix Metalloproteinase-3, Rheumatoid Factor, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate, and C-reactive Protein in Patients with Erosive and Non-erosive Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shovman, O.; Gilburd, B.; Zandman-Goddard, G.; Sherer, Y.; Orbach, H.; Gerli, R.; Shoenfeld, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic utility of laboratory variables, including matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with erosive and non-erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We assembled a training set, consisting of 60 patients with RA, all fulfilling the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. A commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used both to test for anti-CCP antibodies (second generation ELISA kit) and MMP; RF were detected by latex-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. CRP was measured by latex turbidimetric immunoassay. Results: The levels of anti-CCP antibody titers and ESR were significantly higher in patients with erosive disease than those in non-erosive RA patients (p < 0.001 and 0.0341) respectively. Moreover, a higher frequency of elevated titers of anti-CCP antibodies was found in RA patients with erosions compared to patients with non-erosive RA (78.3% vs. 43.2% respectively). The ROC curves of anti-CCP passed closer to the upper left corner than those other markers and area under the curve (AUC) of anti-CCP was significantly larger than AUC of other markers (0.755 for anti-CCP, 0.660 for ESR, 0.611 for CRP, 0.577 for RF, and 0.484 for MMP-3 female). A positive predictive value was higher for anti-CCP antibodies in comparison to other markers. We did not find significant statistical correlation between anti-CCP antibody titers and inflammatory markers such as ESR or CRP. However, we confirmed the correlation of elevated titers of anti-CCP antibodies and RF in both groups of patients whereas the degree of correlation was more significant in non-erosive patients. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that the presence of elevated anti-CCP antibody titers have better diagnostic performance than MMP-3, RF, CRP and ESR in patients with erosive RA. PMID

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux causing sleep interruptions in infants.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rodrigo; Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the relation between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) episodes and sleep interruptions in infants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between GER and the incidence of sleep interruptions in infants. Study patients included 24 infants (younger than 1 year) referred for multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria were a previous fundoplication and studies lasting <20 hours. Tests were clinically indicated to investigate suspicion of GER-related apnea (17, 70.8%), stridor (6, 25%), noisy breathing (2, 8.3%), and cyanotic spells (1, 4.2%). Most patients presented with significant comorbidities (19, 79.2%). The number of nonacid GER (NAGER) per hour was greater during sleep time than during daytime and awakening following sleep onset (median 0.27 vs 1.85 and 1.45, P<0.01). A total of 1204 (range 7-86 per infant) arousals in 24 infants was detected, 165 (13.7%) that followed GER episodes, and 43 (3.6%) that preceded GER episodes. Seven patients presented with a positive symptom association probability for arousals; 5 were exclusively because of NAGER. A positive symptom association probability for awakenings was detected in 9 patients; 4 were because of NAGER, 4 were because of AGER, and 1 was because of both NAGER and GER. Patients with awakenings related to GER presented longer mean clearance time of AGER during sleep (165.5 vs 92.8 seconds, P=0.03). GER was a frequent cause of interrupting sleep among our infant patients, and NAGER proved to be equally important as AGER for causing arousals and awakenings in infants.

  5. Treatment of clinically diagnosed laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Tarek Fouad; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat

    2010-11-01

    To determine the incidence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) stool antigen (HPSA) in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD), and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Randomized controlled study. Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismalia, Egypt. A total of 212 patients with symptoms of LPRD. Patients were evaluated by laryngoscopy, ambulatory pH monitoring for 24 hours, and HPSA testing. Esomeprazole magnesium as a monotherapy was evaluated vs triple therapy in patients with HP infection. To determine the incidence of HPSA in patients with LPRD, and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Persistent dry cough and a feeling of a lump in the throat (globus sensation) were the most frequent symptoms of LPRD, while posterior laryngeal inflammation was the main laryngoscopic finding. Results from the HPSA test were positive in 57% of the studied group. Patients with negative HPSA were treated with esomeprazole as single modality with a reported improvement score of 96.6%. Patients with positive HPSA test results were divided into 2 groups: 1 received only esomeprazole, with reported improvement in 40%, whereas the second group was treated with esomeprazole, plus amoxicillin sodium and clarithromycin (triple therapy) and reported a 90% incidence of symptom improvement. The incidence of HP infection in patients with LPRD in our study was 57%. Triple therapy showed a higher cure rate in patients with HPSA-positive test results.

  6. National trends in gastroesophageal reflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Ross L.; Mercer, C. Dale

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To assess the surgical technique and the frequency of different types of antireflux surgery used in Canada after the introduction of laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Design Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) surgery and population data in fiscal years 1992 through 1996. were accessed through the Canadian Institute of Health Information, provincial health ministries, MED ECHO and Statistics Canada databases. Data were also analysed by province and nationally for type of surgery (e.g., open abdominal, thoracic, thoracoscopic and laparoscopic). Results National data showed a slight increase in GER surgery in the last 5 years. Laparoscopic surgery increased 2.8 fold in 1993 and 1.6 fold in 1995 over the previous years. Open abdominal cases decreased 1.1 fold from 1992 to 1996. Thoracic cases remained essentially unchanged. Provincial and regional disparities in procedures per 100 000 population exist (Ontario 7.1 versus Nova Scotia 20.7). Areas in which little or no laparoscopic surgery was done had an average increase of 3%, whereas areas in which laparoscopic surgery was done had an average increase of 16% in GER surgery during the course of the study. In provinces west of Quebec (with the exception of Manitoba) more than 50% of GER surgery is laparoscopic; in areas east of Ontario less than 25% of GER surgery is performed laparoscopically. Five provinces (Manitoba, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland) performed significantly fewer laparoscopic procedures than the national average. Conclusions The frequency of GER surgery is increasing modestly in Canada and is performed most often by the open abdominal route. Regional disparities in open and laparoscopic techniques are apparent. Laparoscopic surgery for GER is increasing rapidly and accounts for the decrease in open GER surgery. PMID:10714258

  7. Multidimensional voice analysis of reflux laryngitis patients.

    PubMed

    Pribuisienë, Rûta; Uloza, Virgilijus; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the voice characteristics of reflux laryngitis (RL) patients and to determine the most important voice tests and voice-quality parameters in the functional diagnostics of RL. The voices of 83 RL patients and 31 persons in the control group were evaluated. Vocal function was assessed using a multidimensional set of video laryngostroboscopic, perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic and subjective measurements according to the protocol elaborated by the Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society. The mean values of the hoarseness visual analogue scale assessment and voice handicap index were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the group of RL patients as compared to the controls. Objective voice assessment revealed a significant increase in mean values of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy (NNE), along with a significant decrease in pitch range, maximum frequency, phonetogram area (S) and maximum phonation time (MPT) in RL patients, both in the male and female subgroups. According to the results of discriminant analysis, the NNE, MPT, S and intensity range were determined as an optimum set for functional diagnostics of RL. The derived function (equation) makes it possible to assign the person to the group of RL patients with an accuracy of 86.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of eight voice parameters were found to be higher than 50%. The results of the present study demonstrate a reduction of phonation capabilities and voice quality in RL patients. Multidimensional voice evaluation makes it possible to detect significant differences in mean values of perceptual, subjective and objective voice quality parameters between RL patients and controls groups. Therefore, multidimensional voice analysis is an important tool in the functional diagnostics of RL.

  8. A Study on the Relationship between Reflux Esophagitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Mishiro, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shino; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic syndrome and dental erosion have been demonstrated to correlate with gastroesophageal acid reflux disease (GERD), while periodontitis has been reported to have a positive relationship with metabolic syndrome. However, no correlation between periodontitis and GERD has yet been reported. We therefore investigated the relationship between periodontitis and GERD. Methods The subjects consisted of 280 individuals who visited the Health Center for a detailed medical checkup examination. Each underwent upper endoscopy and periodontitis examinations, with the latter performed by measuring the concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin in saliva. The subjects were divided into those with positive and negative periodontitis findings, and the prevalence rates of endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were compared. Results The number of subjects positive for periodontitis was 93, while 187 had negative findings. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis was not different between the positive and negative groups (8.6% vs. 8.0%). In addition, a multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify a positive relationship between the presence of periodontitis and reflux esophagitis. On the other hand, dyslipidemia and hypertension were more frequently observed in the subjects that were positive for periodontitis. Conclusion We did not find an association between periodontitis and reflux esophagitis in the present study. On the other hand, the presence of periodontitis was found to correlate with hypertension and dyslipidemia.

  9. Bile reflux and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sobala, G M; O'Connor, H J; Dewar, E P; King, R F; Axon, A T; Dixon, M F

    1993-01-01

    AIM: To determine associations between enterogastric bile reflux and gastric mucosal pathology. METHOD: A retrospective study using fasting gastric juice bile acid measurements and antral or prestomal biopsy specimens from 350 patients, 66 of whom had previously undergone surgery that either bypassed or disrupted the pyloric sphincter. RESULTS: Bile reflux was positively associated with reactive gastritis and negatively with Helicobacter pylori density. After stratification for previous surgery, age, and H pylori status, the histological feature most strongly associated with bile reflux was intestinal metaplasia, including all its subtypes. The prevalence of intestinal metaplasia was greatest in patients with both H pylori infection and high bile acid concentrations. Bile reflux was also positively associated with the severity of glandular atrophy, chronic inflammation, lamina propria oedema and foveolar hyperplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Bile reflux is a cause of reactive gastritis. It modifies the features of H pylori associated chronic gastritis. The changes are not confined to patients who have had surgery to their stomachs. The positive associations with atrophy and intestinal metaplasia have implications for models of gastric carcinogenesis. Images PMID:8463417

  10. Gastroesophageal Reflux Affects Sleep Quality in Snoring Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Eneli, Ihuoma; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the quality of sleep in snoring obese children without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and to study the possible relationship between sleep interruption and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in snoring obese children. Study subjects included 13 snoring obese children who were referred to our sleep lab for possible sleep-disordered breathing. Patients underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria included history of fundoplication, cystic fibrosis, and infants under the age of 2 years. Significant association between arousals and awakenings with previous reflux were defined by symptom-association probability using 2-minute intervals. Sleep efficiency ranged from 67-97% (median 81%). A total of 111 reflux episodes (90% acidic) were detected during sleep, but there were more episodes per hour during awake periods after sleep onset than during sleep (median 2.3 vs. 0.6, p=0.04). There were 279 total awakenings during the sleep study; 56 (20.1%) of them in 9 patients (69.2%) were preceded by reflux episodes (55 acid, 1 non-acid). In 5 patients (38.5%), awakenings were significantly associated with reflux. The data suggest that acid GER causes sleep interruptions in obese children who have symptoms of snoring or restless sleep and without evidence of OSA.

  11. Jugular venous reflux on magnetic resonance angiography and radionuclide venography

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tomohisa; Okuchi, Sachi; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fujimoto, Koji; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between the signal from retrograde venous flow on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and retrograde upward flow from the left brachiocephalic vein has not been explored. Purpose To reveal the frequency of jugular venous reflux using MRA and nuclear venography in patients being evaluated for cerebral volume and blood flow. Material and Methods A total of 229 patients with cognitive disturbance who had undergone brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on the same day to evaluate cerebral blood flow were evaluated. Jugular venous reflux was measured on MRA and nuclear venography, which was conducted just after injection of N-isopropyl-123I-p-iodoamphetamine for the SPECT study. Results MRA showed jugular reflux in seven patients on the right side, and in 22 on the left. Nuclear venography showed jugular reflux in six patients on the right side, and in 20 on the left. Conclusion Jugular venous reflux was observed mostly on the left side. Retrograde flow was observed on both MRA and nuclear venography in half of the cases, with the rest only on one of the modalities. PMID:27994882

  12. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric patients with asthma].

    PubMed

    Iniestra Flores, Felipe; Gómez Vera, Javier; Orea Solano, Modesto; Flores Sandoval, Graciela; Cruz Parada, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, the gastroesophageal reflux is a predisposing factor for the development of asthmatic attacks. To determine the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in pediatric patients with asthma of the Service of Allergy and Immunology at the Hospital Regional Lic. Adolfo López Mateos. It was made an observational study from July 2000 to July 2001. Gastroesophageal gammagraphic and endoscopy (with taking of esophageal biopsy) were carried out to each of the patients in order to find out if there was gastroesophageal reflux. 112 patients with moderate persistent asthma (54 women and 58 men) were included and divided in three different age groups (group I, from 1 to 5 years old; group II, from 6 to 10 and III, from 11 to 16 years old). The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux was 138, 100 and 93, respectively, being specially high in males. Differences in the prevalence among different groups were statistically significant between group I and II (p < 0.001) and between I and III (p < 0.001). Significant changes were not observed between group II and III (p = NS). The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux the structured was high, situation directly related with the diagnostic suspicion in our asthmatic population.

  13. Gastroesophageal Reflux Affects Sleep Quality in Snoring Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Eneli, Ihuoma; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the quality of sleep in snoring obese children without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and to study the possible relationship between sleep interruption and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in snoring obese children. Methods Study subjects included 13 snoring obese children who were referred to our sleep lab for possible sleep-disordered breathing. Patients underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria included history of fundoplication, cystic fibrosis, and infants under the age of 2 years. Significant association between arousals and awakenings with previous reflux were defined by symptom-association probability using 2-minute intervals. Results Sleep efficiency ranged from 67-97% (median 81%). A total of 111 reflux episodes (90% acidic) were detected during sleep, but there were more episodes per hour during awake periods after sleep onset than during sleep (median 2.3 vs. 0.6, p=0.04). There were 279 total awakenings during the sleep study; 56 (20.1%) of them in 9 patients (69.2%) were preceded by reflux episodes (55 acid, 1 non-acid). In 5 patients (38.5%), awakenings were significantly associated with reflux. Conclusion The data suggest that acid GER causes sleep interruptions in obese children who have symptoms of snoring or restless sleep and without evidence of OSA. PMID:27066445

  14. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  15. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  16. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  17. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-05-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis.

  18. [Sulglicotide in the treatment of dyspeptic patients with duodenogastric reflux].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, M; Bigliazzi, S; Taddeucci, S; Cangioni, G; Psilogenis, M

    The therapeutic efficacy of sulglicotide was tested in an open study of dyspeptic patients suffering from proven duodenogastric reflux. Twenty outpatients with non-ulcer dyspepsia and alkaline reflux demonstrated by measurement of enterogastric flux were enrolled in the study. All patients could be evaluated at the end of 8 weeks' treatment with 200 mg sulglicotide t.i.d. This treatment did not cause any change for the better of alkaline reflux but did induce marked improvement of subjective symptoms (p less than 0.05 vs baseline), giving the impression that in spite of the continued presence of the damaging agent the drug had reduced the mucosal lesion by increasing gastro-protective capacity.

  19. Hot-electron refluxing enhanced relativistic transparency of overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Li, Xiao-Ya; Chen, Zi-Yu; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shen, Bai-Fei; Zhu, Wen-Jun

    2017-03-01

    A new phenomenon of an enhanced relativistic transparency of overdense plasmas by the influence of hot-electron refluxing has been discovered via particle-in-cell simulations. When a p-polarized laser pulse, with intensity below the self-induced-transparency (SIT) threshold, obliquely irradiates a thin overdense plasma, the initially opaque plasma becomes transparent after a time interval that is linearly dependent on the thickness of the plasma. This phenomenon can be interpreted as a consequence of hot-electron refluxing, which reduces the effective electron density by longitudinal heating. When the laser intensity is higher than the SIT threshold, the penetration velocity of the laser in the plasma is enhanced when the refluxing is present.

  20. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen B; Jones, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy.

  1. [Voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Viaz'menov, E O; Radtsig, E Iu; Bogomil'skiĭ, M R; Vodolazov, S Iu; Poliudov, S A; Myzin, A V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Diagnostic algorithm included direct transnasal examination of the larynx using an Olympus fibroscope (Japan), fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour potentiometry, biopsy of oesophageal mucosa, and acoustic analysis of the voice. A total of 26 children at the age from 8 months to 3 years with voice disturbances were examined, including 12 children below one year, 5 between 1 and 2 years, and 9 between 2 and 3 years. The main signs of laryngoesophageal reflux were dysphonia, oedema, hyperemia, and altered light reflex of mucous membrane of arytenoid cartilages, interarytenoid space, and vocal cords. It is concluded that voice disturbances are the most common symptoms of laryngoesophageal reflux in young children which necessitates the earliest possible endoscopic study of the larynx in all cases of dysphonia.

  2. The human aerodigestive tract and gastroesophageal reflux: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Laitman, J T; Reidenberg, J S

    1997-11-24

    In order to appreciate fully the nature of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux in humans, it is essential to view the problem within an evolutionary framework. Examination of the aerodigestive tract anatomy of our mammalian relatives shows that this region in humans is highly derived as compared to other mammals. Among the specializations that adult humans exhibit is a caudal position of the larynx, which results in a permanently expanded oropharynx. These anatomical features underlie our distinctive breathing and swallowing patterns and provide the substrate that allows for the production of articulate speech. While the selection factors that have shaped human evolution obviously favored our derived aerodigestive tract, aspects of this anatomy appear particularly unsuited to accommodate gastroesophageal reflux. Indeed, our unique aerodigestive tract morphology may predispose us to an array of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: recent advances and its association with sleep.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent in Asia as well as in Western countries. Sleep disturbance and breathing disorders during sleep are becoming increasingly prevalent, and they are commonly associated with GERD. The relationship between GERD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is still questionable, and it has expanded to include Barrett's esophagus. Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) symptoms might be clinically important in the explanation of this association. The therapy for reflux symptoms has resulted in improved subjective sleep parameters and enhanced sleep quality, thus supporting a direct relationship between GERD and sleep disturbance. This review discusses the epidemiology of sleep disturbances in GERD patients; the causative relationship between GERD and OSA, even though it remains an area of controversy; and the possible role of nGER in sleep problems. It also provides an update on the current state of knowledge linking GERD and sleep. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard S; Diamond, David A; Chow, Jeanne S

    2006-09-01

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux.

  5. COMBINED 24-HOURS ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING AND MULTICHANNEL INTRALUMINAL IMPEDANCE FOR COMPARISON OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX IN CHILDREN WITH TYPICAL VERSUS ATYPICAL SYMPTOMS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Nasri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common esophageal disorder in pediatrics. - The aim of this study was to compare reflux parameters of typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease using 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance in pediatric population. - In this prospective study, 43 patients aged less than 18 year with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups based on the main presenting symptoms (typical versus atypical). Twenty four-hour pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance were performed in all the patients for comparing these two group regarding association of symptoms and reflux. Number of refluxes, pH related reflux, total reflux time, reflux more than 5 minutes, longest time of the reflux, lowest pH at reflux, reflux index were recorded and compared. Data comparison was done using SPSS. - The mean age of the patients was 5.7±3.4 years and 65.1% were male. Out of 43 patients 24 cases had typical symptoms and 19 had atypical symptoms. The mean reflux events detected by multichannel intraluminal impedance was more than mean reflux events detected by pH monitoring (308.4±115.8 vs 69.7±66.6) with P value of 0.037, which is statistically significant. The mean symptom index and symptom association probability were 35.01% ± 20.78% and 86.42% ± 25.79%, respectively in multichannel intraluminal impedance versus 12.73% ± 12.48% and 45.16% ± 42.29% in pH monitoring (P value <0.001). Number of acid reflux was 46.26±47.16 and 30.9±22.09 for atypical and typical symptoms respectively. The mean symptom index was 18.12% ± 13.101% and 8.30% ± 10.301% in atypical and typical symptoms respectively (P=0.034). Bolus clearance was longer in atypical symptoms compared typical symptoms(P<0.05). - Symptom index was significantly higher in atypical symptoms compared to typical symptoms. Higher number of acid reflux was found in children

  6. The Role of Helicobacter pylori in Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ross; Kilty, Shaun J; Hutton, Brian; Bonaparte, James P

    2017-02-01

    Objective The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. The secondary objective was determining if H pylori eradication leads to greater symptom improvement in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux as compared with standard proton pump inhibitor therapy alone. Data Sources EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, European Union Clinical Trials Register, Cochrane Library databases of clinical trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Review Methods A systematic review was performed of studies assessing the diagnosis or treatment of H pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, and case series were included. A meta-analysis of prevalence data and assessment of heterogeneity was performed on relevant studies. Results Fourteen studies were analyzed in the review, with 13 eligible for the meta-analysis. We determined that the prevalence of H pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux was 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 32.1-56.5). The heterogeneity of studies was high, with an overall I(2) value of 92.3%. We were unable to quantitatively assess findings for our secondary outcome, since H pylori identification and treatment were not the primary focus of the majority of studies. Conclusion There is a high rate of H pylori infection among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. The infection rate in North America and Western Europe has not been adequately studied. There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation regarding the testing and treatment of H pylori infection among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  8. Oesophageal epithelial innervation in health and reflux oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M; Kamm, M; Soediono, P; Milner, P; Burnham, W; Burnstock, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The response of the oesophagus to refluxed gastric contents is likely to depend on intact neural mechanisms in the oesophageal mucosa. The epithelial innervation has not been systematically evaluated in health or reflux disease. 
AIMS—To study oesophageal epithelial innervation in controls, and also inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa in patients with reflux oesophagitis and healed oesophagitis. 
PATIENTS—Ten controls, nine patients with reflux oesophagitis, and five patients with healed oesophagitis. 
METHODS—Oesophageal epithelial biopsy specimens were obtained at endoscopy. The distribution of the neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), and the neuropeptides calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Density of innervation was assessed by the proportion of papillae in each oesophageal epithelial biopsy specimen containing immunoreactive fibres (found in the subepithelium and epithelial papillae, but not penetrating the epithelium). 
RESULTS—The proportion of papillae positive for PGP immunoreactive nerve fibres was significantly increased in inflamed tissue when compared with controls, and non-inflamed and healed tissue. There was also a significant increase in VIP immunoreactive fibres within epithelial papillae. Other neuropeptides showed no proportional changes in inflammation. 
CONCLUSIONS—Epithelial biopsy specimens can be used to assess innervation in the oesophagus. The innervation of the oesophageal mucosa is not altered in non-inflamed tissue of patients with oesophagitis but alters in response to inflammation, where there is a selective increase (about three- to fourfold) in VIP containing nerves. 

 Keywords: gastro-oesophageal reflux; reflux oesophagitis; innervation; neuropeptides; inflammation PMID:10026314

  9. Simulated Reflux Decreases Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The vocal fold epithelium provides a barrier to the entry of inhaled and systemic challenges. However, the location of the epithelium makes it vulnerable to damage. Past research suggests, but does not directly demonstrate, that exposure to gastric reflux adversely affects the function of the epithelial barrier. Understanding the nature of reflux-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction is necessary to better recognize the mechanisms for vocal fold susceptibility to this disease. Therefore, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant reflux challenges on vocal fold transepithelial resistance and gross epithelial and subepithelial appearance. Study Design Ex vivo, mixed design with between-group and repeated-measures analyses. Methods Healthy, native porcine vocal folds (N = 52) were exposed to physiologically relevant acidic pepsin, acid-only, or pepsin-only challenges and examined with electrophysiology and light microscopy. For all challenges, vocal folds exposed to a neutral pH served as control. Results Acidic pepsin and acid-only challenges, but not pepsin-only or control challenges significantly reduced transepithelial resistance within 30 minutes. Reductions in transepithelial resistance were irreversible. Challenge exposure produced minimal gross changes in vocal fold epithelial or subepithelial appearance as evidenced by light microscopy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that acidic environments characteristic of gastric reflux compromise epithelial barrier function without gross structural changes. In healthy, native vocal folds, reductions in transepithelial resistance could reflect reflux-related epithelial disruption. These results might guide the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic recommendations for patients with reflux, such as continued acid-suppression therapy and patient antireflux behavioral education. PMID:20564752

  10. [Laparoscopic reoperation for recurred antireflux surgery of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Hu, Z W; Wu, J M; Wang, Z G; Wang, F; Chen, M P; Dong, Y Y; Zhan, X L; Zhang, Y; Ma, S S; Zhang, C; Yan, C

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic reoperation for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) recurred form previous anti-reflux surgery. Totally 19 patients received laparoscopic reoperation for symptomatic and anatomic recurred GERD in Department of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Rocket Force General Hospital from January 2008 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 12 male and 7 female patients. The average reoperation age was (48±14) years, the average duration of reoperation from original ones was (43±38) months. The patients underwent preoperative barium, endoscopy, manometry and 24-hour pH studies. Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair plus fundoplication was carried out for reoperation. Gastroesophageal reflux related symptoms (reflux, heartburn, chest pain, chough, wheezing, chest tightness and globus sensation) before and after surgery were compared by a questionnaire. The patients' medication consumption, complications and satisfaction of the reoperation were investigated as well. The repeated measures analysis of variance was used for statistical comparison of data preoperatively and postoperatively. No major complication and death occurred. Six cases (32%) had complications such as diarrhea, increased passing wind, flatulence, dysphagia and abdominal pain. The GERD related symptom score of reflux, heartburn, chest pain, chough, wheezing, chest tightness and globus sensation all significantly decreased (F: 25.0 to 56.7; P: 0.000 to 0.001) after the reoperation, with 68% good outcome of all the patients. After a follow-up of (33±22) months after reoperation, 1 case had partial recurrence at the 3(rd) month after reoperation. For all the patients, 12 cases felt very satisfied or satisfied with the reoperation. Laparoscopic reoperation is generally effective with acceptable morbidity rates for patients with esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms recurred form previous hiatal repair and (or

  11. Liquid in the gastroesophageal segment promotes reflux, but compliance does not: a mathematical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip K; Kahrilas, Peter J; Brasseur, James G

    2008-11-01

    The mechanical force relationships that distinguish normal from chronic reflux at sphincter opening are poorly understood and difficult to measure in vivo. Our aim was to apply physics-based computer simulations to determine mechanical pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux. A mathematical model of the gastroesophageal segment (GES) was developed, incorporating the primary anatomical and physiomechanical elements that drive GES opening and reflux. In vivo data were used to quantify muscle stiffness, sphincter tone, and gastric pressure. The liquid lining the mucosa was modeled as an "effective liquid film" between the mucosa and a manometric catheter. Newton's second law was solved mathematically, and the space-time details of opening and reflux were predicted for systematic variations in gastric pressure increase, film thickness, muscle stiffness, and tone. "Reflux" was defined as "2 ml of refluxate entering the esophagus within 1 s." GES opening and reflux were different events. Both were sensitive to changes in gastric pressure and sphincter tone. Reflux initiation was extremely sensitive to the liquid film thickness; the protective function of the sphincter was destroyed with only 0.4 mm of liquid in the GES. Compliance had no effect on reflux initiation, but affected reflux volume. The presence of abnormal levels of liquid within the collapsed GES can greatly increase the probability for reflux, suggesting a mechanical mechanism that may differentiate normal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Compliance does not affect the probability for reflux, but affects reflux volume once it occurs. Opening without reflux suggests the existence of "gastroesophageal pooling" in the distal esophagus, with clinical implications.

  12. Reflux and acid peptic diseases in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, Amir; Schnoll-Sussman, Felice H; Katz, Philip O

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder among elderly patients seeking medical care. Diagnosis and management of GERD in the older patient is a unique challenge for both the primary care provider and the gastroenterologist. Such patients may have atypical symptoms, more severe disease, and a higher rate of complications such as erosive esophagitis, Barrett esophagus, and esophageal cancer. Moreover, the elderly may be more sensitive to the morbidity and mortality of the available treatments for GERD. A careful and vigilant approach to the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of reflux disease in the elderly is warranted.

  13. Does gastroesophageal reflux increase chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations?

    PubMed

    Iliaz, Sinem; Iliaz, Raim; Onur, Seda Tural; Arici, Serpil; Akyuz, Umit; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Besisik, Fatih; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Akyuz, Filiz

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been investigated less than asthma-GER. We aimed to evaluate the presence of GER in patients with COPD and its impact on exacerbations. We included 24 patients with stable mild-moderate stage COPD and 19 volunteers as the control group. We conducted a gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptom questionnaire, gastroscopy, manometry, and an ambulatory 24-h pH-impedance study. According to the GERD questionnaire, only 5 (20.8%) patients with COPD had typical GER symptoms. According to the 24-h pH-impedance study, the mean DeMeester score (DMS) was 38.1 ± 34.6 in the COPD group and 13.3 ± 16.8 in the control group (p = 0.01). The acid reflux (DMS > 14.7) rate was higher in patients with COPD than in controls (73.9% vs 26.3%, p = 0.01). The symptom association probability positivity rate was 17.4% (n = 4) in the COPD group, which was similar to the controls (p = 0.11). The mean proximal extension rate of reflux (Z 17 cm) was 26.4 ± 12.9% in the COPD group. The proximal extent of reflux was positively correlated with the number of COPD exacerbations per year (p = 0.03, r = 0.448). In the motility results, only 2 (20%) patients in the control group had a minor motility disorder. Seventeen (70.8%) patients in the COPD group had a minor motility disorder, and 4 (16.7%) had major motility disorders (p < 0.001). In our study, gastroesophageal reflux was frequent in patients with COPD, but only a quarter had typical reflux symptoms. The proximal extent of reflux may trigger frequent exacerbations of COPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; de Freitas, Carla Lima; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16) and 62.1% (n=87) would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6) in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122) in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132) and 92.9% (n=130) of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1%) of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly. PMID:25662014

  15. Hiatus hernia in healthy volunteers is associated with intrasphincteric reflux and cardiac mucosal lengthening without traditional reflux.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Elaine V; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Wirz, Angela A; Mitchell, David R; Going, James J; Kelman, Andrew W; Ballantyne, Stuart A; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2017-07-01

    Hiatus hernia (HH) is a key mediator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease but little is known about its significance in the general population. We studied the structure and function of the gastro-oesophageal junction in healthy volunteers with and without HH. We compared 15 volunteers with HH, detected by endoscopy or MRI scan, but without gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with 15 controls matched for age, gender and body weight. Jumbo biopsies were taken across the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). High-resolution pH metry (12 sensors) and manometry (36 sensors) were performed upright and supine, before and after a meal. The SCJ was marked with an endoscopically placed clip and visualised fluoroscopically. Cardiac mucosa was longer in volunteers with HH (3.5 vs 2.5 mm, p=0.01). There was no excessive acid reflux 5 cm above the upper border of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) in either group but those with HH had short segment reflux 11 mm above the pH transition point after the meal when supine (pH<4 for 5.5% vs 0.3% of time, p=0.01). The SCJ and pH transition point were proximally displaced within the gastro-oesophageal junction in those with HH versus controls (p<0.05). The pH transition point was proximal to the peak LOS pressure point in HH subjects but distal to it in controls after the meal (p<0.05). When supine, the postprandial pH transition point crossed the SCJ in those with HH (p=0.03). Healthy volunteers with HH have increased intrasphincteric reflux and lengthening of cardiac mucosa in the absence of traditional transsphincteric reflux. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity: do we need to perform reflux testing in all candidates to bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Limongelli, Paolo; del Genio, Gianmattia; Brusciano, Luigi; Rossetti, Gianluca; Amoroso, Vincenzo; Schettino, Pietro; Avellino, Manuela; Gili, Simona; Docimo, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a strong independent risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and esophageal erosions. However the relationship between obesity and GERD is still a subject of debate. In fact, if in most cases bariatric surgery can diminish reflux by losing a large amount of fat, on the other hand some restrictive procedure can worsen or cause the presence of GERD. Thus, it is unclear if patients candidate to bariatric surgery have to perform pre-operative reflux testing or not. of the study was to verify the presence of GERD patterns in patients candidate to surgery and the need of pre-operative reflux testing. All patients underwent to a standardized questionnaire for symptoms severity (GERQ), upper endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRiM) and impedance pH-monitoring (MII-pH). Patients were stratified into: group 1 (negative for both GERQ and endoscopy), group 2 (positive for GERQ and negative for endoscopy), group 3 (positive for both GERQ and endoscopy). A healthy-volunteers group (HV) was assessed. One hundred thirty-nine subjects (obese, 124; HV normal weight, 15) were studied. Group 1 showed comparable mean LES pressure, peristaltic function, bolus transport and presence of hiatal hernia than HV. Group 2 showed a reduction of these parameters, while group 3 showed a statistical significant reduction in LES pressure, peristaltic function, bolus transport and increase in presence of hiatal hernia. At MII-pH, Group 1 showed a not significant increase in reflux patterns; group 2 and 3 showed a significant increase in esophageal acid exposure and in number of refluxes (both acid and weakly acid), with group 3 showing the higher grade of reflux pattern. Obese subjects with pre-operative presence of GERD symptoms and endoscopical signs could be tested with HRM and MII-pH before undergoing bariatric surgery, especially for restrictive procedures. On the other hand, obese patients without any sign of GERD could not be tested for reflux, showing

  17. Liquid in the gastroesophageal segment promotes reflux, but compliance does not: a mathematical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Brasseur, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical force relationships that distinguish normal from chronic reflux at sphincter opening are poorly understood and difficult to measure in vivo. Our aim was to apply physics-based computer simulations to determine mechanical pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux. A mathematical model of the gastroesophageal segment (GES) was developed, incorporating the primary anatomical and physiomechanical elements that drive GES opening and reflux. In vivo data were used to quantify muscle stiffness, sphincter tone, and gastric pressure. The liquid lining the mucosa was modeled as an “effective liquid film” between the mucosa and a manometric catheter. Newton's second law was solved mathematically, and the space-time details of opening and reflux were predicted for systematic variations in gastric pressure increase, film thickness, muscle stiffness, and tone. “Reflux” was defined as “2 ml of refluxate entering the esophagus within 1 s.” GES opening and reflux were different events. Both were sensitive to changes in gastric pressure and sphincter tone. Reflux initiation was extremely sensitive to the liquid film thickness; the protective function of the sphincter was destroyed with only 0.4 mm of liquid in the GES. Compliance had no effect on reflux initiation, but affected reflux volume. The presence of abnormal levels of liquid within the collapsed GES can greatly increase the probability for reflux, suggesting a mechanical mechanism that may differentiate normal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Compliance does not affect the probability for reflux, but affects reflux volume once it occurs. Opening without reflux suggests the existence of “gastroesophageal pooling” in the distal esophagus, with clinical implications. PMID:18718998

  18. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recurrent heartburn after laparoscopic fundoplication is not always recurrent reflux.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sarah K; Jamieson, Glyn G; Myers, Jennifer C; Chin, Kin-Fah; Watson, David I; Devitt, Peter G

    2007-05-01

    A small cohort of patients present after antireflux surgery complaining of recurrent heartburn. Many of these patients have been empirically recommenced on proton pump inhibitors. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with symptoms that suggest recurrent reflux had objective evidence of reflux, and to determine predictors of recurrent reflux. We identified all patients from an existing database who had undergone pH monitoring for "recurrent heartburn" after fundoplication. These patients were then cross-referenced to another database, which recorded the outcomes for patients who had undergone a laparoscopic fundoplication. Patients complaining of dysphagia or other problems without heartburn were excluded from analysis. Seventy-six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. Fifty-six (74%) of these had a normal 24-h pH study. Thirty-five patients (63%) with a normal pH study were on medication for heartburn at the time of referral. Three factors were found to be associated with an abnormal 24-h pH study: a partial fundoplication (P = 0.039), onset of symptoms 6 months or more after surgery (P < 0.001), and a good symptom response when antireflux medication was recommenced (P = 0.015). Not all patients complaining of recurrent heartburn after fundoplication have evidence of abnormal reflux. Objective evidence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure should be confirmed before recommencing antireflux medication.

  20. Endoscopic Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children in Kosova

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Murat; Hyseni, Nexhmi; Statovci, Sejdi; Grajqevci, Salih; Xhiha, Butrint

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children has been treated with subureteric deflux injection of Deflux (dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer) since 2009. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of endoscopic treatment of VUR in our clinic. Methods: Between March 2009 and December 2013, fifty-five children underwent endoscopic subureteral injection of Deflux in 78 ureters. Two months postoperatively voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was performed. This study examined the disappearance of VUR and urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as the quality of life during long-term follow-up. Results: The study included 55 patients (40 females and 15 males) with 78 refluxing ureters. There were 22 refluxed ureters altogether and 33 children had a unilateral reflux (two duplicated systems). All patients were treated, from the age 6 months up to 12 years old. The mean age of patients was 5.2 years. There has been no complications, but with few recurrences. In 6 patients (16.6%), endoscopic treatment with deflux was done twice, while in three patients (8.5%), the endoscopic treatment with deflux was performed three times, because of recurrence. Conclusion: We recommend the use of endoscopic Deflux injection as first line treatment for children with VUR. Endoscopic subureteral injection of Deflux is a minimally invasive method for VUR treatment in pediatric patients and is associated with low morbidity. PMID:25132708

  1. The human laryngeal microbiome: effects of cigarette smoke and reflux

    PubMed Central

    Jetté, Marie E.; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Hanshew, Alissa S.; Suen, Garret; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diffuse laryngeal inflammation from smoking and/or reflux is commonly diagnosed as chronic laryngitis and treated empirically with expensive drugs that have not proven effective. Shifts in microbiota have been associated with many inflammatory diseases, though little is known about how resident microbes may contribute to chronic laryngitis. We sought to characterize the core microbiota of disease-free human laryngeal tissue and to investigate shifts in microbial community membership associated with exposure to cigarette smoke and reflux. Using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we compared bacterial communities of laryngeal tissue biopsies collected from 97 non-treatment-seeking volunteers based on reflux and smoking status. The core community was characterized by a highly abundant OTU within the family Comamonadaceae found in all laryngeal tissues. Smokers demonstrated less microbial diversity than nonsmokers, with differences in relative abundances of OTUs classified as Streptococcus, unclassified Comamonadaceae, Cloacibacterium, and Helicobacter. Reflux status did not affect microbial diversity nor community structure nor composition. Comparison of healthy laryngeal microbial communities to benign vocal fold disease samples revealed greater abundance of Streptococcus in benign vocal fold disease suggesting that mucosal dominance by Streptococcus may be a factor in disease etiology. PMID:27775059

  2. [Severe interstitial lung disease from pathologic gastroesophageal reflux in children].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, P; Weimer, B; Hofmann, D

    1999-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of pulmonary conditions that cause restrictive lung disease of poor prognosis, especially if growth failure, pulmonary hypertension and fibrosis appears. We report on the case of a girl of 11 years of age who suffered from severe nonallergic asthma in early childhood and who developed severe interstitial pulmonary disease caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux at the age of 8 years. This diagnosis was established by lung biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage and a high amount of lipid-laden alveolar macrophages, 2-level pH measurement and oesophageal biopsy. Because therapy with oral and inhaled steroids failed and Omeprazol showed benificial effects, hemifundoplication according to THAL was performed. At present the lung function is clearly normal and there is no need of any medicaments. Following the history, we can assume the pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to be the cause of the disease. It is important to state that there were no typical symptoms at any time pointing to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The development of pulmonary disease by pathological reflux is very often caused by "silent aspiration". Very typically there are no symptoms such as vomiting, heartburn and pain but only signs of chronic lung disease.

  3. Helping Families Understand and Manage Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulsifer-Anderson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common medical problem affecting about 5% of otherwise healthy children. It is extremely common among children with special needs and affects more than half of children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, premature birth, and several other common conditions. The disease is becoming more widely recognized, but children…

  4. GABAB receptors as drug targets to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Anders

    2009-06-01

    For many years, acid-suppressive therapy has been at the forefront of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), yet despite the advent of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) some patients continue to experience persistent GERD symptoms. Therapeutic (non-surgical) options for such patients are currently limited. To tackle this clinical issue, research efforts have begun to focus on 'reflux inhibition' as a potential therapeutic target - i.e. inhibition of transient lower esophageal relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Preclinical research has identified a number of drug targets through which TLESRs can be modulated, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B (GABA(B)) receptor has emerged as one of the most promising. Studies with baclofen, a well-known agonist of this receptor, have demonstrated that reflux inhibition is a valid concept in the clinical setting in that reducing the incidence of TLESRs improves GERD symptoms. But baclofen is associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) side effects, rendering it undesirable for use as a treatment for GERD. Further development work has yielded a number of novel GABA(B) receptor agonists with reduced CNS side effect profiles, and clinical trials are currently being performed with several agents. Compounds that target TLESRs may therefore present a new add-on treatment for patients with persistent GERD symptoms despite PPI therapy.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux demonstrated by hepatobiliary imaging in scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Sawaf, N.W.; Orzel, J.A.; Weiland, F.L.

    1987-03-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging was performed on a patient with a longstanding history of scleroderma who presented with abdominal pain suggestive of biliary disease. Cystic duct patency was documented after 10 min with tracer accumulation in the second portion of the duodenum which failed to progress consistent with the duodenal hypomotility of scleroderma. The patient was given intravenous Kinevac resulting in gastroesophageal reflux of radionuclide.

  6. Helping Families Understand and Manage Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulsifer-Anderson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common medical problem affecting about 5% of otherwise healthy children. It is extremely common among children with special needs and affects more than half of children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, premature birth, and several other common conditions. The disease is becoming more widely recognized, but children…

  7. Epidemiology of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ethnic and geographical differences are important factors in studying disease frequencies, because they may highlight the environmental or genetic influences in the etiology. We retrieved the studies which have been published regarding the epidemiologic features of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Asia, based on the definitions of GERD, study settings, publication years and geographical regions. From the population-based studies, the prevalence of symptom-based GERD in Eastern Asia was found to be 2.5%-4.8% before 2005 and 5.2%-8.5% from 2005 to 2010. In Southeast and Western Asia, it was 6.3%-18.3% after 2005, which was much higher than those in Eastern Asia. There were robust epidemiologic data of endoscopic reflux esophagitis in medical check-up participants. The prevalence of endoscopic reflux esophagitis in Eastern Asia increased from 3.4%-5.0% before 2000, to 4.3%-15.7% after 2005. Although there were only limited studies, the prevalence of extra-esophageal syndromes in Asia was higher in GERD group than in controls. The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was 0.06%-0.84% in the health check-up participants, whereas it was 0.31%-2.00% in the referral hospital settings. In summary, the prevalence of symptom-based GERD and endoscopic reflux esophagitis has increased in Asian countries. However, the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus in Asia has not changed and also still rare. PMID:21369488

  8. Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux: Definition, mechanism and management.

    PubMed

    Lv, Han-Jing; Qiu, Zhong-Min

    2015-09-26

    Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux is a troublesome condition unresponsive to the standard medical anti-reflux therapy. Its underlying mechanisms may include incomplete acid suppression, non-acid reflux, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal hypersensitivity. The diagnosis of this disorder depends on both the findings of multi-channel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and the subsequent intensified anti-reflux therapy. The strategies of pharmacological treatment for refractory chronic cough due to reflux include the optimization of proton pump inhibitors and add-on therapies with histamine H2 receptor antagonists, baclofen and gabapentin. However, the further study is needed to satisfy its management.

  9. Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux: Definition, mechanism and management

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Han-Jing; Qiu, Zhong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux is a troublesome condition unresponsive to the standard medical anti-reflux therapy. Its underlying mechanisms may include incomplete acid suppression, non-acid reflux, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal hypersensitivity. The diagnosis of this disorder depends on both the findings of multi-channel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and the subsequent intensified anti-reflux therapy. The strategies of pharmacological treatment for refractory chronic cough due to reflux include the optimization of proton pump inhibitors and add-on therapies with histamine H2 receptor antagonists, baclofen and gabapentin. However, the further study is needed to satisfy its management. PMID:26413488

  10. [Guideline 'Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children from 0-18 years'].

    PubMed

    Benninga, Marc A; Berger, Marjolein Y; Venmans, Leonie M A J; Tabbers, Merit M

    2014-01-01

    In 2102, a multidiscplinary guideline was developed on behalf of the Dutch Association of Pediatrics entitled 'Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children from 0-18 years'. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guideline from 2009 served for guidance. History and physical examination are usually sufficient for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is important to make a distinction between gastroesophageal reflux, a physiological phenomenon in children, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In practice, medications are provided too often, especially in infants. Only children suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease should be treated according to the therapeutical action plan.

  11. [Gastroesophageal reflux, pulmonary and gastric function in patients with cystic fibrosis. Results of a randomized trial].

    PubMed

    Escobar Castro, H; Perdomo Giraldi, M; Gimeno Benítez, R; Máiz Carro, L; Suárez Cortina, L

    1996-01-01

    We studied ten patients with Cystic fibrosis. The purposes of this study were to investigate the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and establish the probable association between gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary and gastric involvement. All 10 patients underwent 24-hour esophageal pH recording, spirometry and gastric function. Abnormal reflux index was found in all these patients. Lung function was pathologic in the 3 older children. There were no relationship between the severity of the gastroesophageal reflux and the degree of pulmonary damage. No patient has gastric acid hypersecretion. Eight of 10 patients had steatorrhea. Our findings confirm the high frequence of gastroesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis.

  12. Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, Össur Ingi; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Cook, Elizabeth; Júlíusson, Sigurður; Berg, Sören; Nordang, Leif; Björnsson, Einar Stefán; Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna; Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n  =  48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n  =  42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p  =  0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p  =  0.04). Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population.

  13. Different sex-related influences of eating habits on the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Atsushi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Ohara, Shunji; Morita, Terumi; Koshino, Kenji; Tanaka, Shino; Moriyama, Mika; Sumikawa, Masuko; Sanpei, Mari; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2011-06-01

    Many types of food have been shown to affect lower esophageal sphincter pressure and esophageal motor function, and thus, the prevalence of reflux esophagitis. The present study was performed to clarify the different eating habits that predominantly affect the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese. The study included 2303 individuals (males: 1599, females: 704, mean age: 49.9 years) who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for gastric cancer screening. The daily dietary contents of the patients were analyzed using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 201 patients had endoscopically-proven reflux esophagitis, and the percentage of males with reflux esophagitis was significantly higher than their female counterparts (11.3% vs 2.8%). The body mass indexes of individuals with reflux esophagitis were significantly higher than those without, both for males and females. Total energy intake was the most important risk factor for the occurrence of reflux esophagitis in males, but the food content was not a significant risk factor. Dietary habit did not affect the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in the female patients. The age and height of females with reflux esophagitis significantly exceeded those of females without reflux esophagitis, and were independent risk factors for the occurrence of reflux esophagitis only in the female patients. There is a sex-related difference in the influence of eating habits on the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Patterns of saphenous venous reflux in women presenting with lower extremity telangiectasias.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Carlos Alberto; Engelhorn, Ana Luiza V; Cassou, Maria Fernanda; Salles-Cunha, Sergio

    2007-03-01

    Telangiectasias have been treated with sclerotherapy without concomitant assessment or treatment of saphenous veins. To clarify if ultrasound (US) mapping of saphenous veins is justifiable, this investigation determined prevalence of specific patterns of saphenous vein reflux in women with telangiectasias. US mapping of the great and small saphenous veins (GSV, SSV) was performed in 1,740 extremities of 910 consecutive patients, mostly women (86%). A subgroup of 269 limbs of women with telangiectasias (CEAP C1 class) was included in this study. Patterns of GSV and SSV reflux were classified as perijunctional, proximal, distal, segmental, multisegmental, and diffuse. Reflux was detected in 125 extremities (46%): 5% had reflux in both the GSV and the SSV, 39% had GSV reflux, and 2% had SSV reflux. The most common pattern of GSV reflux was segmental (73%, 87/119). Prevalence of reflux was significantly greater in GSV versus SSV (p < .001). GSV segmental plus distal reflux (40%, 108/269) was significantly more prevalent than saphenofemoral junction or near junction reflux (4%, 11/269; p < .001). US mapping of the GSV in women with telangiectasias is justifiable, even in asymptomatic extremities. Further research will determine if segmental reflux should be treated to avoid evolution to severe valvular insufficiency.

  15. Utility of baseline impedance level measurement in patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ban-Suk; Park, Seon-Young; Lee, Du-Hyun; Cho, Eun-Ae; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) and pH monitoring is used for detecting reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. However, the clinical significance of baseline impedance levels (BILs) has not been well studied. We aimed to evaluate whether BILs are related to various reflux events or acid-related parameters and to determine whether BILs during specific intervals could be substituted for 24-h BILs. One-hundred forty-two patients GER symptoms underwent 24-h pH/impedance monitoring. We measured pH [(5 cm above the low esophageal sphincter (LES)] and BILs from three sites (3, 5, and 15 cm above the LES). Eighty-one subjects (57.0%) were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and 53 (37.3%) had acid reflux and 28 (19.7%) had nonacid reflux. The 24-h BILs at distal sites were lower in the "reflux" group than in the "no reflux" group (p < 0.001) and lower in the "acid reflux" group than in the "nonacid reflux" group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in 24-h BILs at the proximal site among the "no reflux", "acid reflux", and "nonacid reflux" groups. The interclass correlation coefficient value of 24-h BILs with daytime 6-h BILs was 0.916 (95% CI 0.882-0.940) and that with nighttime 6-h BILs was 0.909 (95% CI 0.871-0.935). BILs are related to GER, especially acid reflux. Location and duration of assessment for BILs needs to be standardized. Six-hour BILs could be substitutes for 24-h BILs. During analysis of MII-pH, more attention should be paid to BILs in the lower esophagus.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Fatih; Doğan, Mansur; Karataş, Duran; Yüce, Salim; Şentürk, Mehmet; Külahli, Ismail

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate a possible relation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and middle ear effusion in children. Children who came to ear, nose, and throat (ENT) department with the symptoms of hearing loss or aural fullness and diagnosed as OME by examination and tympanometry were included into the study. Children were reviewed gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms including the following: (a) airway symptoms: stridor, frequent cough, recurrent croup, wheezing, nasal congestion, obstructive apnea, hoarseness, and throat clearing; (b) feeding symptoms: frequent emesis, dysphagia, choking: gagging, sore throat, halitosis, food refusal, regurgitation, pyrosis, irritability, failure to thrive, and anemia. Diagnosis is made with at least one positive test of radionuclide gastroesophageal scintigraphy or 24 h pH probe in the patients with reflux. ENT findings were also examined between gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease negative groups. Approximately 39 (54.9%) of 71 children had at least 1 positive test for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Between the gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups, symptoms of reflux were not significantly different. Two pooled variables were created: airway complex (stridor, frequent cough, throat clearing), and feeding complex (irritability, pyrosis, failure to thrive). Percentage of positive symptom complexes were no statistically different between gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups (>0.05). Ear, nose, and throat disorders (including rhinitis/sinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy, tonsillitis/pharyngitis, and laryngitis) were more frequent in gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive group. Tonsillitis/pharyngitis was significantly different between the gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups. Upper respiratory tract infections were seen

  17. Esophagogastric Junction Contractility Integral Reflect the Anti-reflux Barrier Dysfunction in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chenxi; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Yuwen; Tan, Niandi; Cui, Yi; Chen, Minhu; Xiao, Yinglian

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-reflux barrier dysfunction is one of the primary mechanisms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) pathogenesis. The esophagogastric junction contractile integral (EGJ-CI) is a new metric adopted to evaluate the EGJ contractility, which implies the anti-reflux barrier function. The aim of the current study was to validate this new metric in patients with GERD and its correlation with the esophageal acid exposure, as well as the efficacy of proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods Ninety-eight patients with GERD and 21 healthy controls were included in the study. Upper endoscopy, high-resolution manometry (HRM) and 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring were performed in all patients. Three respiration cycles were chosen at the initial HRM resting frame and the value computed with distal contractile integral tool was then divided by the duration of the cycles to yield EGJ-CI. All the patients were treated with esomeprazole 20 mg twice-daily for 8 weeks. Results EGJ-CI was lower in the patients with GERD than that of the controls (P < 0.05). For patients with GERD, EGJ-CI was lower in those with hiatal hernia (P < 0.05). The new metric correlated with esophageal acid exposure in the supine position (P < 0.05), and it also negatively correlated to the total reflux episodes (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference on EGJ-CI between patients with and without response to the esomeprazole treatment (P = 0.627). Conclusions EGJ-CI reflected the dysfunction of the anti-reflux barrier in patients with GERD, but it had little impact on the esomeprazole response. PMID:27426485

  18. Quality of life, patient satisfaction, and disease burden in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with or without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Choi, Kee Don; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Youn, Young Hoon; Min, Byung-Hoon; Song, Kyung Ho; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-07-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL). The quality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms is also significantly impaired. However, the impact of LPR symptoms on HRQL in GERD patients has not been studied. A nationwide, random-sample, and face-to-face survey of 300 Korean patients with GERD was conducted from January to March 2013. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were assessed using the Rome III questionnaire, LPR symptoms using the reflux symptom index, and HRQL using the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A structured questionnaire on patient satisfaction, sickness-related absences, and health-related work productivity was also used. Among the 300 patients with GERD, 150 had LPR symptoms. The mean EQ-5D index was lower in patients with GERD and LPR symptoms than in those without LPR (0.88 vs 0.91, P = 0.002). A linear regression model showed that the severity of LPR symptoms was related to decreased HRQL and was independent of age, marital status, body mass index, or household income. The overall satisfaction rate regarding treatment was lower in patients with GERD and LPR (40.0% vs 69.1%, P = 0.040). GERD patients with LPR symptoms reported greater sickness-related absent hours per week (0.36 vs 0.02 h, P = 0.016) and greater percentages of overall work impairment than those without LPR (31.1% vs 20.8%, P < 0.001). Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with LPR symptoms have a poorer HRQL, a lower satisfaction rate, and a greater disease burden than those without LPR. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Comparison of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and reflux scintigraphy in pediatric patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Uslu Kızılkan, Nuray; Bozkurt, Murat Fani; Saltık Temizel, Inci Nur; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Caner, Biray; Özen, Hasan

    2016-11-21

    To evaluate the agreement of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pHM) and gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Seventy-five consecutive patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) underwent 24-h combined MII-pHM recording and one hour radionuclide scintigraphy during the course of the MII-pHM study. Catheters with 6 impedance channels and 1 pH sensor were placed transnasally. Impedance and pH data analysis were performed automatically and manually. For impedance monitoring, reflux was defined as a retrograde 50% drop in impedance, starting distally and propagating retrogradely to at least the next two more proximal measuring channels. Reflux index (RI, percentage of the entire record that esophageal pH is < 4.0) greater than 4.2% for pHM and number of refluxes more than 50 for 24 h for MII were accepted as positive test results. At scintigraphy, 240 frames of 15 seconds duration were acquired in the supine position. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined as at least one reflux episode in the esophagus. After scintigraphic evaluation, impedance-pH recordings and scintigraphic images were evaluated together and agreement between tests were evaluated with Cohen's kappa. Sufficient data was obtained from 60 (80%) patients (34 male, 56.7%) with a mean age of 8.7 ± 3.7 years (range: 2.5-17.3 years; median: 8.5 years). Chronic cough, nausea, regurgitation and vomiting were the most frequent symptoms. The mean time for recording of MII-pHM was 22.8 ± 2.4 h (range: 16-30 h; median: 22.7 h). At least one test was positive in 57 (95%) patients. According to diagnostic criteria, GERD was diagnosed in 34 (57.7%), 44 (73.3%), 47 (78.3%) and 51 (85%) patients by means of pHM, MII, GES and MII-pHM, respectively. The observed percentage agreements/κ values for GES and pHM, GES and MII, GES and MII-pHM, and MII and pHM are 48.3%/-0.118; 61.7%/-0.042; 73.3%/0.116 and 60

  20. Comparison of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and reflux scintigraphy in pediatric patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Uslu Kızılkan, Nuray; Bozkurt, Murat Fani; Saltık Temizel, Inci Nur; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Caner, Biray; Özen, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the agreement of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pHM) and gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS Seventy-five consecutive patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) underwent 24-h combined MII-pHM recording and one hour radionuclide scintigraphy during the course of the MII-pHM study. Catheters with 6 impedance channels and 1 pH sensor were placed transnasally. Impedance and pH data analysis were performed automatically and manually. For impedance monitoring, reflux was defined as a retrograde 50% drop in impedance, starting distally and propagating retrogradely to at least the next two more proximal measuring channels. Reflux index (RI, percentage of the entire record that esophageal pH is < 4.0) greater than 4.2% for pHM and number of refluxes more than 50 for 24 h for MII were accepted as positive test results. At scintigraphy, 240 frames of 15 seconds duration were acquired in the supine position. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined as at least one reflux episode in the esophagus. After scintigraphic evaluation, impedance-pH recordings and scintigraphic images were evaluated together and agreement between tests were evaluated with Cohen’s kappa. RESULTS Sufficient data was obtained from 60 (80%) patients (34 male, 56.7%) with a mean age of 8.7 ± 3.7 years (range: 2.5-17.3 years; median: 8.5 years). Chronic cough, nausea, regurgitation and vomiting were the most frequent symptoms. The mean time for recording of MII-pHM was 22.8 ± 2.4 h (range: 16-30 h; median: 22.7 h). At least one test was positive in 57 (95%) patients. According to diagnostic criteria, GERD was diagnosed in 34 (57.7%), 44 (73.3%), 47 (78.3%) and 51 (85%) patients by means of pHM, MII, GES and MII-pHM, respectively. The observed percentage agreements/κ values for GES and pHM, GES and MII, GES and MII-pHM, and MII and pHM are 48.3%/-0.118; 61.7%/-0.042; 73