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Sample records for nonessential domain ii

  1. Nonessential Products Ban Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion by banning the sale and introduction into interstate commerce of certain non-essential products manufactured with or containing ozone-depleting substances.

  2. Resistance domain in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1980-01-05

    We show that traveling domains with a finite resistance can exist in type II superconductors in the presence of a transport current. An experiment in which this effect generates an alternating electric field and current is proposed.

  3. The PR/SET domain zinc finger protein Prdm4 regulates gene expression in embryonic stem cells but plays a nonessential role in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Bikoff, Elizabeth K

    2013-10-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal.

  4. An Introduction to the Pthales Domain of Ptolemy II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-26

    An Introduction to the Pthales Domain of Ptolemy II Remi Barrere Eric Lenormand Dai Bui Edward A. Lee Christopher Shaver Stavros Tripakis Electrical...to the Pthales Domain of Ptolemy II 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission. An Introduction to the Pthales Domain of Ptolemy II1 Rémi Barrère, Eric Lenormand Thales

  5. Rsp5 WW domains interact directly with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Cheang, S; Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2000-07-07

    RSP5 is an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was recently shown to form a physical and functional complex with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II). The amino-terminal half of Rsp5 consists of four domains: a C2 domain, which binds membrane phospholipids; and three WW domains, which are protein interaction modules that bind proline-rich ligands. The carboxyl-terminal half of Rsp5 contains a HECT (homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus) domain that catalytically ligates ubiquitin to proteins and functionally classifies Rsp5 as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The C2 and WW domains are presumed to act as membrane localization and substrate recognition modules, respectively. We report that the second (and possibly third) Rsp5 WW domain mediates binding to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA pol II large subunit. The CTD comprises a heptamer (YSPTSPS) repeated 26 times and a PXY core that is critical for interaction with a specific group of WW domains. An analysis of synthetic peptides revealed a minimal CTD sequence that is sufficient to bind to the second Rsp5 WW domain (Rsp5 WW2) in vitro and in yeast two-hybrid assays. Furthermore, we found that specific "imperfect" CTD repeats can form a complex with Rsp5 WW2. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of this minimal CTD sequence on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues acts as a negative regulator of the Rsp5 WW2-CTD interaction. In view of the recent data pertaining to phosphorylation-driven interactions between the RNA pol II CTD and the WW domain of Ess1/Pin1, we suggest that CTD dephosphorylation may be a prerequisite for targeted RNA pol II degradation.

  6. Non-essential metals in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions and compounds are essential to life and many people routinely take them as food supplements in the form of vitamin and mineral pills. Most non-essential metals are considered to be toxic, nevertheless, many are widely used in imaging, diagnostics and medicine. This short review provides an overview from selected examples of the on-going research within my laboratory that uses metal compounds to either understand biological processes or that exhibit therapeutic properties overcoming the limitations of existing chemotherapies.

  7. Evolution of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Hall, Benjamin D.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years a great deal of biochemical and genetic research has focused on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (RPB1) of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. This strongly conserved domain of tandemly repeated heptapeptides has been linked functionally to important steps in the initiation and processing of mRNA transcripts in both animals and fungi. Although they are absolutely required for viability in these organisms, C-terminal tandem repeats do not occur in RPB1 sequences from diverse eukaryotic taxa. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of RPB1 sequences showing that canonical CTD heptads are strongly conserved in only a subset of eukaryotic groups, all apparently descended from a single common ancestor. Moreover, eukaryotic groups in which the most complex patterns of ontogenetic development occur are descended from this CTD-containing ancestor. Consistent with the results of genetic and biochemical investigations of CTD function, these analyses suggest that the enhanced control over RNA polymerase II transcription conveyed by acquired CTD/protein interactions was an important step in the evolution of intricate patterns of gene expression that are a hallmark of large, developmentally complex eukaryotic organisms. PMID:11972039

  8. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains) Christopher Brooks Edward A. Lee Xiaojun Liu Stephen Neuendorffer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II

  9. Distinct and redundant roles of the non-muscle myosin II isoforms and functional domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aibing; Ma, Xuefei; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    We propose that the in vivo functions of NM II (non-muscle myosin II) can be divided between those that depend on the N-terminal globular motor domain and those less dependent on motor activity but more dependent on the C-terminal domain. The former, being more dependent on the kinetic properties of NM II to translocate actin filaments, are less amenable to substitution by different NM II isoforms, whereas the in vivo functions of the latter, which involve the structural properties of NM II to cross-link actin filaments, are more amenable to substitution. In light of this hypothesis, we examine the ability of NM II-A, as well as a motor-compromised form of NM II-B, to replace NM II-B and rescue neuroepithelial cell-cell adhesion defects and hydrocephalus in the brain of NM II-B-depleted mice. We also examine the ability of NM II-B as well as chimaeric forms of NM II (II-A head and II-B tail and vice versa) to substitute for NM II-A in cell-cell adhesions in II-A-ablated mice. However, we also show that certain functions, such as neuronal cell migration in the developing brain and vascularization of the mouse embryo and placenta, specifically require NM II-B and II-A respectively.

  10. Cell surface expression and function of an HLA class II molecule with class I domain configuration

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules were expressed with extracellular polypeptide domains reorganized to form heavy (H) and light (L) chains (alpha 1-beta 1-beta 2 and alpha 2) analogous to class I. Accurate protein folding and dimerization is demonstrated by the ability of this 3+1-DR1 construct to bind class II- restricted peptides and stimulate CD4+ T cells. Cell surface expression of a functional class II molecule consisting of H and L chains supports the validity of current class II models and affirms the evolutionary relatedness of class I/II. MHC functions that differ between class I/II may be influenced by domain configuration, and the use of domain- shifted constructs will allow examination of this possibility. PMID:8340763

  11. Regulation of PKR by HCV IRES RNA: Importance of Domain II and NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Nallagatla, Subba Rao; Boyer, Joshua A.; Cameron, Craig E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is an essential component of the innate immune response. In the presence of dsRNA, PKR is autophosphorylated, which enables it to phosphorylate its substrate, eIF2α, leading to translation cessation. Typical activators of PKR are long dsRNAs produced during viral infection, although certain other RNAs can also activate. A recent study indicated that full-length internal ribosome entry site (IRES), present in the 5′-UTR of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, inhibits PKR, while another showed that it activates. We show here that both activation and inhibition by full-length IRES are possible. The HCV IRES has a complex secondary structure comprising four domains. While it has been demonstrated that domains III-IV activate PKR, we report here that domain II of the IRES also potently activates. Structure mapping and mutational analysis of domain II indicate that while the double-stranded regions of the RNA are important for activation, loop regions contribute as well. Structural comparison reveals that domain II has multiple, non-Watson-Crick features that mimic A-form dsRNA. The canonical and non-canonical features of domain II cumulate to a total of ∼33 unbranched base pairs, the minimum length of dsRNA required for PKR activation. These results provide further insight into the structural basis of PKR activation by a diverse array of RNA structural motifs that deviate from the long helical stretches found in traditional PKR activators. Activation of PKR by domain II of the HCV IRES has implications for the innate immune response when the other domains of the IRES may be inaccessible. We also study the ability of the HCV non-structural protein NS5A to bind various domains of the IRES and alter activation. A model is presented for how domain II of the IRES and NS5A operate to control host and viral translation during HCV infection. PMID:20447405

  12. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  13. Phosphorylation-regulated Binding of RNA Polymerase II to Fibrous Polymers of Low Complexity Domains

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Theodoropoulos, Pano; Mirzaei, Hamid; Han, Tina; Xie, Shanhai; Corden, Jeffry L.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The low complexity (LC) domains of the products of the fused in sarcoma (FUS), Ewings sarcoma (EWS) and TAF15 genes are translocated onto a variety of different DNA-binding domains and thereby assist in driving the formation of cancerous cells. In the context of the translocated fusion proteins, these LC sequences function as transcriptional activation domains. Here we show that polymeric fibers formed from these LC domains directly bind the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in a manner reversible by phosphorylation of the iterated, heptad repeats of the CTD. Mutational analysis indicates that the degree of binding between the CTD and the LC domain polymers correlates with the strength of transcriptional activation. These studies offer a simple means of conceptualizing how RNA polymerase II is recruited to active genes in its unphosphorylated state, and released for elongation following phosphorylation of the CTD. PMID:24267890

  14. The code and beyond: transcription regulation by the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Harlen, Kevin M; Churchman, L Stirling

    2017-04-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) extends from the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) as a long, repetitive and largely unstructured polypeptide chain. Throughout the transcription process, the CTD is dynamically modified by post-translational modifications, many of which facilitate or hinder the recruitment of key regulatory factors of Pol II that collectively constitute the 'CTD code'. Recent studies have revealed how the physicochemical properties of the CTD promote phase separation in the presence of other low-complexity domains. Here, we discuss the intricacies of the CTD code and how the newly characterized physicochemical properties of the CTD expand the function of the CTD beyond the code.

  15. Structural Basis for Ubiquitin Recognition by the Human ESCRT-II EAP45 GLUE Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Alam,S.; Langelier, C.; Whitby, F.; Koirala, S.; Robinson, H.; Hill, C.; Sundquist, W.

    2006-01-01

    ESCRT-IESCRT-IIGLUEEAP45VPS36The ESCRT-I and ESCRT-II complexes help sort ubiquitinated proteins into vesicles that accumulate within multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Crystallographic and biochemical analyses reveal that the GLUE domain of the human ESCRT-II EAP45 (also called VPS36) subunit is a split pleckstrin-homology domain that binds ubiquitin along one edge of the {beta}-sandwich. The structure suggests how human ESCRT-II can couple recognition of ubiquitinated cargoes and endosomal phospholipids during MVB protein sorting.

  16. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    PubMed

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  17. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  18. The Impact of the Human DNA Topoisomerase II C-Terminal Domain on Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meczes, Emma L.; Gilroy, Kathryn L.; West, Katherine L.; Austin, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) are essential enzymes needed for the resolution of topological problems that occur during DNA metabolic processes. Topos carry out an ATP-dependent strand passage reaction whereby one double helix is passed through a transient break in another. Humans have two topoII isoforms, α and β, which while enzymatically similar are differentially expressed and regulated, and are thought to have different cellular roles. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the enzyme has the most diversity, and has been implicated in regulation. We sought to investigate the impact of the CTD domain on activity. Methodology/Principle Findings We have investigated the role of the human topoII C-terminal domain by creating constructs encoding C-terminally truncated recombinant topoIIα and β and topoIIα+β-tail and topoIIβ+α-tail chimeric proteins. We then investigated function in vivo in a yeast system, and in vitro in activity assays. We find that the C-terminal domain of human topoII isoforms is needed for in vivo function of the enzyme, but not needed for cleavage activity. C-terminally truncated enzymes had similar strand passage activity to full length enzymes, but the presence of the opposite C-terminal domain had a large effect, with the topoIIα-CTD increasing activity, and the topoIIβ-CTD decreasing activity. Conclusions/Significance In vivo complementation data show that the topoIIα C-terminal domain is needed for growth, but the topoIIβ isoform is able to support low levels of growth without a C-terminal domain. This may indicate that topoIIβ has an additional localisation signal. In vitro data suggest that, while the lack of any C-terminal domain has little effect on activity, the presence of either the topoIIα or β C-terminal domain can affect strand passage activity. Data indicates that the topoIIβ-CTD may be a negative regulator. This is the first report of in vitro data with chimeric human topoIIs. PMID:18335031

  19. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-11-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice.

  20. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  1. Repression domains of class II ERF transcriptional repressors share an essential motif for active repression.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Matsui, K; Hiratsu, K; Shinshi, H; Ohme-Takagi, M

    2001-08-01

    We reported previously that three ERF transcription factors, tobacco ERF3 (NtERF3) and Arabidopsis AtERF3 and AtERF4, which are categorized as class II ERFs, are active repressors of transcription. To clarify the roles of these repressors in transcriptional regulation in plants, we attempted to identify the functional domains of the ERF repressor that mediates the repression of transcription. Analysis of the results of a series of deletions revealed that the C-terminal 35 amino acids of NtERF3 are sufficient to confer the capacity for repression of transcription on a heterologous DNA binding domain. This repression domain suppressed the intermolecular activities of other transcriptional activators. In addition, fusion of this repression domain to the VP16 activation domain completely inhibited the transactivation function of VP16. Comparison of amino acid sequences of class II ERF repressors revealed the conservation of the sequence motif (L)/(F)DLN(L)/(F)(x)P. This motif was essential for repression because mutations within the motif eliminated the capacity for repression. We designated this motif the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, and we identified this motif in a number of zinc-finger proteins from wheat, Arabidopsis, and petunia plants. These zinc finger proteins functioned as repressors, and their repression domains were identified as regions that contained an EAR motif.

  2. Harmonic Analysis and H2-Functions on Siegel Domains of Type II

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R. D.; Vági, S.

    1972-01-01

    It is known that the distinguished boundary of a Siegel domain of type II can be identified with a simply connected nilpotent Lie group of step two. The Plancherel formula for this group and the irreducible unitary representations which enter into that formula are determined. The H2-space of the domain and its Szegö kernel are characterized in terms of the harmonic analysis of the above group, in particular, the integral representations for H2-functions due to Gindikin and Korányi-Stein are shown to be instances of the Fourier inversion formula. PMID:16591961

  3. Crystal structure of group II intron domain 1 reveals a template for RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of large noncoding RNAs is increasingly appreciated, our understanding of their structures and architectural dynamics remains limited. In particular, we know little about RNA folding intermediates and how they facilitate the productive assembly of RNA tertiary structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of an obligate intermediate that is required during the earliest stages of group II intron folding. Comprised of intron domain 1 from the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron (D1, 266 nts), this intermediate retains native-like features but adopts a compact conformation in which the active-site cleft is closed. Transition between this closed and open (native) conformation is achieved through discrete rotations of hinge motifs in two regions of the molecule. The open state is then stabilized by sequential docking of downstream intron domains, suggesting a “first comes, first folds” strategy that may represent a generalizable pathway for assembly of large RNA and ribonucleoprotein structures. PMID:26502156

  4. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  5. Broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopic study on form II polyvinylidene fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tatsuya; Igawa, Hikaru; Okada, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yohei; Iwamoto, Kei; Toyota, Naoki; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-06-01

    The complex dielectric constant of semicrystalline form II polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF (II)) in the frequency range from 0.2 to 6.0 THz has been determined by broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The obtained dielectric constant consists of superposition of four vibration modes at 1.60, 2.36, 3.04 and 5.31 THz of crystalline part and a broad relaxation mode with center frequency of 0.68 THz which will be attributed to boson peak of amorphous fraction. In addition, the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant has also been measured, and we have determined the glass transition temperature of amorphous fraction of PVDF (II) as about 192 K by analysis of the temperature variation of peak frequency of the lattice vibration mode.

  6. 78 FR 79622 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Threatened Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population of Central Valley Spring-Run...), designate a nonessential experimental population of Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus... Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (hereafter, CV spring-run Chinook salmon) to the San Joaquin...

  7. 75 FR 32727 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Establishment of a Nonessential Experimental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ...; Establishment of a Nonessential Experimental Population of Sonoran Pronghorn in Southwestern Arizona AGENCY... the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), and to classify that reestablished population as a nonessential experimental population (NEP). The proposed rule provided a plan for establishing...

  8. 78 FR 54613 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision to the Nonessential Experimental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AY46 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision to the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican Wolf AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... revise the existing nonessential experimental population designation of the Mexican wolf (Canis...

  9. Preparation and reactivity of a tetranuclear Fe(II) core in the metallothionein α-domain.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yohei; Onoda, Akira; Sakurai, Rie; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins which exhibit high affinities for various metal ions and play roles in storage of essential metals and detoxification of toxic metals. Studies on the redox properties of MTs have been quite limited. Recently, we focused on the α-domain of MT (MTα) as a protein matrix and incorporated a tetranuclear metal cluster as a reductant. UV-visible, CD and MS data indicate the formation of the stable tetranuclear metal-cysteine cluster in the MTα matrix with Fe(II)(4)-MTα and Co(II)(4)-MTα species existing in water. Furthermore, the Fe(II)(4)-MTα species was found to promote the reduction of met-myoglobin and azobenzene derivatives under mild conditions. Particularly, the stoichiometric reduction of methyl red with Fe(II)(4)-MTα (1:1) was found to proceed with a conversion of 98% over a period of 6h at 25°C. This indicates that all of the four Fe(II) cores contribute to the reduction. In this paper, we describe the preparation and reactivity of the tetranuclear iron cluster in the protein matrix.

  10. Deciphering the catalytic domain of colicin M, a peptidoglycan lipid II-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Barreteau, Hélène; Bouhss, Ahmed; Gérard, Fabien; Duché, Denis; Boussaid, Boubekeur; Blanot, Didier; Lloubès, Roland; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Touzé, Thierry

    2010-04-16

    Colicin M inhibits Escherichia coli peptidoglycan synthesis through cleavage of its lipid-linked precursors. It has a compact structure, whereas other related toxins are organized in three independent domains, each devoted to a particular function: translocation through the outer membrane, receptor binding, and toxicity, from the N to the C termini, respectively. To establish whether colicin M displays such an organization despite its structural characteristics, protein dissection experiments were performed, which allowed us to delineate an independent toxicity domain encompassing exactly the C-terminal region conserved among colicin M-like proteins and covering about half of colicin M (residues 124-271). Surprisingly, the in vitro activity of the isolated domain was 45-fold higher than that of the full-length protein, suggesting a mechanism by which the toxicity of this domain is revealed following primary protein maturation. In vivo, the isolated toxicity domain appeared as toxic as the full-length protein under conditions where the reception and translocation steps were by-passed. Contrary to the full-length colicin M, the isolated domain did not require the presence of the periplasmic FkpA protein to be toxic under these conditions, demonstrating that FkpA is involved in the maturation process. Mutational analysis further identified five residues that are essential for cytotoxicity as well as in vitro lipid II-degrading activity: Asp-229, His-235, Asp-226, Tyr-228, and Arg-236. Most of these residues are surface-exposed and located relatively close to each other, hence suggesting they belong to the colicin M active site.

  11. Effects of eliminating a disulfide bridge within domain II of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A.

    PubMed Central

    Madshus, I H; Collier, R J

    1989-01-01

    Cysteines 265 and 287 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) were substituted by serine, thereby eliminating a disulfide bridge within domain II, the putative membrane insertion-translocation domain. Purified mutant toxin was 80-fold less toxic for mouse L cells than was wild-type ETA while retaining the same specific activity in the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction as did wild-type toxin. Binding of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 by mutant ETA occurred at a slightly higher pH than did binding by wild-type ETA, suggesting that the mutant protein more readily undergoes a conformational change exposing hydrophobic regions. Data are presented supporting the notion that the mutant and wild-type toxins enter from the same intracellular compartment. The lower cytotoxicity of the mutant protein could be due to accelerated intracellular degradation or abortive, premature membrane insertion. Images PMID:2499539

  12. Influence of Deletions within Domain II of Exotoxin A on Its Extracellular Secretion from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Voulhoux, Romé; Taupiac, Marie-Pierre; Czjzek, Mirjam; Beaumelle, Bruno; Filloux, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that secretes many proteins into the extracellular medium via the Xcp machinery. This pathway, conserved in gram-negative bacteria, is called the type II pathway. The exoproteins contain information in their amino acid sequence to allow targeting to their secretion machinery. This information may be present within a conformational motif. The nature of this signal has been examined for P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE). Previous studies failed to identify a common minimal motif required for Xcp-dependent recognition and secretion of PE. One study identified a motif at the N terminus of the protein, whereas another one found additional information at the C terminus. In this study, we assess the role of the central PE domain II composed of six α-helices (A to F). The secretion behavior of PE derivatives, individually deleted for each helix, was analyzed. Helix E deletion has a drastic effect on secretion of PE, which accumulates within the periplasm. The conformational rearrangement induced in this variant is predicted from the three-dimensional PE structure, and the molecular modification is confirmed by gel filtration experiments. Helix E is in the core of the molecule and creates close contact with other domains (I and III). Deletion of the surface-exposed helix F has no effect on secretion, indicating that no secretion information is contained in this helix. Finally, we concluded that disruption of a structured domain II yields an extended form of the molecule and prevents formation of the conformational secretion motif. PMID:10869085

  13. Nickel(II)-Schiff base complex recognizing domain II of bovine and human serum albumin: Spectroscopic and docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aurkie; Koley Seth, Banabithi; Pal, Uttam; Basu, Samita

    It has been spectroscopically monitored that a mononuclear nickel(II)-Schiff base complex {[NiL]·CH3OH = NSC} exhibits greater binding affinity for bovine serum albumin (BSA) than that of its human counterpart (HSA). Moreover the modes of binding of NSC with the two serum albumins also differ significantly. Docking studies predict a relatively rare type of 'superficial binding' of NSC at domain IIB of HSA with certain mobility whereas for BSA such phenomena has not been detected. The mobile nature of NSC at domain IIB of HSA has been well correlated with the spectroscopic results. It is to be noted that thermodynamic parameters for the NSC interaction also differ for the two serum albumins. Occurrence of energy transfer between the donor (Trp of BSA and HSA) and acceptor (NSC) has been obtained by means of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The protein stability on NSC binding has also been experimented by the GuHCl-induced protein unfolding studies. Interestingly it has been found that NSC-HSA interaction enhances the protein stability whereas NSC-BSA binding has no such impact. Such observations are indicative of the fact that the conformation of NSC is responsible in recognizing the two serum albumins and selectively enhancing protein stability.

  14. Nickel(II)-Schiff base complex recognizing domain II of bovine and human serum albumin: spectroscopic and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aurkie; Seth, Banabithi Koley; Pal, Uttam; Basu, Samita

    2012-06-15

    It has been spectroscopically monitored that a mononuclear nickel(II)-Schiff base complex {[NiL]·CH(3)OH=NSC} exhibits greater binding affinity for bovine serum albumin (BSA) than that of its human counterpart (HSA). Moreover the modes of binding of NSC with the two serum albumins also differ significantly. Docking studies predict a relatively rare type of 'superficial binding' of NSC at domain IIB of HSA with certain mobility whereas for BSA such phenomena has not been detected. The mobile nature of NSC at domain IIB of HSA has been well correlated with the spectroscopic results. It is to be noted that thermodynamic parameters for the NSC interaction also differ for the two serum albumins. Occurrence of energy transfer between the donor (Trp of BSA and HSA) and acceptor (NSC) has been obtained by means of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The protein stability on NSC binding has also been experimented by the GuHCl-induced protein unfolding studies. Interestingly it has been found that NSC-HSA interaction enhances the protein stability whereas NSC-BSA binding has no such impact. Such observations are indicative of the fact that the conformation of NSC is responsible in recognizing the two serum albumins and selectively enhancing protein stability.

  15. Cooperative activation of the T-type CaV3.2 channel: interaction between Domains II and III.

    PubMed

    Demers-Giroux, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdin, Benoîte; Sauvé, Rémy; Parent, Lucie

    2013-10-11

    T-type CaV3 channels are important mediators of Ca(2+) entry near the resting membrane potential. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for channel activation. Homology models based upon the high-resolution structure of bacterial NaV channels predict interaction between the S4-S5 helix of Domain II (IIS4-S5) and the distal S6 pore region of Domain II (IIS6) and Domain III (IIIS6). Functional intra- and inter-domain interactions were investigated with a double mutant cycle analysis. Activation gating and channel kinetics were measured for 47 single mutants and 20 pairs of mutants. Significant coupling energies (ΔΔG(interact) ≥ 1.5 kcal mol(-1)) were measured for 4 specific pairs of mutants introduced between IIS4-S5 and IIS6 and between IIS4-S5 and IIIS6. In agreement with the computer based models, Thr-911 in IIS4-S5 was functionally coupled with Ile-1013 in IIS6 during channel activation. The interaction energy was, however, found to be stronger between Val-907 in IIS4-S5 and Ile-1013 in IIS6. In addition Val-907 was significantly coupled with Asn-1548 in IIIS6 but not with Asn-1853 in IVS6. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the S4-S5 and S6 helices from adjacent domains are energetically coupled during the activation of a low voltage-gated T-type CaV3 channel.

  16. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  17. Coalescence of B cell receptor and invariant chain MHC II in a raft-like membrane domain.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Julian T; Lindner, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The BCR binds antigen for processing and subsequent presentation on MHC II molecules. Polyvalent antigen induces BCR clustering and targeting to endocytic processing compartments, which are also accessed by Ii-MHC II. Here, we report that clustered BCR is able to team up with Ii-MHC II already at the plasma membrane of mouse B-lymphocytes. Colocalization of BCR and Ii-MHC II on the cell surface required clustering of both types of molecules. The clustering of only one type did not trigger the recruitment of the other. Ii-bound MIF (a ligand of Ii) also colocalized with clustered BCR upon oligomerization of MIF on the surface of the B cell. Abundant surface molecules, such as B220 or TfnR, did not cocluster with the BCR. Some membrane raft-associated molecules, such as peptide-loaded MHC II, coclustered with the BCR, whereas others, such as GM1, did not. The formation of a BCR- and Ii-MHC II-containing membrane domain by antibody-mediated clustering was independent of F-actin and led to the coendocytosis of its constituents. With a rapid Brij 98 extraction method, it was possible to capture this membrane domain biochemically as a DRM. Ii and clustered BCR were present on the same DRM, as shown by immunoisolation. The coalescence of BCR and Ii-MHC II increased tyrosine phosphorylation, indicative of enhanced BCR signaling. Our work suggests a novel role for MIF and Ii-MHC II in BCR-mediated antigen processing.

  18. Domain structure in biphenyl incommensurate phase II observed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, A.; Emery, J.; Spiesser, M.

    1994-11-01

    The domain structure in incommensurate phase II of single biphenyl crystal has been observed by investigations of the optically excited states of the Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (E.P.R.) deuterated naphthalene molecular probes which substitute biphenyl molecules. Our results confirm that this phase is a 1q bi-domain one. The analysis of the spectra obtained in X band (9.5 GHz) experiments, in relation with the spin Hamiltonian parameter properties permits us to show that the E.P.R. probe rotates around a direction perpendicular to its long axis while the biphenyl molecule undergoes a twist movement around this axis. They also account for a regime which is like a “ multi-soliton " regime while the modulation is a plane wave one in the pure single crystal. The two molecules of the high temperature cell do not exactly experience the saure displacement field in the incommensurate phase and consequently the two domains can be distinguished. The spin Hamiltonian parameters which characterize the E.P.R. probes have been determined in the incommensurate phase II of biphenyl. La structure en domaines de la phase II du biphényle est mise en évidence par les investigations dans les états photo-excités des molécules de naphtalène deutéré, utilisées comme sondes de Résonance Paramagnétique Electronique, se substituant de manière diluée dans le mono-cristal de biphényle. Ceci confirme que cette phase est 1q bi-domaine. L'analyse des spectres obtenus dans des expériences en bande X (9.5 GHz) en relation avec les propriétés de l'hamiltonien de spin permet de montrer que la sonde moléculaire tourne autour d'une direction perpendiculaire à son grand axe alors que la molécule de biphényle subit un mouvement de twist autour de cet axe. Les résultats montrent que ces sondes rendent compte d'un régime qui est comme un régime “ multi-solitons " alors que la modulation est plane dans le cristal pur. Les deux molécules sondes de la cellule

  19. Protein Folding Mechanism of the Dimeric AmphiphysinII/Bin1 N-BAR Domain.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Tobias; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The human AmphyphisinII/Bin1 N-BAR domain belongs to the BAR domain superfamily, whose members sense and generate membrane curvatures. The N-BAR domain is a 57 kDa homodimeric protein comprising a six helix bundle. Here we report the protein folding mechanism of this protein as a representative of this protein superfamily. The concentration dependent thermodynamic stability was studied by urea equilibrium transition curves followed by fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopy. Kinetic unfolding and refolding experiments, including rapid double and triple mixing techniques, allowed to unravel the complex folding behavior of N-BAR. The equilibrium unfolding transition curve can be described by a two-state process, while the folding kinetics show four refolding phases, an additional burst reaction and two unfolding phases. All fast refolding phases show a rollover in the chevron plot but only one of these phases depends on the protein concentration reporting the dimerization step. Secondary structure formation occurs during the three fast refolding phases. The slowest phase can be assigned to a proline isomerization. All kinetic experiments were also followed by fluorescence anisotropy detection to verify the assignment of the dimerization step to the respective folding phase. Based on these experiments we propose for N-BAR two parallel folding pathways towards the homodimeric native state depending on the proline conformation in the unfolded state.

  20. Functional interaction between bases C1049 in domain II and G2751 in domain VI of 23S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The factor-binding center within the Escherichia coli ribosome is comprised of two discrete domains of 23S rRNA: the GTPase-associated region (GAR) in domain II and the sarcin–ricin loop in domain VI. These two regions appear to collaborate in the factor-dependent events that occur during protein synthesis. Current X-ray crystallography of the ribosome shows an interaction between C1049 in the GAR and G2751 in domain VI. We have confirmed this interaction by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical probing. Disruption of this base pair affected not only the chemical modification of some bases in domains II and VI and in helix H89 of domain V, but also ribosome function dependent on both EF-G and EF-Tu. Mutant ribosomes carrying the C1049 to G substitution, which show enhancement of chemical modification at G2751, were used to probe the interactions between the regions around 1049 and 2751. Binding of EF-G-GDP-fusidic acid, but not EF-G-GMP-PNP, to the ribosome protected G2751 from modification. The G2751 protection was also observed after tRNA binding to the ribosomal P and E sites. The results suggest that the interactions between the bases around 1049 and 2751 alter during different stages of the translation process. PMID:18252772

  1. Multifarious Beneficial Effect of Nonessential Amino Acid, Glycine: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Meerza Abdul; Begum, Pathan Shajahan

    2017-01-01

    Glycine is most important and simple, nonessential amino acid in humans, animals, and many mammals. Generally, glycine is synthesized from choline, serine, hydroxyproline, and threonine through interorgan metabolism in which kidneys and liver are the primarily involved. Generally in common feeding conditions, glycine is not sufficiently synthesized in humans, animals, and birds. Glycine acts as precursor for several key metabolites of low molecular weight such as creatine, glutathione, haem, purines, and porphyrins. Glycine is very effective in improving the health and supports the growth and well-being of humans and animals. There are overwhelming reports supporting the role of supplementary glycine in prevention of many diseases and disorders including cancer. Dietary supplementation of proper dose of glycine is effectual in treating metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases, several inflammatory diseases, obesity, cancers, and diabetes. Glycine also has the property to enhance the quality of sleep and neurological functions. In this review we will focus on the metabolism of glycine in humans and animals and the recent findings and advances about the beneficial effects and protection of glycine in different disease states. PMID:28337245

  2. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  3. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein downregulates vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Jiro; Takeda, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Narabayashi, Eriko; Kitamoto, Shiro; Tokunou, Tomotake; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) by hypoxia stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and increases the expression of target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. Although the systemic renin-angiotensin system is activated by hypoxia, the role of PHD in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. We examined the effect of PHD inhibition on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Hypoxia, cobalt chloride, and dimethyloxalylglycine, all known to inhibit PHD, reduced AT(1)R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of PHD2, a major isoform of PHDs, by RNA interference also reduced AT(1)R expression. Cobalt chloride diminished angiotensin II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Cobalt chloride decreased AT(1)R mRNA through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Oral administration of cobalt chloride (14 mg/kg per day) to C57BL/6J mice receiving angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated perivascular fibrosis of the coronary arteries without affecting blood pressure level. These data suggest that PHD inhibition may be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system via AT(1)R downregulation.

  4. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  5. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    PubMed

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  6. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-10-01

    Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of beta-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by beta-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel.

  7. β-Scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of β-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of β-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by β-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel. PMID:16020455

  8. Comparison of a fungal (family I) and bacterial (family II) cellulose-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tomme, P; Driver, D P; Amandoron, E A; Miller, R C; Antony, R; Warren, J; Kilburn, D G

    1995-01-01

    A family II cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of an exoglucanase/xylanase (Cex) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi was replaced with the family I CBD of cellobiohydrolase I (CbhI) from the fungus Trichoderma reesei. Expression of the hybrid gene in Escherichia coli yielded up to 50 mg of the hybrid protein, CexCBDCbhI, per liter of culture supernatant. The hybrid was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on cellulose. The relative association constants (Kr) for the binding of Cex, CexCBDCbhI, the catalytic domain of Cex (p33), and CbhI to bacterial microcrystalline cellulose (BMCC) were 14.9, 7.8, 0.8, and 10.6 liters g-1, respectively. Cex and CexCBDCbhI had similar substrate specificities and similar activities on crystalline and amorphous cellulose. Both released predominantly cellobiose and cellotriose from amorphous cellulose. CexCBDCbhI was two to three times less active than Cex on BMCC, but significantly more active than Cex on soluble cellulose and on xylan. Unlike Cex, the hybrid protein neither bound to alpha-chitin nor released small particles from dewaxed cotton fibers. PMID:7635821

  9. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  10. Glucosidase II and MRH-domain containing proteins in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Cecilia; Dahms, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    N -glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of the transfer of a pre-assembled glycan conserved among species (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid donor to a consensus sequence within a nascent protein that is entering the ER. The protein-linked glycans are then processed by glycosidases and glycosyltransferases in the ER producing specific structures that serve as signalling molecules for the fate of the folding glycoprotein: to stay in the ER during the folding process, to be retrotranslocated to the cytosol for proteasomal degradation if irreversibly misfolded, or to pursue transit through the secretory pathway as a mature glycoprotein. In the ER, each glycan signalling structure is recognized by a specific lectin. A domain similar to that of the mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) has been identified in several proteins of the secretory pathway. These include the beta subunit of glucosidase II (GII), a key enzyme in the early processing of the transferred glycan that removes middle and innermost glucoses and is involved in quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER (QC), the lectins OS-9 and XTP3-B, proteins involved in the delivery of ER misfolded proteins to degradation (ERAD), the gamma subunit of the Golgi GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in generating the mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) signal for sorting acidic hydrolases to lysosomes, and finally the MPRs that deliver those hydrolytic enzymes to the lysosome. Each of the MRH-containing proteins recognizes a different signalling N-glycan structure. Three-dimensional structures of some of the MRH domains have been solved, providing the basis to understand recognition mechanisms. PMID:25692846

  11. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  12. Sub1 Globally Regulates RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation ▿

    PubMed Central

    García, Alicia; Rosonina, Emanuel; Manley, James L.; Calvo, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several aspects of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as activation of transcription, termination, and 3′-end formation. Here, we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in controlling phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II large subunit C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the genes encoding all four known CTD kinases, SRB10, KIN28, BUR1, and CTK1, suggesting that Sub1 acts to influence CTD phosphorylation at more than one step of the transcription cycle. To address this directly, we first used in vitro kinase assays, and we show that, on the one hand, SUB1 deletion increased CTD phosphorylation by Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1 but, on the other, it decreased CTD phosphorylation by Srb10. Second, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that SUB1 deletion decreased Srb10 chromatin association on the inducible GAL1 gene but increased Kin28 and Ctk1 chromatin association on actively transcribed genes. Taken together, our data point to multiple roles for Sub1 in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation throughout the transcription cycle. PMID:20823273

  13. Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    García, Alicia; Rosonina, Emanuel; Manley, James L; Calvo, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several aspects of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as activation of transcription, termination, and 3'-end formation. Here, we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in controlling phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II large subunit C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the genes encoding all four known CTD kinases, SRB10, KIN28, BUR1, and CTK1, suggesting that Sub1 acts to influence CTD phosphorylation at more than one step of the transcription cycle. To address this directly, we first used in vitro kinase assays, and we show that, on the one hand, SUB1 deletion increased CTD phosphorylation by Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1 but, on the other, it decreased CTD phosphorylation by Srb10. Second, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that SUB1 deletion decreased Srb10 chromatin association on the inducible GAL1 gene but increased Kin28 and Ctk1 chromatin association on actively transcribed genes. Taken together, our data point to multiple roles for Sub1 in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation throughout the transcription cycle.

  14. A rule-based kinetic model of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Alexander, Ross D.; Beggs, Jean D.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of many RNA processing pathways is such that a conventional systems modelling approach is inadequate to represent all the molecular species involved. We demonstrate that rule-based modelling permits a detailed model of a complex RNA signalling pathway to be defined. Phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD; a flexible tail-like extension of the largest subunit) couples pre-messenger RNA capping, splicing and 3′ end maturation to transcriptional elongation and termination, and plays a central role in integrating these processes. The phosphorylation states of the serine residues of many heptapeptide repeats of the CTD alter along the coding region of genes as a function of distance from the promoter. From a mechanistic perspective, both the changes in phosphorylation and the location at which they take place on the genes are a function of the time spent by RNAPII in elongation as this interval provides the opportunity for the kinases and phosphatases to interact with the CTD. On this basis, we synthesize the available data to create a kinetic model of the action of the known kinases and phosphatases to resolve the phosphorylation pathways and their kinetics. PMID:23804443

  15. The tryptophan switch: changing ligand-binding specificity from type I to type II in SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Blanes-Mira, Clara; Serrano, Luis

    2004-01-09

    The ability of certain Src homology 3 (SH3) domains to bind specifically both type I and type II polyproline ligands is perhaps the best characterized, but also the worst understood, example in the family of protein-interaction modules. A detailed analysis of the structural variations in SH3 domains, with respect to ligand-binding specificity, together with mutagenesis of SH3 Fyn tyrosine kinase, reveal the structural basis for types I and II binding specificity by SH3 domains. The conserved Trp in the SH3 binding pocket can adopt two different orientations that, in turn, determine the type of ligand (I or II) able to bind to the domain. The only exceptions are ligands with Leu at positions P(-1) and P(2), that deviate from standard poly-Pro angles. The motion of the conserved Trp depends on the presence of certain residues located in a key position (132 for Fyn), near the binding pocket. SH3 domains placing aromatic residues in this key position are promiscuous. By contrast, those presenting beta-branched or long aliphatic residues block the conserved Trp in one of the two possible orientations, preventing binding in a type I orientation. This is experimentally demonstrated by a single mutation in Fyn SH3 (Y132I) that abolishes type I ligand binding, while preserving binding to type II ligands. Thus, simple conformational changes, governed by simple rules, can have profound effects on protein-protein interactions, highlighting the importance of structural details to predict protein-protein interactions.

  16. Autophosphorylation of the C2 domain inhibits translocation of the novel protein kinase C (nPKC) Apl II.

    PubMed

    Farah, Carole A; Lindeman, Amanda A; Siu, Vincent; Gupta, Micaela Das; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-11-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are critical signaling molecules controlled by complex regulatory pathways. Herein, we describe an important regulatory role for C2 domain phosphorylation. Novel PKCs (nPKCs) contain an N-terminal C2 domain that cannot bind to calcium. Previously, we described an autophosphorylation site in the Aplysia novel PKC Apl II that increased the binding of the C2 domain to lipids. In this study, we show that the function of this phosphorylation is to inhibit PKC translocation. Indeed, a phosphomimetic serine-glutamic acid mutation reduced translocation of PKC Apl II while blocking phosphorylation with a serine-alanine mutation enhanced translocation and led to the persistence of the kinase at the membrane longer after the end of the stimulation. Consistent with a role for autophosphorylation in regulating kinase translocation, inhibiting PKC activity using bisindolymaleimide 1 increased physiological translocation of PKC Apl II, whereas inhibiting phosphatase activity using calyculin A inhibited physiological translocation of PKC Apl II in neurons. Our results suggest a major role for autophosphorylation-dependent regulation of translocation.

  17. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes.

  18. 78 FR 2893 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ...We, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), are issuing a final rule to authorize the continued release of Middle Columbia River (MCR) steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that are currently being reintroduced as part of an ongoing reintroduction effort into the upper Deschutes River basin in portions of Jefferson, Crook, and Deschutes Counties, Oregon, and designate them as a nonessential......

  19. 78 FR 3381 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population of Central Valley Spring-Run Chinook Salmon... experimental population of Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) under section 10... Restoration Goal shall include the reintroduction of Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (hereafter,...

  20. 76 FR 42658 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Authorizing Release of a Nonessential Experimental Population...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Species: Authorizing Release of a Nonessential Experimental Population of Upper Columbia Spring-Run... Upper Columbia (UC) spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Okanogan River and its... the UC spring-run Chinook salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). This advance notice...

  1. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  2. The mycobacterial PhoH2 proteins are type II toxin antitoxins coupled to RNA helicase domains.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Emma S V; Arcus, Vickery L

    2015-07-01

    PhoH2 proteins are found in a diverse range of organisms that span the bacterial tree and little is known about this large protein family. PhoH2 proteins have two domains: An N-terminal PIN domain fused to a C-terminal PhoH domain. The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes 48 PIN domains and 47 of these constitute the VapC components of the 47 VapBC toxin-antitoxins. The 48th member of the M. tuberculosis PIN domain array is found in the single PhoH2 protein encoded in the genome. All characterized PIN domain proteins are RNases and the PhoH domains are predicted ATPases. This fusion of a PIN domain with an ATPase reflects a much wider association between PIN domains and PhoH domains across many prokaryote genomes. Here, we examine PhoH2 proteins from M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium smegmatis and a thermophilic homologue from Thermobispora bispora and we show that PhoH2 is a sequence-specific RNA helicase and RNAse. In addition, phoH2 from M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis is part of a longer mRNA transcript which includes a small, unannotated open reading frame (ORF) upstream of the phoH2 gene. This small gene overlaps with the beginning of the phoH2 gene in a manner similar to the PIN domain toxin-antitoxin operons. We have annotated the upstream gene as phoAT and its putative promoter elements satisfy previously characterized consensus sequences at the -10 site. Conditional growth experiments carried out in M. smegmatis revealed a negative effect on growth by the expression of M. tuberculosis PhoH2 that was alleviated by co-expression of the PhoAT peptide. Thus in M. tuberculosis, PhoH2 represents a new variation on a type II PIN domain toxin-antitoxin systems such that the toxin-antitoxin is now coupled to an RNA helicase whose predicted biological function is to unwind and cleave RNA in a sequence specific manner.

  3. The Conserved Foot Domain of RNA Pol II Associates with Proteins Involved in Transcriptional Initiation and/or Early Elongation

    PubMed Central

    García-López, M. Carmen; Pelechano, Vicent; Mirón-García, M. Carmen; Garrido-Godino, Ana I.; García, Alicia; Calvo, Olga; Werner, Michel; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Navarro, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) II establishes many protein–protein interactions with transcriptional regulators to coordinate different steps of transcription. Although some of these interactions have been well described, little is known about the existence of RNA pol II regions involved in contact with transcriptional regulators. We hypothesize that conserved regions on the surface of RNA pol II contact transcriptional regulators. We identified such an RNA pol II conserved region that includes the majority of the “foot” domain and identified interactions of this region with Mvp1, a protein required for sorting proteins to the vacuole, and Spo14, a phospholipase D. Deletion of MVP1 and SPO14 affects the transcription of their target genes and increases phosphorylation of Ser5 in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). Genetic, phenotypic, and functional analyses point to a role for these proteins in transcriptional initiation and/or early elongation, consistent with their genetic interactions with CEG1, a guanylyltransferase subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping enzyme. PMID:21954159

  4. Structural and functional analysis of two di-domain aromatase/cyclases from type II polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Caldara-Festin, Grace; Jackson, David R.; Barajas, Jesus F.; Valentic, Timothy R.; Patel, Avinash B.; Aguilar, Stephanie; Nguyen, MyChi; Vo, Michael; Khanna, Avinash; Sasaki, Eita; Liu, Hung-wen; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic polyketides make up a large class of natural products with diverse bioactivity. During biosynthesis, linear poly-β-ketone intermediates are regiospecifically cyclized, yielding molecules with defined cyclization patterns that are crucial for polyketide bioactivity. The aromatase/cyclases (ARO/CYCs) are responsible for regiospecific cyclization of bacterial polyketides. The two most common cyclization patterns are C7–C12 and C9–C14 cyclizations. We have previously characterized three monodomain ARO/CYCs: ZhuI, TcmN, and WhiE. The last remaining uncharacterized class of ARO/CYCs is the di-domain ARO/CYCs, which catalyze C7–C12 cyclization and/or aromatization. Di-domain ARO/CYCs can further be separated into two subclasses: “nonreducing” ARO/CYCs, which act on nonreduced poly-β-ketones, and “reducing” ARO/CYCs, which act on cyclized C9 reduced poly-β-ketones. For years, the functional role of each domain in cyclization and aromatization for di-domain ARO/CYCs has remained a mystery. Here we present what is to our knowledge the first structural and functional analysis, along with an in-depth comparison, of the nonreducing (StfQ) and reducing (BexL) di-domain ARO/CYCs. This work completes the structural and functional characterization of mono- and di-domain ARO/CYCs in bacterial type II polyketide synthases and lays the groundwork for engineered biosynthesis of new bioactive polyketides. PMID:26631750

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Profilaggrin S100 Domain and Identification of Target Proteins Annexin II, Stratifin, and HSP27.

    PubMed

    Bunick, Christopher G; Presland, Richard B; Lawrence, Owen T; Pearton, David J; Milstone, Leonard M; Steitz, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    The fused-type S100 protein profilaggrin and its proteolytic products including filaggrin are important in the formation of a normal epidermal barrier; however, the specific function of the S100 calcium-binding domain in profilaggrin biology is poorly understood. To explore its molecular function, we determined a 2.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal fused-type S100 domain of human profilaggrin with bound calcium ions. The profilaggrin S100 domain formed a stable dimer, which contained two hydrophobic pockets that provide a molecular interface for protein interactions. Biochemical and molecular approaches demonstrated that three proteins, annexin II/p36, stratifin/14-3-3 sigma, and heat shock protein 27, bind to the N-terminal domain of human profilaggrin; one protein (stratifin) co-localized with profilaggrin in the differentiating granular cell layer of human skin. Together, these findings suggest a model where the profilaggrin N-terminus uses calcium-dependent and calcium-independent protein-protein interactions to regulate its involvement in keratinocyte terminal differentiation and incorporation into the cornified cell envelope.

  6. Signaling activity of transforming growth factor beta type II receptors lacking specific domains in the cytoplasmic region.

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, R; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (T beta R-II) is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that contains two inserts in the kinase region and a serine/threonine-rich C-terminal extension. T beta R-II is required for TGF-beta binding to the type I receptor, with which it forms a heteromeric receptor complex, and its kinase activity is required for signaling by this complex. We investigated the role of various cytoplasmic regions in T beta R-II by altering or deleting these regions and determining the signaling activity of the resulting products in cell lines made resistant to TGF-beta by inactivation of the endogenous T beta R-II. TGF-beta binding to receptor I and responsiveness to TGF-beta in these cells can be restored by transfection of wild-type T beta R-II. Using this system, we show that the kinase insert 1 and the C-terminal tail of T beta R-II, in contrast to the corresponding regions in most tyrosine kinase receptors, are not essential to specify ligand-induced responses. Insert 2 is necessary to support the catalytic activity of the receptor kinase, and its deletion yields a receptor that is unable to mediate any of the responses tested. However, substitution of this insert with insert 2 from the activin receptor, ActR-IIB, does not diminish the ability of T beta R-II to elicit these responses. A truncated T beta R-II lacking the cytoplasmic domain still binds TGF-beta, supports ligand binding to receptor I, and forms a complex with this receptor. However, TGF-beta binding to receptor I facilitated by this truncated T beta R-II fails to inhibit cell proliferation, activate extracellular matrix protein production, or activate transcription from a promoter containing TGF-beta-responsive elements. We conclude that the transcriptional and antiproliferative responses to TGF-beta require both components of a heteromeric receptor complex that differs from tyrosine kinase receptors in its mode of signaling. Images PMID:8246946

  7. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  8. Photon Atomic Parameters of Nonessential Amino Acids for Radiotherapy and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bursalıoğlu, Ertuğrul O.; İçelli, Orhan; Balkan, Begüm; Kavanoz, H. Birtan; Okutan, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (μt) (cm2/g) and atomic, molecular, and electronic effective cross sections have been calculated for nonessential amino acids that contain H, C, N, and O such as tyrosine, aspartate, glutamine, alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and glycine in the wide energy region 0.015–15 MeV. The variations with energy of total mass attenuation coefficients and atomic, molecular, and electronic cross sections are shown for all photon interactions. PMID:25548658

  9. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  10. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia.

  11. Metabolic network analysis revealed distinct routes of deletion effects between essential and non-essential genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xun; Ung, Choong Yong; Chen, Yu Zong; Li, Baowen

    2012-04-01

    Interest in essential genes has arisen recently given their importance in antimicrobial drug development. Although knockouts of essential genes are commonly known to cause lethal phenotypes, there is insufficient understanding on the intermediate changes followed by genetic perturbation and to what extent essential genes correlate to other genes. Here, we characterized the gene knockout effects by using a list of affected genes, termed as 'damage lists'. These damage lists were identified through a refined cascading failure approach that was based on a previous topological flux balance analysis. Using an Escherichia coli metabolic network, we incorporated essentiality information into damage lists and revealed that the knockout of an essential gene mainly affects a large range of other essential genes whereas knockout of a non-essential gene only interrupts other non-essential genes. Also, genes sharing common damage lists tend to have the same essentiality. We extracted 72 core functional modules from the common damage lists of essential genes and demonstrated their ability to halt essential metabolites production. Overall, our network analysis revealed that essential and non-essential genes propagated their deletion effects via distinct routes, conferring mechanistic explanation to the observed lethality phenotypes of essential genes.

  12. Identification of transmembrane domain 6 & 7 residues that contribute to the binding pocket of the urotensin II receptor.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Brian J; Domazet, Ivana; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Yan, Li Ping; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2009-04-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic undecapeptide, is the natural ligand of the urotensin II (UT) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. In the present study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TMDs) six and seven of the rat urotensin II receptor (rUT) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the receptor. Each residue in the R256(6.32)-Q283(6.59) fragment of TMD6 and the A295(7.31)-T321(7.57) fragment of TMD7 was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA) or the negatively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate (MTSES) sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of TMD6 mutants F268C(6.44) and W278C(6.54) and TMD7 mutants L298C(7.34), T302C(7.38), and T303C(7.39) to (125)I-U-II. MTSES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of two additional mutants, namely L282C(6.58) in TMD6 and Y300C(7.36) in TMD7. These results suggest that specific residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the rUT receptor. This approach, which allowed us to identify key determinants in TMD6 and TMD7 that contribute to the UT receptor binding pocket, enabled us to further refine our homology-based model of how U-II interacts with its cognate receptor.

  13. Moving toward a precise nutrition: preferential loading of seeds with essential nutrients over non-essential toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mather A.; Castro-Guerrero, Norma; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and seeds are the main source of essential nutrients for humans and livestock. Many advances have recently been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants take up and accumulate micronutrients such as iron, zinc, copper and manganese. Some of these mechanisms, however, also facilitate the accumulation of non-essential toxic elements such as cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As). In humans, Cd and As intake has been associated with multiple disorders including kidney failure, diabetes, cancer and mental health issues. Recent studies have shown that some transporters can discriminate between essential metals and non-essential elements. Furthermore, sequestration of non-essential elements in roots has been described in several plant species as a key process limiting the translocation of non-essential elements to aboveground edible tissues, including seeds. Increasing the concentration of bioavailable micronutrients (biofortification) in grains while lowering the accumulation of non-essential elements will likely require the concerted action of several transporters. This review discusses the most recent advances on mineral nutrition that could be used to preferentially enrich seeds with micronutrients and also illustrates how precision breeding and transport engineering could be used to enhance the nutritional value of crops by re-routing essential and non-essential elements to separate sink tissues (roots and seeds). PMID:24600463

  14. Sensor Technology Comparison Method and Case Study, Part II Time Domain Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D.; Collins, D.; Maechler, B.; Mayo, F.

    2008-12-01

    This study compares an accelerometer with geophone impulse response, then with deconvolution, to differentiate sensors' performance in the time domain. Part I (ref. 3) of this analysis covered frequency domain comparison only. Digital synthesis, which can closely resemble the whole geophysical data processing steps, provided further quantifying evidence of performance differentiators by statistical measures in terms of system time delay, correlation, and coherence. From a synthesized Ricker wavelet, the simulation revealed salient features of the two types of sensors. It discusses the interaction of noise level and deconvolution processing. There are a number of ways to evaluate sensor performance with mathematics. Traditionally, researchers used sensor transfer function for this purpose. One of the shortcomings of transfer function approach is that both amplitude and phase response are discussed separately but the impact in real world, time domain, takes into consideration both aspects. In frequency domain, it is difficult to establish an absolute scale (normalize in mathematical sense) for the total difference. Therefore it is logical to discuss the issues in time domain directly. Impulse response reveals hardware in time domain, instead of frequency domain as transfer function and reveals the intrinsic features of each sensor, making it easier to analyze and understand. Seismic wavelet interval in survey is normally in the range of 10s to 100s milliseconds and reflection wavelet is shorter. This requires a very quick sensor with rise/fall time less than ms without overshot/undershot. Therefore, the sensor's temporal resolution needs to be improved by deconvolution which makes the total filter as a δ(t), delta function. In this research, we propose to adopt other tools such as lagged maximum correlation in time domain and coherence function in spectrum (coherence discussion is omitted for part III). Lagged maximum correlation method is a statistical process

  15. Transmembrane domains I and II of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT-4 contain molecular determinants of substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Kanner, Baruch I

    2004-06-01

    The sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters GABA transporter (GAT) 1 to 4 in the central nervous system enable efficient synaptic transmission by removing the neurotransmitter from the cleft. Taurine interacts only weakly with the GABA transporter GAT-4 (IC50 approximately 1.6 mM). Glutamate-61 is located in the conserved transmembrane domain I of GAT-4, whereas in the related taurine-transporter taurine transporter (TAUT), glycine occupies the equivalent position. [3H]GABA uptake by the GAT-4 E61G mutant becomes markedly more sensitive to inhibition by taurine (IC50 approximately 0.26 mM). Replacement of cysteine-94, located in the conserved transmembrane domain II of GAT-4, to its TAUT counterpart serine, results only in a modest increase in the ability of taurine to inhibit GABA uptake. However, introduction of glycine at this position decreases the IC50 for taurine by approximately 8-fold (IC50 approximately 0.20 mM). The inhibitory potency of taurine is inversely correlated with the volume of the side chain of the amino acid residue introduced at positions 61 and 94. It is striking that the IC50 for taurine of the E61G/C94G double mutant is decreased by approximately 35-fold (IC50 approximately 0.05 mM), and this inhibition of GABA transport is competitive. Changes in the inhibitory potency of the mutants described are also observed with beta-ala-nine and GABA, although they are much less pronounced. Our results suggest that determinants on transmembrane domains I and II can influence the specificity of the substrate binding pocket. The size of the side chain at positions 61 and 94 seems to determine the ability of substrate and substrate analogs to interact with the transporter.

  16. Macrolides and lincomycin susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and variable mutation of domain II and V in 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Nakajima, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yuka; Eguchi, Masashi; Hata, Eiji; Yamamoto, Koshi

    2005-08-01

    A total of 151 strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from porcine lung lesions (weaned pigs, n=71, and finishers, n=80) were investigated for their in vitro susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial agents. Thirty-one strains (28 from weaned pigs and 3 from finishers) showed resistance to 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and lincomycin. The prevalence of the 16-membered macrolide-resistant M. hyorhinis strain in weaned pigs from Japanese herds has approximately quadrupled in the past 10 years. Several of the 31 strains were examined for mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). All field strains tested showed a transition of A to G at position 2059 of 23S rRNA-rendered Escherichia coli. On the other hand, individual tylosin- and lincomycin-resistant mutants of M. hyorhinis were selected in vitro from the susceptible type strain BTS7 by 3 to 9 serial passages in subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic. The 23S rRNA sequences of both tylosin and lincomycin-resistant mutants were compared with that of the radical BTS7 strain. The BTS7 mutant strain selected by tylosin showed the same transition as the field-isolated strains of A2059G. However, the transition selected in lincomycin showed mutations in domains II and V of 23S rRNA, G2597U, C2611U in domain V, and the addition of an adenine at the pentameric adenine loop in domain II. The strain selected by lincomycin showed an additional point mutation of A2062G selected by tylosin.

  17. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... limited to household, industrial, automotive and pesticide uses; (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in... a propellant where evidence of good faith efforts to secure alternatives indicates that, other than a class I substance, there are no suitable alternatives; (v) Spinnerette lubricants/cleaning...

  18. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limited to household, industrial, automotive and pesticide uses; (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in... a propellant where evidence of good faith efforts to secure alternatives indicates that, other than a class I substance, there are no suitable alternatives; (v) Spinnerette lubricants/cleaning...

  19. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... limited to household, industrial, automotive and pesticide uses; (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in... a propellant where evidence of good faith efforts to secure alternatives indicates that, other than a class I substance, there are no suitable alternatives; (v) Spinnerette lubricants/cleaning...

  20. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limited to household, industrial, automotive and pesticide uses; (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in... a propellant where evidence of good faith efforts to secure alternatives indicates that, other than a class I substance, there are no suitable alternatives; (v) Spinnerette lubricants/cleaning...

  1. 40 CFR 82.70 - Nonessential Class II products and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limited to household, industrial, automotive and pesticide uses; (2) Except— (i) Medical devices listed in... a propellant where evidence of good faith efforts to secure alternatives indicates that, other than a class I substance, there are no suitable alternatives; (v) Spinnerette lubricants/cleaning...

  2. C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase links Rho GTPase signaling to Pol II CTD phosphorylation in Arabidopsis and yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Guohua; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yihong; Gao, Peng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-12-13

    Rho GTPases, including the Rho, Cdc42, Rac, and ROP subfamilies, act as pivotal signaling switches in various growth and developmental processes. Compared with the well-defined role of cytoskeletal organization in Rho signaling, much less is known regarding transcriptional regulation. In a mutant screen for phenotypic enhancers of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a constitutively active form of ROP2 (designated CA1-1), we identified RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) as a transcriptional regulator of ROP2 signaling. We show that ROP2 activation inhibits CPL1 activity by promoting its degradation, leading to an increase in CTD Ser5 and Ser2 phosphorylation. We also observed similar modulation of CTD phosphorylation by yeast Cdc42 GTPase and enhanced degradation of the yeast CTD phosphatase Fcp1 by activated ROP2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that modulation of the Pol II CTD code by Rho GTPase signaling represents an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.

  3. Bio-molecular architects: a scaffold provided by the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmeng; Gill, Gordon N; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the transcription of genes is accurately orchestrated both spatially and temporally by the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (CTD). The CTD provides a dynamic platform to recruit different regulators of the transcription apparatus. Different posttranslational modifications are precisely applied to specific sites of the CTD to coordinate transcription process. Regulators of the RNA polymerase II must identify specific sites in the CTD for cellular survival, metabolism, and development. Even though the CTD is disordered in the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II crystal structures due to its intrinsic flexibility, recent advances in the complex structural analysis of the CTD with its binding partners provide essential clues for understanding how selectivity is achieved for individual site recognition. The recent discoveries of the interactions between the CTD and histone modification enzymes disclose an important role of the CTD in epigenetic control of the eukaryotic gene expression. The intersection of the CTD code with the histone code discloses an intriguing yet complicated network for eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

  4. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: fracturing of colliding walls

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2015-08-26

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  5. Computational models of music perception and cognition II: Domain-specific music processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Grachten, Maarten; Herrera, Perfecto; Hazan, Amaury; Marxer, Ricard; Serra, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    In Part I [Purwins H, Herrera P, Grachten M, Hazan A, Marxer R, Serra X. Computational models of music perception and cognition I: The perceptual and cognitive processing chain. Physics of Life Reviews 2008, in press, doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2008.03.004], we addressed the study of cognitive processes that underlie auditory perception of music, and their neural correlates. The aim of the present paper is to summarize empirical findings from music cognition research that are relevant to three prominent music theoretic domains: rhythm, melody, and tonality. Attention is paid to how cognitive processes like category formation, stimulus grouping, and expectation can account for the music theoretic key concepts in these domains, such as beat, meter, voice, consonance. We give an overview of computational models that have been proposed in the literature for a variety of music processing tasks related to rhythm, melody, and tonality. Although the present state-of-the-art in computational modeling of music cognition definitely provides valuable resources for testing specific hypotheses and theories, we observe the need for models that integrate the various aspects of music perception and cognition into a single framework. Such models should be able to account for aspects that until now have only rarely been addressed in computational models of music cognition, like the active nature of perception and the development of cognitive capacities from infancy to adulthood.

  6. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: fracturing of colliding walls

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura E-mail: bond@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-08-01

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  7. Peat humic substances enriched with nutrients for agricultural applications: competition between nutrients and non-essential metals present in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Botero, Wander Gustavo; de Oliveira, Luciana Camargo; Rocha, Julio Cesar; Rosa, Andre Henrique; Dos Santos, Ademir

    2010-05-15

    Improved agricultural productivity, and reduction of environmental impacts, require studies of the interactions between different soil components. Fertilizers marketed as "organic" or "natural", such as peats or humic substances (HS) extracted from peats, are enriched with macro and micronutrients that, according to the manufacturers, are released to the plant in accordance with its needs. This work investigates the complexation capacity of HS for macro and micronutrient metal species, considering the competition, for HS complexation sites, between non-essential metals (aluminium and lead), present in the soil, and the nutrients. Humic substances were found to possess strong affinities for Pb(II) and Al(III), forming stable complexes, with concomitant release of complexed nutrients. Although HS are already used commercially as organic fertilizers, further studies of methods of HS enrichment, aimed at avoiding losses, are highly desirable from environmental and economic perspectives.

  8. Dietary essentiality of “nutritionally non-essential amino acids” for animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids (AA) had traditionally been classified as nutritionally essential (indispensable) or non-essential (dispensable) for animals and humans. Nutritionally essential AA (EAA) are defined as either those AA whose carbon skeletons cannot be synthesized de novo in animal cells or those that normally are insufficiently synthesized de novo by the animal organism relative to its needs for maintenance, growth, development, and health and which must be provided in the diet to meet requirements. In contrast, nutritionally non-essential AA (NEAA) are those AA which can be synthesized de novo in adequate amounts by the animal organism to meet requirements for maintenance, growth, development, and health and, therefore, need not be provided in the diet. Although EAA and NEAA had been described for over a century, there are no compelling data to substantiate the assumption that NEAA are synthesized sufficiently in animals and humans to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. NEAA play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling pathways, digestion and absorption of dietary nutrients, DNA and protein synthesis, proteolysis, metabolism of glucose and lipids, endocrine status, men and women fertility, acid–base balance, antioxidative responses, detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, neurotransmission, and immunity. Emerging evidence indicates dietary essentiality of “nutritionally non-essential amino acids” for animals and humans to achieve their full genetic potential for growth, development, reproduction, lactation, and resistance to metabolic and infectious diseases. This concept represents a new paradigm shift in protein nutrition to guide the feeding of mammals (including livestock), poultry, and fish. PMID:26041391

  9. Dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-08-01

    Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids (AA) had traditionally been classified as nutritionally essential (indispensable) or non-essential (dispensable) for animals and humans. Nutritionally essential AA (EAA) are defined as either those AA whose carbon skeletons cannot be synthesized de novo in animal cells or those that normally are insufficiently synthesized de novo by the animal organism relative to its needs for maintenance, growth, development, and health and which must be provided in the diet to meet requirements. In contrast, nutritionally non-essential AA (NEAA) are those AA which can be synthesized de novo in adequate amounts by the animal organism to meet requirements for maintenance, growth, development, and health and, therefore, need not be provided in the diet. Although EAA and NEAA had been described for over a century, there are no compelling data to substantiate the assumption that NEAA are synthesized sufficiently in animals and humans to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. NEAA play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling pathways, digestion and absorption of dietary nutrients, DNA and protein synthesis, proteolysis, metabolism of glucose and lipids, endocrine status, men and women fertility, acid-base balance, antioxidative responses, detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, neurotransmission, and immunity. Emerging evidence indicates dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans to achieve their full genetic potential for growth, development, reproduction, lactation, and resistance to metabolic and infectious diseases. This concept represents a new paradigm shift in protein nutrition to guide the feeding of mammals (including livestock), poultry, and fish.

  10. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  11. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Analysis of Polarization-Dependent Transmission in Cholesteric Blue Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Ryotaro; Moritake, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2010-03-01

    The photonic band structure and circular-polarization dependence of the transmission properties of cholesteric blue phase II were analyzed using a finite-difference time-domain method based on a double-twist cylinder model. The polarization dependence of the calculated band structure was not recognized in the same manner as that in previous studies. However, it can be clearly observed that the calculated transmission spectra depend on the circular polarization; this result agrees well with experimental results. On the basis of the circular-polarization dependence of the transmission spectra in the case of a thick sample, it can be indicated that a total reflection band appears in the selective reflection band.

  12. RNA polymerase II C-terminal heptarepeat domain Ser-7 phosphorylation is established in a mediator-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Rigault, Caroline; Heidemann, Martin; Eick, Dirk; Meisterernst, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal heptarepeat domain (CTD) is subject to phosphorylation during initiation and elongation of transcription by RNA polymerase II. Here we study the molecular mechanisms leading to phosphorylation of Ser-7 in the human enzyme. Ser-7 becomes phosphorylated before initiation of transcription at promoter regions. We identify cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) as one responsible kinase. Phosphorylation of both Ser-5 and Ser-7 is fully dependent on the cofactor complex Mediator. A subform of Mediator associated with an active RNAPII is critical for preinitiation complex formation and CTD phosphorylation. The Mediator-RNAPII complex independently recruits TFIIB and CDK7 to core promoter regions. CDK7 phosphorylates Ser-7 selectively in the context of an intact preinitiation complex. CDK7 is not the only kinase that can modify Ser-7 of the CTD. ChIP experiments with chemical inhibitors provide evidence that other yet to be identified kinases further phosphorylate Ser-7 in coding regions.

  13. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products.

  14. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S.

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products. PMID:26903957

  15. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  16. Role of salt bridge dynamics in inter domain recognition of human IMPDH isoforms: an insight to inhibitor topology for isoform-II.

    PubMed

    Bairagya, Hridoy R; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu P; Bera, Asim K

    2011-12-01

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme involves in the biosynthesis pathway of guanosine nucleotide. Type II isoform of the enzyme is selectively upregulated in neoplastic fast replicating lymphocytes and CML cancer cells. The hIMPDH-II is an excellent target for antileukemic agent. The detailed investigation during MD-Simulation (15 ns) of three different unliganded structures (1B3O, 1JCN and 1JR1) have clearly explored the salt bridge mediated stabilization of inter or intra domain (catalytic domains I(N), I(C) with res. Id. 28-111 and 233-504, whereas two CBS domains C₁, C₂ are 112-171 and 172-232) in IMPDH enzyme which are mostly inaccessible in their X-rays structures. The salt bridge interaction in I(N)---C₁ inter-domain of hIMPDH-I, I(N)---C₂ of IMPDH-II and C₁---I(C) of nhIMPDH-II are discriminative features among the isoforms. The I(N)---C₂ recognition in hIMPDH-II (1B3O) is missing in type-I isoform (1JCN). The salt bridge interaction D232---K238 at the surface of protein and the involvement of three conserved water molecules or the hydrophilic centers (WA²³²(OD1), WB ²³²(OD2) and W²³⁸(NZ)) to those acidic and basic residues seem to be unique in hIMPDH-II. The hydrophilic susceptibility, geometrical and electronic consequences of this salt bridge interaction could be useful to design the topology of specific inhibitor for hIMPDH-II which may not be effective for hIMPDH-I. Possibly, the aliphatic ligand containing carboxyl, amide or hydrophilic groups with flexible structure may be implicated for hIMPDH-II inhibitor design using the conserved water mimic drug design protocol.

  17. Profiles of non-essential trace elements in ewe and goat milk and their yoghurt, Torba yoghurt and whey.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hasan; Güler, Zehra; Park, Young W

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the profiles of non-essential trace elements in ewes' and goats' milk and manufactured products, such as yoghurt, torba yoghurt and whey, as well as changes in trace element content during Torba yoghurt-making processes. Concentrations of non-essential trace elements in ewe (Awassi) and goat (Damascus) milk and their yoghurt, torba yoghurt and whey were quantitatively determined by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), after microwave digestion. Aluminium, antimony, arsenic, boron, beryllium, cadmium, nickel, lead, silver, titanium, thallium and vanadium were determined for both types of milk and their products. Barium was not detected in goats' milk or their products. Among all trace elements, boron was the most abundant and beryllium was least present in milk and the manufactured products. The results showed that goats' and ewes' milk and their manufactured products may be a source of 13 non-essential trace elements.

  18. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  19. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  20. Differential Contribution of Transmembrane Domains IV, V, VI, and VII to Human Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Homomer Formation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brent M; Nguyen, Elaine; Chedrawe, Matthew A J; Rainey, Jan K; Dupré, Denis J

    2017-02-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in drug therapy and represent one of the largest families of drug targets. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is notable as it has a central role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Blockade of AT1R signaling has been shown to alleviate hypertension and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Despite this, it has become apparent that our initial understanding of AT1R signaling is oversimplified. There is considerable evidence to suggest that AT1R signaling is highly modified in the presence of receptor-receptor interactions, but there is very little structural data available to explain this phenomenon even with the recent elucidation of the AT1R crystal structure. The current study investigates the involvement of transmembrane domains in AT1R homomer assembly with the goal of identifying hydrophobic interfaces that contribute to receptor-receptor affinity. A recently published crystal structure of the AT1R was used to guide site-directed mutagenesis of outward-facing hydrophobic residues within the transmembrane region of the AT1R. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer was employed to analyze how receptor mutation affects the assembly of AT1R homomers with a specific focus on hydrophobic residues. Mutations within transmembrane domains IV, V, VI, and VII had no effect on angiotensin-mediated β-arrestin1 recruitment; however, they exhibited differential effects on the assembly of AT1R into oligomeric complexes. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrophobic amino acids at the AT1R transmembrane interface and provide the first glimpse of the requirements for AT1R complex assembly.

  1. Analysis of transmembrane domains 1 and 4 of the human angiotensin II AT1 receptor by cysteine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Holleran, Brian J; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard

    2010-01-22

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the AT(1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT(1) receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. Here, we investigated the role of the first and fourth transmembrane domains (TMDs) in the formation of the binding pocket of the human AT(1) receptor using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Each residue within the Phe-28((1.32))-Ile-53((1.57)) fragment of TMD1 and Leu-143((4.40))-Phe-170((4.67)) fragment of TMD4 was mutated, one at a time, to a cysteine. The resulting mutant receptors were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA). This treatment led to a significant reduction in the binding affinity of TMD1 mutants M30C((1.34))-AT(1) and T33C((1.37))-AT(1) and TMD4 mutant V169C((4.66))-AT(1). Although this reduction in binding of the TMD1 mutants was maintained when examined in a constitutively active receptor (N111G-AT(1)) background, we found that V169C((4.66))-AT(1) remained unaffected when treated with MTSEA compared with untreated in this context. Moreover, the complete loss of binding observed for R167C((4.64))-AT(1) was restored upon treatment with MTSEA. Our results suggest that the extracellular portion of TMD1, particularly residues Met-30((1.34)) and Thr-33((1.37)), as well as residues Arg-167((4.64)) and Val-169((4.66)) at the junction of TMD4 and the second extracellular loop, are important binding determinants within the AT(1) receptor binding pocket but that these TMDs undergo very little movement, if at all, during the activation process.

  2. Magnetic domain patterns on strong perpendicular magnetization of Co/Ni multilayers as spintronics materials: II. Numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kojima, Kazuki; Yasue, Tsuneo; Akutsu, Noriko; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Bauer, Ernst; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2013-10-02

    Magnetic domains in ultrathin films form domain patterns, which strongly depend on the magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic anisotropy in Co/Ni multilayers changes with the number of layers. We provide a model to simulate the experimentally observed domain patterns. The model assumes a layer-dependent magnetic anisotropy. With the anisotropy parameter estimated from experimental data, we reproduce the magnetic domain patterns.

  3. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Transportation/Automotive Mechanics. Volume II: Theory. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, James F., Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of transportation/automotive mechanics test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a test item…

  4. Site-specific methylation and acetylation of lysine residues in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Descostes, Nicolas; Hintermair, Corinna; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Imhof, Axel; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic modification of heptad-repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) regulates transcription-coupled processes. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that K7-residues in non-consensus repeats of human RNAPII are modified by acetylation, or mono-, di-, and tri-methylation. K7ac, K7me2, and K7me3 were found exclusively associated with phosphorylated CTD peptides, while K7me1 occurred also in non-phosphorylated CTD. The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes K7me1/2 residues in CTD and reacts with RNAPIIA. Treatment of cellular extracts with phosphatase or of cells with the kinase inhibitor flavopiridol unmasked the K7me1/2 epitope in RNAPII0, consistent with the association of K7me1/2 marks with phosphorylated CTD peptides. Genome-wide profiling revealed high levels of K7me1/2 marks at the transcriptional start site of genes for sense and antisense transcribing RNAPII. The new K7 modifications further expand the mammalian CTD code to allow regulation of differential gene expression.

  5. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga; Connolly, Denise C.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications. PMID:26618181

  6. Direct analysis of phosphorylation sites on the Rpb1 C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyunsuk; Ficarro, Scott B.; Kang, Un-Beom; Chun, Yujin; Marto, Jarrod A.; Buratowski, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RNA polymerase II and various mRNA processing and chromatin modifying enzymes are mediated by the changing phosphorylation pattern on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of polymerase subunit Rpb1 during different stages of transcription. Phosphorylations within the repetitive heptamer sequence (YSPTSPS) of CTD have primarily been defined using antibodies, but these do not distinguish different repeats or allow comparative quantitation. Using a CTD modified for mass spectrometry (msCTD), we show that Ser5-P and Ser2-P occur throughout the length of CTD and are far more abundant than other phosphorylation sites. msCTD extracted from cells mutated in several CTD kinases or phosphatases showed the expected changes in phosphorylation. Furthermore, msCTD associated with capping enzyme was enriched for Ser5-P while that bound to the transcription termination factor Rtt103 had higher levels of Ser2-P. These results suggest a relatively sparse and simple "CTD code". PMID:26799764

  7. Function and Control of RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation in Vertebrate Transcription and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Kehui

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (the Rpb1 CTD) is composed of tandem heptad repeats of the consensus sequence Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7. We reported previously that Thr 4 is phosphorylated and functions in histone mRNA 3′-end formation in chicken DT40 cells. Here, we have extended our studies on Thr 4 and to other CTD mutations by using these cells. We found that an Rpb1 derivative containing only the N-terminal half of the CTD, as well as a similar derivative containing all-consensus repeats (26r), conferred full viability, while the C-terminal half, with more-divergent repeats, did not, reflecting a strong and specific defect in snRNA 3′-end formation. Mutation in 26r of all Ser 2 (S2A) or Ser 5 (S5A) residues resulted in lethality, while Ser 7 (S7A) mutants were fully viable. While S2A and S5A cells displayed defects in transcription and RNA processing, S7A cells behaved identically to 26r cells in all respects. Finally, we found that Thr 4 was phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 9 in cells and dephosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo by the phosphatase Fcp1. PMID:24752900

  8. Site-specific methylation and acetylation of lysine residues in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Descostes, Nicolas; Hintermair, Corinna; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Imhof, Axel; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic modification of heptad-repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) regulates transcription-coupled processes. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that K7-residues in non-consensus repeats of human RNAPII are modified by acetylation, or mono-, di-, and tri-methylation. K7ac, K7me2, and K7me3 were found exclusively associated with phosphorylated CTD peptides, while K7me1 occurred also in non-phosphorylated CTD. The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes K7me1/2 residues in CTD and reacts with RNAPIIA. Treatment of cellular extracts with phosphatase or of cells with the kinase inhibitor flavopiridol unmasked the K7me1/2 epitope in RNAPII0, consistent with the association of K7me1/2 marks with phosphorylated CTD peptides. Genome-wide profiling revealed high levels of K7me1/2 marks at the transcriptional start site of genes for sense and antisense transcribing RNAPII. The new K7 modifications further expand the mammalian CTD code to allow regulation of differential gene expression. PMID:26566685

  9. Identification of essential and non-essential genes in Ambystoma tigrinum virus.

    PubMed

    Aron, Mariah M; Allen, Alexander G; Kromer, Mathew; Galvez, Hector; Vigil, Brianna; Jancovich, James K

    2016-06-02

    Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses that are found world-wide infecting fish, amphibian and reptile ectothermic hosts. Ranavirus genomes range from 105 to 155kbp in length and they are predicted to encode around 90-125 genes. Currently, our knowledge of the function of ∼50% of these genes is known or inferred based on homology to orthologous genes characterized in other systems; however, the function of the remaining open reading frames (ORFS) is unknown. Therefore, in order to begin to uncover the function of unknown ORFs in ranaviruses we developed a standardized approach to generate a recombination cassette for any ORF in Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Our standardized approach quickly and efficiently assembles recombination cassettes and recombinant ATV. We have used this approach to identify two essential, one semi-essential and two non-essential genes in ATV.

  10. Essential and non-essential element concentrations in two sleeper shark species collected in arctic waters.

    PubMed

    McMeans, Bailey C; Borgå, Katrine; Bechtol, William R; Higginbotham, David; Fisk, Aaron T

    2007-07-01

    A number of elements/metals have increased in arctic biota and are of concern due to their potential toxicity. Most studies on elements in the Arctic have focused on marine mammals and seabirds, but concentrations in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) and Pacific sleeper shark (Somniosus pacificus), the only two shark species known to regularly inhabit arctic waters, have never been reported. To address this data gap, concentrations and patterns of 25 elements were analyzed in liver of Greenland sharks collected about Cumberland Sound (n=24) and Pacific sleeper sharks collected about Prince William Sound (n=14). Several non-essential elements differed between species/locations, which could suggest geographical exposure differences or ecological (e.g., diet) differences between the species. Certain essential elements also differed between the two sleeper sharks, which may indicate different physiological requirements between these closely related shark species, although information on such relationships are lacking for sharks and fish.

  11. The C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals: A conserved structure with an essential function

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, L.A.; Wong, J.K.C.; Fitzpatrick, V.D.; Moyle, M.; Ingles, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Using DNA encoding the largest subunit of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II, the authors isolated the homologous hamster RPO21 gene. Nucleotide sequencing of both the hamster and D. melanogaster RPO21 DNAs confirmed that the RPO21 polypeptides of these two species, like the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPO21 polypeptide, contain both an N-terminal region homologous to the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunit ..beta..' and a unique polymerase II-specific C-terminal domain. This C-terminal domain, encoded by separate exons in the D. melanogaster and hamster genes, consists of a tandemly repeated heptapeptide sequence. By constructing a series of deletions in DNA encoding the 26 heptapeptide repeats normally present in the S. cerevisiae RPO21 polypeptide, the authors have established that a minimum of between 9 and 11 repeats is necessary for RPO21 function in yeast cells. Replacement of the yeast RPO21 heptapeptide repeats by the longer hamster repetitive domain resulted in viable yeast cells with no detectable mutant phenotype, while a similar replacement of the yeast repeats by the more divergent D. melanogaster repeats was a recessive lethal mutation. The authors suggest that this novel repetitive domain is essential for proper initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and that it may mediate the functions of TATA boxes, upstream activating sequences, and enhancers.

  12. Structure of Ctk3, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II CTD kinase complex, reveals a noncanonical CTD-interacting domain fold.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Wolfgang; Mayer, Andreas; Sun, Mai; Remmert, Michael; Cheung, Alan C M; Niesser, Jürgen; Soeding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    CTDK-I is a yeast kinase complex that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to promote transcription elongation. CTDK-I contains the cyclin-dependent kinase Ctk1 (homologous to human CDK9/CDK12), the cyclin Ctk2 (human cyclin K), and the yeast-specific subunit Ctk3, which is required for CTDK-I stability and activity. Here we predict that Ctk3 consists of a N-terminal CTD-interacting domain (CID) and a C-terminal three-helix bundle domain. We determine the X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Ctk3 homologue Lsg1 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight helices arranged into a right-handed superhelical fold that resembles the CID domain present in transcription termination factors Pcf11, Nrd1, and Rtt103. Ctk3 however shows different surface properties and no binding to CTD peptides. Together with the known structure of Ctk1 and Ctk2 homologues, our results lead to a molecular framework for analyzing the structure and function of the CTDK-I complex.

  13. Interactions between relay helix and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix drive the converter domain rotation during the recovery stroke of myosin II.

    PubMed

    Baumketner, Andrij

    2012-06-01

    Myosin motor protein exists in two alternative conformations, prerecovery state M* and postrecovery state M**, on adenosine triphosphate binding. The details of the M*-to-M** transition, known as the recovery stroke to reflect its role as the functional opposite of the force-generating power stroke, remain elusive. The defining feature of the postrecovery state is a kink in the relay helix, a key part of the protein involved in force generation. In this article, we determine the interactions that are responsible for the appearance of the kink. We design a series of computational models that contain three other segments, relay loop, converter domain, and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix, with which relay helix interacts and determine their structure in accurate replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. By conducting an exhaustive combinatorial search among different models, we find that: (1) the converter domain must be attached to the relay helix during the transition, so it does not interfere with other parts of the protein and (2) the structure of the relay helix is controlled by SH1 helix. The kink is strongly coupled to the position of SH1 helix. It arises as a result of direct interactions between SH1 and the relay helix and leads to a rotation of the C-terminal part of the relay helix, which is subsequently transmitted to the converter domain.

  14. Alanine scanning analyses of the three major loops in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Kagawa, Yasuhiro; Miyakawa, Ai; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Tohru; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. Therefore, it is very important to characterize the functional motif of Cry4Aa that is responsible for its mosquitocidal activity. In this study, to characterize a potential receptor binding site, namely, loops 1, 2, and 3 in domain II, we constructed a series of Cry4Aa mutants in which a residue in these three loops was replaced with alanine. A bioassay using Culex pipiens larvae revealed that replacement of some residues affected the mosquitocidal activity of Cry4Aa, but the effect was limited. This finding was partially inconsistent with previous results which suggested that replacement of the Cry4Aa loop 2 results in a significant loss of mosquitocidal activity. Therefore, we constructed additional mutants in which multiple (five or six) residues in loop 2 were replaced with alanine. Although the replacement of multiple residues also resulted in some decrease in mosquitocidal activity, the mutants still showed relatively high activity. Since the insecticidal spectrum of Cry4Aa is specific, Cry4Aa must have a specific receptor on the surface of the target tissue, and loss of binding to the receptor should result in a complete loss of mosquitocidal activity. Our results suggested that, unlike the receptor binding site of the well-characterized molecule Cry1, the receptor binding site of Cry4Aa is different from loops 1, 2, and 3 or that there are multiple binding sites that work cooperatively for receptor binding.

  15. Instability and Pattern Formation in Three-Species Food Chain Model via Holling Type II Functional Response on a Circular Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Walid; Yafia, R.; Aziz Alaoui, M. A.; Bouhafa, H.; Abichou, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of food chain predator-prey model. This model is given by a reaction-diffusion system defined on a circular spatial domain, which includes three-state variables namely, prey and intermediate predator and top predator and incorporates the Holling type II and a modified Leslie-Gower functional response. The aim of this paper is to investigate theoretically and numerically the asymptotic behavior of the interior equilibrium of the model. The local and global stabilities of the positive steady-state solution and the conditions that enable the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation and Turing instability in the circular spatial domain are proved. In the end, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate how biological processes can affect spatiotemporal pattern formation in a disc spatial domain and different types of spatial patterns with respect to different time steps and diffusion coefficients are obtained.

  16. Identification of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin domain II loop 1 as the binding site of Tenebrio molitor cadherin repeat CR12.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Amaro, Itzel; Ortíz, Ernesto; Becerril, Baltazar; Ibarra, Jorge E; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins exert their toxic effect by specific recognition of larval midgut proteins leading to oligomerization of the toxin, membrane insertion and pore formation. The exposed domain II loop regions of Cry toxins have been shown to be involved in receptor binding. Insect cadherins have shown to be functionally involved in toxin binding facilitating toxin oligomerization. Here, we isolated a VHH (VHHA5) antibody by phage display that binds Cry3Aa loop 1 and competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to Tenebrio molitor brush border membranes. VHHA5 also competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to a cadherin fragment (CR12) that was previously shown to be involved in binding and toxicity of Cry3Aa, indicating that Cry3Aa binds CR12 through domain II loop 1. Moreover, we show that a loop 1 mutant, previously characterized to have increased toxicity to T. molitor, displayed a correlative enhanced binding affinity to T. molitor CR12 and to VHHA5. These results show that Cry3Aa domain II loop 1 is a binding site of CR12 T. molitor cadherin.

  17. Fcp1 directly recognizes the C-terminal domain (CTD) and interacts with a site on RNA polymerase II distinct from the CTD

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Man-Hee; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Mincheng; Hausmann, Stéphane; Shuman, Stewart; Gnatt, Averell L.; Fu, Jianhua

    2005-01-01

    Fcp1 is an essential protein phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphoserines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Fcp1 plays a major role in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation and, hence, critically influences the function of Pol II throughout the transcription cycle. The basic understanding of Fcp1–CTD interaction has remained ambiguous because two different modes have been proposed: the “dockingsite” model versus the “distributive” mechanism. Here we demonstrate biochemically that Fcp1 recognizes and dephosphorylates the CTD directly, independent of the globular non-CTD part of the Pol II structure. We point out that the recognition of CTD by the phosphatase is based on random access and is not driven by Pol II conformation. Results from three different types of experiments reveal that the overall interaction between Fcp1 and Pol II is not stable but dynamic. In addition, we show that Fcp1 also interacts with a region on the polymerase distinct from the CTD. We emphasize that this non-CTD site is functionally distinct from the docking site invoked previously as essential for the CTD phosphatase activity of Fcp1. We speculate that Fcp1 interaction with the non-CTD site may mediate its stimulatory effect on transcription elongation reported previously. PMID:16301539

  18. Report on audit of the US Department of Energy`s identification and disposal of nonessential land

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the results of an audit of four US DOE facilities to determine whether any land holdings are excess to current and anticipated future needs. Facilities audited were the Hanford Site, the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Brookhaven Laboratory. Audit findings were that 309,000 acres at the Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho sites were not essential to carrying out current and foreseeable mission requirements. It is recommended that the DOE dispose of the nonessential land holdings, reevaluate requirements for remaining land holdings and dispose of any additional nonessential land, and reevaluate the policy of defining ecosystem management as a valid basis for retaining Department real property. 2 tabs.

  19. Toxicological interactions of silver nanoparticles and non-essential metals in human hepatocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Renata Rank; Bezerra, Arandi Ginane; Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; Randi, Marco Antônio Ferreira; Voigt, Carmen Lúcia; Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Kjeldsen, Frank; Filipak Neto, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    Toxicological interaction represents a challenge to toxicology, particularly for novel contaminants. There are no data whether silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), present in a wide variety of products, can interact and modulate the toxicity of ubiquitous contaminants, such as nonessential metals. In the current study, we investigated the toxicological interactions of AgNP (size=1-2nm; zeta potential=-23mV), cadmium and mercury in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The results indicated that the co-exposures led to toxicological interactions, with AgNP+Cd being more toxic than AgNP+Hg. Early (2-4h) increases of ROS (DCF assay) and mitochondrial O2(-) levels (Mitosox® assay) were observed in the cells co-exposed to AgNP+Cd/Hg, in comparison to control and individual contaminants, but the effect was partially reverted in AgNP+Hg at the end of 24h-exposure. In addition, decreases of mitochondrial metabolism (MTT), cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), cell proliferation (crystal violet assay) and ABC-transporters activity (rhodamine accumulation assay) were also more pronounced in the co-exposure groups. Foremost, co-exposure to AgNP and metals potentiated cell death (mainly by necrosis) and Hg(2+) (but not Cd(2+)) intracellular levels (ICP-MS). Therefore, toxicological interactions seem to increase the toxicity of AgNP, cadmium and mercury.

  20. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  1. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  2. Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in meat from cattle reared under organic, intensive or conventional production systems.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M; Hernández, J; Prieto, F; Shore, R F

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated if differences in non-essential and essential trace element accumulation in beef-cattle reared under different systems (including organic, conventional and intensive management) were reflected in the meat derived from these animals. Diaphragm muscle from 166 calves from nine farms were analysed. Muscle cadmium concentrations were low (<10 microg/kg wet weight) and muscle arsenic, mercury and lead levels were below the limits of detection (<12, 2 and 3 microg/kg, respectively) in most (77-97%) samples; there were no significant differences between farms. Essential trace element concentrations in muscle were generally within adequate physiological ranges and, although they varied significantly between farms, this was not apparently related to management practices. There were no significant correlations in element concentrations between muscle and liver or kidney (organ concentrations that better reflect exposure), except for cobalt (positive association) and zinc (negative association). Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in muscle in the studied animals did not generally reflect differences in exposure. This is particularly relevant for animals reared in systems (such as organic farms) where cattle are exposed to higher levels of non-essential elements (probably due to soil ingestion when grazing) but also can suffer from mineral deficiencies.

  3. Structure-Function Map of the Receptor Site for β-Scorpion Toxins in Domain II of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are the molecular targets of β-scorpion toxins, which shift the voltage dependence of activation to more negative membrane potentials by a voltage sensor-trapping mechanism. Molecular determinants of β-scorpion toxin (CssIV) binding and action on rat brain sodium channels are located in the S1-S2 (IIS1-S2) and S3-S4 (IIS3-S4) extracellular linkers of the voltage-sensing module in domain II. In IIS1-S2, mutations of two amino acid residues (Glu779 and Pro782) significantly altered the toxin effect by reducing binding affinity. In IIS3-S4, six positions surrounding the key binding determinant, Gly845, define a hot spot of high-impact residues. Two of these substitutions (A841N and L846A) reduced voltage sensor trapping. The other three substitutions (N842R, V843A, and E844N) increased voltage sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that the IIS3-S4 loop plays a primary role in determining both toxin affinity and efficacy. A high resolution molecular model constructed with the Rosetta-Membrane modeling system reveals interactions of amino acid residues in sodium channels that are crucial for toxin action with residues in CssIV that are required for its effects. In this model, the wedge-shaped CssIV inserts between the IIS1-S2 and IIS3-S4 loops of the voltage sensor, placing key amino acid residues in position to interact with binding partners in these extracellular loops. These results provide new molecular insights into the voltage sensor-trapping model of toxin action and further define the molecular requirements for the development of antagonists that can prevent or reverse toxicity of scorpion toxins. PMID:21795675

  4. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  5. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-02

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies.

  6. Computer simulation of vapor-liquid phase separation in two- and three-dimensional fluids. II. Domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Nakanishi, Koichiro

    1995-02-01

    Fluids undergoing phase separation exhibit complicated domain patterns. In this study we perform molecular-dynamics simulations for two- and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids in order to investigate the relationship between statistical properties of domain structure and system temperature. The asymptotic form factor of each pattern is obtained using scaling and its temperature dependence studied. In particular the asymptotic tail of the form factor is analyzed. This tail is related to the domain-wall structure. At low system, temperatures, the form factor satisfies Porod's law; its asymptotic tail decreases as S(k)~k-(D+1) where D is the system dimensionality. However, it is found that the decay of the asymptotic tail becomes slower than that of the Porod tail at higher temperatures in both the two- and three-dimensional systems. This indicates that the dimension of the domain wall is fractal and increases with increasing system temperature.

  7. Transcription-Independent RNA Polymerase II Dephosphorylation by the FCP1 Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase in Xenopus laevis Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Palancade, Benoît; Dubois, Marie Françoise; Dahmus, Michael E.; Bensaude, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in mRNA metabolism. The relative ratio of hyperphosphorylated RNAP II to hypophosphorylated RNAP II is determined by a dynamic equilibrium between CTD kinases and CTD phosphatase(s). The CTD is heavily phosphorylated in meiotic Xenopus laevis oocytes. In this report we show that the CTD undergoes fast and massive dephosphorylation upon fertilization. A cDNA was cloned and shown to code for a full-length xFCP1, the Xenopus orthologue of the FCP1 CTD phosphatases in humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two critical residues in the catalytic site were identified. CTD phosphatase activity was observed in extracts prepared from Xenopus eggs and cells and was shown to be entirely attributable to xFCP1. The CTD dephosphorylation triggered by fertilization was reproduced upon calcium activation of cytostatic factor-arrested egg extracts. Using immunodepleted extracts, we showed that this dephosphorylation is due to xFCP1. Although transcription does not occur at this stage, phosphorylation appears as a highly dynamic process involving the antagonist action of Xp42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and FCP1 phosphatase. This is the first report that free RNAP II is a substrate for FCP1 in vivo, independent from a transcription cycle. PMID:11533226

  8. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  9. Mutations in the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin demonstrate the role of domains II and III in specificity towards Spodoptera exigua larvae

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Several mutants of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin affected with regard to specific activity towards Spodoptera exigua were studied. Alanine was used to replace single residues in loops 2 and 3 of domain II (mutant pPB19) and to replace residues 541–544 in domain III (mutant pPB20). Additionally, a Cry1Ca mutant combining all mutations was constructed (mutant pPB21). Toxicity assays showed a marked decrease in toxicity against S. exigua for all mutants, while they retained their activity against Manduca sexta, confirming the importance of these residues in determining insect specificity. Parameters for binding to the specific receptors in BBMV (brush border membrane vesicles) of S. exigua were determined for all toxins. Compared with Cry1Ca, the affinity of mutant pPB19 was slightly affected (2-fold lower), whereas the affinity of the mutants with an altered domain III (pPB20 and pPB21) was approx. 8-fold lower. Activation of Cry1Ca protoxin by incubation with S. exigua or M. sexta BBMV revealed the transient formation of an oligomeric form of Cry1Ca. The presence of this oligomeric form was tested in the activation of the different Cry1Ca mutants, and we found that those mutated in domain II (pPB19 and pPB21) could not generate the oligomeric form when activated by S. exigua BBMV. In contrast, when oligomerization was tested using BBMV prepared from M. sexta, all of the Cry1Ca mutants showed the formation of a similar oligomeric form as did the wild-type toxin. Our results show how modification of insect specificity can be achieved by manipulation of different parts of the toxin structure involved in different steps of the mode of action of B. thuringiensis toxins. PMID:15320864

  10. Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu (HER2) Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IIIB and IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab Monotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide - Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IIIB and IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab...To) 27 APR 2007 - 26 APR 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu (HER2) Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide ...intracellular domain (ICD) peptide -based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab. Patients enrolled will be HER2 overexpressing stage IIIB and IV

  11. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  12. Crystal structure of the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment complexed to a class II MHC molecule.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-H.; Meijers, R.; Xiong, Y.; Liu, J.-H.; Sakihama, T.; Zhang, R.-G.; Joachimiak, A.; Reinherz, E. L.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School

    2001-09-11

    The structural basis of the interaction between the CD4 coreceptor and a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is described. The crystal structure of a complex containing the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment and the murine I-A{sup k }class II MHC molecule with associated peptide (pMHCII) shows that only the 'top corner' of the CD4 molecule directly contacts pMHCII. The CD4 Phe-43 side chain extends into a hydrophobic concavity formed by MHC residues from both {alpha}2 and {beta}2 domains. A ternary model of the CD4-pMHCII-T-cell receptor (TCR) reveals that the complex appears V-shaped with the membrane-proximal pMHCII at the apex. This configuration excludes a direct TCR-CD4 interaction and suggests how TCR and CD4 signaling is coordinated around the antigenic pMHCII complex. Human CD4 binds to HIV gp120 in a manner strikingly similar to the way in which CD4 interacts with pMHCII. Additional contacts between gp120 and CD4 give the CD4-gp120 complex a greater affinity. Thus, ligation of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 occludes the pMHCII-binding site on CD4, contributing to immunodeficiency.

  13. A Lysine Cluster in Domain II of Bacillus subtilis PBP4a Plays a Role in the Membrane Attachment of This C1-PBP

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Broeck, Arnaud; Van der Heiden, Edwige; Sauvage, Eric; Dauvin, Marjorie; Joris, Bernard; Duez, Colette

    2015-01-01

    In PBP4a, a Bacillus subtilis class-C1 penicillin-binding protein (PBP), four clustered lysine (K) residues, K86, K114, K119, and K265, protrude from domain II. Replacement of these amino acids with glutamine (Q) residues by site-directed mutagenesis yielded Mut4KQ PBP4a. When produced in Escherichia coli without its predicted Sec-signal peptide, wild-type (WT) PBP4a was found mainly associated with the host cytoplasmic membrane, whereas Mut4KQ PBP4a remained largely unbound. After purification, the capacities of the two proteins to bind to B. subtilis membranes were compared. The results were similar to those obtained in E. coli: in vitro, a much higher percentage of WT PBP4a than of Mut4KQ PBP4a was found to interact with B. subtilis membranes. Immunodetection of PBP4a in B. subtilis membrane extracts revealed that a processed form of this PBP (as indicated by its size) associates with the B. subtilis cytoplasmic membrane. In the absence of any amphiphilic peptide in PBP4a, the crown of positive charges on the surface of domain II is likely responsible for the cellular localization of this PBP and its attachment to the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:26460848

  14. Improvement of cellulose-degrading ability of a yeast strain displaying Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II by recombination of cellulose-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Ito, Junji; Fujita, Yasuya; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2004-01-01

    To improve the cellulolytic activity of a yeast strain displaying endoglucanase II (EGII) from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei QM9414, the genes encoding the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of EGII, cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) and cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) from T. reesei QM9414, were fused with the catalytic domain of EGII and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Display of each of the recombinant EGIIs was confirmed using immunofluorescence microscopy. In the case of EGII-displaying yeast strains in which the CBD of EGII was replaced with the CBD of CBHI or CBHII, the binding affinity to Avicel and hydrolytic activity toward phosphoric acid swollen Avicel were similar to that of a yeast strain displaying wild-type EGII. On the other hand, the three yeast strains displaying EGII with two or three tandemly aligned CBDs showed binding affinity and hydrolytic activity higher than that of the yeast strain displaying wild-type EGII. This result indicates that the hydrolytic activity of yeast strains displaying recombinant EGII increases with increased binding ability to cellulose.

  15. Mammalian inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase II can compensate for the absence of all three yeast Sac1-like-domain-containing 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, C J; McColl, B K; Kong, A M; Ellis, S L; Wijayaratnam, A P; Sambrook, J; Mitchell, C A

    2001-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] plays a complex role in generating intracellular signalling molecules, and also in regulating actin-binding proteins, vesicular trafficking and vacuolar fusion. Four inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (hereafter called 5-phosphatases) have been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Inp51p, Inp52p, Inp53p and Inp54p. Each enzyme contains a 5-phosphatase domain which hydrolyses PtdIns(4,5)P(2), forming PtdIns4P, while Inp52p and Inp53p also express a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase domain within the Sac1-like domain. Disruption of any two yeast 5-phosphatases containing a Sac1-like domain results in abnormalities in actin polymerization, plasma membrane, vacuolar morphology and bud-site selection. Triple null mutant 5-phosphatase strains are non-viable. To investigate the role of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in mediating the phenotype of double and triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast, we determined whether a mammalian PtdIns(4,5)P(2) 5-phosphatase, 5-phosphatase II, which lacks polyphosphoinositide phosphatase activity, could correct the phenotype of triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast and restore cellular PtdIns(4,5)P(2) levels to near basal values. Mammalian 5-phosphatase II expressed under an inducible promoter corrected the growth, cell wall, vacuolar and actin polymerization defects of the triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast strains. Cellular PtdIns(4,5)P(2) levels in various 5-phosphatase double null mutant strains demonstrated significant accumulation (4.5-, 3- and 2-fold for Deltainp51Deltainp53, Deltainp51Deltainp52 and Deltainp52Deltainp53 double null mutants respectively), which was corrected significantly following 5-phosphatase II expression. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the functional and cellular consequences of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) accumulation and the evolutionary conservation of function between mammalian and yeast PtdIns(4,5)P(2) 5-phosphatases. PMID:11311145

  16. HSP70 Domain II of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Modulates Immune Response and Protective Potential of F1 and LcrV Antigens of Yersinia pestis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Lalit; Verma, Shailendra K.; Nagar, Durgesh P.; Saxena, Nandita; Pathak, Prachi; Pant, Satish C.; Tuteja, Urmil

    2014-01-01

    No ideal vaccine exists to control plague, a deadly dangerous disease caused by Yersinia pestis. In this context, we cloned, expressed and purified recombinant F1, LcrV antigens of Y. pestis and heat shock protein70 (HSP70) domain II of M. tuberculosis in E. coli. To evaluate the protective potential of each purified protein alone or in combination, Balb/C mice were immunized. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses were evaluated. Immunized animals were challenged with 100 LD50 of Y. pestis via intra-peritoneal route. Vaccine candidates i.e., F1 and LcrV generated highly significant titres of anti-F1 and anti-LcrV IgG antibodies. A significant difference was noticed in the expression level of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in splenocytes of immunized animals. Significantly increased percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-γ in spleen of vaccinated animals were observed in comparison to control group by flow cytometric analysis. We investigated whether the F1, LcrV and HSP70(II) antigens alone or in combination can effectively protect immunized animals from any histopathological changes. Signs of histopathological lesions noticed in lung, liver, kidney and spleen of immunized animals on 3rd day post challenge whereas no lesions in animals that survived to day 20 post-infection were observed. Immunohistochemistry showed bacteria in lung, liver, spleen and kidney on 3rd day post-infection whereas no bacteria was observed on day 20 post-infection in surviving animals in LcrV, LcrV+HSP70(II), F1+LcrV, and F1+LcrV+HSP70(II) vaccinated groups. A significant difference was observed in the expression of IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CD4+/CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ in the F1+LcrV+HSP70(II) vaccinated group in comparison to the F1+LcrV vaccinated group. Three combinations that included LcrV+HSP70(II), F1+LcrV or F1+LcrV+HSP70(II) provided 100% protection, whereas LcrV alone provided only 75% protection. These findings suggest that HSP70(II) of M. tuberculosis can be a

  17. The Cost of Concreteness: The Effect of Nonessential Information on Analogical Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Jennifer A.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Heckler, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Most theories of analogical transfer focus on similarities between the learning and transfer domains, where transfer is more likely between domains that share common surface features, similar elements, or common interpretations of structure. We suggest that characteristics of the learning instantiation alone can give rise to different levels of…

  18. RPRD1A and RPRD1B Are Human RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Scaffolds for Ser5 Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinghua; Hunter, Gerald O.; Kuznetsova, Olga V.; Tempel, Wolfram; Marcon, Edyta; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Hongbo; Kuo, Wei-Hung William; Li, Joyce; Young, Peter; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Wan, Cuihong; Loppnau, Peter; El Bakkouri, Majida; Senisterra, Guillermo A.; He, Hao; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Emili, Andrew; Murphy, Shona; Mosley, Amber L.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Min, Jinrong; Greenblatt, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) heptapeptide repeats (Y1-S2-P3-T4-S5-P6-S7) undergo dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the transcription cycle to recruit factors that regulate transcription, RNA processing and chromatin modification. We show here that RPRD1A and RPRD1B form homodimers and heterodimers through their coiled-coil domains and interact preferentially via CTD interaction domains (CIDs) with CTD repeats phosphorylated at S2 and S7. Our high resolution crystal structures of the RPRD1A, RPRD1B and RPRD2 CIDs, alone and in complex with CTD phosphoisoforms, elucidate the molecular basis of CTD recognition. In an interesting example of cross-talk between different CTD modifications, our data also indicate that RPRD1A and RPRD1B associate directly with RPAP2 phosphatase and, by interacting with CTD repeats where phospho-S2 and/or phospho-S7 bracket a phospho-S5 residue, serve as CTD scaffolds to coordinate the dephosphorylation of phospho-S5 by RPAP2. PMID:24997600

  19. Residue-by-residue view of in vitro FUS granules that bind the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Janke, Abigail M.; Rhine, Christy L.; Fawzi, Nicolas L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Phase-separated states of proteins underlie ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and nuclear RNA-binding protein assemblies that may nucleate protein inclusions associated with neurodegenerative diseases. We report that the N-terminal low complexity domain of the RNA-binding protein Fused in Sarcoma (FUS LC) is structurally disordered and forms a liquid-like phase-separated state resembling RNP granules. This state directly binds the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. Phase-separated FUS lacks static structures as probed by fluorescence microscopy, indicating they are distinct from both protein inclusions and hydrogels. We use solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to directly probe the dynamic architecture within FUS liquid phase-separated assemblies. Importantly, we find that FUS LC retains disordered secondary structure even in the liquid phase-separated state. Therefore, we propose that disordered protein granules, even those made of aggregation-prone prion-like domains, are dynamic and disordered molecular assemblies with transiently formed protein-protein contacts. PMID:26455390

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Tristram's Bunting, Emberiza tristrami (Aves: Passeriformes): the first representative of the family Emberizidae with six boxes in the central conserved domain II of control region.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xianzhao; Yuan, Jian; Zhang, Liqin; Li, Xifeng; Yu, Lei; Chen, Lei; Guo, Zhichun; Yang, Jianke

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome has proven to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic inference, phylogeography, and molecular evolution. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Emberiza tristrami (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) for use in future phylogenetic analyses. This circular mitochondrial genome is 16,789 bp in length and composed of 13 typical protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 putative control region (CR). One extra nucleotide "C" of nad3 is not detected in the mitogenome of E. tristrami. The CR of E. tristrami can be divided into three domains: ETAS (extended termination-associated sequence) domain I (nt 1-431), central conserved domain II (nt 432-847), and CSB (conserved sequence block) domain III (nt 848-1217). Six conserved sequence boxes in the central conserved domain II were identified as boxes F, E, D, C, b, and B.

  1. Hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site RNA contains a tertiary structural element in a functional domain of stem–loop II

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Alita J.; Lytle, J. Robin; Gomez, Jordi; Robertson, Hugh D.

    2001-01-01

    The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA contains >300 bases of highly conserved 5′-terminal sequence, most of it in the uncapped 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) upstream from the single AUG initiator triplet at which translation of the HCV polyprotein begins. Although progress has been made in defining singularities like the RNA pseudoknot near this AUG, the sequence and structural features of the HCV IRES which stimulate accurate and efficient initiation of protein synthesis are only partially defined. Here we report that a region further upstream from the AUG, stem–loop II of the HCV IRES, also contains an element of local tertiary structure which we have detected using RNase H cleavage and have mapped using the singular ability of two bases therein to undergo covalent intra-chain crosslinking stimulated by UV light. This pre-existing element maps to two non-contiguous stretches of the HCV IRES sequence, residues 53–68 and 103–117. Several earlier studies have shown that the correct sequence between bases 45 and 70 of the HCV IRES stem–loop II domain is required for initiation of protein synthesis. Because features of local tertiary structure like the one we report here are often associated with protein binding, we propose that the HCV stem–loop II element is directly involved in IRES action. PMID:11410661

  2. Neutralization of Gating Charges in Domain II of the Sodium Channel α Subunit Enhances Voltage-Sensor Trapping by a β-Scorpion Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Scheuer, Todd; Mantegazza, Massimo; Rochat, Hervé; Catterall, William A.

    2001-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins shift the voltage dependence of activation of sodium channels to more negative membrane potentials, but only after a strong depolarizing prepulse to fully activate the channels. Their receptor site includes the S3–S4 loop at the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor in domain II of the α subunit. Here, we probe the role of gating charges in the IIS4 segment in β-scorpion toxin action by mutagenesis and functional analysis of the resulting mutant sodium channels. Neutralization of the positively charged amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment by mutation to glutamine shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive membrane potentials and reduces the steepness of voltage-dependent gating, which is consistent with the presumed role of these residues as gating charges. Surprisingly, neutralization of the gating charges at the outer end of the IIS4 segment by the mutations R850Q, R850C, R853Q, and R853C markedly enhances β-scorpion toxin action, whereas mutations R856Q, K859Q, and K862Q have no effect. In contrast to wild-type, the β-scorpion toxin Css IV causes a negative shift of the voltage dependence of activation of mutants R853Q and R853C without a depolarizing prepulse at holding potentials from −80 to −140 mV. Reaction of mutant R853C with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate causes a positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation and restores the requirement for a depolarizing prepulse for Css IV action. Enhancement of sodium channel activation by Css IV causes large tail currents upon repolarization, indicating slowed deactivation of the IIS4 voltage sensor by the bound toxin. Our results are consistent with a voltage-sensor–trapping model in which the β-scorpion toxin traps the IIS4 voltage sensor in its activated position as it moves outward in response to depolarization and holds it there, slowing its inward movement on deactivation and enhancing subsequent channel activation. Evidently

  3. Conformational changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase mutants: effect of mutations either at Ca(2+)-binding site II or at tryptophan 552 in the cytosolic domain.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Jaxel, Christine; Picard, Martin; le Maire, Marc; Champeil, Philippe; Falson, Pierre

    2006-04-25

    By analyzing, after expression in yeast and purification, the intrinsic fluorescence properties of point mutants of rabbit Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) with alterations to amino acid residues in Ca(2+)-binding site I (E(771)), site II (E(309)), in both sites (D(800)), or in the nucleotide-binding domain (W(552)), we were able to follow the conformational changes associated with various steps in the ATPase catalytic cycle. Whereas Ca(2+) binding to purified wild-type (WT) ATPase in the absence of ATP leads to the rise in Trp fluorescence expected for the so-called E2 --> E1Ca(2) transition, the Ca(2+)-induced fluorescence rise is dramatically reduced for the E(309)Q mutant. As this purified E(309)Q mutant retains the ability to bind Ca(2+) at site I (but not at site II), we tentatively conclude that the protein reorganization induced by Ca(2+) binding at site II makes the major contribution to the overall Trp fluorescence changes observed upon Ca(2+) binding to both sites. Judging from the fluorescence response of W(552)F, similar to that of WT, these changes appear to be primarily due to membranous tryptophans, not to W(552). The same holds for the fluorescence rise observed upon phosphorylation from P(i) (the so-called E2 --> E2P transition). As for WT ATPase, Mg(2+) binding in the absence of Ca(2+) affects the fluorescence of the E(309)Q mutant, suggesting that this Mg(2+)-dependent fluorescence rise does not reflect binding of Mg(2+) to Ca(2+) sites; instead, Mg(2+) probably binds close to the catalytic site, or perhaps near transmembrane span M3, at a location recently revealed by Fe(2+)-catalyzed oxidative cleavage. Mutation of W(552) hardly affects ATP-induced fluorescence changes in the absence of Ca(2+), which are therefore mostly due to membranous Trp residues, demonstrating long-range communication between the nucleotide-binding domain and the membranous domain.

  4. Substitution of aspartate for glycine 103 of the type II collagen triple helical domain: Identification of the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    Kniest dysplasia is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia which results from mutations in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. Characteristics of the disorder include a short trunk and extremities, mid-face hypoplasia, cleft palate, myopia, retinal detachment, and hearing loss. Recently, deletions of all or part of exon 12 have been identified in individuals with Kniest dysplasia, suggesting that mutations within this region of the protein may primarily result in the Kniest dysplasia phenotype. We used SSCP to analyze an amplified genomic DNA fragment containing exon 12 from 7 individuals with Kniest dysplasia. An abnormality was identified in one patient. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the patient was heterozygous for a G to A transition that implied substitution of glycine{sup 103} of the triple helix by aspartate. The mutation was not observed in DNA from either of the proband`s parents. Protein microsequencing demonstrated expression of the abnormal allele in the proband`s cartilage, indicating that the Kniest phenotype results from the presence of abnormal type II collagen molecules in the extracellular matrix. These data demonstrate the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia and further support the hypothesis that alteration of a domain which includes the region encoded by exon 12 in the type II collagen protein leads to this disorder. Experiments designed to identify specific effects that mutations in this region have on intermolecular interactions among abnormal type II collagen molecules and other components of the cartilage extracellular matrix may clarify the underlying pathophysiology of Kniest dysplasia.

  5. Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as type II kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors: CoMFA and CoMSIA studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wu, Shu-Guang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors have been proved to be very effective anticancer agents. Molecular docking, 3D-QSAR methods, CoMFA and CoMSIA were performed on pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as non-ATP competitive KDR inhibitors (type II). The bioactive conformation was explored by docking one potent compound 20 into the active site of KDR in its DFG-out inactive conformation. The constructed CoMFA and CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q(2) of 0.542 and 0.552, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r(2) of 0.912 and 0.955, and predicted correction coefficients r(2) (pred) of 0.913 and 0.897, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of a series of new potent KDR inhibitors.

  6. HESS-II reconstruction strategy and performance in the low-energy (20-150 GeV) domain

    SciTech Connect

    Becherini, Y.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Punch, M.; Bernloehr, K.; Ehlert, S.; Masbou, J.; Moulin, E.

    2008-12-24

    In mid-2009 a notable upgrade of the H.E.S.S. telescope system will take place: a new telescope with a 600 m{sup 2} mirror area and very-high-resolution camera (0.07 deg.) will be positioned at the centre of the present configuration, with the aim of lowering the threshold and enhance its sensitivity in the 100 GeV to several TeV energy range. HESS-II will permit the investigation of the lower energy {gamma}-ray spectra in various cosmic accelerators, giving information on the origin of the {gamma}-rays observed, and will detect AGNs with a redshift greater than 0.2 (being less affected by absorption by Extragalactic Background Light--EBL--in this energy range) and will search for new classes of very high energy {gamma}-ray emitters (pulsars, microquasars, GRB, and dark matter candidates)

  7. Loop replacements with gut-binding peptides in Cry1Ab domain II enhanced toxicity against the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ensi; Lin, Li; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hanze; Zhuang, Haohan; Wu, Songqing; Sha, Li; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins have been used widely in pest managements. However, Cry toxins are not effective against sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera), which limits the application of Bt for pest management. In order to extend the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxins to the rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, we modified Cry1Ab putative receptor binding domains with selected BPH gut-binding peptides (GBPs). Three surface exposed loops in the domain II of Cry1Ab were replaced with two GBPs (P2S and P1Z) respectively. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of modified toxin L2-P2S increased significantly (~9 folds) against BPH nymphs. In addition, damage of midgut cells was observed from the nymphs fed with L2-P2S. Our results indicate that modifying Cry toxins based on the toxin-gut interactions can broaden the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxin. This method provides another approach for the development of transgenic crops with novel insecticidal activity against hemipteran insects and insect populations resistant to current Bt transgenic crops. PMID:26830331

  8. Theory of filtered type-II parametric down-conversion in the continuous-variable domain: Quantifying the impacts of filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Lupo, Cosmo; Reichelt, Matthias; Meier, Torsten; Silberhorn, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Parametric down-conversion (PDC) forms one of the basic building blocks for quantum optical experiments. However, the intrinsic multimode spectral-temporal structure of pulsed PDC often poses a severe hindrance for the direct implementation of the heralding of pure single-photon states or, for example, continuous-variable entanglement distillation experiments. To get rid of multimode effects narrowband frequency filtering is frequently applied to achieve a single-mode behavior. A rigorous theoretical description to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC, however, is still missing. To date, the theoretical models of filtered PDC are rooted in the discrete-variable domain and only account for filtering in the low-gain regime, where only a few photon pairs are emitted at any single point in time. In this paper we extend these theoretical descriptions and put forward a simple model, which is able to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC in the continuous-variable domain. This developed straightforward theoretical framework enables us to accurately quantify the tradeoff between suppression of higher-order modes, reduced purity, and lowered Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement, when narrowband filters are applied to multimode type-II PDC.

  9. Activation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor leads to movement of the sixth transmembrane domain: analysis by the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane S; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard

    2007-07-01

    The role of transmembrane domain six (TMD6) of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor, which is predicted to undergo conformational changes after agonist binding, was investigated using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Each residue in the Lys240-Leu265 fragment was mutated, one at a time, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). This treatment led to a significant reduction in binding of (125)I-[Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII to the F249C, H256C, T260C, and V264C mutant receptors, suggesting that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. It is noteworthy that this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD6 cysteines engineered in a constitutively active AT(1) receptor. Indeed, mutant F249C was insensitive to MTSEA treatment, whereas the sensitivity of mutant V264C decreased. Under these conditions, one other mutant, F261C, was found to be sensitive to MTSEA treatment. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT(1) receptor causes TMD6 to pivot. This movement moves the top (extracellular side) of TMD6 toward the binding pocket and simultaneously distances the bottom (intracellular side) away from the binding pocket. Using this approach, we identified key elements within TMD6 that contribute to the activation of class A GPCRs through structural rearrangements.

  10. Regulation of the actin-activated MgATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II by phosphorylation of serine 639 in motor domain loop 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Cai, Shutao; Yu, Shuhua; Shu, Shi; Levine, Rodney L; Korn, Edward D

    2013-01-02

    It had been proposed previously that only filamentous forms of Acanthamoeba myosin II have actin-activated MgATPase activity and that this activity is inhibited by phosphorylation of up to four serine residues in a repeating sequence in the C-terminal nonhelical tailpiece of the two heavy chains. We have reinvestigated these issues using recombinant WT and mutant myosins. Contrary to the earlier proposal, we show that two nonfilamentous forms of Acanthamoeba myosin II, heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1, have actin-activated MgATPase that is down-regulated by phosphorylation. By mass spectroscopy, we identified five serines in the heavy chains that can be phosphorylated by a partially purified kinase preparation in vitro and also are phosphorylated in endogenous myosin isolated from the amoebae: four serines in the nonhelical tailpiece and Ser639 in loop 2 of the motor domain. S639A mutants of both subfragment 1 and full-length myosin had actin-activated MgATPase that was not inhibited by phosphorylation of the serines in the nonhelical tailpiece or their mutation to glutamic acid or aspartic acid. Conversely, S639D mutants of both subfragment 1 and full-length myosin were inactive, irrespective of the phosphorylation state of the serines in the nonhelical tailpiece. To our knowledge, this is the first example of regulation of the actin-activated MgATPase activity of any myosin by modification of surface loop 2.

  11. Phosphoserines of the carboxy terminal domain of RNA polymerase II are involved in the interaction with transcription-associated proteins (TAPs).

    PubMed

    Vidyalakshmi, Subramanian; Ramamurthy, Viraraghavan

    2013-03-01

    Generation of productive transcripts of protein coding genes in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process centrally controlled by the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of the enzyme is designed to be modified by differential phosphorylation, and plays a key role in orchestrating the multiple events of the process by interacting with a host of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) at different stages. We analyzed, in silico, the role of serine phosphorylation of CTD in relation to molecular interaction between different TAPs and a representative part of the CTD repeat structure. Using molecular docking, we investigated eight different proteins involved in capping, elongation, splicing, 3' end cleavage, or polyadenylation functions during the transcription process. Among the different phosphorylated forms of CTD, the form found to have the most affinity for a particular protein was also the form that is predominant during that process, the only exception being the equally high affinity of S2PCTD to Spt4, although S5PCTD is the known active form during elongation. The unique phosphoserine of the CTD forms associated with the TAPs was an important participant in the association between both the molecules. These studies have also identified other residues of TAPs interacting with CTD which in previous studies have not been recognized as being functionally significant. These findings add to an emerging body of literature on the regulatory aspects of genomics and proteomics and thus, might catalyze future applications for discovery and translational omics science.

  12. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  13. First-Year Evaluation of Mexico’s Tax on Nonessential Energy-Dense Foods: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2016-01-01

    Background In an effort to prevent continued increases in obesity and diabetes, in January 2014, the Mexican government implemented an 8% tax on nonessential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g and a peso-per-liter tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Limited rigorous evaluations of food taxes exist worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine changes in volume of taxed and untaxed packaged food purchases in response to these taxes in the entire sample and stratified by socioeconomic status (SES). Methods and Findings This study uses data on household packaged food purchases representative of the Mexican urban population from The Nielsen Company’s Mexico Consumer Panel Services (CPS). We included 6,248 households that participated in the Nielsen CPS in at least 2 mo during 2012–2014; average household follow-up was 32.7 mo. We analyzed the volume of purchases of taxed and untaxed foods from January 2012 to December 2014, using a longitudinal, fixed-effects model that adjusted for preexisting trends to test whether the observed post-tax trend was significantly different from the one expected based on the pre-tax trend. We controlled for household characteristics and contextual factors like minimum salary and unemployment rate. The mean volume of purchases of taxed foods in 2014 changed by -25 g (95% confidence interval = -46, -11) per capita per month, or a 5.1% change beyond what would have been expected based on pre-tax (2012–2013) trends, with no corresponding change in purchases of untaxed foods. Low SES households purchased on average 10.2% less taxed foods than expected (-44 [–72, –16] g per capita per month); medium SES households purchased 5.8% less taxed foods than expected (-28 [–46, –11] g per capita per month), whereas high SES households’ purchases did not change. The main limitations of our findings are the inability to infer causality because the taxes were implemented at the national level (lack of control group

  14. Identification of the peptide derived from S1 domain that inhibits type I and type II feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Koyama, Yusuke; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-06-02

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A therapeutic drug that is effective against FIP has not yet been developed. Peptides based on viral protein amino acid sequences have recently been attracting attention as new antiviral drugs. In the present study, we synthesized 30 overlapping peptides based on the amino acid sequence of the S1 domain of the type I FIPV strain KU-2 S protein, and investigated their inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. To evaluate the inhibitory effects on type I FIPV infection of these peptides, we investigated a method to increase the infection efficiency of poorly replicative type I FIPV. The efficiency of type I FIPV infection was increased by diluting the virus with medium containing a polycation. Of the 30 peptides, I-S1-8 (S461-S480), I-S1-9 (S471-S490), I-S1-10 (S481-S500), I-S1-16 (S541-S560), and I-S1-22 (S601-S620) significantly decreased the infectivity of FIPV strain KU-2 while I-S1-9 and I-S1-16 exhibited marked inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. The inhibitory effects on FIPV infection of these 2 peptides on other type I and type II FIPV strains, feline herpesvirus (FHV), and feline calicivirus (FCV) were also examined. These 2 peptides specifically inhibited type I and type II FIPV, but did FHV or FCV infection. In conclusion, the possibility of peptides derived from the S protein of type I FIPV strain KU-2 as anti-FIPV agents effective not only for type I, but also type II FIPV was demonstrated in vitro.

  15. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the 'Gyr A' half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdDeltaC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdDeltaNDeltaC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdDeltaNDeltaC, core and LdDeltaN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25-350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdDeltaNDeltaC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr(775) through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication.

  16. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the ‘Gyr A’ half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdΔC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdΔNΔC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdΔNΔC, core and LdΔN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25–350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdΔNΔC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr775 through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication. PMID:15860773

  17. Tarantula Huwentoxin-IV Inhibits Neuronal Sodium Channels by Binding to Receptor Site 4 and Trapping the Domain II Voltage Sensor in the Closed Configuration*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yucheng; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Zhu, Weiguo; Moczydlowski, Edward; Liang, Songping; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2008-01-01

    Peptide toxins with high affinity, divergent pharmacological functions, and isoform-specific selectivity are powerful tools for investigating the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although a number of interesting inhibitors have been reported from tarantula venoms, little is known about the mechanism for their interaction with VGSCs. We show that huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), a 35-residue peptide from tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena venom, preferentially inhibits neuronal VGSC subtypes rNav1.2, rNav1.3, and hNav1.7 compared with muscle subtypes rNav1.4 and hNav1.5. Of the five VGSCs examined, hNav1.7 was most sensitive to HWTX-IV (IC50 ∼ 26 nm). Following application of 1 μm HWTX-IV, hNav1.7 currents could only be elicited with extreme depolarizations (>+100 mV). Recovery of hNav1.7 channels from HWTX-IV inhibition could be induced by extreme depolarizations or moderate depolarizations lasting several minutes. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis indicated that the toxin docked at neurotoxin receptor site 4 located at the extracellular S3-S4 linker of domain II. Mutations E818Q and D816N in hNav1.7 decreased toxin affinity for hNav1.7 by ∼300-fold, whereas the reverse mutations in rNav1.4 (N655D/Q657E) and the corresponding mutations in hNav1.5 (R812D/S814E) greatly increased the sensitivity of the muscle VGSCs to HWTX-IV. Our data identify a novel mechanism for sodium channel inhibition by tarantula toxins involving binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4. In contrast to scorpion β-toxins that trap the IIS4 voltage sensor in an outward configuration, we propose that HWTX-IV traps the voltage sensor of domain II in the inward, closed configuration. PMID:18628201

  18. Functional heterogeneity of photosystem II in domain specific regions of the thylakoid membrane of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Veerman, John; McConnell, Michael D; Vasil'ev, Sergei; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn; Bruce, Doug

    2007-03-20

    A mild sonication and phase fractionation method has been used to isolate five regions of the thylakoid membrane in order to characterize the functional lateral heterogeneity of photosynthetic reaction centers and light harvesting complexes. Low-temperature fluorescence and absorbance spectra, absorbance cross-section measurements, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay kinetics were used to determine the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI), to determine the relative PSII antenna size, and to characterize the excited-state dynamics of PSI and PSII in each fraction. Marked progressive increases in the proportion of PSI complexes were observed in the following sequence: grana core (BS), whole grana (B3), margins (MA), stroma lamellae (T3), and purified stromal fraction (Y100). PSII antenna size was drastically reduced in the margins of the grana stack and stroma lamellae fractions as compared to the grana. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay kinetics of PSII were characterized by three exponential decay components in the grana fractions, and were found to have only two decay components with slower lifetimes in the stroma. Results are discussed in the framework of existing models of chloroplast thylakoid membrane lateral heterogeneity and the PSII repair cycle. Kinetic modeling of the PSII fluorescence decay kinetics revealed that PSII populations in the stroma and grana margin fractions possess much slower primary charge separation rates and decreased photosynthetic efficiency when compared to PSII populations in the grana stack.

  19. Functional analysis of a nonsyndromic hearing loss-associated mutation in the transmembrane II domain of the GJC3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Swee-Hee; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chen, Pin-Hua; Li, Shuan-Yow; Yang, Jiann-Jou

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study, we identified a novel missense mutation, p.W77S, in the GJC3 gene encoding connexin30.2/connexin31.3 (CX30.2/CX31.3) from patients with hearing loss. The functional alteration of CX30.2/CX31.3 caused by the p.W77S mutant of GJC3 gene, however, remains unclear. In the current study, our result indicated that the p.W77 is localized at the second membrane-spanning segments (TM2) and near border of the E1 domain of the CX30.2/CX31.3 protein and highly conserved (Conseq score = 8~9) in all species. The p.W77S missense mutation proteins in the intracellular distribution are different CX30.2/CX31.3WT and an accumulation of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the HeLa cell. Furthermore, co-expression of WT and p.W77S mutant chimerae proteins showed that the heteromeric connexon accumulated in the cytoplasm, thereby impairing the WT proteins' expression in the cell membranes. In addition, we found that CX30.2/CX31.3W77S missense mutant proteins were degraded by lysosomes and proteosomes in the transfected HeLa cell. Based on these findings, we suggest that p.W77S mutant has a dominant negative effect on the formation and function of the gap junction. These results give a novel molecular elucidation for the mutation of GJC3 in the development of hearing loss. PMID:28367085

  20. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  1. Stability of the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1-RON2 Complex Is Governed by the Domain II (DII) Loop

    PubMed Central

    Delgadillo, Roberto F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J.; Douguet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that employs a highly sophisticated mechanism to access the protective environment of the host cells. Key to this mechanism is the formation of an electron dense ring at the parasite-host cell interface called the Moving Junction (MJ) through which the parasite invades. The MJ incorporates two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1) and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON) complex, the latter one being targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. Crystal structures of AMA1 have shown that a partially mobile loop, termed the DII loop, forms part of a deep groove in domain I and overlaps with the RON2 binding site. To investigate the mechanism by which the DII loop influences RON2 binding, we measured the kinetics of association and dissociation and binding equilibria of a PfRON2sp1 peptide with both PfAMA1 and an engineered form of PfAMA1 where the flexible region of the DII loop was replaced by a short Gly-Ser linker (ΔDII-PfAMA1). The reactions were tracked by fluorescence anisotropy as a function of temperature and concentration and globally fitted to acquire the rate constants and corresponding thermodynamic profiles. Our results indicate that both PfAMA1 constructs bound to the PfRON2sp1 peptide with the formation of one intermediate in a sequential reversible reaction: A↔B↔C. Consistent with Isothermal Titration Calorimetry measurements, final complex formation was enthalpically driven and slightly entropically unfavorable. Importantly, our experimental data shows that the DII loop lengthened the complex half-life time by 18-fold (900 s and 48 s at 25°C for Pf and ΔDII-Pf complex, respectively). The longer half-life of the Pf complex appeared to be driven by a slower dissociation process. These data highlight a new influential role for the DII loop in kinetically locking the functional binary complex to enable host cell invasion

  2. The Calcium-induced Conformation and Glycosylation of Scavenger-rich Cysteine Repeat (SRCR) Domains of Glycoprotein 340 Influence the High Affinity Interaction with Antigen I/II Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-01-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections. PMID:24923446

  3. Identification of transmembrane domain 3, 4 & 5 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Boulais, Philip E; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide, selectively binds the urotensin-II receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in cardiovascular effects and associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions including hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and others. In order to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) three (TM3), four (TM4) and five (TM5) that are involved in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue in the F118((3.20)) to S146((3.48)) fragment of TM3, the L168((4.44)) to G194((4.70)) fragment of TM4 and the W203((5.30)) to V232((5.59)) fragment of TM5, was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the positively charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of (125)I-UII to TM3 mutants L126C((3.28)), F127C((3.29)), F131C((3.33)) and M134C((3.36)) and TM4 mutants M184C((4.60)) and I188C((4.64)). No loss of binding was detected following treatment by MTSEA for all TM5 mutants tested. In absence of a crystal structure of UT receptor, these results identify key determinants in TM3, TM4 and TM5 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket and has led us to propose a homology model of the UT receptor.

  4. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  5. Specific Interaction of the Transcription Elongation Regulator TCERG1 with RNA Polymerase II Requires Simultaneous Phosphorylation at Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 within the Carboxyl-terminal Domain Repeat*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangxin; Fan, Shilong; Lee, Chul-Jin; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Zhou, Pei

    2013-01-01

    The human transcription elongation regulator TCERG1 physically couples transcription elongation and splicing events by interacting with splicing factors through its N-terminal WW domains and the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II through its C-terminal FF domains. Here, we report biochemical and structural characterization of the C-terminal three FF domains (FF4–6) of TCERG1, revealing a rigid integral domain structure of the tandem FF repeat that interacts with the hyperphosphorylated CTD (PCTD). Although FF4 and FF5 adopt a classical FF domain fold containing three orthogonally packed α helices and a 310 helix, FF6 contains an additional insertion helix between α1 and α2. The formation of the integral tandem FF4–6 repeat is achieved by merging the last helix of the preceding FF domain and the first helix of the following FF domain and by direct interactions between neighboring FF domains. Using peptide column binding assays and NMR titrations, we show that binding of the FF4–6 tandem repeat to the PCTD requires simultaneous phosphorylation at Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 positions within two consecutive Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 heptad repeats. Such a sequence-specific PCTD recognition is achieved through CTD-docking sites on FF4 and FF5 of TCERG1 but not FF6. Our study presents the first example of a nuclear factor requiring all three phospho-Ser marks within the heptad repeat of the CTD for high affinity binding and provides a molecular interpretation for the biochemical connection between the Ser7 phosphorylation enrichment in the CTD of the transcribing RNA polymerase II over introns and co-transcriptional splicing events. PMID:23436654

  6. Mapping the interaction between murine IgA and murine secretory component carrying epitope substitutions reveals a role of domains II and III in covalent binding to IgA.

    PubMed

    Crottet, P; Corthésy, B

    1999-10-29

    We have identified sites for epitope insertion in the murine secretory component (SC) by replacing individual surface-exposed loops in domains I, II, and III with the FLAG sequence (Crottet, P., Peitsch, M. C., Servis, C., and Corthésy, B. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 31445-31455). We had previously shown that epitope-carrying SC reassociated with dimeric IgA (IgA(d)) can serve as a mucosal delivery vehicle. When analyzing the capacity of SC mutants to associate with IgA(d), we found that all domain II and III mutants bound specifically with immobilized IgA(d), and their affinity for IgA(d) was comparable to that of the wild type protein (IC(50) approximately 1 nM). We conclude that domains II and III in SC are permissive to local mutation and represent convenient sites to antigenize the SC molecule. No mutant bound to monomeric IgA. SC mutants exposing the FLAG at their surface maintained this property once bound to IgA(d), thereby defining regions not required for high affinity binding to IgA(d). Association of IgA(d) with SC mutants carrying a buried FLAG did not expose de novo the epitope, consistent with limited, local changes in the SC structure upon binding. Only wild type and two mutant SCs bound covalently to IgA(d), thus implicating domains II and III in the correct positioning of the reactive cysteine in SC. This establishes that the integrity of murine SC domains II and III is not essential to preserve specific IgA(d) binding but is necessary for covalency to take place. Finally, SC mutants existing in the monomeric and dimeric forms exhibited the same IgA(d) binding capacity as monomeric wild type SC known to bind with a 1:1 stoichiometry.

  7. Rafting MHC-II domains in the APC (presynaptic) plasma membrane and the thresholds for T-cell activation and immunological synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Imre; Detre, Cynthia; Vámosi, György; Matkó, János

    2004-03-29

    Glycosphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (rafts) in T-cells are important in triggering and regulation of T(H)-cell activation in immunological synapses (IS), which in turn may control the T-cell repertoire in lymph nodes and at the periphery. It is less known, however, how the "presynaptic side" controls formation and function of IS. We investigated here activation signals and synapse formation frequency of murine IP12-7 T(H) hybridoma cell specific to influenza virus HA-peptide upon stimulation with two B-lymphoma cells, A20 and 2PK3, pulsed with peptide antigen. Confocal microscopic colocalization and FRET data consonantly revealed clustered distribution and constitutive raft-association of a major fraction of MHC-II molecules in both APCs. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), not associated constitutively with rafts, were expressed at much lower level in A20 cells. T-cells responded to 2PK3 APC with much higher signal strength than to A20 cells, in good correlation with the frequency of IS formation, as assessed by microscopic conjugation assay. Disruption of rafts by cholesterol depletion in 2PK3 cells largely decreased the magnitude of T(H) cell activation signals, especially at low peptide antigen doses, similarly to masking CD4 with mAb on T-cells. The frequency of IS formation was reduced by blocking LFA-1 on T-cells and CD80 on APCs, by lowering the temperature below the phase transition of the membrane or by disrupting actin cytoskeleton. These data together suggest that the surface density and affinity/stability of peptide-MHC-II complexes and the costimulatory level are primary determinants for an efficient TCR recognition and the strength of the subsequent T-cell signals, as well as of the IS formation, which additionally requires a cytoskeleton-dependent remodeling of APC surface after the initial TCR signal. The threshold of T-cell activation can be further set by rafting MHC-II domains via concentrating high affinity

  8. Field-collected permethrin-resistant Aedes aegypti from central Thailand contain point mutations in the domain IIS6 of the sodium channel gene (KDR).

    PubMed

    Srisawat, Raweewan; Komalamisra, Narumon; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Paeporn, Pungasem; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Eshita, Yuki

    2012-11-01

    One of the mechanisms responsible for pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes is mutations in domain IIS6 of voltage-gated sodium channel gene (kdr). Aedes aegypti larvae were collected from the central provinces of Thailand (Bangkok, Prachin Buri and Ratchaburi) and colonized until they became adults. Partial fragment of kdr of permethrin-resistant mosquitoes were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Among the four nucleotide mutations detected, two mutations resulted in two amino acid substitutions, S(TCC) 989 P(CCC) and V(GTA)1016 G(GGA). Among 94 permethrin-resistant mosquitoes, the SS genotype (SS/VV) was found to predominate (n = 74), followed by SR (SP/VG) (n = 15) and RR (PP/ GG) genotypes (n = 5), with the resistant allele frequency ranging from 0.03 to 0.17. As pyrethroid insecticides are currently being advocated for use in Thailand, investigations of pyrethroid resistance in other regions of the country are needed to prevent potential cross-resistance among different types of insecticides.

  9. Five-factor model personality domains in the prediction of Axis II personality disorders: an exploratory study in late adulthood women non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Junqueira, Diana; Sacoto, Carlota; Keong, Ana Marta

    2014-05-01

    Relationships between Axis II personality disorders (DSM-IV) and the five-factor model were explored in a non-clinical sample of late adulthood women. The sample consists of 90 women (M = 72.29 years of age, standard deviation = 7.10), who were administered with two measures, the NEO-FFI and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+. Some personality disorders scales such as paranoid, schizotypal, borderline and dependent demonstrate a differentiated pattern of five-factor model domain predictors. Low agreeableness predicted schizoid, narcissistic and antisocial; histrionic, obsessive-compulsive and negativistic were predicted by high neuroticism and low agreeableness; high neuroticism and low extraversion, in turn, predicted dependent and depressive scales. Also, two clusters of personality disorders are identified, one associated with low agreeableness and another with low agreeableness and high neuroticism. This study suggest that some traits become maladaptive personality traits, and correspond more closely to psychopathology, when they become opposite to what would be expected in line with studies in normal late adulthood development.

  10. cis-Proline-mediated Ser(P)[superscript 5] Dephosphorylation by the RNA Polymerase II C-terminal Domain Phosphatase Ssu72

    SciTech Connect

    Werner-Allen, Jon W.; Lee, Chul-Jin; Liu, Pengda; Nicely, Nathan I.; Wang, Su; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Zhou, Pei

    2012-05-16

    RNA polymerase II coordinates co-transcriptional events by recruiting distinct sets of nuclear factors to specific stages of transcription via changes of phosphorylation patterns along its C-terminal domain (CTD). Although it has become increasingly clear that proline isomerization also helps regulate CTD-associated processes, the molecular basis of its role is unknown. Here, we report the structure of the Ser(P){sup 5} CTD phosphatase Ssu72 in complex with substrate, revealing a remarkable CTD conformation with the Ser(P){sup 5}-Pro{sup 6} motif in the cis configuration. We show that the cis-Ser(P){sup 5}-Pro{sup 6} isomer is the minor population in solution and that Ess1-catalyzed cis-trans-proline isomerization facilitates rapid dephosphorylation by Ssu72, providing an explanation for recently discovered in vivo connections between these enzymes and a revised model for CTD-mediated small nuclear RNA termination. This work presents the first structural evidence of a cis-proline-specific enzyme and an unexpected mechanism of isomer-based regulation of phosphorylation, with broad implications for CTD biology

  11. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte; Dupont Søgaard, Mia; Kaever, Volkhard; Siljamäki, Pia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase) gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone. PMID:27507828

  12. Rewiring yeast osmostress signalling through the MAPK network reveals essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 in osmoadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Roja; Furukawa, Takako; Hohmann, Stefan; Furukawa, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have a number of targets which they regulate at transcriptional and post-translational levels to mediate specific responses. The yeast Hog1 MAPK is essential for cell survival under hyperosmotic conditions and it plays multiple roles in gene expression, metabolic regulation, signal fidelity and cell cycle regulation. Here we describe essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 using engineered yeast cells in which osmoadaptation was reconstituted in a Hog1-independent manner. We rewired Hog1-dependent osmotic stress-induced gene expression under the control of Fus3/Kss1 MAPKs, which are activated upon osmostress via crosstalk in hog1Δ cells. This approach revealed that osmotic up-regulation of only two Hog1-dependent glycerol biosynthesis genes, GPD1 and GPP2, is sufficient for successful osmoadaptation. Moreover, some of the previously described Hog1-dependent mechanisms appeared to be dispensable for osmoadaptation in the engineered cells. These results suggest that the number of essential MAPK functions may be significantly smaller than anticipated and that knockout approaches may lead to over-interpretation of phenotypic data. PMID:24732094

  13. Identification of transmembrane domain 1 & 2 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2014-11-15

    The vasoactive urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide widely distributed in cardiovascular, renal and endocrine systems, specifically binds the UII receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The involvement of this receptor in numerous pathophysiological conditions including atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, renal impairment and diabetes potentially makes it an interesting therapeutic target. To elucidate how UII binds the UT receptor through the identification of specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) one (TM1) and two (TM2) that are involved in the formation of the receptor's binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue of TM1 (V49((1.30)) to M76((1.57))) and TM2 (V88((2.41)) to H117((2.70))) was mutated, one by one, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant binding inhibition of (125)I-UII to mutant I54C((1.35)) in TM1 and mutants Y100C((2.53)), S103C((2.56)), F106C((2.59)), I107C((2.60)), T110C((2.63)) and Y111C((2.64)) in TM2. These results identify key structural residues in TM1 and TM2 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket. Together with previous SCAM analysis of TM3, TM4, TM5, TM6 and TM7, these results have led us to identify residues within all 7 TMs that participate in UT's binding pocket and have enabled us to propose a model of this receptor's orthosteric binding site.

  14. Release of Nonmuscle Myosin II from the Cytosolic Domain of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Is Required for Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Dechert, Lisa; Davidson, Uchechukwu I.; Waitkus, Matthew; Mavrakis, Lori; Lyons, Katherine; Beach, Jordan R.; Li, Xiaoxia; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Fox, Paul L.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) elicits its biological activities through activation of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1, also known as p55) and TNFR2 (also known as p75). The activities of both receptors are required for the TNF-α–induced proinflammatory response. The adaptor protein TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is critical for either p55- or p75-mediated activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as for target gene expression. Here, we identified nonmuscle myosin II (myosin) as a binding partner of p75. TNF-α–dependent signaling by p75 and induction of target gene expression persisted for substantially longer in cells deficient in myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, a component of myosin) than in cells replete in myosin. In resting endothelial cells, myosin was bound constitutively to the intracellular region of p75, a region that overlaps with the TRAF2-binding domain, and TNF-α caused the rapid dissociation of myosin from p75. At early time points after exposure to TNF-α, p75 activated Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Inhibition of ROCK1 activity blocked TNF-α–dependent phosphorylation of MRLC and the dissociation of myosin from p75. ROCK1-dependent release of myosin was necessary for the TNF-α–dependent recruitment of TRAF2 to p75 and for p75-specific activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Thus, our findings have revealed a previously uncharacterized, noncanonical regulatory function of myosin in cytokine signaling. PMID:23861542

  15. Protein engineering of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin: Mutations at domain II of CryIAb enhance receptor affinity and toxicity toward gypsy moth larvae

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Francis; Alzate, Oscar; Cotrill, Jeffrey A.; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Substitutions or deletions of domain II loop residues of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin CryIAb were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis techniques to investigate their functional roles in receptor binding and toxicity toward gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). Substitution of loop 2 residue N372 with Ala or Gly (N372A, N372G) increased the toxicity against gypsy moth larvae 8-fold and enhanced binding affinity to gypsy moth midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) ≈4-fold. Deletion of N372 (D3), however, substantially reduced toxicity (>21 times) as well as binding affinity, suggesting that residue N372 is involved in receptor binding. Interestingly, a triple mutant, DF-1 (N372A, A282G and L283S), has a 36-fold increase in toxicity to gypsy moth neonates compared with wild-type toxin. The enhanced activity of DF-1 was correlated with higher binding affinity (18-fold) and binding site concentrations. Dissociation binding assays suggested that the off-rate of the BBMV-bound mutant toxins was similar to that of the wild type. However, DF-1 toxin bound 4 times more than the wild-type and N372A toxins, and it was directly correlated with binding affinity and potency. Protein blots of gypsy moth BBMV probed with labeled N372A, DF-1, and CryIAb toxins recognized a common 210-kDa protein, indicating that the increased activity of the mutants was not caused by binding to additional receptor(s). The improved binding affinity of N372A and DF-1 suggest that a shorter side chain at these loops may fit the toxin more efficiently to the binding pockets. These results offer an excellent model system for engineering δ-endotoxins with higher potency and wider spectra of target pests by improving receptor binding interactions. PMID:8962052

  16. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  17. Voltammetric analysis of Cu (II), Cd (II) and Zn (II) complexes and their cyclic voltammetry with several cephalosporin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Maali, N; Osman, A H; Aly, A A M; Al-Hazmi, G A A

    2005-02-01

    Both osteryoung square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry have been utilized to elucidate and confirm the possible complexation reaction that occur between the various cephalosporin antibiotics and either the toxic, non-essential metal ion, viz. Cd (II), or the essential but toxic (when their concentration exceeds certain level in serum) metal ions, viz. Cu (II) and Zn (II). Voltammetric measurements indicated the existence of 1:1 metal-to-ligand ratio (as in cephalexin and cephapirin complexes), 1:2 ratio (such as in cefamandole, cefuroxime and cefotaxime complexes) and 2:1 ratio in case of ceftazidime complexes. Adsorption behavior was evidenced for Cu (II)-cefuroxime or ceftazidime complexes as well as for those for Zn (II)-cephalexin or cephapirin. This phenomenon could be used for the determination of either the antibiotic or the metal ion using adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Detection limits down to 7x10(-10) M have been easily achieved.

  18. The pnk/pnl gene (ORF 86) of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a non-essential, immediate early gene.

    PubMed

    Durantel, D; Croizier, L; Ayres, M D; Croizier, G; Possee, R D; López-Ferber, M

    1998-03-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ORF 86, located within the HindIII C fragment, potentially encodes a protein which shares sequence similarity with two T4 bacteriophage gene products, RNA ligase and polynucleotide kinase. This AcMNPV gene has been designated pnk/pnl but has yet to be assigned a function in virus replication. It has been classified as an immediate early virus gene, since the promoter was active in uninfected insect cells and mRNA transcripts were detectable from 4 to 48 h post-infection and in the presence of cycloheximide or aphidicolin in virus-infected cells. The extremities of the transcript have been mapped by primer extension and 3' RACE-PCR to positions -18 from the translational start codon and +15 downstream of the stop codon. The function of pnk/pnl was investigated by producing a recombinant virus (Acdel86lacZ) with the coding region replaced with that of lacZ. This virus replicated normally in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf 21) cells, indicating that pnk/pnl is not essential for propagation in these cells. Virus protein production in Acdel86lacZ-infected Sf 21 cells also appeared to be unaffected, with normal synthesis of the IE-1, GP64, VP39 and polyhedrin proteins. Shut-down of host protein synthesis was not abolished in recombinant infection. When other baculovirus genomes were examined for the presence of pnk/pnl by restriction enzyme digestion and PCR, a deletion was found in AcMNPV 1.2, Galleria mellonella NPV (GmMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV), suggesting that in many isolates this gene has either never been acquired or has been lost during genome evolution. This is one of the first baculovirus immediate early genes that appears to be nonessential for virus survival.

  19. Cephem Potentiation by Inactivation of Nonessential Genes Involved in Cell Wall Biogenesis of β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristin R; Sigurðardóttir, Helga Høeg; Jana, Bimal; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Reversal of antimicrobial resistance is an appealing and largely unexplored strategy in drug discovery. The objective of this study was to identify potential targets for "helper" drugs reversing cephem resistance in Escherichia coli strains producing β-lactamases. A CMY-2-encoding plasmid was transferred by conjugation to seven isogenic deletion mutants exhibiting cephem hypersusceptibility. The effect of each mutation was evaluated by comparing the MICs in the wild type and the mutant harboring the same plasmid. Mutation of two genes encoding proteins involved in cell wall biosynthesis, dapF and mrcB, restored susceptibility to cefoxitin (FOX) and reduced the MICs of cefotaxime and ceftazidime, respectively, from the resistant to the intermediate category according to clinical breakpoints. The same mutants harboring a CTX-M-1-encoding plasmid fell into the intermediate or susceptible category for all three drugs. Individual deletion of dapF and mrcB in a clinical isolate of CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) resulted in partial reversal of ceftazidime and cefepime resistance but did not reduce MICs below susceptibility breakpoints. Growth curve analysis indicated no fitness cost in a ΔmrcB mutant, whereas a ΔdapF mutant had a 3-fold longer lag phase than the wild type, suggesting that drugs targeting DapF may display antimicrobial activity, in addition to synergizing with selected cephems. DapF appeared to be a potential FOX helper drug target candidate, since dapF inactivation resulted in synergistic potentiation of FOX in the genetic backgrounds tested. The study showed that individual inactivation of two nonessential genes involved in cell wall biogenesis potentiates cephem activity according to drug- and strain-specific patterns.

  20. Single amino acid changes in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin affect irreversible binding to Manduca sexta midgut membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, F; Alcantara, E; Lee, M K; Chen, X J; Curtiss, A; Dean, D H

    1995-01-01

    Deletion of amino acid residues 370 to 375 (D2) and single alanine substitutions between residues 371 and 375 (FNIGI) of lepidopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. All mutants, except that with the I-to-A change at position 373 (I373A), produced delta-endotoxin as CryIAb and were stable upon activation either by Manduca sexta gut enzymes or by trypsin. Mutants D2, F371A, and G374A lost most of the toxicity (400 times less) for M. sexta larvae, whereas N372A and I375A were only 2 times less toxic than CryIAb. The results of homologous and heterologous competition binding assays to M. sexta midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) revealed that the binding curves for all mutant toxins were similar to those for the wild-type toxin. However, a significant difference in irreversible binding was observed between the toxic (CryIAb, N372A, and I375A) and less-toxic (D2, F371A, and G374A) proteins. Only 20 to 25% of bound, radiolabeled CryIAb, N372A, and I375A toxins was dissociated from BBMV, whereas about 50 to 55% of the less-toxic mutants, D2, F371A, and G374A, was dissociated from their binding sites by the addition of excess nonlabeled ligand. Voltage clamping experiments provided further evidence that the insecticidal property (inhibition of short-circuit current across the M. sexta midgut) was directly correlated to irreversible interaction of the toxin with the BBMV. We have also shown that CryIAb and mutant toxins recognize 210- and 120-kDa peptides in ligand blotting. Our results imply that mutations in residues 370 to 375 of domain II of CrylAb do not affect overall binding but do affect the irreversible association of the toxin to the midgut columnar epithelial cells of M. sexta. PMID:7730254

  1. Partial dispensability of Djp1's J domain in peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results from genetic redundancy with another class II J protein, Caj1.

    PubMed

    Dobriyal, Neha; Tripathi, Prerna; Sarkar, Susrita; Tak, Yogesh; Verma, Amit K; Sahi, Chandan

    2017-03-06

    J proteins are obligate co-chaperones of Hsp70s. Via their signature J domain, all J proteins interact with their partner Hsp70s and stimulate their weak ATPase activity, which is vital for Hsp70 functions. The dependency of J proteins on their J domain is such that mutations in critical amino acids in the J domain often results into a null phenotype for a particular J protein. Here, we show that the J domain of Djp1, a cytosolic J protein important for peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is partially dispensable. A complete deletion of Djp1 J domain resulted into only partial loss in peroxisomal protein import function. Instead, the C-terminal domain of Djp1 was found to be essential for proper localization of the peroxisomal targeted GFP-PTS1. Furthermore, we show that Caj1, another cytosolic J protein, also has some role in peroxisomal protein import. Caj1 was found to be partially redundant with Djp1 as cells lacking both Djp1 and Caj1 resulted into a much more severe defect in GFP-PTS1 localization. Based on these results, we propose that dispensability of J domains could be attributed to genetic redundancy between different J proteins sharing common structural topology and cellular localization.

  2. Cooperativity in the two-domain arginine kinase from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus. II. Evidence from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    The arginine kinase (AK) from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus has an unusual two-domain structure (contiguous dimer; denoted by D1-D2). In a previous report, we suggested cooperativity in the contiguous dimer, which may be a result of domain-domain interactions, using MBP-fused enzymes. To further understand this observation, we inserted six-Lys residues into the linker region of the two-domain AK (D1-K6-D2 mutant) using His-tagged enzyme. The dissociation constants, K(a) and K(ia), of the mutant were similar to those of the wild-type enzyme but the catalytic constant, k(cat), was decreased to 28% that of the wild-type, indicating that some of the domain-domain interactions are lost due to the six-Lys insertion. Y68 plays a major role in arginine binding in the catalytic pocket in Limulus AK, and introduction of mutation at the Y68 position virtually abolishes catalytic activity. Thus, the constructed D1(Y68G)-D2 and D1-D2(Y68G) mutants mimic the D1(inactive)-D2(active) and D1(active)-D2(inactive) enzymes, respectively. The k(cat) values of both Y68 mutants were decreased to 13-18% that of the wild-type enzyme, which is much less than the 50% level of the two-domain enzyme. Thus, it is clear that substrate-binding to both domains is necessary for full expression of activity. In other words, substrate-binding appears to act as the trigger of the functional cooperativity in two-domain AK.

  3. Functional characterisation of the non-essential protein kinases and phosphatases regulating Aspergillus nidulans hydrolytic enzyme production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in the understanding of lignocellulolytic enzyme regulation, less is known about how different carbon sources are sensed and the signaling cascades that result in the adaptation of cellular metabolism and hydrolase secretion. Therefore, the role played by non-essential protein kinases (NPK) and phosphatases (NPP) in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status was investigated in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Results Eleven NPKs and seven NPPs were identified as being involved in cellulase, and in some cases also hemicellulase, production in A. nidulans. The regulation of CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in the parental strain was determined by fluorescence microscopy, utilising a CreA::GFP fusion protein. The sensing of phosphorylated glucose, via the RAS signalling pathway induced CreA repression, while carbon starvation resulted in derepression. Growth on cellulose represented carbon starvation and derepressing conditions. The involvement of the identified NPKs in the regulation of cellulose-induced responses and CreA derepression was assessed by genome-wide transcriptomics (GEO accession 47810). CreA::GFP localisation and the restoration of endocellulase activity via the introduction of the ∆creA mutation, was assessed in the NPK-deficient backgrounds. The absence of either the schA or snfA kinase dramatically reduced cellulose-induced transcriptional responses, including the expression of hydrolytic enzymes and transporters. The mechanism by which these two NPKs controlled gene transcription was identified, as the NPK-deficient mutants were not able to unlock CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression under derepressing conditions, such as carbon starvation or growth on cellulose. Conclusions Collectively, this study identified multiple kinases and phosphatases involved in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status, while demonstrating the overlapping, synergistic roles of schA and

  4. Amide hydrogens reveal a temperature-dependent structural transition that enhances site-II Ca(2+)-binding affinity in a C-domain mutant of cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Tiago; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Palhano, Fernando L; Marques, Mayra de A; Moraes, Adolfo H; Silva, Jerson L; Sorenson, Martha M; Pinto, Jose R

    2017-04-06

    The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutant D145E, in cardiac troponin C (cTnC) C-domain, causes generalised instability at multiple sites in the isolated protein. As a result, structure and function of the mutant are more susceptible to higher temperatures. Above 25 °C there are large, progressive increases in N-domain Ca(2+)-binding affinity for D145E but only small changes for the wild-type protein. NMR-derived backbone amide temperature coefficients for many residues show a sharp transition above 30-40 °C, indicating a temperature-dependent conformational change that is most prominent around the mutated EF-hand IV, as well as throughout the C-domain. Smaller, isolated changes occur in the N-domain. Cardiac skinned fibres reconstituted with D145E are more sensitive to Ca(2+) than fibres reconstituted with wild-type, and this defect is amplified near body-temperature. We speculate that the D145E mutation destabilises the native conformation of EF-hand IV, leading to a transient unfolding and dissociation of helix H that becomes more prominent at higher temperatures. This creates exposed hydrophobic surfaces that may be capable of binding unnaturally to a variety of targets, possibly including the N-domain of cTnC when it is in its open Ca(2+)-saturated state. This would constitute a potential route for propagating signals from one end of TnC to the other.

  5. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits.

  6. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  7. The C-terminal domain-phosphorylated IIO form of RNA polymerase II is associated with the transcription repressor NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) and is required for transcription activation in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Gross, P; Wang, Z; Roeder, R G; Oelgeschläger, T

    2000-06-20

    Activation of class II gene transcription may involve alleviation of transcription repression as well as stimulation of the assembly and function of the general RNA polymerase (RNAP) II transcription machinery. Here, we investigated whether activator-reversible transcription repression by NC2 (Dr1/DRAP1) contributes to maximum induction levels in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. Surprisingly, we found that depletion of NC2 does not significantly affect basal transcription, but dramatically reduces activated transcription. Immunoblot analyses revealed that the loss of activator function coincides with selective removal of the C-terminal domain (CTD)-hyperphosphorylated RNAP IIO along with NC2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with purified factors confirmed that NC2 interacts with RNAP IIO, but not with the unphosphorylated or hypophosphorylated RNAP IIA or CTD-less RNAP IIB forms. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to previously published observations in cell-free systems reconstituted with purified factors, only the CTD-phosphorylated form of RNAP II can mediate activator function in the context of unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts. These findings reveal an unexpected link between NC2 and transcription activation and suggest that regulation of RNAP II transcription through reversible CTD phosphorylation might be more complex than previously proposed.

  8. Identification of essential and non-essential genes of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome via transposome mutagenesis of an infectious BAC clone.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alistair; Liu, Fenyong; Schleiss, Mark R

    2004-05-01

    We report application of a transposition methodology that allows the easy characterization and mutation of genes encoded on an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone. We characterized mutants generated by transposome (Tn) mutagenesis of a BAC clone of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV). A pool of Tn mutant GPCMV BACs were screened initially by restriction profile analysis to verify they were full-length, and subsequently GPCMV BAC DNA from individual mutants was transfected onto guinea pig lung fibroblast cells in order to generate virus. Tn GPCMV BAC mutants were classed as either essential or non-essential gene insertions, depending upon their ability to regenerate viable, replication-competent virus. Representative mutants were more fully characterized. Analysis by sequencing the Tn insertion site on the mutated BACs, and by regeneration of virus using transfection of guinea pig fibroblasts (GPL), demonstrated that a recombinant with a Tn insertion in the UL35 homolog gene (GP35) was a non-essential gene for viral replication in tissue culture. A mutant with an insertion in the UL46 homolog (GP46) was nonviable, a phenotype which could be rescued by homologous recombination of BAC DNA with wild-type UL46 sequences, suggesting an essential role of this putative capsid gene in virus replication.

  9. Study on effect of lomefloxacin on human holo-transferrin in the presence of essential and nonessential amino acids: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Marouzi, Somaye; Sharifi Rad, Atena; Beigoli, Sima; Teimoori Baghaee, Parisa; Assaran Darban, Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how lomefloxacin (LMF) interacts with human holo-transferrin (HTF) in the presence of two kinds of essential and nonessential amino acids. The investigations were carried out by fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. We were able to determine the number of binding sites, the drug binding affinity to HTF in the presence of essential and nonessential amino acids and the quenching source of HTF. The interaction between HTF with LMF suggested that the microenvironment of the Trp residues was altered causing a strong static fluorescence quenching in the binary and ternary systems. The results pointed at the formation of a complex in the binary and ternary systems which caused an enhancement of the RLS intensity that was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The density functional theory (DFT) was employed to determine the amino acid residues on HTF that interacted with LMF. Also, Steric and van der Waals forces as well as the contribution of small amounts of hydrogen bonds were stronger or Tyr 71 in chain (b) than for 128 Trp in chain (a) of HTF.

  10. Affinity, speciation, and molecular features of copper(II) complexes with a prion tetraoctarepeat domain in aqueous solution: insights into old and new results.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Ősz, Katalin; Kállay, Csilla; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sanna, Daniele; Impellizzeri, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2013-03-11

    Characterization of the copper(II) complexes formed with the tetraoctarepeat peptide at low and high metal-to-ligand ratios and in a large pH range, would provide a breakthrough in the interpretation of biological relevance of the different metal complexes of copper(II)-tetraoctarepeat system. In the present work, the potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism (CD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out on copper(II) complexes with a PEG-ylated derivative of the tetraoctarepeats peptide sequence (Ac-PEG27 -(PHGGGWGQ)4 -NH2 ) and the peptide Ac-(PHGGGWGQ)2 -NH2 . Conjugation of tetraoctarepeat peptide sequence with polyethyleneglycol improved the solubility of the copper(II) complexes. The results enable a straightforward explanation of the conflicting results originated from the underestimation of all metal-ligand equilibria and the ensuing speciation. A complete and reliable speciation is therefore obtained with the released affinity and binding details of the main complexes species formed in aqueous solution. The results contribute to clarify the discrepancies of several studies in which the authors ascribe the redox activity of copper(II)-tetraoctarepeat system considering only the average effects of several coexisting species with very different stoichiometries and binding modes.

  11. Homo- and Heterobimetallic Ruthenium(II) and Osmium(II) Complexes Based on a Pyrene-Biimidazolate Spacer as Efficient DNA-Binding Probes in the Near-Infrared Domain.

    PubMed

    Mardanya, Sourav; Karmakar, Srikanta; Mondal, Debiprasad; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2016-04-04

    We report in this work a new family of homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of the type [(bpy)2M(Py-Biimz)M'(II)(bpy)2](2+) (M = M' = Ru(II) or Os(II); M = Ru(II) and M' = Os(II)) derived from a pyrenyl-biimidazole-based bridge, 2-imidazolylpyreno[4,5-d]imidazole (Py-BiimzH2). The homobimetallic Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes were found to crystallize in monoclinic form with space group P21/n. All the complexes exhibit strong absorptions throughout the entire UV-vis region and also exhibit luminescence at room temperature. For osmium-containing complexes (2 and 3) both the absorption and emission band stretched up to the NIR region and thus afford more biofriendly conditions for probable applications in infrared imaging and phototherapeutic studies. Detailed luminescence studies indicate that the emission originates from the respective (3)MLCT excited state mainly centered in the [M(bpy)2](2+) moiety of the complexes and is only slightly affected by the pyrene moiety. The bimetallic complexes show two successive one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidations in the positive potential window and several reduction processes in the negative potential window. An efficient intramolecular electronic energy transfer is found to occur from the Ru center to the Os-based component in the heterometallic dyad. The binding studies of the complexes with DNA were thoroughly studied through different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved emission, circular dichroism, and relative DNA binding study using ethidium bromide. The intercalative mode of binding was suggested to be operative in all cases. Finally, computational studies employing DFT and TD-DFT were also carried out to interpret the experimentally observed absorption and emission bands of the complexes.

  12. In Silico Analysis for Transcription Factors With Zn(II)2C6 Binuclear Cluster DNA-Binding Domains in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Sergi; Moreno, Inmaculada; Nieto, Almudena; Gómez, Micaela; Sentandreu, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    A total of 6047 open reading frames in the Candida albicans genome were screened for Zn(II)2C6-type zinc cluster proteins (or binuclear cluster proteins) involved in DNA recognition. These fungal proteins are transcription regulators of genes involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including metabolism of different compounds such as sugars or amino acids, as well as multi-drug resistance, control of meiosis, cell wall architecture, etc. The selection criteria used in the sequence analysis were the presence of the CysX2CysX6CysX5-16CysX2CysX6-8Cys motif and a putative nuclear localization signal. Using this approach, 70 putative Zn(II)2C6 transcription factors have been found in the genome of C. albicans. PMID:18629206

  13. PDZ Domain Dependent Regulation of NHE3 Occurs by Both Internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PDZ Binding Motifs.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boyoung; Yang, Jianbo; Singh, Varsha; Zachos, Nicholas C; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Chen, Tian-E; Chakraborty, Molee; Tse, Chung-Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-03-10

    NHE3 directly binds NHERF family scaffolding proteins that are required for many aspects of NHE3 regulation. The NHERFs bind both to an internal region (aa. 586-660) of the NHE3 C-terminus and to the NHE3 C-terminal four amino acids. The internal NHERF binding region contains both putative Class I (-592SAV-) and Class II (-595CLDM-) PDZ binding motifs (PBM). Point mutagenesis showed that only the Class II motif contributes to NHERF binding. In this study, the roles in regulation of NHE3 activity of these two PBMs were investigated, revealing: 1) Interaction between these binding sites since mutation of either removed nearly all NHERF binding. 2) Mutations in either significantly reduced basal NHE3 activity. Total and percent plasma membrane (PM) NHE3 protein expression were reduced in the C-terminal but not in the internal PBD mutation. 3) cGMP and Ca2+-mediated inhibition of NHE3 were impaired both in the internal and in the C-terminal PBM mutations. 4) A significant reduction in half-life of the PM pool of NHE3 in only the internal PBM mutation but no change in total NHE3 half-life in either. 5) Some difference in NHE3 associating proteins in the two PBM mutations. In conclusion, NHE3 binds to NHERF proteins via both an internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PBM, which interact. The former appears to determine NHE3 stability of a pool in the PM and the letter determines total expression and percent PM expression.

  14. [Review on nonessential constituents of vegetables. II. Cruciferae (Brassica vegetables, radish, turnip, rutabaga, horse-radish) and gramineae (onion, leek, chive, garlic, asparagus) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, K

    1977-12-09

    In this paper the hitherto known constituents of the titled vegetables except proteins, carbohydrates, triglyceride-fatty acids, and vitamins are reviewed, especially the volatiles, organic acids, phenolics, carotenoids and lipids.

  15. Mutations in the Voltage Sensors of Domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are Associated with Arrhythmias and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Generate Gating Pore Currents.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav) are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively), which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy. Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods. Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD.

  16. Thermodynamics of heme-induced conformational changes in hemopexin: role of domain-domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. L.; Morgan, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hemopexin is a serum glycoprotein that binds heme with high affinity and delivers heme to the liver cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. A hinge region connects the two non-disulfide-linked domains of hemopexin, a 35-kDa N-terminal domain (domain I) that binds heme, and a 25-kDa C-terminal domain (domain II). Although domain II does not bind heme, it assumes one structural state in apo-hemopexin and another in heme-hemopexin, and this change is important in facilitating the association of heme-hemopexin with its receptor. In order to elucidate the structure and function of hemopexin, it is important to understand how structural information is transmitted to domain II when domain I binds heme. Here we report a study of the protein-protein interactions between domain I and domain II using analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis showed that domain I associates with domain II both in the presence and absence of heme with Kd values of 0.8 microM and 55 microM, respectively. The interaction between heme-domain I and domain II has a calorimetric enthalpy of +11 kcal/mol, a heat capacity (delta Cp) of -720 cal/mol.K, and a calculated entropy of +65 cal/mol.K. By varying the temperature of the centrifugation equilibrium runs, a van't Hoff plot with an apparent change in enthalpy (delta H) of -3.6 kcal/mol and change in entropy (delta S) of +8.1 cal/mol.K for the association of apo-domain I with domain II was obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773173

  17. Backbone assignments and secondary structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme-II mannitol A domain determined by heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, G. J.; Grötzinger, J.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the backbone assignments and the secondary structure determination of the A domain of the Escherichia coli mannitol transport protein, enzyme-IImtl. The backbone resonances were partially assigned using three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H NOE 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy on uniformly 15N enriched protein. Triple-resonance experiments on uniformly 15N/13C enriched protein were necessary to complete the backbone assignments, due to overlapping 1H and 15N frequencies. Data obtained from three-dimensional 1H-15N-13C alpha correlation experiments (HNCA and HN(CO)CA), a three-dimensional 1H-15N-13CO correlation experiment (HNCO), and a three-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO correlation experiment (COCAH) were combined using SNARF software, and yielded the assignments of virtually all observed backbone resonances. Determination of the secondary structure of IIAmtl is based upon NOE information from the 15N NOESY-HSQC and the 1H alpha and 13C alpha secondary chemical shifts. The resulting secondary structure is considerably different from that reported for IIAglc of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis determined by NMR and X-ray. PMID:8401218

  18. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  19. Alternative Splicing of Toll-Like Receptor 9 Transcript in Teleost Fish Grouper Is Regulated by NF-κB Signaling via Phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Domain of the RPB1 Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank Fang-Yao; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chang, Tien-Hsien; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2016-01-01

    Similar to its mammalian counterparts, teleost Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA presented in the genome of bacteria or DNA viruses and initiates signaling pathway(s) for immune responses. We have previously shown that the TLR9 pathway in grouper, an economically important teleost, can be debilitated by an inhibitory gTLR9B isoform, whose production is mediated by RNA alternative splicing. However, how does grouper TLR9 (gTLR9) signaling impinge on the RNA splicing machinery to produce gTlr9B is unknown. Here we show that the gTlr9 alternative splicing is regulated through ligand-induced phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We first observed that ligand-activated NF- κB pathway biased the production of the gTlr9B isoform. Because NF- κB is known to recruit p-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates the Pol II CTD at Ser2 residues, we examined p-TEFb’s role in alternative splicing. We found that promoting p-TEFb kinase activity significantly favored the production of the gTlr9B isoform, whereas inhibiting p-TEFb yielded an opposite result. We further showed that p-TEFb-mediated production of the gTlr9B isoform down-regulates its own immune responses, suggesting a self-limiting mechanism. Taken together, our data indicate a feedback mechanism of the gTLR9 signaling pathway to regulate the alternative splicing machinery, which in turn produces an inhibitor to the pathway. PMID:27658294

  20. Photoprotection in plants involves a change in lutein 1 binding domain in the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ilioaia, Cristian; Johnson, Matthew P; Liao, Pen-Nan; Pascal, Andrew A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Walla, Peter J; Ruban, Alexander V; Robert, Bruno

    2011-08-05

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the fundamental process by which plants exposed to high light intensities dissipate the potentially harmful excess energy as heat. Recently, it has been shown that efficient energy dissipation can be induced in the major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII) in the absence of protein-protein interactions. Spectroscopic measurements on these samples (LHCII gels) in the quenched state revealed specific alterations in the absorption and circular dichroism bands assigned to neoxanthin and lutein 1 molecules. In this work, we investigate the changes in conformation of the pigments involved in NPQ using resonance Raman spectroscopy. By selective excitation we show that, as well as the twisting of neoxanthin that has been reported previously, the lutein 1 pigment also undergoes a significant change in conformation when LHCII switches to the energy dissipative state. Selective two-photon excitation of carotenoid (Car) dark states (Car S(1)) performed on LHCII gels shows that the extent of electronic interactions between Car S(1) and chlorophyll states correlates linearly with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, as observed previously for isolated LHCII (aggregated versus trimeric) and whole plants (with versus without NPQ).

  1. Identification of two immunogenic domains of the prion protein--PrP--which activate class II-restricted T cells and elicit antibody responses against the native molecule.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Sylvie; Logre, Caroline; Metharom, Pat; Loing, Estelle; Chomilier, Jacques; Rosset, Martine Bruley; Aucouturier, Pierre; Carnaud, Claude

    2004-07-01

    Recent reports suggest that immunity against the prion protein (PrP) retards transmissible spongiform encephalopathies progression in infected mice. A major obstacle to the development of vaccines comes from the fact that PrP is poorly immunogenic, as it is seen as self by the host immune system. Additional questions concern the immune mechanisms involved in protection and the risk of eliciting adverse reactions in the central nervous system of treated patients. Peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive strategy to overcome these difficulties. We have undertaken the identification of the immunogenic regions of PrP, which trigger helper T cells (Th) associated with antibody production. Our results identify two main regions, one between the structured and flexible portion of PrP (98-127) and a second between alpha 1 and alpha 2 helix (143-187). Peptides (30-mer) corresponding to these regions elicit class II-restricted Th cells and antibody production against native PrP and could therefore be of potential interest for a peptide-based vaccination.

  2. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F.; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate previous

  3. Sparse maps--A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  4. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    SciTech Connect

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: evaleev@vt.edu

    2016-01-14

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  5. The GALEX Time Domain Survey. II. Wavelength-Dependent Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, T.; Gezari, S.; Jones, D. O.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Rest, A.; Huber, M.; Narayan, G.; Scolnic, D.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the wavelength-dependent variability of a sample of spectroscopically confirmed active galactic nuclei selected from near-UV (NUV) variable sources in the GALEX Time Domain Survey that have a large amplitude of optical variability (difference-flux S/N > 3) in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). By matching GALEX and PS1 epochs in five bands (NUV, g P1, r P1, i P1, z P1) in time, and taking their flux difference, we create co-temporal difference-flux spectral energy distributions ({{Δ }}f{SEDs}) using two chosen epochs for each of the 23 objects in our sample, on timescales of about a year. We confirm the “bluer-when-brighter” trend reported in previous studies, and measure a median spectral index of the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} of {α }λ = 2.1 that is consistent with an accretion disk spectrum. We further fit the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} of each source with a standard accretion disk model in which the accretion rate changes from one epoch to the other. In our sample, 17 out of 23 (∼74%) sources are described well by this variable accretion-rate disk model, with a median average characteristic disk temperature \\bar{T}* of 1.2× {10}5 K that is consistent with the temperatures expected, given the distribution of accretion rates and black hole masses inferred for the sample. Our analysis also shows that the variable accretion rate model is a better fit to the {{Δ }}f{SEDs} than a simple power law.

  6. The Inorganic Side of NGF: Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Affect the NGF Mimicking Signaling of the N-Terminus Peptides Encompassing the Recognition Domain of TrkA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Giuseppe; Satriano, Cristina; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Gianì, Fiorenza; Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G.; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) N-terminus peptide, NGF(1–14), and its acetylated form, Ac-NGF(1–14), were investigated to scrutinize the ability of this neurotrophin domain to mimic the whole protein. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that non-covalent forces assist the molecular recognition of TrkA receptor by both peptides. Combined parallel tempering/docking simulations discriminated the effect of the N-terminal acetylation on the recognition of NGF(1–14) by the domain 5 of TrkA (TrkA-D5). Experimental findings demonstrated that both NGF(1–14) and Ac-NGF(1–14) activate TrkA signaling pathways essential for neuronal survival. The NGF-induced TrkA internalization was slightly inhibited in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions, whereas the metal ions elicited the NGF(1–14)-induced internalization of TrkA and no significant differences were found in the weak Ac-NGF(1–14)-induced receptor internalization. The crucial role of the metals was confirmed by experiments with the metal-chelator bathocuproine disulfonic acid, which showed different inhibitory effects in the signaling cascade, due to different metal affinity of NGF, NGF(1–14) and Ac-NGF(1–14). The NGF signaling cascade, activated by the two peptides, induced CREB phosphorylation, but the copper addition further stimulated the Akt, ERK and CREB phosphorylation in the presence of NGF and NGF(1–14) only. A dynamic and quick influx of both peptides into PC12 cells was tracked by live cell imaging with confocal microscopy. A significant role of copper ions was found in the modulation of peptide sub-cellular localization, especially at the nuclear level. Furthermore, a strong copper ionophoric ability of NGF(1–14) was measured. The Ac-NGF(1–14) peptide, which binds copper ions with a lower stability constant than NGF(1–14), exhibited a lower nuclear localization with respect to the total cellular uptake. These findings were correlated to the metal-induced increase of CREB and BDNF

  7. Surface Forcing of the Infrared Cooling Profile over the Tibetan Plateau. Part II: Cooling-Rate Variation over Large-Scale Plateau Domain during Summer Monsoon Transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-05-01

    During the summer east Asian monsoon transition period in 1979, a meteorological field experiment entitled the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau Meteorological Experiment (QXPMEX-79) was conducted over the entire Tibetan Plateau. Data collected on and around the plateau during this period, in conjunction with a medium spectral-resolution infrared radiative transfer model, are used to gain an understanding of how elevation and surface biophysical factors, which are highly variable over the large-scale plateau domain, regulate the spatial distribution of clear-sky infrared cooling during the transition phase of the summer monsoon.The spatial distribution of longwave cooling over the plateau is significantly influenced by variations in biophysical composition, topography, and elevation, the surface thermal diurnal cycle, and various climatological factors. An important factor is soil moisture. Bulk clear-sky longwave cooling rates are larger in the southeast sector of the plateau than in the north. This is because rainfall is greatest in the southeast, whereas the north is highly desertified and relative longwave radiative heating by the surface is greatest. Another important phenomenon is that the locale of a large-scale east-west-aligned spatial gradient in radiative cooling propagates northward with time. During the premonsoon period (May-June), the location of the strong spatial gradient is found in the southeastern margin of the plateau. Due to changes in surface and atmospheric conditions after the summer monsoon commences, the high gradient sector is shifted to the central Qinghai region. Furthermore, an overall decrease in longwave cooling takes place in the lower atmosphere immediately prior to the arrival of the active monsoon.The magnitude of longwave cooling is significantly affected by skin-temperature boundary conditions at plateau altitudes. If skin-temperature discontinuities across the surface-atmosphere interface are neglected, bulk cooling rates will be in

  8. Orthologs of a novel archaeal and of the bacterial peptidyl–tRNA hydrolase are nonessential in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Sandoval, Guillermina; Ambrogelly, Alexandre; Rinehart, Jesse; Wei, David; Cruz-Vera, L. Rogelio; Graham, David E.; Stetter, Karl O.; Guarneros, Gabriel; Söll, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    Peptidyl–tRNA hydrolase (encoded by pth) is an essential enzyme in all bacteria, where it releases tRNA from the premature translation termination product peptidyl–tRNA. Archaeal genomes lack a recognizable peptidyl–tRNA hydrolase (Pth) ortholog, although it is present in most eukaryotes. However, we detected Pth-like activity in extracts of the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The uncharacterized MJ0051 ORF was shown to correspond to a protein with Pth activity. Heterologously expressed MJ0051 enzyme catalyzed in vitro the cleavage of the Pth substrates diacetyl-[14C]lysyl–tRNA and acetyl-[14C]phenylalanyl–tRNA. On transformation of an Escherichia coli pthts mutant, the MJ0051 gene (named pth2) rescued the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the strain. Analysis of known genomes revealed the presence of highly conserved orthologs of the archaeal pth2 gene in all archaea and eukaryotes but not in bacteria. The phylogeny of pth2 homologs suggests that the gene has been vertically inherited throughout the archaeal and eukaryal domains. Deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the pth2 (YBL057c) or pth (YHR189w) orthologs were viable, as was the double deletion strain, implying that the canonical Pth and Pth2 enzymes are not essential for yeast viability. PMID:12475929

  9. Polar domains and charge-density waves in the acentric cerium(III) iron(II) sulfide Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54}

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Allison M.; Ruck, Michael

    2008-11-15

    The cerium(III) iron(II) sulfide Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54} was synthesized through reaction of the binary sulfides C-Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3} and FeS in a LiCl/KCl flux at 1170 K, and its structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Ce{sub 22}Fe{sub 21}S{sub 54} crystallizes in the polar monoclinic space group Cm with a=16.3912(7) A, b=3.9554(1) A, c=62.028(3) A, {beta}=94.831(4){sup o}, and Z=2. The structure is a superstructure of the La{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5} structure type. Akin to the parent structure, trans-edge-sharing [FeS{sub 6}]-octahedra form linear chains, which are isotactically capped on one side by [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra. The polarity of the resulting {sub {infinity}}{sup 1}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-chains is transferred to the entire structure, as the unit cell contains two layered domains of opposite polarity with the unbalanced size ratio of 4:6. The domain walls are intrinsically centrosymmetric (layer group c 1 2/m 1). One wall consists of trigonal [FeS{sub 5}]-bipyramids, which are linked by corners and edges into a {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-layer. In the other wall, the [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra of two opposing {sub {infinity}}{sup 1}[Fe{sub 2}S{sub 5}]-chains share their vertices. The sulfur anions eliminated thereby are counterbalanced by vacancies in the iron sites, which follow a sinusoidal occupation modulation corresponding to a frozen charge-density wave with the wave vector k=4{pi}c*. The coordination polyhedra of all the cerium cations are bicapped trigonal prisms. - Graphical Abstract: Chains of [FeS{sub 6}]-octahedra that are isotactically capped on one side by [FeS{sub 4}]-tetrahedra dominate the acentric structure. The unit cell contains two layered domains of opposite polarity with unbalanced size ratio. Vacancies in the iron sites follow a sinusoidal occupation modulation corresponding to a frozen charge-density wave.

  10. Increasing CO2 differentially affects essential and non-essential amino acid concentration of rice grains grown in cadmium-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huibin; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Zhongqi; Tang, Shirong

    2016-09-01

    Environmental pollution by both ambient CO2 and heavy metals has been steadily increasing, but we do not know how fluctuating CO2 concentrations influence plant nutrients under high Cd pollution, especially in crops. Here, we studied the effects of elevated CO2 and Cd accumulation on proteins and amino acids in rice under Cd stress. In this pot experiment, we analyzed the amino-acid profile of 20 rice cultivars that accumulate Cd differently; the plants were grown in Cd-containing soils under ambient conditions and elevated CO2 levels. We found that although Cd concentrations appeared to be higher in most cultivars under elevated CO2 than under ambient CO2, the effect was significant only in seven cultivars. Combined exposure to Cd and elevated CO2 strongly decreased rice protein and amino acid profiles, including essential and non-essential amino acids. Under elevated CO2, the ratios of specific amino acids were either higher or lower than the optimal ratios provided by FAO/WHO, suggesting that CO2 may flatten the overall amino-acid profile, leading to an excess in some amino acids and deficiencies in others when the rice is consumed. Thus, Cd-tainted rice limits the concentration of essential amino acids in rice-based diets, and the combination with elevated CO2 further exacerbates the problem.

  11. Mapping of herpes simplex virus-1 neurovirulence to. gamma. sub 1 34. 5, a gene nonessential for growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.; Roizman, B. ); Kern, E.R.; Whitley, R.J. )

    1990-11-30

    The gene designated {gamma}{sub 1}34.5 maps in the inverted repeats flanking the long unique sequence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) DNA, and therefore it is present in two copies per genome. This gene is not essential for viral growth in cell culture. Four recombinant viruses were genetically engineered to test the function of this gene. These were (i) a virus from which both copies of the gene were deleted, (ii) a virus containing a stop codon in both copies of the gene, (iii) a virus containing after the first codon an insert encoding a 16-amino acid epitope known to react with a specific monoclonal antibody, and (iv) a virus in which the deleted sequences were restored. The viruses from which the gene was deleted or which carried stop codons were avirulent on intracerebral inoculation of mice. The virus with the gene tagged by the sequence encoding the epitope was moderately virulent, whereas the restored virus reacquired the phenotype of the parent virus. Significant amounts of virus were recovered only from brains of animals inoculated with virulent viruses. Inasmuch as the product of the {gamma}{sub 1}34.5 gene extended the host range of the virus by enabling it to replicate and destroy brain cells, it is a viral neurovirulence factor.

  12. Genetic interactions with C-terminal domain (CTD) kinases and the CTD of RNA Pol II suggest a role for ESS1 in transcription initiation and elongation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Cathy B; Rossettini, Anne; Hanes, Steven D

    2004-01-01

    Ess1 is an essential prolyl isomerase that binds the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Ess1 is proposed to control transcription by isomerizing phospho-Ser-Pro peptide bonds within the CTD repeat. To determine which step(s) in the transcription cycle might require Ess1, we examined genetic interactions between ESS1 and genes encoding the known CTD kinases (KIN28, CTK1, BUR1, and SRB10). Although genetic interactions were identified between ESS1 and all four kinases, the clearest interactions were with CTK1 and SRB10. Reduced dosage of CTK1 rescued the growth defect of ess1(ts) mutants, while overexpression of CTK1 enhanced the growth defects of ess1(ts) mutants. Deletion of SRB10 suppressed ess1(ts) and ess1Delta mutants. The interactions suggest that Ess1 opposes the functions of these kinases, which are thought to function in preinitiation and elongation. Using a series of CTD substitution alleles, we also identified Ser5-Pro6 as a potential target for Ess1 isomerization within the first "half" of the CTD repeats. On the basis of the results, we suggest a model in which Ess1-directed conformational changes promote dephosphorylation of Ser5 to stimulate preinitiation complex formation and, later, to inhibit elongation. PMID:15166139

  13. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  14. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  15. Assessment of essential and nonessential metals and different metal exposure biomarkers in the human placenta in a population from the south of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A; Company, R; Lopes, B; Rosa, J; Cavaco, A; Castela, G; Castela, E; Olea, N; Bebianno, M J

    2012-01-01

    The general population is exposed to metals as trace amounts of metallic compounds are present in air, water, and food. Information on background exposures and biomarker concentrations of environmental chemicals in the general Portuguese population is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the levels of important nonessential metals with recognized toxicity cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) and essential metals copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), and zinc (Zn) in placentas of mothers living in south Portugal (Algarve). Due to the difficulty in establishing the effects of chemicals in a complex and variable environment, this study also aimed to examine the response of biomarkers, such as biochemical changes that occurs at subcellular levels in the presence of contaminants. The investigated biomarkers in placentas indicative of metal exposure or damage included the metallothioneins (MT), delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) (specific for Pb), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) as an index of oxidative stress damage. Moreover, HJ-BIPLOT was applied in order to identify and categorize mothers vulnerable to environmental contamination in this region. Metal concentrations in the placenta were not excessive but within the range found in most European studies. In general, the biomarkers MT and LPO were positively correlated with metal levels, while with ALAD the opposite occurred, indicating the selected battery of biomarkers were suitable to study the effects of metals on human placenta. Further, the application of multivariate analysis with HJ-BIPLOT showed that most significant factors contributing to maternal and fetal exposures via placenta were dietary and smoking habits.

  16. Marked depletion of polar lipid and non-essential fatty acids following settlement by post-larvae of the spiny lobster Jasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Andrew G; Phleger, Charles F; Nelson, Matthew M; Mooney, Ben D; Nichols, Peter D

    2002-02-01

    The development from the non-feeding post-larva (puerulus) to the first instar juvenile of spiny lobsters is highly energetically demanding. These demands may greatly compromise the energy reserves of the lobsters following settlement, leading to reduced growth and survival in the wild, and also in aquaculture. Therefore, the lipid class and fatty acid composition of wild caught pueruli and first instar juveniles of the spiny lobster Jasus verreauxi (H. Milne Edwards, 1851) were analysed by thin layer chromatography-flame ionisation detection and capillary gas chromatography. Pueruli contained substantially more lipid than first instar juveniles (mean difference =3.5 mg, or 41.9%) and most of this difference was due to the presence of greater amounts of polar lipid (mean difference =3.9 mg or 49.2%) in pueruli. First instar juveniles contained significantly more triacylglycerol (mean =0.2 mg), consistent with the polar lipid being converted to a more readily metabolised lipid class in the hepatopancreas. These results indicate that polar lipid is the major energy store during the non-feeding puerulus stage of spiny lobsters from the genus Jasus. Overall, the essential, polyunsaturated linoleic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids did not show a significant decrease between the two developmental stages, despite the absence of feeding. However, significant reductions in the abundance of both saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids between the two stages were identified (decrease of 811 and 783 microg per individual, respectively). This suggested that selective depletion of non-essential fatty acids may be occurring, with resultant sparing of the essential fatty acids. Supplying diets rich in these depleted fatty acids, and in particular the essential fatty acids, preferably in polar lipid, is likely to result in increased survival and growth of J. verreauxi and other spiny lobsters from first instar juveniles in aquaculture.

  17. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    transcriptional and functional networks of S. Typhimurium. Hubs theoretically confer higher resistance to random mutation but a greater susceptibility to directed attacks, however, we found that genes that formed hubs were dispensable for growth, stress adaptation and virulence, suggesting that evolution favors non-essential genes as main connectors in cellular networks. PMID:24345035

  18. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  19. A novel cysteine-rich sequence-specific DNA-binding protein interacts with the conserved X-box motif of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes via a repeated Cys-His domain and functions as a transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules function in the presentation of processed peptides to helper T cells. As most mammalian cells can endocytose and process foreign antigen, the critical determinant of an antigen-presenting cell is its ability to express class II MHC molecules. Expression of these molecules is usually restricted to cells of the immune system and dysregulated expression is hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and certain autoimmune diseases. Human complementary DNA clones encoding a newly identified, cysteine-rich transcription factor, NF-X1, which binds to the conserved X-box motif of class II MHC genes, were obtained, and the primary amino acid sequence deduced. The major open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 1,104 amino acids with a symmetrical organization. A central cysteine-rich portion encodes the DNA-binding domain, and is subdivided into seven repeated motifs. This motif is similar to but distinct from the LIM domain and the RING finger family, and is reminiscent of known metal-binding regions. The unique arrangement of cysteines indicates that the consensus sequence CX3CXL-XCGX1- 5HXCX3CHXGXC represents a novel cysteine-rich motif. Two lines of evidence indicate that the polypeptide encodes a potent and biologically relevant repressor of HLA-DRA transcription: (a) overexpression of NF-X1 from a retroviral construct strongly decreases transcription from the HLA-DRA promoter; and (b) the NF-X1 transcript is markedly induced late after induction with interferon gamma (IFN- gamma), coinciding with postinduction attenuation of HLA-DRA transcription. The NF-X1 protein may therefore play an important role in regulating the duration of an inflammatory response by limiting the period in which class II MHC molecules are induced by IFN-gamma. PMID:7964459

  20. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  1. Revisiting the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Sridevi; Brenet, Gilles; Machado-Charry, Eduardo; Caliste, Damien; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Pochet, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we study the stability of the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite in stages III and II by means of Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the domain model is either thermodynamically or kinetically stable when compared to the standard model in stages III and II. The existence of domains in the intercalation sequence is well supported by recent high resolution transmission electron microscope observations in lithiated graphite. Moreover, we predict that such domain staging sequences leads to a wide range of diffusivity as reported in experiments.

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa PMID:24179444

  3. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  4. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher A.; Epperson, Megan L.; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection. PMID:26343707

  5. The Non-Essential Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes hadA and hadC Contribute to the Physiology and Fitness of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Stevie; Slama, Nawel; Domingues, Joana; Laval, Françoise; Texier, Pauline; Eynard, Nathalie; Quémard, Annaik; Peixoto, Antonio; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Cam, Kaymeuang

    2015-01-01

    Gram positive mycobacteria with a high GC content, such as the etiological agent of tuberculosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess an outer membrane mainly composed of mycolic acids (MAs), the so-called mycomembrane, which is essential for the cell. About thirty genes are involved in the biosynthesis of MAs, which include the hadA, hadB and hadC genes that encode the dehydratases Fatty Acid Synthase type II (FAS-II) known to function as the heterodimers HadA-HadB and HadB-HadC. The present study shows that M. smegmatis cells remain viable in the absence of either HadA and HadC or both. Inactivation of HadC has a dramatic effect on the physiology and fitness of the mutant strains whereas that of HadA exacerbates the phenotype of a hadC deletion. The hadC mutants exhibit a novel MA profile, display a distinct colony morphology, are less aggregated, are impaired for sliding motility and biofilm development and are more resistant to detergent. Conversely, the hadC mutants are significantly more susceptible to low- and high-temperature and to selective toxic compounds, including several current anti-tubercular drugs. PMID:26701652

  6. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan Dw

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed.

  7. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan DW

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed. PMID:24637704

  8. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  9. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  10. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  11. SNP@Domain: a web resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within protein domain structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Areum; Kang, Hyo Jin; Cho, Yoobok; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Joo; Gong, Sungsam

    2006-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved protein regions have been thought to be strong candidates that alter protein functions. Thus, we have developed SNP@Domain, a web resource, to identify SNPs within human protein domains. We annotated SNPs from dbSNP with protein structure-based as well as sequence-based domains: (i) structure-based using SCOP and (ii) sequence-based using Pfam to avoid conflicts from two domain assignment methodologies. Users can investigate SNPs within protein domains with 2D and 3D maps. We expect this visual annotation of SNPs within protein domains will help scientists select and interpret SNPs associated with diseases. A web interface for the SNP@Domain is freely available at and from . PMID:16845090

  12. A Domain Analysis Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Bauhaus , a prototype CASE workstation for D-SAPS development. [ARAN88A] Guillermo F. Arango. Domain Engineering for Software Reuse. PhD thesis...34 VITA90B: Domain Analysis within the ISEC Rapid Center 48 CMU/SEI-90-SR-3 Appendix III Alphabetical by Organization/Project BAUHAUS * ALLE87A

  13. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  14. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  15. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  16. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  17. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  18. Cross Domain Analogies for Learning Domain Theories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Example Problem and Worked Solution All problems and worked solutions used in this work were taken from the same physics textbook ( Giancoli 1991...domain theory. We close with a discussion of related work and our plans for the future. Representations and Problem Solving Representing physics ...small compared to the 30,000+ concepts and 8,000+ predicates already defined in the KB. Thus, objects, relations, and events that appear in physics

  19. Full-Length Trimeric Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin II Membrane Fusion Protein and Shorter Constructs Lacking the Fusion Peptide or Transmembrane Domain: Hyperthermostability of the Full-Length Protein and the Soluble Ectodomain and Fusion Peptide Make Significant Contributions to Fusion of Membrane Vesicles†

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U.; Ekanayaka, E. A. Prabodha; Komanduru, Sweta S.; Weliky, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus is a Class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5–6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ~25, ~160, ~25, and ~10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP + SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE + TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm > 90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM. PMID:26297995

  20. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  1. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  2. Cloning, expression and purification of the SRCR domains of glycoprotein 340.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2013-08-01

    Glycoprotein 340 (gp340), an innate immunity molecule is secreted luminally by monolayered epithelia and associated glands within the human oral cavity. Gp340 contains 14 scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains, two CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains and one zona pellucida (ZP) domain. Oral streptococci are known to adhere to the tooth immobilized gp340 via its surface protein Antigen I/II (AgI/II), which is considered to be the critical first step in pathogenesis that eventually results in colonization and infection. In order to decipher the interactions between gp340's domains and oral streptococcal AgI/II domains, we undertook to express human gp340's first SRCR domain (SRCR1) and the first three tandem SRCR domains (SRCR123) in Drosophila S2 cells. While our initial attempts with human codons did not produce optimal results, codon-optimization for expression in Drosophila S2 cells and usage of inducible/secretory Drosophila expression system (DES) pMT/BiP/V5-HisA vector greatly enhanced the expression of the SRCR domains. Here we report the successful cloning, expression, and purification of the SRCR domains of gp340. Recognition of expressed SRCRs by the conformational dependent gp340 antibody indicate that these domains are appropriately folded and furthermore, surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed functional adherence of the SRCR domains to AgI/II.

  3. The Promise of Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; Li, Jingling; Vaijanapurkar, Samarth; Bue, Brian; Miller, Adam; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Graham, Matthew; CRTS, iPTF

    2016-01-01

    Most new surveys spend an appreciable time in collecting data on which to train classifiers before they can be used on future observations from the same dataset. The result generating phase can start much earlier if the training could incorporate data accumulated from older surveys enhanced with a small set from the new survey. This is exactly what Domain Adaptation (DA) allows us to do. The main idea behind DAs can be summarized thus: if we have two classes of separable objects in some feature space of a Source survey (S), we can define a hyperplane to separate the two types. In a second Target survey (T), for the same features the hyperplane would be inclined differently. DA methods get the mapping between the two hyperplanes using a small fraction of data from the Target (T) survey and can then be used to predict the classes of the remaining majority of data in T. We discuss the parameters that need to be tuned, the difficulties involved, and ways to improve the results. As we move towards bigger, and deeper surveys, being able to use existing labelled information to conduct classification in future surveys will be more cost-effective and promote time efficiency as well. Starting with the light curve data of 50,000 periodic objects from Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we have applied domain adaptation techniques such as Geodesic Flow Kernel (GFK) with Random forest classifier and Co-training for domain adaptation (CODA) to the CRTS data which has 35,000 points overlapping with Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and 12,000 with Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR). The results suggest that domain adaptation is an area worth exploring as the knowledge between these surveys is transferable and the approaches to find the mappings between these surveys can be applied to the remaining data as well as for near future surveys such as CRTS-II, Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to name a few at the optical

  4. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  5. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  6. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  7. Optimal domain decomposition strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Yonghyun; Soni, Bharat K.

    1995-01-01

    The primary interest of the authors is in the area of grid generation, in particular, optimal domain decomposition about realistic configurations. A grid generation procedure with optimal blocking strategies has been developed to generate multi-block grids for a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The focus of this study is the domain decomposition which optimizes solution algorithm/block compatibility based on geometrical complexities as well as the physical characteristics of flow field. The progress realized in this study is summarized in this paper.

  8. Essential and Nonessential Micronutrients and Sport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, Kristen M.; Serra, Monica C.

    The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of micronutrients in sport. Attention is given to the function of micronutrients in the body, examples of quality dietary sources of each micronutrient, and an assessment of the literature examining how the recommended daily intake of a micronutrient may or may not change with exercise. The discussion includes plausible biological mechanisms of proposed performance enhancement and current research to support or negate these claims. Water-soluble vitamins, fat-soluble vitamins, macrominerals, and select microminerals are discussed in detail, and a comprehensive table reviewing all micronutrients recommendations for the athlete is provided. Practical applications for professionals working with athletes conclude the chapter.

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. The Domains of TESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, Betty Wallace

    The domains of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) are those spheres of concern involving persons who speak languages other than English or dialects of English other than the standard. This clientele has been classified traditionally in terms of programs in English as a foreign language, English as a second language, English…

  11. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. Domain Validity and Generalizability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Michael, William B.

    1975-01-01

    An alternative derivation of Tryon's basic formula for the coefficient of domain validity or the coefficient of generalizability developed by Cronbach, Rajaratnam, and Glaser is provided. This derivation, which is also the generalized Kuder-Richardson coefficient, requires a relatively minimal number of assumptions compared with that in previously…

  13. Dynein's C-terminal Domain Plays a Novel Role in Regulating Force Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Nicholas, Matthew; Brenner, Sibylle; Lazar, Caitlin; Weil, Sarah; Vallee, Richard; Hook, Peter; Gennerich Lab Collaboration; Vallee Lab Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in a wide range of low and high force requiring functions in metazoans. In contrast, yeast dynein is involved in a single, nonessential function, nuclear positioning. Interestingly, the single-molecule function of yeast dynein is also unique: whereas mammalian dyneins generate forces of 1-2 pN, S. cerevisiae dynein stalls at 5-7 pN. The basis for this functional difference is unknown. However, the major structural difference between mammalian and yeast dyneins is a ~30 kDa C-terminal extension (CT) present in higher eukaryotic dyneins, but missing in yeast. To test whether the CT accounts for the differences in function, we produced recombinant rat dynein motor domains (MD) with (WT-MD) and without (ΔCT-MD) the CT, using baculovirus expression. To define motor function, we performed single-molecule optical trapping studies. Dimerized WT-MD stalls at ~1 pN and detaches from microtubules after brief stalls, in agreement with previous studies on native mammalian dynein. In sharp contrast, but similar to yeast dynein, ΔCT-MD stalls at ~6 pN, with stall durations up to minutes. These results identify the CT as a new regulatory element for controlling dynein force generation. Supported by NIH GM094415 (A.G.) and GM102347 (R.B.V.)

  14. PEP-II RF Feedback System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.

    2004-03-11

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions.

  15. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  16. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  17. Magnetic domain and domain wall in Co/Pt multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, A.; Mohanty, J.

    2016-05-01

    We report systematic micromagnetic investigation of formation of magnetic domains in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer with the variation in magnetic anisotropy and stack thickness. The lowering of anisotropy makes the domain wall broader and domain formation less efficient. Domain sizeincreases with increasing thickness of the stack to minimize the stray field energy.The minimization of energy of the system due to domain formation makes the M-H loop narrower whereas, lower stack thickness results in a wider loop. The magnetization reversalin this system occurs due tothe nucleation and growth of reverse domains.

  18. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  19. Ii Chain Controls the Transport of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecules to and from Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Valérie; Raposo, Graça; Amigorena, Sebastian; Mellman, Ira

    1997-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II molecules are synthesized as a nonameric complex consisting of three αβ dimers associated with a trimer of invariant (Ii) chains. After exiting the TGN, a targeting signal in the Ii chain cytoplasmic domain directs the complex to endosomes where Ii chain is proteolytically processed and removed, allowing class II molecules to bind antigenic peptides before reaching the cell surface. Ii chain dissociation and peptide binding are thought to occur in one or more postendosomal sites related either to endosomes (designated CIIV) or to lysosomes (designated MIIC). We now find that in addition to initially targeting αβ dimers to endosomes, Ii chain regulates the subsequent transport of class II molecules. Under normal conditions, murine A20 B cells transport all of their newly synthesized class II I-Ab αβ dimers to the plasma membrane with little if any reaching lysosomal compartments. Inhibition of Ii processing by the cysteine/serine protease inhibitor leupeptin, however, blocked transport to the cell surface and caused a dramatic but selective accumulation of I-Ab class II molecules in lysosomes. In leupeptin, I-Ab dimers formed stable complexes with a 10-kD NH2-terminal Ii chain fragment (Ii-p10), normally a transient intermediate in Ii chain processing. Upon removal of leupeptin, Ii-p10 was degraded and released, I-Ab dimers bound antigenic peptides, and the peptide-loaded dimers were transported slowly from lysosomes to the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that alterations in the rate or efficiency of Ii chain processing can alter the postendosomal sorting of class II molecules, resulting in the increased accumulation of αβ dimers in lysosome-like MIIC. Thus, simple differences in Ii chain processing may account for the highly variable amounts of class II found in lysosomal compartments of different cell types or at different developmental stages. PMID:9105036

  20. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)

  1. Comprehensive optimization of a single-chain variable domain antibody fragment as a targeting ligand for a cytotoxic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kathy; Geddie, Melissa L; Kohli, Neeraj; Kornaga, Tad; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Jiao, Yang; Rennard, Rachel; Drummond, Daryl C; Nielsen, Ulrik B; Xu, Lihui; Lugovskoy, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-targeted nanoparticles have the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies by directing them to tumor cells. Using antibodies or their fragments requires careful engineering because multiple parameters, including affinity, internalization rate and stability, all need to be optimized. Here, we present a case study of the iterative engineering of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) for use as a targeting arm of a liposomal cytotoxic nanoparticle. We describe the effect of the orientation of variable domains, the length and composition of the interdomain protein linker that connects VH and VL, and stabilizing mutations in both the framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) on the molecular properties of the scFv. We show that variable domain orientation can alter cross-reactivity to murine antigen while maintaining affinity to the human antigen. We demonstrate that tyrosine residues in the CDRs make diverse contributions to the binding affinity and biophysical properties, and that replacement of non-essential tyrosines can improve the stability and bioactivity of the scFv. Our studies demonstrate that a comprehensive engineering strategy may be required to identify a scFv with optimal characteristics for nanoparticle targeting.

  2. Prediction of VH-VL domain orientation for antibody variable domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Dunbar, James; Lipsmeier, Florian; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Antes, Iris; Deane, Charlotte M; Georges, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The antigen-binding site of antibodies forms at the interface of their two variable domains, VH and VL, making VH-VL domain orientation a factor that codetermines antibody specificity and affinity. Preserving VH-VL domain orientation in the process of antibody engineering is important in order to retain the original antibody properties, and predicting the correct VH-VL orientation has also been recognized as an important factor in antibody homology modeling. In this article, we present a fast sequence-based predictor that predicts VH-VL domain orientation with Q(2) values ranging from 0.54 to 0.73 on the evaluation set. We describe VH-VL orientation in terms of the six absolute ABangle parameters that have recently been proposed as a means to separate the different degrees of freedom of VH-VL domain orientation. In order to assess the impact of adjusting VH-VL orientation according to our predictions, we use the set of antibody structures of the recently published Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA) II study. In comparison to the original AMAII homology models, we find an improvement in the accuracy of VH-VL orientation modeling, which also translates into an improvement in the average root-mean-square deviation with regard to the crystal structures.

  3. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  4. Mixed metal copper(II)-nickel(II) and copper(II)-zinc(II) complexes of multihistidine peptide fragments of human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Jószai, Viktória; Turi, Ildikó; Kállay, Csilla; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2012-07-01

    Mixed metal copper(II)-nickel(II) and copper(II)-zinc(II) complexes of four peptide fragments of human prion protein have been studied by potentiometric, UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. One peptide contained three histidyl residues: HuPrP(84-114) with H85 inside and H96, H111 outside the octarepeat domain. The other three peptides contained two histidyl residues; H96 and H111 for HuPrP(91-115) and HuPrP(84-114)H85A while HuPrP(84-114)H96A contained the histidyl residues at positions 85 and 111. It was found that both histidines of the latter peptides can simultaneously bind copper(II) and nickel(II) ions and dinuclear mixed metal complexes can exist in slightly alkaline solution. One molecule of the peptide with three histidyl residues can bind two copper(II) and one nickel(II) ions. H85 and H111 were identified as the major copper(II) and H96 as the preferred nickel(II) binding sites in mixed metal species. The studies on the zinc(II)-PrP peptide binary systems revealed that zinc(II) ions can coordinate to the 31-mer PrP peptide fragments in the form of macrochelates with two or three coordinated imidazol-nitrogens but the low stability of these complexes cannot prevent the hydrolysis of the metal ion in slightly alkaline solution. These data provide further support for the outstanding affinity of copper(II) ions towards the peptide fragments of prion protein but the binding of nickel(II) can significantly modify the distribution of copper(II) among the available metal binding sites.

  5. Application of Wavelet Transform for PDZ Domain Classification

    PubMed Central

    Daqrouq, Khaled; Alhmouz, Rami; Balamesh, Ahmed; Memic, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains have been identified as part of an array of signaling proteins that are often unrelated, except for the well-conserved structural PDZ domain they contain. These domains have been linked to many disease processes including common Avian influenza, as well as very rare conditions such as Fraser and Usher syndromes. Historically, based on the interactions and the nature of bonds they form, PDZ domains have most often been classified into one of three classes (class I, class II and others - class III), that is directly dependent on their binding partner. In this study, we report on three unique feature extraction approaches based on the bigram and trigram occurrence and existence rearrangements within the domain's primary amino acid sequences in assisting PDZ domain classification. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) and Shannon entropy denoted by wavelet entropy (WE) feature extraction methods were proposed. Using 115 unique human and mouse PDZ domains, the existence rearrangement approach yielded a high recognition rate (78.34%), which outperformed our occurrence rearrangements based method. The recognition rate was (81.41%) with validation technique. The method reported for PDZ domain classification from primary sequences proved to be an encouraging approach for obtaining consistent classification results. We anticipate that by increasing the database size, we can further improve feature extraction and correct classification. PMID:25860375

  6. Starch-binding domain shuffling in Aspergillus niger glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Catherine A G; Fang, Tsuei-Yun; Reilly, Peter J; Ford, Clark

    2003-07-01

    Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA) consists mainly of two forms, GAI [from the N-terminus, catalytic domain + linker + starch-binding domain (SBD)] and GAII (catalytic domain + linker). These domains were shuffled to make RGAI (SBD + linker + catalytic domain), RGAIDeltaL (SBD + catalytic domain) and RGAII (linker + catalytic domain), with domains defined by function rather than by tertiary structure. In addition, Paenibacillus macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD replaced the closely related A.niger GA SBD to give GAE. Soluble starch hydrolysis rates decreased as RGAII approximately GAII approximately GAI > RGAIDeltaL approximately RGAI approximately GAE. Insoluble starch hydrolysis rates were GAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAI > GAE approximately RGAII > GAII, while insoluble starch-binding capacities were GAI > RGAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAII > GAII > GAE. These results indicate that: (i) moving the SBD to the N-terminus or replacing the native SBD somewhat affects soluble starch hydrolysis; (ii) SBD location significantly affects insoluble starch binding and hydrolysis; (iii) insoluble starch hydrolysis is imperfectly correlated with its binding by the SBD; and (iv) placing the P.macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD at the end of a linker, instead of closely associated with the rest of the enzyme, severely reduces its ability to bind and hydrolyze insoluble starch.

  7. Nuclear import of RNA polymerase II is coupled with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Forget, Diane; Lacombe, Andrée-Anne; Cloutier, Philippe; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-08-01

    The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated protein (RPAP) 2 has been discovered through its association with various subunits of RNAP II in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry experiments. Here, we show that RPAP2 is a mainly cytoplasmic protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. RPAP2 shuttling is tightly coupled with nuclear import of RNAP II, as RPAP2 silencing provokes abnormal accumulation of RNAP II in the cytoplasmic space. Most notably, RPAP4/GPN1 silencing provokes the retention of RPAP2 in the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RPAP2 enters the nucleus in association with RNAP II and returns to the cytoplasm in association with the GTPase GPN1/RPAP4. Although binding of RNAP II to RPAP2 is mediated by an N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-170) that contains a nuclear retention domain, and binding of RPAP4/GPN1 to RPAP2 occurs through a C-terminal domain (amino acids 156-612) that has a dominant cytoplasmic localization domain. In conjunction with previously published data, our results have important implications, as they indicate that RPAP2 controls gene expression by two distinct mechanisms, one that targets RNAP II activity during transcription and the other that controls availability of RNAP II in the nucleus.

  8. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  9. Field Evolution of Antiferromagnetic Domains and Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Eric E.; Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas K.

    2003-03-01

    We have used magnetron sputtered [Co(4Å)Pt(7Å)]X Co(4Å)Ru(9Å)N multiplayer films to create artificially layered antiferromagnets. In contrast to atomic antiferromagnets our model system has an antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange energy comparable to the Zeemann energy in moderate fields and allows to fine tune the relative magnitude of the different magnetic energy terms by varying the parameters X and N. With increasing X and N we observe a transition from traditionally observed sharp AF domain walls towards AF domain walls with a finite width which consist of ferromagnetic stripes, i.e. the AF domains have zero net moment whereas the domain walls carry a finite magnetic moment. Such AF domain walls have not been observed before and are a direct consequence of balancing out exchange and Zeeman energy. We also show that such domain walls are expected from theoretical energy calculations. In this contribution we study the nature and field evolution of the AF stripe domain walls by Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM). The surface sensitivity of MFM and the finite moment of the AF domain walls allow us to image AF domains as well as domain walls. We are showing first experiments to study the AF domain wall evolution in real space while applying an external field. O.H. was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via a Forschungsstipendium under the contract number HE 3286/1-1.

  10. Space Domain Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    information required to characterize a space object. Another key parameter to be considered is the frequency of observation. This sampling rate varies...useful to define the values of these parameters that approximate the current and future state of the space domain. The current catalog and network... Parameters used in estimating data needs for SDA Current Threshold Objective βmo , βimg 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb Number of Objects (Na , Np

  11. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  12. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  13. Essential roles for ankyrin repeat and transactivation domains in induction of T-cell leukemia by notch1.

    PubMed

    Aster, J C; Xu, L; Karnell, F G; Patriub, V; Pui, J C; Pear, W S

    2000-10-01

    Notch receptors participate in a conserved signaling pathway that controls the development of diverse tissues and cell types, including lymphoid cells. Signaling is normally initiated through one or more ligand-mediated proteolytic cleavages that permit nuclear translocation of the intracellular portion of the Notch receptor (ICN), which then binds and activates transcription factors of the Su(H)/CBF1 family. Several mammalian Notch receptors are oncogenic when constitutively active, including Notch1, a gene initially identified based on its involvement in a (7;9) chromosomal translocation found in sporadic T-cell lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas (T-ALL). To investigate which portions of ICN1 contribute to transformation, we performed a structure-transformation analysis using a robust murine bone marrow reconstitution assay. Both the ankyrin repeat and C-terminal transactivation domains were required for T-cell leukemogenesis, whereas the N-terminal RAM domain and a C-terminal domain that includes a PEST sequence were nonessential. Induction of T-ALL correlated with the transactivation activity of each Notch1 polypeptide when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4, with the exception of polypeptides deleted of the ankyrin repeats, which lacked transforming activity while retaining strong transactivation activity. Transforming polypeptides also demonstrated moderate to strong activation of the Su(H)/CBF1-sensitive HES-1 promoter, while polypeptides with weak or absent activity on this promoter failed to cause leukemia. These experiments define a minimal transforming region for Notch1 in T-cell progenitors and suggest that leukemogenic signaling involves recruitment of transcriptional coactivators to ICN1 nuclear complexes.

  14. Harmonic Domains and Synchronization in Typically and Atypically Developing Hebrew-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bat-El, Outi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of typical and atypical consonant harmony (onset-onset place harmony), with emphasis on (i) the size of the harmonic domain, (ii) the position of the harmonic domain within the prosodic word, and (iii) the maximal size of the prosodic word that exhibits consonant harmony. The data, drawn from typically and…

  15. Research Ethics II: Mentoring, Collaboration, Peer Review, and Data Management and Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics II", the authors review the RCR domains of mentoring,…

  16. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  17. Swarming in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Motsch, Sébastien; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Vicsek model is a prototype for the emergence of collective motion. In free space, it is characterized by a swarm of particles all moving in the same direction. Since this dynamic does not include attraction among particles, the swarm, while aligning in velocity space, has no spatial coherence. Adding specular reflection at the boundaries generates global spatial coherence of the swarms while maintaining its velocity alignment. We investigate numerically how the geometry of the domain influences the Vicsek model using three type of geometry: a channel, a disk and a rectangle. Varying the parameters of the Vicsek model (e.g. noise levels and influence horizons), we discuss the mechanisms that generate spatial coherence and show how they create new dynamical solutions of the swarming motions in these geometries. Several observables are introduced to characterize the simulated patterns (e.g. mass profile, center of mass, connectivity of the swarm).

  18. Beyond the Number Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

  19. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  20. Domain adaptation for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, research focuses on the early computer-aided diagnosis of dementia with the goal to understand the disease process, determine risk and preserving factors, and explore preventive therapies. By now, large amounts of data from multi-site studies have been made available for developing, training, and evaluating automated classifiers. Yet, their translation to the clinic remains challenging, in part due to their limited generalizability across different datasets. In this work, we describe a compact classification approach that mitigates overfitting by regularizing the multinomial regression with the mixed ℓ1/ℓ2 norm. We combine volume, thickness, and anatomical shape features from MRI scans to characterize neuroanatomy for the three-class classification of Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. We demonstrate high classification accuracy via independent evaluation within the scope of the CADDementia challenge. We, furthermore, demonstrate that variations between source and target datasets can substantially influence classification accuracy. The main contribution of this work addresses this problem by proposing an approach for supervised domain adaptation based on instance weighting. Integration of this method into our classifier allows us to assess different strategies for domain adaptation. Our results demonstrate (i) that training on only the target training set yields better results than the naïve combination (union) of source and target training sets, and (ii) that domain adaptation with instance weighting yields the best classification results, especially if only a small training component of the target dataset is available. These insights imply that successful deployment of systems for computer-aided diagnostics to the clinic depends not only on accurate classifiers that avoid overfitting, but also on a dedicated domain adaptation strategy.

  1. Molecular characterization of MHC class II region in guinea fowl.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Mathew, J; Gupta, J; Mehra, S; Goyal, G; Sharma, D

    2010-12-01

    1. The MHC class II gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced in guinea fowl. 2. The NumeMHC II sequence of 754 nucleotides included complete exon 1 (91 nt), exon 2 (270 nt), exon 3 (282 nt) and exon 4 (110 nt). 3. The size of β(1) and β(2), domains were 89 and 93 amino acids, respectively in guinea fowl. 4. High amino acid variability (38·2%) was observed within guinea fowl in β(1) domain, while in β(2) domain, amino acid variability (6·3%) was low. 5. Among poultry species, the percent amino acid identity between guinea fowl and chicken, quail, pheasant and duck was 38·8, 42·2, 44·4 and 58·8 in β(1) domain; and 13·8, 17·0, 13·8 and 27·6 in β(2) domain, respectively. 6. Sequence alignment with mammalian and avian MHC showed that many of the conserved features of MHC class II glycoprotein was conserved in guinea fowl. 7. Within-species genetic distances (Poisson correction) based on cumulative amino acid variability in β(1) domain and β(2) domains was 0·141 in guinea fowl. 8. Guinea fowl showed low and similar genetic distances with all the poultry species (0·255-0·268) except duck (0·456). 9. Guinea fowl made separate branch within the major cluster having chicken, quail and pheasant, showing equal distance from these poultry species, whereas duck MHC II clustered separately.

  2. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  3. Multifunctionalities driven by ferroic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. C.; Huang, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; He, Q.

    2014-08-14

    Considerable attention has been paid to ferroic systems in pursuit of advanced applications in past decades. Most recently, the emergence and development of multiferroics, which exhibit the coexistence of different ferroic natures, has offered a new route to create functionalities in the system. In this manuscript, we step from domain engineering to explore a roadmap for discovering intriguing phenomena and multifunctionalities driven by periodic domain patters. As-grown periodic domains, offering exotic order parameters, periodic local perturbations and the capability of tailoring local spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom, are introduced as modeling templates for fundamental studies and novel applications. We discuss related significant findings on ferroic domain, nanoscopic domain walls, and conjunct heterostructures based on the well-organized domain patterns, and end with future prospects and challenges in the field.

  4. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants monitored by domain-specific intrinsic phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Sorensen, Brenda R; Rusinova, Elena; Laws, William R; Ross, J B Alexander; Shea, Madeline A

    2002-11-01

    Cooperative calcium binding to the two homologous domains of calmodulin (CaM) induces conformational changes that regulate its association with and activation of numerous cellular target proteins. Calcium binding to the pair of high-affinity sites (III and IV in the C-domain) can be monitored by observing calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 277/320 nm). However, calcium binding to the low-affinity sites (I and II in the N-domain) is more difficult to measure with optical spectroscopy because that domain of CaM does not contain tryptophan or tyrosine. We recently demonstrated that calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic phenylalanine fluorescence (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 250/280 nm) of an N-domain fragment of CaM reflect occupancy of sites I and II (VanScyoc, W. S., and M. A. Shea, 2001, Protein Sci. 10:1758-1768). Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, we now show that these excitation and emission wavelength pairs for phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence can be used to monitor equilibrium calcium titrations of the individual domains in full-length CaM. Calcium-dependent changes in phenylalanine fluorescence specifically indicate ion occupancy of sites I and II in the N-domain because phenylalanine residues in the C-domain are nonemissive. Tyrosine emission from the C-domain does not interfere with phenylalanine fluorescence signals from the N-domain. This is the first demonstration that intrinsic fluorescence may be used to monitor calcium binding to each domain of CaM. In this way, we also evaluated how mutations of two residues (Arg74 and Arg90) located between sites II and III can alter the calcium-binding properties of each of the domains. The mutation R74A caused an increase in the calcium affinity of sites I and II in the N-domain. The mutation R90A caused an increase in calcium affinity of sites III and IV in the C-domain whereas R90G caused an increase in calcium affinity

  5. Mapping the Moral Domain

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  6. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  7. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35–120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  8. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  9. The Scw1 RNA-binding domain protein regulates septation and cell-wall structure in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim; Oulton, Rena; Young, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    Loss of the nonessential RNA-binding domain protein, Scw1, increases resistance to cell-wall-degrading enzymes in fission yeast. Surprisingly, scw1 null mutations also suppress the lethality of mutations (cdc11-136, cdc7-24, cdc14-118, sid1-239, sid2-250, sid3-106, sid4-A1, and mob1-1) at all levels of the sid pathway. This pathway forms part of the septation initiation network (SIN), which regulates the onset of septum formation and ensures the proper coupling of mitosis to cytokinesis. In contrast, scw1(-) mutations do not suppress ts alleles of the rng genes, cdc12 or cdc15. These mutations also prevent the formation of a septum and in addition block assembly and/or function of the contractile acto-myosin ring. sid mutants exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to cell-wall-degrading enzymes that is suppressed by loss of Scw1. Furthermore, scw1(-)-mediated rescue of sid mutants is abolished in the presence of calcofluor white, a compound that interferes with cell-wall synthesis. These data suggest that Scw1 acts in opposition to the SIN as a negative regulator of cell-wall/septum deposition. Unlike components of the SIN, Scw1 is predominantly a cytoplasmic protein and is not localized to the spindle pole body. PMID:12242222

  10. The two distinctive metal ion binding domains of the wheat metallothionein Ec-1.

    PubMed

    Peroza, Estevão A; Kaabi, Ali Al; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Freisinger, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Metallothioneins are small cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role, among others, in the homeostasis of essential metal ions such as Zn(II) and Cu(I). Recently, we could show that wheat E(c)-1 is coordinating its six Zn(II) ions in form of metal-thiolate clusters analogously to the vertebrate metallothioneins. Specifically, two Zn(II) ions are bound in the N-terminal and four in the C-terminal domain. In the following, we will present evidence for the relative independence of the two domains from each other with respect to their metal ion binding abilities, and uncover three intriguing peculiarities of the protein. Firstly, one Zn(II) ion of the N-terminal domain is relative resistant to complete replacement with Cd(II) indicating the presence of a Zn(II)-binding site with increased stability. Secondly, the C-terminal domain is able to coordinate an additional fifth metal ion, though with reduced affinity, which went undetected so far. Finally, reconstitution of apoE(c)-1 with an excess of Zn(II) shows a certain amount of sub-stoichiometrically metal-loaded species. The possible relevance of these finding for the proposed biological functions of wheat E(c)-1 will be discussed. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on both, the full-length and the truncated protein, provide final evidence for His participation in metal ion binding.

  11. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  12. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  13. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  14. Phase-domain photoacoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Ruochong; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Qiu, Lei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-01-01

    As one of the fastest-growing imaging modalities in recent years, photoacoustic imaging has attracted tremendous research interest for various applications including anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging. The majority of the photoacoustic imaging systems are based on the time-domain pulsed photoacoustic method, which utilizes a pulsed laser source to induce a wideband photoacoustic signal, revealing optical absorption contrast. An alternative way is the frequency-domain photoacoustic method utilizing the chirping modulation of laser intensity to achieve lower system cost. In this paper, we report another way of the photoacoustic method, called phase-domain photoacoustic sensing, which explores the phase difference between two consequent intensity-modulated laser pulse induced photoacoustic measurements to reveal the optical properties. The basic principle is introduced, modeled, and experimentally validated in this paper, which opens another potential pathway to perform photoacoustic sensing and imaging, eliminating acoustic detection variations beyond the conventional time-domain and frequency-domain photoacoustic methods.

  15. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  16. Copper(II) and nickel(II) binding sites of peptide containing adjacent histidyl residues.

    PubMed

    Grenács, Ágnes; Sanna, Daniele; Sóvágó, Imre

    2015-10-01

    Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of the terminally protected nonapeptide Ac-SGAEGHHQK-NH2 modeling the metal binding sites of the (8-16) domain of amyloid-β have been studied by potentiometric, UV-vis, CD and ESR spectroscopic methods. The studies on the mutants containing only one of the histidyl residues (Ac-SGAEGAHQK-NH2, Ac-SGAEGHAQK-NH2) have also been performed. The formation of imidazole and amide coordinated mononuclear complexes is characteristic of all systems with a preference of nickel(II) binding to the His14 site, while the involvement of both histidines in metal binding is suggested in the corresponding copper(II) complexes. The formation of bis(ligand) and dinuclear complexes has also been observed in the copper(II)-Ac-SGAEGHHQK-NH2 system. The results provide further support for the copper(II) binding ability of the (8-16) domain of amyloid-β and support the previous assumptions that via the bis(ligand) complex formation copper(II) ions may promote the formation of the oligomers of amyloid-β.

  17. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  18. Separated matter and antimatter domains with vanishing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.; Godunov, S.I.; Rudenko, A.S.; Tkachev, I.I. E-mail: sgodunov@itep.ru E-mail: tkachev@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2015-10-01

    We present a model of spontaneous (or dynamical) C and CP violation where it is possible to generate domains of matter and antimatter separated by cosmologically large distances. Such C(CP) violation existed only in the early universe and later it disappeared with the only trace of generated baryonic and/or antibaryonic domains. So the problem of domain walls in this model does not exist. These features are achieved through a postulated form of interaction between inflaton and a new scalar field, realizing short time C(CP) violation.

  19. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  20. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  1. Modeling software systems by domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  2. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  3. Structure and functional analysis of the IGF-II/IGF2R interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; Delaine, Carlie; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Siebold, Christian; Gilbert, Robert J; van Boxel, Gijs; Denley, Adam; Wallace, John C; Hassan, A Bassim; Forbes, Briony E; Jones, E Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic development and normal growth require exquisite control of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). In mammals the extracellular region of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor has gained an IGF-II-binding function and is termed type II IGF receptor (IGF2R). IGF2R sequesters IGF-II; imbalances occur in cancers and IGF2R is implicated in tumour suppression. We report crystal structures of IGF2R domains 11–12, 11–12–13–14 and domains 11–12–13/IGF-II complex. A distinctive juxtaposition of these domains provides the IGF-II-binding unit, with domain 11 directly interacting with IGF-II and domain 13 modulating binding site flexibility. Our complex shows that Phe19 and Leu53 of IGF-II lock into a hydrophobic pocket unique to domain 11 of mammalian IGF2Rs. Mutagenesis analyses confirm this IGF-II ‘binding-hotspot', revealing that IGF-binding proteins and IGF2R have converged on the same high-affinity site. PMID:18046459

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  5. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  6. Engineered autonomous human variable domains

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Tessier, Peter M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2017-01-01

    The complex multi-chain architecture of antibodies has spurred interest in smaller derivatives that retain specificity but can be more easily produced in bacteria. Domain antibodies consisting of single variable domains are the smallest antibody fragments and have been shown to possess enhanced ability to target epitopes that are difficult to access using multidomain antibodies. However, in contrast to natural camelid antibody domains, human variable domains typically suffer from low stability and high propensity to aggregate. This review summarizes strategies to improve the biophysical properties of heavy chain variable domains from human antibodies with an emphasis on aggregation resistance. Several protein engineering approaches have targeted antibody frameworks and complementarity determining regions to stabilize the native state and prevent aggregation of the denatured state. Recent findings enable the construction of highly diverse libraries enriched in aggregation-resistant variants that are expected to provide binders to diverse antigens. Engineered domain antibodies possess unique advantages in expression, epitope preference and flexibility of formatting over conventional immunoreagents and are a promising class of antibody fragments for biomedical development. PMID:27655414

  7. Roots of angiosperm formins: The evolutionary history of plant FH2 domain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Shuffling of modular protein domains is an important source of evolutionary innovation. Formins are a family of actin-organizing proteins that share a conserved FH2 domain but their overall domain architecture differs dramatically between opisthokonts (metazoans and fungi) and plants. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of formins in most eukaryotic kingdoms, aiming to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario that may have produced the current diversity of domain combinations with focus on the origin of the angiosperm formin architectures. Results The Rho GTPase-binding domain (GBD/FH3) reported from opisthokont and Dictyostelium formins was found in all lineages except plants, suggesting its ancestral character. Instead, mosses and vascular plants possess the two formin classes known from angiosperms: membrane-anchored Class I formins and Class II formins carrying a PTEN-like domain. PTEN-related domains were found also in stramenopile formins, where they have been probably acquired independently rather than by horizontal transfer, following a burst of domain rearrangements in the chromalveolate lineage. A novel RhoGAP-related domain was identified in some algal, moss and lycophyte (but not angiosperm) formins that define a specific branch (Class III) of the formin family. Conclusion We propose a scenario where formins underwent multiple domain rearrangements in several eukaryotic lineages, especially plants and chromalveolates. In plants this replaced GBD/FH3 by a probably inactive RhoGAP-like domain, preserving a formin-mediated association between (membrane-anchored) Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton. Subsequent amplification of formin genes, possibly coincident with the expansion of plants to dry land, was followed by acquisition of alternative membrane attachment mechanisms present in extant Class I and Class II formins, allowing later loss of the RhoGAP-like domain-containing formins in angiosperms. PMID:18430232

  8. Protein export by the mycobacterial SecA2 system is determined by the preprotein mature domain.

    PubMed

    Feltcher, Meghan E; Gibbons, Henry S; Ligon, Lauren S; Braunstein, Miriam

    2013-02-01

    At the core of the bacterial general secretion (Sec) pathway is the SecA ATPase, which powers translocation of unfolded preproteins containing Sec signal sequences through the SecYEG membrane channel. Mycobacteria have two nonredundant SecA homologs: SecA1 and SecA2. While the essential SecA1 handles "housekeeping" export, the nonessential SecA2 exports a subset of proteins and is required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence. Currently, it is not understood how SecA2 contributes to Sec export in mycobacteria. In this study, we focused on identifying the features of two SecA2 substrates that target them to SecA2 for export, the Ms1704 and Ms1712 lipoproteins of the model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the mature domains of Ms1704 and Ms1712, not the N-terminal signal sequences, confer SecA2-dependent export. We also demonstrated that the lipid modification and the extreme N terminus of the mature protein do not impart the requirement for SecA2 in export. We further showed that the Ms1704 mature domain can be efficiently exported by the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Because the Tat system exports only folded proteins, this result implies that SecA2 substrates can fold in the cytoplasm and suggests a putative role of SecA2 in enabling export of such proteins. Thus, the mycobacterial SecA2 system may represent another way that bacteria solve the problem of exporting proteins that can fold in the cytoplasm.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  10. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of hcp domains in compressed iron.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-06-12

    In our previous work, we have pointed out that the shock-induced phase transition in iron occurs with the help of interface energy which reduces the potential barrier between two phases. Here, through studying the nucleation and growth mechanisms of hcp domains in compressed iron, we find that the flatted-octahedral-structure (FOS) is the primary structural unit of the embryo nucleus and phase interface of hcp domains, and the interfacial energy is reduced via formation of FOSs. The phase transition process can be described by the following four stages: (i) Some atoms deviate from their equilibrium positions with the aid of thermal fluctuations to form FOSs with two different deformation directions in the local region; (ii) FOSs with different deformation directions aggregate to form a thin stratified structure like twin-crystal configuration; (iii) The thin stratified structure undergoes a relative slip to form the new hcp phase; (iv) The hcp phase domain grows up through the formation of new FOSs along the phase boundary. In addition, through comparing the time evolution curves of initial single phase domain, we find that the growth rate of single phase domain depends on the loading way and its occurrence time.

  11. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  12. Mechanistic investigation of domain specific unfolding of human serum albumin and the effect of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sen, Pratik

    2013-11-01

    This study is devoted to understand the unfolding mechanism of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), in absence and presence of the sucrose by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain specific marker molecules and is further being substantiated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In water, the domain III of HSA found to unfold first followed by domains I and II as the concentration of GnHCl is increased in the medium. The sequential unfolding behavior of different domains of HSA remains same in presence of sucrose; however, a higher GnHCl concentration is required for unfolding, suggesting stabilizing effect of sucrose on HSA. Domain I is found to be most stabilized by sucrose. The stabilization of domain II is somewhat similar to domain I, but the effect of sucrose on domain III is found to be very small. MD simulation also predicted a similar behavior of sucrose on HSA. The stabilizing effect of sucrose is explained in terms of the entrapment of water molecules in between HSA surface and sucrose layer as well as direct interaction between HSA and sucrose.

  13. Mechanistic investigation of domain specific unfolding of human serum albumin and the effect of sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sen, Pratik

    2013-01-01

    This study is devoted to understand the unfolding mechanism of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), in absence and presence of the sucrose by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain specific marker molecules and is further being substantiated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In water, the domain III of HSA found to unfold first followed by domains I and II as the concentration of GnHCl is increased in the medium. The sequential unfolding behavior of different domains of HSA remains same in presence of sucrose; however, a higher GnHCl concentration is required for unfolding, suggesting stabilizing effect of sucrose on HSA. Domain I is found to be most stabilized by sucrose. The stabilization of domain II is somewhat similar to domain I, but the effect of sucrose on domain III is found to be very small. MD simulation also predicted a similar behavior of sucrose on HSA. The stabilizing effect of sucrose is explained in terms of the entrapment of water molecules in between HSA surface and sucrose layer as well as direct interaction between HSA and sucrose. PMID:24038622

  14. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  15. Soluble CuA domain of cyanobacterial cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Paumann, Martina; Lubura, Borjana; Regelsberger, Günther; Feichtinger, Markus; Köllensberger, Gunda; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

    2004-03-12

    The genomes of several cyanobacteria show the existence of gene clusters encoding subunits I, II, and III of aa(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase. The enzyme occurs on both plasma and thylakoid membranes of these oxygenic phototrophic prokaryotes. Here we report the expression and purification of a truncated subunit II copper A (Cu(A)) domain (i.e. the electron entry and donor binding site) of cytochrome c oxidase from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 in high yield. The water-soluble purple redox-active bimetallic center displays a relatively low standard reduction potential of 216 mV. Its absorption spectrum at pH 7 is similar to that of other soluble fragments from aa(3)-type oxidases, but the insensitivity of both absorbance and circular dichroism spectra to pH suggests that it is less exposed to the aqueous milieu compared with other Cu(A) domains. Oxidation of horse heart cytochrome c by the bimetallic center follows monophasic kinetics. At pH 7 and low ionic strength the bimolecular rate constant is (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(4) m-1 s(-1), and the rates decrease upon the increase of ionic strength. Sequence alignment and modeling of cyanobacterial Cu(A) domains show several peculiarities such as: (i) a large insertion located between the second transmembrane region and the putative hydrophobic cytochrome c docking site, (ii) the lack of acidic residues shown to be important in the interaction between cytochrome c and Paracoccus Cu(A) domain, and (iii) an extended C terminus similar to Escherichia coli ubiquinol oxidase.

  16. Localization of resistive domains in inhomogeneous superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of resistive domains due to the Joule heating in inhomogeneous superconductors with transport currents are studied. The equilibrium of a domain at an inhomogeneity of arbitrary type and with dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the domain is investigated. It is shown that resistive domains can become localized at inhomogeneities. The temperature distribution in a domain and the current--voltage characteristic of the domain are determined. The stability of localized domains is discussed. It is shown that such domains give rise to a hysteresis in the destruction (recovery) of the superconductivity by the transport current.

  17. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  18. Variable contribution of functional prey groups in diets reveals inter- and intraspecific differences in faecal concentrations of essential and non-essential elements in three sympatric avian aerial insectivores: a re-assessment of usefulness of bird faeces in metal biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Kamiński, Piotr; Karg, Jerzy; Baszyński, Jędrzej; Szady-Grad, Małgorzata; Koim-Puchowska, Beata; Klawe, Jacek J

    2015-06-15

    Aerial insectivores through their insect diet can contribute to biotransfer of elements across habitats. We investigate the relationship between dietary composition as expressed by the contributions of six functional invertebrate prey groups (primarily of agriculturally subsidised invertebrates characteristic of agricultural areas in temperate regions of Europe) and concentrations of essential (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Co) and non-essential (As, Cd, Pb) elements of environmental concern in the faeces of nestlings of three species of avian aerial insectivores - Common Swift Apus apus, Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica and House Martin Delichon urbicum - which breed sympatrically and use apparently similar resources of flying insect prey. There were significant differences between the species for 7 of the 12 elements (Ca, Zn, Cu, Co, As, Pb, Cd); these differences were attributable to the variable dietary composition, even though the concentrations of the elements varied enormously between the faecal samples from the individual species. Partial correlation analysis between the biomass (expressed in mg dry weight) of the six functional prey groups and faecal concentrations of elements showed the highest number of significant relationships for toxic metals (As, Pb and Cd). The results of the General Regression Model explaining faecal element concentrations revealed the different explanatory power of the effects of PCA (of six functional prey groups) dietary scores. A significant fit of GRM was obtained for 7 elements (Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, As, Pb, Cd) for Barn Swallows, 2 elements (Cu, As) for House Martins and 1 element (Mn) for Common Swifts. Overall, the results confirmed our predictions that the biomass of consumed coprophilous taxa and insects from crop habitats was positively correlated with the faecal concentrations of toxic elements. Unexpectedly, however, the faecal samples (primarily those of Common Swifts) that contained many oil-seed rape insect pests had lower

  19. Formin homology 2 domains occur in multiple contexts in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Novotný, Marian; Pícková, Denisa; Žárský, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Background Involvement of conservative molecular modules and cellular mechanisms in the widely diversified processes of eukaryotic cell morphogenesis leads to the intriguing question: how do similar proteins contribute to dissimilar morphogenetic outputs. Formins (FH2 proteins) play a central part in the control of actin organization and dynamics, providing a good example of evolutionarily versatile use of a conserved protein domain in the context of a variety of lineage-specific structural and signalling interactions. Results In order to identify possible plant-specific sequence features within the FH2 protein family, we performed a detailed analysis of angiosperm formin-related sequences available in public databases, with particular focus on the complete Arabidopsis genome and the nearly finished rice genome sequence. This has led to revision of the current annotation of half of the 22 Arabidopsis formin-related genes. Comparative analysis of the two plant genomes revealed a good conservation of the previously described two subfamilies of plant formins (Class I and Class II), as well as several subfamilies within them that appear to predate the separation of monocot and dicot plants. Moreover, a number of plant Class II formins share an additional conserved domain, related to the protein phosphatase/tensin/auxilin fold. However, considerable inter-species variability sets limits to generalization of any functional conclusions reached on a single species such as Arabidopsis. Conclusions The plant-specific domain context of the conserved FH2 domain, as well as plant-specific features of the domain itself, may reflect distinct functional requirements in plant cells. The variability of formin structures found in plants far exceeds that known from both fungi and metazoans, suggesting a possible contribution of FH2 proteins in the evolution of the plant type of multicellularity. PMID:15256004

  20. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  1. Sinh-domain complex integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotis, George-Drosos; Khanday, Farooq A.; Psychalinos, Costas

    2015-07-01

    The basic building blocks for performing complex signal processing in the Sinh-domain are introduced in this article. Attractive offered benefits are the capabilities for achieving resistorless realisations with electronic adjustment of their frequency characteristics, independent tuning of centre frequency and bandwidth and operating in a low-voltage environment. In addition, the inherent class-AB operation of Sinh-domain filters allows the handling of signals greater than the bias current, leading to a power saving. The aforementioned benefits have been evaluated through simulation results, using the Analog Design Environment of the Cadence software.

  2. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  3. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  4. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  5. Characterization of domain-peptide interaction interface: prediction of SH3 domain-mediated protein-protein interaction network in yeast by generic structure-based models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-04

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue-residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain-peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain-peptide interactions.

  6. Distinct domains of the limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) mediate discrete effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Kathie L; Pimenta, Aurea F; Burns, Mary M; Fairfull, Liane D; Cornuet, Pamela K; Zhang, Li; Levitt, Pat

    2003-11-01

    The limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein with three immunoglobulin (Ig) domains that can either enhance or inhibit neurite outgrowth depending upon the neuronal population examined. In the present study, we investigate the domains responsible for these activities. Domain deletion revealed that the N-terminal IgI domain is necessary and sufficient for the neurite-promoting activity observed in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in SCG neurons, which is mediated by heterophilic interactions, requires full-length LAMP, although selective inhibition of the second Ig domain, but not the first or third domains, prevented the inhibitory effect. This indicates that the IgII domain of LAMP harbors the neurite-inhibiting activity, but only in the context of the full-length configuration. Covasphere-binding analyses demonstrate IgI/IgI interactions, but no interaction between IgII and any other domain, consistent with the biological activities that each domain mediates. The data suggest that LAMP may serve as a bifunctional guidance molecule, with distinct structural domains contributing to the promotion and inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

  7. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of plant protein sequences. A domain homology between storage and lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Popineau, Y; Kader, J C

    1988-01-01

    Hydrophobic-cluster analysis was used to characterize a conserved domain located near the C-terminal amino acid sequence of wheat (Triticum aestivum) storage proteins. This domain was transformed into a linear template for a global search for similarities in over 5200 protein sequences. In addition to proteins that had already been found to exhibit homology to wheat storage proteins, a previously unreported homology was found with non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) and from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of various members of the present protein group clearly shows a typical domain structure where (i) variable and conserved domains are located along the sequence at precise positions, (ii) the conserved domains probably reflect a common ancestor, and (iii) the unique properties of a given protein (chain cut into subunits, repetitive domains, trypsin-inhibitor active site) are associated with the variable domains. PMID:3214430

  8. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Development in the Food Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Discusses problems of general interest in developmental psychology that can be successfully studied in the domain of food; these include (1) development of food likes and dislikes; (2) establishment of the edible/inedible distinction; (3) disgust and contagion; (4) transgenerational communication of preferences; and (5) transition to food…

  10. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Modular coenzyme specificity: a domain-swopped chimera of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C

    2009-11-01

    Domain-swopped chimeras of the glutamate dehydrogenases from Clostridium symbiosum (CsGDH) (NAD(+)-specific) and Escherichia coli (EcGDH) (NADP(+)-specific) have been produced, with the aim of testing the localization of determinants of coenzyme specificity. An active chimera consisting of the substrate-binding domain (Domain I) of CsGDH and the coenzyme-binding domain (Domain II) of EcGDH has been purified to homogeneity, and a thorough kinetic analysis has been carried out. Results indicate that selectivity for the phosphorylated coenzyme does indeed reside solely in Domain II; the chimera utilizes NAD(+) at 0.8% of the rate observed with NADP(+), similar to the 0.5% ratio for EcGDH. Positive cooperativity toward L-glutamate, characteristic of CsGDH, has been retained with Domain I. An unforeseen feature of this chimera, however, is that, although glutamate cooperativity occurs only at higher pH values in the parent CsGDH, the chimeric protein shows it over the full pH range explored. Also surprising is that the chimera is capable of catalysing severalfold higher reaction rates (V(max)) in both directions than either of the parent enzymes from which it is constructed.

  12. Impact of Domain Analysis on Reuse Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-06

    libraries with very different domain models . The semantic network knowledge representation system (differing in this respect from object-oriented approaches...2.1.4 Organizational Strategies ...... ............. 10 2.1.5 Role of Existing Systems ..... .............. ..11 2.2 Process Models for Domain Analysis...Acquire Domain Analysis Resources. ... 15 2.2.4 Develop the Domain Model ..... .............. .16 2.2.4.1 Identification of Domain Objects

  13. Structural mimicry in transcription regulation of human RNA polymerase II by the DNA helicase RECQL5

    PubMed Central

    Kassube, Susanne A.; Jinek, Martin; Fang, Jie; Tsutakawa, Susan; Nogales, Eva

    2013-01-01

    RECQL5 is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family of DNA helicases involved in DNA repair. RECQL5 interacts with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and inhibits transcription of protein–coding genes by an unknown mechanism. We show that RECQL5 contacts the Rpb1 jaw domain of Pol II at a site that overlaps with the binding site for the transcription elongation factor TFIIS. Our cryo–electron microscopy structure of elongating Pol II arrested in complex with RECQL5 shows that the RECQL5 helicase domain is positioned to sterically block elongation. The crystal structure of the RECQL5 KIX domain reveals similarities with TFIIS, and binding of RECQL5 to Pol II interferes with the ability of TFIIS to promote transcriptional read–through in vitro. Together, our findings reveal a dual mode of transcriptional repression by RECQL5 that includes structural mimicry of the Pol II–TFIIS interaction. PMID:23748380

  14. Magnetic properties and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented Fe-3%Si steel under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertov, O.; Schäfer, R.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of an applied compressive stress on the magnetic properties and domain structure in Goss-textured (110) [001] Fe-3%Si steel is studied. The magnetic domains and magnetization processes were observed by longitudinal Kerr microscopy at different levels of compressive stress. With stress increase the domain structure without applied field evolves from 180° slab-like domains along the surface-parallel easy axis first into stress pattern I, then into the checkerboard pattern and finally into stress pattern II, in which all internal domains are oriented along the transverse axes. The magnetization process under compression is realized by surface closure [001] domains that grow into the bulk at the expense of transverse domains. The domain evolution by these three stress patterns is not practically noticeable in hysteresis curves above 10 MPa—they change continuously with the same effective field being valid for curves from 10 to 67 MPa. The comparison with previous measurements under different stress/cutting angle combinations shows that for the prediction of a constricted hysteresis loop it is sufficient to consider the energy difference between surface-parallel and transverse easy axes neglecting details of the spatial organization of transverse domains.

  15. Expression, purification, and crystallography of the conserved methionine-rich domain of human signal recognition particle 54 kDa protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K.; Clemons, W. M.; Zwieb, C.; Black, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein SRP54 is an essential component of eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP). The methionine-rich M-domain (SRP54M or 54M) interacts with the SRP RNA and is also involved in the binding to signal peptides of secretory proteins during their targeting to cellular membranes. To gain insight into the molecular details of SRP-mediated protein targeting, we studied the human 54M polypeptide. The recombinant human protein was expressed successfully in Escherichia coli and was purified to homogeneity. Our studies determined the sites that were susceptible to limited proteolysis, with the goal to design smaller functional mutant derivatives that lacked nonessential amino acid residues from both termini. Of the four polypeptides produced by V8 protease or chymotrypsin, 54MM-2 was the shortest (120 residues; Mr = 13,584.8), but still contained the conserved amino acids suggested to associate with the signal peptide or the SRP RNA. 54MM-2 was cloned, expressed, purified to homogeneity, and was shown to bind human SRP RNA in the presence of protein SRP19, indicating that it was functional. Highly reproducible conditions for the crystallization of 54MM-2 were established. Examination of the crystals by X-ray diffraction showed an orthorhombic unit cell of dimensions a = 29.127 A, b = 63.693 A, and c = 129.601 A, in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with reflections extending to at least 2.0 A. PMID:10338025

  16. Maximum probability domains in crystals: the rock-salt structure.

    PubMed

    Causà, Mauro; Savin, Andreas

    2011-11-17

    The present paper studies MX crystals in rock-salt structure (M: Li, Na, K; X: F, Cl, Br, I). They are often described as being formed by ions. Pictures based on quantum mechanical calculations sustain and quantify it. The tools used are (i) the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, (ii) the Electron Localization Function, and (iii) the maximization of the probability to find in a spatial domain a number of electrons equal to that of the ion under consideration. The present paper shows that the images provided by these three different tools to analyze the quantum mechanical calculations yield, for these systems, very similar results, in the sense that the spatial domains and probability distributions are close. While results for the first two methods are already present in the literature, the last of the methods is applied for the first time to these systems, and details about the method of calculation and program are also given.

  17. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  18. Integrated structural model and membrane targeting mechanism of the human ESCRT-II complex

    PubMed Central

    Im, Young Jun; Hurley, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary ESCRT-II plays a pivotal role in receptor downregulation and multivesicular body biogenesis, and is conserved from yeast to humans. The crystal structures of two human ESCRT-II complex structures have been determined at 2.6 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. The complex has three lobes and contains one copy each of VPS22 and VPS36, and two copies of VPS25. The structure reveals a dynamic helical domain to which both the VPS22 and VPS36 subunits contribute, which connects the GLUE domain to the rest of the ESCRT-II core. Hydrodynamic analysis shows that intact ESCRT-II has a compact, closed conformation. ESCRT-II binds to the ESCRT-I VPS28 C-terminal domain subunit through a helix immediately C-terminal to the VPS36-GLUE domain. ESCRT-II is targeted to endosomal membranes by the lipid binding activities of both the Vps36 GLUE domain and the first helix of Vps22. These data provide a unifying structural and functional framework for the ESCRT-II complex. PMID:18539118

  19. Integrated structural model and membrane targeting mechanism of the human ESCRT-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Young Jun; Hurley, James H.

    2009-01-15

    ESCRT-II plays a pivotal role in receptor downregulation and multivesicular body biogenesis and is conserved from yeast to humans. The crystal structures of two human ESCRT-II complex structures have been determined at 2.6 and 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The complex has three lobes and contains one copy each of VPS22 and VPS36 and two copies of VPS25. The structure reveals a dynamic helical domain to which both the VPS22 and VPS36 subunits contribute that connects the GLUE domain to the rest of the ESCRT-II core. Hydrodynamic analysis shows that intact ESCRT-II has a compact, closed conformation. ESCRT-II binds to the ESCRT-I VPS28 C-terminal domain subunit through a helix immediately C-terminal to the VPS36-GLUE domain. ESCRT-II is targeted to endosomal membranes by the lipid-binding activities of both the Vps36 GLUE domain and the first helix of Vps22. These data provide a unifying structural and functional framework for the ESCRT-II complex.

  20. A Work Domain Analysis of Shipboard Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    environment. This work is part of ongoing research to evaluate the role of CWA in C2 system design. Résumé Le commandement et le contrôle (C2) à bord...l’application de l’Analyse du domaine de travail au commandement et au contrôle tactiques à bord des frégates de la classe Halifax de la Marine...d’un système de commandement et de contrôle . ii DREA TM 2001-212 This page intentionally left blank. DREA TM 2001-212 iii Executive summary

  1. Smooth Muscle Titin Zq Domain Interaction with the Smooth Muscle α-Actinin Central Rod*

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Simon, Alanna R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Felix, Augustine; Keller, Thomas C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells contain the actin filament-cross-linking protein α-actinin. In striated muscle Z-disks, α-actinin interacts with N-terminal domains of titin to provide a structural linkage crucial for the integrity of the sarcomere. We previously discovered a long titin isoform, originally smitin, hereafter sm-titin, in smooth muscle and demonstrated that native sm-titin interacts with C-terminal EF hand region and central rod R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat region sites in α-actinin. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA from human adult smooth muscles and cultured rat smooth muscle cells and Western blot analysis with a domain-specific antibody presented here revealed that sm-titin contains the titin gene-encoded Zq domain that may bind to the α-actinin R2-R3 central rod domain as well as Z-repeat domains that bind to the EF hand region. We investigated whether the sm-titin Zq domain binds to α-actinin R2 and R3 spectrin repeat-like domain loops that lie in proximity with two-fold symmetry on the surface of the central rod. Mutations in α-actinin R2 and R3 domain loop residues decreased interaction with expressed sm-titin Zq domain in glutathione S-transferase pull-down and solid phase binding assays. Alanine mutation of a region of the Zq domain with high propensity for α-helix formation decreased apparent Zq domain dimer formation and decreased Zq interaction with the α-actinin R2-R3 region in surface plasmon resonance assays. We present a model in which two sm-titin Zq domains interact with each other and with the two R2-R3 sites in the α-actinin central rod. PMID:18519573

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YFR041C/ERJ5 gene encoding a type I membrane protein with a J domain is required to preserve the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Famá, M. Carla; Raden, David; Zacchi, Nicolás; Lemos, Darío R.; Robinson, Anne S.; Silberstein, Susana

    2007-01-01

    YFR041C/ERJ5 was identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a gene regulated by the unfolded protein response pathway (UPR). The open reading frame of the gene has a J domain characteristic of the DnaJ chaperone family of proteins that regulate the activity of Hsp70 chaperones. We determined the expression and topology of Erj5p, a type I membrane protein with a J domain in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that colocalizes with Kar2p, the major Hsp70 in the yeast ER. We identified synthetic interactions of Δerj5 with mutations in genes involved in protein folding in the ER (kar2-159, Δscj1Δjem1) and in the induction of the unfolded protein response (Δire1). Loss of Erj5p in yeast cells with impaired ER protein folding capacity increased sensitivity to agents that cause ER stress. We identified the ERJ5 mRNA and confirmed that agents that promote accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER regulate its abundance. We found that loss of the non-essential ERJ5 gene leads to a constitutively induced UPR, indicating that ERJ5 is required for maintenance of an optimal folding environment in the yeast ER. PMID:17157937

  3. A single domain antibody fragment that recognizes the adaptor ASC defines the role of ASC domains in inflammasome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Lu, Alvin; Chen, Jeff W.; Ruan, Jianbin; Tang, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells assemble inflammasomes in response to infection or cell damage; cytosolic sensors activate pro–caspase-1, indirectly for the most part, via the adaptors ASC and NLRC4. This leads to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and pyroptosis. To explore complex formation under physiological conditions, we generated an alpaca single domain antibody, VHHASC, which specifically recognizes the CARD of human ASC via its type II interface. VHHASC not only impairs ASCCARD interactions in vitro, but also inhibits inflammasome activation in response to NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP triggers when expressed in living cells, highlighting a role of ASC in all three types of inflammasomes. VHHASC leaves the Pyrin domain of ASC functional and stabilizes a filamentous intermediate of inflammasome activation. Incorporation of VHHASC-EGFP into these structures allowed the visualization of endogenous ASCPYD filaments for the first time. These data revealed that cross-linking of ASCPYD filaments via ASCCARD mediates the assembly of ASC foci. PMID:27069117

  4. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  5. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  6. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  7. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  8. Domain Processes in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-14

    WALLS Electron holography utilizing the wave characteristics of electrons. Through a sharp emission tip, the emitted electron beam is largely coherent, or...mirostructural modulation at 25% doping. The strongly first order ferroelectric phase transition in PbTiO3 is also gradually changed to a nearly second...a new domain configuraton. 13 The end-member of the PZT solid solution, PbTiO3 , has the highest transition temperature (Tc = 490 °C) and the largest

  9. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations.

  10. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.

  11. Cross-Domain Network Fault Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    digest, or simply digest, for Gi. • Gj = ( n ] i6=j f(Gi) ) ] Gj , where j is a domain performing cross-domain inference and ] is a model-specific union... Gj is the cross-domain model integrating the digests from all the other domains with domain j’s undigested graph. Now, domain j may use an existing...algorithm such as SHRINK to perform inference over Gj . Before a practical graph digest design can be implemented, interoperability standards must be

  12. Electroporation of the photosynthetic membrane: structural changes in protein and lipid-protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Y; Rotenberg, M; Korenstein, R

    1994-01-01

    A biological membrane undergoes a reversible permeability increase through structural changes in the lipid domain when exposed to high external electric fields. The present study shows the occurrence of electric field-induced changes in the conductance of the proton channel of the H(+)-ATPase as well as electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domain of photosystem (PS) II in the photosynthetic membrane. The study was carried out by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (EPL), which originates from charge recombination in the protein complexes of PS I and II of photosynthetic vesicles. We established that a small fraction of the total electric field-induced conductance change was abolished by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the H(+)-ATPase. This reversible electric field-induced conductance change has characteristics of a small channel and possesses a lifetime < or = 1 ms. To detect electric field-induced changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II, we examined the effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on EPL. Higher values of EPL were observed from vesicles that were exposed in the presence of PLA2 to an electroporating electric field than to a nonelectroporating electric field. The effect of the electroporating field was a long-lived one, lasting for a period > or = 2 min. This effect was attributed to long-lived electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II. PMID:7811916

  13. A novel domain-by-domain survivable mechanism in multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xingwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Chongshan; Li, Hongming; Wang, Hongpeng; Liu, Xin

    2009-03-01

    In multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical networks, the inter-domain routing is a challenge since each single-domain cannot view the full network topology. At the same time, survivability is also an important issue in optical networks since the failures of fiber links or network nodes may lead to a lot of traffic being blocked. In this paper, we study the survivability in multi-domain WDM optical networks, and propose a new survivable mechanism called load balanced domain-by-domain routing (LBDDR). In LBDDR, in order to obtain the efficient inter-domain survivable routes, we present the domain-by-domain routing (DDR) method which can find the intra-domain sub-working path and sub-backup path in each single-domain to form the inter-domain working path and backup path for each demand. In order to reduce the blocking probability, we present the load balanced routing method which can encourage the traffic to be uniformly distributed on the links with more free wavelengths. Simulation results show that, compared with conventional mechanism, LBDDR can obtain better performances.

  14. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  15. A universal characteristic of type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gopalswamy, N.; MacDowall, R.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a study on the spectral properties of interplanetary type II radio bursts observed by the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We investigated the relative bandwidth of the type II radio bursts observed by WAVES from 1997 up to 2003. We obtained three sets of events, based on the frequency domain of occurrence: 109 events in the low-frequency domain (30 KHz to 1000 kHz, detected by the RAD1 receiver), 216 events in the high-frequency domain (1-14 MHz, observed by the RAD2 receiver), and 73 events that spanned both domains (RAD1 and RAD2). Statistical results show that the average bandwidth-to-frequency ratio (BFR) was 0.28 ± 0.15, 0.26 ± 0.16, and 0.32 ± 0.15 for RAD1, RAD2, and RAD1 + RAD2, respectively. We compared our results with those obtained for ISEE-3 type II bursts and found a difference in the average BFR, which seems to be due to a selection effect. The BFR of the WAVES type II bursts is similar to that of metric type II bursts reported in published works. This suggests that the BFR is a universal characteristic, irrespective of the spectral domain. Finally, we also studied the BFR evolution with heliocentric distance using white-light observation of the associated coronal mass ejections. We found that the BFR remains roughly constant in the SOHO/LASCO field of view (i.e., from 2.1 to 32 solar radii), while the bandwidth itself decreases.

  16. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group II Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Taylor, Sean D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-04-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  17. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-02-15

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species.

  18. Acetylcholine Receptor Organization in Membrane Domains in Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, Joachim; Schreiter, Christoph; Segura, Jean-Manuel; Vogel, Horst; Hovius, Ruud

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in muscle fibers are densely packed in the postsynaptic region at the neuromuscular junction. Rapsyn plays a central role in directing and clustering nAChR during cellular differentiation and neuromuscular junction formation; however, it has not been demonstrated whether rapsyn is the only cause of receptor immobilization. Here, we used single-molecule tracking methods to investigate nAChR mobility in plasma membranes of myoblast cells during their differentiation to myotubes in the presence and absence of rapsyn. We found that in myoblasts the majority of nAChR were immobile and that ∼20% of the receptors showed restricted diffusion in small domains of ∼50 nm. In myoblasts devoid of rapsyn, the fraction of mobile nAChR was considerably increased, accompanied by a 3-fold decrease in the immobile population of nAChR with respect to rapsyn-expressing cells. Half of the mobile receptors were confined to domains of ∼120 nm. Measurements performed in heterologously transfected HEK cells confirmed the direct immobilization of nAChR by rapsyn. However, irrespective of the presence of rapsyn, about one-third of nAChR were confined in 300-nm domains. Our results show (i) that rapsyn efficiently immobilizes nAChR independently of other postsynaptic scaffold components; (ii) nAChR is constrained in confined membrane domains independently of rapsyn; and (iii) in the presence of rapsyn, the size of these domains is strongly reduced. PMID:20978122

  19. Structural features and domain organization of huntingtin fibrils.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Charles W; Isas, J Mario; Fischer, Torsten; Patterson, Paul H; Langen, Ralf

    2012-09-14

    Misfolding and aggregation of huntingtin is one of the hallmarks of Huntington disease, but the overall structure of these aggregates and the mechanisms by which huntingtin misfolds remain poorly understood. Here we used site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study the structural features of huntingtin exon 1 (HDx1) containing 46 glutamine residues in its polyglutamine (polyQ) region. Despite some residual structuring in the N terminus, we find that soluble HDx1 is highly dynamic. Upon aggregation, the polyQ domain becomes strongly immobilized indicating significant tertiary or quaternary packing interactions. Analysis of spin-spin interactions does not show the close contact between same residues that is characteristic of the parallel, in-register structure commonly found in amyloids. Nevertheless, the same residues are still within 20 Å of each other, suggesting that polyQ domains from different molecules come into proximity in the fibrils. The N terminus has previously been found to take up a helical structure in fibrils. We find that this domain not only becomes structured, but that it also engages in tertiary or quaternary packing interactions. The existence of spin-spin interactions in this region suggests that such contacts could be made between N-terminal domains from different molecules. In contrast, the C-terminal domain is dynamic, contains polyproline II structure, and lacks pronounced packing interactions. This region must be facing away from the core of the fibrils. Collectively, these data provide new constraints for building structural models of HDx1 fibrils.

  20. Antigenicity of peptides comprising the immunosuppressive domain of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To achieve persistent infection of the host, viruses often subvert or suppress host immunity through mechanisms that are not entirely understood. The envelope glycoprotein of several retroviruses is thought to possess potent immunosuppressive activity, mapped to a 17-amino acid residue conserved domain. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this immunosuppressive domain can inhibit lymphocyte activation, whereas mutation of key domain residues can increase the lymphocyte response to linked antigenic epitopes. Using three T cell receptors (TCRs) of defined specificity, we examine the effect of the immunosuppressive domain on the T cell response to their respective antigenic peptides. We find that fusion of a T cell epitope to the immunosuppressive domain can greatly modulate its potency. However, the effects heavily depend on the particular combination of TCR and peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC II), and are mimicked by sequence-scrambled peptides of similar length, suggesting they operate at the level of TCR-pMHC interaction. These results offer an alternative explanation for the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes comprising the putative immunosuppressive domain, which is more consistent with an effect on peptide antigenicity than true immunosuppressive activity. PMID:28111636

  1. Copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of the N-terminal nonapeptide fragment of amyloid-β and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Grenács, Ágnes; Sóvágó, Imre

    2014-10-01

    Copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of the nonapeptide fragment of amyloid-β Aβ(1-9) (NH2-DAEFRHDSG-NH2) and its two derivatives: NH2-DAAAAHAAA-NH2 and NH2-DAAAAAHAA-NH2 have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible and CD spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the primary role of the amino terminus of peptides in copper(II) and nickel(II) binding. The formation of dinuclear complexes was also possible in the copper(II) containing systems but only the first six amino acids from the amino terminus were involved in metal binding in the physiologically relevant pH range. The coordination chemistry of the two alanine mutated peptides is almost the same as that of the native nonapeptide, but the thermodynamic stability of the copper(II) complexes of the mutants is significantly reduced. This difference probably comes from the secondary interactions of the polar side chains of Asp, Glu, Ser and Arg residues present in the native peptide. Moreover, this difference reveals that the amino acid sequence of the N-terminal domains of amyloid peptides is especially well suited for the complexation with copper(II) ions.

  2. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  3. Generic domain models in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  4. Detection of dsRNA-binding domains in RNA helicase A and Drosophila maleless: implications for monomeric RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, T J; Thompson, J D

    1994-01-01

    Searches with dsRNA-binding domain profiles detected two copies of the domain in each of RNA helicase A, Drosophila maleless and C. elegans ORF T20G5-11 (of unknown function). RNA helicase A is unusual in being one of the few characterised DEAD/DExH helicases that are active as monomers. Other monomeric DEAD/DExH RNA helicases (p68, NPH-II) have domains that match another RNA-binding motif, the RGG repeat. The DEAD/DExH domain appears to be insufficient on its own to promote helicase activity and additional RNA-binding capacity must be supplied either as domains adjacent to the DEAD/DExH-box or by bound partners as in the eIF-4AB dimer. The presence or absence of extra RNA-binding domains should allow classification of DEAD/DExH proteins as monomeric or multimeric helicases. Images PMID:8041617

  5. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  6. Rapid Activation of Bone Morphogenic Protein 9 by Receptor-mediated Displacement of Pro-domains*

    PubMed Central

    Kienast, Yvonne; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Thier, Martina; de Wouters, Mariana; Haas, Alexander; Lehmann, Christian; Brand, Verena; Bernicke, Dirk; Honold, Konrad; Lorenz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    By non-covalent association after proteolytic cleavage, the pro-domains modulate the activities of the mature growth factor domains across the transforming growth factor-β family. In the case of bone morphogenic protein 9 (BMP9), however, the pro-domains do not inhibit the bioactivity of the growth factor, and the BMP9·pro-domain complexes have equivalent biological activities as the BMP9 mature ligand dimers. By using real-time surface plasmon resonance, we could demonstrate that either binding of pro-domain-complexed BMP9 to type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), type II receptors, co-receptor endoglin, or to mature BMP9 domain targeting antibodies leads to immediate and complete displacement of the pro-domains from the complex. Vice versa, pro-domain binding by an anti-pro-domain antibody results in release of the mature BMP9 growth factor. Based on these findings, we adjusted ELISA assays to measure the protein levels of different BMP9 variants. Although mature BMP9 and inactive precursor BMP9 protein were directly detectable by ELISA, BMP9·pro-domain complex could only be measured indirectly as dissociated fragments due to displacement of mature growth factor and pro-domains after antibody binding. Our studies provide a model in which BMP9 can be readily activated upon getting into contact with its receptors. This increases the understanding of the underlying biology of BMP9 activation and also provides guidance for ELISA development for the detection of circulating BMP9 variants. PMID:26677222

  7. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  8. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  9. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  10. Pectin Homogalacturonans: Nanostructural Characterization of Methylesterified Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functionality of pectic hydrocolloids is largely dependent on the two major domains commonly found in their homogalacturonan (HG) regions, i.e., methylester protected domains (MPDs)and non methylesterified domains (NMDs). MPDs can participate in hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions but unli...

  11. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  12. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  13. A Scaffoldin of the Bacteroides cellulosolvens Cellulosome That Contains 11 Type II Cohesins

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-You; Bayer, Edward A.; Steiner, David; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael

    2000-01-01

    A cellulosomal scaffoldin gene, termed cipBc, was identified and sequenced from the mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobe Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The gene encodes a 2,292-residue polypeptide (excluding the signal sequence) with a calculated molecular weight of 242,437. CipBc contains an N-terminal signal peptide, 11 type II cohesin domains, an internal family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD), and a C-terminal dockerin domain. Its CBD belongs to family IIIb, like that of CipV from Acetivibrio cellulolyticus but unlike the family IIIa CBDs of other clostridial scaffoldins. In contrast to all other scaffoldins thus far described, CipBc lacks a hydrophilic domain or domain X of unknown function. The singularity of CipBc, however, lies in its numerous type II cohesin domains, all of which are very similar in sequence. One of the latter cohesin domains was expressed, and the expressed protein interacted selectively with cellulosomal enzymes, one of which was identified as a family 48 glycosyl hydrolase on the basis of partial sequence alignment. By definition, the dockerins, carried by the cellulosomal enzymes of this species, would be considered to be type II. This is the first example of authentic type II cohesins that are confirmed components of a cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit rather than a cell surface anchoring component. The results attest to the emerging diversity of cellulosomes and their component sequences in nature. PMID:10940036

  14. Immunological Functions of the Membrane Proximal Region of MHC Class II Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harton, Jonathan; Jin, Lei; Hahn, Amy; Drake, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules present exogenously derived antigen peptides to CD4 T cells, driving activation of naïve T cells and supporting CD4-driven immune functions. However, MHC class II molecules are not inert protein pedestals that simply bind and present peptides. These molecules also serve as multi-functional signaling molecules delivering activation, differentiation, or death signals (or a combination of these) to B cells, macrophages, as well as MHC class II-expressing T cells and tumor cells. Although multiple proteins are known to associate with MHC class II, interaction with STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and CD79 is essential for signaling. In addition, alternative transmembrane domain pairing between class II α and β chains influences association with membrane lipid sub-domains, impacting both signaling and antigen presentation. In contrast to the membrane-distal region of the class II molecule responsible for peptide binding and T-cell receptor engagement, the membrane-proximal region (composed of the connecting peptide, transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic tail) mediates these “non-traditional” class II functions. Here, we review the literature on the function of the membrane-proximal region of the MHC class II molecule and discuss the impact of this aspect of class II immunobiology on immune regulation and human disease. PMID:27006762

  15. Combined Final Report for Colony II Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Laxmikant; Jones, Terry; Moreira, Jose

    2013-10-23

    (This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

  16. [Extraction, purification and identification of type II collagen from Agkistrodon acutus].

    PubMed

    Gu, Heng-Cun; Hu, Jin-Bo; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Fan, Yong-Sheng; Ding, Xing-Hong

    2013-11-01

    The object of the research was to extract, purify and identify the type II collagen of Agkistrodon acutus. Type II collagen of A. acutus was extracted by enzyme decomposition method, and purified by ion exchange column chromatography. It was characterized by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. The results showed that the size of C II was about 130 kDa. It absorbed at 223 nm. IR spectrum obtained showed that the triple helical domains of amino-acid sequences were characterized by the repetition of triplets Gly-X-Y. The MS spectrum graphically stated that C II extracted from cow and A. acutus have the similar peptides. The C II of A. acutus was obtained by extraction and purification. Appraisal analysis by SDS-PAGE, UV, IR and MS, C II of A. acutus was consistent with the standard C II of cow. It was proved that the extracted protein was C II.

  17. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  18. Time domain backcalculation of pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kunihito; Nishizawa, Tatsuo; Kikuta, Yukio

    1998-03-01

    Falling weight deflectometor (FWD) has been frequently used to evaluate structural integrity of pavement. The device applies an impulsive force on the surface of pavement and measure surface deflections at several locations including the place of loading. Although the test is dynamic, the data is regarded as pseudo-static data. According to common practice, using the peak load and the corresponding peak deflections, layer moduli are estimated in a static domain such that the measured peak deflections coincide with the corresponding calculated deflections based on the assumption of the theory of linear elasticity. This paper presents a method to back calculate layer moduli in dynamic domain such that the histories of both measured and calculated responses corresponding to the impulsive force coincide. Pavement is modeled by an axisymmetric linear elastic system. FEM is utilized coupled with Ritz vector to reduce a matrix and thus to improve computational efficiency. The backcalculation algorithm used is the Gauss-Newton method coupled with a truncated singular value decomposition.

  19. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  20. Crystal Structure of Heparinase II from Pedobacter Heparinus and its Complex with a Disaccharide Product

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya,D.; Tocilj, A.; Li, Y.; Myette, J.; Venkatarman, G.; Sasisekharan, R.; Cygler, M.

    2006-01-01

    Heparinase II depolymerizes heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans, yielding unsaturated oligosaccharide products through an elimination degradation mechanism. This enzyme cleaves the oligosaccharide chain on the nonreducing end of either glucuronic or iduronic acid, sharing this characteristic with a chondroitin ABC lyase. We have determined the first structure of a heparin-degrading lyase, that of heparinase II from Pedobacter heparinus (formerly Flavobacterium heparinum), in a ligand-free state at 2.15Angstroms resolution and in complex with a disaccharide product of heparin degradation at 2.30Angstroms resolution. The protein is composed of three domains: an N-terminal {alpha}-helical domain, a central two-layered {beta}-sheet domain, and a C-terminal domain forming a two-layered {beta}-sheet. Heparinase II shows overall structural similarities to the polysaccharide lyase family 8 (PL8) enzymes chondroitin AC lyase and hyaluronate lyase. In contrast to PL8 enzymes, however, heparinase II forms stable dimers, with the two active sites formed independently within each monomer. The structure of the N-terminal domain of heparinase II is also similar to that of alginate lyases from the PL5 family. A Zn2+ ion is bound within the central domain and plays an essential structural role in the stabilization of a loop forming one wall of the substrate-binding site. The disaccharide binds in a long, deep canyon formed at the top of the N-terminal domain and by loops extending from the central domain. Based on structural comparison with the lyases from the PL5 and PL8 families having bound substrates or products, the disaccharide found in heparinase II occupies the '+1' and '+2' subsites. The structure of the enzyme-product complex, combined with data from previously characterized mutations, allows us to propose a putative chemical mechanism of heparin and heparan-sulfate degradation.

  1. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  2. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  3. Investigation of magnetic domains in Ni Mn Ga alloys with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y.; Heczko, O.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.; Lindroos, V. K.

    2005-10-01

    The magnetic domains of martensite have been investigated with a scanning electron microscope in three Ni-Mn-Ga alloys with five-layered, seven-layered and non-layered (T) martensite structure. Type I magnetic contrast provides an overview of the domain pattern. This contrast arises from the stray field of the specimen and it is observed in a secondary-electron image. The type II magnetic contrast of a backscattered electron image gives the detailed magnetic microstructure together with the crystal morphology. A stripe domain pattern is formed in all the alloys when there is one dominant martensite variant in the sample. The second minor variant might be distorted due to interaction with the magnetic domain structure of the major variant. The mechanism of the deformation is not entirely clear and a tentative explanation for this deformation is suggested.

  4. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  5. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  6. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  7. Strengths and limitations of formal ontologies in the biomedical domain

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Stefan; Stenzhorn, Holger; Boeker, Martin; Smith, Barry

    2010-01-01

    We propose a typology of representational artifacts for health care and life sciences domains and associate this typology with different kinds of formal ontology and logic, drawing conclusions as to the strengths and limitations for ontology of different kinds of logical resources, with a focus on description logics. The four types of domain representation we consider are: (i) lexico-semantic representation, (ii) representation of types of entities, (iii) representations of background knowledge, and (iv) representation of individuals. We advocate a clear distinction of the four kinds of representation in order to provide a more rational basis for using of ontologies and related artifacts to advance integration of data and interoperability of associated reasoning systems. We highlight the fact that only a minor portion of scientifically relevant facts in a domain such as biomedicine can be adequately represented by formal ontologies when the latter are conceived as representations of entity types. In particular, the attempt to encode default or probabilistic knowledge using ontologies so conceived is prone to produce unintended, erroneous models. PMID:20640238

  8. The use of signal peptide domains as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Kovjazin, Riva; Carmon, Lior

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide (SP) domains have a common motif but also sequence specific features. This knowledge was mainly ignored by immunologists who considered SP as generic, short-lived, targeting sequences. Consequently, while SP-derived MHC class I, class II and HLA-E epitopes have been isolated, their use as antigen-specific vaccine candidates (VCs) was mostly neglected. Recently we demonstrated the rational of selecting entire SP domains as multi-epitope long peptide VCs based on their high T and B-cell epitope densities. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical results demonstrating the various advantages of human SP domain VCs derived from both bacterial and tumor antigens. Such vaccine design provides for a straightforward, yet unique immunotherapeutic means of generating robust, non-toxic, diversified, combined antigen-specific CD4+/CD8+ T/B-cell immunity, irrespective of patient HLA repertoire also in disease associated transporter-associated with antigen processing (TAP) deficiencies. Subsequent clinical trials will further assess the full potential of this approach.

  9. C-S bond cleavage by a polyketide synthase domain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Liu, Tao; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Leinamycin (LNM) is a sulfur-containing antitumor antibiotic featuring an unusual 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety that is spiro-fused to a thiazole-containing 18-membered lactam ring. The 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety is essential for LNM’s antitumor activity, by virtue of its ability to generate an episulfonium ion intermediate capable of alkylating DNA. We have previously cloned and sequenced the lnm gene cluster from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. In vivo and in vitro characterizations of the LNM biosynthetic machinery have since established that: (i) the 18-membered macrolactam backbone is synthesized by LnmP, LnmQ, LnmJ, LnmI, and LnmG, (ii) the alkyl branch at C-3 of LNM is installed by LnmK, LnmL, LnmM, and LnmF, and (iii) leinamycin E1 (LNM E1), bearing a thiol moiety at C-3, is the nascent product of the LNM hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS). Sulfur incorporation at C-3 of LNM E1, however, has not been addressed. Here we report that: (i) the bioinformatics analysis reveals a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent domain, we termed cysteine lyase (SH) domain (LnmJ-SH), within PKS module-8 of LnmJ; (ii) the LnmJ-SH domain catalyzes C-S bond cleavage by using l-cysteine and l-cysteine S-modified analogs as substrates through a PLP-dependent β-elimination reaction, establishing l-cysteine as the origin of sulfur at C-3 of LNM; and (iii) the LnmJ-SH domain, sharing no sequence homology with any other enzymes catalyzing C-S bond cleavage, represents a new family of PKS domains that expands the chemistry and enzymology of PKSs and might be exploited to incorporate sulfur into polyketide natural products by PKS engineering. PMID:26240335

  10. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  11. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  12. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  13. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  14. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  15. Evidence for a role for the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Shc in interleukin 2 signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, K S; Igras, V; Shoelson, S E; Fesik, S W; Burakoff, S J

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation via the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2 (IL-2) leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc, the interaction of Shc with Grb2, and the Ras GTP/GDP exchange factor, mSOS. Shc also coprecipitates with the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), and therefore, may link IL-2R to Ras activation. We have further characterized the Shc-IL-2R interaction and have made the following observations. (i) Among the two phosphotyrosine-interaction domains present in Shc, the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, rather than its SH2 domain, interacts with the tyrosine-phosphorylated IL-2R beta chain. Moreover, the Shc-PTB domain binds a phosphopeptide derived from the IL-2R beta chain (corresponding to residues surrounding Y338, SCFTNQGpYFF) with high affinity. (ii) In vivo, mutant IL-2R beta chains lacking the acidic region of IL-2Rbeta (which contains Y338) fail to phosphorylate Shc. Furthermore, when wild type or mutant Shc proteins that lack the PTB domain were expressed in the IL-2-dependent CTLL-20 cell line, an intact Shc-PTB domain was required for Shc phosphorylation by the IL-2R, which provides further support for a Shc-PTB-IL-2R interaction in vivo. (iii) PTB and SH2 domains of Shc associate with different proteins in IL-2- and T-cell-receptor-stimulated lysates, suggesting that Shc, through the concurrent use of its two different phosphotyrosine-binding domains, could assemble multiple protein complexes. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest that the PTB domain of Shc interacts with Y338 of the IL-2R and provide evidence for a functional role for the Shc-PTB domain in IL-2 signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643566

  16. Domain structure and function of matrix metalloprotease 23 (MMP23): role in potassium channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Galea, Charles A; Nguyen, Hai M; George Chandy, K; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-04-01

    MMP23 is a member of the matrix metalloprotease family of zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which are involved in a wide variety of cellular functions. Its catalytic domain displays a high degree of structural homology with those of other metalloproteases, but its atypical domain architecture suggests that it may possess unique functional properties. The N-terminal MMP23 pro-domain contains a type-II transmembrane domain that anchors the protein to the plasma membrane and lacks the cysteine-switch motif that is required to maintain other MMPs in a latent state during passage to the cell surface. Instead of the C-terminal hemopexin domain common to other MMPs, MMP23 contains a small toxin-like domain (TxD) and an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule (IgCAM) domain. The MMP23 pro-domain can trap Kv1.3 but not closely-related Kv1.2 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing their passage to the cell surface, while the TxD can bind to the channel pore and block the passage of potassium ions. The MMP23 C-terminal IgCAM domain displays some similarity to Ig-like C2-type domains found in IgCAMs of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which are known to mediate protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. MMP23 and Kv1.3 are co-expressed in a variety of tissues and together are implicated in diseases including cancer and inflammatory disorders. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of action of this unique member of the MMP family.

  17. Structural and functional characteristics of plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) family.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shazia; Aziz, Ejaz; Akhtar, Wasim; Ilyas, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-02-09

    Plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) proteins are one of the promising defensive proteins that helped the plants to resist against different kinds of unfavorable conditions. Different roles for PI-II have been suggested such as regulation of endogenous proteases, modulation of plant growth and developmental processes and mediating stress responses. The basic knowledge on genetic and molecular diversity of these proteins has provided significant insight into their gene structure and evolutionary relationships in various members of this family. Phylogenetic comparisons of these family genes in different plants suggested that the high rate of retention of gene duplication and inhibitory domain multiplication may have resulted in the expansion and functional diversification of these proteins. Currently, a large number of transgenic plants expressing PI-II genes are being developed for enhancing the defensive capabilities against insects, bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Much emphasis is yet to be given to exploit this ever expanding repertoire of genes for improving abiotic stress resistance in transgenic crops. This review presents an overview about the current knowledge on PI-II family genes, their multifunctional role in plant defense and physiology with their potential applications in biotechnology.

  18. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components T(X) that have similar P(T(X)) on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if P(Y∣T(X)) in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution P(T(X)∣Y) is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:28239433

  19. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components [Formula: see text] that have similar [Formula: see text] on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if [Formula: see text] in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution [Formula: see text] is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Intragenic suppressor mutations restore GTPase and translation functions of a eukaryotic initiation factor 5B switch II mutant.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Maag, David; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    Structural studies of GTP-binding proteins identified the Switch I and Switch II elements as contacting the gamma-phosphate of GTP and undergoing marked conformational changes upon GTP versus GDP binding. Movement of a universally conserved Gly at the N terminus of Switch II is thought to trigger the structural rearrangement of this element. Consistently, we found that mutation of this Gly in the Switch II element of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae impaired cell growth and the guanine nucleotide-binding, GTPase, and ribosomal subunit joining activities of eIF5B. In a screen for mutations that bypassed the critical requirement for this Switch II Gly in eIF5B, intragenic suppressors were identified in the Switch I element and at a residue in domain II of eIF5B that interacts with Switch II. The intragenic suppressors restored yeast cell growth and eIF5B nucleotide-binding, GTP hydrolysis, and subunit joining activities. We propose that the Switch II mutation distorts the geometry of the GTP-binding active site, impairing nucleotide binding and the eIF5B domain movements associated with GTP binding. Accordingly, the Switch I and domain II suppressor mutations induce Switch II to adopt a conformation favorable for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis and thereby reestablish coupling between GTP binding and eIF5B domain movements.

  1. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage.

  2. FIRE II Cirrus Info

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-03-18

    ... Page:  FIRE II Main Grouping:  Cirrus Description:  First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Data Products:  Cirrus ...

  3. Electron-beam-induced ferroelectric domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope: Toward deterministic domain patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, James L.; Liu, Shi; Lang, Andrew C.; Hubert, Alexander; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Beanland, Richard; Rappe, Andrew M.; Arredondo, Miryam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on transmission electron microscope beam-induced ferroelectric domain nucleation and motion. While previous observations of this phenomenon have been reported, a consistent theory explaining induced domain response is lacking, and little control over domain behavior has been demonstrated. We identify positive sample charging, a result of Auger and secondary electron emission, as the underlying mechanism driving domain behavior. By converging the electron beam to a focused probe, we demonstrate controlled nucleation of nanoscale domains. Molecular dynamics simulations performed are consistent with experimental results, confirming positive sample charging and reproducing the result of controlled domain nucleation. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of sample geometry and electron irradiation conditions on induced domain response. These findings elucidate past reports of electron beam-induced domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope and provide a path towards more predictive, deterministic domain patterning through electron irradiation.

  4. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  5. Mod II engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karl, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Mod II engine, a four-cylinder, automotive Stirling engine utilizing the Siemens-Rinia double-acting concept, was assembled and became operational in January 1986. This paper describes the Mod II engine, its first assembly, and the subsequent development work done on engine components up to the point that engine performance characterization testing took place. Performance data for the engine are included.

  6. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  7. Domain-specific control of selective attention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Szu-Hung; Yeh, Yei-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that loading information on working memory affects selective attention. However, whether the load effect on selective attention is domain-general or domain-specific remains unresolved. The domain-general effect refers to the findings that load in one content (e.g. phonological) domain in working memory influences processing in another content (e.g., visuospatial) domain. Attentional control supervises selection regardless of information domain. The domain-specific effect refers to the constraint of influence only when maintenance and processing operate in the same domain. Selective attention operates in a specific content domain. This study is designed to resolve this controversy. Across three experiments, we manipulated the type of representation maintained in working memory and the type of representation upon which the participants must exert control to resolve conflict and select a target into the focus of attention. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants maintained digits and nonverbalized objects, respectively, in working memory while selecting a target in a letter array. In Experiment 2, we presented auditory digits with a letter flanker task to exclude the involvement of resource competition within the same input modality. In Experiments 3a and 3b, we replaced the letter flanker task with an object flanker task while manipulating the memory load on object and digit representation, respectively. The results consistently showed that memory load modulated distractibility only when the stimuli of the two tasks were represented in the same domain. The magnitude of distractor interference was larger under high load than under low load, reflecting a lower efficacy of information prioritization. When the stimuli of the two tasks were represented in different domains, memory load did not modulate distractibility. Control of processing priority in selective attention demands domain-specific resources.

  8. Domain Decomposition for the SPN Solver MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3® code.

  9. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  10. Spectral functions of non-essentially self-adjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falomir, H. A.; Pisani, P. A. G.

    2012-09-01

    One of the many problems to which Dowker devoted his attention is the effect of a conical singularity in the base manifold on the behavior of the quantum fields. In particular, he studied the small-t asymptotic expansion of the heat-kernel trace on a cone and its effects on physical quantities as the Casimir energy. In this paper, we review some peculiar results found in the last decade, regarding the appearance of non-standard powers of t, and even negative integer powers of log t, in this asymptotic expansion for the self-adjoint extensions of some symmetric operators with singular coefficients. Similarly, we show that the ζ-function associated with these self-adjoint extensions presents an unusual analytic structure. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  11. Mn(II) binding to human serum albumin: a ¹H-NMR relaxometric study.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Gabriella; Cao, Yu; Ascenzi, Paolo; Fasano, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) displays several metal binding sites, participating to essential and toxic metal ions disposal and transport. The major Zn(II) binding site, called Site A, is located at the I/II domain interface, with residues His67, Asn99, His247, and Asp249 contributing with five donor atoms to the metal ion coordination. Additionally, one water molecule takes part of the octahedral coordination geometry. The occurrence of the metal-coordinated water molecule allows the investigation of the metal complex geometry by water (1)H-NMR relaxation, provided that the diamagnetic Zn(II) is replaced by the paramagnetic Mn(II). Here, the (1)H-NMR relaxometric study of Mn(II) binding to HSA is reported. Mn(II) binding to HSA is modulated by Zn(II), pH, and myristate through competitive inhibition and allosteric mechanisms. The body of results indicates that the primary binding site of Zn(II) corresponds to the secondary binding site of Mn(II), i.e. the multimetal binding site A. Excess Zn(II) completely displaces Mn(II) from its primary site suggesting that the primary Mn(II) site corresponds to the secondary Zn(II) site. This uncharacterized site is functionally-linked to FA1; moreover, metal ion binding is modulated by myristate and pH. Noteworthy, water (1)H-NMR relaxometry allowed a detailed analysis of thermodynamic properties of HSA-metal ion complexes.

  12. Domain walls in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric E

    2003-11-07

    We report experimentally observed magnetic domain-wall structures in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films with perpendicular anisotropy. Our studies reveal a first-order phase transition from domain walls with no net moment to domain walls with ferromagnetic cores. The transition originates from the competition between dipolar and exchange energies, which we tune by means of layer thickness. Although observed in a synthetic antiferromagnetic system, such domain-wall structures may be expected to occur in A-type antiferromagnets with anisotropic exchange coupling.

  13. Stability on Time-Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the key differences in the stability picture between extended systems on time-fixed and time-dependent spatial domains. As a paradigm, we take the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a finite critical wavenumber, and use it to study dynamic pattern formation and evolution on time-dependent spatial domains in translationally invariant systems, i.e., when dilution effects are absent. In particular, we discuss the effects of a time-dependent domain on the stability of spatially homogeneous and spatially periodic base states, and explore its effects on the Eckhaus instability of periodic states. New equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the pattern wavenumber on time-dependent domains are derived, and the results compared with those on fixed domains. Pattern coarsening on time-dependent domains is contrasted with that on fixed domains with the help of the Cahn-Hilliard equation extended here to time-dependent domains. Parallel results for the evolution of the Benjamin-Feir instability on time-dependent domains are also given.

  14. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  15. Transform domain steganography with blind source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, Ismail

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies blind source separation or independent component analysis for images that may contain mixtures of text, audio, or other images for steganography purposes. The paper focuses on separating mixtures in the transform domain such as Fourier domain or the Wavelet domain. The study addresses the effectiveness of steganography when using linear mixtures of multimedia components and the ability of standard blind sources separation techniques to discern hidden multimedia messages. Mixing in the space, frequency, and wavelet (scale) domains is compared. Effectiveness is measured using mean square error rate between original and recovered images.

  16. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  17. Statistical Study of Shocks and CMEs Associated With Interplanetary Type II Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gopalswamy, N.; MacDowall, R.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    We present a study of some spectral properties associated with interplanetary Type II radio emission. Type II radio bursts are signatures of violent eruptions from the Sun that result in shock waves propagating through the corona and the interplanetary medium. We investigated the relative bandwidth of all the type II bursts observed by the Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (WAVES) on board the Wind spacecraft from 1997 up to 2003. We obtained three sets of events, based on the frequency domain of occurrence: 109 events in the low frequency domain (30 KHz to 1000 kHz detected by the RAD1 receiver), 216 events in the high frequency domain (1-14 MHz, observed by the RAD2 receiver), and 73 events that spanned both domains (RAD1 and RAD2). We present statistical results for the bandwidth-to-frequency ratio (BFR) in the three subsets as well as a comparision of our results with the Type II solar radio bursts observed by ISEE-3 radio experiment, which is similar to WAVES/RAD1. We analyzed the bandwidth and BFR evolution with the heliocentric distance as well as an analysis of drift rate magnitude of type II radio bursts and its starting frequency. We also present some properties of shocks and coronal mass ejections associated with interplanetary type II bursts. This work is partially supported by NSF/SHINE (ATM 0204588)

  18. Bioconvection in spatially extended domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, A.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    We numerically explore gyrotactic bioconvection in large spatially extended domains of finite depth using parameter values from available experiments with the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas nivalis. We numerically integrate the three-dimensional, time-dependent continuum model of Pedley [J. Fluid Mech.10.1017/S0022112088002393 195, 223 (1988)] using a high-order, parallel, spectral-element approach. We explore the long-time nonlinear patterns and dynamics found for layers with an aspect ratio of 10 over a range of Rayleigh numbers. Our results yield the pattern wavelength and pattern dynamics which we compare with available theory and experimental measurement. There is good agreement for the pattern wavelength at short times between numerics, experiment, and a linear stability analysis. At long times we find that the general sequence of patterns given by the nonlinear evolution of the governing equations correspond qualitatively to what has been described experimentally. However, at long times the patterns in numerics grow to larger wavelengths, in contrast to what is observed in experiment where the wavelength is found to decrease with time.

  19. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  20. Discoidin Domain Receptors in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to diseases progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  1. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  2. Domain loss facilitates accelerated evolution and neofunctionalization of duplicate snake venom metalloproteinase toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Wagstaff, Simon C; Harrison, Robert A; Renjifo, Camila; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    Gene duplication is a key mechanism for the adaptive evolution and neofunctionalization of gene families. Large multigene families often exhibit complex evolutionary histories as a result of frequent gene duplication acting in concordance with positive selection pressures. Alterations in the domain structure of genes, causing changes in the molecular scaffold of proteins, can also result in a complex evolutionary history and has been observed in functionally diverse multigene toxin families. Here, we investigate the role alterations in domain structure have on the tempo of evolution and neofunctionalization of multigene families using the snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) as a model system. Our results reveal that the evolutionary history of viperid (Serpentes: Viperidae) SVMPs is repeatedly punctuated by domain loss, with the single loss of the cysteine-rich domain, facilitating the formation of P-II class SVMPs, occurring prior to the convergent loss of the disintegrin domain to form multiple P-I SVMP structures. Notably, the majority of phylogenetic branches where domain loss was inferred to have occurred exhibited highly significant evidence of positive selection in surface-exposed amino acid residues, resulting in the neofunctionalization of P-II and P-I SVMP classes. These results provide a valuable insight into the mechanisms by which complex gene families evolve and detail how the loss of domain structures can catalyze the accelerated evolution of novel gene paralogues. The ensuing generation of differing molecular scaffolds encoded by the same multigene family facilitates gene neofunctionalization while presenting an evolutionary advantage through the retention of multiple genes capable of encoding functionally distinct proteins.

  3. Multi-Objective Scheduling for the Cluster II Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Giuliano, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the MUSE multiobjecctive scheduling framework to the Cluster II WBD scheduling domain. Cluster II is an ESA four-spacecraft constellation designed to study the plasma environment of the Earth and it's magnetosphere. One of the instruments on each of the four spacecraft is the Wide Band Data (WBD) plasma wave experiment. We have applied the MUSE evolutionary algorithm to the scheduling problem represented by this instrument, and the result has been adopted and utilized by the WBD schedulers for nearly a year. This paper describes the WBD scheduling problem, its representation in MUSE, and some of the visualization elements that provide insight into objective value tradeoffs.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of ferroelectric domain nucleation and domain switching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Vishal; Endres, Florian; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-04-11

    Ferroelectric materials contain domains of ordered electric dipoles, separated by domain walls, that can undergo polarisation switching under externally applied electric fields. The domain switching dynamics in ferroelectric materials plays an essential role in their application to electronic and electro-optic de- vices. Previous studies suggest that the switching occurs largely through domain wall motion which is explained from the viewpoint of statistical physics on surface growth as the behaviour of a pinned elas- tic interface. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the domain switching process and quantitatively estimate the switching speed of anti-parallel 180° domains in ferroelectric, tetragonal BaTiO3 perfect single crystals at room temperature using the core-shell model. We observe an unprece- dented, non-linear increase in the domain switching speed caused by the nucleation of new domains within the switching domain. We determine the strength of the electric field to evoke nucleation of new domains and show that the nucleated domains diffuse into nearby favourable domains when the electric field is removed. Furthermore, we discuss the prominence of domain nucleations during ferroelectric switching.

  5. Fuzzy domains: new way of describing flexibility and interdependence of the protein domains.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Kharkyanen, Valery N

    2009-03-01

    We proposed the innovative method of domain identification based on the concept of the fuzzy domains. In this method each residue of the protein can belong to several domains simultaneously with certain weights, which reflect to what extent this residue shares the motion pattern of the given domain. Our method allows describing the fuzzy boundaries between the domains and the gradual changes of the motion pattern from one domain to the other. It provides the reasonable compromise between the continuous change of the protein dynamics from one residue to the other and the discrete description of the structure in terms of small number of domains. We suggested quantitative criterion, which shows the overall degree of domain flexibility in the protein. The concept of the fuzzy domains provides an innovative way of visualization of domain flexibility, which makes the gradual transitions between the domains clearly visible and comparable to available experimental and structural data. In the future, the concept of the fuzzy domains can be used in the coarse-grained simulations of the domain dynamics in order to account for internal protein flexibility.

  6. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  7. Naturally occurring active N-domain of human angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Deddish, P A; Wang, J; Michel, B; Morris, P W; Davidson, N O; Skidgel, R A; Erdös, E G

    1994-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, kininase II) is a single-chain protein containing two active site domains (named N- and C-domains according to position in the chain). ACE is bound to plasma membranes by its C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane anchor. Ileal fluid, rich in ACE activity, obtained from patients after surgical colectomy was used as the source. Column chromatography, including modified affinity chromatography on lisinopril-Sepharose, yielded homogeneous ACE after only a 45-fold purification. N-terminal sequencing of ileal ACE and partial sequencing of CNBr fragments revealed the presence of an intact N terminus but only a single N-domain active site, ending between residues 443 and 559. Thus, ileal-fluid ACE is a unique enzyme differing from the widely distributed two-domain somatic enzyme or the single C-domain testicular (germinal) ACE. The molecular mass of ileal ACE is 108 kDa and when deglycosylated, the molecular mass is 68 kDa, indicating extensive glycosylation (37% by weight). In agreement with the results reported with recombinant variants of ACE, the ileal enzyme is less Cl(-)-dependent than somatic ACE; release of the C-terminal dipeptide from a peptide substrate was optimal in only 10 mM Cl-. In addition to hydrolyzing at the C-terminal end of peptides, ileal ACE efficiently cleaved the protected N-terminal tripeptide from the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and its congener 6-31 times faster, depending on the Cl- concentration, than the C-domain in recombinant testicular ACE. Thus we have isolated an active human ACE consisting of a single N-domain. We suggest that there is a bridge section of about 100 amino acids between the active N- and C-domains of somatic ACE where it may be proteolytically cleaved to liberate the active N-domain. These findings have potential relevance and importance in the therapeutic application of ACE inhibitors. PMID:8052664

  8. Structural and histone binding ability characterization of the ARB2 domain of a histone deacetylase Hda1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Yan, Hui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Hda1 is the catalytic core component of the H2B- and H3- specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is involved in the epigenetic repression and plays a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and developmental events. Though the N-terminal catalytic HDAC domain of Hda1 is well characterized, the function of the C-terminal ARB2 domain remains unknown. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of the ARB2 domain from S. cerevisiae Hda1 at a resolution of 2.7 Å. The ARB2 domain displays an α/β sandwich architecture with an arm protruding outside. Two ARB2 domain molecules form a compact homo-dimer via the arm elements, and assemble as an inverse “V” shape. The pull-down and ITC results reveal that the ARB2 domain possesses the histone binding ability, recognizing both the H2A-H2B dimer and H3-H4 tetramer. Perturbation of the dimer interface abolishes the histone binding ability of the ARB2 domain, indicating that the unique dimer architecture of the ARB2 domain coincides with the function for anchoring to histone. Collectively, our data report the first structure of the ARB2 domain and disclose its histone binding ability, which is of benefit for understanding the deacetylation reaction catalyzed by the class II Hda1 HDAC complex. PMID:27665728

  9. Physiological Role for Phosphatidic Acid in the Translocation of the Novel Protein Kinase C Apl II in Aplysia Neurons▿

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Carole A.; Nagakura, Ikue; Weatherill, Daniel; Fan, Xiaotang; Sossin, Wayne S.

    2008-01-01

    In Aplysia californica, the serotonin-mediated translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) Apl II to neuronal membranes is important for synaptic plasticity. The orthologue of PKC Apl II, PKCɛ, has been reported to require phosphatidic acid (PA) in conjunction with diacylglycerol (DAG) for translocation. We find that PKC Apl II can be synergistically translocated to membranes by the combination of DAG and PA. We identify a mutation in the C1b domain (arginine 273 to histidine; PKC Apl II-R273H) that removes the effects of exogenous PA. In Aplysia neurons, the inhibition of endogenous PA production by 1-butanol inhibited the physiological translocation of PKC Apl II by serotonin in the cell body and at the synapse but not the translocation of PKC Apl II-R273H. The translocation of PKC Apl II-R273H in the absence of PA was explained by two additional effects of this mutation: (i) the mutation removed C2 domain-mediated inhibition, and (ii) the mutation decreased the concentration of DAG required for PKC Apl II translocation. We present a model in which, under physiological conditions, PA is important to activate the novel PKC Apl II both by synergizing with DAG and removing C2 domain-mediated inhibition. PMID:18505819

  10. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis for the Teacher Form, Ages 5 to 21, of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aricak, O. Tolga; Oakland, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities has promulgated various models of adaptive behavior, including its 1992 model that highlighted 10 adaptive skills and its 2002 model that highlighted three conceptual domains. The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II (ABAS-II) was designed to be consistent with these models.…

  11. Design and Use of Peptide-Based Antibodies Decreasing Superoxide Production by Mitochondrial Complex I and Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Yun, June; Kaumaya, Pravin P.T.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of reactive oxygen species. Both complex I and complex II mediate O2•− production in mitochondria and host reactive protein thiols. To explore the functions of the specific domains involved in the redox modifications of complexes I and II, various peptide-based antibodies were generated against these complexes, and their inhibitory effects were subsequently measured. The redox domains involved in S-glutathionylation and nitration, as well as the binding motif of the iron-sulfur cluster (N1a) of the complexes I and II were utilized to design B cell epitopes for generating antibodies. The effect of antibody binding on enzyme-mediated O2•− generation was measured by EPR spin trapping. Binding of either antibody AbGSCA206 or AbGSCB367 against glutathione (GS)-binding domain to complex I inhibits its O2•− generation, but does not affect electron transfer efficiency. Binding of antibody (Ab24N1a) against the binding motif of N1a to complex I modestly suppresses both O2•− generation and electron transfer efficiency. Binding of either antibody Ab75 or Ab24 against non-redox domain decreases electron leakage for O2•− production. In complex II, binding of antibody AbGSC90 against GS-binding domain to complex II marginally decreases both O2•− generation and electron transfer activity. Binding of antibody AbY142 to complex II against the nitrated domain modestly inhibits electron leakage, but does not affect the electron transfer activity of complex II. In conclusion, mediation of O2•− generation by complexes I and II can be regulated by specific redox and non-redox domains. PMID:20564035

  12. The Domain Specificity of Academic Emotional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Hall, Nathan C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyzed the domain specificity of emotions and focused on experiences of enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom in the domains of mathematics, Latin, German, and English. On the basis of assumptions in R. Pekrun's (2000; in press) control-value theory and findings of pilot studies, the authors hypothesized the existence of a largely…

  13. Domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This monograph sets forth in detail the concepts included in the five domains of teaching as identified by the Florida Coalition for the Development of a Performance Evaluation System. The first domain, planning, includes the concepts: (1) content coverage; (2) utilization of instructional materials; (3) activity structure; (4) goal focusing; and…

  14. Multiple hypothesis tracking for the cyber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoegler, Stefan; Blackman, Sam; Holsopple, Jared; Hirsch, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses how methods used for conventional multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) can be extended to domain-agnostic tracking of entities from non-kinematic constraints such as those imposed by cyber attacks in a potentially dense false alarm background. MHT is widely recognized as the premier method to avoid corrupting tracks with spurious data in the kinematic domain but it has not been extensively applied to other problem domains. The traditional approach is to tightly couple track maintenance (prediction, gating, filtering, probabilistic pruning, and target confirmation) with hypothesis management (clustering, incompatibility maintenance, hypothesis formation, and Nassociation pruning). However, by separating the domain specific track maintenance portion from the domain agnostic hypothesis management piece, we can begin to apply the wealth of knowledge gained from ground and air tracking solutions to the cyber (and other) domains. These realizations led to the creation of Raytheon's Multiple Hypothesis Extensible Tracking Architecture (MHETA). In this paper, we showcase MHETA for the cyber domain, plugging in a well established method, CUBRC's INFormation Engine for Real-time Decision making, (INFERD), for the association portion of the MHT. The result is a CyberMHT. We demonstrate the power of MHETA-INFERD using simulated data. Using metrics from both the tracking and cyber domains, we show that while no tracker is perfect, by applying MHETA-INFERD, advanced nonkinematic tracks can be captured in an automated way, perform better than non-MHT approaches, and decrease analyst response time to cyber threats.

  15. XML Based Markup Languages for Specific Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varde, Aparna; Rundensteiner, Elke; Fahrenholz, Sally

    A challenging area in web based support systems is the study of human activities in connection with the web, especially with reference to certain domains. This includes capturing human reasoning in information retrieval, facilitating the exchange of domain-specific knowledge through a common platform and developing tools for the analysis of data on the web from a domain expert's angle. Among the techniques and standards related to such work, we have XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This serves as a medium of communication for storing and publishing textual, numeric and other forms of data seamlessly. XML tag sets are such that they preserve semantics and simplify the understanding of stored information by users. Often domain-specific markup languages are designed using XML, with a user-centric perspective. Standardization bodies and research communities may extend these to include additional semantics of areas within and related to the domain. This chapter outlines the issues to be considered in developing domain-specific markup languages: the motivation for development, the semantic considerations, the syntactic constraints and other relevant aspects, especially taking into account human factors. Illustrating examples are provided from domains such as Medicine, Finance and Materials Science. Particular emphasis in these examples is on the Materials Markup Language MatML and the semantics of one of its areas, namely, the Heat Treating of Materials. The focus of this chapter, however, is not the design of one particular language but rather the generic issues concerning the development of domain-specific markup languages.

  16. Time Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time -Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication Paul Swanson Andrew Wang...Approved for public release. SSC Pacific San Diego, CA 92152-5001 TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time ...objective of this report is to record the decision-making process for developing the device design and fabrication workflow for the time -domain switched

  17. FERM Domain Interaction Promotes FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dunty, Jill M.; Gabarra-Niecko, Veronica; King, Michelle L.; Ceccarelli, Derek F. J.; Eck, Michael J.; Schaller, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    From the results of deletion analyses, the FERM domain of FAK has been proposed to inhibit enzymatic activity and repress FAK signaling. We have identified a sequence in the FERM domain that is important for FAK signaling in vivo. Point mutations in this sequence had little effect upon catalytic activity in vitro. However, the mutant exhibits reduced tyrosine phosphorylation and dramatically reduced Src family kinase binding. Further, the abilities of the mutant to transduce biochemical signals and to promote cell migration were severely impaired. The results implicate a FERM domain interaction in cell adhesion-dependent activation of FAK and downstream signaling. We also show that the purified FERM domain of FAK interacts with full-length FAK in vitro, and mutation of this sequence disrupts the interaction. These findings are discussed in the context of models of FAK regulation by its FERM domain. PMID:15169899

  18. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  19. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds.

  20. Time-Domain Stability Margin Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  1. Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  2. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  3. DEIMOS Spectroscopy of GALEX Time Domain Survey Tidal Disruption Event Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi

    2011-08-01

    We propose for Keck II DEIMOS follow-up spectroscopy of extreme UV-flaring galaxies from the GALEX Time Domain Survey that are candidates for flares from the tidal disruption of stars around dormant supermassive black holes. GALEX has conducted an innovative dedicated survey in the time domain in the NUV, over a wide field of view (42 deg^2) with a cadence of 2 days to discover and characterize a wide range of UV variable and transient sources, including variable stars, quasars, active galactic nuclei, and Type II SNe. Here we propose for follow-up low-resolution spectroscopy of galaxies which demonstrated large amplitude UV flares to investigate their nature, and identify candidate tidal disruption events.

  4. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  5. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  6. Single-molecule tracking of mRNA exiting from RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Lewis, Robert; Brückner, Florian; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2008-01-08

    Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to track RNA exiting from RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in elongation complexes. Measuring the distance between the RNA 5' end and three known locations within the elongation complex allows us determine its position by means of triangulation. RNA leaves the polymerase active center cleft via the previously proposed exit tunnel and then disengages from the enzyme surface. When the RNA reaches lengths of 26 and 29 nt, its 5' end associates with Pol II at the base of the dock domain. Because the initiation factor TFIIB binds to the dock domain and exit tunnel, exiting RNA may prevent TFIIB reassociation during elongation. RNA further extends toward the linker connecting to the polymerase C-terminal repeat domain (CTD), which binds the 5'-capping enzyme and other RNA processing factors.

  7. Crystal structures of a group II intron maturase reveal a missing link in spliceosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that are essential in many organisms, and they are hypothesized to share a common evolutionary ancestor with the spliceosome. While structural similarity of RNA components supports this connection, it is of interest to determine whether associated protein factors also share an evolutionary heritage. Here we present the crystal structures of reverse transcriptase (RT) domains from two group II intron encoded proteins (maturases) from Roseburia intestinalis and Eubacterium rectale, obtained at 1.2 Å and 2.1 Å respectively. Their architecture is more similar to the spliceosomal Prp8 RT-like domain than to any other RTs, and they share substantial similarity with flaviviral RNA polymerases. The RT domain itself is sufficient for binding intron RNA with high affinity and specificity, and it is contained within an active RT enzyme. These studies provide a foundation for understanding structure-function relationships within group II intron–maturase complexes. PMID:27136328

  8. Bunch-by-bunch feedback for PEP II

    SciTech Connect

    Oxoby, G.; Claus, R.; Eisen, N.; Fox, J.; Hindi, H.; Hoeflich, J.; Olsen, J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Linscott, I.

    1993-01-01

    The proposed PEP II B factory at SLAC requires a feedback to damp out longitudinal synchrotron oscillations. A time domain, downsampled, bunch-by-bunch feedback system in which each bunch is treated as an oscillator being driven by disturbances from other bunches is presented as we review the evolution of the system design. Results from a synchrotron oscillation damping experiment conducted at the SLAC/SSRL/SPEAR ring are also presented in this paper.

  9. Structural and functional dynamics of plant photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jan M; Chow, W S

    2002-01-01

    Given the unique problem of the extremely high potential of the oxidant P(+)(680) that is required to oxidize water to oxygen, the photoinactivation of photosystem II in vivo is inevitable, despite many photoprotective strategies. There is, however, a robustness of photosystem II, which depends partly on the highly dynamic compositional and structural heterogeneity of the cycle between functional and non-functional photosystem II complexes in response to light level. This coordinated regulation involves photon usage (energy utilization in photochemistry) and excess energy dissipation as heat, photoprotection by many molecular strategies, photoinactivation followed by photon damage and ultimately the D1 protein dynamics involved in the photosystem II repair cycle. Compelling, though indirect evidence suggests that the radical pair P(+)(680)Pheo(-) in functional PSII should be protected from oxygen. By analogy to the tentative oxygen channel of cytochrome c oxidase, oxygen may be liberated from the two water molecules bound to the catalytic site of the Mn cluster, via a specific pathway to the membrane surface. The function of the proposed oxygen pathway is to prevent O(2) from having direct access to P(+)(680)Pheo(-) and prevent the generation of singlet oxygen via the triplet-P(680) state in functional photosytem IIs. Only when the, as yet unidentified, potential trigger with a fateful first oxidative step destroys oxygen evolution, will the ensuing cascade of structural perturbations of photosystem II destroy the proposed oxygen, water and proton pathways. Then oxygen has direct access to P(+)(680)Pheo(-), singlet oxygen will be produced and may successively oxidize specific amino acids of the phosphorylated D1 protein of photosystem II dimers that are confined to appressed granal domains, thereby targeting D1 protein for eventual degradation and replacement in non-appressed thylakoid domains. PMID:12437881

  10. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  11. Unusual Nature of NanoDomains in Ultrahigh Temperature Polymer Derived Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-25

    2005, gave the following information: (i) Raman suggested the presence of long range graphene structures, (ii) NMR studies showed the presence of sp2...interface between the graphene interface in the silica domain. This information is provided Fi. 4: The width of thedomain wall, and the size from NMR data...for the PDCs, which is validated by the experimental findings. The model consists of a graphene network interconnected in the form of nanodomains

  12. Interoperation of heterogeneous CAD tools in Ptolemy II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Wu, Bicheng; Liu, Xiaojun; Lee, Edward A.

    1999-03-01

    Typical complex systems that involve microsensors and microactuators exhibit heterogeneity both at the implementation level and the problem level. For example, a system can be modeled using discrete events for digital circuits and SPICE-like analog descriptions for sensors. This heterogeneity exist not only in different implementation domains, but also at different level of abstraction. This naturally leads to a heterogeneous approach to system design that uses domain-specific models of computation (MoC) at various levels of abstractions to define a system, and leverages multiple CAD tools to do simulation, verification and synthesis. As the size and scope of the system increase, the integration becomes too difficult and unmanageable if different tools are coordinated using simple scripts. In addition, for MEMS devices and mixed-signal circuits, it is essential to integrate tools with different MoC to simulate the whole system. Ptolemy II, a heterogeneous system-level design tool, supports the interaction among different MoCs. This paper discusses heterogeneous CAD tool interoperability in the Ptolemy II framework. The key is to understand the semantic interface and classify the tools by their MoC and their level of abstraction. Interfaces are designed for each domain so that the external tools can be easily wrapped. Then the interoperability of the tools becomes the interoperability of the semantics. Ptolemy II can act as the standard interface among different tools to achieve the overall design modeling. A micro-accelerometer with digital feedback is studied as an example.

  13. Field tuning of ferromagnetic domain walls on elastically coupled ferroelectric domain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Kévin J. A.; Lahtinen, Tuomas H. E.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2012-03-01

    We report on the evolution of ferromagnetic domain walls during magnetization reversal in elastically coupled ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures. Using optical polarization microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we demonstrate that the spin rotation and width of ferromagnetic domain walls can be accurately controlled by the strength of the applied magnetic field if the ferromagnetic walls are pinned onto 90∘ ferroelectric domain boundaries. Moreover, reversible switching between magnetically charged and uncharged domain walls is initiated by magnetic field rotation. Switching between both wall types reverses the wall chirality and abruptly changes the width of the ferromagnetic domain walls by up to 1000%.

  14. Transcription control by the ENL YEATS domain in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Erb, Michael A; Scott, Thomas G; Li, Bin E; Xie, Huafeng; Paulk, Joshiawa; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Souza, Amanda; Roberts, Justin M; Dastjerdi, Shiva; Buckley, Dennis L; Sanjana, Neville E; Shalem, Ophir; Nabet, Behnam; Zeid, Rhamy; Offei-Addo, Nana K; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Zhang, Feng; Orkin, Stuart H; Winter, Georg E; Bradner, James E

    2017-03-09

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations producing a chimaeric MLL oncogene give rise to a highly aggressive acute leukaemia associated with poor clinical outcome. The preferential involvement of chromatin-associated factors as MLL fusion partners belies a dependency on transcription control. Despite recent progress made in targeting chromatin regulators in cancer, available therapies for this well-characterized disease remain inadequate, prompting the need to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, using unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 technology to perform a genome-scale loss-of-function screen in an MLL-AF4-positive acute leukaemia cell line, we identify ENL as an unrecognized gene that is specifically required for proliferation in vitro and in vivo. To explain the mechanistic role of ENL in leukaemia pathogenesis and dynamic transcription control, a chemical genetic strategy was developed to achieve targeted protein degradation. Acute loss of ENL suppressed the initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II at active genes genome-wide, with pronounced effects at genes featuring a disproportionate ENL load. Notably, an intact YEATS chromatin-reader domain was essential for ENL-dependent leukaemic growth. Overall, these findings identify a dependency factor in acute leukaemia and suggest a mechanistic rationale for disrupting the YEATS domain in disease.

  15. The N domain of Argonaute drives duplex unwinding during RISC assembly.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Pieter Bas; Tomari, Yukihide

    2012-01-10

    Small RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, act through Argonaute (Ago) proteins as a part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). To make RISCs, Ago proteins bind and subsequently unwind small RNA duplexes, finally leaving one strand stably incorporated. Here we identified the N domain of human AGO2 as the initiator of duplex unwinding during RISC assembly. We discovered that a functional N domain is strictly required for small RNA duplex unwinding but not for precedent duplex loading or subsequent target cleavage. We postulate that RISC assembly is tripartite, comprising (i) RISC loading, whereby Ago undergoes conformational opening and loads a small RNA duplex, forming pre-RISC; (ii) wedging, whereby the end of the duplex is pried open through active wedging by the N domain, in preparation for unwinding; and (iii) unwinding, whereby the passenger strand is removed through slicer-dependent or slicer-independent unwinding, forming mature RISC.

  16. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  17. Domain Analysis of ArcS, the Hybrid Sensor Kinase of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Arc Two-Component System, Reveals Functional Differentiation of Its Two Receiver Domains

    PubMed Central

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In all species of the genus Shewanella, the redox-sensing Arc two-component system consists of the response regulator ArcA, the sensor kinase ArcS, and the separate phosphotransfer protein HptA. Compared to its counterpart ArcB in Escherichia coli, ArcS has a significantly different domain structure. Resequencing and reannotation revealed that in the N-terminal part, ArcS possesses a periplasmic CaChe-sensing domain bracketed by two transmembrane domains and, moreover, that ArcS has two cytoplasmic PAS-sensing domains and two receiver domains, compared to a single one of each in ArcB. Here, we used a combination of in vitro phosphotransfer studies on purified proteins and phenotypic in vivo mutant analysis to determine the roles of the different domains in ArcS function. The analysis revealed that phosphotransfer occurs from and toward the response regulator ArcA and involves mainly the C-terminal RecII domain. However, RecI also can receive a phosphate from HptA. In addition, the PAS-II domain, located upstream of the histidine kinase domain, is crucial for function. The results support a model in which phosphorylation of RecI stimulates histidine kinase activity of ArcS in order to maintain an appropriate level of phosphorylated ArcA according to environmental conditions. In addition, the study reveals some fundamental mechanistic differences between ArcS/HptA and ArcB with respect to signal perception and phosphotransfer despite functional conservation of the Arc system in Shewanella and E. coli. PMID:23161031

  18. Structural organization of human replication timing domains.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Rasha E; Drillon, Guénola; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2015-10-07

    Recent analysis of genome-wide epigenetic modification data, mean replication timing (MRT) profiles and chromosome conformation data in mammals have provided increasing evidence that flexibility in replication origin usage is regulated locally by the epigenetic landscape and over larger genomic distances by the 3D chromatin architecture. Here, we review the recent results establishing some link between replication domains and chromatin structural domains in pluripotent and various differentiated cell types in human. We reconcile the originally proposed dichotomic picture of early and late constant timing regions that replicate by multiple rather synchronous origins in separated nuclear compartments of open and closed chromatins, with the U-shaped MRT domains bordered by "master" replication origins specified by a localized (∼200-300 kb) zone of open and transcriptionally active chromatin from which a replication wave likely initiates and propagates toward the domain center via a cascade of origin firing. We discuss the relationships between these MRT domains, topologically associated domains and lamina-associated domains. This review sheds a new light on the epigenetically regulated global chromatin reorganization that underlies the loss of pluripotency and the determination of differentiation properties.

  19. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  20. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  1. Instant Insanity II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Tom; Young, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    "Instant Insanity II" is a sliding mechanical puzzle whose solution requires the special alignment of 16 colored tiles. We count the number of solutions of the puzzle's classic challenge and show that the more difficult ultimate challenge has, up to row permutation, exactly two solutions, and further show that no…

  2. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the…

  3. Listen & Learn II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Building Resources, Spruce Grove (Alberta).

    Six community builders in Edmonton, Alberta, planned, developed, and implemented Listen and Learn II, a reflective research project in asset-based community building, over a 6-month period in 1998. They met regularly over 2 months to plan the research and design a method that was open to participation at any stage, encouraged exchange of…

  4. A la Mode II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowe, Richard A.

    This paper describes two modes of educational decision-making: Mode I, in which the instructor makes such decisions as what to teach, to whom, when, in what order, at what pace, and at what complexity level; and Mode II, in which the learner makes the decisions. While Mode I comprises most of what is regarded as formal education, the learner in…

  5. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  6. Class II Microcins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Gaëlle; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Peduzzi, Jean

    Class II microcins are 4.9- to 8.9-kDa polypeptides produced by and active against enterobacteria. They are classified into two subfamilies according to their structure and their gene cluster arrangement. While class IIa microcins undergo no posttranslational modification, class IIb microcins show a conserved C-terminal sequence that carries a salmochelin-like siderophore motif as a posttranslational modification. Aside from this C-terminal end, which is the signature of class IIb microcins, some sequence similarities can be observed within and between class II subclasses, suggesting the existence of common ancestors. Their mechanisms of action are still under investigation, but several class II microcins use inner membrane proteins as cellular targets, and some of them are membrane-active. Like group B colicins, many, if not all, class II microcins are TonB- and energy-dependent and use catecholate siderophore receptors for recognition/­translocation across the outer membrane. In that context, class IIb microcins are considered to have developed molecular mimicry to increase their affinity for their outer membrane receptors through their salmochelin-like posttranslational modification.

  7. Thermal variations of domain wall thickness and number of domains in magnetic rectangular grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Merrill, Ronald T.

    1990-12-01

    Equilibrium domain wall thickness and number of domains in rectangular magnetic grains are determined by using a modified Amar model. It is shown that domain structure, particularly domain wall thickness, in a magnetized grain depends strongly on grain shape and orientation. These dependencies are attributed to the existence of two competing self-magnetostatic interactions, one from the ends of the grain and the other from the sides. One of the consequences of this is that the thermal variation of domain wall thickness in an elongated grain is greater (smaller) than predicted by classical theory when the grain is magnetized along the shortest (longest) dimension. For magnetite, classical theory provides a good approximation in predicting both domain wall thickness and number of domains in equal-dimensional grains larger than about 4 μm.

  8. The domain-specific and domain-general relationships of visuospatial working memory to reasoning ability.

    PubMed

    Shipstead, Zach; Yonehiro, Jade

    2016-10-01

    The degree to which visuospatial working memory (VSWM) is separable from working memory in general is an open question. On one hand, the construct is often researched as a unitary, domain-specific system. On the other, there is evidence that VWSM shares a common processing component with verbal memory. One might interpret this shared component as domain-general attention. We used confirmatory factor analysis to demonstrate that VSWM shares a domain-general component with verbal memory tasks and has a domain-specific component that is independent of verbal memory. Furthermore, the domain-general component was found to correlate with reasoning ability in both the visuospatial and verbal domains. The domain-specific component only correlated with reasoning ability when the tests had a strong visuospatial component. We argue that theories of VSWM need to place greater emphasis on its multiply determined nature.

  9. Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II interacts with the leucin rich repeat of NLR family member Ipaf.

    PubMed

    Cividini, Federico; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Galli, Alvaro; Pesi, Rossana; Camici, Marcella; Dumontet, Charles; Jordheim, Lars Petter; Allegrini, Simone

    2015-01-01

    IMP/GMP preferring cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) is a bifunctional enzyme whose activities and expression play crucial roles in nucleotide pool maintenance, nucleotide-dependent pathways and programmed cell death. Alignment of primary amino acid sequences of cN-II from human and other organisms show a strong conservation throughout the entire vertebrata taxon suggesting a fundamental role in eukaryotic cells. With the aim to investigate the potential role of this homology in protein-protein interactions, a two hybrid system screening of cN-II interactors was performed in S. cerevisiae. Among the X positive hits, the Leucin Rich Repeat (LRR) domain of Ipaf was found to interact with cN-II. Recombinant Ipaf isoform B (lacking the Nucleotide Binding Domain) was used in an in vitro affinity chromatography assay confirming the interaction obtained in the screening. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation with proteins from wild type Human Embryonic Kidney 293 T cells demonstrated that endogenous cN-II co-immunoprecipitated both with wild type Ipaf and its LRR domain after transfection with corresponding expression vectors, but not with Ipaf lacking the LRR domain. These results suggest that the interaction takes place through the LRR domain of Ipaf. In addition, a proximity ligation assay was performed in A549 lung carcinoma cells and in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and showed a positive cytosolic signal, confirming that this interaction occurs in human cells. This is the first report of a protein-protein interaction involving cN-II, suggesting either novel functions or an additional level of regulation of this complex enzyme.

  10. Crystal structure of the Staphylococcus aureus pI258 CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-responsive repressor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Kandegedara, Ashoka; Martin, Philip; Rosen, Barry P

    2005-06-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to the heavy metals Cd(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II). Expression of this heavy-metal efflux pump is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CadC at 1.9 angstroms resolution. The dimensions of the protein dimer are approximately 30 angstroms by 40 angstroms by 70 angstroms. Each monomer contains six alpha-helices and a three-stranded beta-sheet. Helices 4 and 5 form a classic helix-turn-helix motif that is the putative DNA binding region. The alpha1 helix of one monomer crosses the dimer to approach the alpha4 helix of the other monomer, consistent with the previous proposal that these two regulatory metal binding sites for the inducer cadmium or lead are each formed by Cys-7 and Cys-11 from the N terminus of one monomer and Cys-58 and Cys-60 of the other monomer. Two nonregulatory metal binding sites containing zinc are formed between the two antiparallel alpha6 helices at the dimerization interface. This is the first reported three-dimensional structure of a member of the ArsR/SmtB family with regulatory metal binding sites at the DNA binding domain and the first structure of a transcription repressor that responds to the heavy metals Cd(II) and Pb(II).

  11. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  12. Compositional Dictionaries for Domain Adaptive Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Qiang Qiu; Chellappa, Rama

    2015-12-01

    We present a dictionary learning approach to compensate for the transformation of faces due to the changes in view point, illumination, resolution, and so on. The key idea of our approach is to force domain-invariant sparse coding, i.e., designing a consistent sparse representation of the same face in different domains. In this way, the classifiers trained on the sparse codes in the source domain consisting of frontal faces can be applied to the target domain (consisting of faces in different poses, illumination conditions, and so on) without much loss in recognition accuracy. The approach is to first learn a domain base dictionary, and then describe each domain shift (identity, pose, and illumination) using a sparse representation over the base dictionary. The dictionary adapted to each domain is expressed as the sparse linear combinations of the base dictionary. In the context of face recognition, with the proposed compositional dictionary approach, a face image can be decomposed into sparse representations for a given subject, pose, and illumination. This approach has three advantages. First, the extracted sparse representation for a subject is consistent across domains, and enables pose and illumination insensitive face recognition. Second, sparse representations for pose and illumination can be subsequently used to estimate the pose and illumination condition of a face image. Last, by composing sparse representations for the subject and the different domains, we can also perform pose alignment and illumination normalization. Extensive experiments using two public face data sets are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for face recognition.

  13. Inhibitory role of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) on cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2005-08-29

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in all oxygen-utilizing organisms. Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) as one of antioxidant enzymes may play a protective role against the oxidative damage caused by ROS. In order to define the role of Prx II in organismal aging, we evaluated cellular senescence in Prx II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF). As compared to wild type MEF, cellular senescence was accelerated in Prx II(-/-) MEF. Senescence-associated (SA)-beta-galactosidase (Gal)-positive cell formation was about 30% higher in Prx II(-/-) MEF. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment attenuated SA-beta-Gal-positive cell formation. Prx II(-/-) MEF exhibited the higher G2/M (41%) and lower S (1.6%) phase cells as compared to 24% and 7.3% [corrected] in wild type MEF, respectively. A high increase in the p16 and a slight increase in the p21 and p53 levels were detected in PrxII(-/-) MEF cells. The cellular senescence of Prx II(-/-) MEF was correlated with the organismal aging of Prx II(-/-) mouse skin. While extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) MEF, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) skin. These results suggest that Prx II may function as an enzymatic antioxidant to prevent cellular senescence and skin aging.

  14. dcGOR: an R package for analysing ontologies and protein domain annotations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai

    2014-10-01

    I introduce an open-source R package 'dcGOR' to provide the bioinformatics community with the ease to analyse ontologies and protein domain annotations, particularly those in the dcGO database. The dcGO is a comprehensive resource for protein domain annotations using a panel of ontologies including Gene Ontology. Although increasing in popularity, this database needs statistical and graphical support to meet its full potential. Moreover, there are no bioinformatics tools specifically designed for domain ontology analysis. As an add-on package built in the R software environment, dcGOR offers a basic infrastructure with great flexibility and functionality. It implements new data structure to represent domains, ontologies, annotations, and all analytical outputs as well. For each ontology, it provides various mining facilities, including: (i) domain-based enrichment analysis and visualisation; (ii) construction of a domain (semantic similarity) network according to ontology annotations; and (iii) significance analysis for estimating a contact (statistical significance) network. To reduce runtime, most analyses support high-performance parallel computing. Taking as inputs a list of protein domains of interest, the package is able to easily carry out in-depth analyses in terms of functional, phenotypic and diseased relevance, and network-level understanding. More importantly, dcGOR is designed to allow users to import and analyse their own ontologies and annotations on domains (taken from SCOP, Pfam and InterPro) and RNAs (from Rfam) as well. The package is freely available at CRAN for easy installation, and also at GitHub for version control. The dedicated website with reproducible demos can be found at http://supfam.org/dcGOR.

  15. The N-Terminal Domain of the Arenavirus L Protein Is an RNA Endonuclease Essential in mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Benjamin; Coutard, Bruno; Lelke, Michaela; Ferron, François; Kerber, Romy; Jamal, Saïd; Frangeul, Antoine; Baronti, Cécile; Charrel, Rémi; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Vonrhein, Clemens; Lescar, Julien; Bricogne, Gérard; Günther, Stephan; Canard, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Arenaviridae synthesize viral mRNAs using short capped primers presumably acquired from cellular transcripts by a ‘cap-snatching’ mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure and functional characterization of the N-terminal 196 residues (NL1) of the L protein from the prototypic arenavirus: lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The NL1 domain is able to bind and cleave RNA. The 2.13 Å resolution crystal structure of NL1 reveals a type II endonuclease α/β architecture similar to the N-terminal end of the influenza virus PA protein. Superimposition of both structures, mutagenesis and reverse genetics studies reveal a unique spatial arrangement of key active site residues related to the PD…(D/E)XK type II endonuclease signature sequence. We show that this endonuclease domain is conserved and active across the virus families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Orthomyxoviridae and propose that the arenavirus NL1 domain is the Arenaviridae cap-snatching endonuclease. PMID:20862324

  16. Domain-decomposed preconditionings for transport operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The performance was tested of five different interface preconditionings for domain decomposed convection diffusion problems, including a novel one known as the spectral probe, while varying mesh parameters, Reynolds number, ratio of subdomain diffusion coefficients, and domain aspect ratio. The preconditioners are representative of the range of practically computable possibilities that have appeared in the domain decomposition literature for the treatment of nonoverlapping subdomains. It is shown that through a large number of numerical examples that no single preconditioner can be considered uniformly superior or uniformly inferior to the rest, but that knowledge of particulars, including the shape and strength of the convection, is important in selecting among them in a given problem.

  17. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  18. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  19. An introduction to recognizing functional domains.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2006-10-01

    This unit provides an overview of issues involved in domain recognition in protein and DNA sequences. It opens with a discussion of the two primary methods of domain representation, namely consensus sequences and alignment matrices (e.g., the log-odds matrix). The unit continues with a brief overview of some of the resources available for identifying functional domains in nucleotide sequences (e.g., TRANSFAC). In addition, it reviews databases such as Pfam, InterPro and Blocks, which are available for protein analysis.

  20. Inferring Evolutionary Scenarios for Protein Domain Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, John; Krause, Roland; Eulenstein, Oliver

    Essential cellular processes are controlled by functional interactions of protein domains, which can be inferred from their evolutionary histories. Methods to reconstruct these histories are challenged by the complexity of reconstructing macroevolutionary events. In this work we model these events using a novel network-like structure that represents the evolution of domain combinations, called plexus. We describe an algorithm to find a plexus that represents the evolution of a given collection of domain histories as phylogenetic trees with the minimum number of macroevolutionary events, and demonstrate its effectiveness in practice.

  1. Cross domains Arabic named entity recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmari, S. Saad; Abdullatif Al-Johar, B.

    2016-07-01

    Named Entity Recognition (NER) plays an important role in many Natural Language Processing (NLP) applications such as; Information Extraction (IE), Question Answering (QA), Text Clustering, Text Summarization and Word Sense Disambiguation. This paper presents the development and implementation of domain independent system to recognize three types of Arabic named entities. The system works based on a set of domain independent grammar-rules along with Arabic part of speech tagger in addition to gazetteers and lists of trigger words. The experimental results shown, that the system performed as good as other systems with better results in some cases of cross-domains corpora.

  2. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  3. The Oct-1 POU-specific domain can stimulate small nuclear RNA gene transcription by stabilizing the basal transcription complex SNAPc.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, V; Cleary, M A; Herr, W; Hernandez, N

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II and III human small nuclear RNA promoters have a common basal element, the proximal sequence element, which binds the TATA box-binding protein-containing complex SNAPc. They also contain an enhancer characterized by a highly conserved octamer sequence, which constitutes a binding site for the broadly expressed POU domain transcription factor Oct-1. The POU domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain consisting of a POU-homeo (POUH) domain and a POU-specific (POUs) domain joined by a flexible linker. Here, we show that the Oct-1 POU domain but not the related Pit-1 POU domain can facilitate the binding of SNAPc to the proximal sequence element, and activate transcription. The effect is probably mediated by protein-protein contacts, and 1 of 30 amino acid differences between the Oct-1 and Pit-1 POUs domains is the key determinant for the differential interaction with SNAPc and the ability to activate transcription. These results show that a function that is the hallmark of activation domains, namely, recruitment of a basal transcription complex resulting in activation of transcription, can be performed by a DNA-binding domain. In this case, subtle changes between activator DNA-binding domains, as subtle as a single amino acid difference, can profoundly affect interaction with the basal transcription machinery. PMID:8628262

  4. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E

    2015-12-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132-713) and STAT3 (127-722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition.

  5. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132–713) and STAT3 (127–722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition. PMID:26553978

  6. Dandelion PPO-1/PPO-2 domain-swaps: the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum and the linker affects SDS-mediated activation and stability.

    PubMed

    Leufken, Christine M; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E

    2015-02-01

    Plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have a conserved three-domain structure: (i) the N-terminal domain (containing the active site) is connected via (ii) a linker to (iii) the C-terminal domain. The latter covers the active site, thereby maintaining the enzyme in a latent state. Activation can be achieved with SDS but little is known about the mechanism. We prepared domain-swap variants of dandelion PPO-1 and PPO-2 to test the specific functions of individual domains and their impact on enzyme characteristics. Our experiments revealed that the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum curve and has a strong influence on the optimal pH value. The linker determines the SDS concentration required for full activation. It also influences the SDS concentration required for half maximal activation (kSDS) and the stability of the enzyme during prolonged incubation in buffers containing SDS, but the N-terminal domain has the strongest effect on these parameters. The N-terminal domain also determines the IC50 of SDS and the stability in buffers containing or lacking SDS. We propose that the linker and C-terminal domain fine-tune the activation of plant PPOs. The C-terminal domain adjusts the pH optimum and the linker probably contains an SDS-binding/interaction site that influences inactivation and determines the SDS concentration required for activation. For the first time, we have determined the influence of the three PPO domains on enzyme activation and stability providing insight into the regulation and activation mechanisms of type-3 copper proteins in general.

  7. A Specific Structural Requirement for Ergosterol in Long-chain Fatty Acid Synthesis Mutants Important for Maintaining Raft Domains in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenkolb, Marlis; Zenzmaier, Christoph; Leitner, Erich; Schneiter, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Fungal sphingolipids contain ceramide with a very-long-chain fatty acid (C26). To investigate the physiological significance of the C26-substitution on this lipid, we performed a screen for mutants that are synthetically lethal with ELO3. Elo3p is a component of the ER-associated fatty acid elongase and is required for the final elongation cycle to produce C26 from C22/C24 fatty acids. elo3Δ mutant cells thus contain C22/C24- instead of the natural C26-substituted ceramide. We now report that under these conditions, an otherwise nonessential, but also fungal-specific, structural modification of the major sterol of yeast, ergosterol, becomes essential, because mutations in ELO3 are synthetically lethal with mutations in ERG6. Erg6p catalyzes the methylation of carbon atom 24 in the aliphatic side chain of sterol. The lethality of an elo3Δ erg6Δ double mutant is rescued by supplementation with ergosterol but not with cholesterol, indicating a vital structural requirement for the ergosterol-specific methyl group. To characterize this structural requirement in more detail, we generated a strain that is temperature sensitive for the function of Erg6p in an elo3Δ mutant background. Examination of raft association of the GPI-anchored Gas1p and plasma membrane ATPase, Pma1p, in the conditional elo3Δ erg6ts double mutant, revealed a specific defect of the mutant to maintain raft association of preexisting Pma1p. Interestingly, in an elo3Δ mutant at 37°C, newly synthesized Pma1p failed to enter raft domains early in the biosynthetic pathway, and upon arrival at the plasma membrane was rerouted to the vacuole for degradation. These observations indicate that the C26 fatty acid substitution on lipids is important for establishing raft association of Pma1p and stabilizing the protein at the cell surface. Analysis of raft lipids in the conditional mutant strain revealed a selective enrichment of ergosterol in detergent-resistant membrane domains, indicating that specific

  8. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles.

  9. Supporting multiple domains in a single reuse repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David

    1992-01-01

    Domain analysis typically results in the construction of a domain-specific repository. Such a repository imposes artificial boundaries on the sharing of similar assets between related domains. A lattice-based approach to repository modeling can preserve a reuser's domain specific view of the repository, while avoiding replication of commonly used assets and supporting a more general perspective on domain interrelationships.

  10. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  11. FHA domains: Phosphopeptide binding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Ahmad W; Matthews, Lindsay A; Guarné, Alba

    2016-12-08

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are small phosphopeptide recognition modules found in eubacterial and eukaryotic, but not archeal, genomes. Although they were originally found in forkhead-type transcription factors, they have now been identified in many other signaling proteins. FHA domains share a remarkably conserved fold despite very low sequence conservation. They only have five conserved amino acids that are important for binding to phosphorylated epitopes. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that FHA domains can mediate many interactions that do not depend on their ability to recognize a phosphorylated threonine. In this review, we present structural and biochemical work that has unveiled novel interaction interfaces on FHA domains. We discuss how these non-canonical interactions modulate the recognition of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated substrates, as well as protein oligomerization - events that collectively determine FHA function.

  12. Time-domain flicker measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseli, Joseph

    1999-04-01

    The visibility of flicker on a display depends upon many factors, including the observer's sensitivity to flicker. Whenever flicker is observed, it is probably undesirable and often unacceptable. Much has been written about flicker, its perception, and its variability. Methods have been presented to the industry that use frequency domain analysis of measured flicker response. Here we prose an alternate method to quantify flicker in the time domain, just as people see it, and we will try to understand how the measurements relate to what people see. Both the frequency domain and time domain flicker measurements can be found in the Video Electronics Standards Association Flat Panel Display Measurements Standard. An attempt is made to compare the two methods and show how the simpler measurement can be employed for many display technologies.

  13. Domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Hu, Xiukun; Liebing, Niklas; Sievers, Sibylle; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2015-10-01

    The interplay between charge, spin, and heat currents in magnetic nanostructures subjected to a temperature gradient has led to a variety of novel effects and promising applications studied in the fast-growing field of spin caloritronics. Here, we explore the magnetothermoelectrical properties of an individual magnetic domain wall in a permalloy nanowire. In thermal gradients of the order of few K /μ m along the long wire axis, we find a clear magneto-Seebeck signature due to the presence of a single domain wall. The observed domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect can be explained by the magnetization-dependent Seebeck coefficient of permalloy in combination with the local spin configuration of the domain wall.

  14. Magnified time-domain ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2017-04-01

    Ghost imaging allows the imaging of an object without directly seeing this object. Originally demonstrated in the spatial domain, it was recently shown that ghost imaging can be transposed into the time domain to detect ultrafast signals, even in the presence of distortion. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a temporal ghost imaging scheme which generates a 5× magnified ghost image of an ultrafast waveform. Inspired by shadow imaging in the spatial domain and building on the dispersive Fourier transform of an incoherent supercontinuum in an optical fiber, the approach overcomes the resolution limit of standard time-domain ghost imaging generally imposed by the detectors speed. The method can be scaled up to higher magnification factors using longer fiber lengths and light source with shorter duration.

  15. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  16. Investigations on polarimetric terahertz frequency domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yandong; Zhang, Banghong; Notake, Takashi; Minamide, Hiroaki; Olivo, Malini; Sugii, Shigeki

    2014-04-01

    A polarimetric Terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy system is presented which has an additional polarization measurement function at the Terahertz band. The achromatic Terahertz waveplate, which acts as the key device in the system, is also presented.

  17. Epistemic Analysis of Interrogative Domains using Cuboids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Cameron; Hughes, Tracey

    We are interested in analyzing the propositional knowledge extracted by an epistemic agent from interrogative domains. The interrogative domains that have our current focus are taken from transcripts of legal trials, congressional hearings, or law enforcement interrogations. These transcripts have be encoded in XML or HTML formats. The agent uses these transcripts as a primary knowledge source. The complexity, size, scope and potentially conflicting nature of transcripts from interrogative domains bring into question the quality of propositional knowledge that can be garnered by the agent. Epistemic Cuboids or Cubes are used as a knowledge analysis technique that helps determine the quality and quantity of the propositional knowledge extracted by an epistemic agent from an interrogative domain. In this paper we explore how 'Epistemic Cubes' can be used to evaluate the nature of the agent's propositional knowledge.

  18. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes.

  19. Time-Domain vs. Frequency-Domain CSEM: Implications for Marine Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, D. M.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The frequency-domain marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method is now routinely applied to map resistive hydrocarbons buried beneath the seabed in deepwater. Alternatively, it has been suggested that time-domain CSEM methods may offer improved resolution of difficult targets such as deeply buried reservoirs. Furthermore, time-domain methods may overcome a sensitivity limitation imposed by the airwave saturation that is experienced for shallow-water frequency-domain CSEM. In order to examine and test these claims, we have developed a modeling code for computing time-domain responses for layered 1D models with arbitrarily located and oriented transmitters and receivers. Our code extends the open-source frequency domain code Dipole1D by efficiently computing the time-domain step-on and impulse responses by Fourier transformation of the frequency-domain kernels. By applying a realistic noise model to synthetic data generated from this code, we systematically examine the sensitivity and resolution of time-domain and frequency-domain CSEM to representative targets of interest for offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploration surveys of seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal systems. These studies have practical implications for marine EM survey systems that use either towed or stationary transmitters and receivers.

  20. Between-domain relations of students' academic emotions and their judgments of school domain similarity

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Thomas; Haag, Ludwig; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Keller, Melanie M.; Frenzel, Anne C.; Collier, Antonie P. M.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to deepen our understanding of the between-domain relations of academic emotions, a series of three studies was conducted. We theorized that between-domain relations of trait (i.e., habitual) emotions reflected students' judgments of domain similarities, whereas between-domain relations of state (i.e., momentary) emotions did not. This supposition was based on the accessibility model of emotional self-report, according to which individuals' beliefs tend to strongly impact trait, but not state emotions. The aim of Study 1 (interviews; N = 40; 8th and 11th graders) was to gather salient characteristics of academic domains from students' perspective. In Study 2 (N = 1709; 8th and 11th graders) the 13 characteristics identified in Study 1 were assessed along with academic emotions in four different domains (mathematics, physics, German, and English) using a questionnaire-based trait assessment. With respect to the same domains, state emotions were assessed in Study 3 (N = 121; 8th and 11th graders) by employing an experience sampling approach. In line with our initial assumptions, between-domain relations of trait but not state academic emotions reflected between-domain relations of domain characteristics. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25374547