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Sample records for nonlinear charge transport

  1. Charge fluctuations in nonlinear heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergs, Niklas M.; Hörig, Christoph B. M.; Wegewijs, Maarten R.; Schuricht, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    We show that charge fluctuation processes are crucial for the nonlinear heat conductance through an interacting nanostructure, even far from a resonance. We illustrate this for an Anderson quantum dot accounting for the first two leading orders of the tunneling in a master equation. The often made assumption that off-resonant transport proceeds entirely by virtual occupation of charge states, underlying exchange-scattering models, can fail dramatically for heat transport. The identified energy-transport resonances in the Coulomb blockade regime provide qualitative information about relaxation processes, for instance, by a strong negative differential heat conductance relative to the heat current. These can go unnoticed in the charge current, making nonlinear heat-transport spectroscopy with energy-level control a promising experimental tool.

  2. Memory and nonlinear transport effects in charging-discharging of a supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaikin, V. V.; Ambrozevich, A. S.; Sibatov, R. T.; Ambrozevich, S. A.; Morozova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the results of analysis of the kinetics of charge-discharge current of Panasonic supercapacitors in a wide range of time from 10-1 to 104 s. The non-Debye behavior of relaxation observed earlier by us and other authors is confirmed experimentally, and the influence of the supercapacitor charging regime on this process for various previous histories (values of applied voltage, charging time, and load resistance) is analyzed. The results are compared with available experimental data for paper-oil and electrolytic capacitors and with the results of calculations in the linear response model. It is found that in contrast to conventional capacitors, the response of the supercapacitor under investigation to variations of the charging regime does not match the linear response model. The relation of this nonlinearity to processes in the double electric layer, the morphology of the porous electrode, and the effect of charge reversal in pores is considered.

  3. Electromagnetic radiation influence on nonlinear charge and energy transport in biosystems.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L; Cruzeiro-Hansson, L; Eremko, A

    1999-06-01

    The influence of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on charge and energy transport processes in biological systems is studied in the light of the soliton model. It is shown that in the spectrum of biological effects of EMR there are two frequency resonances corresponding to qualitatively different frequency dependent effects of EMR on solitons. One of them is connected with the quasiresonance dynamic response of solitons to the EMR. At EMR frequencies close to the dynamic resonance frequency the solitons absorb energy from the field and generate intensive vibrational modes in the macromolecule. The second EMR resonance is connected with soliton decay due to the quantum mechanical transition of the system from the bound soliton state into the excited unbound states.

  4. Nonlinear chiral transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ishii, Takeaki; Pu, Shi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We study the nonlinear responses of relativistic chiral matter to the external fields such as the electric field E , gradients of temperature and chemical potential, ∇T and ∇μ . Using the kinetic theory with Berry curvature corrections under the relaxation time approximation, we compute the transport coefficients of possible new electric currents that are forbidden in usual chirally symmetric matter but are allowed in chirally asymmetric matter by parity. In particular, we find a new type of electric current proportional to ∇μ ×E due to the interplay between the effects of the Berry curvature and collisions. We also derive an analog of the "Wiedemann-Franz" law specific for anomalous nonlinear transport in relativistic chiral matter.

  5. BRST charges for finite nonlinear algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. P.; Krivonos, S. O.; Ogievetsky, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    Some ingredients of the BRST construction for quantum Lie algebras are applied to a wider class of quadratic algebras of constraints. We build the BRST charge for a quantum Lie algebra with three generators and ghost-anti-ghosts commuting with constraints. We consider a one-parametric family of quadratic algebras with three generators and show that the BRST charge acquires the conventional form after a redefinition of ghosts. The modified ghosts form a quadratic algebra. The family possesses a nonlinear involution, which implies the existence of two independent BRST charges for each algebra in the family. These BRST charges anticommute and form a double BRST complex.

  6. Scattering theory of nonlinear thermoelectric transport.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2013-01-11

    We investigate nonlinear transport properties of quantum conductors in response to both electrical and thermal driving forces. Within the scattering approach, we determine the nonequilibrium screening potential of a generic mesoscopic system and find that its response is dictated by particle and entropic injectivities which describe the charge and entropy transfer during transport. We illustrate our model analyzing the voltage and thermal rectification of a resonant tunneling barrier. Importantly, we discuss interaction induced contributions to the thermopower in the presence of large temperature differences.

  7. Charging up Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen R.

    1994-01-01

    In Antelope Valley, California, a regional transportation consortium, cooperatively run by six adjacent school districts, is operating an electric-powered school bus as a pilot project. Although the prototype bus cost nearly six times more than a traditional school bus, lower operating and maintenance expenses and safety factors appeal to many…

  8. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  9. Nonlinear fluorescence imaging by photoinduced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Kentaro; Shi, Lanting; Mizukami, Shin; Yamanaka, Masahito; Tanabe, Mamoru; Gong, Wei-Tao; Palonpon, Almar F.; Kawano, Shogo; Kawata, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-04-01

    Manipulation of the optical property of fluorescent probes has been a powerful strategy to establish super-resolution microscopy. We describe a new strategy to realize a probe with a nonlinear fluorescence response by using photoinduced charge separation. In this scheme, the first photon is used for the generation of the charge-separated state and the second photon is for fluorescence excitation. This stepwise two-photon absorption was confirmed by detection of a second-order nonlinear fluorescence response. Transient absorption spectra studies and simulation indicate that fluorescence is emitted through the photophysical pathways we proposed. Fluorescence imaging of biological cells showed marked improvements in image contrast and resolution, demonstrating the usefulness of the fluorescent probe in laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  10. Semiconductor nanocrystals in photoconductive polymers: Charge generation and charge transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Herron, Norman; Suna, A.

    1996-10-01

    A new class of photoconductive polymer composites, based on semiconductor nanocrystals (clusters) and carder-transporting polymers, have been developed. These materials are interesting for their potentials in laser printing, imaging, and photorefractives. We will describe material synthesis, charge transport and charge generation mechanisms. In particular, a model of field-dependent charge generation and separation in nonpolar media (e.g. polymers) will be discussed.

  11. DNA charge transport: Moving beyond 1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Zhang, William B.; Liu, Chaoren; Zhang, Peng; Balaeff, Alexander; Beratan, David N.

    2016-10-01

    Charge transport across novel DNA junctions has been studied for several decades. From early attempts to move charge across DNA double crossover junctions to recent studies on DNA three-way junctions and G4 motifs, it is becoming clear that efficient cross-junction charge migration requires strong base-to-base electronic coupling at the junction, facilitated by favorable pi-stacking. We review recent progress toward the goal of manipulating and controlling charge transport through DNA junctions.

  12. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  13. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores.

    PubMed

    Peters, P B; van Roij, R; Bazant, M Z; Biesheuvel, P M

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the classical problem of flow of electrolyte solutions through charged capillary nanopores or nanotubes as described by the capillary pore model (also called "space charge" theory). This theory assumes very long and thin pores and uses a one-dimensional flux-force formalism which relates fluxes (electrical current, salt flux, and fluid velocity) and driving forces (difference in electric potential, salt concentration, and pressure). We analyze the general case with overlapping electric double layers in the pore and a nonzero axial salt concentration gradient. The 3×3 matrix relating these quantities exhibits Onsager symmetry and we report a significant new simplification for the diagonal element relating axial salt flux to the gradient in chemical potential. We prove that Onsager symmetry is preserved under changes of variables, which we illustrate by transformation to a different flux-force matrix given by Gross and Osterle [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 228 (1968)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1669814]. The capillary pore model is well suited to describe the nonlinear response of charged membranes or nanofluidic devices for electrokinetic energy conversion and water desalination, as long as the transverse ion profiles remain in local quasiequilibrium. As an example, we evaluate electrical power production from a salt concentration difference by reverse electrodialysis, using an efficiency versus power diagram. We show that since the capillary pore model allows for axial gradients in salt concentration, partial loops in current, salt flux, or fluid flow can develop in the pore. Predictions for macroscopic transport properties using a reduced model, where the potential and concentration are assumed to be invariant with radial coordinate ("uniform potential" or "fine capillary pore" model), are close to results of the full model.

  14. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, P. B.; van Roij, R.; Bazant, M. Z.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the classical problem of flow of electrolyte solutions through charged capillary nanopores or nanotubes as described by the capillary pore model (also called "space charge" theory). This theory assumes very long and thin pores and uses a one-dimensional flux-force formalism which relates fluxes (electrical current, salt flux, and fluid velocity) and driving forces (difference in electric potential, salt concentration, and pressure). We analyze the general case with overlapping electric double layers in the pore and a nonzero axial salt concentration gradient. The 3 ×3 matrix relating these quantities exhibits Onsager symmetry and we report a significant new simplification for the diagonal element relating axial salt flux to the gradient in chemical potential. We prove that Onsager symmetry is preserved under changes of variables, which we illustrate by transformation to a different flux-force matrix given by Gross and Osterle [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 228 (1968), 10.1063/1.1669814]. The capillary pore model is well suited to describe the nonlinear response of charged membranes or nanofluidic devices for electrokinetic energy conversion and water desalination, as long as the transverse ion profiles remain in local quasiequilibrium. As an example, we evaluate electrical power production from a salt concentration difference by reverse electrodialysis, using an efficiency versus power diagram. We show that since the capillary pore model allows for axial gradients in salt concentration, partial loops in current, salt flux, or fluid flow can develop in the pore. Predictions for macroscopic transport properties using a reduced model, where the potential and concentration are assumed to be invariant with radial coordinate ("uniform potential" or "fine capillary pore" model), are close to results of the full model.

  15. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores.

    PubMed

    Peters, P B; van Roij, R; Bazant, M Z; Biesheuvel, P M

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the classical problem of flow of electrolyte solutions through charged capillary nanopores or nanotubes as described by the capillary pore model (also called "space charge" theory). This theory assumes very long and thin pores and uses a one-dimensional flux-force formalism which relates fluxes (electrical current, salt flux, and fluid velocity) and driving forces (difference in electric potential, salt concentration, and pressure). We analyze the general case with overlapping electric double layers in the pore and a nonzero axial salt concentration gradient. The 3×3 matrix relating these quantities exhibits Onsager symmetry and we report a significant new simplification for the diagonal element relating axial salt flux to the gradient in chemical potential. We prove that Onsager symmetry is preserved under changes of variables, which we illustrate by transformation to a different flux-force matrix given by Gross and Osterle [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 228 (1968)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1669814]. The capillary pore model is well suited to describe the nonlinear response of charged membranes or nanofluidic devices for electrokinetic energy conversion and water desalination, as long as the transverse ion profiles remain in local quasiequilibrium. As an example, we evaluate electrical power production from a salt concentration difference by reverse electrodialysis, using an efficiency versus power diagram. We show that since the capillary pore model allows for axial gradients in salt concentration, partial loops in current, salt flux, or fluid flow can develop in the pore. Predictions for macroscopic transport properties using a reduced model, where the potential and concentration are assumed to be invariant with radial coordinate ("uniform potential" or "fine capillary pore" model), are close to results of the full model. PMID:27300979

  16. Magnetosymmetries of nonlinear transport in dissipative conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkihal, Salil; Segal, Dvira

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate with numerically exact simulations that nonlinear transport coefficients obey certain magnetic field symmetries. Our model includes a two terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot located at each of its arms. One quantum dot is interacting electrostatically with a reservoir, a fermionic environment made of a quantum dot coupled to one or more leads. We study the dynamics and steady state properties of this many-body out of equilibrium setup, by using a numerically exact influence functional path integral technique (Phys. Rev.B 82, 205323 (2010)). We show that, in agreement with phenomenological treatments of dephasing and mean field approaches, even (odd) conductance terms obey odd (even) symmetry with threading magnetic flux, as long as system acquires spatial inversion symmetry. When spatial asymmetry is introduced, magnetic field symmetries are broken, but more general symmetries with respect to left-right interchange are obeyed. Finally we also numerically demonstrate that double quantum dot Aharonov-Bohm interferometer coupled electrostatically to a fermionic environment can act as a charge current rectifier when two conditions are met simultaneously (I)broken time reversal and (II) many body effects. Authors acknowledge funding from NSERC, University of Toronto Department of Chemistry, Queen Elizabeth II graduate scholarship, Gilchrist fellowship.

  17. Weakly nonlinear electrophoresis of a highly charged colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Zeyde, Roman; Yavneh, Irad; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    At large zeta potentials, surface conduction becomes appreciable in thin-double-layer electrokinetic transport. In the linear weak-field regime, where this effect is quantified by the Dukhin number, it is manifested in non-Smoluchowski electrophoretic mobilities. In this paper we go beyond linear response, employing the recently derived macroscale model of Schnitzer and Yariv ["Macroscale description of electrokinetic flows at large zeta potentials: Nonlinear surface conduction," Phys. Rev. E 86, 021503 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021503] as the infrastructure for a weakly nonlinear analysis of spherical-particle electrophoresis. A straightforward perturbation in the field strength is frustrated by the failure to satisfy the far-field conditions, representing a non-uniformity of the weak-field approximation at large distances away from the particle, where salt advection becomes comparable to diffusion. This is remedied using inner-outer asymptotic expansions in the spirit of Acrivos and Taylor ["Heat and mass transfer from single spheres in Stokes flow," Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630], with the inner region representing the particle neighborhood and the outer region corresponding to distances scaling inversely with the field magnitude. This singular scheme furnishes an asymptotic correction to the electrophoretic velocity, proportional to the applied field cubed, which embodies a host of nonlinear mechanisms unfamiliar from linear electrokinetic theories. These include the effect of induced zeta-potential inhomogeneity, animated by concentration polarization, on electro-osmosis and diffuso-osmosis; bulk advection of salt; nonuniform bulk conductivity; Coulomb body forces acting on bulk volumetric charge; and the nonzero electrostatic force exerted upon the otherwise screened particle-layer system. A numerical solution of the macroscale model validates our weakly nonlinear analysis.

  18. Space charge induced nonlinear effects in quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xiong, Xingchuang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Tao; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical method was proposed in this work to study space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps, including ion trapping, ion motion frequency shift, and nonlinear effects on ion trajectories. The spatial distributions of ion clouds within quadrupole ion traps were first modeled for both 3D and linear ion traps. It is found that the electric field generated by space charge can be expressed as a summation of even-order fields, such as quadrupole field, octopole field, etc. Ion trajectories were then solved using the harmonic balance method. Similar to high-order field effects, space charge will result in an "ocean wave" shape nonlinear resonance curve for an ion under a dipolar excitation. However, the nonlinear resonance curve will be totally shifted to lower frequencies and bend towards ion secular frequency as ion motion amplitude increases, which is just the opposite effect of any even-order field. Based on theoretical derivations, methods to reduce space charge effects were proposed.

  19. Charge and spin transport in mesoscopic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, M J; Hübler, F; Kolenda, S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Non-equilibrium charge transport in superconductors has been investigated intensely in the 1970s and 1980s, mostly in the vicinity of the critical temperature. Much less attention has been paid to low temperatures and the role of the quasiparticle spin. Results: We report here on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures at very low temperatures. By comparing the nonlocal conductance obtained by using ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors, we discriminate charge and spin degrees of freedom. We observe spin injection and long-range transport of pure, chargeless spin currents in the regime of large Zeeman splitting. We elucidate charge and spin transport by comparison to theoretical models. Conclusion: The observed long-range chargeless spin transport opens a new path to manipulate and utilize the quasiparticle spin in superconductor nanostructures. PMID:24605283

  20. Nonlinear acceleration of SN transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, Erin D; Warsa, James S; Calef, Matthew T

    2010-12-20

    The use of nonlinear iterative methods, Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) in particular, for solving eigenvalue problems in transport applications has recently become an active subject of research. While JFNK has been shown to be effective for k-eigenvalue problems, there are a number of input parameters that impact computational efficiency, making it difficult to implement efficiently in a production code using a single set of default parameters. We show that different selections for the forcing parameter in particular can lead to large variations in the amount of computational work for a given problem. In contrast, we present a nonlinear subspace method that sits outside and effectively accelerates nonlinear iterations of a given form and requires only a single input parameter, the subspace size. It is shown to consistently and significantly reduce the amount of computational work when applied to fixed-point iteration, and this combination of methods is shown to be more efficient than JFNK for our application.

  1. Modeling charge transport in organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jenny; Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Kirkpatrick, James; Frost, Jarvist M

    2009-11-17

    The performance of an organic photovoltaic cell depends critically on the mobility of charge carriers within the constituent molecular semiconductor materials. However, a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales control charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. This Account describes a set of computational methods, specifically molecular modeling methods, to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. Using case studies, we show how this combination of methods can reproduce experimental mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Although currently applied to material systems of high symmetry or well-defined structure, further developments of this approach could address more complex systems such anisotropic or multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers. Even with an approximate treatment of packing disorder, these computational methods simulate experimental mobilities within an order of magnitude at high electric fields. We can both reproduce the relative values of electron and hole mobility in a conjugated small molecule and rationalize those values based on the symmetry of frontier orbitals. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of molecular packing, we can quantitatively replicate vertical charge transport along stacks of discotic liquid crystals which vary only in the structure of their side chains. We can reproduce the trends in mobility with molecular weight for self-organizing polymers using a cheap, coarse

  2. Classical Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin charge for nonlinear algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Lavrov, P. M.

    2007-08-01

    We study the construction of the classical nilpotent canonical Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) charge for the nonlinear gauge algebras, where a commutator (in terms of Poisson brackets) of the constraints is a finite order polynomial of the constraints. Such a polynomial is characterized by the coefficients forming a set of higher order structure constraints. Assuming the set of constraints to be linearly independent, we find the restrictions on the structure constraints when the nilpotent BRST charge can be written in a simple and universal form. In the case of quadratically nonlinear algebras, we find the expression for third order contribution in the ghost fields to the BRST charge without the use of any additional restrictions on the structure constants.

  3. Towards a wave theory of charged beam transport: A collection of thoughts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mari, C.; Torre, A.

    1992-01-01

    We formulate in a rigorous way a wave theory of charged beam linear transport. The Wigner distribution function is introduced and provides the link with classical mechanics. Finally, the von Neumann equation is shown to coincide with the Liouville equation for the nonlinear transport.

  4. 34 nm Charge Transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason; Muren, Natalie; Renfrew, Sara; Barton, Jacqueline

    2011-03-01

    Long-range charge transport through DNA has broad-reaching implications due to its inherent biological recognition capabilities and unmatched capacity to be patterned into precise, nanoscale shapes. We have observed charge transport through 34 nm DNA monolayers (100 base pairs) using DNA-mediated electrochemistry. Cyclic voltammetry of multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100mer DNAs reveal sizable peaks from distally-bound Nile Blue redox probes for well matched duplexes but highly attenuated redox peaks from 100mer monolayers containing a single base pair mismatch, demonstrating that the charge transfer is DNA-mediated. The 100mers on the gold surface are efficiently cleaved by the restriction enzyme RsaI. The 100mers in the DNA film thus adopt conformations that are readily accessible to protein binding and restriction. The ability to assemble well-characterized DNA films with these 100mers permits the demonstration of charge transport over distances surpassing most reports of molecular wires. Supported by funding from the NIH/NIBIB.

  5. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-01

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions. PMID:18851262

  6. Charge transport through inhomogeneous polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhshouri, Kiarash

    The generation of unique properties through mixing of organic semiconductors has enabled improved performance and novel functionalities in organic electronic devices. In organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), isolated phases of a second material within the photoactive layer can act as recombination centers, enhancing the overall device performance. Mixing of flexible polymer semiconductors with high-mobility small organic molecules can yield high-performance flexible thin film transistors. Solution-processed, bulk-heterojunction (BHJ), thin-film organic solar cells rely on the self-assembly of polymer/fullerene donor/acceptor mixtures to create the necessary morphology with a high interfacial area for efficient photocurrent generation. Efficient conversion of absorbed photons into photocurrent requires sufficiently intimate mixing of the donor and acceptor phases such that photogenerated excitons can easily find an interface, as well as a sufficiently large thermodynamic driving force for charge separation at the interface. At the same time, efficient transport of separated charges towards the electrodes requires a certain degree of phase segregation between the two materials, to enable ordered molecular packing within each phase and also minimize interfacial recombination. Despite the importance of creating inhomogeneous mixtures of organic semiconductors and the tremendous recent advances in the performance of the aforementioned devices, it remains a challenge to fully describe the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductor mixtures and understand the effects of structural and morphological parameters on charge transport. Recently, it has been shown that highly regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) and poly[2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno(3,2-b)thiophene] (PBTTT) are promising materials for organic electronic applications due to the relatively high charge carrier mobility, high solubility in different organic solvents and acceptable film

  7. Variational multiscale models for charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei; Zheng, Qiong; Chen, Zhan; Xia, Kelin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a few variational multiscale models for charge transport in complex physical, chemical and biological systems and engineering devices, such as fuel cells, solar cells, battery cells, nanofluidics, transistors and ion channels. An essential ingredient of the present models, introduced in an earlier paper (Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 72, 1562-1622, 2010), is the use of differential geometry theory of surfaces as a natural means to geometrically separate the macroscopic domain from the microscopic domain, meanwhile, dynamically couple discrete and continuum descriptions. Our main strategy is to construct the total energy functional of a charge transport system to encompass the polar and nonpolar free energies of solvation, and chemical potential related energy. By using the Euler-Lagrange variation, coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Nernst-Planck (LB-PNP) equations are derived. The solution of the LB-PNP equations leads to the minimization of the total free energy, and explicit profiles of electrostatic potential and densities of charge species. To further reduce the computational complexity, the Boltzmann distribution obtained from the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is utilized to represent the densities of certain charge species so as to avoid the computationally expensive solution of some Nernst-Planck (NP) equations. Consequently, the coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Boltzmann-Nernst-Planck (LB-PBNP) equations are proposed for charge transport in heterogeneous systems. A major emphasis of the present formulation is the consistency between equilibrium LB-PB theory and non-equilibrium LB-PNP theory at equilibrium. Another major emphasis is the capability of the reduced LB-PBNP model to fully recover the prediction of the LB-PNP model at non-equilibrium settings. To account for the fluid impact on the charge transport, we derive coupled Laplace-Beltrami, Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations from the variational principle

  8. Stochastic acceleration of charged particle in nonlinear wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kaifen

    2003-04-01

    Possibility of stochastic acceleration of charged particle by nonlinear waves is investigated. Spatially regular (SR) and spatiotemporal chaotic (STC) wave solutions evolving from saddle steady wave are tested as the fields. In the non-steady SR field the particle is finally trapped by the wave and averagely gains its group velocity, while in the STC field the particle motion displays trapped-free phases with its averaged velocity larger or smaller than the group velocity depending on the charge sign. A simplified model is established to investigate the acceleration mechanism. By analogy with motor protein, it is found that the virtual pattern of saddle steady wave plays a role of asymmetric potential, which and the nonlinear varying perturbation wave are the two sufficient ingredients for the acceleration in our case.

  9. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-03-30

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  10. Particle transport through hydrogels is charge asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2015-02-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks.

  11. Particle Transport through Hydrogels Is Charge Asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R.; DeRouchey, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks. PMID:25650921

  12. Charged anisotropic matter with linear or nonlinear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Victor; Rahaman, Farook; Ray, Saibal; Chakraborty, Koushik; Kalam, Mehedi

    2010-08-15

    Ivanov pointed out substantial analytical difficulties associated with self-gravitating, static, isotropic fluid spheres when pressure explicitly depends on matter density. Simplifications achieved with the introduction of electric charge were noticed as well. We deal with self-gravitating, charged, anisotropic fluids and get even more flexibility in solving the Einstein-Maxwell equations. In order to discuss analytical solutions we extend Krori and Barua's method to include pressure anisotropy and linear or nonlinear equations of state. The field equations are reduced to a system of three algebraic equations for the anisotropic pressures as well as matter and electrostatic energy densities. Attention is paid to compact sources characterized by positive matter density and positive radial pressure. Arising solutions satisfy the energy conditions of general relativity. Spheres with vanishing net charge contain fluid elements with unbounded proper charge density located at the fluid-vacuum interface. Notably the electric force acting on these fluid elements is finite, although the acting electric field is zero. Net charges can be huge (10{sup 19}C) and maximum electric field intensities are very large (10{sup 23}-10{sup 24} statvolt/cm) even in the case of zero net charge. Inward-directed fluid forces caused by pressure anisotropy may allow equilibrium configurations with larger net charges and electric field intensities than those found in studies of charged isotropic fluids. Links of these results with charged strange quark stars as well as models of dark matter including massive charged particles are highlighted. The van der Waals equation of state leading to matter densities constrained by cubic polynomial equations is briefly considered. The fundamental question of stability is left open.

  13. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  14. Dust Charging and Transport on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-11-29

    In this paper, we review laboratory studies of dust transport on surfaces in plasmas, performed for a number of different mechanisms: 1) Dust particles were levitated in plasma sheaths by electrostatic forces balancing the gravitational force. 2) Dust was observed to spread over and lift off a surface that repels electrons in a plasma. 3) Dust was transported on surfaces having different secondary electron yields in plasma with an electron beam as a consequence of differential charging. 4) We also report a mechanism of dust transport by electric fields occurring at electron beam impact/shadow boundaries. These processes are candidates to explain the formation of dust ponds that were recently observed in craters on the asteroid Eros by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft.

  15. Nonlinear evolution and final fate of (charged) superradiant instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen; Bosch, Pablo; Lehner, Luis

    2016-03-01

    We describe the full nonlinear development of the superradiant instability for a charged massless scalar field, coupled to general relativity and electromagnetism, in the vicinity of a Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black hole. The presence of the negative cosmological constant provides a natural context for considering perfectly reflecting boundary conditions and studying the dynamics as the scalar field interacts repeateadly with the black hole. At early times, small superradiant perturbations grow as expected from linearized studies. Backreaction then causes the black hole to lose charge and mass until the perturbation becomes nonsuperradiant, with the final state described by a stable hairy black hole. For large gauge coupling, the instability extracts a large amount of charge per unit mass, resulting in greater entropy increase. We discuss the implications of the observed behavior for the general problem of superradiance in black hole spacetimes.

  16. Nonlinear fluorescence probe using photoinduced charge separation (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Kentaro; Shi, Lanting; Mizukami, Shin; Yamanaka, Masahito; Tanabe, Mamoru; Gong, Wei-Tao; Palonpon, Almar F.; Kawano, Shogo; Kawata, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-08-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) provides spatial resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit using the nonlinear response of fluorescent molecules. One of the strong advantages of TPEM is that it can be performed using a laser-scanning microscope without a complicated excitation method or computational post-processing. However, TPEM has not been recognized as a super-resolution microscopy due to the use of near-infrared light as excitation source, which provides lower resolution than visible light. In our research, we aimed for the realization of nonlinear fluorescence response with visible light excitation to perform super-resolution imaging using a laser-scanning microscope. The nonlinear fluorescence response with visible light excitation is achieved by developing a probe which provides stepwise two-photon excitation through photoinduced charge separation. The probe named nitro-bisBODIPY consists of two fluorescent molecules (electron donor: D) and one electron acceptor (A), resulting to the structure of D-A-D. Excited by an incident photon, nitro-bisBODIPY generates a charge-separated pair between one of the fluorescent molecules and the acceptor. Fluorescence emission is obtained only when one more incident photon is used to excite the other fluorescent molecule of the probe in the charge-separated state. This stepwise two-photon excitation by nitro-bisBODIPY was confirmed by detection of the 2nd order nonlinear fluorescence response using a confocal microscope with 488 nm CW excitation. The physical model of the stepwise two-photon excitation was investigated by building the energy diagram of nitro-bisBODIPY. Finally, we obtained the improvement of spatial resolution in fluorescence imaging of HeLa cells using nitro-bisBODIPY.

  17. Thermodynamics of charged black holes with a nonlinear electrodynamics source

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Hernan A.; Hassaiene, Mokhtar; Martinez, Cristian

    2009-11-15

    We study the thermodynamical properties of electrically charged black hole solutions of a nonlinear electrodynamics theory defined by a power p of the Maxwell invariant, which is coupled to Einstein gravity in four and higher spacetime dimensions. Depending on the range of the parameter p, these solutions present different asymptotic behaviors. We compute the Euclidean action with the appropriate boundary term in the grand canonical ensemble. The thermodynamical quantities are identified and, in particular, the mass and the charge are shown to be finite for all classes of solutions. Interestingly, a generalized Smarr formula is derived and it is shown that this latter encodes perfectly the different asymptotic behaviors of the black hole solutions. The local stability is analyzed by computing the heat capacity and the electrical permittivity and we find that a set of small black holes is locally stable. In contrast to the standard Reissner-Nordstroem solution, there is a first-order phase transition between a class of these nonlinear charged black holes and the Minkowski spacetime.

  18. Conformation sensitive charge transport in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattias Andersson, L.; Hedström, Svante; Persson, Petter

    2013-11-18

    Temperature dependent charge carrier mobility measurements using field effect transistors and density functional theory calculations are combined to show how the conformation dependent frontier orbital delocalization influences the hole- and electron mobilities in a donor-acceptor based polymer. A conformationally sensitive lowest unoccupied molecular orbital results in an electron mobility that decreases with increasing temperature above room temperature, while a conformationally stable highest occupied molecular orbital is consistent with a conventional hole mobility behavior and also proposed to be one of the reasons for why the material works well as a hole transporter in amorphous bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  19. Nonlinear potential model of space-charge-limited electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litz, M.S.; Golden, J.

    1995-11-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) time-varying nonlinear theory based on the Duffing equation is applied to space-charge limited beams and specifically vircators. This theory classifies test particle trajectories in a modulated nonlinear potential. Two predictions of the theory that can be directly compared to experiment are the final state of electron trajectories and the oscillation frequency of the electrons m the potential well. Experimental measurements of electron flux recorded along the vircator chamber wall correlates well with the numerically integrated final state of electron trajectory in the 1D theory. The oscillation frequency measured in the experiment is shown to be a better match to the oscillation frequency calculated from the nonlinear potential as compared to a parabolic potential (that results from a linear restoring force). In the experiment, random initial conditions arise from beam thermalization and nonuniform electron emission at the surface of the cathode. However, these characteristics alone do not explain the experimentally observed fluctuations in rf power and frequency. The predictions of the time-varying nonlinear potential theory clearly exhibits trends that were observed in the experimental results, in the form of classes of particle trajectories, fluctuations in particle asymptotic states, and particle motion sensitive to the shape of the virtual cathode.

  20. Nonlinear plasma voids (holes) in a charge-varying dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Ait Gougam, Leila; Aoutou, Kamel; Zerguini, Taha Houssine

    2005-09-15

    Nonlinear large amplitude plasma voids are investigated in a charge-varying dusty plasma. Numerical solutions of highly nonlinear equations are carried out including dust charging and ion trapping. The results complement previously published results on this problem. It is found that under certain conditions the effect of dust charge variation can be quite important. In particular, it may be noted that the dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the nonlinear plasma voids.

  1. Dynamics of nonlinear excitations of helically confined charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetaki, A. V.; Stockhofe, J.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-10-01

    We explore the long-time dynamics of a system of identical charged particles trapped on a closed helix. This system has recently been found to exhibit an unconventional deformation of the linear spectrum when tuning the helix radius. Here we show that the same geometrical parameter can affect significantly also the dynamical behavior of an initially broad excitation for long times. In particular, for small values of the radius, the excitation disperses into the whole crystal whereas within a specific narrow regime of larger radii the excitation self-focuses, assuming finally a localized form. Beyond this regime, the excitation defocuses and the dispersion gradually increases again. We analyze this geometrically controlled nonlinear behavior using an effective discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model, which allows us among others to identify a number of breatherlike excitations.

  2. Thermodynamic instability of nonlinearly charged black holes in gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam; Momennia, M.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the violation of Lorentz invariance in quantum gravity, we study black hole solutions in gravity's rainbow in the context of Einstein gravity coupled with various models of nonlinear electrodynamics. We regard an energy dependent spacetime and obtain the related metric functions and electric fields. We show that there is an essential singularity at the origin which is covered by an event horizon. We also compute the conserved and thermodynamical quantities and examine the validity of the first law of thermodynamics in the presence of rainbow functions. Finally, we investigate the thermal stability conditions for these black hole solutions in the context of canonical ensemble. We show that the thermodynamical structure of the solutions depends on the choices of nonlinearity parameters, charge, and energy functions.

  3. Charge transport in single crystal organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei

    Organic electronics have engendered substantial interest in printable, flexible and large-area applications thanks to their low fabrication cost per unit area, chemical versatility and solution processability. Nevertheless, fundamental understanding of device physics and charge transport in organic semiconductors lag somewhat behind, partially due to ubiquitous defects and impurities in technologically useful organic thin films, formed either by vacuum deposition or solution process. In this context, single-crystalline organic semiconductors, or organic single crystals, have therefore provided the ideal system for transport studies. Organic single crystals are characterized by their high chemical purity and outstanding structural perfection, leading to significantly improved electrical properties compared with their thin-film counterparts. Importantly, the surfaces of the crystals are molecularly flat, an ideal condition for building field-effect transistors (FETs). Progress in organic single crystal FETs (SC-FETs) is tremendous during the past decade. Large mobilities ~ 1 - 10 cm2V-1s-1 have been achieved in several crystals, allowing a wide range of electrical, optical, mechanical, structural, and theoretical studies. Several challenges still remain, however, which are the motivation of this thesis. The first challenge is to delineate the crystal structure/electrical property relationship for development of high-performance organic semiconductors. This thesis demonstrates a full spectrum of studies spanning from chemical synthesis, single crystal structure determination, quantum-chemical calculation, SC-OFET fabrication, electrical measurement, photoelectron spectroscopy characterization and extensive device optimization in a series of new rubrene derivatives, motivated by the fact that rubrene is a benchmark semiconductor with record hole mobility ~ 20 cm2V-1s-1. With successful preservation of beneficial pi-stacking structures, these rubrene derivatives form

  4. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  5. Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric response of charged cellular polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kressmann, Reiner

    2001-10-01

    Piezoelectricity in a charged cellular polypropylene, called EMFi, is investigated with respect to nonlinearities to explain the strong differences in longitudinal piezoelectric constants published in the literature and ranging from 90 to 250 pC/N. The inverse constant was measured interferometrically to be 90 pm/V. Quasistatic and dynamic measurements with small loads yielded the same value for the direct constant. The direct constant was also investigated with respect to large-signal behavior becoming noticeable at static and dynamic loads higher than 10 kPa. Both the quasistatic and the dynamic constant increase up to 130 pC/N at such loads. Furthermore, an additional resonance appears under strong loading in the range of about 10 Hz shifting down with increasing load. In addition, the piezoelectric constant increases also with increasing dynamic load under constant static load. The nonlinearity also results in the generation of harmonics. Finally, boundary effects can be detected if just a small area of the sample is loaded. This effect appearing mainly at frequencies below 20 Hz is attributed to airflow between the air bubbles. A load-dependent Young's modulus, mainly responsible for the nonlinear behavior, is calculated from the experiments. It diminishes from 2 to 1.5 MPa at a load of 60 kPa.

  6. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  7. Transport and Structure of Charge Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicarlo, David Anthony

    Experimental studies are presented concerning the transport properties and structure of charge-density waves (CDWs) in rm NbSe_3 and rm K_{0.3}MoO_3. Transport measurements were performed to determine how charged impurities affect the CDW and how the narrow -band noise is created in sliding CDWs. Ti-doped rm NbSe_3 is shown to have a weakly pinned CDW even though Ti is incorporated as a charged impurity. The narrow-band-noise amplitude versus sample volume and impurity concentration is consistent with the narrow-band-noise being generated in the bulk by impurities and a weakly pinned CDW. X-ray scattering measurements were performed to determine how impurities, temperature, normal carriers, and electric fields affect the CDW structure. The periodic CDW scatters x-rays and the sharpness of the scattering is a reflection of the CDW structure. The CDW correlation function and its characteristic length are determined through the competition between the disordering impurity forces and the ordering elastic forces. Added impurities and high temperatures decrease the correlations by increasing the disorder forces and decreasing the CDW order parameter Delta , respectively. For rm NbSe_3, the correlation length l was much greater than the average impurity spacing and depends on impurity density n _{i} and temperature as l ~ Delta^2/n_{i}. In addition, the CDW correlation function decays exponentially in real space; ~ e^{-| {bf r}| /l}. These results are consistent with weak pinning. In rm K_{0.3}MoO _3, the CDW exhibits a different structure than that in rm NbSe_3. Changes occur in the correlation function and peak width at low temperatures. These are possibly due to the freeze out of normal carriers in semiconducting rm K _{0.3}MoO_3.. Longitudinal CDW deformations are observed when the CDW was driven by an external electric field. The electric field, temperature, and position dependence of these deformations are consistent with those required for CDW

  8. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Stout, Robert F; Khair, Aditya S

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of V_{o}/(k_{B}T/e), where V_{o} is the amplitude of the driving voltage and k_{B}T/e is the thermal voltage with k_{B} as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D/λ_{D}L, where D is the ion diffusivity, λ_{D} is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O(V_{o}^{3}) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in V_{o}. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing V_{o}. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer. PMID:26465471

  9. Nonlinear effects on electrophoresis of a charged dielectric nanoparticle in a charged hydrogel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Simanta

    2016-09-01

    The impact of the solid polarization of a charged dielectric particle in gel electrophoresis is studied without imposing a weak-field or a thin Debye length assumption. The electric polarization of a dielectric particle due to an external electric field creates a non-uniform surface charge density, which in turn creates a non-uniform Debye layer at the solid-gel interface. The solid polarization of the particle, the polarization of the double layer, and the electro-osmosis of mobile ions within the hydrogel medium create a nonlinear effect on the electrophoresis. We have incorporated those nonlinear effects by considering the electrokinetics governed by the Stokes-Brinkman-Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations. We have computed the governing nonlinear coupled set of equations numerically by adopting a finite volume based iterative algorithm. Our numerical method is tested for accuracy by comparing with several existing results on free-solution electrophoresis as well as results based on the Debye-Hückel approximation. Our computed result shows that the electrophoretic velocity decreases with the rise of the particle dielectric permittivity constant and attains a saturation limit at large values of permittivity. A significant impact of the solid polarization is found in gel electrophoresis compared to the free-solution electrophoresis.

  10. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  11. Sediment transport under wave groups: Relative importance between nonlinear waveshape and nonlinear boundary layer streaming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yu, X.; Hsu, T.-J.; Hanes, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment transport under nonlinear waves in a predominately sheet flow condition is investigated using a two-phase model. Specifically, we study the relative importance between the nonlinear waveshape and nonlinear boundary layer streaming on cross-shore sand transport. Terms in the governing equations because of the nonlinear boundary layer process are included in this one-dimensional vertical (1DV) model by simplifying the two-dimensional vertical (2DV) ensemble-averaged two-phase equations with the assumption that waves propagate without changing their form. The model is first driven by measured time series of near-bed flow velocity because of a wave group during the SISTEX99 large wave flume experiment and validated with the measured sand concentration in the sheet flow layer. Additional studies are then carried out by including and excluding the nonlinear boundary layer terms. It is found that for the grain diameter (0.24 mm) and high-velocity skewness wave condition considered here, nonlinear waveshape (e.g., skewness) is the dominant mechanism causing net onshore transport and nonlinear boundary layer streaming effect only causes an additional 36% onshore transport. However, for conditions of relatively low-wave skewness and a stronger offshore directed current, nonlinear boundary layer streaming plays a more critical role in determining the net transport. Numerical experiments further suggest that the nonlinear boundary layer streaming effect becomes increasingly important for finer grain. When the numerical model is driven by measured near-bed flow velocity in a more realistic surf zone setting, model results suggest nonlinear boundary layer processes may nearly double the onshore transport purely because of nonlinear waveshape. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    DOE PAGES

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-29

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. We discuss a new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry. The resulting solution is applied to the problemmore » of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.« less

  13. Suppression of space charge induced beam halo in nonlinear focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Yuri K.; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-04-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  14. Near equilibrium distributions for beams with space charge in linear and nonlinear periodic focusing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Cary, John R.

    2015-04-15

    A procedure to obtain a near equilibrium phase space distribution function has been derived for beams with space charge effects in a generalized periodic focusing transport channel. The method utilizes the Lie transform perturbation theory to canonically transform to slowly oscillating phase space coordinates. The procedure results in transforming the periodic focusing system to a constant focusing one, where equilibrium distributions can be found. Transforming back to the original phase space coordinates yields an equilibrium distribution function corresponding to a constant focusing system along with perturbations resulting from the periodicity in the focusing. Examples used here include linear and nonlinear alternating gradient focusing systems. It is shown that the nonlinear focusing components can be chosen such that the system is close to integrability. The equilibrium distribution functions are numerically calculated, and their properties associated with the corresponding focusing system are discussed.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of capacitive charging and desalination by porous electrodes.

    PubMed

    Biesheuvel, P M; Bazant, M Z

    2010-03-01

    The rapid and efficient exchange of ions between porous electrodes and aqueous solutions is important in many applications, such as electrical energy storage by supercapacitors, water desalination and purification by capacitive deionization, and capacitive extraction of renewable energy from a salinity difference. Here, we present a unified mean-field theory for capacitive charging and desalination by ideally polarizable porous electrodes (without Faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions) valid in the limit of thin double layers (compared to typical pore dimensions). We illustrate the theory for the case of a dilute, symmetric, binary electrolyte using the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) model of the double layer, for which simple formulae are available for salt adsorption and capacitive charging of the diffuse part of the double layer. We solve the full GCS mean-field theory numerically for realistic parameters in capacitive deionization, and we derive reduced models for two limiting regimes with different time scales: (i) in the "supercapacitor regime" of small voltages and/or early times, the porous electrode acts like a transmission line, governed by a linear diffusion equation for the electrostatic potential, scaled to the RC time of a single pore, and (ii) in the "desalination regime" of large voltages and long times, the porous electrode slowly absorbs counterions, governed by coupled, nonlinear diffusion equations for the pore-averaged potential and salt concentration.

  16. Plasmon decay and thermal transport from spin-charge coupling in generic Luttinger liquids.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Alex

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the violation of spin-charge separation in generic nonlinear Luttinger liquids and investigate its effect on the relaxation and thermal transport of genuine spin-1/2 electron liquids in ballistic quantum wires. We identify basic scattering processes compatible with the symmetry of the problem and conservation laws that lead to the decay of plasmons into the spin modes. We derive a closed set of coupled kinetic equations for the spin-charge excitations and solve the problem of thermal conductance of interacting electrons for an arbitrary relation between the quantum wire length and spin-charge thermalization length. PMID:25415912

  17. Plasmon Decay and Thermal Transport from Spin-Charge Coupling in Generic Luttinger Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Alex

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the violation of spin-charge separation in generic nonlinear Luttinger liquids and investigate its effect on the relaxation and thermal transport of genuine spin-1 /2 electron liquids in ballistic quantum wires. We identify basic scattering processes compatible with the symmetry of the problem and conservation laws that lead to the decay of plasmons into the spin modes. We derive a closed set of coupled kinetic equations for the spin-charge excitations and solve the problem of thermal conductance of interacting electrons for an arbitrary relation between the quantum wire length and spin-charge thermalization length.

  18. Charge transport and memristive properties of graphene quantum dots embedded in poly(3-hexylthiophene) matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Cosmin Obreja, Alexandru; Cristea, Dana; Radoi, Antonio; Gavrila, Raluca; Comanescu, Florin; Kusko, Cristian; Mihalache, Iuliana

    2014-08-25

    We show that graphene quantum dots (GQD) embedded in a semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymeric matrix act as charge trapping nanomaterials. In plane current-voltage (I-V) measurements of thin films realized from this nanocomposite deposited on gold interdigitated electrodes revealed that the GQD enhanced dramatically the hole transport. I-V characteristics exhibited a strong nonlinear behavior and a pinched hysteresis loop, a signature of a memristive response. The transport properties of this nanocomposite were explained in terms of a trap controlled space charge limited current mechanism.

  19. Charge-transport-induced dissociation in donor-bridge-acceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Brisker, Daria; Peskin, Uri

    2008-12-28

    Possible mechanisms for charge-transport-induced dissociation in donor-bridge-acceptor complexes are studied. Two mechanisms for dissociation at the molecular bridge are captured within a simple model of an anharmonic bridge vibration coupled nonlinearly to an electronic degree of freedom. A direct mechanism is associated with vibronic excitations to the nuclear continuum and an alternative dissociation mechanism involves intermediate quasibound vibrational states (Feshbach resonances). The two different mechanisms of charge-transport-induced dissociation are analyzed and their interplay as a function of the system parameters is examined. A parameter regime is suggested where the phenomenon should be experimentally accessible.

  20. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  1. Nonlinear degradation-enhanced transport of morphogens performing subdiffusion.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei; Falconer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We study a morphogen gradient formation under nonlinear degradation and subdiffusive transport. In the long-time limit, we obtain the nonlinear effect of degradation-enhanced diffusion, resulting from the interaction of non-Markovian subdiffusive transport with a nonlinear reaction. We find the stationary profile of power-law type, which has implications for robustness, with the shape of the profile being controlled by the anomalous exponent. Far away from the source of morphogens, any changes in the rate of production are not felt.

  2. 31 CFR 337.2 - Transportation charges and risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation charges and risks. 337.2 Section 337.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.2 Transportation charges and...

  3. 31 CFR 337.2 - Transportation charges and risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation charges and risks. 337.2 Section 337.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.2 Transportation charges and...

  4. 31 CFR 337.2 - Transportation charges and risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation charges and risks. 337.2 Section 337.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.2 Transportation charges and...

  5. Brownian dynamics determine universality of charge transport in ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Sangoro, Joshua R; Iacob, Ciprian; Mierzwa, Michal; Paluch, Marian; Kremer, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy is employed to investigate charge transport in a variety of glass-forming ionic liquids over wide frequency, temperature and pressure ranges. Using a combination of Einstein, Einstein-Smoluchowski, and Langevin relations, the observed universal scaling of charge transport in ionic liquids is traced back to the dominant role of Brownian dynamics.

  6. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  7. Enhanced energy transport owing to nonlinear interface interaction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ruixia; Yuan, Zongqiang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    It is generally expected that the interface coupling leads to the suppression of thermal transport through coupled nanostructures due to the additional interface phonon-phonon scattering. However, recent experiments demonstrated that the interface van der Waals interactions can significantly enhance the thermal transfer of bonding boron nanoribbons compared to a single freestanding nanoribbon. To obtain a more in-depth understanding on the important role of the nonlinear interface coupling in the heat transports, in the present paper, we explore the effect of nonlinearity in the interface interaction on the phonon transport by studying the coupled one-dimensional (1D) Frenkel-Kontorova lattices. It is found that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing interface nonlinear intensity for weak inter-chain nonlinearity. By developing the effective phonon theory of coupled systems, we calculate the dependence of heat conductivity on interfacial nonlinearity in weak inter-chain couplings regime which is qualitatively in good agreement with the result obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, we demonstrate that, with increasing interface nonlinear intensity, the system dimensionless nonlinearity strength is reduced, which in turn gives rise to the enhancement of thermal conductivity. Our results pave the way for manipulating the energy transport through coupled nanostructures for future emerging applications. PMID:26787363

  8. Nonlinear parallel momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wen, Tiliang; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-05-01

    Most existing theoretical studies of momentum transport focus on calculating the Reynolds stress based on quasilinear theory, without considering the nonlinear momentum flux- ⟨ v ˜ r n ˜ u ˜ ∥ ⟩ . However, a recent experiment on TORPEX found that the nonlinear toroidal momentum flux induced by blobs makes a significant contribution as compared to the Reynolds stress [Labit et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032308 (2011)]. In this work, the nonlinear parallel momentum flux in strong electrostatic turbulence is calculated by using a three dimensional Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is relevant for tokamak edge turbulence. It is shown that the nonlinear diffusivity is smaller than the quasilinear diffusivity from Reynolds stress. However, the leading order nonlinear residual stress can be comparable to the quasilinear residual stress, and so may be important to intrinsic rotation in tokamak edge plasmas. A key difference from the quasilinear residual stress is that parallel fluctuation spectrum asymmetry is not required for nonlinear residual stress.

  9. Nonlinear dust phase-space vortices (holes) in charge-varying dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Zerguini, Taha Houssine

    2005-03-01

    The recent analysis of dust voids [A. A. Mamun and P. K. Shukla, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1757 (2004)] is extended to include self-consistently the dust charge variation. Numerical solutions of highly nonlinear equations are carried out including dust charging and dust trapping. It is found that under certain conditions the effect of dust charge variation can be quite important. In particular, it may be noted that the dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the nonlinear dust voids. The effects of ion/electron temperature, trapping parameter, and dust size on the properties of these nonlinear dust voids are briefly discussed.

  10. DNA Charge Transport within the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Grodick, Michael A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include Endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within E. coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. Based on these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  11. DNA charge transport within the cell.

    PubMed

    Grodick, Michael A; Muren, Natalie B; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-02-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long-range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long-range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long-range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within Escherichia coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. On the basis of these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome.

  12. Nonlinear delta(f) Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-21

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles.

  13. Charge transport in tri-p-tolylamine doped trinaphthalylbenzene glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang-Bih; O'Reilly, James M.; Magin, Edward H.; Weiss, David S.; Jenekhe, Samson A.

    2000-09-01

    The charge transport properties of tri-p-tolylamine (TTA) doped trinaphthalylbenzene have been measured as a function of electric field and temperature. The charge mobilities of the composite are comparable to but somewhat lower than that of TTA doped polystyrene, a nonpolar polymeric host, at similar weight fractions. We suggest that the difference is due to inhomogeneity between the host and the dopant. The results suggest that, similar to polymer hosts in molecularly doped polymers, the molecular host only functions as an inert diluter and does not directly participate in the charge transport manifold. The results also substantiate the importance of molecular packing to charge hopping in disordered organic materials. The charge mobility data are analyzed with a disorder model due to Bässler and coworkers and a recently modified expression due to Novikov and coworkers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4472 (1998)]. Both models provide adequate descriptions of charge transport in organic amorphous materials.

  14. Charge transport mechanism in lead oxide revealed by CELIV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, O.; Juska, G.; Oelerich, J.-O.; Wiemer, M.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Reznik, A.

    2016-09-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) belongs to the most promising photoconductors for optoelectronic and large area detectors applications, the charge transport mechanism in this material still remains unclear. Combining the conventional time-of-flight and the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) techniques, we investigate the transport of holes which are shown to be the faster carriers in poly-PbO. Experimentally measured temperature and electric field dependences of the hole mobility suggest a highly dispersive transport. In order to analyze the transport features quantitatively, the theory of the photo-CELIV is extended to account for the dispersive nature of charge transport. While in other materials with dispersive transport the amount of dispersion usually depends on temperature, this is not the case in poly-PbO, which evidences that dispersive transport is caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the material and not by the energy disorder.

  15. Charge transport mechanism in lead oxide revealed by CELIV technique

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk, O.; Juska, G.; Oelerich, J.-O.; Wiemer, M.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Reznik, A.

    2016-01-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) belongs to the most promising photoconductors for optoelectronic and large area detectors applications, the charge transport mechanism in this material still remains unclear. Combining the conventional time-of-flight and the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) techniques, we investigate the transport of holes which are shown to be the faster carriers in poly-PbO. Experimentally measured temperature and electric field dependences of the hole mobility suggest a highly dispersive transport. In order to analyze the transport features quantitatively, the theory of the photo-CELIV is extended to account for the dispersive nature of charge transport. While in other materials with dispersive transport the amount of dispersion usually depends on temperature, this is not the case in poly-PbO, which evidences that dispersive transport is caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the material and not by the energy disorder. PMID:27628537

  16. Charge transport mechanism in lead oxide revealed by CELIV technique.

    PubMed

    Semeniuk, O; Juska, G; Oelerich, J-O; Wiemer, M; Baranovskii, S D; Reznik, A

    2016-01-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) belongs to the most promising photoconductors for optoelectronic and large area detectors applications, the charge transport mechanism in this material still remains unclear. Combining the conventional time-of-flight and the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) techniques, we investigate the transport of holes which are shown to be the faster carriers in poly-PbO. Experimentally measured temperature and electric field dependences of the hole mobility suggest a highly dispersive transport. In order to analyze the transport features quantitatively, the theory of the photo-CELIV is extended to account for the dispersive nature of charge transport. While in other materials with dispersive transport the amount of dispersion usually depends on temperature, this is not the case in poly-PbO, which evidences that dispersive transport is caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the material and not by the energy disorder. PMID:27628537

  17. Topological charge algebra of optical vortices in nonlinear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutova, Mariia; Zhdanova, Alexandra; Bahari, Aysan; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei

    2016-05-01

    Optical vortices find their use in multiple areas of research and technology; in particular, they provide an opportunity to generate short-pulse spatially-structured optical beams, which can be used to study ultrafast processes. In our work, we explore interactions of femtosecond optical vortices in nonlinear crystals. We investigate the transfer of orbital angular momentum among multiple (applied and generated) beams involved in a coherent Raman interaction. We use a liquid crystal light modulator to shape the applied pump and Stokes beams into optical vortices with various integer values of topological charge, and cross them in a Raman-active crystal to produce multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands. We then examine the transfer of optical angular momentum into each sideband and find that it follows a certain law that can be derived from angular momentum conservation for created and annihilated photons, or equivalently, from phase-matching considerations for the interacting beams. Presenter is supported by the Herman F. Heep and Minnie Belle Heep Texas A&M University Endowed Fund administered by the Texas A&M Foundation

  18. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  19. Nonlinear transport processes in tokamak plasmas. I. The collisional regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Peeters, Philippe

    2008-06-15

    An application of the thermodynamic field theory (TFT) to transport processes in L-mode tokamak plasmas is presented. The nonlinear corrections to the linear ('Onsager') transport coefficients in the collisional regimes are derived. A quite encouraging result is the appearance of an asymmetry between the Pfirsch-Schlueter (P-S) ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter presents a nonlinear correction, which is absent for the ions, and makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. Explicit calculations and comparisons between the neoclassical results and the TFT predictions for Joint European Torus (JET) plasmas are also reported. It is found that the nonlinear electron P-S transport coefficients exceed the values provided by neoclassical theory by a factor that may be of the order 10{sup 2}. The nonlinear classical coefficients exceed the neoclassical ones by a factor that may be of order 2. For JET, the discrepancy between experimental and theoretical results for the electron losses is therefore significantly reduced by a factor 10{sup 2} when the nonlinear contributions are duly taken into account but, there is still a factor of 10{sup 2} to be explained. This is most likely due to turbulence. The expressions of the ion transport coefficients, determined by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes, remain unaltered. The low-collisional regimes, i.e., the plateau and the banana regimes, are analyzed in the second part of this work.

  20. Transport equations for subdiffusion with nonlinear particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Straka, P; Fedotov, S

    2015-02-01

    We show how the nonlinear interaction effects 'volume filling' and 'adhesion' can be incorporated into the fractional subdiffusive transport of cells and individual organisms. To this end, we use microscopic random walk models with anomalous trapping and systematically derive generic non-Markovian and nonlinear governing equations for the mean concentrations of the subdiffusive cells or organisms. We uncover an interesting interaction between the nonlinearities and the non-Markovian nature of the transport. In the subdiffusive case, this interaction manifests itself in a nontrivial combination of nonlinear terms with fractional derivatives. In the long time limit, however, these equations simplify to a form without fractional operators. This provides an easy method for the study of aggregation phenomena. In particular, this enables us to show that volume filling can prevent "anomalous aggregation," which occurs in subdiffusive systems with a spatially varying anomalous exponent.

  1. Simulation of electron transport across charged grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Srikant, V.; Clarke, D.R.; Evans, P.V.

    1996-09-01

    The {ital I}{endash}{ital V} (current density-electric field) characteristics of low-angle grain boundaries consisting of periodic arrays of charged dislocations are computed using a quasiclassical molecular dynamics approach. Below a critical value of the grain boundary misorientation, the computed {ital I}{endash}{ital V} characteristics are linear whereas above they are nonlinear. The degree of nonlinearity and the voltage onset of nonlinearity are found to be dependent on the grain boundary misorientation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  3. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport.

    PubMed

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  4. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-09-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality.

  5. Groundwater transport modeling with nonlinear sorption and intraparticle diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anshuman; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Rabideau, Alan J.

    2014-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of sorption in groundwater systems, most contaminant transport models provide limited support for nonideal sorption processes such as nonlinear isotherms and/or diffusion-limited sorption. However, recent developments in the conceptualization of "dual mode" sorption for hydrophobic organic contaminants have provided more realistic and mechanistically sound alternatives to the commonly used Langmuir and Freundlich models. To support the inclusion of both nonlinear and diffusion-limited sorption processes in groundwater transport models, this paper presents two numerical algorithms based on the split operator approach. For the nonlinear equilibrium scenario, the commonly used two-step split operator algorithm has been modified to provide a more robust treatment of complex multi-parameter isotherms such as the Polanyi-partitioning model. For diffusion-limited sorption, a flexible three step split-operator procedure is presented to simulate intraparticle diffusion in multiple spherical particles with different sizes and nonlinear isotherms. Numerical experiments confirmed the accuracy of both algorithms for several candidate isotherms. However, the primary advantages of the algorithms are: (1) flexibility to accommodate any isotherm equation including "dual mode" and similar expressions, and (2) ease of adapting existing grid-based transport models of any dimensionality to include nonlinear sorption and/or intraparticle diffusion. Comparisons are developed for one-dimensional transport scenarios with different isotherms and particle configurations. Illustrative results highlight (1) the potential influence of isotherm model selection on solute transport predictions, and (2) the combined effects of intraparticle diffusion and nonlinear sorption on the plume transport and flushing for both single-particle and multi-particle scenarios.

  6. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  7. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Chris J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the progress during the second six month period of the project. This includes both experimental and theoretical work on the acoustic charge transport (ACT) portion of the chip, the theoretical program modelling of both the avalanche photodiode (APD) and the charge transfer and overflow transistor and the materials growth and fabrication part of the program.

  8. Multiscale modelling of charge transport in organic electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Jenny

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors is controlled by a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. In this presentation we will show how a set of computational methods, namely molecular modelling methods to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport can be used to reproduce experimental charge mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Using case studies, we will show how such simulations can explain the relative values of electron and hole mobility and the effects of grain size, side chains and polymer molecular weight on charge mobility. Although currently applied to material systems of relatively high symmetry or well defined structure, this approach can be developed to address more complex systems such as multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers.

  9. Modeling taper charge with a non-linear equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    Work aimed at modeling the charge voltage and current characteristics of nickel-cadmium cells subject to taper charge is presented. Work reported at previous NASA Battery Workshops has shown that the voltage of cells subject to constant current charge and discharge can be modeled very accurately with the equation: voltage = A + (B/(C-X)) + De to the -Ex where A, B, D, and E are fit parameters and x is amp-hr of charge removed during discharge or returned during charge. In a constant current regime, x is also equivalent to time on charge or discharge.

  10. Charge transport in electrically doped amorphous organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews recent progress on charge generation by doping and its influence on the carrier mobility in organic semiconductors (OSs). The doping induced charge generation efficiency is generally low in OSs which was explained by the integer charge transfer model and the hybrid charge transfer model. The ionized dopants formed by charge transfer between hosts and dopants can act as Coulomb traps for mobile charges, and the presence of Coulomb traps in OSs broadens the density of states (DOS) in doped organic films. The Coulomb traps strongly reduce the carrier hopping rate and thereby change the carrier mobility, which was confirmed by experiments in recent years. In order to fully understand the doping mechanism in OSs, further quantitative and systematic analyses of charge transport characteristics must be accomplished.

  11. Charge effect on solute transport across a periodic fiber array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Akinaga, Takeshi; O-Tani, Hideyuki

    2011-11-01

    The luminal surface of vascular endothelial cells is covered by a fiber matrix layer referred to as the glycocalyx layer, and charge carried by the glycocalyx layer has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the microvessel wall to charged solutes. The present study is aimed to develop a fluid mechanical and electrostatic model for the transport of charged solutes across the glycocalyx layer and to examine the charge effect on the rate of diffusional and convectional transport of the solute. The glycocalyx layer was assumed to consist of identical circular cylinders with fixed surface charge, aligned parallel to each other in a hexagonal arrangement. For a spherical solute with fixed surface charge suspended in an electrolyte solution between circular cylinders, fluid mechanical and electrostatic analyses were carried out to calculate the flow field as well as the electric field around the solute to estimate the rate of solute transport across the layer. It was found that even at rather large ion concentrations, the repulsive electrostatic interaction between the solute and cylinder of like charge could significantly reduce the transport rate of the solute.

  12. 31 CFR 337.2 - Transportation charges and risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation charges and risks. 337.2 Section 337.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... GOVERNING FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.2 Transportation...

  13. Focus: Phase-resolved nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy—From charge dynamics in solids to molecular excitations in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, Thomas Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael

    2015-06-07

    Intense terahertz (THz) electric field transients with amplitudes up to several megavolts/centimeter and novel multidimensional techniques are the key ingredients of nonlinear THz spectroscopy, a new area of basic research. Both nonlinear light-matter interactions including the non-perturbative regime and THz driven charge transport give new insight into the character and dynamics of low-energy excitations of condensed matter and into quantum kinetic phenomena. This article provides an overview of recent progress in this field, combining an account of technological developments with selected prototype results for liquids and solids. The potential of nonlinear THz methods for future studies of low-frequency excitations of condensed-phase molecular systems is discussed as well.

  14. Nonlinear parallel momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu Wen, Tiliang; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-05-15

    Most existing theoretical studies of momentum transport focus on calculating the Reynolds stress based on quasilinear theory, without considering the nonlinear momentum flux-〈v{sup ~}{sub r}n{sup ~}u{sup ~}{sub ∥}〉. However, a recent experiment on TORPEX found that the nonlinear toroidal momentum flux induced by blobs makes a significant contribution as compared to the Reynolds stress [Labit et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032308 (2011)]. In this work, the nonlinear parallel momentum flux in strong electrostatic turbulence is calculated by using a three dimensional Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is relevant for tokamak edge turbulence. It is shown that the nonlinear diffusivity is smaller than the quasilinear diffusivity from Reynolds stress. However, the leading order nonlinear residual stress can be comparable to the quasilinear residual stress, and so may be important to intrinsic rotation in tokamak edge plasmas. A key difference from the quasilinear residual stress is that parallel fluctuation spectrum asymmetry is not required for nonlinear residual stress.

  15. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying-Hua; Li, Kun; Chen, Wei-Yu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qi-Yan; Chen, Yun-Fei

    2015-10-01

    Porous graphene has a high mechanical strength and an atomic-layer thickness that makes it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solutions are a type of strong long-range interaction that may greatly influence fluid transport through nanopores. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through 1.05-nm diameter monolayer graphene nanopores, with their edges charge-modified. Our results indicated that these nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonically decrease. The co-ion rejection can reach 76.5% and 90.2% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. The Cl- ion current increases and reaches a plateau, and the Na+ current decreases as the charge amount increases in systems in which Na+ ions act as counterions. In addition, charge modification can enhance water transport through nanopores. This is mainly due to the ion selectivity of the nanopores. Notably, positive charges on the pore edges facilitate water transport much more strongly than negative charges. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB707601 and 2011CB707605), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50925519), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Funding of Jiangsu Provincial Innovation Program for Graduate Education, China (Grant No. CXZZ13_0087), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBJJ 1322).

  16. Transient dynamics of pulse-coupled oscillators with nonlinear charging curves.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P

    2016-03-01

    We consider the transient behavior of globally coupled systems of identical pulse-coupled oscillators. Synchrony develops through an aggregation phenomenon, with clusters of synchronized oscillators forming and growing larger in time. Previous work derived expressions for these time dependent clusters, when each oscillator obeyed a linear charging curve. We generalize these results to cases where the charging curves have nonlinearities.

  17. Interfacial charge and spin transport in Z2 topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakage, Ai; Imura, Ken-Ichiro; Cayssol, Jérôme; Kuramoto, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    The Kane-Mele model realizes a two-dimensional version of a Z2 topological insulator as an idealized model of graphene with intrinsic and extrinsic (Rashba) spin-orbit couplings. We study the transport of charge and spin in such a Dirac electron system in the presence of a sharp potential step, that is, a pn junction. An electron incident normal to the junction is completely reflected when Rashba coupling is dominant, whereas it is perfectly transmitted when the two types of couplings are balanced. The latter manifests in charge transport as a peak of conductance and a dip in Fano factor. Charge transport occurs in the direction normal to the barrier, whereas a spin current is induced along the barrier that is also localized in its vicinity. It is demonstrated that contributions from interband matrix elements and evanescent modes are responsible for such an interfacial spin Hall current. Our analysis of spin transport is based on the observation that in the case of vanishing Rashba coupling, each channel carries a conserved spin current, whereas only the integrated spin current is a conserved quantity in the general case. The perfect transmission/reflection of charge and conserved spin current is a consequence of reflection symmetry. Finally, we provide a quasiclassical picture of charge and spin transport by imaging flow lines over the entire sample and Veselago lensing (negative refraction).

  18. Explicit construction of the classical BRST charge for nonlinear algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratchikov, Andrei V.

    2012-02-01

    We give an explicit formula for the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) charge associated with Poisson superalgebras. To this end, we split the master equation for the BRST charge into a pair of equations such that one of themis equivalent to the original one and find a solution to this equation. The solution possesses a graphical representation in terms of diagrams.

  19. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  20. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value. PMID:20087768

  1. Transportable charge in a periodic alternating gradient system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Fessenden, T.J.; Laslett, L.J.

    1985-05-01

    A simple set of formulas is derived which relate emittance, line charge density, matched maximum and average envelope radii, occupancy factors, and the (space charge) depressed and vacuum values of tune. This formulation is an improvement on the smooth limit approximation; deviations from exact (numerically determined) relations are on the order of +-2%, while the smooth limit values are in error by up to +-30%. This transport formalism is used to determine the limits of transportable line charge density in an electrostatic quadrupole array, with specific application to the low energy portion of the High Temperature Experiment of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research. The line charge density limit is found to be essentially proportional to the voltage on the pole faces and the fraction of occupied aperture area. A finite injection energy (greater than or equal to 2 MeV) is required to realize this limit, independent of particle mass.

  2. Coulomb Traps and Charge Transport in Molecular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, Harvey

    2000-03-01

    A major result of experimental studies of a diverse assortment of disordered molecular solids is the observation of a common pattern in the charge transport properties. The transport ranges from charge transfer between molecules doped in an inert polymer to motion along the silicon backbone of polysilylenes. The pattern is the unusual combination of Poole Frenkel-like electric field dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the mobility. The latter feature has been especially puzzling. We study the drift mobility of a molecular polaron in the presence of an applied field and Coulomb traps. The model is based on one previously developed for geminate recombination of photogenerated charge carriers. The key electric field and temperature dependencies of the mobility measurements are well reproduced by this model. Our conclusion is that this nearly universal transport behavior arises from competition between rates of polaron trapping and release from a very low density of Coulomb traps.

  3. Charged-particle calculations using Boltzmann transport methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.; Robinson, M.T.; Holmes, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of radiation damage effects in fusion reactor neutron and ion irradiation environments are amenable to treatment by transport theory methods. In this paper, multigroup transport techniques are developed for the calculation of charged particle range distributions, reflection coefficients, and sputtering yields. The Boltzmann transport approach can be implemented, with minor changes, in standard neutral particle computer codes. With the multigroup discrete ordinates code, ANISN, determination of ion and target atom distributions as functions of position, energy, and direction can be obtained without the stochastic error associated with atomistic computer codes such as MARLOWE and TRIM. With the multigroup Monte Carlo code, MORSE, charged particle effects can be obtained for problems associated with very complex geometries. Results are presented for several charged particle problems. Good agreement is obtained between quantities calculated with the multigroup approach and those obtained experimentally or by atomistic computer codes.

  4. Topological charge algebra of optical vortices in nonlinear interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Alexandra A; Shutova, Mariia; Bahari, Aysan; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the transfer of orbital angular momentum among multiple beams involved in a coherent Raman interaction. We use a liquid crystal light modulator to shape pump and Stokes beams into optical vortices with various integer values of topological charge, and cross them in a Raman-active crystal to produce multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands. We measure the resultant vortex charges using a tilted-lens technique. We verify that in every case the generated beams' topological charges obey a simple relationship, resulting from angular momentum conservation for created and annihilated photons, or equivalently, from phase-matching considerations for multiple interacting beams.

  5. Topological charge algebra of optical vortices in nonlinear interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Alexandra A; Shutova, Mariia; Bahari, Aysan; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the transfer of orbital angular momentum among multiple beams involved in a coherent Raman interaction. We use a liquid crystal light modulator to shape pump and Stokes beams into optical vortices with various integer values of topological charge, and cross them in a Raman-active crystal to produce multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands. We measure the resultant vortex charges using a tilted-lens technique. We verify that in every case the generated beams' topological charges obey a simple relationship, resulting from angular momentum conservation for created and annihilated photons, or equivalently, from phase-matching considerations for multiple interacting beams. PMID:26832066

  6. Charge generation, charge transport, and residual charge in the electrospinning of polymers: A review of issues and complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, George; Federici, John; Imura, Yuki; Catalani, Luiz H.

    2012-02-01

    Electrospinning has become a widely implemented technique for the generation of nonwoven mats that are useful in tissue engineering and filter applications. The overriding factor that has contributed to the popularity of this method is the ease with which fibers with submicron diameters can be produced. Fibers on that size scale are comparable to protein filaments that are observed in the extracellular matrix. The apparatus and procedures for conducting electrospinning experiments are ostensibly simple. While it is rarely reported in the literature on this topic, any experience with this method of fiber spinning reveals substantial ambiguities in how the process can be controlled to generate reproducible results. The simplicity of the procedure belies the complexity of the physical processes that determine the electrospinning process dynamics. In this article, three process domains and the physical domain of charge interaction are identified as important in electrospinning: (a) creation of charge carriers, (b) charge transport, (c) residual charge. The initial event that enables electrospinning is the generation of region of excess charge in the fluid that is to be electrospun. The electrostatic forces that develop on this region of charged fluid in the presence of a high potential result in the ejection of a fluid jet that solidifies into the resulting fiber. The transport of charge from the charge solution to the grounded collection device produces some of the current which is observed. That transport can occur by the fluid jet and through the atmosphere surrounding the electrospinning apparatus. Charges that are created in the fluid that are not dissipated remain in the solidified fiber as residual charges. The physics of each of these domains in the electrospinning process is summarized in terms of the current understanding, and possible sources of ambiguity in the implementation of this technique are indicated. Directions for future research to further

  7. Detecting monopole charge in Weyl semimetals via quantum interference transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing; Yao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Topological Weyl semimetals can host Weyl nodes with monopole charges in momentum space. How to detect the signature of the monopole charges in quantum transport remains a challenging topic. Here, we reveal the connection between the parity of monopole charge in topological semimetals and the quantum interference corrections to the conductivity. We show that the parity of monopole charge determines the sign of the quantum interference correction, with odd and even parity yielding the weak antilocalization and weak localization effects, respectively. This is attributed to the Berry phase difference between time-reversed trajectories circulating the Fermi sphere that encloses the monopole charges. From standard Feynman diagram calculations, we further show that the weak-field magnetoconductivity at low temperatures is proportional to +√{B } in double-Weyl semimetals and -√{B } in single-Weyl semimetals, respectively, which could be verified experimentally.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  9. A Simple Index for Characterizing Charge Transport in Molecular Materials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Savoie, Brett M; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-03-19

    While advances in quantum chemistry have rendered the accurate prediction of band alignment relatively straightforward, the ability to forecast a noncrystalline, multimolecule system's conductivity possesses no simple computational form. Adapting the theory of classical resistor networks, we develop an index for quantifying charge transport in bulk molecular materials, without the requirement of crystallinity. The basic behavior of this index is illustrated through its application to simple lattices and clusters of common organic photovoltaic molecules, where it is shown to reproduce experimentally known performances for these materials. This development provides a quantitative computational means for determining a priori the bulk charge transport properties of molecular materials. PMID:26262862

  10. Origin of traps and charge transport mechanism in hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Islamov, D. R. Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the charge transport in HfO{sub 2}. Basing on the model of phonon-assisted tunneling between traps, and assuming that the electron traps are oxygen vacancies, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. The thermal trap energy of 1.25 eV in HfO{sub 2} was determined based on the charge transport experiments.

  11. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    PubMed Central

    Brambila, D. S.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2013-01-01

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter. PMID:23912934

  12. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambila, D. S.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2013-08-01

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter.

  13. Nonlinear space charge dynamics in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Resistive switching and ferroelectric-like hysteresis of electromechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Morozovsky, Nicholas V.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Kim, Yunseok; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-08-14

    We performed self-consistent modelling of nonlinear electrotransport and electromechanical response of thin films of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) allowing for steric effects of mobile charged defects (ions, protons, or vacancies), electron degeneration, and Vegard stresses. We establish correlations between the features of the nonlinear space-charge dynamics, current-voltage, and bending-voltage curves for different types of the film electrodes. A pronounced ferroelectric-like hysteresis of the bending-voltage loops and current maxima on the double hysteresis current-voltage loops appear for the electron-transport electrodes. The double hysteresis loop with pronounced humps indicates a memristor-type resistive switching. The switching occurs due to the strong nonlinear coupling between the electronic and ionic subsystems. A sharp meta-stable maximum of the electron density appears near one open electrode and moves to another one during the periodic change of applied voltage. Our results can explain the nonlinear nature and correlation of electrical and mechanical memory effects in thin MIEC films. The analytical expression proving that the electrically induced bending of MIEC films can be detected by interferometric methods is derived.

  14. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  15. The telegraph equation in charged particle transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Lorencz, K.; Williams, L. L.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new derivation of the telegraph equation which modifies its coefficients. First, an infinite order partial differential equation is obtained for the velocity space solid angle-averaged phase-space distribution of particles which underwent at least a few collisions. It is shown that, in the lowest order asymptotic expansion, this equation simplifies to the well-known diffusion equation. The second-order asymptotic expansion for isotropic small-angle scattering results in a modified telegraph equation with a signal propagation speed of v(5/11) exp 1/2 instead of the usual v/3 exp 1/2. Our derivation of a modified telegraph equation follows from an expansion of the Boltzmann equation in the relevant smallness parameters and not from a truncation of an eigenfunction expansion. This equation is consistent with causality. It is shown that, under steady state conditions in a convecting plasma, the telegraph equation may be regarded as a diffusion equation with a modified transport coefficient, which describes a combination of diffusion and cosmic-ray inertia.

  16. Theoretical characterization of charge transport in organic molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Carrera, Roel S.

    The rapid growth in the interest to explore new synthetic crystalline organic semiconductors and their subsequent device characterization has revived the debate on the development of theoretical models to better understand the intrinsic charge transport mechanisms in organic materials. At the moment, several charge-transport theories for organic molecular crystals have been proposed and have observed a comparable agreement with experimental results. However, these models are limited in scope and restricted to specific ranges of microscopic parameters and temperatures. A general description that is applicable in all parameter regimes is still unavailable. The first step towards a complete understanding of the problem associated with the charge transport in organic molecular crystals includes the development of a first-principles theoretical methodology to evaluate with high accuracy the main microscopic charge-transport parameters and their respective couplings with intra- and intermolecular vibrational degrees of freedom. In this thesis, we have developed a first-principles methodology to investigate the impact of electron-phonon interactions on the charge-carrier mobilities in organic molecular crystals. Well-known organic materials such as oligoacene and oligothienoacene derivatives were studied in detail. To predict the charge-transport phenomena in organic materials, we rely on the Marcus theory of electron-transfer reactions. Within this context, the nature of the intramolecular vibronic coupling in oligoacenes was studied using an approach that combines high-resolution gas-phase photo-electron spectroscopy measurements with first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations. This further led to investigation of the electron interactions with optical phonons in oligoacene single crystals. The lattice phonon modes were computed at both density functional theory (DFT) and empirical force field levels. The low-frequency optical modes are found to play a significant

  17. Theory of charge transport in molecular junctions: From Coulomb blockade to coherent tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2014-08-14

    We study charge transport through molecular junctions in the presence of electron-electron interaction using the nonequilibrium Green's function techniques and the renormalized perturbation theory. In the perturbation treatment, the zeroth-order Hamiltonian of the molecular junction is composed of independent single-impurity Anderson's models, which act as the channels where charges come through or occupy, and the interactions between different channels are treated as the perturbation. Using this scheme, the effects of molecule-lead, electron-electron, and hopping interactions are included nonperturbatively, and the charge transport processes can thus be studied in the intermediate parameter range from the Coulomb blockade to the coherent tunneling regimes. The concept of quasi-particles is introduced to describe the kinetic process of charge transport, and then the electric current can be studied and calculated. As a test study, the Hubbard model is used as the molecular Hamiltonian to simulate dimeric and trimeric molecular junctions. Various nonlinear current-voltage characteristics, including Coulomb blockade, negative differential resistance, rectification, and current hysteresis, are shown in the calculations, and the mechanisms are elucidated.

  18. [Hopping and superexchange mechanisms of charge transport to DNA].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2003-01-01

    A theory for charge transport in nucleobase sequences was constructed in which the hole migration proceeds via hopping between guanines. Each hop over the adenine-thymine (A-T) bridge connecting neighboring guanines occurs by means of the superexchange mechanism. The experimental data and theoretical results for various types of nucleobase sequences are compared.

  19. On the Structure of the Fixed Charge Transportation Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, K.

    2005-01-01

    This work extends the theory of the fixed charge transportation problem (FCTP), currently based mostly on a forty-year-old publication by Hirsch and Danzig. This paper presents novel properties that need to be considered by those using existing, or those developing new methods for optimizing FCTP. It also defines the problem in an easier way,…

  20. Morphology and charge carrier transport in eumelanin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Clara; Wuensche, Julia; Rosei, Federico

    2012-02-01

    Eumelanin is a biomolecule with important functions in the human body, animals, and plants. However, several fundamental properties of eumelanin, such as the mechanism of charge carrier transport and the supramolecular structure, are still a matter of debate. This work is the first step of a study with the long-term goal to characterize structure and charge carrier transport of eumelanin in thin film form. We compared the most common synthesis routes and processing solvents for eumelanin observing the morphology (AFM) and chemical composition (XPS) of the prepared films. Eumelanin synthesized from tyrosine by oxidation with H2O2 and deposited from dimethyl sulfoxide yielded films with a RMS roughness below 0.4 nm and an elementary composition in agreement with the eumelanin building blocks suggested in literature. A more detailed AFM study revealed a layer-by-layer growth mode for solution-processed eumelanin films. The first electrical characterization of these films in a planar two-electrode configuration and a high-humidity environment demonstrated the high complexity of charge transport in eumelanin films. The planar device geometry permits imaging the changes in the optical or morphological properties of the eumelanin film by optical microscopy and AFM. Our measurements suggest that several processes, including electrochromism and electropolymerization, contribute to determine the electroactivity of eumelanin films, depending on the applied electrical bias. Current transients over several hours support the hypothesis that ions are involved in charge transport.

  1. Physical constraints on charge transport through bacterial nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzi, Nicholas F.; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular appendages of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were recently shown to sustain currents of 10{sup 10} electrons per second over distances of 0.5 microns [El-Naggar et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2010, 107, 18127]. However, the identity of the charge localizing sites and their organization along the “nanowire” remain unknown. We use theory to predict redox cofactor separation distances that would permit charge flow at rates of 10{sup 10} electrons per second over 0.5 microns for voltage biases of ≤1V, using a steady-state analysis governed by a non-adiabatic electron transport mechanism. We find the observed currents necessitate a multi-step hopping transport mechanism, with charge localizing sites separated by less than 1 nm and reorganization energies that rival the lowest known in biology.

  2. Physical constraints on charge transport through bacterial nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzi, Nicholas F.; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.

    2011-10-17

    Extracellular appendages of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were recently shown to sustain currents of 10¹⁰ electrons per second over distances of 0.5 microns [El-Naggar et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2010, 107, 18127]. However, the identity of the charge localizing sites and their organization along the “nanowire” remain unknown. We use theory to predict redox cofactor separation distances that would permit charge flow at rates of 10¹⁰ electrons per second over 0.5 microns for voltage biases of ≤1V, using a steady-state analysis governed by a non-adiabatic electron transport mechanism. We find the observed currents necessitate a multi-step hopping transport mechanism, with charge localizing sites separated by less than 1 nm and reorganization energies that rival the lowest known in biology.

  3. Charge transport in disordered semiconducting polymers driven by nuclear tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaap, N. J.; Katsouras, I.; Asadi, K.; Blom, P. W. M.; Koster, L. J. A.; de Leeuw, D. M.

    2016-04-01

    The current density-voltage (J -V ) characteristics of hole-only diodes based on poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2' ethyl-hexyloxy)-p -phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) were measured at a wide temperature and field range. At high electric fields the temperature dependence of the transport vanishes, and all J -V sweeps converge to a power law. Nuclear tunneling theory predicts a power law at high fields that scales with the Kondo parameter. To model the J -V characteristics we have performed master-equation calculations to determine the dependence of charge carrier mobility on electric field, charge carrier density, temperature, and Kondo parameter, using nuclear tunneling transfer rates. We demonstrate that nuclear tunneling, unlike other semiclassical models, provides a consistent description of the charge transport for a large bias, temperature, and carrier density range.

  4. Physical constraints on charge transport through bacterial nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Nicholas F.; Skourtis, Spiros S.

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular appendages of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were recently shown to sustain currents of 1010 electrons per second over distances of 0.5 microns [El-Naggar et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2010, 107, 18127]. However, the identity of the charge localizing sites and their organization along the “nanowire” remain unknown. We use theory to predict redox cofactor separation distances that would permit charge flow at rates of 1010 electrons per second over 0.5 microns for voltage biases of ≤1V, using a steady-state analysis governed by a non-adiabatic electron transport mechanism. We find the observed currents necessitate a multi-step hopping transport mechanism, with charge localizing sites separated by less than 1 nm and reorganization energies that rival the lowest known in biology. PMID:22470966

  5. Intrinsic non-ohmic electronic transport properties of the transparent In-Zn-O compound nanobelts under ohmic contact and out of the space charge limited transport region.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Xitian; Gao, Hong

    2016-02-19

    It is generally accepted that the nonlinear I-V characteristics for semiconductor nanostructures are mainly induced by the Schottky contacts or by the space charge limited transport mechanism. We perform I-V measurements on undoped and doped In-Zn-O compound nanobelts and confirm that their intrinsic non-ohmic transport behaviors are not caused by these mechanisms. A model based on the hopping assisted trap state electrons transport process is introduced to explain the nonlinear I-V characteristics and to extract their electrical parameters. An understanding of this trap-state influenced carrier transport can advance the progress of nanomaterials applications and enable us to distinguish their intrinsic transport behaviors from contact effects. The results also indicate that the material has good electrical properties and can be used as a potential substitute for In2O3.

  6. An Efficient Scheduling Scheme on Charging Stations for Smart Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Junghoon; Park, Gyung-Leen; Kang, Min-Jae; Kang, Mikyung

    This paper proposes a reservation-based scheduling scheme for the charging station to decide the service order of multiple requests, aiming at improving the satisfiability of electric vehicles. The proposed scheme makes it possible for a customer to reduce the charge cost and waiting time, while a station can extend the number of clients it can serve. A linear rank function is defined based on estimated arrival time, waiting time bound, and the amount of needed power, reducing the scheduling complexity. Receiving the requests from the clients, the power station decides the charge order by the rank function and then replies to the requesters with the waiting time and cost it can guarantee. Each requester can decide whether to charge at that station or try another station. This scheduler can evolve to integrate a new pricing policy and services, enriching the electric vehicle transport system.

  7. Charge pariticle transport in the non-isotropic turbulences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The scattering and diffusion of energetic charged particles is not only important for understanding phenomena such as diffusive shock acceleration but it also is a natural probe of the statistical characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although Parker's transport equation (Parker 1965) allows us to describe the propagation of charged particles, the transport coefficients needed in the equation must be determined. Using Quasi-Linear Theory (QLT, e.g. Jokipii (1966)), one finds that coefficients can be related to the correlation function or power spectrum of homogeneous magnetic turbulence. However, different turbulence models will generally have a different influence on particle's scattering and diffusion. Among those models developed in MHD Turbulence, such as isotropic, Slab plus 2D (Tu & Marsch 1993; Gray et al 1996; Bieber et al 1996), etc. Here, using test-particle orbit simulations to calculate the transport coefficients, we study particle transport in synthesized asymmetric turbulence using the form first proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995). We developed and introduce a systematic method to synthesize scale-dependent non-isotropic magnetic turbulences. We also developed and introduce a method to synthesize the 3d turbulent magnetic field from the observed solar wind time series dataset. We present the comparison of their effects on charge particle transport with previous theories and models.

  8. Pore network model of electrokinetic transport through charged porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obliger, Amaël; Jardat, Marie; Coelho, Daniel; Bekri, Samir; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a method for the numerical determination of the steady-state response of complex charged porous media to pressure, salt concentration, and electric potential gradients. The macroscopic fluxes of solvent, salt, and charge are computed within the framework of the Pore Network Model (PNM), which describes the pore structure of the samples as networks of pores connected to each other by channels. The PNM approach is used to capture the couplings between solvent and ionic flows which arise from the charge of the solid surfaces. For the microscopic transport coefficients on the channel scale, we take a simple analytical form obtained previously by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations in a cylindrical channel. These transport coefficients are upscaled for a given network by imposing conservation laws for each pores, in the presence of macroscopic gradients across the sample. The complex pore structure of the material is captured by the distribution of channel diameters. We investigate the combined effects of this complex geometry, the surface charge, and the salt concentration on the macroscopic transport coefficients. The upscaled numerical model preserves the Onsager relations between the latter, as expected. The calculated macroscopic coefficients behave qualitatively as their microscopic counterparts, except for the permeability and the electro-osmotic coupling coefficient when the electrokinetic effects are strong. Quantitatively, the electrokinetic couplings increase the difference between the macroscopic coefficients and the corresponding ones for a single channel of average diameter.

  9. 950809 Charged particle transport updated multi-group diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, E.G.; Perkins, S.T.; Dairiki, N.T.

    1995-09-01

    In 1974, a charged particle transport scheme was introduced which utilized a multi-group diffusion method for the spatial transport and slowing down of energetic ions in a hot plasma. In this treatment a diffusion coefficient was used which was flux-limited to provide, hopefully, some degree of accuracy when the slowing down of an energetic charged particle is dominated by Coulomb collisions with thermal ions and electrons in a plasma medium. An advantage of this method was a very fast, memory-contained program for calculating the behavior of energetic charged particles which resulted in smoothly varying particle number densities and energy depositions. The main limitation of the original multi-group charged particle diffusion scheme is its constraint to a basic ten group structure; the same ten group structure for each of the five energetic ions tracked. This is regarded as a severe limitation, inasmuch as more groups would be desired to simulate more accurately the corresponding Monte Carlo results of energies deposited over spatial zones from a charged particle source. More generally, it seems preferable to have a different group structure for each particle type since they are created at inherently different energies. In this paper, the basic theory and multi-group description will be given. This is followed by the specific techniques that were used to solve the resultant equations. Finally, the modifications that were made to the cross section data as well as the methods used for energy and momentum deposition are described.

  10. Nonlinear localized dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Amour, Rabia

    2007-10-15

    A numerical investigation is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of large-amplitude dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. These nonlinear localized structures are self-consistent solutions of the collisionless Vlasov equation with a population of fast particles. The spatial patterns of the variable charge DA solitary wave are significantly modified by the nonthermal effects. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem.

  11. Nonlinear Transport and Noise Properties of Acoustic Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Kamil

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in molecular junctions composed of organic molecules coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. The phononic heat flux and its dynamical noise properties are analyzed within the scattering (Landauer) formalism with transmission probability function for acoustic phonons calculated within the method of atomistic Green's functions (AGF technique). The perturbative computational scheme is used to determine nonlinear corrections to phononic heat flux and its noise power spectral density with up to the second order terms with respect to temperature difference. Our results show the limited applicability of ballistic Fourier's law and fluctuation-dissipation theorem to heat transport in quantum systems. We also derive several noise-signal relations applicable to nanoscale heat flow carried by phonons, but valid for electrons as well. We also discuss the extension of the perturbative transport theory to higher order terms in order to address a huge variety of problems related to nonlinear thermal effects which may occur at nanoscale and at strongly non-equilibrium conditions with high-intensity heat fluxes. This work was supported by Pace University Start-up Grant.

  12. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas in the nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2006-06-15

    A field theory approach to transport phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas is presented. The thermodynamic field theory (TFT), previously developed for treating the generic thermodynamic system out of equilibrium, is applied to plasmas physics. Transport phenomena are treated here as the effect of the field linking the thermodynamic forces with their conjugate flows combined with statistical mechanics. In particular, the Classical and the Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes are analyzed by solving the thermodynamic field equations of the TFT in the weak-field approximation. We found that, the TFT does not correct the expressions of the ionic heat fluxes evaluated by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes. On the other hand, the fluxes of matter and electronic energy (heat flow) is further enhanced in the nonlinear Classical and Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes. These results seem to be in line with the experimental observations. The complete set of the electronic and ionic transport equations in the nonlinear Banana regime, is also reported. A paper showing the comparison between our theoretic results and the experimental observations in the JET machine is currently in preparation.

  13. Charge-carrier transport in smectic mesophases of biphenyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Akira; Haruyama, Akihide; Kurotaki, Kensuke; Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2007-10-01

    The charge-transport properties of ω ,ω'-alkylalkoxylbiphenyls, one of the simplest calamitic (rodlike) liquid crystals exhibiting smectic mesophases, were investigated using the time-of-flight experiments. A mobility of ˜10-3 cm2/V s was determined for holes in both smectic B (SmB) and smectic E (SmE) phases. This high electronic mobility, comparable to the highest mobilities in amorphous organic semiconductors, indicates that the self-organization of such simple molecules including small aromatic compounds is quite effective in enhancing the charge transport in organic materials. The mobilities of both smectic mesophases, however, depend on temperatures, which is not the case for other typical smectic liquid crystals reported previously. Interestingly, the mobility in the SmE phase exhibits a Poole-Frenkel type of field dependence. Detailed experimental studies have shown that this field dependence is not due to the trapping effect of carriers caused by chemical contaminants or structural defects such as domain boundaries and dislocation, but arises from the widely distributed density of states with a distribution width of 0.11-0.13 eV for the SmE phase, as estimated based on a two-dimensional Gaussian disorder model. The phase-specific carrier transport in biphenyls may provide us with unique insights leading to a more complete understanding of the charge carrier transport in the mesophase materials.

  14. The Role of Wave Nonlinearity on Sediment Motion and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. L.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Frank, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been assumed that higher moments of velocity and acceleration affect the motion and transport of mobile sediment beds. The goal of this effect is to identify the influence of wave shape on sediment motion and mobile layer thickness. Theoretic predictions of neared velocity and horizontal pressure gradient will be approximated with Dean's 1965 stream function theory for representing nonlinear waves. The formulation also allows for the inclusion of mean flow. Wave nonlinearity is characterized with skewness and asymmetry of the wave shape. An incipient motion criterion that resolves the fluid forcing due to both the bed shear stress and the horizontal pressure gradients is applied to a slab of sediment. The resulting formulation provides a measure of sediment transport vulnerability to commonly available wave parameters (wave height, wave period, water depth, skewness, and asymmetry). The formulation is compared with several available data sets with a range of forcing and sediment conditions. Particle image velocimetry observations of velocity and sediment motion and acoustic Doppler observations of the three-dimensional velocity field provide high resolution of the near bed dynamics. The wave shape is characterized with mid water column pressure sensors and wave gages. As the wave nonlinearities increase, the role of the horizontal pressure gradient also increases. The influence of the pressure gradient also is shown to be particularly sensitive to a decrease in the wave period and an increase in the wave asymmetry. The influence of the bed shear is shown to be particularly sensitive to wave skewness. The analysis demonstrates the potential for improving the larger scale predictions of sediment transport in our nearshore and coastal waters.

  15. Transport in disordered monolayer MoS2 nanoflakes—evidence for inhomogeneous charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Klochan, O.; Liu, C.-H.; Wang, W.-H.; Hamilton, A. R.; Liang, C.-T.

    2014-09-01

    We study charge transport in a monolayer MoS2 nanoflake over a wide range of carrier density, temperature and electric bias. We find that the transport is best described by a percolating picture in which the disorder breaks translational invariance, breaking the system up into a series of puddles, rather than previous pictures in which the disorder is treated as homogeneous and uniform. Our work provides insight to a unified picture of charge transport in monolayer MoS2 nanoflakes and contributes to the development of next-generation MoS2-based devices.

  16. Superexchange Charge Transport in Loaded Metal Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Tobias; Liu, Jianxi; Wächter, Tobias; Friederich, Pascal; Symalla, Franz; Welle, Alexander; Mugnaini, Veronica; Meded, Velimir; Zharnikov, Michael; Wöll, Christof; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-26

    In the past, nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been mostly studied for their huge potential with regard to gas storage and separation. More recently, the discovery that the electrical conductivity of a widely studied, highly insulating MOF, HKUST-1, improves dramatically when loaded with guest molecules has triggered a huge interest in the charge carrier transport properties of MOFs. The observed high conductivity, however, is difficult to reconcile with conventional transport mechanisms: neither simple hopping nor band transport models are consistent with the available experimental data. Here, we combine theoretical results and new experimental data to demonstrate that the observed conductivity can be explained by an extended hopping transport model including virtual hops through localized MOF states or molecular superexchange. Predictions of this model agree well with precise conductivity measurements, where experimental artifacts and the influence of defects are largely avoided by using well-defined samples and the Hg-drop junction approach. PMID:27359160

  17. Nonlinear transport in ionic liquid gated strontium titanate nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence M.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-09-14

    Measurements of the current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of ionic liquid gated nanometer scale channels of strontium titanate have been carried out. At low gate voltages, the I–V characteristics exhibit a large voltage threshold for conduction and a nonlinear power law behavior at all temperatures measured. The source-drain current of these nanowires scales as a power law of the difference between the source-drain voltage and the threshold voltage. The scaling behavior of the I–V characteristic is reminiscent of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots. At large gate voltages, the narrow channel acts as a quasi-1D wire whose conductance follows Landauer's formula for multichannel transport.

  18. COMPARISON OF MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR NONLINEAR RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. MARTIN; F. B. BROWN

    2001-03-01

    Five Monte Carlo methods for solving the nonlinear thermal radiation transport equations are compared. The methods include the well-known Implicit Monte Carlo method (IMC) developed by Fleck and Cummings, an alternative to IMC developed by Carter and Forest, an ''exact'' method recently developed by Ahrens and Larsen, and two methods recently proposed by Martin and Brown. The five Monte Carlo methods are developed and applied to the radiation transport equation in a medium assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Conservation of energy is derived and used to define appropriate material energy update equations for each of the methods. Details of the Monte Carlo implementation are presented, both for the random walk simulation and the material energy update. Simulation results for all five methods are obtained for two infinite medium test problems and a 1-D test problem, all of which have analytical solutions. Conclusions regarding the relative merits of the various schemes are presented.

  19. Charge Transport and Structural Dynamics in Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam; Terheggen, Logan; Griffin, Philip; Benson, Roberto; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a series of imidazole and carboxylic acid-based deep eutectic mixtures are investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the extended hydrogen-bonded networks characteristic of imidazoles are broken down upon addition of carboxylic acids, resulting in an increase in dc conductivity of the mixtures. These results are discussed within the framework of recent theories of hydrogen bonding and proton transport.

  20. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  1. An alternative approach to charge transport in semiconducting electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomchick, J.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The excess-carrier charge transport through the space-charge region of a semiconducting electrode is analyzed by a technique known as the flux method. In this approach reflection and transmission coefficients appropriate for a sheet of uniform semiconducting material describe its transport properties. A review is presented of the flux method showing that the results for a semiconductor electrode reduce in a limiting case to those previously found by Gaertner if the depletion layer is treated as a perfectly transmitting medium in which scattering and recombination are ignored. Then, in the framework of the flux method the depletion layer is considered more realistically by explicitly taking into account scattering and recombination processes which occur in this region.

  2. Photoinduced charge-transfer materials for nonlinear optical applications

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.

    2006-10-24

    A method using polyelectrolyte self-assembly for preparing multi-layered organic molecular materials having individual layers which exhibit ultrafast electron and/or energy transfer in a controlled direction occurring over the entire structure. Using a high molecular weight, water-soluble, anionic form of poly-phenylene vinylene, self-assembled films can be formed which show high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (QE). The highest emission QE is achieved using poly(propylene-imine) (PPI) dendrimers as cationic binders. Self-quenching of the luminescence is observed as the solid polymer film thickness is increased and can be reversed by inserting additional spacer layers of transparent polyelectrolytes between each active conjugated layer, such that the QE grows with thickness. A red shift of the luminescence is also observed as additional PPV layers are added. This effect persists as self-quenching is eliminated. Charge transfer superlattices can be formed by additionally incorporating C.sub.60 acceptor layers.

  3. Charge Transport in Antiferromagnetic Insulating Phase of Two-Dimensional Organic Conductor λ-(BETS)2FeCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shiori; Shimada, Kazuo; Tajima, Naoya; Nishio, Yutaka; Terashima, Taichi; Isono, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Akiko; Zhou, Biao; Kato, Reizo; Uji, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    Resistance and dielectric constants have been measured in the antiferromagnetic insulating phase of the quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 to understand charge transport. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics are observed at low temperatures, which are explained by a charge transport model based on the electric-field dependent Coulomb potential between the thermally excited electron and hole. A small dip in the magnetic field dependence of the resistance is found at 1.2 T, which is ascribed to a spin-flop transition. The large difference between the in-plane and out-of-plane dielectric constants shows the two-dimensionality of the Coulomb potential, which is consistent with the charge transport model. The angular dependence of the metal-insulator transition field is determined, which suggests that the Zeeman effect of the 3d spins of the Fe ions plays an essential role.

  4. Thermodynamic Bounds on Nonlinear Electrostatic Perturbations in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolas C. Logan and Ronald C. Davidson

    2012-07-18

    This paper places a lowest upper bound on the field energy in electrostatic perturbations in single-species charged particle beams with initial temperature anisotropy (TllT⊥ < 1). The result applies to all electrostatic perturbations driven by the natural anisotropies that develop in accelerated particle beams, including Harris-type electrostatic instabilities, known to limit the luminosity and minimum spot size attainable in experiments. The thermodynamic bound on the field perturbation energy of the instabilities is obtained from the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations for an arbitrary initial distribution function, including the effects of intense self-fields, finite geometry and nonlinear processes. This paper also includes analytical estimates of the nonlinear bounds for space-charge-dominated and emittance-dominated anisotropic bi-Maxwellian distributions.

  5. Thermodynamic bounds on nonlinear electrostatic perturbations in intense charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2012-07-15

    This paper places a lowest upper bound on the field energy in electrostatic perturbations in single-species charged particle beams with initial temperature anisotropy (T{sub Parallel-To }/T{sub Up-Tack }<1). The result applies to all electrostatic perturbations driven by the natural anisotropies that develop in accelerated particle beams, including Harris-type electrostatic instabilities, known to limit the luminosity and minimum spot size attainable in experiments. The thermodynamic bound on the field perturbation energy of the instabilities is obtained from the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations for an arbitrary initial distribution function, including the effects of intense self-fields, finite geometry, and nonlinear processes. This paper also includes analytical estimates of the nonlinear bounds for space-charge-dominated and emittance-dominated anisotropic bi-Maxwellian distributions.

  6. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, K. F.; Summers, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels/frame. This imager will offer an order of magnitude improvements in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their subsequent integration. The camera chip can be divided into three distinct functions: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's); (2) charge collection, storage, and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD); and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the optimization of each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration and manufacturability is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail.

  7. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state high definition television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels per frame. This imager offers an order of magnitude improvement in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to the UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their integration. The imager chip can be divided into three distinct components: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's), (2) charge collection, storage and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD), and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the development of manufacturable designs for each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail in Sections 2-4.

  8. Charge Central Interpretation of the Full Nonlinear PB Equation: Implications for Accurate and Scalable Modeling of Solvation Interactions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Wang, Changhao; Ye, Xiang; Luo, Ray

    2016-08-25

    Continuum solvation modeling based upon the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is widely used in structural and functional analysis of biomolecules. In this work, we propose a charge-central interpretation of the full nonlinear PBE electrostatic interactions. The validity of the charge-central view or simply charge view, as formulated as a vacuum Poisson equation with effective charges, was first demonstrated by reproducing both electrostatic potentials and energies from the original solvated full nonlinear PBE. There are at least two benefits when the charge-central framework is applied. First the convergence analyses show that the use of polarization charges allows a much faster converging numerical procedure for electrostatic energy and forces calculation for the full nonlinear PBE. Second, the formulation of the solvated electrostatic interactions as effective charges in vacuum allows scalable algorithms to be deployed for large biomolecular systems. Here, we exploited the charge-view interpretation and developed a particle-particle particle-mesh (P3M) strategy for the full nonlinear PBE systems. We also studied the accuracy and convergence of solvation forces with the charge-view and the P3M methods. It is interesting to note that the convergence of both the charge-view and the P3M methods is more rapid than the original full nonlinear PBE method. Given the developments and validations documented here, we are working to adapt the P3M treatment of the full nonlinear PBE model to molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Aggregate-mediated charge transport in ionomeric electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Keran; Maranas, Janna; Milner, Scott

    Polymers such PEO can conduct ions, and have been studied as possible replacements for organic liquid electrolytes in rechargeable metal-ion batteries. More generally, fast room-temperature ionic conduction has been reported for a variety of materials, from liquids to crystalline solids. Unfortunately, polymer electrolytes generally have limited conductivity; these polymers are too viscous to have fast ion diffusion like liquids, and too unstructured to promote cooperative transport like crystalline solids. Ionomers are polymer electrolytes in which ionic groups are covalently bound to the polymer backbone, neutralized by free counterions. These materials also conduct ions, and can exhibit strong ionic aggregation. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics, we explore the forces driving ionic aggregation, and describe the role ion aggregates have in mediating charge transport. The aggregates are string-like such that ions typically have two neighbors. We find ion aggregates self-assemble like worm-like micelles. Excess charge, or free ions, occasionally coordinate with aggregates and are transported along the chain in a Grotthuss-like mechanism. We propose that controlling ionomer aggregate structure through materials design can enhance cooperative ion transport.

  10. Nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion at the atomic scale studied with scanning tunneling microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xiuwen

    2008-10-01

    Several novel phenomena at the single-atom and single-molecule level occurring on the surfaces of single crystals were studied with home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. The results revealed intriguing properties of single atoms and single molecules, including nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion. First, negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed in the dI/dV spectra for single copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on one- and two-layer sodium bromide (NaBr), but not for single CuPc molecules adsorbed on three-layer NaBr, all grown on a NiAl(110) surface. This transition from NDR to the absence of NDR was explained as the result of competing effects in the double-barrier tunnel junction (DBTJ) and was reproduced in a calculation based on a resonant-tunneling model. Second, the nonlinearity of the STM junction due to a single manganese (Mn) atom or MnCO molecule adsorbed on a NiAl(110) surface was used to rectify microwave irradiation. The resulting rectification current was shown to be sensitive to the spin-splitting of the electronic states of the Mn atom and to the vibrations of the MnCO molecule. Next, the ordering of cesium (Cs) atoms adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and a NiAl(110) surface was imaged in real space. Because of charge transfer to the substrates, Cs adatoms were positively charged on both surfaces. Even at 12 K, Cs adatoms were able to move and adjust according to coverage. On Au(111), the Cs first layer had a quasi-hexagonal lattice and islands of the second Cs layer did not appear until the first was completed. On NiAl(110), a locally disordered Cs first layer was observed before a locally ordered layer appeared at higher coverages. The cation-pi interactions were then studied at the single molecular level. We were able to form cation-pi complexes such as Cs···DSB, Cs···DSB···Cs, Rb···DSB, and Rb···ZnEtiol controllably by manipulation with the STM tip. We could also separate these

  11. Charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sangoro, Joshua R; Kremer, Friedrich

    2012-04-17

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit unique features such as low melting points, low vapor pressures, wide liquidus temperature ranges, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. As a result, they show promise for use in variety of applications: as reaction media, in batteries and supercapacitors, in solar and fuel cells, for electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors, for protein extraction and crystallization, and many others. Because of the ease with which they can be supercooled, ionic liquids offer new opportunities to investigate long-standing questions regarding the nature of the dynamic glass transition and its possible link to charge transport. Despite the significant steps achieved from experimental and theoretical studies, no generally accepted quantitative theory of dynamic glass transition to date has been capable of reproducing all the experimentally observed features. In this Account, we discuss recent studies of the interplay between charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids as investigated by a combination of several experimental techniques including broadband dielectric spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Based on Einstein-Smoluchowski relations, we use dielectric spectra of ionic liquids to determine diffusion coefficients in quantitative agreement with independent pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, but spanning a broader range of more than 10 orders of magnitude. This approach provides a novel opportunity to determine the electrical mobility and effective number density of charge carriers as well as their types of thermal activation from the measured dc conductivity separately. We also unravel the origin of the remarkable universality of charge transport in different classes of glass-forming ionic liquids.

  12. Charge Transport and Glassy Dynamics in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Sangoro, Joshua R; Kremer, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit unique features such as low melting points, low vapor pressures, wide liquidus temperature ranges, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. As a result, they show promise for use in variety of applications: as reaction media, in batteries and supercapacitors, in solar and fuel cells, for electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors, for protein extraction and crystallization, and many others. Because of the ease with which they can be supercooled, ionic liquids offer new opportunities to investigate long-standing questions regarding the nature of the dynamic glass transition and its possible link to charge transport. Despite the significant steps achieved from experimental and theoretical studies, no generally accepted quantitative theory of dynamic glass transition to date has been capable of reproducing all the experimentally observed features. In this Account, we discuss recent studies of the interplay between charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids as investigated by a combination of several experimental techniques including broadband dielectric spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Based on EinsteinSmoluchowski relations, we use dielectric spectra of ionic liquids to determine diffusion coefficients in quantitative agreement with independent pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, but spanning a broader range of more than 10 orders of magnitude. This approach provides a novel opportunity to determine the electrical mobility and effective number density of charge carriers as well as their types of thermal activation from the measured dc conductivity separately. We also unravel the origin of the remarkable universality of charge transport in different classes of glass-forming ionic liquids.

  13. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Internal transport and freight charges for export... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of internal transport and freight charges on export shipments, a benefit exists to the extent that the...

  14. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  15. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  16. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching charge... on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport transmission charges that are not presumed... exchange carrier experiences based on the prior year's annual use. Tandem-switched transport...

  17. Normal and impaired charge transport in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John H.; Villagrán, Martha Y. Suárez; Maric, Sladjana; Briggs, James M.

    2015-03-01

    We examine the physics behind some of the causes (e.g., hole migration and localization that cause incorrect base pairing in DNA) and effects (due to amino acid replacements affecting mitochondrial charge transport) of disease-implicated point mutations, with emphasis on mutations affecting mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). First we discuss hole transport and localization in DNA, including some of our quantum mechanical modeling results, as they relate to certain mutations in cancer. Next, we give an overview of electron and proton transport in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and how such transport can become impaired by mutations implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and other major illnesses. In particular, we report on our molecular dynamics (MD) studies of a leucine→arginine amino acid replacement in ATP synthase, encoded by the T→G point mutation at locus 8993 of mtDNA. This mutation causes Leigh syndrome, a devastating maternally inherited neuromuscular disorder, and has been found to trigger rapid tumor growth in prostate cancer cell lines. Our MD results suggest, for the first time, that this mutation adversely affects water channels that transport protons to and from the c-ring of the rotary motor ATP synthase, thus impairing the ability of the motor to produce ATP. Finally, we discuss possible future research topics for biological physics, such as mitochondrial complex I, a large proton-pumping machine whose physics remains poorly understood.

  18. Charge Localization and Transport in Lithiated Olivine Phosphate Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jianguo; Rosso, Kevin M.; Liu, Jun

    2011-11-10

    We report density functional theory (DFT) calculations for olivine-type LiTMPO4 and TMPO4 (TM=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) structures, using GGA+U and the B3LYP hybrid density functional that includes nonlocal Fock exchange. TM is typically characterized in terms of the formal oxide states of 2+ or 3+, corresponding to TM with localized charge in LiTMPO4 and TMPO4 structures, respectively, in which electron transport would take place by thermally activated hopping of electrons strongly localized on the transition metal (small polarons). In this work, we assess the validity of the concept of formal TM oxidation states in these materials, and conclude that the valence depends in large part on the strength of d-p hybridization. Stable small polaron formation, i.e., mixed 2+ and 3+ valence states, appears to require that the ratio of differences in the metal and oxygen ionic charges (dQTM/dQO) of the two end member phases is larger than 2, corresponding to the mixed-valence TM system. If the ratio of dQTM/dQO is smaller than 2, excess electrons prefer delocalization and the system behaves more single-valence like with charge transport more akin to metallic conduction. The critical ratio emerging from our analysis may turn out to be relevant to other transition metal systems as well, as a criterion to discriminate single-valence or mixed-valence characteristics and hence the predominant conduction mechanism.

  19. Charge Transport in Hybrid Halide Perovskite Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Oana

    Hybrid organic-inorganic trihalide perovskite (HTP) materials exhibit a strong optical absorption, tunable band gap, long carrier lifetimes and fast charge carrier transport. These remarkable properties, coupled with their reduced complexity processing, make the HTPs promising contenders for large scale, low-cost thin film optoelectronic applications. But in spite of the remarkable demonstrations of high performance solar cells, light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistor devices, all of which took place in a very short time period, numerous questions related to the nature and dynamics of the charge carriers and their relation to device performance, stability and reliability still remain. This presentation describes the electrical properties of HTPs evaluated from field-effect transistor measurements. The electrostatic gating of provides an unique platform for the study of intrinsic charge transport in these materials, and, at the same time, expand the use of HTPs towards switching electronic devices, which have not been explored previously. We fabricated FETs on SiO2 and polymer dielectrics from spin coating, thermal evaporation and spray deposition and compare their properties. CH3NH3PbI3-xClx can reach balanced electron and hole mobilities of 10 cm2/Vs upon tuning the thin-film microstructure, injection and the defect density at the semiconductor/dielectric interface. The work was performed in collaboration with Yaochuan Mei (Wake Forest University), Chuang Zhang, and Z. Valy Vardeny (University of Utah). The work is supported by ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2943.

  20. Charge transport and injection in amorphous organic electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Shing Chi

    This thesis presents how we use various measuring techniques to study the charge transport and injection in organic electronic materials. Understanding charge transport and injection properties in organic solids is of vital importance for improving performance characteristics of organic electronic devices, including organic-light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells (OPVs), and field effect transistors (OFETs). The charge transport properties of amorphous organic materials, commonly used in organic electronic devices, are investigated by the means of carrier mobility measurements. Transient electroluminescence (EL) technique was used to evaluate the electron mobility of an electron transporting material--- tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3). The results are in excellent agreement with independent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Then, the effect of dopants on electron transport was also examined. TOF technique was also used to examine the effects of tertiary-butyl (t-Bu) substitutions on anthracene derivatives (ADN). All ADN compounds were found to be ambipolar. As the degree of t-Bu substitution increases, the carrier mobilities decrease progressively. The reduction of carrier mobilities with increasing t-butylation can be attributed to a decrease in the charge-transfer integral or the wavefunction overlap. In addition, from TOF measurements, two naphthylamine-based hole transporters, namely, N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'diamine (NPB) and 4,4',4"-tris(n-(2-naphthyl)-n-phenyl-amino)-triphenylamine (2TNATA) were found to possess electron-transporting (ET) abilities. An organic light-emitting diode that employed NPB as the ET material was demonstrated. The electron conducting mechanism of NPB and 2TNATA in relation to the hopping model will be discussed. Furthermore, the ET property of NPB applied in OLEDs will also be examined. Besides transient EL and TOF techniques, we also use dark-injection space-charge-limited current

  1. Quantitative comparison of experimental impurity transport with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Reinke, M. L.; White, A. E.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport are compared to experimental impurity transport for the first time. The GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) was used to perform global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport for a standard Alcator C-Mod, L-mode discharge. The laser blow-off technique was combined with soft x-ray measurements of a single charge state of calcium to provide time-evolving profiles of this non-intrinsic, non-recycling impurity over a radial range of 0.0 ⩽ r/a ⩽ 0.6. Experimental transport coefficient profiles and their uncertainties were extracted from the measurements using the impurity transport code STRAHL and rigorous Monte Carlo error analysis. To best assess the agreement of gyrokinetic simulations with the experimental profiles, the sensitivity of the GYRO predicted impurity transport to a wide range of turbulence-relevant plasma parameters was investigated. A direct comparison of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation and experiment is presented with an in depth discussion of error sources and a new data analysis methodology.

  2. Symposium GC: Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bommisetty, Venkat

    2011-06-23

    This paper provides a summary only and table of contents of the sessions. Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  3. Nonlinear ionic transport through microstructured solid electrolytes: homogenization estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto Sillamoni, Ignacio J.; Idiart, Martín I.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the transport of multiple ionic species by diffusion and migration through microstructured solid electrolytes in the presence of strong electric fields. The assumed constitutive relations for the constituent phases follow from convex energy and dissipation potentials which guarantee thermodynamic consistency. The effective response is heuristically deduced from a multi-scale convergence analysis of the relevant field equations. The resulting homogenized response involves an effective dissipation potential per species. Each potential is mathematically akin to that of a standard nonlinear heterogeneous conductor. A ‘linear-comparison’ homogenization technique is then used to generate estimates for these nonlinear potentials in terms of available estimates for corresponding linear conductors. By way of example, use is made of the Maxwell-Garnett and effective-medium linear approximations to generate estimates for two-phase systems with power-law dissipation. Explicit formulas are given for some limiting cases. In the case of threshold-type behavior, the estimates exhibit non-analytical dilute limits and seem to be consistent with fields localized in low energy paths.

  4. Ion transport through macrocapillaries - Oscillations due to charge patch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, D. D.; Lyle, L. A. M.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results on ion transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ion-guided aspects of this ion delivery mechanism. We have demonstrated that guiding in macrocapillaries exhibits position- and angle-dependent transmission properties which are directly related to the capillary material (either metal or insulator) and geometry. Specifically, we have passed 1 keV Rb+ ions through glass and metal macrocapillaries, and have observed oscillations for the transmitted ion current passing through the insulating capillaries. Straightforward calculations show that these oscillations can be attributed to beam deflections from charge patches that form on the interior walls of the capillary. The absence of these oscillations in the metal capillary data serve as further confirmation of the role of charge patch formation.

  5. Dust charging and transport on airless planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H.-W.; Grün, E.; Horányi, M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on laboratory experiments to shed light on dust charging and transport that have been suggested to explain a variety of unusual phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies. We have recorded micron-sized insulating dust particles jumping to several centimeters high with an initial speed of ~0.6 m/s under ultraviolet illumination or exposure to plasmas, resulting in an equivalent height of ~0.11 m on the lunar surface that is comparable to the height of the so-called lunar horizon glow. Lofted large aggregates and surface mobilization are related to many space observations. We experimentally show that the emission and re-absorption of photoelectron and/or secondary electron at the walls of microcavities formed between neighboring dust particles below the surface are responsible for generating unexpectedly large negative charges and intense particle-particle repulsive forces to mobilize and lift off dust particles.

  6. SLC injector simulation and tuning for high charge transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.; Clendenin, J.E.; Early, R.A.; Ross, M.C.; Turner, J.L.; Wang, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    We have simulated the SLC injector from the thermionic gun through the first accelerating section and used the resulting parameters to tune the injector for optimum performance and high charge transport. Simulations are conducted using PARMELA, a three-dimensional ray-trace code with a two-dimensional space-charge model. The magnetic field profile due to the existing magnetic optics is calculated using POISSON, while SUPERFISH is used to calculate the space harmonics of the various bunchers and the accelerator cavities. The initial beam conditions in the PARMELA code are derived from the EGUN model of the gun. The resulting injector parameters from the PARMELA simulation are used to prescribe experimental settings of the injector components. The experimental results are in agreement with the results of the integrated injector model.

  7. Charge transport model to predict intrinsic reliability for dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Sean P.; Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L. Gill, William N.; Lu, T.-M.; Yeap, Kong Boon

    2015-09-28

    Several lifetime models, mostly empirical in nature, are used to predict reliability for low-k dielectrics used in integrated circuits. There is a dispute over which model provides the most accurate prediction for device lifetime at operating conditions. As a result, there is a need to transition from the use of these largely empirical models to one built entirely on theory. Therefore, a charge transport model was developed to predict the device lifetime of low-k interconnect systems. The model is based on electron transport and donor-type defect formation. Breakdown occurs when a critical defect concentration accumulates, resulting in electron tunneling and the emptying of positively charged traps. The enhanced local electric field lowers the barrier for electron injection into the dielectric, causing a positive feedforward failure. The charge transport model is able to replicate experimental I-V and I-t curves, capturing the current decay at early stress times and the rapid current increase at failure. The model is based on field-driven and current-driven failure mechanisms and uses a minimal number of parameters. All the parameters have some theoretical basis or have been measured experimentally and are not directly used to fit the slope of the time-to-failure versus applied field curve. Despite this simplicity, the model is able to accurately predict device lifetime for three different sources of experimental data. The simulation's predictions at low fields and very long lifetimes show that the use of a single empirical model can lead to inaccuracies in device reliability.

  8. Charge transport model to predict intrinsic reliability for dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Sean P.; Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L.; Lu, T.-M.; Yeap, Kong Boon; Gill, William N.

    2015-09-01

    Several lifetime models, mostly empirical in nature, are used to predict reliability for low-k dielectrics used in integrated circuits. There is a dispute over which model provides the most accurate prediction for device lifetime at operating conditions. As a result, there is a need to transition from the use of these largely empirical models to one built entirely on theory. Therefore, a charge transport model was developed to predict the device lifetime of low-k interconnect systems. The model is based on electron transport and donor-type defect formation. Breakdown occurs when a critical defect concentration accumulates, resulting in electron tunneling and the emptying of positively charged traps. The enhanced local electric field lowers the barrier for electron injection into the dielectric, causing a positive feedforward failure. The charge transport model is able to replicate experimental I-V and I-t curves, capturing the current decay at early stress times and the rapid current increase at failure. The model is based on field-driven and current-driven failure mechanisms and uses a minimal number of parameters. All the parameters have some theoretical basis or have been measured experimentally and are not directly used to fit the slope of the time-to-failure versus applied field curve. Despite this simplicity, the model is able to accurately predict device lifetime for three different sources of experimental data. The simulation's predictions at low fields and very long lifetimes show that the use of a single empirical model can lead to inaccuracies in device reliability.

  9. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Arend G; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-06-01

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods.

  10. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkstra, Arend G. E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-07

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods.

  11. Nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann model of charged lipid membranes: Accounting for the presence of zwitterionic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, Demmelash H.; May, Sylvio

    2008-09-01

    The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann model is used to derive analytical expressions for the free energies of both mixed anionic-zwitterionic and mixed cationic-zwitterionic lipid membranes as function of the mole fraction of charged lipids. Accounting explicitly for the electrostatic properties of the zwitterionic lipid species affects the free energy of anionic and cationic membranes in a qualitatively different way: That of an anionic membrane changes monotonously as a function of the mole fraction of charged lipids, whereas it passes through a pronounced minimum for a cationic membrane.

  12. Acoustic charge transport technology investigation for advanced development transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayalar, S.

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic charge transport (ACT) technology has provided a basis for a new family of analog signal processors, including a programmable transversal filter (PTF). Through monolithic integration of ACT delay lines with GaAs metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) digital memory and controllers, these devices significantly extend the performance of PTF's. This article introduces the basic operation of these devices and summarizes their present and future specifications. The production and testing of these devices indicate that this new technology is a promising one for future space applications.

  13. Charge transport in pn and npn junctions of silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakage, Ai; Ezawa, Motohiko; Tanaka, Yukio; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-08-01

    We investigate charge transport of pn and npn junctions made from silicene, a Si analogue of graphene. The conductance shows the distinct gate-voltage dependencies peculiar to the topological and nontopological phases, where the topological phase transition is caused by external electric field. Namely, the conductance is (not) suppressed in the np (nn) regime when both sides are topological, and in the nn (np) regime when one side is topological and the other side is nontopological. Furthermore, we find that the conductance is almost quantized to be 0, 1, and 2. Our findings will open a new way to nanoelectronics based on silicene.

  14. Magnetically charged regular black hole in a model of nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2015-11-01

    We obtain a magnetically charged regular black hole in general relativity. The source to the Einstein field equations is nonlinear electrodynamic field in a physically reasonable model of nonlinear electrodynamics (NED). "Physically" here means the NED model is constructed on the basis of three conditions: the Maxwell asymptotic in the weak electromagnetic field limit; the presence of vacuum birefringence phenomenon; and satisfying the weak energy condition (WEC). In addition, we analyze the thermodynamic properties of the regular black hole in two ways. According to the usual black hole thermodynamics, we calculate the heat capacity at constant charge, from which we know the smaller black hole is more stable. We also employ the horizon thermodynamics to discuss the thermodynamic quantities, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure.

  15. Charge transport in strongly coupled quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Cherie R; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of high-mobility, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids has triggered fundamental studies that map the evolution from carrier hopping through localized quantum-confined states to band-like charge transport in delocalized and hybridized states of strongly coupled QD solids, in analogy with the construction of solids from atoms. Increased coupling in QD solids has led to record-breaking performance in QD devices, such as electronic transistors and circuitry, optoelectronic light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. Here, we review the advances in synthesis, assembly, ligand treatments and doping that have enabled high-mobility QD solids, as well as the experiments and theory that depict band-like transport in the QD solid state. We also present recent QD devices and discuss future prospects for QD materials and device design.

  16. Thermal detection of trapped charge carriers in organic transport materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Malm, Norwin; Steiger, Juergen; Finnberg, Torsten; Schmechel, Roland; von Seggern, Heinz

    2003-03-01

    The effect of trap states on the transport and luminescence properties of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is studied. For trap level detection energy resolved thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements known as fractional glow are utilized to determine the density of occupied states (DOOS) in various organic semiconductors such as the small molecule systems Alq3 [aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)], 1-NaphDATA {4,4',4"-tris-[N-(1-naphtyl)-N-phenylamino]-triphenylamine} and α-NPD [N,N'-di-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine] and the polymeric semiconductor MDMO-PPV {poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene]}. Characteristic differences in the trap spectra are obtained and interpreted in terms of possible structural and compositional origins of the investigated materials. In order to judge the formation process of traps and their practical consequences on the charge carrier transport I-V and L-V characteristics of 1-NaphDATA doped α-NPD devices and α-NPD doped 1-NaphDATA devices were compared to respective non-doped samples. A clearly reduced current and luminescence was found only in the former case. It was possible to conclude that the detected electronic trap states either act as hole traps or as scattering centers. Furthermore, pulsed transport studies on ITO/α-NPD/Alq3/Al devices show thte critical influence of traps on the dynamical performance of the charge transport. In a two-pulse experiment the carrier injection and trap depletion can be separated.

  17. Enhancement and electric charge-assisted tuning of nonlinear light generation in bipolar plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Zhou, Liangcheng; Chou, Stephen Y

    2014-05-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new plasmonic nonlinear light generation (NLG) structure, termed plasmonic-enhanced, charge-assisted second-harmonic generator (p-CASH), that not only achieves high second-harmonic generation (SHG) enhancement (76-fold), large SHG tunability by bias (8%/V), wide tuning range (280%), 7.8 × 10(-9) conversion efficiency, and high stability but also exhibits a SHG tuning, that is bipolar rather than unipolar, not due to the third-order nonlinear polarization term, hence fundamentally different from the classic electric field induced SHG-tuning (EFISH). We propose a new SHG tuning mechanism: the second-order nonlinear polarization term enhanced by plasmonic effects, changed by charge injection and negative oxygen vacancies movement, and is nearly 3 orders of magnitude larger than EFISH. p-CASH is a bipolar parallel-plate capacitor with thin layers of plasmonic nanostructures, a TiOx (semiconductor and nonlinear) and a SiO2 (insulator) sandwiched between two electrodes. Fabrication of p-CASH used nanoimprint on 4″ wafer and is scalable to wallpaper-sized areas. The new structure, new properties, and new understanding should open up various new designs and applications of NLG in various fields.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics and Bifurcation Analysis of a Boost Converter for Battery Charging in Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hindawi, Mohammed M.; Abusorrah, Abdullah; Al-Turki, Yusuf; Giaouris, Damian; Mandal, Kuntal; Banerjee, Soumitro

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems with a battery back-up form an integral part of distributed generation systems and therefore have recently attracted a lot of interest. In this paper, we consider a system of charging a battery from a PV panel through a current mode controlled boost dc-dc converter. We analyze its complete nonlinear/nonsmooth dynamics, using a piecewise model of the converter and realistic nonlinear v-i characteristics of the PV panel. Through this study, it is revealed that system design without taking into account the nonsmooth dynamics of the converter combined with the nonlinear v-i characteristics of the PV panel can lead to unpredictable responses of the overall system with high current ripple and other undesirable phenomena. This analysis can lead to better designed converters that can operate under a wide variation of the solar irradiation and the battery's state of charge. We show that the v-i characteristics of the PV panel combined with the battery's output voltage variation can increase or decrease the converter's robustness, both under peak current mode control and average current mode control. We justify the observation in terms of the change in the discrete-time map caused by the nonlinear v-i characteristics of the PV panel. The theoretical results are validated experimentally.

  19. Enhancement and electric charge-assisted tuning of nonlinear light generation in bipolar plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Zhou, Liangcheng; Chou, Stephen Y

    2014-05-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new plasmonic nonlinear light generation (NLG) structure, termed plasmonic-enhanced, charge-assisted second-harmonic generator (p-CASH), that not only achieves high second-harmonic generation (SHG) enhancement (76-fold), large SHG tunability by bias (8%/V), wide tuning range (280%), 7.8 × 10(-9) conversion efficiency, and high stability but also exhibits a SHG tuning, that is bipolar rather than unipolar, not due to the third-order nonlinear polarization term, hence fundamentally different from the classic electric field induced SHG-tuning (EFISH). We propose a new SHG tuning mechanism: the second-order nonlinear polarization term enhanced by plasmonic effects, changed by charge injection and negative oxygen vacancies movement, and is nearly 3 orders of magnitude larger than EFISH. p-CASH is a bipolar parallel-plate capacitor with thin layers of plasmonic nanostructures, a TiOx (semiconductor and nonlinear) and a SiO2 (insulator) sandwiched between two electrodes. Fabrication of p-CASH used nanoimprint on 4″ wafer and is scalable to wallpaper-sized areas. The new structure, new properties, and new understanding should open up various new designs and applications of NLG in various fields. PMID:24730390

  20. Mechanism of electrochemical charge transport in individual transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Guckian, Adrian; Kuznetsov, Alexander M; Vos, Johannes G; Ulstrup, Jens

    2006-12-27

    We used electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to elucidate the mechanism of electron transport through individual pyridyl-based Os complexes. Our tunneling data obtained by two-dimensional electrochemical STS and STM imaging lead us to the conclusion that electron transport occurs by thermally activated hopping. The conductance enhancement around the redox potential of the complex, which is reminiscent of switching and transistor characterics in electronics, is reflected both in the STM imaging contrast and directly in the tunneling current. The latter shows a biphasic distance dependence, in line with a two-step electron hopping process. Under conditions where the substrate/molecule electron transfer (ET) step is dominant in determining the overall tunneling current, we determined the conductance of an individual Os complex to be 9 nS (Vbias = 0.1 V). We use theoretical approaches to connect the single-molecule conductance with electrochemical kinetics data obtained from monolayer experiments. While the latter leave some controversy regarding the degree of electronic coupling, our results suggest that electron transport occurs in the adiabatic limit of strong electronic coupling. Remarkably, and in contrast to established ET theory, the redox-mediated tunneling current remains strongly distance dependent due to the electronic coupling, even in the adiabatic limit. We exploit this feature and apply it to electrochemical single-molecule conductance data. In this way, we attempt to paint a unified picture of electrochemical charge transport at the single-molecule and monolayer levels. PMID:17177467

  1. Non-linear transport by solitons in nanofibers of polymers in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirova, N.; Brazovskii, S.; Choi, A.; Park, Y. W.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear local excitations like solitons, polarons, and bipolarons are known to be responsible for physical properties of conducting polymers. Recent experiments on nano-fibers in high electric and magnetic fields provide a further insight by demonstrating an effect of vanishing magnetoconductance (MC) in the polyacetylene (PA)-in contrast to other polymers. Here we present new experimental data and describe the theoretical model based on notion of solitons-dimerization kinks which can carry either the spin or the charge; they are allowed only in the PA with its degenerate ground state. The solitons experience a confinement force due to the interchange coupling which is erased by the electric field and disappears above critical field strength. The unbinding by tunneling allows for the transport of individual solitons, which sweeps off the spins residing at electronic intragap states associated with polarons, hence the vanishing MC.

  2. Ab initio investigations of the charge transport properties of endohedral M@C20 (M = Na and K) metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yi-Peng; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Wang, De-Hua

    2010-11-01

    Using density functional theory and quantum transport calculations based on nonequilibum Green's function formalism, we investigate the charge transport properties of endohedral M@C20(M = Na and K) metallofullerenes. Our results show that the conductance of C20 fullerene can be obviously improved by insertion of alkali atom at its centre. Both linear and nonlinear sections are found on the I—V curves of the Au-M@C20-Au two-probe systems. The novel negative differential resistance behaviour is also observed in Na@C20 molecule but not in K@C20.

  3. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics for charge transport in organics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2015-05-21

    Charge transport plays a crucial role in the working principle of most opto-electronic and energy devices. This is especially true for organic materials where the first theoretical models date back to the 1950s and have continuously evolved ever since. Most of these descriptions rely on perturbation theory to treat small interactions in the Hamiltonian. In particular, applying a perturbative treatment to the electron-phonon and electron-electron coupling results in the band and hopping models, respectively, the signature of which is conveyed by a characteristic temperature dependence of mobility. This perspective describes recent progress of studying charge transport in organics using mixed quantum-classical dynamics techniques, including mean field and surface hopping theories. The studies go beyond the perturbation treatments and represent the processes explicitly in the time-domain, as they occur in real life. The challenges, advantages, and disadvantages of both approaches are systematically discussed. Special focus is dedicated to the temperature dependence of mobility, the role of local and nonlocal electron-phonon couplings, as well as the interplay between electronic and electron-phonon interactions.

  4. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P.; Walsh, Kathleen A.; Feliciano, Gustavo T.; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Tessmer, Stuart H.; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:27009596

  5. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P; Walsh, Kathleen A; Feliciano, Gustavo T; Steidl, Rebecca J; Tessmer, Stuart H; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:27009596

  6. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-01

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer. PMID:25310861

  7. Light-Induced Charge Transport within a Single Asymmetric Nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chong; Hwang, Yun Yeong; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-21

    Artificial photosynthetic systems using semiconductor materials have been explored for more than three decades in order to store solar energy in chemical fuels such as hydrogen. By mimicking biological photosynthesis with two light-absorbing centers that relay excited electrons in a nanoscopic space, a dual-band gap photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is expected to have higher theoretical energy conversion efficiency than a single band gap system. This work demonstrates the vectorial charge transport of photo-generated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Under UV illumination, higher surface potential was observed on the n-TiO₂ side, relative to the potential of the p-Si side, as a result of majority carriers’ recombination at the Si/TiO₂ interface. These results demonstrate a new approach to investigate charge separation and transport in a PEC system. This asymmetric nanowire heterostructure, with a dual band gap configuration and simultaneously exposed anode and cathode surfaces represents an ideal platform for the development of technologies for the generation of solar fuels, although better photoanode materials remain to be discovered.

  8. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Guo, Shaoyin; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    The methylation of cytosine bases in DNA commonly takes place in the human genome and its abnormality can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. In this paper we explore the effects of cytosine methylation on the conductance of DNA. Although the methyl group is a small chemical modification, and has a van der Waals radius of only 2 Å, its presence significantly changes the duplex stability, and as such may also affect the conductance properties of DNA. To determine if charge transport through the DNA stack is sensitive to this important biological modification we perform multiple conductance measurements on a methylated DNA molecule with an alternating G:C sequence and its non-methylated counterpart. From these studies we find a measurable difference in the conductance between the two types of molecules, and demonstrate that this difference is statistically significant. The conductance values of these molecules are also compared with a similar sequence that has been previously studied to help elucidate the charge transport mechanisms involved in direct DNA conductance measurements.

  9. Exciton transport, charge extraction, and loss mechanisms in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Shawn Ryan

    Organic photovoltaics have attracted significant interest over the last decade due to their promise as clean low-cost alternatives to large-scale electric power generation such as coal-fired power, natural gas, and nuclear power. Many believe power conversion efficiency targets of 10-15% must be reached before commercialization is possible. Consequently, understanding the loss mechanisms which currently limit efficiencies to 4-5% is crucial to identify paths to reach higher efficiencies. In this work, we investigate the dominant loss mechanisms in some of the leading organic photovoltaic architectures. In the first class of architectures, which include planar heterojunctions and bulk heterojunctions with large domains, efficiencies are primarily limited by the distance photogenerated excitations (excitons) can be transported (termed the exciton diffusion length) to a heterojunction where the excitons may dissociate. We will discuss how to properly measure the exciton diffusion length focusing on the effects of optical interference and of energy transfer when using fullerenes as quenching layers and show how this explains the variety of diffusion lengths reported for the same material. After understanding that disorder and defects limit exciton diffusion lengths, we suggest some approaches to overcome this. We then extensively investigate the use of long-range resonant energy transfer to increase exciton harvesting. Using simulations and experiments as support, we discuss how energy transfer can be engineered into architectures to increase the distance excitons can be harvested. In an experimental model system, DOW Red/PTPTB, we will show how the distance excitons are harvested can be increased by almost an order of magnitude up to 27 nm from a heterojunction and give design rules and extensions of this concept for future architectures. After understanding exciton harvesting limitations we will look at other losses that are present in planar heterojunctions. One of

  10. Femtosecond x rays link melting of charge-density wave correlations and light-enhanced coherent transport in YBa2Cu3O6.6

    DOE PAGES

    Först, M.; Frano, A.; Kaiser, S.; Mankowsky, R.; Hunt, C. R.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Loew, T.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In this study, we use femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction to measure the optically stimulated ultrafast changes of charge density wave correlations in underdoped YBa₂Cu₃O₆.₆. We find that when coherent interlayer transport is enhanced by optical excitation of the apical oxygen distortions, at least 50% of the in-plane charge density wave order is melted. These results indicate that charge ordering and superconductivity may be competing up to the charge ordering transition temperature, with the latter becoming a hidden phase that is accessible only by nonlinear phonon excitation.

  11. ULF Waves and Diffusive Radial Transport of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ashar Fawad

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain highly energetic particles which interact with a variety of plasma and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Waves in the ultra low-frequency (ULF) range play an important role in the loss and acceleration of energetic particles. Considering the geometry of the geomagnetic field, charged particles trapped in the inner magnetosphere undergo three distinct types of periodic motions; an adiabatic invariant is associated with each type of motion. The evolution of the phase space density of charged particles in the magnetosphere in the coordinate space of the three adiabatic invariants is modeled by the Fokker-Planck equation. If we assume that the first two adiabatic invariants are conserved while the third invariant is violated, then the general Fokker-Planck equation reduces to a radial diffusion equation with the radial diffusion coefficient quantifying the rate of the radial diffusion of charged particles, including contributions from perturbations in both the magnetic and the electric fields. This thesis investigates two unanswered questions about ULF wave-driven radial transport of charged particles. First, how important are the ULF fluctuations in the magnetic field compared with the ULF fluctuations in the electric field in driving the radial diffusion of charged particles in the Earth's inner magnetosphere? It has generally been accepted that magnetic field perturbations dominate over electric field perturbations, but several recently published studies suggest otherwise. Second, what is the distribution of ULF wave power in azimuth, and how does ULF wave power depend upon radial distance and the level of geomagnetic activity? Analytic treatments of the diffusion coefficients generally assume uniform distribution of power in azimuth, but in situ measurements suggest that this may not be the case. We used the magnetic field data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and the electric and the magnetic

  12. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-01

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley "bracelet" and "rod" test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, "Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes," J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405-2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  13. Nonlinear Evolution and Final Fate of Charged Anti-de Sitter Black Hole Superradiant Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Pablo; Green, Stephen R.; Lehner, Luis

    2016-04-01

    We describe the full nonlinear development of the superradiant instability for a charged massless scalar field coupled to general relativity and electromagnetism, in the vicinity of a Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter black hole. The presence of the negative cosmological constant provides a natural context for considering perfectly reflecting boundary conditions and studying the dynamics as the scalar field interacts repeatedly with the black hole. At early times, small superradiant perturbations grow as expected from linearized studies. Backreaction then causes the black hole to lose charge and mass until the perturbation becomes nonsuperradiant, with the final state described by a stable hairy black hole. For large gauge coupling, the instability extracts a large amount of charge per unit mass, resulting in greater entropy increase. We discuss the implications of the observed behavior for the general problem of superradiance in black hole spacetimes.

  14. Communication: modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Knepley, Matthew G

    2014-10-01

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley "bracelet" and "rod" test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, "Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes," J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405-2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry. PMID:25296776

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of spin and charge in spin-Calogero model

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Manas; Franchini, Fabio; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2009-10-15

    The fully nonlinear dynamics of spin and charge in spin-Calogero model is studied. The latter is an integrable one-dimensional model of quantum spin-1/2 particles interacting through inverse-square interaction and exchange. Classical hydrodynamic equations of motion are written for this model in the regime where gradient corrections to the exact hydrodynamic formulation of the theory may be neglected. In this approximation variables separate in terms of dressed Fermi momenta of the model. Hydrodynamic equations reduce to a set of decoupled Riemann-Hopf (or inviscid Burgers') equations for the dressed Fermi momenta. We study the dynamics of some nonequilibrium spin-charge configurations for times smaller than the time scale of the gradient catastrophe. We find an interesting interplay between spin and charge degrees of freedom. In the limit of large coupling constant the hydrodynamics reduces to the spin hydrodynamics of the Haldane-Shastry model.

  16. Nonlinear Evolution and Final Fate of Charged Anti-de Sitter Black Hole Superradiant Instability.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Pablo; Green, Stephen R; Lehner, Luis

    2016-04-01

    We describe the full nonlinear development of the superradiant instability for a charged massless scalar field coupled to general relativity and electromagnetism, in the vicinity of a Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter black hole. The presence of the negative cosmological constant provides a natural context for considering perfectly reflecting boundary conditions and studying the dynamics as the scalar field interacts repeatedly with the black hole. At early times, small superradiant perturbations grow as expected from linearized studies. Backreaction then causes the black hole to lose charge and mass until the perturbation becomes nonsuperradiant, with the final state described by a stable hairy black hole. For large gauge coupling, the instability extracts a large amount of charge per unit mass, resulting in greater entropy increase. We discuss the implications of the observed behavior for the general problem of superradiance in black hole spacetimes. PMID:27104693

  17. Effect of electron nonthermality on nonlinear electrostatic solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Boumezoued, Ghania

    2008-05-15

    The effect of nonthermal electrons with excess of fast energetic electrons on large amplitude electrostatic solitary waves is investigated in a charge varying dusty plasma. The correct nonthermal electron charging is investigated based on the orbit-motion-limited approach. It is found that the nonlinear localized potential structure shrinks when the electrons deviate from isothermality. The dust particles are locally expelled and pushed out the region of the soliton localization as the electrons evolve far away from their thermodynamic equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation, the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the value of the electron nonthermal parameter {alpha} increases.

  18. Nonlinear Evolution and Final Fate of Charged Anti-de Sitter Black Hole Superradiant Instability.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Pablo; Green, Stephen R; Lehner, Luis

    2016-04-01

    We describe the full nonlinear development of the superradiant instability for a charged massless scalar field coupled to general relativity and electromagnetism, in the vicinity of a Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter black hole. The presence of the negative cosmological constant provides a natural context for considering perfectly reflecting boundary conditions and studying the dynamics as the scalar field interacts repeatedly with the black hole. At early times, small superradiant perturbations grow as expected from linearized studies. Backreaction then causes the black hole to lose charge and mass until the perturbation becomes nonsuperradiant, with the final state described by a stable hairy black hole. For large gauge coupling, the instability extracts a large amount of charge per unit mass, resulting in greater entropy increase. We discuss the implications of the observed behavior for the general problem of superradiance in black hole spacetimes.

  19. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-07

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley “bracelet” and “rod” test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, “Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes,” J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405–2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  20. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-15

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (~ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T{sub 0}){sup −α} with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm{sup -1}), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  1. Nonlinear quantum transport in low-dimensional electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Andres Javier

    The study of transport processes in low-dimensional semiconductors requires a rigorous quantum mechanical treatment. However, a full-fledged quantum transport theory of electrons (or holes) in semiconductors of small scale, applicable in the presence of external fields of arbitrary strength, is still not available. In the literature, different approaches have been proposed, including: (a) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation, (b) perturbation theory based on Keldysh's Green functions, and (c) the Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE), previously derived by Van Vliet and coworkers, applicable in the realm of Kubo's Linear Response Theory (LRT). In the present work, we follow the method originally proposed by Van Wet in LRT. The Hamiltonian in this approach is of the form: H = H 0(E, B) + lambdaV, where H0 contains the externally applied fields, and lambdaV includes many-body interactions. This Hamiltonian differs from the LRT Hamiltonian, H = H0 - AF(t) + lambdaV, which contains the external field in the field-response part, -AF(t). For the nonlinear problem, the eigenfunctions of the system Hamiltonian, H0(E, B), include the external fields without any limitation on strength. In Part A of this dissertation, both the diagonal and nondiagonal Master equations are obtained after applying projection operators to the von Neumann equation for the density operator in the interaction picture, and taking the Van Hove limit, (lambda → 0, t → infinity, so that (lambda2 t)n remains finite). Similarly, the many-body current operator J is obtained from the Heisenberg equation of motion. In Part B, the Quantum Boltzmann Equation is obtained in the occupation-number representation for an electron gas, interacting with phonons or impurities. On the one-body level, the current operator obtained in Part A leads to the Generalized Calecki current for electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary strength. Furthermore, in this part, the LRT results for the current and conductance are

  2. Tunable spin and charge transport in silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouri, Kh.; Simchi, H.; Esmaeilzadeh, M.; Mazidabadi, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-07-01

    Using the tight-binding formalism, we study spin and charge transport through a zigzag silicene ribbon subject to an external electric field Ez. The effect of an exchange field Mz is also taken into account and its consequences on the band structure as well as spin transport are evaluated. We show that the band structure lacks spin inversion symmetry in the presence of intrinsic spin-orbit interaction in combination of Ez and Mz fields. Our quantum transport calculations indicate that for certain energy ranges of the incoming electrons the silicene ribbon can act as a controllable high-efficiency spin polarizer. The polarization maxima occur simultaneously with the van Hove singularities of the local density of states. In this case, the combination of electric and exchange fields is the key to achieving nearly perfect spin polarization, which also leads to the appearance of additional narrow plateaus in the quantum conductance. Moreover, we demonstrate that the output current still remains completely spin-polarized for low-energy carriers even when a few edge vacancies are present.

  3. Charge and spin transport in PEDOT:PSS nanoscale lateral devices.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales V A G; Gobbi, Marco; Porro, José M; Hueso, Luis E; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-29

    The electrical transport of the highly conductive poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) is investigated with Ohmic and spin-polarized tunnel contacts at nanoscale lateral dimensions. Temperature-dependent charge transport measurements reveal that electrical conductivity scales non-linearly as a function of electrode spacing, which is attributed to the localization of carriers induced by the disorder introduced by the PSS polyelectrolyte. In addition, we demonstrate the integration of this conducting polymer in nanoscale lateral spin-valve devices by increasing the pH of the PEDOT:PSS solution. We present charge and magnetotransport measurement results of NiFe/AlOx/PEDOT:PSS/AlOx/NiFe lateral structures for various thicknesses of the alumina tunnel barriers. We discuss the absence of magnetoresistance of our spin valves within the framework of Valet-Fert theory, and estimate an upper limit for the spin lifetime of carriers in PEDOT:PSS to τsf ≤ 50 ns. PMID:24177495

  4. Tuning The Optical, Charge Injection, and Charge Transport Properties of Organic Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalar, Peter

    Since the early 1900's, synthetic insulating polymers (plastics) have slowly taken over the role that traditional materials like wood or metal have had as basic components for construction, manufactured goods, and parts. Plastics allow for high throughput, low temperature processing, and control of bulk properties through molecular modifications. In the same way, pi-conjugated organic molecules are emerging as a possible substitute for inorganic materials due to their electronic properties. The semiconductive nature of pi-conjugated materials make them an attractive candidate to replace inorganic materials, primarily due to their promise for low cost and large-scale production of basic semiconducting devices such as light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and field-effect transistors. Before organic semiconductors can be realized as a commercial product, several hurdles must be cleared. The purpose of this dissertation is to address three distinct properties that dominate the functionality of devices harnessing these materials: (1) optical properties, (2) charge injection, and (3) charge transport. First, it is shown that the electron injection barrier in the emissive layer of polymer light-emitting diodes can be significantly reduced by processing of novel conjugated oligoelectrolytes or deoxyribonucleic acid atop the emissive layer. Next, the charge transport properties of several polymers could be modified by processing them from solvents containing small amounts of additives or by using regioregular and enantiopure chemical structures. It is then demonstrated that the optical and electronic properties of Lewis basic polymer structures can be readily modified by interactions with strongly electron-withdrawing Lewis acids. Through red-shifted absorption, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence, a single pi-conjugated backbone can be polychromatic. In addition, interaction with Lewis acids can remarkably p-dope the hole transport of the parent polymer, leading to a

  5. Charge transport in hybrid nanorod-polymer composite photovoltaiccells

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, Wendy U.; Dittmer, Janke J.; Teclemariam, Nerayo; Milliron, Delia; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Barnham, Keith W.J.

    2002-06-21

    Charge transport in composites of inorganic nanorods and aconjugated polymer is investigated using a photovoltaic device structure.We show that the current-voltage (I-V) curves in the dark can be modelledusing the Shockley equation modified to include series and shuntresistance at low current levels, and using an improved model thatincorporates both the Shockley equation and the presence of a spacecharge limited region at high currents. Under illumination, theefficiency of photocurrent generation is found to be dependent on appliedbias. Furthermore, the photocurrent-light intensity dependence was foundto be sublinear. An analysis of the shunt resistance as a function oflight intensity suggests that the photocurrent as well as the fill factoris diminished as a result of increased photoconductivity of the activelayer at high light intensity. By studying the intensity dependence ofthe open circuit voltage for nanocrystals with different diameters andthus ! band gaps, it was inferred that Fermi-level pinning occurs at theinterface between the aluminum electrode and the nanocrystal.

  6. Lunar dust transport by photoelectric charging at sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelizzari, M. A.; Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motion of dust grains from a photoelectrically charged object at the moon's sunset terminator is studied with the aid of a simple model. It is shown that sunlit objects ranging in size from less than 0.01 cm to 5 cm in radius are responsible for the levitation of dust grains to heights of observed horizon glow. The transverse displacement of these grains is observed to be at least twice their maximum altitude, so that fitting the latter to horizon glow implies horizontal particle ranges typically 6 to 60 cm. Detachment of these grains from the sunlit areas takes place mainly along the contracting sunlight boundaries as the areas shrink during sunset. A high ratio of intergrain adhesion force to dust-grain weight is essential for the occurrence of horizon glow and significant dust transport from the subcentimeter sized sunlit areas.

  7. Charge transport in cancer-related genes and early carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chi-Tin; Cheng, Yun-Yin; Wells, Stephen A.; Hsu, Ching-Ling; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic transmission properties of DNA molecules are believed to play a significant role in many physical phenomena taking place in living organisms (Chakraborty, 2007) [1]. Here we study the charge transport (CT) properties of cancer-related genes, including some of the most important tumor suppressors. We find that the changes in averaged CT around the sites of pathogenic and cancerous mutations are statistically smaller than those on sites where pathogenic mutations have not been observed. The results suggest that CT might be an indicator to discriminate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic mutations at an early stage. Mutations which cause little change in CT may be more likely to occur, or more likely to be missed by damage-repair enzymes which probe CT, and are therefore more likely to persist and cause disease.

  8. Charge transport across the metal-polymer film boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumaguzin, Yu. M.; Salikhov, T. R.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Salikhov, R. B.

    2016-08-01

    Thin polyaniline films were fabricated by thermal vacuum evaporation from a Knudsen effusion cell. The conducting properties of films synthesized under different evaporation conditions were studied. The enhancement of the emission capacity of a wolfram tip coated with a polyaniline film of a nanometer thickness was demonstrated experimentally. A model of the discovered effect was proposed. The obtained Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics were used to estimate the change in the electronic work function occurring when a thin film is deposited on the tip surface. The effective temperature of electrons emitted from the polyaniline film was determined based on the results of analysis of energy distributions, and the specific features of charge transport in the metal-polyaniline-vacuum system were examined. A model of energy bands of the metal-polymer film contact was also constructed.

  9. Spin Relaxation in Materials Lacking Coherent Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    As semiconductor spintronics research extends to materials beyond intrinsic or lightly doped semiconductors (e. g. organic materials, amorphous semiconductors, and impurity bands), the need is readily apparent for new theories of spin relaxation that encompass highly disordered materials, where charge transport is incoherent. We describe a broadly applicable theory of spin relaxation in materials with incoherent charge transport. The theory is based on continuous-time-random-walk theory and can incorporate many different relaxation mechanisms. We focus primarily on spin relaxation caused by spin-orbit and hyperfine effects in conjunction with carrier hopping. Analytic and numerical results from the theory are compared in various regimes with Monte Carlo simulations. Three different systems were examined: a polymer (MEH-PPV), amorphous silicon, and heavily doped n-GaAs. In the organic and amorphous systems, we predict spin relaxation and spin diffusion dependences on temperature and disorder for three different mechanisms (hyperfine, hopping-induced spin-orbit, and intra-site spin relaxation). The resulting unique experimental signatures predicted by the theory for each mechanism in these disordered systems provide a prescription for determining the dominant spin relaxation mechanism. We find our theory to be in agreement with available measurements in these materials. We also predict that large disorder modifies certain mechanisms to be algebraic instead of exponential in time. Our results should assist in evaluating the suitability of various disordered materials for spintronic devices. All work done in collaboration with Michael E. Flatté. Timothy Peterson and Paul Crowell collaborated as well on the n-GaAs study. This work was supported by an ARO MURI and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  10. Microscopic theory on charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Current vertex correction (CVC), the backflowlike correction to the current, comes from conservation laws, and the CVC due to electron correlation contains information about many-body effects. However, it has been little understood how the CVC due to electron correlation affects the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. To improve this situation, I studied the in-plane resistivity ρa b and the Hall coefficient in the weak-field limit RH, in addition to the magnetic properties and the electronic structure, for a t2 g-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice in a paramagnetic state away from or near an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum-critical point (QCP) in the fluctuation-exchange (FLEX) approximation with the CVCs arising from the self-energy (Σ ), the Maki-Thompson (MT) irreducible four-point vertex function, and the main terms of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) one. Then, I found three main results about the CVCs. First, the main terms of the AL CVC do not qualitatively change the results obtained in the FLEX approximation with the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Second, ρa b and RH near the AF QCP have a high-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC, and a low-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Third, in case away from the AF QCP, the MT CVC leads to a considerable effect on only RH at low temperatures, although RH at high temperatures and ρa b at all temperatures considered are sufficiently described by including only the Σ CVC. Those findings reveal several aspects of many-body effects on the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. I also achieved the qualitative agreement with several experiments of Sr2RuO4 or Sr2Ru0.975Ti0.025O4 . Moreover, I showed several better points of this theory than other theories.

  11. EPR, charge transport, and spin dynamics in doped polyanilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon'kin, A. L.; Shtyrlin, V. G.; Garipov, R. R.; Aganov, A. V.; Zakharov, A. V.; Krinichnyi, V. I.; Adams, P. N.; Monkman, A. P.

    2002-08-01

    Charge transport and magnetic properties of films of polyaniline (PAN) doped with 10-camphorsulfonic acid and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPSA) have been studied by conductivity, magnetic-susceptibility superconducting quantum interference device measurements, and 3-cm and 8-mm electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at doping levels (x) from 0.3 to 0.9 over a temperature range from 15 to 300 K. The temperature dependences of conductivities were explained in terms of the advanced multiphase heterogeneous granular metallic (HGM) model with percolation including disordered metallic (DM) and nonmetallic (NM) phases. The anomalous conductivity change in the PAN-AMPSAx system at T>240 K was accounted quantitatively for a solid-phase equilibrium with the occurrence of the disordered anion phase from the metallic islands. A means for analysis of the EPR line shape in conducting media has been developed and, with this, conductivity and microwave dielectric constants were estimated and two EPR signals, R1 and R2, were detected in both systems. It was shown that R1 signal belongs to pinned radicals of isolated polymer chains, whereas R2 is the weight-averaged signal, resulting from three types of paramagnetic centers, localized and mobile spins in the NM and DM phases, which interact via exchange. From the temperature and frequency dependences of the R2 linewidth the spin-diffusion parameters for the NM phase in both systems were determined. It was found that the HGM model allows good explanation of both charge transport and spin diffusion in the doped polyaniline films.

  12. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  13. Effect of Conformation in Charge Transport for Semiflexible Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Rodrigo; Salleo, Alberto; Spakowitz, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Current models for the electronic properties of semiconducting conjugated polymers do not include the hierarchical connectivity between charge transport units that results from the physical makeup of the materials. Concepts like on-chain vs. interchain mobility anisotropy have been known for a long time, yet they must be artificially incorporated into simulations. Models that achieve remarkable predictive power but provide limited physical insight when applied to this new class of materials are of limited use for the rational design of new conjugated polymers. Here we present a new model in which the morphology of individual polymer chains is determined by well-known statistical models and the electronic coupling between units is described using Marcus theory. Combining knowledge from polymer physics and semiconducting materials into an analytical and computational model that realistically incorporates the structural and electronic properties of conjugated polymers, it is possible to explain observations that previously relied on phenomenological models. The multi-scale behavior of charges in these materials (high mobility at short scales, low mobility at long scales) can be naturally described with our framework.

  14. Charge transport in single CuO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junnan; Yin, Bo; Wu, Fei; Myung, Yoon; Banerjee, Parag

    2014-11-03

    Charge transport in single crystal, p-type cupric oxide (CuO) nanowire (NW) was studied through temperature based (120 K–400 K) current-voltage measurements. CuO NW with a diameter of 85 nm was attached to Au electrodes 2.25 μm apart, using dielectrophoresis. At low electrical field (<0.89 × 10{sup 3 }V/cm), an ohmic conduction is observed with an activation energy of 272 meV. The injected electrons fill traps with an average energy, E{sub T} = 26.6 meV and trap density, N{sub T} = 3.4 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3}. After the traps are saturated, space charge limited current mechanism becomes dominant. For 120 K ≤ T ≤ 210 K phonon scattering limits mobility. For T ≥ 220 K, a thermally activated mobility is observed and is attributed to small polaron hopping with an activation energy of 44 meV. This mechanism yields a hole mobility of 0.0015 cm{sup 2}/V s and an effective hole concentration of 4 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} at 250 K.

  15. Temperature Dependence of Lateral Charge Transport in Silicon Nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Scott, Shelley; Jacobson, Rb; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Savage, Donald; Eriksson, Mark; Lagally, Max

    2014-03-01

    Thin sheets of single-crystal silicon (nanomembranes), electrically isolated from a bulk substrate by a dielectric layer, are an exceptional tool for studying the electronic transport properties of surfaces in the absence of an extended bulk. Under UHV, we measure the conductivity, and a back gate allows us to look into the depletion region, where we can determine the minimum conductance. For hydrogen-terminated Si(001) NMs, for which the surface has no conductivity, the minimum conductance decreases with decreasing NM thickness (220-42nm), demonstrating the reduction in carriers for thinner NMs. For the clean Si(2 ×1)surface, mobile charge exists in the π* surface band. For thicknesses below 200nm surface conduction dominates, rendering the thickness independence of the minimum. We determine a surface charge mobility of ~50cm2V-1s-1. We have measured the temperature dependence of the conductance of a 42nm thick HF treated SiNM. The results show that the Fermi level is pinned 0.21 +/- 0 . 01 eV below the conduction band minimum, in agreement with XPS results. Supported by DOE.

  16. Charge transport in single CuO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junnan; Yin, Bo; Wu, Fei; Myung, Yoon; Banerjee, Parag

    2014-11-01

    Charge transport in single crystal, p-type cupric oxide (CuO) nanowire (NW) was studied through temperature based (120 K-400 K) current-voltage measurements. CuO NW with a diameter of 85 nm was attached to Au electrodes 2.25 μm apart, using dielectrophoresis. At low electrical field (<0.89 × 103 V/cm), an ohmic conduction is observed with an activation energy of 272 meV. The injected electrons fill traps with an average energy, ET = 26.6 meV and trap density, NT = 3.4 × 1015 cm-3. After the traps are saturated, space charge limited current mechanism becomes dominant. For 120 K ≤ T ≤ 210 K phonon scattering limits mobility. For T ≥ 220 K, a thermally activated mobility is observed and is attributed to small polaron hopping with an activation energy of 44 meV. This mechanism yields a hole mobility of 0.0015 cm2/V s and an effective hole concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3 at 250 K.

  17. Charge Transport Mechanism in Thin Cuticles Holding Nandi Flame Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K.; Katana, Gabriel; Migwi, Charles M.; Rathore, I. V. S.; Sangoro, Joshua R.

    2009-01-01

    Metal-sample-metal sandwich configuration has been used to investigate DC conductivity in 4 μm thick Nandi flame [Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv.] seed cuticles. J-V characteristics showed ohmic conduction at low fields and space charge limited current at high fields. Charge mobility in ohmic region was 4.06 × 10−5  (m2V−1s−1). Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements have been carried out in the temperature range 320 K < T > 450 K. Activation energy within a temperature of 320 K–440 K was about 0.86 eV. Variable range hopping (VRH) is the main current transport mechanism at the range of 330–440 K. The VRH mechanism was analyzed based on Mott theory and the Mott parameters: density of localized states near the Fermi-level N(EF) ≈ 9.04 × 1019  (eV−1cm−3) and hopping distance R ≈ 1.44 × 10−7 cm, while the hopping energy (W) was in the range of 0.72 eV–0.98 eV. PMID:20130799

  18. Charge injection and transport properties of an organic light-emitting diode

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, Peter; Nevrela, Juraj; Micjan, Michal; Novota, Miroslav; Uhrik, Jan; Stuchlikova, Lubica; Jakabovic, Jan; Harmatha, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Summary The charge behavior of organic light emitting diode (OLED) is investigated by steady-state current–voltage technique and impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures to obtain activation energies of charge injection and transport processes. Good agreement of activation energies obtained by steady-state and frequency-domain was used to analyze their contributions to the charge injection and transport. We concluded that charge is injected into the OLED device mostly through the interfacial states at low voltage region, whereas the thermionic injection dominates in the high voltage region. This comparison of experimental techniques demonstrates their capabilities of identification of major bottleneck of charge injection and transport. PMID:26925351

  19. Understanding of flux-limited behaviors of heat transport in nonlinear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Jou, David; Wang, Moran

    2016-01-01

    The classical Fourier's law of heat transport breaks down in highly nonequilibrium situations as in nanoscale heat transport, where nonlinear effects become important. The present work is aimed at exploring the flux-limited behaviors based on a categorization of existing nonlinear heat transport models in terms of their theoretical foundations. Different saturation heat fluxes are obtained, whereas the same qualitative variation trend of heat flux versus exerted temperature gradient is got in diverse nonlinear models. The phonon hydrodynamic model is proposed to act as a standard to evaluate other heat flux limiters because of its more rigorous physical foundation. A deeper knowledge is thus achieved about the phenomenological generalized heat transport models. The present work provides deeper understanding and accurate modeling of nonlocal and nonlinear heat transport beyond the diffusive limit.

  20. Understanding Charge Transport in Mixed Networks of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to select and enrich semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with high purity has led to a fast rise of solution-processed nanotube network field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities and on/off current ratios. However, it remains an open question whether it is best to use a network of only one nanotube species (monochiral) or whether a mix of purely semiconducting nanotubes but with different bandgaps is sufficient for high performance FETs. For a range of different polymer-sorted semiconducting SWNT networks, we demonstrate that a very small amount of narrow bandgap nanotubes within a dense network of large bandgap nanotubes can dominate the transport and thus severely limit on-currents and effective carrier mobility. Using gate-voltage-dependent electroluminescence, we spatially and spectrally reveal preferential charge transport that does not depend on nominal network density but on the energy level distribution within the network and carrier density. On the basis of these results, we outline rational guidelines for the use of mixed SWNT networks to obtain high performance FETs while reducing the cost for purification. PMID:26867006

  1. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  2. A new continuum approach for nonlinear kinetic simulation and transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Zongliang Wang, Shaojie; Xu, Yingfeng; Ye, Lei; Xiao, Xiaotao

    2015-02-15

    A numerical code based on the I-transform approach is developed to solve the nonlinear Vlasov equation and carry out the transport analysis. The numerical results given by the I-transform approach agree with the conservative semi-Lagrangian approach in the Landau damping case and the bump-on-tail instability case. The diffusivities induced by the random fields and the quasilinear transport are also successfully demonstrated by using the new approach. It is found that the nonlinear transport in the one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence cannot be well-described by a simple diffusion model, due to the strong particle trapping at the nonlinear stage.

  3. Intrinsic slow charge response in the perovskite solar cells: Electron and ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Huiyin; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2015-10-19

    The intrinsic charge response and hysteresis characteristic in the perovskite solar cell has been investigated by an electrically modulated transient photocurrent technology. An ultraslow charge response process in the timescale of seconds is observed, which can be well explained by the ion migration in the perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film driven by multiple electric fields derived from the heterojunction depletion charge, the external modulation, and the accumulated ion charge. Furthermore, theoretical calculation of charge transport reveals that the hysteresis behavior is also significantly influenced by the interfacial charge extraction velocity and the carrier transport properties inside the cell.

  4. Small amplitude nonlinear electrostatic waves in a collisional complex plasma with positively charged dust

    SciTech Connect

    Fedila, D. Ali; Djebli, M.

    2010-10-15

    The effect of collision on small amplitude dust-acoustic waves is investigated for a plasma with positively charged dust grains. Taking into account the presence of different electron populations in thermal equilibrium, a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is established. The existence conditions and nature of the waves, i.e., rarefactive or compressive, are found to be mainly dependent on the temperature and the density of the cold electrons. The present model is used to understand the salient features of the fully nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in the lower region of the Earth's ionosphere, at an altitude of {approx}85 km with the presence of an external heating source.

  5. Validation of Travel-Time based Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport Models under Flow and Transport Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Prat, A.; Lu, C.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Travel-time based models are presented as an alternative to traditional spatially explicit models to solve nonlinear reactive-transport problems. The main advantage of the travel-time approach is that it does not require multi-dimensional characterization of physical and chemical parameters, and transport is one-dimensional. Spatial dimensions are replaced by groundwater travel time, defined as the time required by a water particle to reach an observation point or the outflow boundary, respectively. The fundamental hypothesis is that locations of the same groundwater age exhibit the same reactive-species concentrations. This is true in strictly advective-reactive transport in steady-state flows if the coefficients of reactions are uniform and the concentration is uniform over the inflow boundary. We hypothesize that the assumption still holds when adding some dispersion in coupled flow and transport dynamics. We compare a two-dimensional, spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ by the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. We consider biodegradation of organic matter catalyzed by non-competitive inhibitive microbial populations. The simulated inflow contains oxygen, nitrate, and DOC. The domain contains growing aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, the latter being inhibited by oxygen. This system is computed in 1-D, and in 2-D heterogeneous domains. We conclude that the conceptualization of nonlinear bioreactive transport in complex multi-dimensional domains by quasi 1-D travel-time models is valid for steady-state flow if the reactants are introduced over a wide cross-section, flow is at quasi-steady state, and dispersive

  6. Aquifer reclamation design: the use of contaminant transport simulation combined with nonlinear programing.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, S.M.; Voss, C.I.; Gill, P.E.; Murray, W.; Saunders, M.A.; Wright, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation-management methodology is demonstrated for the rehabilitation of aquifers that have been subjected to chemical contamination. Finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation are combined with nonlinear optimization. The model is capable of determining well locations plus pumping and injection rates for groundwater quality control. Examples demonstrate linear or nonlinear objective functions subject to linear and nonlinear simulation and water management constraints. -from Authors

  7. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory's correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the "extended molecule"). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current-voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  8. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  9. Microscopic modeling of charge transport in sensing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Lino; Millithaler, Jean-Francois; Pennetta, Cecilia

    2012-06-01

    Sensing proteins (receptors) are nanostructures that exhibit very complex behaviors (ions pumping, conformational change, reaction catalysis, etc). They are constituted by a specific sequence of amino acids within a codified spatial organization. The functioning of these macromolecules is intrinsically connected with their spatial structure, which modifications are normally associated with their biological function. With the advance of nanotechnology, the investigation of the electrical properties of receptors has emerged as a demanding issue. Beside the fundamental interest, the possibility to exploit the electrical properties for the development of bioelectronic devices of new generations has attracted major interest. From the experimental side, we investigate three complementary kinds of measurements: (1) current-voltage (I-V) measurements in nanometric layers sandwiched between macroscopic contacts, (2) I-V measurements within an AFM environment in nanometric monolayers deposited on a conducting substrate, and (3) electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements on appropriate monolayers of self-assembled samples. From the theoretical side, a microscopic interpretation of these experiments is still a challenging issue. This paper reviews recent theoretical results carried out within the European project, Bioelectronic Olfactory Neuron Device, which provides a first quantitative interpretation of charge transport experiments exploiting static and dynamic electrical properties of several receptors. To this purpose, we have developed an impedance network protein analogue (INPA) which considers the interaction between neighboring amino acids within a given radius as responsible of charge transfer throughout the protein. The conformational change, due to the sensing action produced by the capture of the ligand (photon, odour), induces a modification of the spatial structure and, thus, of the electrical properties of the receptor. By a scaling procedure, the

  10. Photoinduced Charge Transport in a BHJ Solar Cell Controlled by an External Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqing; Feng, Yanting; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated theoretical photoinduced charge transport in a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell controlled by an external electric field. Our method for visualizing charge difference density identified the excited state properties of photoinduced charge transfer, and the charge transfer excited states were distinguished from local excited states during electronic transitions. Furthermore, the calculated rates for the charge transfer revealed that the charge transfer was strongly influenced by the external electric field. The external electric field accelerated the rate of charge transfer by up to one order when charge recombination was significantly restrained. Our research demonstrated that photoinduced charge transport controlled by an external electric field in a BHJ solar cell is efficient, and the exciton dissociation is not the limiting factor in organic solar cells.Our research should aid in the rational design of a novel conjugated system of organic solar cells. PMID:26353997

  11. Image charge dynamics in time-dependent quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myöhänen, Petri; Tuovinen, Riku; Korhonen, Topi; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of the electron-electron interaction between a molecular junction and the metallic leads in time-dependent quantum transport. We employ the recently developed embedded Kadanoff-Baym method [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.80.115107 80, 115107 (2009)] and show that the molecule-lead interaction changes substantially the transient and steady-state transport properties. We first show that the mean-field Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation does not capture the polarization effects responsible for the renormalization of the molecular levels neither in nor out of equilibrium. Furthermore, due to the time-local nature of the HF self-energy, there exists a region in parameter space for which the system does not relax after the switch-on of a bias voltage. These and other artifacts of the HF approximation disappear when including correlations at the second-Born or GW levels. Both these approximations contain polarization diagrams, which correctly account for the screening of the charged molecule. We find that by changing the molecule-lead interaction, the ratio between the screening and relaxation time changes, an effect which must be properly taken into account in any realistic time-dependent simulation. Another important finding is that while in equilibrium the molecule-lead interaction is responsible for a reduction of the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap and for a substantial redistribution of the spectral weight between the main spectral peaks and the induced satellite spectrum, in the biased system it can have the opposite effect, i.e., it sharpens the spectral peaks and opens the HOMO-LUMO gap.

  12. Excited state properties and quadratic optical nonlinearities in charged organic chromophores: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inerbaev, Talgat M.; Saito, Shigeki; Belosludov, Rodion V.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masae; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2006-12-01

    As it has been found experimentally [K. Clays and B. Coe, Chem. Mater. 15, 642 (2003); B. J. Coe et al., 126, 10418 (2004)], elongation of the conjugation path length and N-arylation in stilbazolium chromophores both lead to substantial enhancement of the molecular optical nonlinearities. In the present contribution the authors perform a quantum chemical analysis of the excited state properties and quadratic nonlinear optical responses of a series of this type of dyes. Nonlinear optical responses are estimated by both finite-field and two-state model approaches that demonstrate an excellent qualitative mutual agreement. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations on the isolated cations predict redshift in the energy of the intramolecular charge transfer transition that is overestimated for cations with the longer conjugation path length. At the same time, in comparison with the Stark spectroscopy measurements the differences between the excited and ground state dipole moments are grossly underestimated for all compounds. The inclusion of solvent effect by polarizable continuum model affords a better agreement with experiment for these quantities. The authors' calculations demonstrate the crucial dependence of the electronic excitation properties on the way of the investigated compound geometry optimization. The origin of such dependence is discussed.

  13. Excited state properties and quadratic optical nonlinearities in charged organic chromophores: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Inerbaev, Talgat M; Saito, Shigeki; Belosludov, Rodion V; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masae; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2006-12-21

    As it has been found experimentally [K. Clays and B. Coe, Chem. Mater. 15, 642 (2003); B. J. Coe et al., 126, 10418 (2004)], elongation of the conjugation path length and N-arylation in stilbazolium chromophores both lead to substantial enhancement of the molecular optical nonlinearities. In the present contribution the authors perform a quantum chemical analysis of the excited state properties and quadratic nonlinear optical responses of a series of this type of dyes. Nonlinear optical responses are estimated by both finite-field and two-state model approaches that demonstrate an excellent qualitative mutual agreement. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations on the isolated cations predict redshift in the energy of the intramolecular charge transfer transition that is overestimated for cations with the longer conjugation path length. At the same time, in comparison with the Stark spectroscopy measurements the differences between the excited and ground state dipole moments are grossly underestimated for all compounds. The inclusion of solvent effect by polarizable continuum model affords a better agreement with experiment for these quantities. The authors' calculations demonstrate the crucial dependence of the electronic excitation properties on the way of the investigated compound geometry optimization. The origin of such dependence is discussed. PMID:17190565

  14. Role of direction of charge transfer on the nonlinear optical behavior of pyridine substituted chalcone derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Anthoni Praveen; Jayarama, A.

    2014-10-01

    High quality single crystals of an efficient novel nonlinear optical (NLO) chalcone derivative 3-(4-nitrophenyl)-1-(pyridine-3-yl) prop-2-en-1-one (4NP3AP) that are transparent in the entire visible and infrared region are grown by the slow evaporation solution growth method at ambient temperature. The single crystal XRD studies reveal that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with the noncentrosymmetric space group P21. The presence of functional groups in the compound is confirmed by different spectroscopic techniques. The surface morphology of the crystal is studied by scanning electron microscopy. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of 4NP3AP determined by Perry and Kurtz method is 56% that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) single crystals. The static and frequency dependent molecular hyperpolarizabilities were computed using MOPAC 2012. Thermal analysis confirms that the crystal is thermally stable up to 177 °C. The origin of nonlinearity and the role of charge transfer direction on the nonlinearity of the chalcone have been discussed in detail.

  15. Charge and heat transport in soft nanosystems in the presence of time-dependent perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perroni, Carmine Antonio; Ramaglia, Vincenzo Marigliano; Cataudella, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Soft nanosystems are electronic nanodevices, such as suspended carbon nanotubes or molecular junctions, whose transport properties are modulated by soft internal degrees of freedom, for example slow vibrational modes. Effects of the electron–vibration coupling on the charge and heat transport of soft nanoscopic systems are theoretically investigated in the presence of time-dependent perturbations, such as a forcing antenna or pumping terms between the leads and the nanosystem. A well-established approach valid for non-equilibrium adiabatic regimes is generalized to the case where external time-dependent perturbations are present. Then, a number of relevant applications of the method are reviewed for systems composed by a quantum dot (or molecule) described by a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode. Results: Before introducing time-dependent perturbations, the range of validity of the adiabatic approach is discussed showing that a very good agreement with the results of an exact quantum calculation is obtained in the limit of low level occupation. Then, we show that the interplay between the low frequency vibrational modes and the electronic degrees of freedom affects the thermoelectric properties within the linear response regime finding out that the phonon thermal conductance provides an important contribution to the figure of merit at room temperature. Our work has been stimulated by recent experimental results on carbon nanotube electromechanical devices working in the semiclassical regime (resonator frequencies in the megahertz range compared to an electronic hopping frequency of the order of tens of gigahertz) with extremely high quality factors. The nonlinear vibrational regime induced by the external antenna in such systems has been discussed within the non-perturbative adiabatic approach reproducing quantitatively the characteristic asymmetric shape of the current–frequency curves. Within the same set-up, we have

  16. Critical adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto planar and convex highly charged surfaces: the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Sidney J.; Metzler, Ralf; Cherstvy, Andrey G.

    2016-08-01

    We study the adsorption–desorption transition of polyelectrolyte chains onto planar, cylindrical and spherical surfaces with arbitrarily high surface charge densities by massive Monte Carlo computer simulations. We examine in detail how the well known scaling relations for the threshold transition—demarcating the adsorbed and desorbed domains of a polyelectrolyte near weakly charged surfaces—are altered for highly charged interfaces. In virtue of high surface potentials and large surface charge densities, the Debye–Hückel approximation is often not feasible and the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann approach should be implemented. At low salt conditions, for instance, the electrostatic potential from the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is smaller than the Debye–Hückel result, such that the required critical surface charge density for polyelectrolyte adsorption {σ }{{c}} increases. The nonlinear relation between the surface charge density and electrostatic potential leads to a sharply increasing critical surface charge density with growing ionic strength, imposing an additional limit to the critical salt concentration above which no polyelectrolyte adsorption occurs at all. We contrast our simulations findings with the known scaling results for weak critical polyelectrolyte adsorption onto oppositely charged surfaces for the three standard geometries. Finally, we discuss some applications of our results for some physical–chemical and biophysical systems.

  17. Charge transport through one-dimensional Moiré crystals.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Roméo; Lherbier, Aurélien; Barraud, Clément; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Lafarge, Philippe; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Moiré superlattices were generated in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and have revealed intriguing electronic structures. The appearance of mini-Dirac cones within the conduction and valence bands of graphene is one of the most striking among the new quantum features. A Moiré superstructure emerges when at least two periodic sub-structures superimpose. 2D Moiré patterns have been particularly investigated in stacked hexagonal 2D atomic lattices like twisted graphene layers and graphene deposited on hexagonal boron-nitride. In this letter, we report both experimentally and theoretically evidence of superlattices physics in transport properties of one-dimensional (1D) Moiré crystals. Rolling-up few layers of graphene to form a multiwall carbon nanotube adds boundaries conditions that can be translated into interference fringes-like Moiré patterns along the circumference of the cylinder. Such a 1D Moiré crystal exhibits a complex 1D multiple bands structure with clear and robust interband quantum transitions due to the presence of mini-Dirac points and pseudo-gaps. Our devices consist in a very large diameter (>80 nm) multiwall carbon nanotubes of high quality, electrically connected by metallic electrodes acting as charge reservoirs. Conductance measurements reveal the presence of van Hove singularities assigned to 1D Moiré superlattice effect and illustrated by electronic structure calculations. PMID:26786067

  18. Yield modeling of acoustic charge transport transversal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, J. S.; May, G. S.; Hunt, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a yield model for acoustic charge transport transversal filters. This model differs from previous IC yield models in that it does not assume that individual failures of the nondestructive sensing taps necessarily cause a device failure. A redundancy in the number of taps included in the design is explained. Poisson statistics are used to describe the tap failures, weighted over a uniform defect density distribution. A representative design example is presented. The minimum number of taps needed to realize the filter is calculated, and tap weights for various numbers of redundant taps are calculated. The critical area for device failure is calculated for each level of redundancy. Yield is predicted for a range of defect densities and redundancies. To verify the model, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed on an equivalent circuit model of the device. The results of the yield model are then compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Better than 95% agreement was obtained for the Poisson model with redundant taps ranging from 30% to 150% over the minimum.

  19. Charge transport through one-dimensional Moiré crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Roméo; Lherbier, Aurélien; Barraud, Clément; Rocca, Maria Luisa Della; Lafarge, Philippe; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Moiré superlattices were generated in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and have revealed intriguing electronic structures. The appearance of mini-Dirac cones within the conduction and valence bands of graphene is one of the most striking among the new quantum features. A Moiré superstructure emerges when at least two periodic sub-structures superimpose. 2D Moiré patterns have been particularly investigated in stacked hexagonal 2D atomic lattices like twisted graphene layers and graphene deposited on hexagonal boron-nitride. In this letter, we report both experimentally and theoretically evidence of superlattices physics in transport properties of one-dimensional (1D) Moiré crystals. Rolling-up few layers of graphene to form a multiwall carbon nanotube adds boundaries conditions that can be translated into interference fringes-like Moiré patterns along the circumference of the cylinder. Such a 1D Moiré crystal exhibits a complex 1D multiple bands structure with clear and robust interband quantum transitions due to the presence of mini-Dirac points and pseudo-gaps. Our devices consist in a very large diameter (>80 nm) multiwall carbon nanotubes of high quality, electrically connected by metallic electrodes acting as charge reservoirs. Conductance measurements reveal the presence of van Hove singularities assigned to 1D Moiré superlattice effect and illustrated by electronic structure calculations.

  20. Charge transport through one-dimensional Moiré crystals.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Roméo; Lherbier, Aurélien; Barraud, Clément; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Lafarge, Philippe; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-20

    Moiré superlattices were generated in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and have revealed intriguing electronic structures. The appearance of mini-Dirac cones within the conduction and valence bands of graphene is one of the most striking among the new quantum features. A Moiré superstructure emerges when at least two periodic sub-structures superimpose. 2D Moiré patterns have been particularly investigated in stacked hexagonal 2D atomic lattices like twisted graphene layers and graphene deposited on hexagonal boron-nitride. In this letter, we report both experimentally and theoretically evidence of superlattices physics in transport properties of one-dimensional (1D) Moiré crystals. Rolling-up few layers of graphene to form a multiwall carbon nanotube adds boundaries conditions that can be translated into interference fringes-like Moiré patterns along the circumference of the cylinder. Such a 1D Moiré crystal exhibits a complex 1D multiple bands structure with clear and robust interband quantum transitions due to the presence of mini-Dirac points and pseudo-gaps. Our devices consist in a very large diameter (>80 nm) multiwall carbon nanotubes of high quality, electrically connected by metallic electrodes acting as charge reservoirs. Conductance measurements reveal the presence of van Hove singularities assigned to 1D Moiré superlattice effect and illustrated by electronic structure calculations.

  1. Charge transport in DNA nanowires connected to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bikan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, J.

    2015-08-01

    DNA is perhaps the worlds most controllable nanowire, with potential applications in nanoelectronics and sensing. However, understanding of its charge transport (CT) properties remains elusive, with experiments reporting a wide range of behaviors from insulating to superconductive. We report extensive first-principle simulations that account for DNA's high flexibility and its native solvent environment. The results show that the CT along the DNA's long axis is strongly dependent on DNA's instantaneous conformation varying over many orders of magnitude. In high CT conformations, delocalized conductive states extending over up to 10 base pairs are found. Their low exponential decay constants further indicate that coherent CT, which is assumed to be active only over 2-3 base pairs in the commonly accepted DNA CT models, can act over much longer length scales. We also identify a simple geometrical rule that predicts CT properties of a given conformation with high accuracy. The effect of mismatched base pairs is also considered: while they decrease conductivities of specific DNA conformations, thermally induced conformational fluctuations wash out this effect. Overall, our results indicate that an immobilized partially dried poly(G)-poly(C) B-DNA is preferable for nanowire applications.

  2. Controllable spin-charge transport in strained graphene nanoribbon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Ginetom S.; Guassi, Marcos R.; Qu, Fanyao

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin-charge transport in two-terminal device of graphene nanoribbons in the presence of a uniform uniaxial strain, spin-orbit coupling, exchange field, and smooth staggered potential. We show that the direction of applied strain can efficiently tune strain-strength induced oscillation of band-gap of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). It is also found that electronic conductance in both AGNR and zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) oscillates with Rashba spin-orbit coupling akin to the Datta-Das field effect transistor. Two distinct strain response regimes of electronic conductance as function of spin-orbit couplings magnitude are found. In the regime of small strain, conductance of ZGNR presents stronger strain dependence along the longitudinal direction of strain. Whereas for high values of strain shows larger effect for the transversal direction. Furthermore, the local density of states shows that depending on the smoothness of the staggered potential, the edge states of AGNR can either emerge or be suppressed. These emerging states can be determined experimentally by either spatially scanning tunneling microscope or by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Our findings open up new paradigms of manipulation and control of strained graphene based nanostructure for application on novel topological quantum devices.

  3. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  4. Controllable spin-charge transport in strained graphene nanoribbon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, Ginetom S. Guassi, Marcos R.; Qu, Fanyao

    2014-09-21

    We theoretically investigate the spin-charge transport in two-terminal device of graphene nanoribbons in the presence of a uniform uniaxial strain, spin-orbit coupling, exchange field, and smooth staggered potential. We show that the direction of applied strain can efficiently tune strain-strength induced oscillation of band-gap of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). It is also found that electronic conductance in both AGNR and zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) oscillates with Rashba spin-orbit coupling akin to the Datta-Das field effect transistor. Two distinct strain response regimes of electronic conductance as function of spin-orbit couplings magnitude are found. In the regime of small strain, conductance of ZGNR presents stronger strain dependence along the longitudinal direction of strain. Whereas for high values of strain shows larger effect for the transversal direction. Furthermore, the local density of states shows that depending on the smoothness of the staggered potential, the edge states of AGNR can either emerge or be suppressed. These emerging states can be determined experimentally by either spatially scanning tunneling microscope or by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Our findings open up new paradigms of manipulation and control of strained graphene based nanostructure for application on novel topological quantum devices.

  5. Charge transport through one-dimensional Moiré crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Roméo; Lherbier, Aurélien; Barraud, Clément; Rocca, Maria Luisa Della; Lafarge, Philippe; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Moiré superlattices were generated in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and have revealed intriguing electronic structures. The appearance of mini-Dirac cones within the conduction and valence bands of graphene is one of the most striking among the new quantum features. A Moiré superstructure emerges when at least two periodic sub-structures superimpose. 2D Moiré patterns have been particularly investigated in stacked hexagonal 2D atomic lattices like twisted graphene layers and graphene deposited on hexagonal boron-nitride. In this letter, we report both experimentally and theoretically evidence of superlattices physics in transport properties of one-dimensional (1D) Moiré crystals. Rolling-up few layers of graphene to form a multiwall carbon nanotube adds boundaries conditions that can be translated into interference fringes-like Moiré patterns along the circumference of the cylinder. Such a 1D Moiré crystal exhibits a complex 1D multiple bands structure with clear and robust interband quantum transitions due to the presence of mini-Dirac points and pseudo-gaps. Our devices consist in a very large diameter (>80 nm) multiwall carbon nanotubes of high quality, electrically connected by metallic electrodes acting as charge reservoirs. Conductance measurements reveal the presence of van Hove singularities assigned to 1D Moiré superlattice effect and illustrated by electronic structure calculations. PMID:26786067

  6. Coherent pulses in the diffusive transport of charged particles`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present exact solutions to the diffusive transport of charged particles following impulsive injection for a simple model of scattering. A modified, two-parameter relaxation-time model is considered that simulates the low rate of scattering through perpendicular pitch-angle. Scattering is taken to be isotropic within each of the foward- and backward-pointing hemispheres, respectively, but, at the same time, a reduced rate of sccattering is assumed from one hemisphere to the other one. By applying a technique of Fourier- and Laplace-transform, the inverse transformation can be performed and exact solutions can be reached. By contrast with the first, and so far only exact solutions of Federov and Shakov, this wider class of solutions gives rise to coherent pulses to appear. The present work addresses omnidirectional densities for isotropic injection from an instantaneous and localized source. The dispersion relations are briefly discussed. We find, for this particular model, two diffusive models to exist up to a certain limiting wavenumber. The corresponding eigenvalues are real at the lowest wavenumbers. Complex eigenvalues, which are responsible for coherent pulses, appear at higher wavenumbers.

  7. Spatial charge configuration regulates nanoparticle transport and binding behavior in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hee-Sun; Martin, John D.; Lee, Jungmin; Harris, Daniel K.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi

    2013-01-01

    Detailed Charge arrangements: A new set of zwitterionic quantum dots were synthesized and used to study the influence of microscopic charge arrangements on the in vivo behavior of nanoparticles. Experiments using cultured cells and live mice demonstrate that the microscopic arrangement of surface charges strongly influence nonspecific binding, clearance behavior, and in vivo transport of nanoparticles. PMID:23255143

  8. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. 351.515 Section 351.515 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case...

  9. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. 351.515 Section 351.515 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case...

  10. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. 351.515 Section 351.515 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case...

  11. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. 351.515 Section 351.515 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case...

  12. Charge transport model in nanodielectric composites based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guochang; Chen, George; Li, Shengtao

    2016-08-01

    Charge transport properties in nanodielectrics present different tendencies for different loading concentrations. The exact mechanisms that are responsible for charge transport in nanodielectrics are not detailed, especially for high loading concentration. A charge transport model in nanodielectrics has been proposed based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps. In the model, the thermally assisted hopping (TAH) process for the shallow traps and the tunnelling process for the deep traps are considered. For different loading concentrations, the dominant charge transport mechanisms are different. The quantum tunneling mechanism plays a major role in determining the charge conduction in nanodielectrics with high loading concentrations. While for low loading concentrations, the thermal hopping mechanism will dominate the charge conduction process. The model can explain the observed conductivity property in nanodielectrics with different loading concentrations.

  13. Magnetic stochasticity and transport due to nonlinearly excited subdominant microtearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Doerk, H.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Nevins, W. M.

    2013-01-15

    Subdominant, linearly stable microtearing modes are identified as the main mechanism for the development of magnetic stochasticity and transport in gyrokinetic simulations of electromagnetic ion temperature gradient driven plasma microturbulence. The linear eigenmode spectrum is examined in order to identify and characterize modes with tearing parity. Connections are demonstrated between microtearing modes and the nonlinear fluctuations that are responsible for the magnetic stochasticity and electromagnetic transport, and nonlinear coupling with zonal modes is identified as the salient nonlinear excitation mechanism. A simple model is presented, which relates the electromagnetic transport to the electrostatic transport. These results may provide a paradigm for the mechanisms responsible for electromagnetic stochasticity and transport, which can be examined in a broader range of scenarios and parameter regimes.

  14. Charge Transport and Conductance Switching of Redox-Active Azulene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Florian; Koch, Michael; Kastlunger, Georg; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Venkatesan, Koushik; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-09-19

    Azulene (Az) is a non-alternating, aromatic hydrocarbon composed of a five-membered, electron-rich and a seven-membered, electron-poor ring; an electron distribution that provides intrinsic redox activity. By varying the attachment points of the two electrode-bridging substituents to the Az center, the influence of the redox functionality on charge transport is evaluated. The conductance of the 1,3 Az derivative is at least one order of magnitude lower than those of the 2,6 Az and 4,7 Az derivatives, in agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, only 1,3 Az exhibits pronounced nonlinear current-voltage characteristics with hysteresis, indicating a bias-dependent conductance switching. DFT identifies the LUMO to be nearest to the Fermi energy of the electrodes, but to be an active transport channel only in the case of the 2,6 and the 4,7 Az derivatives, whereas the 1,3 Az derivative uses the HOMO at low and the LUMO+1 at high bias. In return, the localized, weakly coupled LUMO of 1,3 Az creates a slow electron-hopping channel responsible for the voltage-induced switching due to the occupation of a single molecular orbital (MO).

  15. Charge Transport and Conductance Switching of Redox-Active Azulene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Florian; Koch, Michael; Kastlunger, Georg; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Venkatesan, Koushik; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-09-19

    Azulene (Az) is a non-alternating, aromatic hydrocarbon composed of a five-membered, electron-rich and a seven-membered, electron-poor ring; an electron distribution that provides intrinsic redox activity. By varying the attachment points of the two electrode-bridging substituents to the Az center, the influence of the redox functionality on charge transport is evaluated. The conductance of the 1,3 Az derivative is at least one order of magnitude lower than those of the 2,6 Az and 4,7 Az derivatives, in agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, only 1,3 Az exhibits pronounced nonlinear current-voltage characteristics with hysteresis, indicating a bias-dependent conductance switching. DFT identifies the LUMO to be nearest to the Fermi energy of the electrodes, but to be an active transport channel only in the case of the 2,6 and the 4,7 Az derivatives, whereas the 1,3 Az derivative uses the HOMO at low and the LUMO+1 at high bias. In return, the localized, weakly coupled LUMO of 1,3 Az creates a slow electron-hopping channel responsible for the voltage-induced switching due to the occupation of a single molecular orbital (MO). PMID:27553767

  16. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  17. Charge transport optimization in CZT ring-drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothman, V.; Alruhaili, A.; Perumal, V.; Sellin, P.; Lohstroh, A.; Sawhney, K.; Kachanov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ring-drift design has been applied to large (7.5~\\text{mm}× 7.5~\\text{mm}× 2.3 mm) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) devices. This low-noise, single-carrier-sensing configuration is the gold standard for spectroscopic silicon x-ray detectors. By combining the advantages of ring-drift with the high quantum efficiency and room-temperature operating capabilities of CZT, a simple and compact device for high-resolution spectroscopy of x-rays in the range 50-500 keV can be created. Quality of CZT crystals has improved greatly in recent years and electron-only sensing overcomes the problem of inherently poor hole transport in II-VI semiconductors. The spatial response of our 3-ring CZT device was studied by microbeam scanning while the voltages applied to all electrodes were systematically varied. Maximum active radius extended to 2.3 mm, beyond the second ring. Resolution was limited by electronic noise. Our results show that the lateral field and its ratio to the bulk field exert a crucial influence on active area, peak position and sensitivity. CZT and the device geometry were modelled in 3D with Sentaurus TCAD. Line scans were simulated and trends in performance with bias conditions matched experimental data, validating the model. We aimed to optimize the resolution, sensitivity and active radius of the device. Fields and charge drift were visualized and the active volume was mapped in 3D to improve understanding of the factors governing performance including number of rings, their widths, positions and bias.

  18. Charge Transport at Ti-Doped Hematite (001)/Aqueous Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-03-10

    Solid-state transport and electrochemical properties of Ti-doped hematite (001) epitaxial thin films (6.0, 8.3, and 16.6 at% Ti) were probed to achieve a better understanding of doped hematite for photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications. Room temperature resistivity measurements predict a resistivity minimum near 10 at% Ti doping, which can be rationalized as maximizing charge compensating Fe2+ concentration and Fe3+ electron accepting percolation pathways simultaneously. Temperature dependent resistivity data are consistent with small polaron hopping, revealing an activation energy that is Ti concentration dependent and commensurate with previously reported values (≈ 0.11 eV). In contact with inert electrolyte, linear Mott-Schottky data at various pH values indicate that there is predominantly a single donor for Ti-doped hematite at 6.0 at% Ti and 16.6 at% Ti concentrations. Two slope Mott-Schottky data at pH extremes indicate the presence of a second donor or surface state in the 8.3 at% Ti-doped film, with an energy level ≈ 0.7 eV below the Fermi level. Mott-Schottky plots indicate pH and Ti concentration dependent flatband potentials of -0.4 to -1.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl, commensurate with previously reported data. Flatband potentials exhibited super-Nernstian pH dependence ranging from -69.1 to -101.0 mV/pH. Carrier concentration data indicate that the Fermi energy of the Ti-doped system is Ti concentration dependent, with a minimum of 0.15 eV near 10 at% Ti. These energy level data allow us to construct an energy band diagram for Ti-doped hematite electrode/electrolyte interfaces, and to determine a Ti-doping concentration t

  19. Charge-density study of the nonlinear optical precursor DED-TCNQ at 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Copley, Royston C.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Howard, Judith A.; Szablewski, Marek; Cross, Graham H.

    2002-03-01

    A charge-density study of the nonlinear-optical (NLO) precursor \\{4-[bis(diethylamino)-methylium] phenyl\\}dicyanomethanide (DED-TCNQ), space group P21/c, a=11.174(2) Å b=12.859(2) Å c=12.486(2) Å β=112.00(1)°, is presented. The results derive from a suitable combination of complementary 20 K x-ray and neutron diffraction data, the latter being important for locating the hydrogen atoms precisely. The compound is one in a series of TCNQ derivatives that exhibit varying degrees of quinoidal and zwitterionic character, these two electronic states being very close energetically. Bond-length-alternation type calculations show that the molecule at 20 K exists in a mixture of the two states, the zwitterionic ground state being dominant (63:37% zwitterionic: quinoidal). A topological analysis of the bonding density within the benzenoid ring provides for a more direct, alternative method to calculate this ratio which utilizes ellipticity values derived from the charge-density study. Results are identical thus corroborating the validity of the ``strength-length'' relationship implicitly assumed in bond-length-alternation type calculations. The ratio determined corresponds well to the electronic configuration needed to meet the requirements of the general rule for obtaining a maximum value of β (a measure of the NLO response on the molecular scale) as a function of bond-length alternation. The promise of this class of compounds for nonlinear optics also lies partly in their high molecular dipole moments and so the pseudoatomic charges derived from this study were used to evaluate the nature of the molecular charge transfer in detail and the solid-state dipolar vector moment μ. Such measurements of μ are otherwise difficult in the solid state. A value of \\|μ\\|=91×10-30 Cm was deduced which compares with liquid and gas phase theoretical calculations of μ=66.71×10-30 Cm and μ=33.36×10-30 Cm, respectively. This comparison, combined with an analysis of the sense

  20. Nonlinear shielding of a point-like charge in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovsky, Victor

    A simple formulation of the problem related to the shielding phenomenon presumes instantaneous appearance of an external point-like charge in a uniform isotropic plasma. Corresponding asymptotic solution of the problem leads to well-known Debye formula for spatial dependence of electrostatic potential at long times. To determine dielectric constant of the plasma, such an approach implies linearization of Vlasov equation. At the same time, according to the Debye expression, the electric field intensity can take very high values in the vicinity of the external charge, i.e. the result of the calculation is in obvious contradiction with the condition for applicability of the linear theory. It follows from here that rejection of the perturbation theory methods is necessary in order to solve the problem correctly. Although the same initial-value problem becomes too difficult for analytical treatment beyond the scope of the linear approximation, analysis of the asymptotic equilibrium state of the disturbed plasma is still not hopeless effort. This study presents a solution of the nonlinear problem of the shielding of a positive point-like charge under simplifying assumption of immobile ions. The disturbed electron number density is calculated on the basis of kinetic theory, and the corresponding Poisson equation is solved numerically. The found spatial profiles of the electrostatic potential are confronted with the Debye formula. Particular attention is given to trapped electrons executing a spatially limited motion on finite orbits. It is shown that these particles contribute significantly to the disturbance of the plasma density and thereby affect essentially the structure of the disturbed region and the behavior of the self-consistent electric field. The major conclusion of the developed theory consists in weakening of the nonlinear shielding in comparison with the result of the linear analysis. Although the consideration of the point-like charge is probably one of the

  1. Interfacial Charge States in Graphene on SiC Studied by Noncontact Scanning Nonlinear Dielectric Potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Kohei; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Funakubo, Kazutoshi; Suemitsu, Maki; Cho, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    We investigate pristine and hydrogen-intercalated graphene synthesized on a 4H-SiC(0001) substrate by using noncontact scanning nonlinear dielectric potentiometry (NC-SNDP). Permanent dipole moments are detected at the pristine graphene-SiC interface. These originate from the covalent bonds of carbon atoms of the so-called buffer layer to the substrate. Hydrogen intercalation at the interface eliminates these covalent bonds and the original quasi-(6×6) corrugation, which indicates the conversion of the buffer layer into a second graphene layer by the termination of Si bonds at the interface. NC-SNDP images suggest that a certain portion of the Si dangling bonds remains even after hydrogen intercalation. These bonds are thought to act as charged impurities reducing the carrier mobility in hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC.

  2. Interfacial Charge States in Graphene on SiC Studied by Noncontact Scanning Nonlinear Dielectric Potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasue, Kohei; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Funakubo, Kazutoshi; Suemitsu, Maki; Cho, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    We investigate pristine and hydrogen-intercalated graphene synthesized on a 4 H -SiC (0001 ) substrate by using noncontact scanning nonlinear dielectric potentiometry (NC-SNDP). Permanent dipole moments are detected at the pristine graphene-SiC interface. These originate from the covalent bonds of carbon atoms of the so-called buffer layer to the substrate. Hydrogen intercalation at the interface eliminates these covalent bonds and the original quasi-(6 ×6 ) corrugation, which indicates the conversion of the buffer layer into a second graphene layer by the termination of Si bonds at the interface. NC-SNDP images suggest that a certain portion of the Si dangling bonds remains even after hydrogen intercalation. These bonds are thought to act as charged impurities reducing the carrier mobility in hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC.

  3. Electric vehicle state of charge estimation: Nonlinear correlation and fuzzy support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Hanmin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the state of charge (SOC) of the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery pack by applying machine learning strategy. To reduce the noise sensitive issue of common machine learning strategies, a kind of SOC estimation method based on fuzzy least square support vector machine is proposed. By applying fuzzy inference and nonlinear correlation measurement, the effects of the samples with low confidence can be reduced. Further, a new approach for determining the error interval of regression results is proposed to avoid the control system malfunction. Tests are carried out on modified COMS electric vehicles, with two battery packs each consists of 24 50 Ah LiFePO4 batteries. The effectiveness of the method is proven by the test and the comparison with other popular methods.

  4. Regular rotating electrically charged structures in nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina; Galaktionov, Evgeny

    2016-03-01

    In nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity, regular spherically symmetric electrically charged solutions satisfy the weak energy condition and have obligatory de Sitter center. By the Gürses-Gürsey algorithm they are transformed to regular axially symmetric solutions asymptotically Kerr-Newman for a distant observer. Rotation transforms de Sitter center into de Sitter equatorial disk embedded as a bridge into a de Sitter vacuum surface. The de Sitter surfaces satisfy p = -ρ and have properties of a perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic. The Kerr ring singularity is replaced with the superconducting current which serves as a non-dissipative electromagnetic source of the asymptotically Kerr-Newman geometry. Violation of the weak energy condition is prevented by the basic requirement of electrodynamics of continued media.

  5. Identification procedures for the charge-controlled nonlinear noise model of microwave electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filicori, Fabio; Traverso, Pier Andrea; Florian, Corrado; Borgarino, Mattia

    2004-05-01

    The basic features of the recently proposed Charge-Controlled Non-linear Noise (CCNN) model for the prediction of low-to-high-frequency noise up-conversion in electron devices under large-signal RF operation are synthetically presented. It is shown that the different noise generation phenomena within the device can be described by four equivalent noise sources, which are connected at the ports of a "noiseless" device model and are non-linearly controlled by the time-varying instantaneous values of the intrinsic device voltages. For the empirical identification of the voltage-controlled equivalent noise sources, different possible characterization procedures, based not only on conventional low-frequency noise data, but also on different types of noise measurements carried out under large-signal RF operating conditions are discussed. As an example of application, the measurement-based identification of the CCNN model for a GaInP heterojunction bipolar microwave transistor is presented. Preliminary validation results show that the proposed model can describe with adequate accuracy not only the low-frequency noise of the HBT, but also its phase-noise performance in a prototype VCO implemented by using the same monolithic GaAs technology.

  6. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... switching facilities. (iii) A flat-rated charge for transport of traffic over dedicated transport facilities... defined in § 61.3(x) of this chapter shall then make downward exogenous adjustments to the service band... corresponding upward adjustments to the service band index for the tandem-switched transport service...

  7. EDITORIAL: Charge transport in non-metallic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, Ian J.; Almond, Darryl P.

    2009-03-01

    Workers engaged in a wide range of investigations of charge transport in non-metallic solids came together at a meeting of the Institute of Physics Dielectric Group, held in London on 2 April 2008. Topics included both ionic and electronic conduction, investigations of the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport, percolation, modelling the conduction process in both natural and man-made composite electrical and electromagnetic materials, the design and development of solids with specified conduction properties and the ac characteristics of non-metallic solids. In the first session, the long-standing problem of the anomalous power law increase in ac conductivity with frequency was addressed by a set of four presentations. Jeppe Dyre, an invited speaker from Roskilde University, Denmark, introduced the problem and stressed the universality of the frequency dependence observed in the ac conductivities of disordered non-metallic materials. He showed that it could be obtained from a simple random barrier model, independent of the barrier distribution. Darryl Almond, University of Bath, showed that the electrical responses of large networks of randomly positioned resistors and capacitors, simulating the microstructures of disordered two-phase (conductor insulator) materials, exhibit the same frequency dependence. He demonstrated their robustness to component value and distribution and suggested that it was an emergent property of these networks and of two-phase materials. Klaus Funke, an invited speaker from the University of Munster, Germany, presented a detailed model of ion motion in disordered ionic materials. He stressed the need to account for the concerted many-particle processes that occur whilst ions hop from site to site in response to an applied electric field. The conductivity spectra obtained from this work reproduce the same frequency dispersion and have the additional feature of conductivity saturation at high frequencies. Tony West, University of

  8. Semiconductor drift chamber: an application of a novel charge transport scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Rehak, P.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel charge tranport scheme in semiconductors in which the field responsible for the charge transport is independent of the depletion field. The application of the novel charge transport scheme leads to the following new semiconductor detectors: (1) Semiconductor Draft Chamber; (2) Ultra low capacitance - large semiconductor x-ray spectrometers and photodiodes; and (3) Fully depleted thick CCD. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Semiconductor Draft Chamber as a position sensing detector for high energy charged particles. Position resolution limiting factors are considered, and the values of the resolutions are given.

  9. An energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Knoll, Dana; Daughton, William; CoCoMans (LANL) Team

    2013-10-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes a nonlinear electrostatic implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension. The algorithm employs a kinetically enslaved Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method, and conserves energy and charge to numerical round-off. In this study, we generalize the method to electromagnetic simulations in 1D using the Darwin approximation of Maxwell's equations. An implicit, orbit-averaged central finite difference scheme is applied to both the Darwin field equations and the particle orbit equations to produce a discrete system that remains exactly charge-and energy-conserving. Furthermore, the canonical momentum in any ignorable direction is exactly conserved per particle by appropriate interpolations of the magnetic field. A fluid preconditioner targeting the stiffest electron waves has been developed to accelerate the linear GMRES solver of JFNK. We present 1D numerical experiments (e.g. the Weibel instability, kinetic Alfven wave ion-ion streaming instability, etc.) to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the implicit Darwin PIC algorithm, and the performance of the fluid preconditioner.

  10. Effect of nonlinear instability on gravity-wave momentum transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear instability of internal gravity waves and the effects of their nonlinear interaction on momentum flux, using simple theoretical and numerical models. From the result of an analysis of parametric instability of a two-dimensional internal gravity wave as discussed by Yeh and Liu (1981) and Klostermeyer (1982), a group trajectory length scale for a gravity wave packet was determined, expressed in terms of the dominant vertical wavelenght and the degree of convective saturation. It is shown that this analysis justifies the Eikonal saturation method for relatively transient packets, that are well below the saturation amplitude, propagating in a slowly varying mean flow. Conversely, linear theory fails for persistent disturbances and trasient wave packets near convective saturation.

  11. Nonlinear electrostatic excitations of charged dust in degenerate ultra-dense quantum dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsalam, U. M.; Ali, S.; Kourakis, I.

    2012-06-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of low-frequency electrostatic excitations of charged dust particles (or defects) in a dense collisionless, unmagnetized Thomas-Fermi plasma are investigated. A fully ionized three-component model plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and negatively charged massive dust grains is considered. Electrons and ions are assumed to be in a degenerate quantum state, obeying the Thomas-Fermi density distribution, whereas the inertial dust component is described by a set of classical fluid equations. Considering large-amplitude stationary profile travelling-waves in a moving reference frame, the fluid evolution equations are reduced to a pseudo-energy-balance equation, involving a Sagdeev-type potential function. The analysis describes the dynamics of supersonic dust-acoustic solitary waves in Thomas-Fermi plasmas, and provides exact predictions for their dynamical characteristics, whose dependence on relevant parameters (namely, the ion-to-electron Fermi temperature ratio, and the dust concentration) is investigated. An alternative route is also adopted, by assuming weakly varying small-amplitude disturbances off equilibrium, and then adopting a multiscale perturbation technique to derive a Korteweg-de Vries equation for the electrostatic potential, and finally solving in terms for electric potential pulses (electrostatic solitons). A critical comparison between the two methods reveals that they agree exactly in the small-amplitude, weakly superacoustic limit. The dust concentration (Havnes) parameter h=Z{sub d0}n{sub d0}/n{sub e0} affects the propagation characteristics by modifying the phase speed, as well as the electron/ion Fermi temperatures. Our results aim at elucidating the characteristics of electrostatic excitations in dust-contaminated dense plasmas, e.g., in metallic electronic devices, and also arguably in supernova environments, where charged dust defects may occur in the quantum plasma regime.

  12. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  13. Conditions for charge transport without recombination in low mobility organic solar cells and photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Martin; Armin, Ardalan; Philippa, Bronson; White, Ronald D.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Juška, Gytis; Pivrikas, Almantas

    2015-10-01

    Organic semiconductors typically possess low charge carrier mobilities and Langevin-type recombination dynamics, which both negatively impact the performance of organic solar cells and photodetectors. Charge transport in organic solar cells is usually characterized by the mobility-lifetime product. Using newly developed transient and steady state photocurrent measurement techniques we show that the onset of efficiency limiting photocarrier recombination is determined by the charge that can be stored on the electrodes of the device. It is shown that significant photocarrier recombination can be avoided when the total charge inside the device, defined by the trapped, doping-induced and mobile charge carriers, is less than the electrode charge. Based upon this physics we propose the mobility-recombination coefficient product as an alternative and more convenient figure of merit to minimize the recombination losses. We validate the results in 3 different organic semiconductor-based light harvesting systems with very different charge transport properties. The findings allow the determination of the charge collection efficiency in fully operational devices. In turn, knowing the conditions under which non-geminate recombination is eliminated enables one to quantify the generation efficiency of free charge carriers. The results are relevant to a wide range of light harvesting systems, particularly those based upon disordered semiconductors, and require a rethink of the critical parameters for charge transport.

  14. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited).

    PubMed

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  15. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  16. Electron transport and dielectric breakdown in silicon nitride using a charge transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Sean P.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nitride is an important material used in the electronics industry. As such, the electronic transport and reliability of these materials are important to study and understand. We report on a charge transport model to predict leakage current and failure trends based on previously published data for a stoichiometric silicon nitride dielectric. Failure occurs when the defect density increases to a critical value of approximately 6 × 1025 traps/m3. The model's parameters are determined using voltage ramp data only, and yet, the model is also able to predict constant voltage stress failure over a time scale ranging from minutes to months. The successful fit of the model to the experimental data validates our assumption that the dominant defect in the dielectric is the Si dangling bond, located approximately 2.2 eV below the conduction band. A comparison with previous SiCOH simulations shows SiN and SiCOH have similar defect-related material properties. It is also speculated that, based on the estimated parameter values of 2.75 eV for the defect formation activation energy, the materials' TDDB wear-out are caused by broken Si-H bonds, resulting in Si dangling bond defects.

  17. Charge transport in organic crystals: critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy "bonding"-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the "missing link" for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals.

  18. Charge transport in organic crystals: Critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy “bonding”-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the “missing link” for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals.

  19. Charge transport in organic crystals: critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy "bonding"-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the "missing link" for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals. PMID:25877586

  20. A Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Controller for a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) architecture for a generic transport aircraft. At its core, this architecture features a three-axis, non-linear, dynamic-inversion controller. Command inputs for this baseline controller are provided by pilot roll-rate, pitch-rate, and sideslip commands. This paper will first thoroughly present the baseline controller followed by a description of the PMRAC adaptive augmentation to this control system. Results are presented via a full-scale, nonlinear simulation of NASA s Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  1. Variable range hopping and nonlinear transport in monolayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chieh-I.; Wu, Bi-Yi; Chuang, Chiashain; Lee, Ya-Chi; Ho, Yi-Ju; Yang, Yanfei; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Lo, Shun-Tsung; Liang, Chi-Te

    2016-10-01

    We report experimental results on variable range hopping (VRH) and nonlinear transport in monolayer epitaxial graphene. In the linear regime in which the conductance is independent of voltage, the resistance curve derivative analysis method can be used to unequivocally determine whether Mott VRH or Efros-Shklovskii VRH is the dominant transport mechanism in our devices. In the nonlinear regime in which the conductance shows a strong dependence on voltage, we find that our experimental results can be successfully described by existing theoretical models. We suggest that the observed vastly different exponents in the threshold voltage-temperature dependence require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  2. An Enhanced Nonlinear Critical Gradient for Electron Turbulent Transport due to Reversed Magnetic Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Hammet, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2011-05-11

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment show that reversed magnetic shear can suppress thermal transport by increasing the nonlinear critical gradient for electron-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence to three times its linear critical value. An interesting feature of this turbulence is non- linearly driven off-midplane radial streamers. This work reinforces the experimental observation that magnetic shear is likely an effective way of triggering and sustaining e-ITBs in magnetic fusion devices.

  3. Generation and transport of space charge waves in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C. T.; Beaudoin, Brian; Feldman, Donald; Kishek, Rami; Bernal, Santiago; Sutter, David; Reiser, Martin; O'Shea, Patrick

    2009-01-22

    An experimental study of longitudinal dynamics of space charge dominated beams is presented. We use drive-laser driven perturbations to study the evolution of space charge waves on an intese electron beam. Collective effects like propagation of space charge waves, superposition of waves and crossing of waves are presented and verified with 1-D cold fluid model theory. Multi-turn transport and other collective effects in UMER are discussed.

  4. Charge transport anisotropy in n-type disk-shaped triphenylene-tris(aroyleneimidazole)s.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Hanifi, David; Alvarez, Steven; Antonio, Francisco; Pun, Andrew; Klivansky, Liana M; Hexemer, Alexander; Ma, Biwu; Liu, Yi

    2011-12-16

    Two novel n-type disk-shaped molecules containing a triphenylene core and three fused naphthaleneimide imidazole or peryleneimide imidazole "arms" are synthesized and characterized. The n-type charge carrier mobilities of these molecules are evaluated by both field effect transistors and space-charge limited-current measurements, which exhibit drastically different mobility anisotropy. A strong correlation between film morphology and the charge transport behavior is established by X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopic analyses.

  5. Charge carrier transport in polycrystalline organic thin film based field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Varsha; Sharma, Akanksha; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    The charge carrier transport mechanism in polycrystalline thin film based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) has been explained using two competing models, multiple trapping and releases (MTR) model and percolation model. It has been shown that MTR model is most suitable for explaining charge carrier transport in grainy polycrystalline organic thin films. The energetic distribution of traps determined independently using Mayer-Neldel rule (MNR) is in excellent agreement with the values obtained by MTR model for copper phthalocyanine and pentacene based OFETs.

  6. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points.

  8. Holographic charge transport in non commutative gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Dibakar

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, based on the holographic techniques, we explore the hydrodynamics of charge diffusion phenomena in non commutative SYM plasma at strong coupling. In our analysis, we compute the R charge diffusion rates both along commutative as well as the non commutative coordinates of the brane. It turns out that unlike the case for the shear viscosity, the DC conductivity along the non commutative direction of the brane differs significantly from that of its cousin corresponding to the commutative direction of the brane. Such a discrepancy however smoothly goes away in the limit of the vanishing non commutativity.

  9. Percolation, tie-lines, and the microstructural determinants of charge transport in semicrystalline conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakowitz, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Semiconducting polymers play an important role in a wide range of optical and electronic material applications. It is widely accepted that the polymer ordering impacts charge transport in such devices. However, the connection between molecular ordering and device performance is difficult to predict due to the current need for a mathematical theory of the physics that dictates charge transport in semiconducting polymers. Here, we present a new analytical and computational description in which the morphology of individual polymer chains is dictated by well-known statistical models and the electronic coupling between units is determined using Marcus theory. This effort combines our research group's modeling efforts in polymer conformational properties and reaction-diffusion phenomena to address the multiscale dynamics of charge transport in a heterogeneous material. The resulting model is capable of bridging molecular-level charge transport mechanisms to large scale transport behavior, thus facilitating direct comparison with experiments. The multiscale transport of charges in these materials (high mobility at short length scales, low mobility at long length scales) is naturally described with our framework. Additionally, the dependence of mobility with electric field and temperature is explained in terms of conformational variability and spatial correlation. Our model offers a predictive approach to connecting processing conditions with transport behavior.

  10. The charge transport mechanism and electron trap nature in thermal oxide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, Damir R.; Gritsenko, Vladimir A.; Perevalov, Timofey V.; Orlov, Oleg M.; Krasnikov, Gennady Ya.

    2016-08-01

    The charge transport mechanism of electron via traps in amorphous SiO2 has been studied. Electron transport is limited by phonon-assisted tunneling between traps. Thermal and optical trap energies Wt=1.6 eV, Wopt=3.2 eV, respectively, were determined. Charge flowing leads to oxygen vacancies generation, and the leakage current increases due to the increase of charge trap density. Long-time annealing at high temperatures decreased the leakage current to initial values due to oxygen vacancies recombination with interstitial oxygen. It is found that the oxygen vacancies act as electron traps in SiO2.

  11. Poloidal rotation driven by nonlinear momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wen, Tiliang; Diamond, P. H.

    2016-10-01

    Virtually, all existing theoretical works on turbulent poloidal momentum transport are based on quasilinear theory. Nonlinear poloidal momentum flux—< {{\\tilde{v}}r}\\tilde{n}{{\\tilde{v}}θ}> is universally neglected. However, in the strong turbulence regime where relative fluctuation amplitude is no longer small, quasilinear theory is invalid. This is true at the all-important plasma edge. In this work, nonlinear poloidal momentum flux < {{\\tilde{v}}r}\\tilde{n}{{\\tilde{v}}θ}> in strong electrostatic turbulence is calculated using the Hasegawa-Mima equation, and is compared with quasilinear poloidal Reynolds stress. A novel property is that symmetry breaking in fluctuation spectrum is not necessary for a nonlinear poloidal momentum flux. This is fundamentally different from the quasilinear Reynold stress. Furthermore, the comparison implies that the poloidal rotation drive from the radial gradient of nonlinear momentum flux is comparable to that from the quasilinear Reynolds force. Nonlinear poloidal momentum transport in strong electrostatic turbulence is thus not negligible for poloidal rotation drive, and so may be significant to transport barrier formation.

  12. Nonlinear Transport in Organic Thin Film Transistors with Soluble Small Molecule Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeok; Song, Dong-Seok; Kwon, Jin-Hyuk; Jung, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Do-Kyung; Kim, SeonMin; Kang, In Man; Park, Jonghoo; Tae, Heung-Sik; Battaglini, Nicolas; Lang, Philippe; Horowitz, Gilles; Bae, Jin-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear transport is intensively explained through Poole-Frenkel (PF) transport mechanism in organic thin film transistors with solution-processed small molecules, which is, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS) pentacene. We outline a detailed electrical study that identifies the source to drain field dependent mobility. Devices with diverse channel lengths enable the extensive exhibition of field dependent mobility due to thermal activation of carriers among traps. PMID:27455707

  13. Nonlinear Transport in Organic Thin Film Transistors with Soluble Small Molecule Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeok; Song, Dong-Seok; Kwon, Jin-Hyuk; Jung, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Do-Kyung; Kim, SeonMin; Kang, In Man; Park, Jonghoo; Tae, Heung-Sik; Battaglini, Nicolas; Lang, Philippe; Horowitz, Gilles; Bae, Jin-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear transport is intensively explained through Poole-Frenkel (PF) transport mechanism in organic thin film transistors with solution-processed small molecules, which is, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS) pentacene. We outline a detailed electrical study that identifies the source to drain field dependent mobility. Devices with diverse channel lengths enable the extensive exhibition of field dependent mobility due to thermal activation of carriers among traps.

  14. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Pandey, Ravindra; Das, Puspendu K; Ramasesha, S

    2011-01-28

    In this paper, we have computed the quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of a class of weak charge transfer (CT) complexes. These weak complexes are formed when the methyl substituted benzenes (donors) are added to strong acceptors like chloranil (CHL) or di-chloro-di-cyano benzoquinone (DDQ) in chloroform or in dichloromethane. The formation of such complexes is manifested by the presence of a broad absorption maximum in the visible range of the spectrum where neither the donor nor the acceptor absorbs. The appearance of this visible band is due to CT interactions, which result in strong NLO responses. We have employed the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO∕S) Hamiltonian to calculate the energy levels of these CT complexes using single and double configuration interaction (SDCI). The solvent effects are taken into account by using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) scheme. The geometry of the complex is obtained by exploring different relative molecular geometries by rotating the acceptor with respect to the fixed donor about three different axes. The theoretical geometry that best fits the experimental energy gaps, β(HRS) and macroscopic depolarization ratios is taken to be the most probable geometry of the complex. Our studies show that the most probable geometry of these complexes in solution is the parallel displaced structure with a significant twist in some cases.

  15. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Ramasesha, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Das, Puspendu K.

    2011-01-28

    In this paper, we have computed the quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of a class of weak charge transfer (CT) complexes. These weak complexes are formed when the methyl substituted benzenes (donors) are added to strong acceptors like chloranil (CHL) or di-chloro-di-cyano benzoquinone (DDQ) in chloroform or in dichloromethane. The formation of such complexes is manifested by the presence of a broad absorption maximum in the visible range of the spectrum where neither the donor nor the acceptor absorbs. The appearance of this visible band is due to CT interactions, which result in strong NLO responses. We have employed the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO/S) Hamiltonian to calculate the energy levels of these CT complexes using single and double configuration interaction (SDCI). The solvent effects are taken into account by using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) scheme. The geometry of the complex is obtained by exploring different relative molecular geometries by rotating the acceptor with respect to the fixed donor about three different axes. The theoretical geometry that best fits the experimental energy gaps, {beta}{sub HRS} and macroscopic depolarization ratios is taken to be the most probable geometry of the complex. Our studies show that the most probable geometry of these complexes in solution is the parallel displaced structure with a significant twist in some cases.

  16. Complementing Graphenes: 1D Interplanar Charge Transport in Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Merschjann, Christoph; Tschierlei, Stefanie; Tyborski, Tobias; Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Orthmann, Steven; Hollmann, Dirk; Schedel-Niedrig, Thomas; Thomas, Arne; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2015-12-22

    Charge transport in polymeric graphitic carbon nitrides is shown to proceed via diffusive hopping of electron and hole polarons with reasonably high mobilities >10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The power-law behavior of the ultrafast luminescence decay exhibits that the predominant transport direction is perpendicular to the graphitic polymer sheets, thus complementing 2D materials like graphene. PMID:26543003

  17. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  18. Nonlinear thermoelectric response due to energy-dependent transport properties of a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svilans, Artis; Burke, Adam M.; Svensson, Sofia Fahlvik; Leijnse, Martin; Linke, Heiner

    2016-08-01

    Quantum dots are useful model systems for studying quantum thermoelectric behavior because of their highly energy-dependent electron transport properties, which are tunable by electrostatic gating. As a result of this strong energy dependence, the thermoelectric response of quantum dots is expected to be nonlinear with respect to an applied thermal bias. However, until now this effect has been challenging to observe because, first, it is experimentally difficult to apply a sufficiently large thermal bias at the nanoscale and, second, it is difficult to distinguish thermal bias effects from purely temperature-dependent effects due to overall heating of a device. Here we take advantage of a novel thermal biasing technique and demonstrate a nonlinear thermoelectric response in a quantum dot which is defined in a heterostructured semiconductor nanowire. We also show that a theoretical model based on the Master equations fully explains the observed nonlinear thermoelectric response given the energy-dependent transport properties of the quantum dot.

  19. Evolved phase separation toward balanced charge transport and high efficiency in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haijun; Zhang, Maojie; Guo, Xia; Li, Yongfang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2011-09-01

    Understanding effect of morphology on charge carrier transport within polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction is necessary to develop high-performance polymer solar cells. In this work, we synthesized a new benzodithiophene-based polymer with good self-organization behavior as well as favorable morphology evolution of its blend films with PC(71)BM under improved processing conditions. Charge carrier transport behavior of blend films was characterized by space charge limited current method. Evolved blend film morphology by controlling blend composition and additive content gradually reaches an optimized state, featured with nanoscale fibrilla polymer phase in moderate size and balanced mobility ratio close to 1:1 for hole and electron. This optimized morphology toward more balanced charge carrier transport accounts for the best power conversion efficiency of 3.2%, measured under simulated AM 1.5 solar irradiation 100 mW/cm(2), through enhancing short circuit current and reducing geminate recombination loss.

  20. The effect of interfaces on charge transport and recombination in polymeric solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbacka, Ronald; Sanden, Simon; Xu, Qian; Sandberg, Oskar; Nyman, Mathias; Smatt, Jan-Henrik; Juska, Gytis

    2013-03-01

    Charge-carrier transport and recombination in hybrid TiO2/P3HT:PCBM bulk-heterojunction solar cells (BHSCs) have been measured using photo-CELIV. We have fabricated hybrid devices in the form of indium tin oxide/titanium dioxide/P3HT:PCBM/Cu) to clarify the impact of the TiO2/P3HT:PCBM interface on the charge transport using the charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage (CELIV) technique. We found that a large equilibrium charge reservoir is accumulated at negative offsets at the TiO2/P3HT:PCBM interface leading to space charge limited extraction current (SCLC) transients. We show analytically the SCLC transient response and compare the experimental data to calculated SCLC in a linearly increasing voltage. The theoretical calculations indicate that the large charge reservoir at negative offset voltages is due to thermally generated charges combined with poor hole extraction at the ITO/TiO2 contact, due to the hole blocking character of TiO2. In this presentation we will discuss how interfaces, both metal-organic but also organic-organic interfaces affect charge carrier transport and recombination measurements. Laboratory of Physical Chemistry

  1. On the nature of high field charge transport in reinforced silicone dielectrics: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    The high field charge injection and transport properties in reinforced silicone dielectrics were investigated by measuring the time-dependent space charge distribution and the current under dc conditions up to the breakdown field and were compared with the properties of other dielectric polymers. It is argued that the energy and spatial distribution of localized electronic states are crucial in determining these properties for polymer dielectrics. Tunneling to localized states likely dominates the charge injection process. A transient transport regime arises due to the relaxation of charge carriers into deep traps at the energy band tails and is successfully verified by a Monte Carlo simulation using the multiple-hopping model. The charge carrier mobility is found to be highly heterogeneous due to the non-uniform trapping. The slow moving electron packet exhibits a negative field dependent drift velocity possibly due to the spatial disorder of traps.

  2. Observation of complete space-charge-limited transport in metal-oxide-graphene heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Fei; Fang, Jingyue; Wang, Guang; Qin, Shiqiao; Zhang, Xue-Ao E-mail: xazhang@nudt.edu.cn; Wang, Chaocheng; Wang, Li E-mail: xazhang@nudt.edu.cn

    2015-01-12

    The metal-oxide-graphene heterostructures have abundant physical connotations. As one of the most important physical properties, the electric transport property of the gold-chromium oxide-graphene heterostructure has been studied. The experimental measurement shows that the conductive mechanism is dominated by the space-charge-limited transport, a kind of bulk transport of an insulator with charge traps. Combining the theoretical analysis, some key parameters such as the carrier mobility and trap energy also are obtained. The study of the characteristics of the metal-oxide-graphene heterostructures is helpful to investigate the graphene-based electronic and photoelectric devices.

  3. Molecular structure and charge transfer contributions to nonlinear optical property of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, G. Femina; Amalanathan, M.; Roy, S. Dawn Dharma

    2016-05-01

    The Charge transfer contributions to the second-order nonlinear optical properties of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline have been performed by means of DFT computation. The vibrational contribution studies of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline have also been performed using FTIR, FT-Raman analysis. More support on the experimental findings were added from the quantum chemical studies performed with DFT (B3LYP) method using 6-311++G(d,p)basis sets. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction. The HOMO and LUMO analysis reveals the possibility of charge transfer within the molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (α0) and related properties (β,α0 and Δα) of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline were calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), charge analysis also were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  4. Intermittent transport of nonlinear reduced models in tokomak plasmas turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgherras, S.; Benouaz, T.; Bekkouche, S. M. A.; Bekkouche

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the origin and nature of turbulent transport in tokomak plasmas is one of the major challenges of a successful magnetic confinement fusion. The aim of this work is to study instability associated with the ion-temperature gradient (ITG)-driven turbulence in the core of the plasma, which is the seat of fusion reactions. We used a low degree of freedom model composed of 18 ordinary differential equations. When the system is slightly above the stability threshold of the ITG mode, it is considered to be in the convection regime and convective heat transport of the system is time-independent, or oscillates periodically. As ITG is increased further, the system bifurcates to the turbulent regime. In a strongly turbulent regime, intermittent bursts (the so-called avalanches) are observed. This intermittency is a result of the competition among the following three factors: generation of sheared flows and suppression of ITG turbulence, gradual reduction of the sheared flows due to viscosity, and rapid regrowth of ITG modes due to reduction of sheared flows.

  5. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Kędzierska, Barbara; Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Wach, Elżbieta; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M.

    2015-07-01

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot-ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes.

  6. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  7. Stereocomplex micelle from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers efficiently transports antineoplastic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jixue; Shen, Kexin; Xu, Weiguo; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Chunxi; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    Nanoscale polymeric micelles have attracted more and more attention as a promising nanocarrier for controlled delivery of antineoplastic drugs. Herein, the doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(D-lactide)-based micelle (PDM/DOX), poly(L-lactide)-based micelle (PLM/DOX), and stereocomplex micelle (SCM/DOX) from the equimolar mixture of the enantiomeric four-armed poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PEG-PLA) copolymers were successfully fabricated. In phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4, SCM/DOX exhibited the smallest hydrodynamic diameter ( D h) of 90 ± 4.2 nm and the slowest DOX release compared with PDM/DOX and PLM/DOX. Moreover, PDM/DOX, PLM/DOX, and SCM/DOX exhibited almost stable D hs of around 115, 105, and 90 nm at above normal physiological condition, respectively, which endowed them with great potential in controlled drug delivery. The intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity after the incubation with the laden micelles was different degrees weaker than that incubated with free DOX · HCl within 12 h, probably due to the slow DOX release from micelles. As the incubation time reached to 24 h, all the cells incubated with the laden micelles, especially SCM/DOX, demonstrated a stronger intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity than free DOX · HCl-cultured ones. More importantly, all the DOX-loaded micelles, especially SCM/DOX, exhibited potent antineoplastic efficacy in vitro, excellent serum albumin-tolerance stability, and satisfactory hemocompatibility. These encouraging data indicated that the loading micelles from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers, especially SCM/DOX, might be promising in clinical systemic chemotherapy through intravenous injection.

  8. The influence of negative charged centers on the hole transport in a typical molecularly doped polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyutnev, Andrey P.; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh.; Saenko, Vladimir S.; Pozhidaev, Evgenii D.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied effects of the negative charged centers on the time of flight (TOF) curves measured in a typical hole-conducting molecularly doped polymer. The main effects are the unusual TOF (surface generation) current rise in the preflight region (be it a flat plateau or a cusp) due to the accumulated space charge and the current reduction at all times because of the monomolecular recombination. TOF-2 (bulk generation) transients are less sensitive to charged centers. Analysis of these effects has proved that charged centers do not change the carrier mobility provided that the space charge field and bimolecular recombination are properly accounted for in terms of the proposed two-layer MT model. We have shown that combination of TOF, TOF-1a and TOF-2 variants of the electron-gun based technique allows one to establish definitively the character of the charge carrier transport in MDPs.

  9. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2

  10. The effect of charge separation on nonlinear electrostatic waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature ions

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Pillay, S. R.; Singh, S. V.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2008-09-07

    In view of the observations of parallel (to Earth's magnetic field) spiky electric field structures by the FAST satellite, a theoretical study is conducted using a dusty plasma model comprising Boltzmann distributed hot and cool ions, Boltzmann electrons and a negatively charged cold dust fluid to investigate the existence of similar low frequency nonlinear electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma which could have a similar appearance as the observed waveforms. Charge separation effects are incorporated into our model by the inclusion of Poisson's equation as opposed to assuming quasineutrality. The system of nonlinear equations is then numerically solved. The resulting electric field structure is examined as a function of various plasma parameters such as Mach number, driving electric field amplitude, bulk dust drift speed, particle densities and particle temperatures.

  11. A quantitative model for charge carrier transport, trapping and recombination in nanocrystal-based solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozyigit, Deniz; Lin, Weyde M. M.; Yazdani, Nuri; Yarema, Olesya; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Improving devices incorporating solution-processed nanocrystal-based semiconductors requires a better understanding of charge transport in these complex, inorganic–organic materials. Here we perform a systematic study on PbS nanocrystal-based diodes using temperature-dependent current–voltage characterization and thermal admittance spectroscopy to develop a model for charge transport that is applicable to different nanocrystal-solids and device architectures. Our analysis confirms that charge transport occurs in states that derive from the quantum-confined electronic levels of the individual nanocrystals and is governed by diffusion-controlled trap-assisted recombination. The current is limited not by the Schottky effect, but by Fermi-level pinning because of trap states that is independent of the electrode–nanocrystal interface. Our model successfully explains the non-trivial trends in charge transport as a function of nanocrystal size and the origins of the trade-offs facing the optimization of nanocrystal-based solar cells. We use the insights from our charge transport model to formulate design guidelines for engineering higher-performance nanocrystal-based devices. PMID:25625647

  12. A quantitative model for charge carrier transport, trapping and recombination in nanocrystal-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozyigit, Deniz; Lin, Weyde M. M.; Yazdani, Nuri; Yarema, Olesya; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Improving devices incorporating solution-processed nanocrystal-based semiconductors requires a better understanding of charge transport in these complex, inorganic-organic materials. Here we perform a systematic study on PbS nanocrystal-based diodes using temperature-dependent current-voltage characterization and thermal admittance spectroscopy to develop a model for charge transport that is applicable to different nanocrystal-solids and device architectures. Our analysis confirms that charge transport occurs in states that derive from the quantum-confined electronic levels of the individual nanocrystals and is governed by diffusion-controlled trap-assisted recombination. The current is limited not by the Schottky effect, but by Fermi-level pinning because of trap states that is independent of the electrode-nanocrystal interface. Our model successfully explains the non-trivial trends in charge transport as a function of nanocrystal size and the origins of the trade-offs facing the optimization of nanocrystal-based solar cells. We use the insights from our charge transport model to formulate design guidelines for engineering higher-performance nanocrystal-based devices.

  13. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-01

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species. PMID:25557761

  14. Robust transport by multiple motors with nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Mogilner, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Transport by processive molecular motors plays an important role in many cell biological phenomena. In many cases, motors work together to transport cargos in the cell, so it is important to understand the mechanics of the multiple motors. Based on earlier modeling efforts, here we study effects of nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing on multiple motor transport. We find that when two or three motors transport the cargo, then the nonlinear and stochastic effects compensate so that the mechanical properties of the transport are robust. Similarly, the transport is insensitive to compliance of the cargo-motor links. Furthermore, the rate of movement against moderate loads is not improved by increasing the small number of motors. When the motor number is greater than 4, correlations between the motors become negligible, and the earlier analytical mean-field theory of the multiple motor transport holds. We predict that the effective diffusion of the cargo driven by the multiple motors under load increases by an order of magnitude compared to that for the single motor. Finally, our simulations predict that the stochastic effects are responsible for a significant dispersion of velocities generated by the 'tug-of-war' of the multiple opposing motors.

  15. Robust transport by multiple motors with nonlinear force–velocity relations and stochastic load sharing

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Mogilner, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Transport by processive molecular motors plays an important role in many cell biological phenomena. In many cases, motors work together to transport cargos in the cell, so it is important to understand the mechanics of the multiple motors. Based on earlier modeling efforts, here we study effects of nonlinear force–velocity relations and stochastic load sharing on multiple motor transport. We find that when two or three motors transport the cargo, then the nonlinear and stochastic effects compensate so that the mechanical properties of the transport are robust. Similarly, the transport is insensitive to compliance of the cargo-motor links. Furthermore, the rate of movement against moderate loads is not improved by increasing the small number of motors. When the motor number is greater than 4, correlations between the motors become negligible, and the earlier analytical mean-field theory of the multiple motor transport holds. We predict that the effective diffusion of the cargo driven by the multiple motors under load increases by an order of magnitude compared to that for the single motor. Finally, our simulations predict that the stochastic effects are responsible for a significant dispersion of velocities generated by the ‘tug-of-war’ of the multiple opposing motors. PMID:20147778

  16. Application of Chebyshev Formalism to Identify Nonlinear Magnetic Field Components in Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a beam-based technique for characterizing the extent of the nonlinearity of the magnetic fields of a beam transport system. Horizontally and vertically oriented pairs of air-core kicker magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the beam orbit relative to the unperturbed reference orbit. Fourier decomposition of the position data at eight different points along the beamline was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the kickers with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. Chebyshev polynomials and their unique properties allow one to directly quantify the magnitude of the nonlinearity with the minimum error. A calibration standard was developed using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline. The technique was then applied to a pair of Arc 1 dipoles and then to the magnets in the Transport Recombiner beamline to measure their multipole content as a function of transverse position within the magnets.

  17. Time-Dependent Ginzburg-Landau Equation and Boltzmann Transport Equation for Charge-Density-Wave Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yositake; Hayashi, Masahiko; Ebisawa, Hiromichi

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and the Boltzmann transport equation for charge-density-wave (CDW) conductors are derived from a microscopic one-dimensional model by applying the Keldysh Green's function approach under a quasiclassical approximation. The effects of an external electric field and impurity pinning of the CDW are fully taken into account without relying on a phenomenological argument. These equations simultaneously describe the spatiotemporal dynamics of both the CDW and quasiparticles; thus, they serve as a starting point to develop a general framework to analyze various nonequilibrium phenomena, such as current conversion between the CDW condensate and quasiparticles, in realistic CDW conductors. It is shown that, in typical situations, the equations correctly describe the nonlinear behavior of electric conductivity in a simpler manner.

  18. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  19. Rigid band shifts, charge pinning, and charge transport through graphene junctions with wetting metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Tobias; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador

    2014-03-01

    It is a common perception that graphene band shifts cannot be determined directly when attached to chemisorbed (``wetting'') metals due to the hybridization of graphene bands around the Dirac point. Graphene has deeper energy (sigma) bands which don't hybridize with the metal's bands, providing a definite measure of actual shifts. Looking at hybridization in a controlled way (by varying the metal/graphene separation by hand) one realizes the shifts can actually be considered rigid, i.e., σ - and p - bands shift by about the same energy ΔE. In a related context, charge depinning is the modification of graphene's electron density at a metal/graphene interface with a (back) gate. Depinning happens at metal/graphene interfaces with physisorbed (non-wetting) metals. Oxidation or contamination at the interface can lead to charge depinning as well. Using first-principles calculations, we establish a link between charge depinning at a wetting metal/graphene interface and the quality of such an interface. For this purpose, metal/graphene/insulator structures are studied under transverse bias. We also report transmission coefficients through nanoscale two-terminal graphene/metal junctions.

  20. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized complex plasma with nonthermal ions and dust charge variation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Wadati, Miki; Sabry, R.

    2007-03-15

    Propagations of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves and shock waves in a nonuniform magnetized dusty plasma are investigated. The incorporation of the combined effects of nonthermally distributed ions, nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation, and the inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle density, charging variable, and particle potential on the waves leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Zakhavov-Kusnetsov-Burgers (MZKB) equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Using a generalized expansion method, new solutions for the MZKB equation are obtained. The form of solutions consists of two parts; one of them is the amplitude factor and the other is a superposition of bell-shaped and kink-type shock waves. New solutions are classified into three categories. A type of the solution is determined depending on the nonthermal parameter. Findings in this investigation should be useful for understanding the ion acceleration mechanisms close to the Moon and also enhancing our knowledge on pickup ions around unmagnetized bodies, such as comets, Mars, and Venus, including medium inhomogeneities with nonadiabatic dust charging processes.

  1. Symmetry reductions of a nonlinear convection-dispersion model arising in contaminant transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntsime, Basetsana P.; Moitsheki, Raseelo J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider a nonlinear convection-dispersion equation arising in contaminant transport. The water flow velocity is considered to be spatially-dependent and dispersion coefficient depends on concentration. A direct group classification resulted in a number of cases for which the governing equation admits Lie point symmetries. In each case the one dimensional optimal system of subalgebras is constructed. Reductions are performed. The reduced ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are nonlinear and difficult to solve exactly. On the other hand we consider the steady state problem and applied the method of canonical coordinates to determine exact solutions.

  2. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  3. Nonlinear Waves in Reaction Diffusion Systems: The Effect of Transport Memory

    SciTech Connect

    HURD,ALAN J.; KENKRE,V.M.; MANNE,K.K.

    1999-11-04

    Motivated by the problem of determining stress distributions in granular materials, we study the effect of finite transport correlation times on the propagation of nonlinear wavefronts in reaction diffusion systems. We obtain new results such as the possibility of spatial oscillations in the wavefront shape for certain values of the system parameters and high enough wavefront speeds. We also generalize earlier known results concerning the minimum wavefront speed and shape-speed relationships stemming from the finiteness of the correlation times. Analytic investigations are made possible by a piece-wise linear representation of the nonlinearity.

  4. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  5. Trust-region based solver for nonlinear transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new nonlinear solver for immiscible two-phase transport in porous media, where viscous, buoyancy, and capillary forces are significant. The flux (fractional flow) function, F, is a nonlinear function of saturation and typically has inflection points and can be non-monotonic. The non-convexity and non-monotonicity of F are major sources of difficulty for nonlinear solvers of coupled multiphase flow and transport in natural porous media. We describe a modified Newton algorithm that employs trust regions of the flux function to guide the Newton iterations. The flux function is divided into saturation trust regions delineated by the inflection, unit-flux, and end points. The updates are performed such that two successive iterations cannot cross any trust-region boundary. If a crossing is detected, the saturation value is chopped back to the appropriate trust-region boundary. The proposed trust-region Newton solver, which is demonstrated across the parameter space of viscous, buoyancy and capillary effects, is a significant extension of the inflection-point strategy of Jenny et al. (JCP, 2009) [5] for viscous dominated flows. We analyze the discrete nonlinear transport equation obtained using finite-volume discretization with phase-based upstream weighting. Then, we prove convergence of the trust-region Newton method irrespective of the timestep size for single-cell problems. Numerical results across the full range of the parameter space of viscous, gravity and capillary forces indicate that our trust-region scheme is unconditionally convergent for 1D transport. That is, for a given choice of timestep size, the unique discrete solution is found independently of the initial guess. For problems dominated by buoyancy and capillarity, the trust-region Newton solver overcomes the often severe limits on timestep size associated with existing methods. To validate the effectiveness of the new nonlinear solver for large reservoir models with strong heterogeneity

  6. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  7. Charge Transport in Dendrimer Melts Using Multiscale Modeling Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Jain, Manish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we present a theoretical calculation of the charge carrier mobility in two different dendrimeric melt systems (dendritic phenylazomethine with a triphenyl amine core and dendritic carbazole with cyclic phenylazomethine as the core), which have recently been reported1 to increase the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells by interface modification. Our mobility calculation, which is a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, first-principles calculation, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, leads to mobilities that are in quantitative agreement with available experimental data. We also show how the mobility depends on dendrimer generation. Furthermore, we examine the variation of mobility with an external electric field and external reorganization energy. Physical mechanisms behind the observed electric field and generation dependencies of mobility are also explored. PMID:27479077

  8. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  9. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  10. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  11. Transport of quantum excitations coupled to spatially extended nonlinear many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, Stefano; Boada, Octavi; Omar, Yasser; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The role of noise in the transport properties of quantum excitations is a topic of great importance in many fields, from organic semiconductors for technological applications to light-harvesting complexes in photosynthesis. In this paper we study a semi-classical model where a tight-binding Hamiltonian is fully coupled to an underlying spatially extended nonlinear chain of atoms. We show that the transport properties of a quantum excitation are subtly modulated by (i) the specific type (local versus non-local) of exciton-phonon coupling and by (ii) nonlinear effects of the underlying lattice. We report a non-monotonic dependence of the exciton diffusion coefficient on temperature, in agreement with earlier predictions, as a direct consequence of the lattice-induced fluctuations in the hopping rates due to long-wavelength vibrational modes. A standard measure of transport efficiency confirms that both nonlinearity in the underlying lattice and off-diagonal exciton-phonon coupling promote transport efficiency at high temperatures, preventing the Zeno-like quench observed in other models lacking an explicit noise-providing dynamical system.

  12. Electron Trapping and Charge Transport by Large Amplitude Whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2010-01-01

    Trapping of electrons by magnetospheric whistlers is investigated using data from the Waves experiment on Wind and the S/WAVES experiment on STEREO. Waveforms often show a characteristic distortion which is shown to be due to electrons trapped in the potential of the electrostatic part of oblique whistlers. The density of trapped electrons is significant, comparable to that of the unperturbed whistler. Transport of these trapped electrons to new regions can generate potentials of several kilovolts, Trapping and the associated potentials may play an important role in the acceleration of Earth's radiation belt electrons.

  13. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  14. Modelling charge transport lengths in heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, K. P.; Ievskaya, Y.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    A drift-diffusion model is used to estimate the minority carrier transport length and depletion width in heterojunction solar cells from measured external quantum efficiency (EQE) data. The model is applied to Cu2O-ZnO heterojunctions synthesized by electrodeposition and thermal oxidation, and the electron drift and diffusion lengths are estimated: Ldrift ≈ 110 nm for electrodeposited Cu2O and Ldrift ≈ 2790 nm and Ldiff ≈ 310 nm for thermally oxidized Cu2O. Better fitting of EQE data is obtained than with traditional models that neglect recombination in the depletion region.

  15. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  16. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  17. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-15

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  18. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-01

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  19. Twisted Thiophene-Based Chromophores with Enhanced Intramolecular Charge Transfer for Cooperative Amplification of Third-Order Optical Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Teran, Natasha B; He, Guang S; Baev, Alexander; Shi, Yanrong; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N; Marks, Tobin J; Reynolds, John R

    2016-06-01

    Exploiting synergistic cooperation between multiple sources of optical nonlinearity, we report the design, synthesis, and nonlinear optical properties of a series of electron-rich thiophene-containing donor-acceptor chromophores with condensed π-systems and sterically regulated inter-aryl twist angles. These structures couple two key mechanisms underlying optical nonlinearity, namely, (i) intramolecular charge transfer, greatly enhanced by increased electron density and reduced aromaticity at chromophore thiophene rings and (ii) a twisted chromophore geometry, producing a manifold of close-lying excited states and dipole moment changes between ground and excited states that are nearly twice that of untwisted systems. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and nonlinear Z-scan measurements, combined with quantum chemical calculations, illuminate relationships between molecular structure and mechanisms of enhancement of the nonlinear refractive index. Experiment and calculations together reveal ground-state structures that are strongly responsive to the solvent polarity, leading to substantial negative solvatochromism (Δλ ≈ 10(2) nm) and prevailing zwitterionic/aromatic structures in the solid state and in polar solvents. Ground-to-excited-state energy gaps below 2.0 eV are obtained in condensed π-systems, with lower energy gaps for twisted versus untwisted systems. The real part of the second hyperpolarizability in the twisted structures is much greater than the imaginary part, with the highest twist angle chromophore giving |Re(γ)/Im(γ)| ≈ 100, making such chromophores very promising for all-optical-switching applications. PMID:27232098

  20. Surface Charge- and Space-Dependent Transport of Proteins in Crowded Environments of Nanotailored Posts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Retterer, Scott T; Siuti, Piro; Iyer, Sukanya; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of molecules across barriers and through crowded environments is integral to biological system function and to separation technologies. Ordered, microfabricated post arrays are a promising route to creating synthetic barriers with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. They can be used to create crowded environments, to mimic aspects of cellular membranes, and to serve as engineered replacements of polymer-based separation media. Here, the translational diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyante and various forms of green fluorescent protein (GFP), including 'supercharged' variants, are examined in a silicon-based post array environment. The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is combined with analytical approximations and numerical simulations to assess the relative effects of reaction and diffusion on molecular transport, respectively. FRAP experiments were conducted for 64 different cases where the molecular species, the density of the posts, and the chemical surface charge of the posts were varied. In all cases, the dense packing of the posts hindered the diffusive transport of the fluorescent species. The supercharged GFPs strongly interacted with oppositely charged surfaces. With similar molecular and surface charges, transport is primarily limited by hindered diffusion. For conventional, enhanced GFP in a positively charged surface environment, transport was limited by the coupled action of hindered diffusion and surface interaction with the posts. Quantification of the size-, space-, time-, and charge-dependent translational diffusion in the post array environments can provide insight into natural processes and guide the design and development of selective membrane systems.

  1. Rapid substrate-induced charge movements of the GABA transporter GAT1.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Ana; Grewer, Christof

    2005-07-01

    The GABA transporter GAT1 removes the neurotransmitter GABA from the synaptic cleft by coupling of GABA uptake to the co-transport of two sodium ions and one chloride ion. The aim of this work was to investigate the individual reaction steps of GAT1 after a GABA concentration jump. GAT1 was transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and its pre-steady-state kinetics were studied by combining the patch-clamp technique with the laser-pulse photolysis of caged GABA, which allowed us to generate GABA concentration jumps within <100 micros. Recordings of transport currents generated by GAT1, both in forward and exchange transport modes, showed multiple charge movements that can be separated along the time axis. The individual reactions associated with these charge movements differ from the well-characterized electrogenic "sodium-occlusion" reaction by GAT1. One of the observed electrogenic reactions is shown to be associated with the GABA-translocating half-cycle of the transporter, in contradiction to previous studies that showed no charge movements associated with these reactions. Interestingly, reactions of the GABA-bound transporter were not affected by the absence of extracellular chloride, suggesting that Cl- may not be co-translocated with GABA. Based on the results, a new alternating access sequential-binding model is proposed for GAT1's transport cycle that describes the results presented here and those by others. PMID:15849242

  2. Inverse Reactive Transport Simulator (Inverts): An Inverse Model for Contaminant Transport with Nonlinear Adsorption and Source Terms

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter

    2001-10-31

    A numerically based simulator was developed to assist in the interpretation of complex laboratory experiments examining transport processes of chemical and biological contaminants subject to nonlinear adsorption and/or source terms. The inversion is performed with any of three nonlinear regression methods, Marquardt-Levenberg, conjugate gradient, or quasi-Newton. The governing equations for the problem are solved by the method of finite-differences including any combination of three boundary conditions: (1) Dirichlet, (2) Neumann, and (3) Cauchy. The dispersive terms in the transport equations were solved using the second-order accurate in time and space Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advective terms were handled using a third-order in time and space, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme that damps spurious oscillations around sharp concentration fronts. The numerical algorithms were implemented in the computer code INVERTS, which runs on any standard personal computer. Apart from a comprehensive set of test problems, INVERTS was also used to model the elution of a nonradioactive tracer, {sup 185}Re, in a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) experiment with a simulated waste glass for low-activity waste immobilization. Interpretation of the elution profile was best described with a nonlinear kinetic model for adsorption.

  3. The impact of interplanetary transport on the charge spectra of heavy ions accelerated in SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, J.; Kovaltsov, G.; Ostryakov, V.; Droege, W.

    We investigate the effects of interplanetary propagation on charge spectra of heavy ions observed at 1 AU. A Monte-Carlo approach is applied to solve the transport equation which takes into account spatial diffusion as well as convection and adiabatic deceleration. It is shown that interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration. This fact should be taken into account when experimental data are interpreted. A broadening of charge distributions caused by interplanetary propagation might explain rather wide charge distributions observed in a number of SEP events. We explain the available charge spectra of iron for several impulsive SEP events making use of our model of interplanetary propagation assuming different values of the mean free path.

  4. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, Rudolf A.; Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of mutation-induced charge transfer modifications is performed. In contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker changes of transmission properties. This suggests that charge transport could play a significant role for DNA-repairing deficiency yielding carcinogenesis.

  5. Charge Transport Anisotropy in n-Type Disk-Shaped Triphenylene-Tris(aroyleneimidazole)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Steven; Zhang, Yue; Hanifi, David; Antonio, Francisco; Pun, Andrew; Klivansky, Liana; Hexemer, Alexander; Ma, Biwu; Liu, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Two novel n-type disk-shaped molecules containing a triphenylene core and three fused naphthaleneimide imidazole or peryleneimide imidazole ``arms'' are synthesized and characterized. Their optical and electronic properties are consistent with the pi-extended structural feature of the aromatic cores. The n-type charge carrier mobilities of these molecules are evaluated by both field effect transistors and space-charge limited-current measurements, which show drastically different mobility anisotropy. A strong correlation between film morphology and the charge transport behavior is established by X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopic analyses.

  6. Improving charge transport property and energy transfer with carbon quantum dots in inverted polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyu; Chang, Kaiwen; Guo, Wenbin E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn Li, Hao; Shen, Liang; Chen, Weiyou E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn; Yan, Dawei E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-08-18

    Carbon quantum dots (Cdots) are synthesized by a simple method and introduced into active layer of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The performance of doped devices was apparently improved, and the highest power conversion efficiency of 7.05% was obtained, corresponding to a 28.2% enhancement compared with that of the contrast device. The charge transport properties, resistance, impedance, and transient absorption spectrum are systematically investigated to explore how the Cdots affect on PSCs performance. This study reveals the importance of Cdots in enhancing the efficiency of PSCs and gives insight into the mechanism of charge transport improvement.

  7. Kinetic phenomena in charged particle transport in gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Dujko, Sasa; Sasic, Olivera; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Malovic, Gordana

    2012-05-25

    The key difference between equilibrium (thermal) and non-equilibrium (low temperature - a.k.a. cold) plasmas is in the degree in which the shape of the cross sections influences the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). In this paper we will discuss the issue of kinetic phenomena from two different angles. The first will be how to take advantage of the strong influence and use low current data to obtain the cross sections. This is also known as the swarm technique and the product of a ''swarm analysis'' is a set of cross sections giving good number, momentum and energy balances of electrons or other charged particles. At the same time understanding the EEDF is based on the cross section data. Nevertheless sometimes the knowledge of the cross sections and even the behaviour of individual particles are insufficient to explain collective behaviour of the ensemble. The resulting ''kinetic'' effects may be used to favour certain properties of non-equilibrium plasmas and even may be used as the basis of some new plasma applications.

  8. Charge Transport Properties of Durene Crystals from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Motta, Carlo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-10-14

    We establish a rigorous computational scheme for constructing an effective Hamiltonian to be used for the determination of the charge carrier mobility of pure organic crystals at finite temperature, which accounts for van der Waals interactions, and it includes vibrational contributions from the entire phonon spectrum of the crystal. Such an approach is based on the ab initio framework provided by density functional theory and the construction of a tight-binding effective model via Wannier transformation. The final Hamiltonian includes coupling of the electrons to the crystals phonons, which are also calculated from density functional theory. We apply this methodology to the case of durene, a small π-conjugated molecule, which forms a high-mobility herringbone-stacked crystal. We show that accounting correctly for dispersive forces is fundamental for obtaining a high-quality phonon spectrum, in agreement with experiments. Then, the mobility as a function of temperature is calculated along different crystallographic directions and the phonons most responsible for the scattering are identified.

  9. Charge Transport Properties of Durene Crystals from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Motta, Carlo; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-10-14

    We establish a rigorous computational scheme for constructing an effective Hamiltonian to be used for the determination of the charge carrier mobility of pure organic crystals at finite temperature, which accounts for van der Waals interactions, and it includes vibrational contributions from the entire phonon spectrum of the crystal. Such an approach is based on the ab initio framework provided by density functional theory and the construction of a tight-binding effective model via Wannier transformation. The final Hamiltonian includes coupling of the electrons to the crystals phonons, which are also calculated from density functional theory. We apply this methodology to the case of durene, a small π-conjugated molecule, which forms a high-mobility herringbone-stacked crystal. We show that accounting correctly for dispersive forces is fundamental for obtaining a high-quality phonon spectrum, in agreement with experiments. Then, the mobility as a function of temperature is calculated along different crystallographic directions and the phonons most responsible for the scattering are identified. PMID:26588155

  10. ``Franklin's Bells'' and charge transport as an undergraduate lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, R. V.; Tuominen, M. T.; Breuer, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    "Franklin's Bells" is a popular lecture demonstration in electricity but seems to have been overlooked as a quantitative undergraduate lab experiment. In our version, a charged ball oscillates back and forth between the plates of a capacitor. This paper has two purposes: one is to discuss some of the wide variety of experiments and calculations which this system affords, the other is to present an analysis of a particular situation in which the ball excites resonant modes of the plates. This excitation gives rise to unexpected steps in the graph of shuttle frequency versus the potential difference between the plates. The apparatus required to show the demonstration is available in most physics departments. Similarly, a quantitative experiment for an introductory undergraduate lab does not require any unusual equipment, nor particularly high voltages. (In our experiment, the highest voltage used was 600 V; this can probably be reduced by scaling down the apparatus.) The physical situation may be analyzed at many different levels, suitable for students in the freshman to senior years, and ranging from a qualitative understanding of the demonstration to computer calculations of chaotic dynamics. The apparatus may be a simple one appropriate to the introductory level, or, at an "Advanced Lab" level, a sophisticated one, with computer-controlled measurements and analysis of various parameters. It is surprising that such a rich system has been neglected in the traditional curriculum.

  11. Proton transport across charged membrane and pH oscillations.

    PubMed Central

    Chay, T R

    1980-01-01

    Based on Eyring's multibarrier activation process, a mathematical model and equation is developed to account for proton diffusion through an immobilized protein and enzyme membrane perfused with an electrolyte, substrate, and a buffer. With this model we find that, in the presence of a buffer, our solution approaches the continuum case very rapidly. We apply our model to membranes composed of papain and bovine serum albumin and find that our theory closely stimulates the experimental observations on the effect of salt and buffer on proton diffusion. Our theory shows that the pH oscillations observed in the diffusion controlled papain-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (BAEE) reaction may be the result of CO2 dissolved in the bath at high pH. In our theory, under certain conditions and in agreement with experimental observation, the buffer penetration depth oscillates near the boundary of a papain membrane in a solution containing BAEE and borate. We also find that at low ionic strength small ions as well as a buffer are seen to oscillate if a membrane is highly charged. PMID:7260272

  12. Charge transport in DNA in solution: The role of polarons

    PubMed Central

    Conwell, Esther M.

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery a decade ago of rapid photoinduced electron transfer in DNA over a distance >4 nm, a large number of experiments and theories have been advanced in the attempt to characterize the transfer, mainly of a radical cation or hole. Particularly influential experiments were carried out by Giese [Giese, B. (2000) Acc. Chem. Res. 33, 631–636] on the sequence G(A)nGGG, where G is guanine and A is adenine. These experiments were interpreted as showing that for n > 3, after the holes tunnel through the first three As, they hop onto the bridge of As, where they are localized on a single A and travel further by hopping between neighboring As. Recent experiments of Barton and coworkers [Shao, F., O'Neill, M. A. & Barton, J. K. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 17914–17919] have, however, established that the hole wavefunctions are delocalized. One of the mechanisms based on delocalized hole wavefunctions that had been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, is transport by polarons. For one type of polaron, the properties are determined by polarization of the surrounding medium (water and ions, in this case). Theory predicts that this type of polaron is delocalized over approximately four bases in DNA. Transport by these polarons could explain the results of Giese et al. [Giese, B., Amaudrut, J., Köhler, A.-K., Spormann, M. & Wessely, S. (2001) Nature 412, 318–320], recent experimental results of O'Neill and Barton [O'Neill, M. A. & Barton, J. K. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 11471–11483] concerning the size of the region over which the hole is delocalized, and other experimental observations. PMID:15956188

  13. Electrostatic charging and charge transport by hydrated amorphous silica under a high voltage direct current electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perles, Carlos Eduardo; Volpe, Pedro Luiz Onófrio

    2011-06-01

    This work was initially based on the casual observation of an electrostatic phenomenon, in which particles of amorphous silica were attracted by a dc electrical field. The first observations were recently shown in a communication in this journal. To explain the electrical charge transport process observed in this work, all forces acting on silica particles were estimated and the significant ones were used to formulate a model made up of three elementary steps. Analyzing the experimental observations using this model, it was possible to suggest that electrons can be introduced into and removed from electronic bands of water.

  14. Electrostatic charging and charge transport by hydrated amorphous silica under a high voltage direct current electrical field.

    PubMed

    Perles, Carlos Eduardo; Volpe, Pedro Luiz Onófrio

    2011-06-01

    This work was initially based on the casual observation of an electrostatic phenomenon, in which particles of amorphous silica were attracted by a dc electrical field. The first observations were recently shown in a communication in this journal. To explain the electrical charge transport process observed in this work, all forces acting on silica particles were estimated and the significant ones were used to formulate a model made up of three elementary steps. Analyzing the experimental observations using this model, it was possible to suggest that electrons can be introduced into and removed from electronic bands of water.

  15. High Order Finite Volume Nonlinear Schemes for the Boltzmann Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bihari, B L; Brown, P N

    2005-03-29

    The authors apply the nonlinear WENO (Weighted Essentially Nonoscillatory) scheme to the spatial discretization of the Boltzmann Transport Equation modeling linear particle transport. The method is a finite volume scheme which ensures not only conservation, but also provides for a more natural handling of boundary conditions, material properties and source terms, as well as an easier parallel implementation and post processing. It is nonlinear in the sense that the stencil depends on the solution at each time step or iteration level. By biasing the gradient calculation towards the stencil with smaller derivatives, the scheme eliminates the Gibb's phenomenon with oscillations of size O(1) and reduces them to O(h{sup r}), where h is the mesh size and r is the order of accuracy. The current implementation is three-dimensional, generalized for unequally spaced meshes, fully parallelized, and up to fifth order accurate (WENO5) in space. For unsteady problems, the resulting nonlinear spatial discretization yields a set of ODE's in time, which in turn is solved via high order implicit time-stepping with error control. For the steady-state case, they need to solve the non-linear system, typically by Newton-Krylov iterations. There are several numerical examples presented to demonstrate the accuracy, non-oscillatory nature and efficiency of these high order methods, in comparison with other fixed-stencil schemes.

  16. How imperfect interfaces affect the nonlinear transport properties in composite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Nanomaterials composed of a population of particles dispersed in a matrix represent the building block for the next generation of several technologies: energy storage and conversion, thermal management, electronics, and photovoltaics. When interfaces between particles and matrix are imperfect, the size of the particles may strongly influence the effective linear and nonlinear response of the whole system. Here, we study these scale effects mainly focussing on the nonlinear transport behavior of composite structures. The theory is developed, in the framework of the electrical conductivity, for an arbitrary nonlinearity of the constituents; however, explicit results are discussed for Kerr-like nonlinear responses. Two kinds of imperfect interfaces are considered: the T-model and the Π-model, which represent a generalization of the classical schemes largely employed in literature, namely the low and the high conducting interface models. The dependence of the nonlinear effective properties on the size of the dispersed particles is explained through intrinsic length scales governing some universal scaling laws.

  17. Nonlinear Spectral Mixture Modeling of Lunar Multispectral: Implications for Lateral Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Li, Lin; He, Guoqi

    1997-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear spectral mixture models applied to Clementine multispectral images of the Moon result in roughly similar spatial distributions of endmember abundances. However, there are important differences in the absolute values of the predicted abundances. The magnitude of these differences and the implications for understanding geological processes are investigated across a geologic contact between mare and highland in the Grimaldi Basin on the western nearside of the Moon. Vertical and lateral mass transport due to impact cratering has redistributed mare and highland materials across the contact, creating a gradient in composition. Solutions to linear and nonlinear spectral mixture models for identical spectral endmembers of mare, highland, and fresh crater materials are compared across this simple geologic contact in the Grimaldi Basin. Profiles of mare abundance across the contact are extracted and compared quantitatively. Profiles from the linear mixture models indicate that the geologic contact has an average mare abundance of 60%, and the compositional boundary is asymmetric with more mare transported onto the highland side of the contact than highland onto the mare side of the contact. In contrast the nonlinear abundance profiles indicate that the geologic contact has an average mare abundance of 50%, and the compositional boundary is remarkably symmetric. Given the expectation that materials will be intimately mixed on the surface of the Moon, and that the asymmetries implied by the linear model are not consistent with our understanding of lunar surface processes, the nonlinear spectral mixture model is preferred and should be applied whenever quantitative abundance information is required. The remarkable symmetry in the compositional gradients across this contact indicate that lateral mass transport dominates over vertical transport at this boundary.

  18. Unifying diffusion and seepage for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongqing; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Jiulong; Li, Zhengyi

    2016-09-01

    We unify the diffusion and seepage process for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media via a proposed new general transport equation. A coherent theoretical derivation indicates the wall-molecule and molecule-molecule collisions drive the Knudsen and collective diffusive fluxes, and constitute the system pressure across the porous media. A new terminology, nominal diffusion coefficient can summarize Knudsen and collective diffusion coefficients. Physical and numerical experiments show the support of the new formulation and provide approaches to obtain the diffusion coefficient and permeability simultaneously. This work has important implication for natural gas extraction and greenhouse gases sequestration in geological formations.

  19. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution using depolarized hyper-Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Ghosh, Sampa; Mukhopadhyay, S; Ramasesha, S; Das, Puspendu K

    2011-01-28

    We report large quadratic nonlinearity in a series of 1:1 molecular complexes between methyl substituted benzene donors and quinone acceptors in solution. The first hyperpolarizability, β(HRS), which is very small for the individual components, becomes large by intermolecular charge transfer (CT) interaction between the donor and the acceptor in the complex. In addition, we have investigated the geometry of these CT complexes in solution using polarization resolved hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS). Using linearly (electric field vector along X direction) and circularly polarized incident light, respectively, we have measured two macroscopic depolarization ratios D=I(2ω,X,X)/I(2ω,Z,X) and D(')=I(2ω,X,C)/I(2ω,Z,C) in the laboratory fixed XYZ frame by detecting the second harmonic scattered light in a polarization resolved fashion. The experimentally obtained first hyperpolarizability, β(HRS), and the value of macroscopic depolarization ratios, D and D('), are then matched with the theoretically deduced values from single and double configuration interaction calculations performed using the Zerner's intermediate neglect of differential overlap self-consistent reaction field technique. In solution, since several geometries are possible, we have carried out calculations by rotating the acceptor moiety around three different axes keeping the donor molecule fixed at an optimized geometry. These rotations give us the theoretical β(HRS), D and D(') values as a function of the geometry of the complex. The calculated β(HRS), D, and D(') values that closely match with the experimental values, give the dominant equilibrium geometry in solution. All the CT complexes between methyl benzenes and chloranil or 1,2-dichloro-4,5-dicyano-p-benzoquinone investigated here are found to have a slipped parallel stacking of the donors and the acceptors. Furthermore, the geometries are staggered and in some pairs, a twist angle as high as 30° is observed. Thus, we have demonstrated in

  20. Real-Time, Nonlinear Optical Probe of Molecular Transport across Living Escherichia coli Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2006-03-01

    We will demonstrate for the first time that a nonlinear optical technique- Second Harmonic Generation- can be used to monitor, with real time resolution, the transport of a molecule across the membranes of a living cell. The transport of the hydrophobic ionic dye molecule malachite green (MG) through both membranes of the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, the outer membrane and the cytoplasmic membrane, has been studied. A kinetic model, assuming that the MG molecules penetrate the bacteria outer membrane through classic porin channels while transport across the cytoplasmic membrane is by diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer, is proposed to account for experimental observations. Analysis of the SHG data enables quantitative determination of the transport rate constants and the adsorption equilibrium constants for the Escherichia coli cells living in different environments.

  1. Sensitivity analysis and parameter identification of nonlinear hybrid systems for glycerol transport mechanisms in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kuikui; Zhang, Xu; Feng, Enmin; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-04-21

    In this paper, we establish a modified fourteen-dimensional nonlinear hybrid dynamic system with genetic regulation to describe the microbial continuous culture, in which we consider that there are three possible ways for glycerol to pass the cell's membrane and one way for 1,3-PD (passive diffusion and active transport). Then we discuss the existence, uniqueness, continuous dependence of solutions and the compactness of the solution set. We construct a global sensitivity analysis approach to reduce the number of kinetic parameters. In order to infer the most reasonable transport mechanism of glycerol, we propose a parameter identification model aiming at identifying the parameter with higher sensitivity and transport of glycerol, which takes the robustness index of the intracellular substance together with the relative error between the experimental data and the computational values of the extracellular substance as a performance index. Finally, a parallel algorithm is applied to find the optimal transport of glycerol and parameters. PMID:24406809

  2. Understanding charge transport in organometal halide field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P.; Yang, Bingyan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard, Prof. _., Sir; Sirrnighaus, Henning, , Prof.

    Organometal halide based perovskite are emerging materials for wide range of electronic applications. A range of optoelectronic applications like high efficiency solar cells, color pure LEDs and optical pumped lasers have been demonstrated. Here, we report the demonstration of a high performance field effect transistor fabricated from iodide perovskite material at room temperature. The devices exhibit clean saturation behavior with electron μFET >3 cm2V-1s-1 and current modulation in the range of 106 - 107 which are till date the best performance achieved with these class of materials. This high performance is attributed to a combination of novel film fabrication technique and device engineering strategies. Detailed understanding of the observed band-like transport phenomenon is developed by tuning the different sources of dynamic and static disorder prevalent in the system. These finding are expected to pave way for developing next generation electronic application from perovskite materials. Authors acknowledge EPSRC for funding and SPS acknowledges Royal Society Newton Fellowship.

  3. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin; May, Gary; Glenn, William E.; Richardson, Mike; Solomon, Richard

    1999-01-01

    This project, over its term, included funding to a variety of companies and organizations. In addition to Georgia Tech these included Florida Atlantic University with Dr. William E. Glenn as the P.I., Kodak with Mr. Mike Richardson as the P.I. and M.I.T./Polaroid with Dr. Richard Solomon as the P.I. The focus of the work conducted by these organizations was the development of camera hardware for High Definition Television (HDTV). The focus of the research at Georgia Tech was the development of new semiconductor technology to achieve a next generation solid state imager chip that would operate at a high frame rate (I 70 frames per second), operate at low light levels (via the use of avalanche photodiodes as the detector element) and contain 2 million pixels. The actual cost required to create this new semiconductor technology was probably at least 5 or 6 times the investment made under this program and hence we fell short of achieving this rather grand goal. We did, however, produce a number of spin-off technologies as a result of our efforts. These include, among others, improved avalanche photodiode structures, significant advancement of the state of understanding of ZnO/GaAs structures and significant contributions to the analysis of general GaAs semiconductor devices and the design of Surface Acoustic Wave resonator filters for wireless communication. More of these will be described in the report. The work conducted at the partner sites resulted in the development of 4 prototype HDTV cameras. The HDTV camera developed by Kodak uses the Kodak KAI-2091M high- definition monochrome image sensor. This progressively-scanned charge-coupled device (CCD) can operate at video frame rates and has 9 gm square pixels. The photosensitive area has a 16:9 aspect ratio and is consistent with the "Common Image Format" (CIF). It features an active image area of 1928 horizontal by 1084 vertical pixels and has a 55% fill factor. The camera is designed to operate in continuous mode

  4. Activationless charge transport across 4.5 to 22 nm in molecular electronic junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lafarge, Philippe; Lacroix, Jean Christophe

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we bridge the gap between short-range tunneling in molecular junctions and activated hopping in bulk organic films, and greatly extend the distance range of charge transport in molecular electronic devices. Three distinct transport mechanisms were observed for 4.5–22-nm-thick oligo(thiophene) layers between carbon contacts, with tunneling operative when d < 8 nm, activated hopping when d > 16 nm for high temperatures and low bias, and a third mechanism consistent with field-induced ionization of highest occupied molecular orbitals or interface states to generate charge carriers when d = 8–22 nm. Transport in the 8–22-nm range is weakly temperature dependent, with a field-dependent activation barrier that becomes negligible at moderate bias. We thus report here a unique, activationless transport mechanism, operative over 8–22-nm distances without involving hopping, which severely limits carrier mobility and device lifetime in organic semiconductors. Charge transport in molecular electronic junctions can thus be effective for transport distances significantly greater than the 1–5 nm associated with quantum-mechanical tunneling. PMID:23509271

  5. Activationless charge transport across 4.5 to 22 nm in molecular electronic junctions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lafarge, Philippe; Lacroix, Jean Christophe

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we bridge the gap between short-range tunneling in molecular junctions and activated hopping in bulk organic films, and greatly extend the distance range of charge transport in molecular electronic devices. Three distinct transport mechanisms were observed for 4.5-22-nm-thick oligo(thiophene) layers between carbon contacts, with tunneling operative when d < 8 nm, activated hopping when d > 16 nm for high temperatures and low bias, and a third mechanism consistent with field-induced ionization of highest occupied molecular orbitals or interface states to generate charge carriers when d = 8-22 nm. Transport in the 8-22-nm range is weakly temperature dependent, with a field-dependent activation barrier that becomes negligible at moderate bias. We thus report here a unique, activationless transport mechanism, operative over 8-22-nm distances without involving hopping, which severely limits carrier mobility and device lifetime in organic semiconductors. Charge transport in molecular electronic junctions can thus be effective for transport distances significantly greater than the 1-5 nm associated with quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of Multi-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates ---Anti-Gravity Transport and Vortex Chaos---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.

    Bose-Einstein condensate(BEC) provides a nice stage when the nonlinearSchrödinger equation plays a vital role. We study the dynamics of multi-component repulsive BEC in 2 dimensions with harmonic traps by using the nonlinear Schrödinger (or Gross-Pitaevskii) equation. Firstly we consider a driven two-component BEC with each component trapped in different vertical positions. The appropriate tuning of the oscillation frequency of the magnetic field leads to a striking anti-gravity transport of BEC. This phenomenon is a manifestation of macroscopic non-adiabatic tunneling in a system with two internal(electronic) degrees of freedom. The dynamics splits into a fast complex spatio-temporal oscillation of each condensate wavefunctions together with a slow levitation of the total center of mass. Secondly, we examine the three-component repulsive BEC in 2 dimensions in a harmonic trap in the absence of magnetic field, and construct a model of conservative chaos based on a picture of vortex molecules. We obtain an effective nonlinear dynamics for three vortex cores, which represents three charged particles under the uniform magnetic field with the repulsive inter-particle potential quadratic in the inter-vortex distance r_{ij} on short scale and logarithmic in r_{ij} on large scale. The vortices here acquire the inertia in marked contrast to the standard theory of point vortices since Onsager. We then explore ``the chaos in the three-body problem" in the context of vortices with inertia.

  7. Electron transport and charge induction in cadmium zinc telluride detectors with space charge build up under intense x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Derek S.; Szeles, Csaba

    2010-06-15

    Under intense x-ray irradiation, wide band gap semiconductor radiation detectors fabricated from crystals with low hole transport properties develop a steady-state space charge distribution that results from a dynamic equilibrium between charge carrier dynamics and the incident photon field. At a high enough x-ray flux, this space charge can collapse the electric field within the detector, resulting in the paralyzation of photon counting (i.e., high-flux polarization). However, well before polarization causes a catastrophic device failure, there can be enough space charge present to significantly modify the electric field. A modified field affects the electron transport and, therefore, signal generation within the sensor, which can ultimately degrade the performance of high-rate photon counting electronics. In this study, we analytically solve the fundamental equation of charge conservation to derive the modified electron transport in the presence of an exponential space charge distribution that results from the incident x-rays. We use these space-time solutions to calculate and study the time dependence of the resulting charge-induced signals. The predicted induced signals are compared throughout with numerical solutions of the full charge transport equation. In addition, we present analogous closed-form signals for a uniform distribution relevant to a broader class of {gamma}-ray applications. Finally, we use these solutions to derive a two-parameter family of modified Hecht curves that naturally predict a voltage offset that appears due to the space charge.

  8. Implementation of polarization processes in a charge transport model applied on poly(ethylene naphthalate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, M.-Q.; Le Roy, S.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2016-06-01

    One of the difficulties in unravelling transport processes in electrically insulating materials is the fact that the response, notably charging current transients, can have mixed contributions from orientation polarization and from space charge processes. This work aims at identifying and characterizing the polarization processes in a polar polymer in the time and frequency-domains and to implement the contribution of the polarization into a charge transport model. To do so, Alternate Polarization Current (APC) and Dielectric Spectroscopy measurements have been performed on poly(ethylene naphthalene 2,6-dicarboxylate) (PEN), an aromatic polar polymer, providing information on polarization mechanisms in the time- and frequency-domain, respectively. In the frequency-domain, PEN exhibits 3 relaxation processes termed β, β* (sub-glass transitions), and α relaxations (glass transition) in increasing order of temperature. Conduction was also detected at high temperatures. Dielectric responses were treated using a simplified version of the Havriliak-Negami model (Cole-Cole (CC) model), using 3 parameters per relaxation process, these parameters being temperature dependent. The time dependent polarization obtained from the CC model is then added to a charge transport model. Simulated currents issued from the transport model implemented with the polarization are compared with the measured APCs, showing a good consistency between experiments and simulations in a situation where the response comes essentially from dipolar processes.

  9. Light-Emitting Organic Materials with Variable Charge Injection and Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. C.-A.; Wallace, J. U.; Wei, S. K.-H.; Zeng, L.; Shen, S. H.; Blenton, T. N.

    2006-01-01

    Novel light-emitting organic materials comprising conjugated oligomers chemically attached via a flexible spacer to an electron- or hole-conducting core were designed for tunable charge injection and transport properties. Representative glassy-isentropic and glassy-liquid-crystalline (i.e., noncrystaline solid) materials were synthesized and characterized; they were found to exhibit a glass transition temperature and a clearing point close to 140 and 250 C, respectively; an orientational order parameter of 0.75; a photoluminescence quantum yield up to 51%; and HOMO and LUMO energy levels intermediate between those of blue-emitting oligofluorenes and the ITO and Mg/Ag electrodes commonly used in organic light-emitting diodes, OLEDs. This class of materials will help to balance charge injection and transport and to spread out the charge recombination zone, thereby significantly improving the device efficiency and lifetime of unpolarized and polarized OLEDs.

  10. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  11. Peculiarities of the charge transport in the gas discharge electronic device with irradiated porous zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Sevgul; Koseoglu, Kivilcim; Ozer, Metin; Salamov, Bahtiyar G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of pressure and β-radiation (1 kGy β doses) on the charge transport mechanism, charge trapping effects in porous zeolite surfaces and breakdown voltage (UB) are discussed in atmospheric microplasmas for the first time. This is due to exposure the zeolite cathode (ZC) to β-radiation resulting in substantial decreases in the UB, discharge currents and conductivity due to increase in porosity of the material. Results indicated that the enhancement of plasma light intensity and electron emission from the ZC surface with the release of trapped electrons which are captured by the defect centers following β-irradiation. The porosity of the ZC and radiation defect centers has significant influence on the charge transport of the microstructure and optical properties of the devices manufactured on its base. Thus, we confirm that the ZCir is a suitable cathode material for plasma light source, field emission displays, energy storage devices and low power gas discharge electronic devices.

  12. A theoretical study of charge transport properties of trifluoromethyl (-CF3) substituted naphthalene (TFMNA) molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. R.; Parida, S. K.; Sahu, S.

    2016-09-01

    We present a density functional (DFT) study of the charge transport properties of CF3-naphthalene. Nature of charge transport is investigated using parameters such as reorganization energy (X), transfer integral (t), ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), and carrier mobility (μ) computed through electronic structure calculations. We observe a decrease in X and IP from 2,6-DTFMNA to 1,5-DTFMNA, whereas, the EA is found to be enhanced, as a result p-type characteristics, with mild n-type signature, in the organic semiconductor gets increased. In addition, the HOMO-LUMO gap also gets reduced inferring more charge injection through the potential barrier. The maximum hole and electron mobility values for the substituted compound are obtained to be 2.17 cm2/ Vsec & 0.20 cm2/ Vsec, respectively.

  13. Electronic-Structure Theory of Organic Semiconductors: Charge-Transport Parameters and Metal/Organic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Li, Hong; Winget, Paul; Zhu, Lingyun; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    We focus this review on the theoretical description, at the density functional theory level, of two key processes that are common to electronic devices based on organic semiconductors (such as organic light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and solar cells), namely charge transport and charge injection from electrodes. By using representative examples of current interest, our main goal is to introduce some of the reliable theoretical methodologies that can best depict these processes. We first discuss the evaluation of the microscopic parameters that determine charge-carrier transport in organic molecular crystals, i.e., electronic couplings and electron-vibration couplings. We then examine the electronic structure at interfaces between an organic layer and a metal or conducting oxide electrode, with an emphasis on the work-function modifications induced by the organic layer and on the interfacial energy-level alignments.

  14. Nonlinear thermoelectric transport in single-molecule junctions: the effect of electron-phonon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze steady-state thermoelectric transport through a single-molecule junction with a vibrating bridge. The thermally induced charge current in the system is explored using a nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We study the combined effects of Coulomb interactions between charge carriers on the bridge and electron-phonon interactions on the thermocurrent beyond the linear response regime. It is shown that electron-vibron interactions may significantly affect both the magnitude and the direction of the thermocurrent, and vibrational signatures may appear.

  15. Chain conformations dictate multiscale charge transport phenomena in disordered semiconducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Rodrigo; Salleo, Alberto; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2013-10-01

    Existing models for the electronic properties of conjugated polymers do not capture the spatial arrangement of the disordered macromolecular chains over which charge transport occurs. Here, we present an analytical and computational description in which the morphology of individual polymer chains is dictated by well-known statistical models and the electronic coupling between units is determined using Marcus theory. The multiscale transport of charges in these materials (high mobility at short length scales, low mobility at long length scales) is naturally described with our framework. Additionally, the dependence of mobility with electric field and temperature is explained in terms of conformational variability and spatial correlation. Our model offers a predictive approach to connecting processing conditions with transport behavior. PMID:24062459

  16. TIME-DEPENDENT PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF FAST CHARGED PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fraschetti, F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2011-06-20

    We present an analytic derivation of the temporal dependence of the perpendicular transport coefficient of charged particles in magnetostatic turbulence, for times smaller than the time needed for charged particles to travel the turbulence correlation length. This time window is left unexplored in most transport models. In our analysis all magnetic scales are taken to be much larger than the particle gyroradius, so that perpendicular transport is assumed to be dominated by the guiding center motion. Particle drift from the local magnetic field lines (MFLs) and magnetic field line random walk are evaluated separately for slab and three-dimensional (3D) isotropic turbulence. Contributions of wavelength scales shorter and longer than the turbulence coherence length are compared. In contrast to the slab case, particles in 3D isotropic turbulence unexpectedly diffuse from local MFLs; this result questions the common assumption that particle magnetization is independent of turbulence geometry. Extensions of this model will allow for a study of solar wind anisotropies.

  17. Low-Frequency MEMS Electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvester With Corona-Charged Vertical Electrets and Nonlinear Stoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Boisseau, S.; Galayko, D.; Marty, F.; Basset, P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports for the first time a MEMS electrostatic vibration energy harvester (e-VEH) with corona-charged vertical electrets on its electrodes. The bandwidth of the 1-cm2 device is extended in low and high frequencies by nonlinear elastic stoppers. With a bias voltage of 46 V (electret@21 V + DC external source@25 V) between the electrodes, the RMS power of the device reaches 0.89 μW at 33 Hz and 6.6 μW at 428 Hz. The -3dB frequency band including the hysteresis is 223∼432 Hz, the one excluding the hysteresis 88∼166 Hz. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47 μF capacitor used for powering a wireless and autonomous temperature sensor node with a data transmission beyond 10 m at 868 MHz.

  18. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  19. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers.

  20. Charge-Dependent Transport Switching of Single Molecular Ions in a Weak Polyelectrolyte Multilayer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10–9 cm2/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  1. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  2. Charge transport through split photoelectrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fakharuddin, Azhar; Ahmed, Irfan; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan; Khalidin, Zulkeflee

    2014-04-28

    Charge transport and recombination are relatively ignored parameters while upscaling dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Enhanced photovoltaic parameters are anticipated by merely widening the devices physical dimensions, viz., thickness and area as evident from the device design adopted in reported large area DSCs. These strip designs lead to ≤50% loss in photocurrent compared to the high efficiency lab scale devices. Herein, we report that the key to achieving higher current density (J{sub SC}) is optimized diffusion volume rather than the increased photoelectrode area because kinetics of the devices is strongly influenced by the varied choices of diffusion pathways upon increasing the electrode area. For a given electrode area and thickness, we altered the photoelectrode design by splitting the electrode into multiple fractions to restrict the electron diffusion pathways. We observed a correlation between the device physical dimensions and its charge collection efficiency via current-voltage and impedance spectroscopy measurements. The modified electrode designs showed >50% increased J{sub SC} due to shorter transport time, higher recombination resistance and enhanced charge collection efficiency compared to the conventional ones despite their similar active volume (∼3.36 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 3}). A detailed charge transport characteristic of the split devices and their comparison with single electrode configuration is described in this article.

  3. Charge carrier transport and photogeneration in P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic blends.

    PubMed

    Laquai, Frédéric; Andrienko, Denis; Mauer, Ralf; Blom, Paul W M

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the charge transport and photogeneration in bulk-heterojunction solar cells made from blend films of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) and methano-fullerene (PCBM). The charge transport, specifically the hole mobility in the RR-P3HT phase of the polymer:fullerene photovoltaic blend, is dramatically affected by thermal annealing. The hole mobility increases more than three orders of magnitude and reaches a value of up to 2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) after the thermal annealing process as a result of an improved semi-crystallinity of the film. This significant increase of the hole mobility balances the electron and hole mobilities in a photovoltaic blend in turn reducing space-charge formation, and this is the most important factor for the strong enhancement of the photovoltaic efficiency compared to an as cast, that is, non-annealed device. In fact, the balanced charge carrier mobility in RR-P3HT:PCBM blends in combination with a field- and temperature-independent charge carrier generation and greatly reduced non-geminate recombination explains the large quantum efficiencies mea-sured in P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic devices.

  4. Applicability of Travel- and Exposure-Time Concepts to Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie Cirpka, Olaf; Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Loschko, Matthias; Finkel, Michael; Lu, Chuanhe

    2016-04-01

    Travel-time based concepts of modeling subsurface transport have been established as computationally efficient alternatives to spatially explicit simulation methods. The spatial coordinates are replaced by travel time, resulting in one-dimensional transport with a constant „velocity" of unity. The concept is straight forward in linear transport applications, and under these conditions the results are exact provided that the coefficients of linear transport don't vary in space. In nonlinear transport, mixing can jeopardize the validity of the approach. This holds particularly true for transverse mixing, exchanging solute mass between streamtubes. We have performed systematic analyses of nonlinear bioreactive transport, involving oxygen, nitrate, organic carbon, as well as aerobic and denitrifying bacteria to analyzed under which conditions the errors introduced by travel-time and similar formulations are negligible. In steady-state flows with uniform reactive parameters, an excellent agreement between multi-dimensional reactive transport results, affected by transverse dispersion and flow heterogeneity, and one-dimensional travel-time results could be achieved by mapping the reactive-species concentrations to the multi-dimensional domain according to the local mean groundwater age. Aliasing of local transverse dispersion to macroscopically longitudinal mixing can be addressed by using a distance-dependent longitudinal dispersion coefficient. The approach also works for transient flows as long as the direction of flow remains constant and only the magnitude varies. Under these conditions, the groundwater age for the time-averaged velocity field is an adequate mapping variable, provided that flow transients are accounted for in the one- and multi-dimensional simulations. If the reaction takes place only in specific regions, the time of exposure to the according conditions is a better predictor of reactive transport than the overall travel time. Spatially variable

  5. Charge carrier transport in molecularly doped polycarbonate as a test case for the dipolar glass model.

    PubMed

    Novikov, S V; Tyutnev, A P

    2013-03-14

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the charge carrier transport in a disordered molecular system containing spatial and energetic disorders using the dipolar glass model. Model parameters of the material were chosen to fit a typical polar organic photoconductor polycarbonate doped with 30% of aromatic hydrazone, whose transport properties are well documented in literature. Simulated carrier mobility demonstrates a usual Poole-Frenkel field dependence and its slope is very close to the experimental value without using any adjustable parameter. At room temperature transients are universal with respect to the electric field and transport layer thickness. At the same time, carrier mobility does not depend on the layer thickness and transients develop a well-defined plateau where the current does not depend on time, thus demonstrating a non-dispersive transport regime. Tails of the transients decay as power law with the exponent close to -2. This particular feature indicates that transients are close to the boundary between dispersive and non-dispersive transport regimes. Shapes of the simulated transients are in very good agreement with the experimental ones. In summary, we provide a first verification of a self-consistency of the dipolar glass transport model, where major transport parameters, extracted from the experimental transport data, are then used in the transport simulation, and the resulting mobility field dependence and transients are in very good agreement with the initial experimental data.

  6. Charge carrier transport in molecularly doped polycarbonate as a test case for the dipolar glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. V.; Tyutnev, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the charge carrier transport in a disordered molecular system containing spatial and energetic disorders using the dipolar glass model. Model parameters of the material were chosen to fit a typical polar organic photoconductor polycarbonate doped with 30% of aromatic hydrazone, whose transport properties are well documented in literature. Simulated carrier mobility demonstrates a usual Poole-Frenkel field dependence and its slope is very close to the experimental value without using any adjustable parameter. At room temperature transients are universal with respect to the electric field and transport layer thickness. At the same time, carrier mobility does not depend on the layer thickness and transients develop a well-defined plateau where the current does not depend on time, thus demonstrating a non-dispersive transport regime. Tails of the transients decay as power law with the exponent close to -2. This particular feature indicates that transients are close to the boundary between dispersive and non-dispersive transport regimes. Shapes of the simulated transients are in very good agreement with the experimental ones. In summary, we provide a first verification of a self-consistency of the dipolar glass transport model, where major transport parameters, extracted from the experimental transport data, are then used in the transport simulation, and the resulting mobility field dependence and transients are in very good agreement with the initial experimental data.

  7. Charge transport in bacteriorhodopsin monolayers: The contribution of conformational change to current-voltage characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, E.; Reggiani, L.

    2009-03-01

    When moving from native to light-activated bacteriorhodospin, modification of charge transport consisting of an increase of conductance is correlated to the protein conformational change. A theoretical model based on a map of the protein tertiary structure into a resistor network is implemented to account for a sequential tunneling mechanism of charge transfer through neighbouring amino acids. The model is validated by comparison with current-voltage experiments. The predictability of the model is further tested on bovine rhodopsin, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) also sensitive to light. In this case, results show an opposite behaviour with a decrease of conductance in the presence of light.

  8. The influence of morphology on charge transport/recombination dynamics in planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Man; Wang, Yi; Wang, Hao-Yi; Han, Jun; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Ai, Xi-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The photovoltaic performance of planar perovskite solar cell is significantly influenced by the morphology of perovskite film. In this work, five kinds of devices with different perovskite film morphologies were prepared by varying the concentration of CH3NH3Cl in precursor solutions. We found that best morphology of perovskite film results in the excellent photovoltaic performance with an average efficiency of 15.52% and a champion efficiency of 16.38%. Transient photovoltage and photocurrent measurements are performed to elucidate the mechanism of photoelectric conversion processes, which shows that the charge recombination is effectively suppressed and the charge transport is obviously promoted by optimized morphology.

  9. Charge Transport in Conjugated Materials: From Theoretical Models to Experimental Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Yoann; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio; Cornil, Jérôme

    2008-09-01

    Charge carrier mobility is the key quantity to characterize the charge transport properties in devices. Based on earlier work of Bässler and co-workers, we set up a Monte-Carlo approach that allows us to calculate mobility using transfer rates derived from Marcus theory. The parameters entering into the rate expression are evaluated by means of different quantum-chemical techniques. Our approach is applied here to a model one-dimensional system made of pentacene molecules as well as to real systems such as crystalline structures and columnar liquid crystal phases.

  10. A fundamental study of the charge transport and morphology of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, R. Joseph

    Conjugated polymers include some of the most promising candidates for the active layer of low-cost thin-film transistors (TFTs) and bulk heterojunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The charge carrier mobility of these conjugated polymers is the key materials property limiting the performance of both of these devices. This thesis outlines a fundamental investigation of the charge transport and morphology of the first high mobility conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The charge carrier mobility in TFTs was found to increase by four orders-of-magnitude as the molecular weight (MW) of P3HT is increased from 3000 g/mole to 36,000 g/mole. P3HT films with different MWs provided an ideal system for correlating morphological changes in conjugated polymers to resulting changes in charge transport. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) were used to measure changes in the crystallinity and crystal orientation associated with varying the spin-casting solvent, annealing conditions, substrate surface treatment, and drop-casting at a constant MW. The GIXS results showed that at a constant MW in both low- and high-MW films, the mobility correlated to the strength of in-plane pi-stacking. When comparing different MWs, however, this correlation broke down. Rocking curves on samples with a chemically modified surface showed highly oriented crystals that were nucleated from the substrate and correlate with variations in charge transport. Switching to low-MW P3HT improves the overall crystallinity, the intensity of in-plane pi-stacking, and the concentration of highly oriented crystals, but the mobility is more than a factor of 100 lower than high-MW P3HT. These counterintuitive results clearly show that the charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymers is coupled to several different aspects of the morphology. In the case of the low-MW films, the strong driving force for ordering creates grain boundaries that

  11. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  12. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb)more » mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.« less

  13. Charge transport properties of graphene: Effects of Cu-based gate electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qide; Zhang, C. X.; He, Chaoyu; Tang, Chao; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    Using the first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function method, we study effects of Cu and Ni@Cu used as the Cu-based gate electrode on the charge transport of graphene in the field effect transistors (FET). We find that the transmission of graphene decreases with both Cu and Ni@Cu absorbed in the scatter region. Especially, noticeable transmission gaps are present around the Femi level. The transmission gaps are still effective, and considerable cut-off regions are found under the non-equilibrium environment. The Ni@Cu depresses the transmission of graphene more seriously than the Cu and enlarges the transmission gap in armchair direction. The effects on the charge transport are attributed to the redistribution of electronic states of graphene. Both Cu and Ni@Cu induce the localization of states, so as to block the electronic transport. The Ni@Cu transforms the interaction between graphene and gate electrode from the physisorption to the chemisorption, and then induces more localized states, so that the transmission decreases further. Our results suggest that besides being used to impose gate voltage, the Cu-based gate electrode itself will have a considerable effect on the charge transport of graphene and induces noticeable transmission gap in the FET.

  14. Charge transport in organic multi-layer devices under electric and optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, June Hyoung

    2007-12-01

    Charge transport in small organic molecules and conjugated conducting polymers under electric or optical fields is studied by using field effect transistors and photo-voltaic cells with multiple thin layers. With these devices, current under electric field, photo-current under optical field, and luminescence of optical materials are measured to characterize organic and polymeric materials. For electric transport studies, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped by polystyrenesulfonic acid is used, which is conductive with conductivity of approximately 25 S/cm. Despite their high conductance, field effect transistors based on the films are successfully built and characterized by monitoring modulations of drain current by gate voltage and IV characteristic curves. Due to very thin insulating layers of poly(vinylphenol), the transistors are relative fast under small gate voltage variation although heavy ions are involved in charge transport. In IV characteristic curves, saturation effects can be observed. Analysis using conventional field effect transistor model indicates high mobility of charge carriers, 10 cm2/V·sec, which is not consistent with the mobility of the conducting polymer. It is proposed that the effect of a small density of ions injected via polymer dielectric upon application of gate voltage and the ion compensation of key hopping sites accounts for the operation of the field effect transistors. For the studies of transport under optical field, photovoltaic cells with 3 different dendrons, which are efficient to harvest photo-excited electrons, are used. These dendrons consist of two electron-donors (tetraphenylporphyrin) and one electron-accepter (naphthalenediimide). Steady-state fluorescence measurements show that inter-molecular interaction is dominant in solid dendron film, although intra-molecular interaction is still present. Intra-molecular interaction is suggested by different fluorescence lifetimes between solutions of donor and dendrons. This

  15. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišković, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  16. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-15

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  17. EBQ code: transport of space-charge beams in axially symmetric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    Such general-purpose space charge codes as EGUN, BATES, WOLF, and TRANSPORT do not gracefully accommodate the simulation of relativistic space-charged beams propagating a long distance in axially symmetric devices where a high degree of cancellation has occurred between the self-magnetic and self-electric forces of the beam. The EBQ code was written specifically to follow high current beam particles where space charge is important in long distance flight in axially symmetric machines possessing external electric and magnetic field. EBQ simultaneously tracks all trajectories so as to allow procedures for charge deposition based on inter-ray separations. The orbits are treated in Cartesian geometry (position and momentum) with z as the independent variable. Poisson's equation is solved in cylindrical geometry on an orthogonal rectangular mesh. EBQ can also handle problems involving multiple ion species where the space charge from each must be included. Such problems arise in the design of ion sources where different charge and mass states are present.

  18. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in inhomogeneous four-component dusty plasma with opposite charge polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W. F.

    2013-09-15

    The reductive perturbation technique is employed to investigate the propagation properties of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) waves in a four-component inhomogeneous dusty plasma (4CIDP). The 4CIDP consists of both positive- and negative-charge dust grains, characterized by different mass, temperature, and density, in addition to a background of Maxwellian electrons and ions. The inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle densities, fluid velocities, and electrostatic potential leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. It is found that this model reveals two DA wave velocities, one slow, λ{sub s}, and the other is fast, λ{sub f}. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Kortweg-de Vries equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Both the two soliton types; compressive and rarefactive are allowed corresponding to λ{sub s}. However, only compressive soliton is created corresponding to λ{sub f}. The numerical investigations illustrate the dependence of the soliton amplitude, width, and velocity on the plasma inhomogeneities in each case. The relevance of these theoretical results with 4CIDPs observed in a multi-component plasma configurations in the polar mesosphere is discussed.

  19. A non-Linear transport model for determining shale rock characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Iftikhar; Malik, Nadeem

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs consist of tight porous rocks which are characterised by nano-scale size porous networks with ultra-low permeability [1,2]. Transport of gas through them is not well understood at the present time, and realistic transport models are needed in order to determine rock properties and for estimating future gas pressure distribution in the reservoirs. Here, we consider a recently developed non-linear gas transport equation [3], ∂p-+ U ∂p- = D ∂2p-, t > 0, (1) ∂t ∂x ∂x2 complimented with suitable initial and boundary conditions, in order to determine shale rock properties such as the permeability K, the porosity φ and the tortuosity, τ. In our new model, the apparent convection velocity, U = U(p,px), and the apparent diffusivity D = D(p), are both highly non-linear functions of the pressure. The model incorporate various flow regimes (slip, surface diffusion, transition, continuum) based upon the Knudsen number Kn, and also includes Forchchiemers turbulence correction terms. In application, the model parameters and associated compressibility factors are fully pressure dependent, giving the model more realism than previous models. See [4]. Rock properties are determined by solving an inverse problem, with model parameters adjustment to minimise the error between the model simulation and available data. It is has been found that the proposed model performs better than previous models. Results and details of the model will be presented at the conference. Corresponding author: namalik@kfupm.edu.sa and nadeem_malik@cantab.net References [1] Cui, X., Bustin, A.M. and Bustin, R., "Measurements of gas permeability and diffusivity of tight reservoir rocks: different approaches and their applications", Geofluids 9, 208-223 (2009). [2] Chiba R., Fomin S., Chugunov V., Niibori Y. and Hashida T., "Numerical Simulation of Non Fickian Diffusion and Advection in a Fractured Porous Aquifer", AIP Conference Proceedings 898, 75 (2007

  20. Crafting zero-bias one-way transport of charge and spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Dal Lago, V.; Suárez Morell, E.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the electronic structure and transport properties of a metal on top of a (weakly coupled) two-dimensional topological insulator. Unlike the widely studied junctions between topological nontrivial materials, the systems studied here allow for a unique band structure and transport steering. First, states on the topological insulator layer may coexist with the gapless bulk and, second, the edge states on one edge can be selectively switched off, thereby leading to nearly perfect directional transport of charge and spin even in the zero bias limit. We illustrate these phenomena for Bernal stacked bilayer graphene with Haldane or intrinsic spin-orbit terms and a perpendicular bias voltage. This opens a path for realizing directed transport in materials such as van der Waals heterostructures, monolayer, and ultrathin topological insulators.

  1. Charge transport dependent high open circuit voltage tandem organic photovoltaic cells with low temperature deposited HATCN-based charge recombination layers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huai-Xin; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Yuan, Yi; Tang, Jian-Xin; Fung, Man-Keung; Lee, Chun-Sing; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms of charge transport between the interconnector and its neighboring layers in tandem organic photovoltaic cells have been systematically investigated by studying electronic properties of the involving interfaces with photoelectron spectroscopies and performance of the corresponding devices. The results show that charge recombination occurs at HATCN and its neighboring hole transport layers which can be deposited at low temperature. The hole transport layer plays an equal role to the interconnector itself. These insights provide guidance for the identification of new materials and the device architecture for high performance devices.

  2. Transport rectification in nanopores with outer membranes modified with surface charges and polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-22

    This work reports a comprehensive theoretical study of the transport-rectification properties of cylindrical nanopores with neutral inner walls and chemically modified outer membrane. The chemical species on the two outer sides of the membrane have charges of opposite sign and can be either surface-confined species (i.e., surface charges) or polyelectrolyte brushes. The advantage of this design over other types of rectifying nanopores is that it requires controlling the composition of the outer walls of the pore (which are easy to access) rather than the inner walls, thus simplifying the fabrication process. Ion-current rectification in nanopores with charged outer walls is ascribed to applied-potential-induced changes in the ionic concentration within the pore. The rectification efficiency is studied as a function of pore length, radius, surface charge and bulk electrolyte concentration. An analytical model is derived for the case of surface-confined charges that predicts the current-potential curves in very good agreement with the numerical calculations. Neutral nanopores with polyelectrolyte-modified outer walls have two distinct advantages compared to surface-charged systems: (i) they exhibit higher rectification factors due to the large charge density immobilized by the polyelectrolyte brushes, and (ii) the applied potential deforms the polyelectrolyte chains toward the oppositely charged electrode. This deformation brings the polyelectrolyte brushes into the pore in the low conductivity state and expels them from the pore in the high conductivity regime. Calculations of the potentials of mean-force suggest that the applied-field-induced conformational changes can be used to control the translocation of cargoes larger than ions, such as proteins and nanoparticles.

  3. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dong; Qin, Xiang; Li, Yuan; He, Yao; Zhong, Cheng; Pan, Jun; Dong, Huanli; Xu, Wei; Li, Tao; Hu, Wenping; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells. PMID:27152342

  4. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Charge Transport in 2D Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gagorik, Adam G; Mohin, Jacob W; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-01

    The effect of morphology on charge transport in organic photovoltaics is assessed using Monte Carlo. In isotopic two-phase morphologies, increasing the domain size from 6.3 to 18.3 nm improves the fill factor by 11.6%, a result of decreased tortuosity and relaxation of Coulombic barriers. Additionally, when small aggregates of electron acceptors are interdispersed into the electron donor phase, charged defects form in the system, reducing fill factors by 23.3% on average, compared with systems without aggregates. In contrast, systems with idealized connectivity show a 3.31% decrease in fill factor when domain size was increased from 4 to 64 nm. We attribute this to a decreased rate of exciton separation at donor-acceptor interfaces. Finally, we notice that the presence of Coulomb interactions increases device performance as devices become smaller. The results suggest that for commonly found isotropic morphologies the Coulomb interactions between charge carriers dominates exciton separation effects.

  6. Unsupervised vector-based classification of single-molecule charge transport data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Mario; Inkpen, Michael S.; Kornysheva, Katja; Long, Nicholas J.; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-10-01

    The stochastic nature of single-molecule charge transport measurements requires collection of large data sets to capture the full complexity of a molecular system. Data analysis is then guided by certain expectations, for example, a plateau feature in the tunnelling current distance trace, and the molecular conductance extracted from suitable histogram analysis. However, differences in molecular conformation or electrode contact geometry, the number of molecules in the junction or dynamic effects may lead to very different molecular signatures. Since their manifestation is a priori unknown, an unsupervised classification algorithm, making no prior assumptions regarding the data is clearly desirable. Here we present such an approach based on multivariate pattern analysis and apply it to simulated and experimental single-molecule charge transport data. We demonstrate how different event shapes are clearly separated using this algorithm and how statistics about different event classes can be extracted, when conventional methods of analysis fail.

  7. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use.

  8. Unsupervised vector-based classification of single-molecule charge transport data

    PubMed Central

    Lemmer, Mario; Inkpen, Michael S.; Kornysheva, Katja; Long, Nicholas J.; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic nature of single-molecule charge transport measurements requires collection of large data sets to capture the full complexity of a molecular system. Data analysis is then guided by certain expectations, for example, a plateau feature in the tunnelling current distance trace, and the molecular conductance extracted from suitable histogram analysis. However, differences in molecular conformation or electrode contact geometry, the number of molecules in the junction or dynamic effects may lead to very different molecular signatures. Since their manifestation is a priori unknown, an unsupervised classification algorithm, making no prior assumptions regarding the data is clearly desirable. Here we present such an approach based on multivariate pattern analysis and apply it to simulated and experimental single-molecule charge transport data. We demonstrate how different event shapes are clearly separated using this algorithm and how statistics about different event classes can be extracted, when conventional methods of analysis fail. PMID:27694904

  9. Low Band Gap Thiophene-Perylene Diimide Systems with Tunable Charge Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, Ganapathy; Kale, Tejaswini S.; Keerthi, Ashok; Della Pelle, Andrea M.; Thayumanavan, S.; Vallyaveettil, Surech

    2010-11-30

    Perylenediimide-pentathiophene systems with varied architecture of thiophene units were synthesized. The photophysical, electrochemical, and charge transport behavior of the synthesized compounds were studied. Both molecules showed a low band gap of ~1.4 eV. Surprisingly, the molecule with pentathiophene attached via β-position to the PDI unit upon annealing showed a predominant hole mobility of 1 × 10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1 whereas the compound with branched pentathiophene attached via β-position showed an electron mobility of 9.8 × 10-7 cm2 V-1 s-1. This suggests that charge transport properties can be tuned by simply varying the architecture of pentathiophene units.

  10. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-07

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  11. Quantized Hamiltonian dynamics captures the low-temperature regime of charge transport in molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linjun E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu; Chen, Liping; Prezhdo, Oleg V. E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu; Akimov, Alexey V.

    2013-11-07

    The quantized Hamiltonian dynamics (QHD) theory provides a hierarchy of approximations to quantum dynamics in the Heisenberg representation. We apply the first-order QHD to study charge transport in molecular crystals and find that the obtained equations of motion coincide with the Ehrenfest theory, which is the most widely used mixed quantum-classical approach. Quantum initial conditions required for the QHD variables make the dynamics surpass Ehrenfest. Most importantly, the first-order QHD already captures the low-temperature regime of charge transport, as observed experimentally. We expect that simple extensions to higher-order QHDs can efficiently represent other quantum effects, such as phonon zero-point energy and loss of coherence in the electronic subsystem caused by phonons.

  12. Templateless electrodeposition ZnO nanowires for charge transport optimization in OLED structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosan, S.; Matei, E.; Ciobotaru, I. C.; Ciobotaru, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Passivated zinc oxide nanowires (NW) were used to improve the charge injection in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structures. Conducting polymers, deposited on the well-dispersed ZnO NW, were used to modify the electrical conductivity across the OLED structure because the charge transport is influenced by the interface interactions. Passivation with polymers improves the transport characteristics of the device due to the interaction between ZnO NW and PEDOT:PSS polymer. The hole current density increases with the ZnO NW concentration, which made the current injection more balanced and therefore enhanced the electroluminescence efficiency. A templateless electrochemical deposition method was used to grow zinc oxide nanowires on an ITO/glass substrate because parameters such as the densities and dimensions of the nanowires can be controlled to produce thin and well dispersed structures.

  13. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Xu, Ke; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  14. Nonlinear Acceleration of a Continuous Finite Element Discretization of the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Form of the Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sanchez; Cristian Rabiti; Yaqi Wang

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element (CFE) discretization of the transport equation requires a modification of the transport solution in order to achieve local conservation, a condition used in nonlinear acceleration to define the stopping criterion. In this work we implement a coarse-mesh finite difference acceleration for a CFE discretization of the second-order self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the transport equation and use a postprocessing to enforce local conservation. Numerical results are given for one-group source calculations of one-dimensional slabs. We also give a novel formal derivation of the boundary conditions for the SAAF.

  15. Polarity switching of charge transport and thermoelectricity in self-assembled monolayer devices.

    PubMed

    Egger, David A; Rissner, Ferdinand; Zojer, Egbert; Heimel, Georg

    2012-08-22

    Self-assembled monolayer devices can exhibit drastically different charge-transport characteristics and thermoelectric properties despite being composed of isomeric molecules with essentially identical frontier-orbital energies. This is rationalized by the cooperative electrostatic action of local intramolecular dipoles in otherwise nonpolar species, thus revealing new challenges but also new opportunities for the targeted design of functional building blocks in future nanoelectronics. PMID:22807087

  16. Different electronic and charge-transport properties of four organic semiconductors Tetraazaperopyrenes derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yarui; Wei, Huiling; Liu, Yufang

    2015-03-01

    Tetraazaperopyrenes (TAPPs) derivatives are high-performance n-type organic semiconductor material families with the remarkable long-term stabilities. The charge carrier mobilities in TAPPs derivatives crystals were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method combined with the Marcus-Hush electron-transfer theory. The existence of considerable C-H…F-C bonding defines the conformation of the molecular structure and contributes to its stability. We illustrated how it is possible to control the electronic and charge-transport parameters of TAPPs derivatives as a function of the positions, a type of the substituents. It is found that the core substitution of TAPPs has a drastic influence on the charge-transport mobilities. The maximum electron mobility value of the core-brominated 2,9-bis (perfluoroalkyl)-substituted TAPPs is 0.521 cm2 V-1 s-1, which appear in the orientation angle 95° and 275°. The results demonstrate that the TAPPs with bromine substituents in ortho positions exhibit the best charge-transfer efficiency among the four different TAPP derivatives.

  17. Charge transport and recombination in P3HT:PbS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Firdaus, Yuliar; Khetubol, Adis; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Vandenplas, Erwin; Cheyns, David; Gehlhaar, Robert

    2015-03-07

    The charge carrier transport in thin film hybrid solar cells is analyzed and correlated with device performance and the mechanisms responsible for recombination loss. The hybrid bulk heterojunction consisted of a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and small size (2.4 nm) PbS quantum dots (QDs). The charge transport in the P3HT:PbS blends was determined by measuring the space-charge limited current in hole-only and electron-only devices. When the loading of PbS QDs exceeds the percolation threshold, a significant increase of the electron mobility is observed in the blend with PbS QDs. The hole mobility, on the other hand, only slightly decreased upon increasing the loading of PbS QDs. We also showed that the photocurrent is limited by the low shunt resistance rather than by space-charge effects. The significant reduction of the fill factor at high light intensity suggests that under these conditions the non-geminate recombination dominates. However, at open-circuit conditions, the trap-assisted recombination dominates over non-geminate recombination.

  18. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with suprathermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha

    2010-07-15

    Arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with a high-energy-tail electron distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and electron deviation from the Boltzmann distribution on the dust acoustic soliton are then considered. The dust charge variation makes the dust acoustic soliton more spiky. The dust grain surface collects less electrons as the latter evolves far away from their thermodynamic equilibrium. The dust accumulation caused by a balance of the electrostatic forces acting on the dust grains is more effective for lower values of the electron spectral index. Under certain conditions, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation, the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the suprathermal character of the plasma becomes important. Our results may explain the strong spiky waveforms observed in auroral plasmas.

  19. A nonlinear model for the layer between plates in acoustic noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    To more accurately describe the noncontact transport behavior of traveling acoustic waves, a nonlinear model is presented in this paper for the squeeze gas film with consideration of gas inertia in the case of a large amplitude motion and low viscosity of the gas. A closed form solution is derived for the vertical and horizontal forces of the film from this model. Our results have shown that the gas inertia has a significant influence on the pressure distribution in the squeeze film, and the inertial force is higher than the viscous force. The predicted levitation and horizontal driving forces are found to be in good agreement with our experimental measurements. Our inertia model provides a powerful tool for the force estimation and its potential benefits could be far reaching. The accurate prediction of these forces is useful to design the system for levitating and transporting planar objects, such as MEMS devices, glass substrates, and IC chips

  20. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  1. Charge transport and mobility engineering in two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals semiconductors represent the thinnest, air stable semiconducting materials known. Their unique optical, electronic and mechanical properties hold great potential for harnessing them as key components in novel applications for electronics and optoelectronics. However, the charge transport behavior in 2D semiconductors is more susceptible to external surroundings (e.g. gaseous adsorbates from air and trapped charges in substrates) and their electronic performance is generally lower than corresponding bulk materials due to the fact that the surface and bulk coincide. In this article, we review recent progress on the charge transport properties and carrier mobility engineering of 2D transition metal chalcogenides, with a particular focus on the markedly high dependence of carrier mobility on thickness. We unveil the origin of this unique thickness dependence and elaborate the devised strategies to master it for carrier mobility optimization. Specifically, physical and chemical methods towards the optimization of the major factors influencing the extrinsic transport such as electrode/semiconductor contacts, interfacial Coulomb impurities and atomic defects are discussed. In particular, the use of ad hoc molecules makes it possible to engineer the interface with the dielectric and heal the vacancies in such materials. By casting fresh light on the theoretical and experimental studies, we provide a guide for improving the electronic performance of 2D semiconductors, with the ultimate goal of achieving technologically viable atomically thin (opto)electronics.

  2. Charge quantization and the Standard Model from the CP2 and CP3 nonlinear σ-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerman, Simeon; Kehayias, John; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate charge quantization in the Standard Model (SM) through a CP2 nonlinear sigma model (NLSM), SU(3/(SU(2×U(1), and a CP3 model, SU(4/(SU(3×U(1). We also generalize to any CPk model. Charge quantization follows from the consistency and dynamics of the NLSM, without a monopole or Grand Unified Theory, as shown in our earlier work on the CP1 model (arXiv:1309.0692). We find that representations of the matter fields under the unbroken non-abelian subgroup dictate their charge quantization under the U(1 factor. In the CP2 model the unbroken group is identified with the weak and hypercharge groups of the SM, and the Nambu-Goldstone boson (NGB) has the quantum numbers of a SM Higgs. There is the intriguing possibility of a connection with the vanishing of the Higgs self-coupling at the Planck scale. Interestingly, with some minor assumptions (no vector-like matter and minimal representations) and starting with a single quark doublet, anomaly cancellation requires the matter structure of a generation in the SM. Similar analysis holds in the CP3 model, with the unbroken group identified with QCD and hypercharge, and the NGB having the up quark as a partner in a supersymmetric model. This can motivate solving the strong CP problem with a vanishing up quark mass.

  3. Transungual iontophoretic transport of polar neutral and positively charged model permeants: effects of electrophoresis and electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA), urea (UR), and positively charged permeant tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) across fully hydrated human nail plates at pH 7.4 were investigated in vitro. Four protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport of 0.1 and 0.3 mA. Water and permeant uptake experiments of nail clippings were also conducted to characterize the hydration and binding effects of the permeants to the nails. Iontophoresis enhanced the transport of MA and UR from anode to cathode, but this effect (electroosmosis) was marginal. The transport of TEA was significantly enhanced by anodal iontophoresis and the experimental enhancement factors were consistent with the Nernst-Planck theory predictions. Hindered transport was also observed and believed to be critical in transungual delivery. The barrier of the nail plates was stable over the time course of the study, and no significant electric field-induced alteration of the barrier was observed. The present results with hydrated nail plates are consistent with electrophoresis-dominant (the direct field effect) transungual iontophoretic transport of small ionic permeants with small contribution from electroosmosis. PMID:17683062

  4. Transungual iontophoretic transport of polar neutral and positively charged model permeants: effects of electrophoresis and electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA), urea (UR), and positively charged permeant tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) across fully hydrated human nail plates at pH 7.4 were investigated in vitro. Four protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport of 0.1 and 0.3 mA. Water and permeant uptake experiments of nail clippings were also conducted to characterize the hydration and binding effects of the permeants to the nails. Iontophoresis enhanced the transport of MA and UR from anode to cathode, but this effect (electroosmosis) was marginal. The transport of TEA was significantly enhanced by anodal iontophoresis and the experimental enhancement factors were consistent with the Nernst-Planck theory predictions. Hindered transport was also observed and believed to be critical in transungual delivery. The barrier of the nail plates was stable over the time course of the study, and no significant electric field-induced alteration of the barrier was observed. The present results with hydrated nail plates are consistent with electrophoresis-dominant (the direct field effect) transungual iontophoretic transport of small ionic permeants with small contribution from electroosmosis.

  5. Charge dependence of neoclassical and turbulent transport of light impurities on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. S.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F. J.; Dickinson, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Summers, H. P.; Tanabe, H.; Valovič, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Carbon and nitrogen impurity transport coefficients are determined from gas puff experiments carried out during repeat L-mode discharges on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and compared against a previous analysis of helium impurity transport on MAST. The impurity density profiles are measured on the low-field side of the plasma, therefore this paper focuses on light impurities where the impact of poloidal asymmetries on impurity transport is predicted to be negligible. A weak screening of carbon and nitrogen is found in the plasma core, whereas the helium density profile is peaked over the entire plasma radius. Both carbon and nitrogen experience a diffusivity of the order of 10 m2s-1 and a strong inward convective velocity of ˜40 m s-1 near the plasma edge, and a region of outward convective velocity at mid-radius. The measured impurity transport coefficients are consistent with neoclassical Banana-Plateau predictions within ρ ≤slant 0.4 . Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the carbon and helium particle flux at two flux surfaces, ρ =0.6 and ρ =0.7 , suggest that trapped electron modes are responsible for the anomalous impurity transport observed in the outer regions of the plasma. The model, combining neoclassical transport with quasi-linear turbulence, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the impurity transport coefficients and the impurity charge dependence.

  6. Growing discharge trees with self-consistent charge transport: the collective dynamics of streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Alejandro; Ebert, Ute

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the generic structure of a growth model for branched discharge trees that consistently combines a finite channel conductivity with the physical law of charge conservation. It is applicable, e.g., to streamer coronas near tip or wire electrodes and ahead of lightning leaders, to leaders themselves and to the complex breakdown structures of sprite discharges high above thunderclouds. Then we implement and solve the simplest model for positive streamers in ambient air with self-consistent charge transport. We demonstrate that charge conservation contradicts the common assumption of dielectric breakdown models that the electric fields inside all streamers are equal to the so-called stability field and we even find cases of local field inversion. We also find that, counter-intuitively, the inner branches of a positive-streamer tree are negatively charged, which provides a natural explanation for the observed reconnections of streamers in laboratory experiments and in sprites. Our simulations show the structure of an overall ‘streamer of streamers’ that we name collective streamer front, and predict effective streamer branching angles, the charge structure within streamer trees and streamer reconnection.

  7. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×105 as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  8. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×10{sup 5} as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  9. Physical vapor transport of mercurous chloride under a nonlinear thermal profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, Christophe; Duval, Walter M. B.; Singh, Narsingh B.

    1992-01-01

    Our study investigates numerically the flow field characteristics during the growth of mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) crystals in a rectangular ampoule under terrestrial and microgravity conditions for a nonlinear thermal gradient. With a residual gas lighter than the nutrient, the solutal Grashof number is dominant. We observe that in tilted configurations, when solutal convection is dominant, the maximum transport rate occurs at approximately 40 percent. For the vertical configurations, we were able to obtain solutions only for the cases either below the critical Rayleigh numbers or the stabilized configurations. The total mass flux decreases exponentially with an increase of pressure of residual gas, but it increases following a power law with the temperature difference driving the transport. The nonlinear thermal gradient appears to destabilize the flow field when thermal convection is dominant for both vertical top-heated and bottom-heated configurations. However, when the solutal Grashof number is dominant, the density gradient resulting from the solutal gradient appears to stabilize the flow for the bottom-heated configuration. The flow field for the top-heated configuration is destabilized for high Grashof numbers. The microgravity environment provides a means for lowering convection. For gravity levels of 10(exp -3) g(0) or less, the Stefan wind drives the flow, and no recirculating cell is predicted.

  10. Field dependent thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors—A tool to determine the nature of charge transport in materials exhibiting thermally activated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendels, Dan; Tessler, Nir

    2015-03-01

    By implementing Monte Carlo simulations and employing the concept of effective temperature, we explore the effects of an applied field bias on the charge carrier statistics and Peltier coefficient in hopping systems subject to the parameter range applicable to disordered organic semiconductors. Distinct differences are found between the observed field dependences as obtained from systems in which energetic disorder is spatially correlated and those in which it is not. Considerable differences are also found between the charge carrier statistics and the Peltier coefficient's field dependence in systems in which charge is transported by bare charge carriers and systems in which it is propagated by polarons. Peltier coefficient field dependence investigations are, hence, proposed as a new tool for studying charge transport and thermoelectricity in disordered organic semiconductors and systems which exhibit thermally activated transport in general.

  11. Variable Charge State Impurities in Coupled Kinetic Plasma-Kinetic Neutral Transport Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Hager, R.; Kim, K.; Koskela, T.; Park, G.

    2015-11-01

    A previous version of the XGC0 neoclassical particle transport code with two fully stripped impurity species was used to study kinetic neoclassical transport in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal. To properly simulate impurities in the scrape-off layer and divertor and to account for radiative cooling, however, the impurity charge state distributions must evolve as the particles are transported into regions of different electron temperatures and densities. To do this, the charge state of each particle in XGC0 is included as a parameter in the list that represents the particle's location in phase space. Impurity ionizations and recombinations are handled with a dedicated collision routine. The associated radiative cooling is accumulated during the process and applied to the electron population later in the time step. The density profiles of the neutral impurities are simulated with the DEGAS 2 neutral transport code and then used as a background for electron impact ionization in XGC0 via a test particle Monte Carlo method analogous to that used for deuterium. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-01

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure effect on charge transport properties of phenacene organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao P; Shim, Ji Hoon

    2016-05-18

    We investigate the charge transport properties of phenacene organic semiconductors including phenanthrene, chrysene and picene using density functional theory (DFT) calculations under hydrostatic pressure. Under compression, the crystal structures of the three materials are altered and thus, a decrease in the intermolecular distances gives changes in charge transport properties while the molecular structures remain stable. As a result of the applied pressure, the mobilities of these materials increase dramatically. Chrysene shows a transition from a p-type semiconductor to an ambipolar semiconductor at around 2.0 GPa. Interestingly, chrysene favors electron transport at above 3.0 GPa. On the other hand, both phenanthrene and picene exhibit hole transport characteristics under high pressure. Between 3.1 and 4.3 GPa, the picene crystal is found to transform from an anisotropic mobility to an isotropic mobility in the ab plane. We also found that, the bulk modulus representing the resistance of the material under pressure compression follows a linear relationship with molecular length. PMID:27146786

  14. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-01

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants. PMID:27348254

  15. Charge Transport in Field-Effect Transistors based on Layered Materials and their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder

    In the quest for energy efficiency and device miniaturization, the research in using atomically thin materials for device applications is gaining momentum. The electronic network in layered materials is different from 3D counterparts. It is due to the interlayer couplings and density of states because of their 2D nature. Therefore, understanding the charge transport in layered materials is fundamental to explore the vast opportunities these ultra-thin materials offer. Hence, the challenges targeted in the thesis are: (1) understanding the charge transport in layered materials based on electronic network of quantum and oxide capacitances, (2) studying thickness dependence, ranging from monolayer to bulk, of full range-characteristics of field-effect transistor (FET) based on layered materials, (3) investigating the total interface trap charges to achieve the ultimate subthreshold slope (SS) theoretically possible in FETs, (4) understanding the effect of the channel length on the performance of layered materials, (5) understanding the effect of substrate on performance of the TMDC FETs and studying if the interface of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/hexagonalboron nitride (h-BN) can have less enough trap charges to observe ambipolar behavior, (6) Exploring optoelectronic properties in 2D heterostructures that includes understanding graphene/WS2 heterostructure and its optoelectronic applications by creating a p-n junction at the interface. The quality of materials and the interface are the issues for observing and extracting clean physics out of these layered materials and heterostructures. In this dissertation, we realized the use of quantum capacitance in layered materials, substrate effects and carrier transport in heterostructure.

  16. BEAMR: An interactive graphic computer program for design of charged particle beam transport systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.; Giamati, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for a PDP-15 is presented which calculates, to first order, the characteristics of charged-particle beam as it is transported through a sequence of focusing and bending magnets. The maximum dimensions of the beam envelope normal to the transport system axis are continuously plotted on an oscilloscope as a function of distance along the axis. Provision is made to iterate the calculation by changing the types of magnets, their positions, and their field strengths. The program is especially useful for transport system design studies because of the ease and rapidity of altering parameters from panel switches. A typical calculation for a system with eight elements is completed in less than 10 seconds. An IBM 7094 version containing more-detailed printed output but no oscilloscope display is also presented.

  17. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  18. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties. PMID:27257640

  19. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties.

  20. High-performing nonlinear visualization of terahertz radiation on a silicon charge-coupled device

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Vicario, Carlo; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transitions can lead to significant changes of the macroscopic electronic properties in semiconductors. This principle is responsible for the detection of light with charge-coupled devices. Their spectral sensitivity is limited by the semiconductor bandgap which has restricted their visualization capabilities to the optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray regimes. The absence of an imaging device in the low frequency terahertz range has severely hampered the advance of terahertz imaging applications in the past. Here we introduce a high-performing imaging concept to the terahertz range. On the basis of a silicon charge-coupled device we visualize 5–13 THz radiation with photon energy under 2% of the sensor's band-gap energy. The unprecedented small pitch and large number of pixels allow the visualization of complex terahertz radiation patterns in real time and with high spatial detail. This advance will have a great impact on a wide range of terahertz imaging disciplines. PMID:26496973

  1. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    PubMed

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  2. Theory of nonlinear ballistic transport in quasi-one-dimensional constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongqi

    1993-06-01

    We report on quantum-mechanical calculations of the differential conductance G of a ballistic and uniform constriction in the nonlinear-response regime of transport. The constriction has been connected to two semi-infinite two-dimensional electron gases, which serve as emitter and collector when a source-drain voltage Vsd is applied. In accordance with the fact that there should not be any electron backscatterings in the idealized constriction, it is assumed, in the calculations, that the electrostatic potential is flat in the constriction along the transport direction and the voltage drops of the applied source-drain voltage occur only at the ends of the constriction. Our calculations show that in addition to the conductance plateaus, which are quantized at multiples of 2e2/h in the linear-response regime of transport, new plateau structure develops as the source-drain voltage is increased. We predict that the edges of the conductance plateaus are shifted linearly with the applied source-drain voltage. Based on this prediction we discuss a method proposed for measuring the energy spacings of the sublevels of the constriction. Under the assumption that the transmission of an electron depends only on the difference between the energy of the electron incident on the constriction and the bottom of the electrostatic confining potential, a simple analytical form is derived for the nonlinear differential conductance of the constriction. This form complements our exact calculational results and shows that at zero temperature the differential conductance at a given finite Vsd and a given Fermi energy EF is a weighted average of two zero-Vsd conductances at Fermi energies of EF+(1-α)eVsd and EF-αeVsd, where α describes the fraction of the source-drain voltage that drops on the connection between the constriction and the drain reservoir.

  3. A 32-channel charge readout IC for programmable, nonlinear quantization of multichannel detector data

    SciTech Connect

    Garverick, S.L.; Skrenes, L.; Baertsch, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    A Charge Readout Integrated Circuit (CRIC) which converts detector charges to digital codes is described. The CRIC provides 32 channels of circuitry needed to form charge-to-digital converters having a total dynamic range of 17 b comprised of 4 b of pre-amp gain control and a conversion range of 13 b. Each channel includes a switched-capacitor integrator, a double-sampling amplifier, a sampling comparator, and a 12-b digital latch, forming a pipeline from which a new conversion result is readout every 50 {mu}s. The data conversion scheme implements a programmable compression curve, which is stored as a look-up table in an off-chip, digital memory. In addition to the lookup table, data conversion requires an off-chip digital-to-analog converter, both of which may be shared by any number of CRIC`S. The CRIC was fabricated using a 3-{mu}m, n-well BiCMOS process, and occupies a die area of 5.1 mm {times} 7.5 mm. It operates at 10 MHz, consumes 440 mW from {+-}5-V supplies, and has a demonstrated input-referred noise performance of 2.2 {mu}V rms i.e., 1,400 e{sup {minus}} on 100 pF of shunt capacitance.

  4. Theoretical characterization of charge transport in chromia (α-Cr2O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, N.; Dupuis, M.; Rosso, K. M.

    2005-08-01

    Transport of conduction electrons and holes through the lattice of α-Cr2O3 (chromia) is modeled as a valence alternation of chromium cations using ab initio electronic structure calculations and electron-transfer theory. In the context of the small polaron model, a cluster approach was used to compute quantities controlling the mobility of localized electrons and holes, i.e., the reorganization energy and the electronic coupling matrix element that enter Marcus' theory. The calculation of the electronic coupling followed the generalized Mulliken-Hush approach using the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) method and the quasidiabatic method. Our findings indicate that hole mobility is more than three orders of magnitude larger than electron mobility in both (001) and [001] lattice directions. The difference arises mainly from the larger internal reorganization energy calculated for electron-transport relative to hole-transport processes while electronic couplings have similar magnitudes. The much larger hole mobility versus electron mobility in α-Cr2O3 is in contrast to similar hole and electron mobilities in hematite α-Fe2O3 previously calculated. Our calculations also indicate that the electronic coupling for all charge-transfer processes of interest is smaller than for the corresponding processes in hematite. This variation is attributed to the weaker interaction between the metal 3d states and the O(2p ) states in chromia than in hematite, leading to a smaller overlap between the charge-transfer donor and acceptor wave functions and smaller superexchange coupling in chromia. Nevertheless, the weaker coupling in chromia is still sufficiently large to suggest that charge-transport processes in chromia are adiabatic in nature. The electronic coupling is found to depend on both the superexchange interaction through the bridging oxygen atoms and the d-shell electron-spin coupling within the Cr-Cr donor-acceptor pair, while the reorganization

  5. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in molecularly-doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Amrita

    The mobility of photo-injected charge carriers in molecularly-doped polymers (MDPs) exhibits a commonly observed, and nearly universal Poole-Frenkel field dependence, mu exp√(beta0E), that has been shown to arise from the correlated Gaussian energy distribution of transport sites encountered by charges undergoing hopping transport through the material. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in these materials are presented here with an attempt to understand how specific features of the various models developed to describe these systems depend on the microscopic parameters that define them. Specifically, previously published time-of-flight mobility data for the molecularly doped polymer 30% DEH:PC (polycarbonate doped with 30 wt.% aromatic hydrazone DEH) is compared with direct analytical and numerical predictions of five disorder-based models, the Gaussian disorder model (GDM) of Bassler, and four correlated disorder models introduced by Novikov, et al., and by Parris, et al. In these numerical studies, disorder parameters describing each model were varied from reasonable starting conditions, in order to give the best overall fit. The uncorrelated GDM describes the Poole-Frenkel field dependence of the mobility only at very high fields, but fails for fields lower than about 64 V/mum. The correlated disorder models with small amounts of geometrical disorder do a good over-all job of reproducing a robust Poole-Frenkel field dependence, with correlated disorder theories that employ polaron transition rates showing qualitatively better agreement with experiment than those that employ Miller-Abrahams rates. In a separate study, the heuristic treatment of spatial or geometric disorder incorporated in existing theories is critiqued, and a randomly-diluted lattice gas model is developed to describe the spatial disorder of the transport sites in a more realistic way.

  6. Solvation effect on conformations of 1,2:dimethoxyethane: charge-dependent nonlinear response in implicit solvent models.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek K; Freed, Karl F

    2008-01-21

    The physical content of and, in particular, the nonlinear contributions from the Langevin-Debye model are illustrated using two applications. First, we provide an improvement in the Langevin-Debye model currently used in some implicit solvent models for computer simulations of solvation free energies of small organic molecules, as well as of biomolecular folding and binding. The analysis is based on the implementation of a charge-dependent Langevin-Debye (qLD) model that is modified by subsequent corrections due to Onsager and Kirkwood. Second, the physical content of the model is elucidated by discussing the general treatment within the LD model of the self-energy of a charge submerged in a dielectric medium for three different limiting conditions and by considering the nonlinear response of the medium. The modified qLD model is used to refine an implicit solvent model (previously applied to protein dynamics). The predictions of the modified implicit solvent model are compared with those from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations for the equilibrium conformational populations of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), which is the shortest ether molecule to reproduce the local conformational properties of polyethylene oxide, a polymer with tremendous technological importance and a wide variety of applications. Because the conformational population preferences of DME change dramatically upon solvation, DME is a good test case to validate our modified qLD model. The present analysis of the modified qLD model provides the motivation and tools for studying a wide variety of other interesting systems with heterogeneous dielectric properties and spatial anisotropy.

  7. Bulk charge carrier transport in push-pull type organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Duzhko, Volodimyr V

    2014-12-10

    Operation of organic electronic and optoelectronic devices relies on charge transport properties of active layer materials. The magnitude of charge carrier mobility, a key efficiency metrics of charge transport properties, is determined by the chemical structure of molecular units and their crystallographic packing motifs, as well as strongly depends on the film fabrication approaches that produce films with different degrees of anisotropy and structural order. Probed by the time-of-flight and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction techniques, bulk charge carrier transport, molecular packing, and film morphology in different structural phases of push-pull type organic semiconductor, 7,7'-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl)bis(6-fluoro-4-(5'-hexyl-[2,2'-bithiophen]-5yl)benzo[c][1,2,5] thiadiazole), one of the most efficient small-molecule photovoltaic materials to-date, are described herein. In the isotropic phase, the material is ambipolar with high mobilities for a fluid state. The electron and hole mobilities at the phase onset at 210.78 °C are 1.0 × 10(-3) cm(2)/(V s) and 6.5 × 10(-4) cm(2)/(V s), respectively. Analysis of the temperature and electric field dependences of the mobilities in the framework of Gaussian disorder formalism suggests larger energetic and positional disorder for electron transport sites. Below 210 °C, crystallization into a polycrystalline film with a triclinic unit cell symmetry and high degree of anisotropy leads to a 10-fold increase of hole mobility. The mobility is limited by the charge transfer along the direction of branched alkyl side chains. Below 90 °C, faster cooling rates produce even higher hole mobilities up to 2 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s) at 25 °C because of the more isotropic orientations of crystalline domains. These properties facilitate in understanding efficient material performance in photovoltaic devices and will guide further development of materials and devices.

  8. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGES

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  9. The role of shape on electronic structure and charge transport in faceted PbSe nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ananth P; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3- ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. PMID:24548107

  10. Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization In Intense Blackbody Radiation And The Generation Of Cherenkov Radiation By Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-03-01

    A study of thermally-induced vacuum polarization stemming from the Euler-Heisenberg nonlinear radiation correction to Maxwell equations is conducted. While nonlinear effects associated with photon-photon scattering in the photon gas had been previously calculated, we present an analysis in the framework of stochastic electrodynamics. To lowest order of approximation, it is shown that the phase velocity of light is reduced in the presence of intense ambient electromagnetic radiation. Therefore Cherenkov radiation can be generated when charged particles traverse a region of intense blackbody radiation. Suitable conditions may be found in astrophysical environments. Cosmic ray electrons and positrons in the GeV to TeV range meet the energy requirement for this process to occur. We present calculations of the emission characteristics and conditions under which Cherenkov radiation may be observed. This effect combined with synchrotron and inverse Compton processes may lead to a more complete understanding of cosmic ray propagation. Also of interest, the question of the linearity of the relic cosmic microwave background is under investigation using this formalism and will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Secondary electron emission and self-consistent charge transport in semi-insulating samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitting, H.-J.; Touzin, M.

    2011-08-01

    Electron beam induced self-consistent charge transport and secondary electron emission (SEE) in insulators are described by means of an electron-hole flight-drift model (FDM) now extended by a certain intrinsic conductivity (c) and are implemented by an iterative computer simulation. Ballistic secondary electrons (SE) and holes, their attenuation to drifting charge carriers, and their recombination, trapping, and field- and temperature-dependent detrapping are included. As a main result the time dependent "true" secondary electron emission rate δ(t) released from the target material and based on ballistic electrons and the spatial distributions of currents j(x,t), charges ρ(x,t), field F(x,t), and potential V(x,t) are obtained where V0 = V(0,t) presents the surface potential. The intrinsic electronic conductivity limits the charging process and leads to a conduction sample current to the support. In that case the steady-state total SE yield will be fixed below the unit: i.e., σ = η + δ < 1.

  12. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  13. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  14. Analytical Solutions for the Nonlinear Longitudinal Drift Compression (Expansion) of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-09

    To achieve high focal spot intensities in heavy ion fusion, the ion beam must be compressed longitudinally by factors of ten to one hundred before it is focused onto the target. The longitudinal compression is achieved by imposing an initial velocity profile tilt on the drifting beam. In this paper, the problem of longitudinal drift compression of intense charged particle beams is solved analytically for the two important cases corresponding to a cold beam, and a pressure-dominated beam, using a one-dimensional warm-fluid model describing the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  15. Implicit Water Simulations of Non-Equilibrium Charge Transport in Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaioli, U.; van der Straaten, T. A.; Kathawala, G.

    Ion channels are natural nano-channels found in the membranes of all living cells, which exhibit a broad range of specific device-like functions to help regulate cell physiology. The study of charge transport in ion channels is imperative to understand how charge regulation is accomplished at the molecular level if one is to develop nanoscale artificial systems that mimic biological function and detection. Although Molecular Dynamics is the most popular approach to simulate ion channel behavior, the computational cost of representing all water molecules and ions in the system is prohibitive to study the timescales required to resolve ionic current and lead to structure design. A hierarchy of models of decreasing complexity is needed to address simulation of different time and space scales, similar to the set of models developed to study transport in semiconductors. This paper discusses the application of Monte Carlo and Drift-diffusion methods to simulate transport in ion channels, using the ompF porin channel as a prototype.

  16. Nonlinear heat transport between the stack and the heat-exchangers of standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Berson, A.

    2008-06-01

    The development of high performance thermoacoustic refrigerators requires an efficient heat transport between the stack and the heat exchangers. A 1D nonlinear model for the thermal coupling of these two components is proposed in the case of a standing-wave thermaocoustic refrigerator. It shows the generation of temperature harmonics close to the edges of the plates that affects heat transport. In order to validate the model, the nonlinear temperature field close to the stack edges is measured using cold-wire anemometry.

  17. Solvation effect on conformations of 1,2:Dimethoxyethane: Charge dependent nonlinear response in implicit solvent models

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek K; Freed, Karl F

    2009-01-01

    We provide an improvement in the Langevin-Debye model currently being used in some implicit solvent models for computer simulations of solvation free energies of small organic molecules, as well as of biomolecular folding and binding. The analysis is based on the implementation of a charge-dependent Langevin-Debye (qLD) model that is modified by subsequent corrections due to Onsager and Kirkwood. The physical content of the model is elucidated by discussing the general treatment within the LD model of the self-energy of a charge submerged in a dielectric medium for three different limiting conditions and by considering the nonlinear response of the medium. The modified qLD model is used to refine an implicit solvent model (previously applied to protein dynamics). The predictions of the modified implicit solvent model are compared with those from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations for the equilibrium conformational populations of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), which is the shortest ether molecule to reproduce the local conformational properties of PEO, a polymer with tremendous technological importance and a wide variety of applications. Because the conformational population preferences of DME change dramatically upon solvation, DME provides a good test case to validate our modified qLD model. PMID:18205504

  18. Large-scale charge transport and collective streamer dynamics within a developing sprite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, A.; Ebert, U.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F.

    2013-12-01

    Sprite discharges, ocurring above active electrical thunderstorms, often appear as huge trees containing hundreds of propagating streamer filaments. Some features in these "carrot sprites", such as the reconnection of neighbouring streamers and the emergence of upward-propagating tendrils, reveal the complex collective dynamics of the propagating branches and the large-scale charge transport within the developing sprite. We here present a model of growing streamer trees that takes into account the finite channel conductivity and treats the electric field self-consistently [1]. Our simulations show the structure of an overall ``streamer of streamers'' that we name collective streamer front. We discuss the charge distribution inside the discharge tree, which provides a natural explanation for the observed reconnections of streamers in sprites and for the emergence from existing channels of upward-propagating, negative streamers. [1] arXiv:1307.2378 [physics.plasm-ph

  19. Massively parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge carrier transport in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaap, N. J.; Koster, L. J. A.

    2016-02-01

    A parallel, lattice based Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is developed that runs on a GPGPU board and includes Coulomb like particle-particle interactions. The performance of this computationally expensive problem is improved by modifying the interaction potential due to nearby particle moves, instead of fully recalculating it. This modification is achieved by adding dipole correction terms that represent the particle move. Exact evaluation of these terms is guaranteed by representing all interactions as 32-bit floating numbers, where only the integers between -222 and 222 are used. We validate our method by modelling the charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors, including Coulomb interactions between charges. Performance is mainly governed by the particle density in the simulation volume, and improves for increasing densities. Our method allows calculations on large volumes including particle-particle interactions, which is important in the field of organic semiconductors.

  20. Unity quantum yield of photogenerated charges and band-like transport in quantum-dot solids.

    PubMed

    Talgorn, Elise; Gao, Yunan; Aerts, Michiel; Kunneman, Lucas T; Schins, Juleon M; Savenije, T J; van Huis, Marijn A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2011-09-25

    Solid films of colloidal quantum dots show promise in the manufacture of photodetectors and solar cells. These devices require high yields of photogenerated charges and high carrier mobilities, which are difficult to achieve in quantum-dot films owing to a strong electron-hole interaction and quantum confinement. Here, we show that the quantum yield of photogenerated charges in strongly coupled PbSe quantum-dot films is unity over a large temperature range. At high photoexcitation density, a transition takes place from hopping between localized states to band-like transport. These strongly coupled quantum-dot films have electrical properties that approach those of crystalline bulk semiconductors, while retaining the size tunability and cheap processing properties of colloidal quantum dots.

  1. Nanojunctions in conducting polypyrrole single nanowire made by focused electron beam: Charge transport characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Min Ho; Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Jo, Seong Gi; Joo, Jinsoo

    2011-07-15

    A focused electron (E)-beam with various doses was irradiated on the intended positions of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) single nanowire (NW) to fabricate nanojunctions. The current-voltage characteristics and their temperature dependence of the PPy single NW with nanojunctions were measured and analyzed. By increasing the E-beam dose and the number of nanojunctions, the current level of the single NW was dramatically decreased, and the conductance gap became more severe as the temperature decreased. The charge transport behavior varied from three-dimensional variable range hopping to fluctuation induced tunneling models, depending on the dose of focused E-beam. From micro-Raman spectra, the focused E-beam irradiation induced the de-doped states and conformational modification of polymer chains in the nanojunctions. The results suggest that the nanojunctions made by focused E-beam acted as a quasi-potential barrier for charge conduction in the conducting PPy single NW.

  2. Selective enhancement of intra-chain charge transport to improve ammonia sensing performance in polyaniline layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Pejman; Qarehbaqi, Akram; Boroumand, Farhad Akbari

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline (PAni) is a p-type conductive polymer and its conductivity decreases upon exposure to ammonia. Ammonia molecules affect the intra-chain charge transfer process. The inter-chain resistance is higher than the intra-chain resistance. Thus, the ammonia sensing performance is highly attenuated by the influence of inter-chain resistance. Here, we report a facile method for the selective enhancement of the intra-chain charge transport process in a PAni film. The use of a good solvent such as toluene is demonstrated to increase the PAni molecular length, to reduce the inter-chain transitions, and to improve the ammonia sensing performance of the PAni film. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Charge, spin and thermal transport of graphene-based FNF multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbaschi, H.; Rashedi, G.; Mojarabian, F. M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the impact of repetition of graphene-based ferromagnet-normal(FN) regions on the transport properties of system is studied, theoretically. Here, the purpose is to generalize the Fert-Grünberg FNF multijunction to a graphene-based one. Thus, parallel and antiparallel magnetization alignments of ferromagnetic regions are considered. The concept of quantum well is used to calculate the transmission probability using the Dirac-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Charge, spin and thermal conductances are investigated for multilayer junctions in terms of magnetization alignments, strength of ferromagnets and thickness of ferromagnet regions. Finally charge, spin and thermal Giant magnetoresistances (GMR) are calculated for the above-mentioned structures. It is obtained that the spin conductance of antiparallel setups is zero, thus it can be used as a spin valve.

  4. Mechanism of Orientation-Dependent Asymmetric Charge Transport in Tunneling Junctions Comprising Photosystem I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, photoactive proteins have gained a lot of attention due to their incorporation into bioinspired (photo)electrochemical and solar cells. This paper describes the measurement of the asymmetry of current transport of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the entire photosystem I (PSI) protein complex (not the isolated reaction center, RCI), on two different “director SAMs” supported by ultraflat Au substrates. The director SAMs induce the preferential orientation of PSI, which manifest as asymmetry in tunneling charge-transport. We measured the oriented SAMs of PSI using eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn), a large-area technique, and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), a single-complex technique, and determined that the transport properties are comparable. By varying the temperatures at which the measurements were performed, we found that there is no measurable dependence of the current on temperature from ±0.1 to ±1.0 V bias, and thus, we suggest tunneling as the mechanism for transport; there are no thermally activated (e.g., hopping) processes. Therefore, it is likely that relaxation in the electron transport chain is not responsible for the asymmetry in the conductance of SAMs of PSI complexes in these junctions, which we ascribe instead to the presence of a large, net dipole moment present in PSI. PMID:26057523

  5. Electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels with pH-dependent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    "Smart" polyelectrolyte-grafted or "soft" nanochannels with pH-responsiveness have shown great promise for applications like manipulation of ion transport, ion sensing and selection, current rectification, and many more. In this paper, we develop a theory to study the electroosmotic transport in a polyelectrolyte-grafted (or soft) nanochannel with pH-dependent charge density. In one of our recent studies, we have identified that explicit consideration of hydrogen ion concentration is mandatory for appropriately describing the electrostatics of such systems and the resulting monomer concentration must obey a non-unique, cubic distribution. Here, we use this electrostatic calculation to study the corresponding electroosmotic transport. We establish that the effect of pH in the electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels introduces two separate issues: first is the consideration of the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations in describing the electroosmotic body force, and second is the consideration of the appropriate drag force that bears the signature of this cubic monomeric distribution. Our results indicate that the strength of the electroosmotic velocity for the pH-dependent case is always smaller than that for the pH-independent case, with the extent of this difference being a function of the system parameters. Such nature of the electroosmotic transport will be extremely significant in suppressing the electroosmotic flow strength with implications in large number applications such as capillary electrophoresis induced separation, electric field mediated DNA elongation, electrophoretic DNA nanopore sequencing, and many more.

  6. Charge distribution and transport properties in reduced ceria phases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, E.; Smith, M. F.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2011-12-01

    The question of the charge distribution in reduced ceria phases (CeO2-x) is important for understanding the microscopic physics of oxygen storage capacity, and the electronic and ionic conductivities in these materials. All these are key properties in the application of these materials in catalysis and electrochemical devices. Several approaches have been applied to study this problem, including ab initio methods. Recently [1], we applied the bond valence model (BVM) to discuss the charge distribution in several different crystallographic phases of reduced ceria. Here, we compare the BVM results to those from atomistic simulations to determine if there is consistency in the predictions of the two approaches. Our analysis shows that the two methods give a consistent picture of the charge distribution around oxygen vacancies in bulk reduced ceria phases. We then review the transport theory applicable to reduced ceria phases, providing useful relationships which enable comparison of experimental results obtained by different techniques. In particular, we compare transport parameters obtained from the observed optical absorption spectrum, α(ω), dc electrical conductivity with those predicted by small polaron theory and the Harrison method. The small polaron energy is comparable to that estimated from α(ω). However, we found a discrepancy between the value of the electron hopping matrix element, t, estimated from the Marcus-Hush formula and that obtained by the Harrison method. Part of this discrepancy could be attributed to the system lying in the crossover region between adiabatic and nonadiabatic whereas our calculations assumed the system to be nonadiabatic. Finally, by considering the relationship between the charge distribution and electronic conductivity, we suggest the possibility of low temperature metallic conductivity for intermediate phases, i.e., x˜0.3. This has not yet been experimentally observed.

  7. Master equation approach to charge injection and transport in organic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, José A.; Voss, Grasiela

    2005-03-01

    We develop a master equation model of a disordered organic insulator sandwiched between metallic electrodes by treating as rate processes both the injection and the internal transport. We show how the master equation model allows for the inclusion of crucial correlation effects in the charge transport, particularly of the Pauli exclusion principle and of space-charge effects, besides, being dependent on just the microscopic form of the transfer rate between the localized electronic states, it allows for the investigation of different microscopic scenarios in the organic, such as polaronic hopping, correlated energy levels, interaction with image charge, etc. The model allows for a separate analysis of the injection and the recombination currents. We find that the disorder, besides increasing the injection current, eliminates the possibility of observation of a Fowler-Nordheim injection current at zero temperature, and that it does not alter the Schottky barrier size of the zero-field thermionic injection current from the value based on the energy difference between the electrode Fermi level and the highest occupied molecular orbital/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels in the organic, but it makes the Arrhenius temperature dependence appear at larger temperatures. We investigate how the I(V ) characteristics of a device is affected by the presence of correlations in the site energy distribution and by the form of the internal hopping rate, specifically the Miller-Abrahams rate and the Marcus or small-polaron rate. We show that the disorder does not modify significantly the eβ√E field dependence of the net current due to the Schottky barrier lowering caused by the attraction between the charge and its image in the electrode.

  8. Exponential characteristic nonlinear radiation transport method for unstructured grids of triangular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.; Brennan, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    The exponential characteristic (EC) method is one of a family of nonlinear spatial quadratures for discrete ordinates radiation transport that are positive and at least second-order accurate and provide accurate results for deep-penetration problems using coarse meshes. The authors use a split-cell methodology to adapt the method to unstructured grids of arbitrarily shaped and oriented triangular cells that provide efficient representation of curved surfaces. Exponential representations of the flux entering through a cell edge and of the scattering source within a cell are constructed to match average values and first moments passed from the adjacent cell (or from the boundary conditions) or obtained from the angular quadrature of the directional flux spatial moments in the previous iteration (or from an initial guess). The resulting one- and two-dimensional nonlinear rootsolving problems are efficiently solved using Newton`s method with an accurate starting approximation. Improved algorithms, presented here, have increased the efficiency of the method by a factor of 10 as compared to an initial report. The EC method now costs only twice as much per cell as does the linear characteristic method but can be accurate with many fewer cells. Numerical testing shows the EC method to be robust and effective.

  9. Adaptive Finite-Element Solution of the Nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann Equation: A Charged Spherical Particle at Various Distances from a Charged Cylindrical Pore in a Charged Planar Surface

    PubMed

    Bowen; Sharif

    1997-03-15

    A Galerkin finite-element approach combined with an error estimator and automatic mesh refinement has been used to provide a flexible numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A Newton sequence technique was used to solve the nonlinear equations arising from the finite-element discretization procedure. Errors arising from the finite-element solution due to mesh refinement were calculated using the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator, and an automatic remeshing strategy was adopted to achieve a solution satisfying a preset quality. Examples of the performance of the error estimator in adaptive mesh refinement are presented. The adaptive finite-element scheme presented in this study has proved to be an effective technique in minimizing errors in finite-element solutions for a given problem, in particular those of complex geometries. As an example, numerical solutions are presented for the case of a charged spherical particle at various distances from a charged cylindrical pore in a charged planar surface. Such a scheme provides a quantification of the significance of electrostatic interactions for an important industrial technology-membrane separation processes.

  10. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  11. Hydrogenated Graphene as a Homoepitaxial Tunnel Barrier for Spin and Charge Transport in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Whitener, Keith E; Jonker, Berend T

    2015-07-28

    We demonstrate that hydrogenated graphene performs as a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier on a graphene charge/spin channel. We examine the tunneling behavior through measuring the IV curves and zero bias resistance. We also fabricate hydrogenated graphene/graphene nonlocal spin valves and measure the spin lifetimes using the Hanle effect, with spintronic nonlocal spin valve operation demonstrated up to room temperature. We show that while hydrogenated graphene indeed allows for spin transport in graphene and has many advantages over oxide tunnel barriers, it does not perform as well as similar fluorinated graphene/graphene devices, possibly due to the presence of magnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene that act as spin scatterers.

  12. Charge transport processes in LiNbO3:Fe at high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermann, F.; Krätzig, E.

    1992-07-01

    Light-induced refractive index changes in LiNbO3:Fe crystals are investigated at high light intensities (>109 Wm-2). Holographic gratings are recorded and erased with frequency-doubled pulses of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We find new intensity dependent contributions to the holographic sensitivity, to the photoconductivity, and to the saturation value of refractive index change. Light-induced absorption changes are also detected. These results indicate that the Fe2+/Fe3+ charge transport model, well established for low intensities, has to be modified for high intensities by assuming additional centers which trap and supply electrons.

  13. The effect of interfacial layers on charge transport in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuyise, Xolani G.; Tonui, Patrick; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-09-01

    The effect of interfacial buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) whose active layer is composed of poly(3 hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend was studied. The electrical properties of OPV devices produced with and without interfacial layers are compared and discussed in terms of measured parameters of the cells. The charge transport properties showed significant difference on the mobility and activation factor between the two types of device structures. The life time measurements in the unprotected conditions are also presented and discussed.

  14. Charge transport in the normal metal/diffusive ferromagnet/ s-wave superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexander; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2005-11-01

    Charge transport in the normal metal/insulator/diffusive ferromagnet/insulator/ s-wave superconductor (N/I/DF/I/S) junctions is studied for various situations solving the Usadel equation under the Nazarov's generalized boundary condition. Conductance of the junction is calculated by changing the magnitude of the resistance in DF, Thouless energy in DF, the exchange field in DF, the transparencies of the insulating barriers. We have found a new broad peak around zero voltage as well as zero bias conductance peak splitting and dip splitting.

  15. Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Li, Connie H; Robinson, Jeremy T; Jonker, Berend T

    2014-01-01

    The coupled imperatives for reduced heat dissipation and power consumption in high-density electronics have rekindled interest in devices based on tunnelling. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, layer uniformity, interface stability and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Two-dimensional materials such as graphene obviate these issues and offer a new paradigm for tunnel barriers. Here we demonstrate a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier structure in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high-mobility transport channel. We fluorinate the top layer of a graphene bilayer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single-monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene channel. We demonstrate high spin injection efficiency with a tunnelling spin polarization >60%, lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the Hanle effect.

  16. Spin Selective Charge Transport through Cysteine Capped CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Brian P; Kiran, Vankayala; Varade, Vaibhav; Naaman, Ron; Waldeck, David H

    2016-07-13

    This work demonstrates that chiral imprinted CdSe quantum dots (QDs) can act as spin selective filters for charge transport. The spin filtering properties of chiral nanoparticles were investigated by magnetic conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (mCP-AFM) measurements and magnetoresistance measurements. The mCP-AFM measurements show that the chirality of the quantum dots and the magnetic orientation of the tip affect the current-voltage curves. Similarly, magnetoresistance measurements demonstrate that the electrical transport through films of chiral quantum dots correlates with the chiroptical properties of the QD. The spin filtering properties of chiral quantum dots may prove useful in future applications, for example, photovoltaics, spintronics, and other spin-driven devices. PMID:27336320

  17. Ultraviolet Electroluminescence and Blue-Green Phosphorescence using an Organic Diphosphine Oxide Charge Transporting Layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Paul E.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    We report electroluminescence with a peak wavelength at 338 nm from a simple bilayer organic light emitting device (OLED) made using 4,4’-bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) biphenyl (PO1). In an OLED geometry, the material is preferentially electron transporting. Doping the PO1 layer with iridium(III)bis(4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C2’)picolinate (FIrpic) gives rise to electrophosphorescence with a peak external quantum efficiency of 7.8% at 0.09 mA/cm2 and 5.8% at 13 mA/cm2. The latter current density is obtained at 6.3 V applied forward bias. This represents a new class of wide-bandgap charge transporting organic materials which may prove useful as host materials for blue electrophosphoresent OLEDs.

  18. Theory of thermal and charge transport in diffusive normal metal/superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, A. A.; Asano, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal and charge transport in diffusive normal metal (DN)/insulator/ s -, d -, and p -wave superconductor junctions are studied based on the Usadel equation with the Nazarov’s generalized boundary condition. We derive a general expression of the thermal conductance in unconventional superconducting junctions. Thermal conductance, electric conductance of junctions and their Lorentz ratio are calculated as a function of resistance in DN, the Thouless energy, magnetic scattering rate in DN and transparency of the insulating barrier. We also discuss transport properties for various orientation angles between the normal to the interface and the crystal axis of superconductors. It is demonstrated that the proximity effect does not influence the thermal conductance while the midgap Andreev resonant states suppress it. Dependencies of the electrical and thermal conductance on temperature are sensitive to pairing symmetries and orientation angles. The results imply a possibility to distinguish one pairing symmetry from another based on the results of experimental observations.

  19. Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Li, Connie H; Robinson, Jeremy T; Jonker, Berend T

    2014-01-01

    The coupled imperatives for reduced heat dissipation and power consumption in high-density electronics have rekindled interest in devices based on tunnelling. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, layer uniformity, interface stability and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Two-dimensional materials such as graphene obviate these issues and offer a new paradigm for tunnel barriers. Here we demonstrate a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier structure in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high-mobility transport channel. We fluorinate the top layer of a graphene bilayer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single-monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene channel. We demonstrate high spin injection efficiency with a tunnelling spin polarization >60%, lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the Hanle effect. PMID:24445349

  20. Microstructural control of charge transport in organic blend thin-film transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Hunter, Simon; Chen, Jihua; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2014-07-17

    In this paper, the charge-transport processes in organic p-channel transistors based on the small-molecule 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene (diF-TES ADT), the polymer poly(triarylamine)(PTAA) and blends thereof are investigated. In the case of blend films, lateral conductive atomic force microscopy in combination with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy are used to study the evolution of charge transport as a function of blends composition, allowing direct correlation of the film's elemental composition and morphology with hole transport. Low-temperature transport measurements reveal that optimized blend devices exhibit lower temperature dependence of hole mobility than pristine PTAA devices while also providing a narrower bandgap trap distribution thanmore » pristine diF-TES ADT devices. These combined effects increase the mean hole mobility in optimized blends to 2.4 cm2/Vs; double the value measured for best diF-TES ADT-only devices. The bandgap trap distribution in transistors based on different diF-TES ADT:PTAA blend ratios are compared and the act of blending these semiconductors is seen to reduce the trap distribution width yet increase the average trap energy compared to pristine diF-TES ADT-based devices. In conclusion, our measurements suggest that an average trap energy of <75 meV and a trap distribution of <100 meV is needed to achieve optimum hole mobility in transistors based on diF-TES ADT:PTAA blends.« less

  1. Microstructural control of charge transport in organic blend thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Simon; Chen, Jihua; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2014-07-17

    In this paper, the charge-transport processes in organic p-channel transistors based on the small-molecule 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene (diF-TES ADT), the polymer poly(triarylamine)(PTAA) and blends thereof are investigated. In the case of blend films, lateral conductive atomic force microscopy in combination with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy are used to study the evolution of charge transport as a function of blends composition, allowing direct correlation of the film's elemental composition and morphology with hole transport. Low-temperature transport measurements reveal that optimized blend devices exhibit lower temperature dependence of hole mobility than pristine PTAA devices while also providing a narrower bandgap trap distribution than pristine diF-TES ADT devices. These combined effects increase the mean hole mobility in optimized blends to 2.4 cm2/Vs; double the value measured for best diF-TES ADT-only devices. The bandgap trap distribution in transistors based on different diF-TES ADT:PTAA blend ratios are compared and the act of blending these semiconductors is seen to reduce the trap distribution width yet increase the average trap energy compared to pristine diF-TES ADT-based devices. In conclusion, our measurements suggest that an average trap energy of <75 meV and a trap distribution of <100 meV is needed to achieve optimum hole mobility in transistors based on diF-TES ADT:PTAA blends.

  2. Applying Differential Transforms and ADER to Multi-Dimensional Atmospheric Transport and Non-Linear Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Differential Transforms (DTs), a core component of so-called "automatic" or "algorithmic" differentiation, offer significant flexibility and efficiency to any numerical method. The i-th and j-th DT, U(i,j), of a function, u(x,y), is simply U(i,j)=1/(i!j!)*∂(i+j)u/∂xi∂yj. Being a term in the Taylor series of u(x,y) makes the reverse transform trivial. This relation also computes initial DTs from known spatial derivatives. What is novel about DTs is how they simplify a complex PDE system, transforming most arithmetic, trigonometric, and other operators into simple recurrence relations in derivative space. This allows one to simply and quickly compute analytical derivatives of highly complex and non-linear functions. Consider a pseudo-conservation law system, u(x)t+f(u,x)x=s(u,x), for instance. The fluxes and source terms could be (and often are) highly complex, non-linear functions of the state vector and independent variables. Regardless of the spatial discretization (variational / finite-element, weak / finite-volume, or strong / finite-difference), one nearly always must resort to tensored quadrature to evaluate face fluxes and body source terms, and this treatment is expensive. However, if one uses DTs to analytically compute spatial derivatives of the flux and source terms, given spatial derivatives of u, then the fluxes and source terms are directly expanded as polynomials, allowing for significantly cheaper, quadrature-free integration, sampling, and differentiation with a single dot product. Besides being simpler, this also allows flexibility for Galerkin methods in particular to analytically and cheaply compute body integrals, which are often approximated inexactly with quadrature. Computing Nth-order DTs in D dimensions is of O(D2*N) complexity, and whether for transport or non-linear compressible Euler equations, they are cheaper to compute and integrate analytically than quadrature. Further, because time-dependent PDE systems relate spatial

  3. Dispersive charge transport due to strong charge dipole interactions of cyano-group in the cyano-carbazole based molecular glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dong Keun; Hong, Sung Mok; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, B.-S.; Jin, J.-I.

    2005-12-01

    Using the time of flight (ToF) method, we investigated the bipolar charge transport for two glass-forming molecules containing carbazole and cyano-carbazole moiety. The enhanced electron mobility was observed in the cyano-carbazole compound. From the numerical method based the Laplace formalism, the distribution of hole trapping energy was obtained for the carbazole compound. This result was compared with the exponential distribution extracted from dispersion parameter for the cyano-carbazole material. Considering charge-dipole interactions as a reason for the disordered trapping mechanism, we discussed dispersive charge transport induced by a strong dipolar (i.e. cyano) group by comparing the distributions of hole trapping sites for two compounds.

  4. 41 CFR 302-7.100 - How are the charges of transporting HHG, and temporary storage calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are the charges of transporting HHG, and temporary storage calculated? 302-7.100 Section 302-7.100 Public Contracts and Property...-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL BOOKS, PAPERS, AND EQUIPMENT...

  5. 41 CFR 302-7.100 - How are the charges of transporting HHG, and temporary storage calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are the charges of transporting HHG, and temporary storage calculated? 302-7.100 Section 302-7.100 Public Contracts and Property...-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL BOOKS, PAPERS, AND EQUIPMENT...

  6. Charge transport properties of bulk Ta3N5 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbec, Juliana M.; Galli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Tantalum nitride is considered a promising material for photoelectrochemical water splitting, however, its charge transport properties remain poorly understood. We investigated polaronic and band transport in Ta3N5 using first-principles calculations. We first studied the formation of small polarons using density-functional theory (DFT) including DFT +U and hybrid functionals. We found that electron small polarons may occur but hole polarons are not energetically favorable. The estimated polaronic mobility for electrons is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than that measured in Ta3N5 films, suggesting that the main transport mechanism for both electrons and holes is bandlike. Since band transport is strongly affected by the carrier effective masses, and Ta3N5 is known to have large electron and hole effective masses, we also investigated whether substitutional impurities or strain may help lower the effective masses. We found a significant reduction in both electron and hole effective masses (up to 17% for electrons and 39% for holes) under applied strain, which may lead to a substantial improvement (up to 30% for electrons and 15% for holes) in the carrier mobilities.

  7. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Livshits, Gideon I; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J; Di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits. PMID:25344689

  8. Coherent Charge Transport in Ballistic InSb Nanowire Josephson Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, S.; Kang, N.; Fan, D. X.; Wang, L. B.; Huang, Y. Q.; Caroff, P.; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid InSb nanowire-superconductor devices are promising for investigating Majorana modes and topological quantum computation in solid-state devices. An experimental realisation of ballistic, phase-coherent superconductor-nanowire hybrid devices is a necessary step towards engineering topological superconducting electronics. Here, we report on a low-temperature transport study of Josephson junction devices fabricated from InSb nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and provide a clear evidence for phase-coherent, ballistic charge transport through the nanowires in the junctions. We demonstrate that our devices show gate-tunable proximity-induced supercurrent and clear signatures of multiple Andreev reflections in the differential conductance, indicating phase-coherent transport within the junctions. We also observe periodic modulations of the critical current that can be associated with the Fabry-Pérot interference in the nanowires in the ballistic transport regime. Our work shows that the InSb nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are of excellent material quality and hybrid superconducting devices made from these nanowires are highly desirable for investigation of the novel physics in topological states of matter and for applications in topological quantum electronics. PMID:27102689

  9. Coherent Charge Transport in Ballistic InSb Nanowire Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kang, N.; Fan, D. X.; Wang, L. B.; Huang, Y. Q.; Caroff, P.; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid InSb nanowire-superconductor devices are promising for investigating Majorana modes and topological quantum computation in solid-state devices. An experimental realisation of ballistic, phase-coherent superconductor-nanowire hybrid devices is a necessary step towards engineering topological superconducting electronics. Here, we report on a low-temperature transport study of Josephson junction devices fabricated from InSb nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and provide a clear evidence for phase-coherent, ballistic charge transport through the nanowires in the junctions. We demonstrate that our devices show gate-tunable proximity-induced supercurrent and clear signatures of multiple Andreev reflections in the differential conductance, indicating phase-coherent transport within the junctions. We also observe periodic modulations of the critical current that can be associated with the Fabry-Pérot interference in the nanowires in the ballistic transport regime. Our work shows that the InSb nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are of excellent material quality and hybrid superconducting devices made from these nanowires are highly desirable for investigation of the novel physics in topological states of matter and for applications in topological quantum electronics.

  10. Description of bipolar charge transport in polyethylene using a fluid model with a constant mobility: model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeRoy, S.; Segur, P.; Teyssedre, G.; Laurent, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conduction model aimed at describing bipolar transport and space charge phenomena in low density polyethylene under dc stress. In the first part we recall the basic requirements for the description of charge transport and charge storage in disordered media with emphasis on the case of polyethylene. A quick review of available conduction models is presented and our approach is compared with these models. Then, the bases of the model are described and related assumptions are discussed. Finally, results on external current, trapped and free space charge distributions, field distribution and recombination rate are presented and discussed, considering a constant dc voltage, a step-increase of the voltage, and a polarization-depolarization protocol for the applied voltage. It is shown that the model is able to describe the general features reported for external current, electroluminescence and charge distribution in polyethylene.

  11. Electron transport and nonlinear optical properties of substituted aryldimesityl boranes: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Altaf Hussain; Islam, Nasarul

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study was carried out on a series of aryldimesityl borane (DMB) derivatives using Density Functional theory. Optimized geometries and electronic parameters like electron affinity, reorganization energy, frontiers molecular contours, polarizability and hyperpolarizability have been calculated by employing B3PW91/6-311++G (d, p) level of theory. Our results show that the Hammett function and geometrical parameters correlates well with the reorganization energies and hyperpolarizability for the series of DMB derivatives studied in this work. The orbital energy study reveals that the electron releasing substituents increase the LUMO energies and electron withdrawing substituents decrease the LUMO energies, reflecting the electron transport character of aryldimesityl borane derivatives. From frontier molecular orbitals diagram it is evident that mesityl rings act as the donor, while the phenylene and Boron atom appear as acceptors in these systems. The calculated hyperpolarizability of secondary amine derivative of DMB is 40 times higher than DMB (1). The electronic excitation contributions to the hyperpolarizability studied by using TDDFT calculation shows that hyperpolarizability correlates well with dipole moment in ground and excited state and excitation energy in terms of the two-level model. Thus the results of these calculations can be helpful in designing the DMB derivatives for efficient electron transport and nonlinear optical material by appropriate substitution with electron releasing or withdrawing substituents on phenyl ring of DMB system.

  12. Charge transport mechanisms and memory effects in amorphous TaNx thin films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous semiconducting materials have unique electrical properties that may be beneficial in nanoelectronics, such as low leakage current, charge memory effects, and hysteresis functionality. However, electrical characteristics between different or neighboring regions in the same amorphous nanostructure may differ greatly. In this work, the bulk and surface local charge carrier transport properties of a-TaNx amorphous thin films deposited in two different substrates are investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The nitride films are grown either on Au (100) or Si [100] substrates by pulsed laser deposition at 157 nm in nitrogen environment. For the a-TaNx films deposited on Au, it is found that they display a negligible leakage current until a high bias voltage is reached. On the contrary, a much lower threshold voltage for the leakage current and a lower total resistance is observed for the a-TaNx film deposited on the Si substrate. Furthermore, I-V characteristics of the a-TaNx film deposited on Au show significant hysteresis effects for both polarities of bias voltage, while for the film deposited on Si hysteresis, effects appear only for positive bias voltage, suggesting that with the usage of the appropriate substrate, the a-TaNx nanodomains may have potential use as charge memory devices. PMID:24134740

  13. Charge transport properties in microcrystalline KDyFe(China){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, P.H.; Goubard, F. Chevrot, C.; Tabuteau, A.

    2007-02-15

    Microcrystalline solid dysprosium(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) was synthesized by co-precipitation in aqueous solution. The resulting solid has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray analysis and solid state electrochemistry. The use of a cavity microelectrode was necessary to explore a wide range of time scale and minimize the (undesired) capacitive currents. Cyclic voltametric experiments were very helpful to understand the kinetic of charge transfer in such microstructure. A structure-properties relationship has been established from the crystallographic and the electrochemical properties. A square-scheme is presented to explain the unique electrochemical behavior of hexacyanoferrate containing dysprosium since this compound exhibits a second redox system. The solid presents an open channel-like morphology in which the motion of charged species occurs during the redox processes. Precisely, the electronic transfer is accompanied by a cation diffusion inside the microcrystalline structure. The size of these channels strongly suggests that the kinetic of charge transfer is limited by the cation transport into these structures. - Graphical abstract: Dy and Fe polyhedra packing in the cell of KDyFe(China){sub 6}.3.5H{sub 2}O shows occluded water molecules and potassium ions forming a pseudohexagonal 2D sub-lattice connected to each other by diffusion channels.

  14. Transport mechanisms and charge trapping in thin dielectric/Si nano-crystals structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salvo, B.; Ghibaudo, G.; Luthereau, P.; Baron, T.; Guillaumot, B.; Reimbold, G.

    2001-08-01

    In this work the transport mechanisms and charge trapping of novel dielectric systems based on semiconductor nano-crystals embedded in a dielectric matrix are studied. In particular, stacked films composed of a thin bottom dielectric (2-4 nm thick SiO2 or Si3N4), with an embedded two-dimensional (2-D) array of Si nano-crystals (obtained by low pressure chemical vapor deposition or by annealing of silicon rich oxide) and a thick top dielectric (8 nm-thick SiO2) are investigated. Gate leakage currents, at medium/high electric fields, are examined at temperatures varying between 77 and 473 K. Charge trapping phenomena, occurring at low electric fields, are studied as a function of the stressing gate voltage and the stressing time. Experimental results are explained by means of an elastic tunneling model, which takes into account the main structural characteristics of the Si-dots (size dispersion, density, spatial distribution) as well as the effect of trapped charges in the silicon nano-crystals.

  15. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  16. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current‑voltage and transient current‑time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm2 v‑1 s‑1), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability.

  17. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current-voltage and transient current-time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm2 v-1 s-1), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability.

  18. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: CAN NONLOCAL TRANSPORT EXPLAIN HELIOSPHERIC CHARGE STATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-08-20

    There have been several ideas proposed to explain how the Sun's corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Some models assume that open magnetic field lines are heated by Alfvén waves driven by photospheric motions and dissipated after undergoing a turbulent cascade. Other models posit that much of the solar wind's mass and energy is injected via magnetic reconnection from closed coronal loops. The latter idea is motivated by observations of reconnecting jets and also by similarities of ion composition between closed loops and the slow wind. Wave/turbulence models have also succeeded in reproducing observed trends in ion composition signatures versus wind speed. However, the absolute values of the charge-state ratios predicted by those models tended to be too low in comparison with observations. This Letter refines these predictions by taking better account of weak Coulomb collisions for coronal electrons, whose thermodynamic properties determine the ion charge states in the low corona. A perturbative description of nonlocal electron transport is applied to an existing set of wave/turbulence models. The resulting electron velocity distributions in the low corona exhibit mild suprathermal tails characterized by ''kappa'' exponents between 10 and 25. These suprathermal electrons are found to be sufficiently energetic to enhance the charge states of oxygen ions, while maintaining the same relative trend with wind speed that was found when the distribution was assumed to be Maxwellian. The updated wave/turbulence models are in excellent agreement with solar wind ion composition measurements.

  19. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-12

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current-voltage and transient current-time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm(2) v(-1) s(-1)), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability. PMID:27363543

  20. Simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport of bismuth vanadate photoanodes for solar water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woo; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia A.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2015-01-01

    n-Type bismuth vanadate has been identified as one of the most promising photoanodes for use in a water-splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The major limitation of BiVO4 is its relatively wide bandgap (∼2.5 eV), which fundamentally limits its solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. Here we show that annealing nanoporous bismuth vanadate electrodes at 350 °C under nitrogen flow can result in nitrogen doping and generation of oxygen vacancies. This gentle nitrogen treatment not only effectively reduces the bandgap by ∼0.2 eV but also increases the majority carrier density and mobility, enhancing electron–hole separation. The effect of nitrogen incorporation and oxygen vacancies on the electronic band structure and charge transport of bismuth vanadate are systematically elucidated by ab initio calculations. Owing to simultaneous enhancements in photon absorption and charge transport, the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of nitrogen-treated BiVO4 for solar water splitting exceeds 2%, a record for a single oxide photon absorber, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26498984