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Sample records for nonlinear finite-element model

  1. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  2. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying a series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.

  3. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  4. Nonlinear structural finite element model updating and uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hamed; Astroza, Rodrigo; Conte, Joel P.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a framework for nonlinear finite element (FE) model updating, in which state-of-the-art nonlinear structural FE modeling and analysis techniques are combined with the maximum likelihood estimation method (MLE) to estimate time-invariant parameters governing the nonlinear hysteretic material constitutive models used in the FE model of the structure. The estimation uncertainties are evaluated based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) theorem. A proof-of-concept example, consisting of a cantilever steel column representing a bridge pier, is provided to verify the proposed nonlinear FE model updating framework.

  5. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  6. Finite element model calibration of a nonlinear perforated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Beberniss, Timothy J.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a case study in which the finite element model for a curved circular plate is calibrated to reproduce both the linear and nonlinear dynamic response measured from two nominally identical samples. The linear dynamic response is described with the linear natural frequencies and mode shapes identified with a roving hammer test. Due to the uncertainty in the stiffness characteristics from the manufactured perforations, the linear natural frequencies are used to update the effective modulus of elasticity of the full order finite element model (FEM). The nonlinear dynamic response is described with nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) measured using force appropriation and high speed 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC). The measured NNMs are used to update the boundary conditions of the full order FEM through comparison with NNMs calculated from a nonlinear reduced order model (NLROM). This comparison revealed that the nonlinear behavior could not be captured without accounting for the small curvature of the plate from manufacturing as confirmed in literature. So, 3D-DIC was also used to identify the initial static curvature of each plate and the resulting curvature was included in the full order FEM. The updated models are then used to understand how the stress distribution changes at large response amplitudes providing a possible explanation of failures observed during testing.

  7. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  8. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of planetary gears using analytical and finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambarisha, Vijaya Kumar; Parker, Robert G.

    2007-05-01

    Vibration-induced gear noise and dynamic loads remain key concerns in many transmission applications that use planetary gears. Tooth separations at large vibrations introduce nonlinearity in geared systems. The present work examines the complex, nonlinear dynamic behavior of spur planetary gears using two models: (i) a lumped-parameter model, and (ii) a finite element model. The two-dimensional (2D) lumped-parameter model represents the gears as lumped inertias, the gear meshes as nonlinear springs with tooth contact loss and periodically varying stiffness due to changing tooth contact conditions, and the supports as linear springs. The 2D finite element model is developed from a unique finite element-contact analysis solver specialized for gear dynamics. Mesh stiffness variation excitation, corner contact, and gear tooth contact loss are all intrinsically considered in the finite element analysis. The dynamics of planetary gears show a rich spectrum of nonlinear phenomena. Nonlinear jumps, chaotic motions, and period-doubling bifurcations occur when the mesh frequency or any of its higher harmonics are near a natural frequency of the system. Responses from the dynamic analysis using analytical and finite element models are successfully compared qualitatively and quantitatively. These comparisons validate the effectiveness of the lumped-parameter model to simulate the dynamics of planetary gears. Mesh phasing rules to suppress rotational and translational vibrations in planetary gears are valid even when nonlinearity from tooth contact loss occurs. These mesh phasing rules, however, are not valid in the chaotic and period-doubling regions.

  10. Determination of Nonlinear Stiffness Coefficients for Finite Element Models with Application to the Random Vibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muravyov, Alexander A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a method for obtaining nonlinear stiffness coefficients in modal coordinates for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models is developed. The method requires application of a finite-element program with a geometrically non- linear static capability. The MSC/NASTRAN code is employed for this purpose. The equations of motion of a MDOF system are formulated in modal coordinates. A set of linear eigenvectors is used to approximate the solution of the nonlinear problem. The random vibration problem of the MDOF nonlinear system is then considered. The solutions obtained by application of two different versions of a stochastic linearization technique are compared with linear and exact (analytical) solutions in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) displacements and strains for a beam structure.

  11. Finite element modelling of non-linear magnetic circuits using Cosmic NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The general purpose Finite Element Program COSMIC NASTRAN currently has the ability to model magnetic circuits with constant permeablilities. An approach was developed which, through small modifications to the program, allows modelling of non-linear magnetic devices including soft magnetic materials, permanent magnets and coils. Use of the NASTRAN code resulted in output which can be used for subsequent mechanical analysis using a variation of the same computer model. Test problems were found to produce theoretically verifiable results.

  12. Non-linear spacecraft component parameters identification based on experimental results and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vismara, S. O.; Ricci, S.; Bellini, M.; Trittoni, L.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present paper is to describe a procedure to identify and model the non-linear behaviour of structural elements. The procedure herein applied can be divided into two main steps: the system identification and the finite element model updating. The application of the restoring force surface method as a strategy to characterize and identify localized non-linearities has been investigated. This method, which works in the time domain, has been chosen because it has `built-in' characterization capabilities, it allows a direct non-parametric identification of non-linear single-degree-of-freedom systems and it can easily deal with sine-sweep excitations. Two different application examples are reported. At first, a numerical test case has been carried out to investigate the modelling techniques in the case of non-linear behaviour based on the presence of a free-play in the model. The second example concerns the flap of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle that successfully completed its 100-min mission on 11 February 2015. The flap was developed under the responsibility of Thales Alenia Space Italia, the prime contractor, which provided the experimental data needed to accomplish the investigation. The procedure here presented has been applied to the results of modal testing performed on the article. Once the non-linear parameters were identified, they were used to update the finite element model in order to prove its capability of predicting the flap behaviour for different load levels.

  13. Fracture prediction for the proximal femur using finite element models: Part II--Nonlinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Lotz, J C; Cheal, E J; Hayes, W C

    1991-11-01

    In Part I we reported the results of linear finite element models of the proximal femur generated using geometric and constitutive data collected with quantitative computed tomography. These models demonstrated excellent agreement with in vitro studies when used to predict ultimate failure loads. In Part II, we report our extension of those finite element models to include nonlinear behavior of the trabecular and cortical bone. A highly nonlinear material law, originally designed for representing concrete, was used for trabecular bone, while a bilinear material law was used for cortical bone. We found excellent agreement between the model predictions and in vitro fracture data for both the onset of bone yielding and bone fracture. For bone yielding, the model predictions were within 2 percent for a load which simulated one-legged stance and 1 percent for a load which simulated a fall. For bone fracture, the model predictions were within 1 percent and 17 percent, respectively. The models also demonstrated different fracture mechanisms for the two different loading configurations. For one-legged stance, failure within the primary compressive trabeculae at the subcapital region occurred first, leading to load transfer and, ultimately, failure of the surrounding cortical shell. However, for a fall, failure of the cortical and trabecular bone occurred simultaneously within the intertrochanteric region. These results support our previous findings that the strength of the subcapital region is primarily due to trabecular bone whereas the strength of the intertrochanteric region is primarily due to cortical bone.

  14. Non-linear rotation-free shell finite-element models for aortic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Stolarski, Henryk; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2017-01-04

    Hyperelastic material models have been incorporated in the rotation-free, large deformation, shell finite element (FE) formulation of (Stolarski et al., 2013) and applied to dynamic simulations of aortic heart valve. Two models used in the past in analysis of such problem i.e. the Saint-Venant and May-Newmann-Yin (MNY) material models have been considered and compared. Uniaxial tests for those constitutive equations were performed to verify the formulation and implementation of the models. The issue of leaflets interactions during the closing of the heart valve at the end of systole is considered. The critical role of using non-linear anisotropic model for proper dynamic response of the heart valve especially during the closing phase is demonstrated quantitatively. This work contributes an efficient FE framework for simulating biological tissues and paves the way for high-fidelity flow structure interaction simulations of native and bioprosthetic aortic heart valves.

  15. Stochastic filtering for damage identification through nonlinear structural finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astroza, Rodrigo; Ebrahimian, Hamed; Conte, Joel P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel framework that combines advanced mechanics-based nonlinear (hysteretic) finite element (FE) models and stochastic filtering techniques to estimate unknown time-invariant parameters of nonlinear inelastic material models used in the FE model. Using input-output data recorded during earthquake events, the proposed framework updates the nonlinear FE model of the structure. The updated FE model can be directly used for damage identification and further used for damage prognosis. To update the unknown time-invariant parameters of the FE model, two alternative stochastic filtering methods are used: the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). A three-dimensional, 5-story, 2-by-1 bay reinforced concrete (RC) frame is used to verify the proposed framework. The RC frame is modeled using fiber-section displacement-based beam-column elements with distributed plasticity and is subjected to the ground motion recorded at the Sylmar station during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The results indicate that the proposed framework accurately estimate the unknown material parameters of the nonlinear FE model. The UKF outperforms the EKF when the relative root-mean-square error of the recorded responses are compared. In addition, the results suggest that the convergence of the estimate of modeling parameters is smoother and faster when the UKF is utilized.

  16. Parameter estimation of a nonlinear Burger's model using nanoindentation and finite element-based inverse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamim, Salah Uddin Ahmed

    Nanoindentation involves probing a hard diamond tip into a material, where the load and the displacement experienced by the tip is recorded continuously. This load-displacement data is a direct function of material's innate stress-strain behavior. Thus, theoretically it is possible to extract mechanical properties of a material through nanoindentation. However, due to various nonlinearities associated with nanoindentation the process of interpreting load-displacement data into material properties is difficult. Although, simple elastic behavior can be characterized easily, a method to characterize complicated material behavior such as nonlinear viscoelasticity is still lacking. In this study, a nanoindentation-based material characterization technique is developed to characterize soft materials exhibiting nonlinear viscoelasticity. Nanoindentation experiment was modeled in finite element analysis software (ABAQUS), where a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was incorporated using user-defined subroutine (UMAT). The model parameters were calibrated using a process called inverse analysis. In this study, a surrogate model-based approach was used for the inverse analysis. The different factors affecting the surrogate model performance are analyzed in order to optimize the performance with respect to the computational cost.

  17. Nonlinear finite element model updating for damage identification of civil structures using batch Bayesian estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hamed; Astroza, Rodrigo; Conte, Joel P.; de Callafon, Raymond A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a framework for structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage identification of civil structures. This framework integrates advanced mechanics-based nonlinear finite element (FE) modeling and analysis techniques with a batch Bayesian estimation approach to estimate time-invariant model parameters used in the FE model of the structure of interest. The framework uses input excitation and dynamic response of the structure and updates a nonlinear FE model of the structure to minimize the discrepancies between predicted and measured response time histories. The updated FE model can then be interrogated to detect, localize, classify, and quantify the state of damage and predict the remaining useful life of the structure. As opposed to recursive estimation methods, in the batch Bayesian estimation approach, the entire time history of the input excitation and output response of the structure are used as a batch of data to estimate the FE model parameters through a number of iterations. In the case of non-informative prior, the batch Bayesian method leads to an extended maximum likelihood (ML) estimation method to estimate jointly time-invariant model parameters and the measurement noise amplitude. The extended ML estimation problem is solved efficiently using a gradient-based interior-point optimization algorithm. Gradient-based optimization algorithms require the FE response sensitivities with respect to the model parameters to be identified. The FE response sensitivities are computed accurately and efficiently using the direct differentiation method (DDM). The estimation uncertainties are evaluated based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) theorem by computing the exact Fisher Information matrix using the FE response sensitivities with respect to the model parameters. The accuracy of the proposed uncertainty quantification approach is verified using a sampling approach based on the unscented transformation. Two validation studies, based on realistic

  18. Implementation of Lumped Plasticity Models and Developments in an Object Oriented Nonlinear Finite Element Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Christopher L.

    Numerical simulation tools capable of modeling nonlinear material and geometric behavior are important to structural engineers concerned with approximating the strength and deformation capacity of a structure. While structures are typically designed to behave linear elastic when subjected to building code design loads, exceedance of the linear elastic range is often an important consideration, especially with regards to structural response during hazard level events (i.e. earthquakes, hurricanes, floods), where collapse prevention is the primary goal. This thesis addresses developments made to Mercury, a nonlinear finite element program developed in MATLAB for numerical simulation and in C++ for real time hybrid simulation. Developments include the addition of three new constitutive models to extend Mercury's lumped plasticity modeling capabilities, a constitutive driver tool for testing and implementing Mercury constitutive models, and Mercury pre and post-processing tools. Mercury has been developed as a tool for transient analysis of distributed plasticity models, offering accurate nonlinear results on the material level, element level, and structural level. When only structural level response is desired (collapse prevention), obtaining material level results leads to unnecessarily lengthy computational time. To address this issue in Mercury, lumped plasticity capabilities are developed by implementing two lumped plasticity flexural response constitutive models and a column shear failure constitutive model. The models are chosen for implementation to address two critical issues evident in structural testing: column shear failure and strength and stiffness degradation under reverse cyclic loading. These tools make it possible to model post-peak behavior, capture strength and stiffness degradation, and predict global collapse. During the implementation process, a need was identified to create a simple program, separate from Mercury, to simplify the process of

  19. a Nonlinear Hybrid and VR Stepping Motor Analysis via AN Integrated Finite Element and Lumped Parameter Modeling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huard, Steven Roger

    The work involves the magnetic modeling of a variable reluctance and a hybrid stepping motor. The model combines two traditional methods for creating a magnetic model. Nonlinear two dimensional finite element analysis is combined with nonlinear lumped element modeling to create a three dimension lumped model. The two dimensional finite element analysis is used to numerically calculate the effective reluctance function of the motor tooth region. After the finite element analysis is completed, a two terminal tooth region reluctance element that is a function of both rotor angle and tooth region flux density results. The two terminal lumped element is then used to represent the tooth region of the motor in a lumped parameter model. The process by which the tooth region finite element field solution is transformed into the two terminal lumped reluctance is a new modeling approach; and, it is the foundation of the modeling method in this dissertation. Torque, back EMF, and inductance are some of the more important motor parameters predicted by the modeling method. The model predictions are compared to experimental data in the dissertation. The final motor parameter predictions from the model correlated quite well with experimental data. Also included in the dissertation is a unique derivation which defines the constraints that a region must satisfy such that a general three dimensional region of non-homogenous material can be modeled as a two terminal lumped reluctance element. The final restrictions imposed on the general three dimensional region are quite liberal. A method for solving any arbitrarily connected network of nonlinear lumped reluctances and sources is shown in detail. The method was developed specifically for use in this dissertation research, however, it is general enough to be applied to a wide variety of lumped element magnetic problems. The method explains how a Newton-Raphson iteration loop can be used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation created

  20. Modeling and finite element analysis of the nonstationary action on a multi-layer poroelastic seam with nonlinear geomechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nasedkina, A.A.; Nasedkin, A.V.; Iovane, G.

    2009-07-15

    The paper discusses modeling of a multi-layer coal seam under hydrodynamic action based on the coupled equations of poroelasticity and filtration with the nonlinear relationship of permeability and porous pressure. The calculations by the finite element method use correspondence between the poroelasticity and thermoelasticity equations. The influence of input data on the size of a degassing hole area is analyzed for the couple problem and pure filtration problem.

  1. Finite element modeling and analysis of tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Predicting the response of tires under various loading conditions using finite element technology is addressed. Some of the recent advances in finite element technology which have high potential for application to tire modeling problems are reviewed. The analysis and modeling needs for tires are identified. Reduction methods for large-scale nonlinear analysis, with particular emphasis on treatment of combined loads, displacement-dependent and nonconservative loadings; development of simple and efficient mixed finite element models for shell analysis, identification of equivalent mixed and purely displacement models, and determination of the advantages of using mixed models; and effective computational models for large-rotation nonlinear problems, based on a total Lagrangian description of the deformation are included.

  2. Numerical approximation of tangent moduli for finite element implementations of nonlinear hyperelastic material models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chaikof, Elliot L; Levenston, Marc E

    2008-12-01

    Finite element (FE) implementations of nearly incompressible material models often employ decoupled numerical treatments of the dilatational and deviatoric parts of the deformation gradient. This treatment allows the dilatational stiffness to be handled separately to alleviate ill conditioning of the tangent stiffness matrix. However, this can lead to complex formulations of the material tangent moduli that can be difficult to implement or may require custom FE codes, thus limiting their general use. Here we present an approach, based on work by Miehe (Miehe, 1996, "Numerical Computation of Algorithmic (Consistent) Tangent Moduli in Large Strain Computational Inelasticity," Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 134, pp. 223-240), for an efficient numerical approximation of the tangent moduli that can be easily implemented within commercial FE codes. By perturbing the deformation gradient, the material tangent moduli from the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress are accurately approximated by a forward difference of the associated Kirchhoff stresses. The merit of this approach is that it produces a concise mathematical formulation that is not dependent on any particular material model. Consequently, once the approximation method is coded in a subroutine, it can be used for other hyperelastic material models with no modification. The implementation and accuracy of this approach is first demonstrated with a simple neo-Hookean material. Subsequently, a fiber-reinforced structural model is applied to analyze the pressure-diameter curve during blood vessel inflation. Implementation of this approach will facilitate the incorporation of novel hyperelastic material models for a soft tissue behavior into commercial FE software.

  3. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  4. Search for critical loading condition of the spine--a meta analysis of a nonlinear viscoelastic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jaw-Lin; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2005-10-01

    The relative vulnerability of spinal motion segments to different loading combinations remains unknown. The meta-analysis described here using the results of a validated L2-L3 nonlinear viscoelastic finite element model was designed to investigate the critical loading and its effect on the internal mechanics of the human lumbar spine. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to design the magnitude of seven independent variables associated with loads, rotations and velocity of motion. Subsequently, an optimization method was used to find the primary and secondary variables that influence spine mechanical output related to facet forces, disc pressure, ligament forces, annulus matrix compressive/shear stresses and anulus fibers strain. The mechanical responses with respect to the two most-relevant variables were then regressed linearly using the response surface quadratic model. Axial force and sagittal rotation were identified as the most-relevant variables for mechanical responses. The procedure developed can be used to find the critical loading for finite element models with multi input variables. The derived meta-models can be used to predict the risk associated with various loading parameters and in setting safer load limits.

  5. Finite element modeling of nonlinear acoustics/ultrasonics for the detection of closed delaminations in composites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Chen, Bo-Yang; Tan, Vincent B C; Tay, Tong-Earn; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2017-02-01

    Linear ultrasonics methods based on the principle of reflection, transmission, dissipation of sound waves have been traditionally used to detect delaminations in composite structures. However, when the delamination is in very early stages such that it is almost closed, or closed due to a compressive load, the linear methods may fail to detect such cases of delaminations. Nonlinear acoustics/ultrasonics have shown potential to identify damages in composite structures which are difficult to detect using conventional linear ultrasonic methods. The nonlinear method involves exciting the structure with a sinusoidal signal of certain (or multiple) frequency and observing the vibrations of the structure. The vibrations of the damage region differ significantly from intact regions and can be used to identify the damage. However due to the complex and varying nature of the nonlinear phenomena created by the interaction between the exciting signal and the damage, there are many variables at play which can lead to success or failure of the method. While experiments lead to the establishment of the method to be used as a damage detection technique, numerical simulations can help to explain the various phenomena associated with nonlinearity. This work presents a quick approach to model the nonlinear behavior caused by closed delaminations. The model is validated with a previously available approach for nonlinear vibrations modeling and a comparison is made between the two. The local nature of the nonlinearity enables to map out the area of damage in the structure. Additionally, a few parametric studies are performed to study the effect of various parameters related to the nonlinear phenomenon.

  6. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  7. Output-only identification of civil structures using nonlinear finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, Hamed; Astroza, Rodrigo; Conte, Joel P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for output-only nonlinear system identification of structures using data recorded during earthquake events. In this approach, state-of-the-art nonlinear structural FE modeling and analysis techniques are combined with Bayesian Inference method to estimate (i) time-invariant parameters governing the nonlinear hysteretic material constitutive models used in the FE model of the structure, and (ii) the time history of the earthquake ground motion. To validate the performance of the proposed framework, the simulated responses of a bridge pier to an earthquake ground motion is polluted with artificial output measurement noise and used to jointly estimate the unknown material parameters and the time history of the earthquake ground motion. This proof-of-concept example illustrates the successful performance of the proposed approach even in the presence of high measurement noise.

  8. Updated Lagrangian finite element formulations of various biological soft tissue non-linear material models: a comprehensive procedure and review.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Molly T; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Simplified material models are commonly used in computational simulation of biological soft tissue as an approximation of the complicated material response and to minimize computational resources. However, the simulation of complex loadings, such as long-duration tissue swelling, necessitates complex models that are not easy to formulate. This paper strives to offer the updated Lagrangian formulation comprehensive procedure of various non-linear material models for the application of finite element analysis of biological soft tissues including a definition of the Cauchy stress and the spatial tangential stiffness. The relationships between water content, osmotic pressure, ionic concentration and the pore pressure stress of the tissue are discussed with the merits of these models and their applications.

  9. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  10. Constitutive Models for Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Masonry Prisms and Infill Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    based on a hyperbolic function proposed by Lotfi and Shing (1994), and is capable of modeling damage accumulation at mortar joints under increasing...loading and the effect that damage accumulation has on the modeling of the masonry infills. The re- view presented here discusses models that consider...nonlinear, plastic be- havior and damage effects resulting from masonry infill as an isotropic or orthotropic brittle or quasi-brittle material and/or

  11. Finite element modeling of permanent magnet devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, J. R.; Larkin, L. A.; Overbye, V. D.

    1984-03-01

    New techniques are presented for finite element modeling of permanent magnets in magnetic devices such as motors and generators. These techniques extend a previous sheet-current permanent magnet model that applies only for straight line B-H loops and rectangular-shaped magnets. Here Maxwell's equations are used to derive the model of a permanent magnet having a general curved B-H loop and any geometric shape. The model enables a nonlinear magnetic finite element program to use Newton-Raphson iteration to solve for saturable magnetic fields in a wide variety of devices containing permanent magnets and steels. The techniques are applied to a brushless dc motor with irregular-shaped permanent magnets. The calculated motor torque agrees well with measured torque.

  12. Effect of CFRP Schemes on the Flexural Behavior of RC Beams Modeled by Using a Nonlinear Finite-element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rousan, R. Z.

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of the number and schemes of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets on the capacity of bending moment, the ultimate displacement, the ultimate tensile strain of CFRP, the yielding moment, concrete compression strain, and the energy absorption of RC beams and to provide useful relationships that can be effectively utilized to determine the required number of CFRP sheets for a necessary increase in the flexural strength of the beams without a major loss in their ductility. To accomplish this, various RC beams, identical in their geometric and reinforcement details and having different number and configurations of CFRP sheets, are modeled and analyzed using the ANSYS software and a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  13. Unified procedure for the nonlinear finite-element analysis of concrete structures based on a new model for tension stiffening

    SciTech Connect

    Ojdrovic, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    A unified procedure for the analysis of reinforced, partially prestressed, and prestressed concrete frames was formulated. Reinforced concrete is treated as a special case of prestressed concrete with zero prestressing force. A large variety of structures can be analyzed, from simple reinforced concrete beams, to reinforced or prestressed concrete frames, to structures whose various parts are made of different materials. Pretensioning and posttensioning with bonded and unbonded tendons are considered. The finite-element method based on the displacement formulation is used to solve the system of nonlinear equilibrium equations. Geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. Large displacements are accounted for using an updated Lagrangian formulation. The nonlinear behavior of concrete in compression is modeled using the Hognestad's parabola. Reinforcing steel is modeled as an elastic-perfectly plastic materials. To account for tension stiffening, a new model for the stress-strain relationship for concrete in tension is proposed. Results obtained in the numerical analyses show good agreement with experiments, although the proposed stress-strain model is based on only one concrete parameter, compressive strength.

  14. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  15. Surface subsidence prediction by nonlinear finite-element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, Y. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Zaman, M. . School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science)

    1993-11-01

    An improved two-dimensional plane-strain numerical procedure based on the incremental-iterative nonlinear finite-element is developed to predict ground subsidence caused by underground mining. The procedure emphasizes the use of the following features: (1) an appropriate constitutive model that can accurately describe the nonlinear behavior of geological strata; and (2) an accurate algorithm for simulation of excavation sequences consistent with the actual underground mining process. The computer code is used to analyze a collapse that occurred in the Blue Goose Lease [number sign]1 Mine in northeastern Oklahoma. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of some selected factors on the shape and extent of subsidence profiles. Analyses of the numerical results indicate that the nonlinear finite-element technique can be employed to meaningfully predict and characterize the potential for ground subsidence due to underground mining.

  16. A mixed finite element formulation for a non-linear, transversely isotropic material model for the cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Thorvaldsen, Tom; Osnes, Harald; Sundnes, Joakim

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we present a mixed finite element method for modeling the passive properties of the myocardium. The passive properties are described by a non-linear, transversely isotropic, hyperelastic material model, and the myocardium is assumed to be almost incompressible. Single-field, pure displacement-based formulations are known to cause numerical difficulties when applied to incompressible or slightly compressible material cases. This paper presents an alternative approach in the form of a mixed formulation, where a separately interpolated pressure field is introduced as a primary unknown in addition to the displacement field. Moreover, a constraint term is included in the formulation to enforce (almost) incompressibility. Numerical results presented in the paper demonstrate the difficulties related to employing a pure displacement-based method, applying a set of physically relevant material parameter values for the cardiac tissue. The same problems are not experienced for the proposed mixed method. We show that the mixed formulation provides reasonable numerical results for compressible as well as nearly incompressible cases, also in situations of large fiber stretches. There is good agreement between the numerical results and the underlying analytical models.

  17. A constitutive material model for nonlinear finite element structural analysis using an iterative matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Herbert A.; Chan, Kwai S.; Cassenti, Brice N.; Weber, Richard

    1988-01-01

    A unified numerical method for the integration of stiff time dependent constitutive equations is presented. The solution process is directly applied to a constitutive model proposed by Bodner. The theory confronts time dependent inelastic behavior coupled with both isotropic hardening and directional hardening behaviors. Predicted stress-strain responses from this model are compared to experimental data from cyclic tests on uniaxial specimens. An algorithm is developed for the efficient integration of the Bodner flow equation. A comparison is made with the Euler integration method. An analysis of computational time is presented for the three algorithms.

  18. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  19. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  20. Finite element methods for the nonlinear motion of flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor P.

    Conventional strategies in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics for studying aircraft involve making broad assumptions based more on analytical or computational convenience rather than on physical reality. Typically in aeroelastic analyses, the study of the interaction between aircraft flexibility and aerodynamic forces, the aircraft or structural component in question is constrained in a way that is not representative of realistic flight conditions. In flight dynamics, the study of the maneuvering of aircraft, it is common to consider the vehicle as perfectly rigid. In both disciplines it is well known that such contrivances can produce incorrect results. To address these shortcomings, a finite element formulation is developed for analyzing the dynamics of flexible aircraft undergoing arbitrarily large rotation and translation. The formulation is derived in a set of body-attached axes, a frame of reference conducive to analyzing the motion and control of aircraft, and considers the structure as a whole. Several implementation issues are addressed and mitigated, including finite element interpolating functions, the use of eigenvectors as the basis for nonlinear deformation, inclusion of geometrically nonlinear effects in the strain energy, and enforcement of kinematic constraints. Numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the latter two aspects, and a free-flying aeroelastic model problem demonstrates the overall potential of the proposed formulation. The development is approached in a general way so that the methodology can be applied to any structure that may be modeled by finite elements.

  1. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  2. The GPRIME approach to finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. R.; Mckee, J. H.; Hurwitz, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    GPRIME, an interactive modeling system, runs on the CDC 6000 computers and the DEC VAX 11/780 minicomputer. This system includes three components: (1) GPRIME, a user friendly geometric language and a processor to translate that language into geometric entities, (2) GGEN, an interactive data generator for 2-D models; and (3) SOLIDGEN, a 3-D solid modeling program. Each component has a computer user interface of an extensive command set. All of these programs make use of a comprehensive B-spline mathematics subroutine library, which can be used for a wide variety of interpolation problems and other geometric calculations. Many other user aids, such as automatic saving of the geometric and finite element data bases and hidden line removal, are available. This interactive finite element modeling capability can produce a complete finite element model, producing an output file of grid and element data.

  3. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  4. Unified constitutive material models for nonlinear finite-element structural analysis. [gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Laflen, J. H.; Lindholm, U. S.

    1985-01-01

    Unified constitutive material models were developed for structural analyses of aircraft gas turbine engine components with particular application to isotropic materials used for high-pressure stage turbine blades and vanes. Forms or combinations of models independently proposed by Bodner and Walker were considered. These theories combine time-dependent and time-independent aspects of inelasticity into a continuous spectrum of behavior. This is in sharp contrast to previous classical approaches that partition inelastic strain into uncoupled plastic and creep components. Predicted stress-strain responses from these models were evaluated against monotonic and cyclic test results for uniaxial specimens of two cast nickel-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Rene' 80. Previously obtained tension-torsion test results for Hastelloy X alloy were used to evaluate multiaxial stress-strain cycle predictions. The unified models, as well as appropriate algorithms for integrating the constitutive equations, were implemented in finite-element computer codes.

  5. Unified constitutive material models for nonlinear finite-element structural analysis. [gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Laflen, J. H.; Lindholm, U. S.

    1985-01-01

    Unified constitutive material models were developed for structural analyses of aircraft gas turbine engine components with particular application to isotropic materials used for high-pressure stage turbine blades and vanes. Forms or combinations of models independently proposed by Bodner and Walker were considered. These theories combine time-dependent and time-independent aspects of inelasticity into a continuous spectrum of behavior. This is in sharp contrast to previous classical approaches that partition inelastic strain into uncoupled plastic and creep components. Predicted stress-strain responses from these models were evaluated against monotonic and cyclic test results for uniaxial specimens of two cast nickel-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Rene 80. Previously obtained tension-torsion test results for Hastelloy X alloy were used to evaluate multiaxial stress-strain cycle predictions. The unified models, as well as appropriate algorithms for integrating the constitutive equations, were implemented in finite-element computer codes.

  6. Finite Element Model to Reduce Fire and Blast Vulnerability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis FEM Finite Element Model NAVAIR...and probabilistic analysis are need to address these challenges. The objective of this effort is to develop a finite element model of a soldier to...UNCLASSIFIED FINITE ELEMENT MODEL TO REDUCE FIRE AND BLAST VULNERABILITY INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 439 by W. Loren Francis

  7. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments: A PARALLEL FEM STOKES ICE SHEET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Wei; Ju, Lili; Gunzburger, Max; Price, Stephen; Ringler, Todd

    2012-01-04

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  8. Differentiating a Finite Element Biodegradation Simulation Model for Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, Barbara S.; Shoemaker, Christine A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimal control model for improving the design of in situ bioremediation of groundwater has been developed. The model uses a finite element biodegradation simulation model called Bio2D to find optimal pumping strategies. Analytical derivatives of the bioremediation finite element model are derived; these derivatives must be computed for the optimal control algorithm. The derivatives are complex and nonlinear; the bulk of the computational effort in solving the optimal control problem is required to calculate the derivatives. An overview of the optimal control and simulation model formulations is also given.

  9. A novel two-layer, coupled finite element approach for modeling the nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic behavior of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Thomas; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2011-07-01

    A novel finite element approach is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of human red blood cells (RBC, erythrocytes). As the RBC membrane comprises a phospholipid bilayer with an intervening protein network, we propose to model the membrane with two distinct layers. The fairly complex characteristics of the very thin lipid bilayer are represented by special incompressible solid shell elements and an anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model. Properties of the protein network are modeled with an isotropic hyperelastic third-order material. The elastic behavior of the model is validated with existing optical tweezers studies with quasi-static deformations. Employing material parameters consistent with literature, simulation results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Available models in literature neglect either the surface area conservation of the RBC membrane or realistic loading conditions of the optical tweezers experiments. The importance of these modeling assumptions, that are both included in this study, are discussed and their influence quantified. For the simulation of the dynamic motion of RBC, the model is extended to incorporate the cytoplasm. This is realized with a monolithic fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation, where the fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian framework. It is shown that both membrane viscosity and cytoplasm viscosity have significant influence on simulation results. Characteristic recovery times and energy dissipation for varying strain rates in dynamic laser trap experiments are calculated for the first time and are found to be comparable with experimental data.

  10. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part III. Finite Element Analysis in Nonlinear Solid Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, T.A.; Attaway, S.W.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1999-03-01

    This report outlines the application of finite element methodology to large deformation solid mechanics problems, detailing also some of the key technological issues that effective finite element formulations must address. The presentation is organized into three major portions: first, a discussion of finite element discretization from the global point of view, emphasizing the relationship between a virtual work principle and the associated fully discrete system, second, a discussion of finite element technology, emphasizing the important theoretical and practical features associated with an individual finite element; and third, detailed description of specific elements that enjoy widespread use, providing some examples of the theoretical ideas already described. Descriptions of problem formulation in nonlinear solid mechanics, nonlinear continuum mechanics, and constitutive modeling are given in three companion reports.

  11. Nonlinear finite element analysis: An alternative formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merazzi, S.; Stehlin, P.

    1980-01-01

    A geometrical nonlinear analysis based on an alternative definition of strain is presented. Expressions for strain are obtained by computing the change in length of the base vectors in the curvilinear element coordinate system. The isoparametric element formulation is assumed in the global Cartesian coordinate system. The approach is based on the minimization of the strain energy, and the resulting nonlinear equations are solved by the modified Newton method. Integration of the first and second variation of the strain energy is performed numerically in the case of two and three dimensional elements. Application is made to a simple long cantilever beam.

  12. Probabilistic finite elements for transient analysis in nonlinear continua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Mani, A.

    1985-01-01

    The probabilistic finite element method (PFEM), which is a combination of finite element methods and second-moment analysis, is formulated for linear and nonlinear continua with inhomogeneous random fields. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random field is also discretized. The formulation is simplified by transforming the correlated variables to a set of uncorrelated variables through an eigenvalue orthogonalization. Furthermore, it is shown that a reduced set of the uncorrelated variables is sufficient for the second-moment analysis. Based on the linear formulation of the PFEM, the method is then extended to transient analysis in nonlinear continua. The accuracy and efficiency of the method is demonstrated by application to a one-dimensional, elastic/plastic wave propagation problem. The moments calculated compare favorably with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Also, the procedure is amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer programs.

  13. Finite element modelling of SAW correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikka, Ajay C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    Numerical simulations of SAW correlators so far are limited to delta function and equivalent circuit models. These models are not accurate as they do not replicate the actual behaviour of the device. Manufacturing a correlator to specifically realise a different configuration is both expensive and time consuming. With the continuous improvement in computing capacity, switching to finite element modelling would be more appropriate. In this paper a novel way of modelling a SAW correlator using finite element analysis is presented. This modelling approach allows the consideration of different code implementation and device structures. This is demonstrated through simulation results for a 5×2-bit Barker sequence encoded SAW correlator. These results show the effect of both bulk and leaky modes on the device performance at various operating frequencies. Moreover, the ways in which the gain of the correlator can be optimised though variation of design parameters will also be outlined.

  14. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  15. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  16. Nonlinear finite-element analysis of nanoindentation of viral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Melissa M.; Klug, William S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) nanoindentation experiments measuring mechanical response of the protein shells of viruses have provided a quantitative description of their strength and elasticity. To better understand and interpret these measurements, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, this paper adopts a course-grained modeling approach within the framework of three-dimensional nonlinear continuum elasticity. Homogeneous, isotropic, elastic, thick-shell models are proposed for two capsids: the spherical cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the ellipsocylindrical bacteriophage ϕ29 . As analyzed by the finite-element method, these models enable parametric characterization of the effects of AFM tip geometry, capsid dimensions, and capsid constitutive descriptions. The generally nonlinear force response of capsids to indentation is shown to be insensitive to constitutive particulars, and greatly influenced by geometric and kinematic details. Nonlinear stiffening and softening of the force response is dependent on the AFM tip dimensions and shell thickness. Fits of the models capture the roughly linear behavior observed in experimental measurements and result in estimates of Young’s moduli of ≈280-360MPa for CCMV and ≈4.5GPa for ϕ29 .

  17. Geometrically Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Space Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kee-Joo; Leet, Sung W.; Clark, Greg; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lightweight aerospace structures, such as low areal density composite space reflectors, are highly flexible and may undergo large deflection under applied loading, especially during the launch phase. Accordingly, geometrically nonlinear analysis that takes into account the effect of finite rotation may be needed to determine the deformed shape for a clearance check and the stress and strain state to ensure structural integrity. In this study, deformation of the space reflector is determined under static conditions using a geometrically nonlinear solid shell finite element model. For the solid shell element formulation, the kinematics of deformation is described by six variables that are purely vector components. Because rotational angles are not used, this approach is free of the limitations of small angle increments. This also allows easy connections between substructures and large load increments with respect to the conventional shell formulation using rotational parameters. Geometrically nonlinear analyses were carried out for three cases of static point loads applied at selected points. A chart shows results for a case when the load is applied at the center point of the reflector dish. The computed results capture the nonlinear behavior of the composite reflector as the applied load increases. Also, they are in good agreement with the data obtained by experiments.

  18. Finite element analysis of structural engineering problems using a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses and a drag strength is investigated for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural engineering problems. To demonstrate suitability for nonlinear structural analyses, the model is implemented into a finite element program and analyses for several uniaxial and multiaxial problems are performed. Good agreement is shown between the results obtained using the finite element implementation and those obtained experimentally. The advantages of using advanced viscoplastic models for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components are indicated.

  19. Failure modelling of trabecular bone using a non-linear combined damage and fracture voxel finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Noel M; McDonnell, Pat; Mullins, Liam; Wilson, Niall; O'Mahoney, Denis; McHugh, Peter E

    2013-04-01

    Trabecular bone tissue failure can be considered as consisting of two stages: damage and fracture; however, most failure analyses of 3D high-resolution trabecular bone samples are confined to damage mechanisms only, that is, without fracture. This study aims to develop a computational model of trabecular bone consisting of an explicit representation of complete failure, incorporating damage criteria, fracture criteria, cohesive forces, asymmetry and large deformation capabilities. Following parameter studies on a test specimen, and experimental testing of bone sample to complete failure, the asymmetric critical tissue damage and fracture strains of ovine vertebral trabecular bone were calibrated and validated to be compression damage -1.16 %, tension damage 0.69 %, compression fracture -2.91 % and tension fracture 1.98 %. Ultimate strength and post-ultimate strength softening were captured by the computational model, and the failure of individual struts in bending and shear was also predicted. This modelling approach incorporated a cohesive parameter that provided a facility to calibrate ductile-brittle behaviour of bone tissue in this non-linear geometric and non-linear constitutive property analyses tool. Finally, the full accumulation of tissue damage and tissue fracture has been monitored from range of small magnitude (normal daily loading) through to specimen yielding, ultimate strength and post-ultimate strength softening.

  20. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  1. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    PubMed

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  2. Validation and application of an intervertebral disc finite element model utilizing independently constructed tissue-level constitutive formulations that are nonlinear, anisotropic, and time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Peloquin, John M; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    Finite element (FE) models are advantageous in the study of intervertebral disc mechanics as the stress-strain distributions can be determined throughout the tissue and the applied loading and material properties can be controlled and modified. However, the complicated nature of the disc presents a challenge in developing an accurate and predictive disc model, which has led to limitations in FE geometry, material constitutive models and properties, and model validation. The objective of this study was to develop a new FE model of the intervertebral disc, to validate the model's nonlinear and time-dependent responses without tuning or calibration, and to evaluate the effect of changes in nucleus pulposus (NP), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), and annulus fibrosus (AF) material properties on the disc mechanical response. The new FE disc model utilized an analytically-based geometry. The model was created from the mean shape of human L4/L5 discs, measured from high-resolution 3D MR images and averaged using signed distance functions. Structural hyperelastic constitutive models were used in conjunction with biphasic-swelling theory to obtain material properties from recent tissue tests in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The FE disc model predictions fit within the experimental range (mean ± 95% confidence interval) of the disc's nonlinear response for compressive slow loading ramp, creep, and stress-relaxation simulations. Changes in NP and CEP properties affected the neutral-zone displacement but had little effect on the final stiffness during slow-ramp compression loading. These results highlight the need to validate FE models using the disc's full nonlinear response in multiple loading scenarios.

  3. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  4. Parameter sampling and metamodel generation for nonlinear finite element simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cundy, A. L.; Schultze, J. F.; Hemez, F. M.; Doebling, S. W.; Hylok, J. E.; Bingham, D.

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses the problem of analyzing the nonlinear transient response of a structural dynamics simulation. A threaded joint assembly's response to impulse loading has been studied. Twelve parameters relating to the input level, preloads of the joint and friction between components are thought to influence the acceleration response of the structure. Due to the high cost of physical testing and large amount of computation time to run numerical models a fastrunning metamodel is being developed. In this case, a metamodel is a statistically developed surrogate to the physics-based finite element model and can be evaluated in minutes on a single processor desktop computer. An unreasonable number of runs is required (312>500,000) to generate a three level full factorial design with 12 parameters for metamodel creation. Some manner of down-selecting or variable screening is needed in order to determine which of the parameters most affect the response and should be retained in subsequent models. A comparision of screening methods to general sensitivity analysis was conducted. A significant effects methodology, which involves a design of experiments technique has been examined. In this method, all parameters were first included in the model and then eliminated on the basis of statistical contributions associated with each parameter. Bayesian variable screening techniques, in which probabilities of effects are generated and updated, have also been explored, Encouraging results have been obtained, as the two methods yield similar sets of statistically significant parameters. Both methods have been compared to general sensitivity analysis (GSA). The resulting compact metamodel can then be explored at more levels to appropriately capture the underlying physics of the threaded assembly with a much smaller set of simulations.

  5. Finite element modelling of fabric shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hua; Clifford, Mike J.; Long, Andrew C.; Sherburn, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a finite element model to predict shear force versus shear angle for woven fabrics is developed. The model is based on the TexGen geometric modelling schema, developed at the University of Nottingham and orthotropic constitutive models for yarn behaviour, coupled with a unified displacement-difference periodic boundary condition. A major distinction from prior modelling of fabric shear is that the details of picture frame kinematics are included in the model, which allows the mechanisms of fabric shear to be represented more accurately. Meso- and micro-mechanisms of deformation are modelled to determine their contributions to energy dissipation during shear. The model is evaluated using results obtained for a glass fibre plain woven fabric, and the importance of boundary conditions in the analysis of deformation mechanisms is highlighted. The simulation results show that the simple rotation boundary condition is adequate for predicting shear force at large deformations, with most of the energy being dissipated at higher shear angles due to yarn compaction. For small deformations, a detailed kinematic analysis is needed, enabling the yarn shear and rotation deformation mechanisms to be modelled accurately.

  6. Analysing the mechanical performance and growth adaptation of Norway spruce using a non-linear finite-element model and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Lundström, T; Jonas, T; Volkwein, A

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] trees of different size, age, and social status, and grown under varying conditions, were investigated to see how they react to complex natural static loading under summer and winter conditions, and how they have adapted their growth to such combinations of load and tree state. For this purpose a non-linear finite-element model and an extensive experimental data set were used, as well as a new formulation describing the degree to which the exploitation of the bending stress capacity is uniform. The three main findings were: material and geometric non-linearities play important roles when analysing tree deflections and critical loads; the strengths of the stem and the anchorage mutually adapt to the local wind acting on the tree crown in the forest canopy; and the radial stem growth follows a mechanically high-performance path because it adapts to prevailing as well as acute seasonal combinations of the tree state (e.g. frozen or unfrozen stem and anchorage) and load (e.g. wind and vertical and lateral snow pressure). Young trees appeared to adapt to such combinations in a more differentiated way than older trees. In conclusion, the mechanical performance of the Norway spruce studied was mostly very high, indicating that their overall growth had been clearly influenced by the external site- and tree-specific mechanical stress.

  7. Nonlinear Legendre Spectral Finite Elements for Wind Turbine Blade Dynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical implementation and examination of new wind turbine blade finite element model based on Geometrically Exact Beam Theory (GEBT) and a high-order spectral finite element method. The displacement-based GEBT is presented, which includes the coupling effects that exist in composite structures and geometric nonlinearity. Legendre spectral finite elements (LSFEs) are high-order finite elements with nodes located at the Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto points. LSFEs can be an order of magnitude more efficient that low-order finite elements for a given accuracy level. Interpolation of the three-dimensional rotation, a major technical barrier in large-deformation simulation, is discussed in the context of LSFEs. It is shown, by numerical example, that the high-order LSFEs, where weak forms are evaluated with nodal quadrature, do not suffer from a drawback that exists in low-order finite elements where the tangent-stiffness matrix is calculated at the Gauss points. Finally, the new LSFE code is implemented in the new FAST Modularization Framework for dynamic simulation of highly flexible composite-material wind turbine blades. The framework allows for fully interactive simulations of turbine blades in operating conditions. Numerical examples showing validation and LSFE performance will be provided in the final paper.

  8. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; ...

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  9. Efficient finite element modeling of elastodynamic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by defects is the physical basis of ultrasonic NDE. Although analytical models exist for some canonical problems, the general case of scattering from an arbitrarily-shaped defect requires numerical methods such as finite elements (FE). In this paper, a robust and efficient FE technique is presented that is based on the premise of meshing a relatively small domain sufficient to enclose the scatterer. Plane waves are then excited from a particular direction by a numerical implementation of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral that uses an encircling array of uni-modal point sources. The scattered field displacements are recorded at the same points and the field decomposed into plane waves of different modes at different angles. By repeating this procedure for different incident angles it is possible to generate the scattering- or S-matrix for the scatterer. For a given size of scatterer, all the information in an S-matrix can be represented in the Fourier domain by a limited number of complex coefficients. Thus the complete scattering behavior of an arbitrary-shaped scatterer can be characterized by a finite number of complex coefficients, that can be obtained from a relatively small number of FE model executions.

  10. Intra Plate Stresses Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Raghukanth, S. T. G.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most challenging problems in the estimation of seismic hazard is the ability to quantify seismic activity. Empirical models based on the available earthquake catalogue are often used to obtain activity of source regions. The major limitation with this approach is the lack of sufficient data near a specified source. The non-availability of data poses difficulties in obtaining distribution of earthquakes with large return periods. Such events recur over geological time scales during which tectonic processes, including mantle convection, formation of faults and new plate boundaries, are likely to take place. The availability of geometries of plate boundaries, plate driving forces, lithospheric stress field and GPS measurements has provided numerous insights on the mechanics of tectonic plates. In this article, a 2D finite element model of Indo-Australian plate is developed with the focus of representing seismic activity in India. The effect of large scale geological features including sedimentary basins, fold belts and cratons on the stress field in India is explored in this study. In order to address long term behaviour, the orientation of stress field and tectonic faults of the present Indo- Australian plate are compared with a reconstructed stress field from the early Miocene (20 Ma).

  11. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide).

  12. A triangular thin shell finite element: Nonlinear analysis. [structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of the formulation of a triangular thin shell finite element which pertain to geometrically nonlinear (small strain, finite displacement) behavior are described. The procedure for solution of the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations combines a one-step incremental (tangent stiffness) approach with one iteration in the Newton-Raphson mode. A method is presented which permits a rational estimation of step size in this procedure. Limit points are calculated by means of a superposition scheme coupled to the incremental side of the solution procedure while bifurcation points are calculated through a process of interpolation of the determinants of the tangent-stiffness matrix. Numerical results are obtained for a flat plate and two curved shell problems and are compared with alternative solutions.

  13. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 1: Handbook for nonlinear finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A survey of research efforts in the area of geometrically nonlinear finite elements is presented. The survey is intended to serve as a guide in the choice of nonlinear elements for specific problems, and as background to provide directions for new element developments. The elements are presented in a handbook format and are separated by type as beams, plates (or shallow shells), shells, and other elements. Within a given type, the elements are identified by the assumed displacement shapes and the forms of the nonlinear strain equations. Solution procedures are not discussed except when a particular element formulation poses special problems or capabilities in this regard. The main goal of the format is to provide quick access to a wide variety of element types, in a consistent presentation format, and to facilitate comparison and evaluation of different elements with regard to features, probable accuracy, and complexity.

  14. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  15. Generating Finite-Element Models Of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Program starts at micromechanical level, from simple inputs supplied by user. COMGEN, COmposite Model GENerator, is interactive FORTRAN program used to create wide variety of finite-element models of continuous-fiber composite materials at micromechanical level. Quickly generates batch or "session files" to be submitted to finite-element preprocessor and postprocessor program, PATRAN. COMGEN requires PATRAN to complete model.

  16. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  17. Finite element meshing of ANSYS (trademark) solid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    A large scale, general purpose finite element computer program, ANSYS, developed and marketed by Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc. is discussed. ANSYS was perhaps the first commercially available program to offer truly interactive finite element model generation. ANSYS's purpose is for solid modeling. This application is briefly discussed and illustrated.

  18. A Non-Linear Finite Element Model for the Determination of Elastic and Thermal Properties of Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    color images. 14 . ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified 17. LIMITATION...picture from their damage sensing model [19].. 45 Figure 14 . A diagram of a single SWCNT structure illustrates the hollow, tubular nature ofCNTs[55...conductivity of diamond, and approximately 10* times that of most polymers [ 14 ]. This value is in fact highly temperature dependent as -• reported by

  19. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A research program has been developed to quantify the effects of the microstructure of a woven ceramic matrix composite and its variability on the effective properties and response of the material. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents, from which two dimensional finite element models were generated which approximated the actual specimen section geometry. A simplified elastic-plastic model, wherein all stress above yield is redistributed to lower stress regions, is used to approximate the progressive damage behavior for each of the composite constituents. Finite element analyses under in-plane tensile loading were performed to examine how the variability in the local microstructure affected the macroscopic stress-strain response of the material as well as the local initiation and progression of damage. The macroscopic stress-strain response appeared to be minimally affected by the variation in local microstructure, but the locations where damage initiated and propagated appeared to be linked to specific aspects of the local microstructure.

  20. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed two-dimensional finite element analyses of the cross-sections of a model CVI (chemical vapor infiltrated) SiC/SiC (silicon carbide fiber in a silicon carbide matrix) ceramic matrix composites are performed. High resolution images of the cross-section of this composite material are generated using serial sectioning of the test specimens. These images are then used to develop very detailed finite element models of the cross-sections using the public domain software OOF2 (Object Oriented Analysis of Material Microstructures). Examination of these images shows that these microstructures have significant variability and irregularity. How these variabilities manifest themselves in the variability in effective properties as well as the stress distribution, damage initiation and damage progression is the overall objective of this work. Results indicate that even though the macroscopic stress-strain behavior of various sections analyzed is very similar, each section has a very distinct damage pattern when subjected to in-plane tensile loads and this damage pattern seems to follow the unique architectural and microstructural details of the analyzed sections.

  1. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  2. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  3. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  4. Finite element analysis to model complex mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry; Baxter, Ian; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although finite element analysis has been used to model simple mitral repair, it has not been used to model complex repair. A virtual mitral valve model was successful in simulating normal and abnormal valve function. Models were then developed to simulate an edge-to-edge repair and repair employing quadrangular resection. Stress contour plots demonstrated increased stresses along the mitral annulus, corresponding to the annuloplasty. The role of finite element analysis in guiding clinical practice remains undetermined.

  5. Nonlinear static and dynamic finite element analysis of an eccentrically loaded graphite-epoxy beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Jones, Lisa E.

    1991-01-01

    The Dynamic Crash Analysis of Structures (DYCAT) and NIKE3D nonlinear finite element codes were used to model the static and implulsive response of an eccentrically loaded graphite-epoxy beam. A 48-ply unidirectional composite beam was tested under an eccentric axial compressive load until failure. This loading configuration was chosen to highlight the capabilities of two finite element codes for modeling a highly nonlinear, large deflection structural problem which has an exact solution. These codes are currently used to perform dynamic analyses of aircraft structures under impact loads to study crashworthiness and energy absorbing capabilities. Both beam and plate element models were developed to compare with the experimental data using the DYCAST and NIKE3D codes.

  6. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  7. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  8. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  9. A simple triangular finite element for nonlinear thin shells: statics, dynamics and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Nils; Pimenta, Paulo M.; Schröder, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a simple finite element implementation of a geometrically exact and fully nonlinear Kirchhoff-Love shell model. Thus, the kinematics are based on a deformation gradient written in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of the displacements. The resulting finite element formulation provides C^1 -continuity using a penalty approach, which penalizes the kinking at the edges of neighboring elements. This approach enables the application of well-known C^0 -continuous interpolations for the displacements, which leads to a simple finite element formulation, where the only unknowns are the nodal displacements. On the basis of polyconvex strain energy functions, the numerical framework for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic thin shells is presented. A consistent plane stress condition is incorporated at the constitutive level of the model. A triangular finite element, with a quadratic interpolation for the displacements and a one-point integration for the enforcement of the C^1 -continuity at the element interfaces leads to a robust shell element. Due to the simple nature of the element, even complex geometries can be meshed easily, which include folded and branched shells. The reliability and flexibility of the element formulation is shown in a couple of numerical examples, including also time dependent boundary value problems. A plane reference configuration is assumed for the shell mid-surface, but initially curved shells can be accomplished if one regards the initial configuration as a stress-free deformed state from the plane position, as done in previous works.

  10. A simple triangular finite element for nonlinear thin shells: statics, dynamics and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Nils; Pimenta, Paulo M.; Schröder, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a simple finite element implementation of a geometrically exact and fully nonlinear Kirchhoff-Love shell model. Thus, the kinematics are based on a deformation gradient written in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of the displacements. The resulting finite element formulation provides C^1-continuity using a penalty approach, which penalizes the kinking at the edges of neighboring elements. This approach enables the application of well-known C^0-continuous interpolations for the displacements, which leads to a simple finite element formulation, where the only unknowns are the nodal displacements. On the basis of polyconvex strain energy functions, the numerical framework for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic thin shells is presented. A consistent plane stress condition is incorporated at the constitutive level of the model. A triangular finite element, with a quadratic interpolation for the displacements and a one-point integration for the enforcement of the C^1-continuity at the element interfaces leads to a robust shell element. Due to the simple nature of the element, even complex geometries can be meshed easily, which include folded and branched shells. The reliability and flexibility of the element formulation is shown in a couple of numerical examples, including also time dependent boundary value problems. A plane reference configuration is assumed for the shell mid-surface, but initially curved shells can be accomplished if one regards the initial configuration as a stress-free deformed state from the plane position, as done in previous works.

  11. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  12. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  13. Finite element analysis of structural components using viscoplastic models with application to a cowl lip problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    The viability of advanced viscoplastic models for nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components is investigated. Several uniaxial and a multiaxial problem are analyzed using the finite element implementation of Freed's viscoplastic model. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated uniaxial results validates the finite element implementation and gives confidence to apply it to more complex multiaxial problems. A comparison of results for a sample structural component (the cowl lip of a hypersonic engine inlet) with the earlier elastic, elastic-plastic, and elastic-plastic-creep analyses available in the literature shows that the elastic-viscoplastic analyses yield more reasonable stress and strain distributions. Finally, the versatility of the finite-element-based solution technology presented herein is demonstrated by applying it to another viscoplastic model.

  14. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 3: Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shen, Mo-How

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear forced vibration of a beam was analyzed by the finite element method. Inplane (longitudinal) displacement and inertia (IDI) are considered in the formulation. By combining the finite element method and nonlinear theory, more realistic models of structural response are obtained more easily and faster.

  15. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  16. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  17. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  18. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  19. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  20. Physical Constraint Finite Element Model for Medical Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingya; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Xiuying; Gao, Xin; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    Due to being derived from linear assumption, most elastic body based non-rigid image registration algorithms are facing challenges for soft tissues with complex nonlinear behavior and with large deformations. To take into account the geometric nonlinearity of soft tissues, we propose a registration algorithm on the basis of Newtonian differential equation. The material behavior of soft tissues is modeled as St. Venant-Kirchhoff elasticity, and the nonlinearity of the continuum represents the quadratic term of the deformation gradient under the Green- St.Venant strain. In our algorithm, the elastic force is formulated as the derivative of the deformation energy with respect to the nodal displacement vectors of the finite element; the external force is determined by the registration similarity gradient flow which drives the floating image deforming to the equilibrium condition. We compared our approach to three other models: 1) the conventional linear elastic finite element model (FEM); 2) the dynamic elastic FEM; 3) the robust block matching (RBM) method. The registration accuracy was measured using three similarities: MSD (Mean Square Difference), NC (Normalized Correlation) and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information), and was also measured using the mean and max distance between the ground seeds and corresponding ones after registration. We validated our method on 60 image pairs including 30 medical image pairs with artificial deformation and 30 clinical image pairs for both the chest chemotherapy treatment in different periods and brain MRI normalization. Our method achieved a distance error of 0.320±0.138 mm in x direction and 0.326±0.111 mm in y direction, MSD of 41.96±13.74, NC of 0.9958±0.0019, NMI of 1.2962±0.0114 for images with large artificial deformations; and average NC of 0.9622±0.008 and NMI of 1.2764±0.0089 for the real clinical cases. Student’s t-test demonstrated that our model statistically outperformed the other methods in comparison (p

  1. Finite element solution of nonlinear eddy current problems with periodic excitation and its industrial applications☆

    PubMed Central

    Bíró, Oszkár; Koczka, Gergely; Preis, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    An efficient finite element method to take account of the nonlinearity of the magnetic materials when analyzing three-dimensional eddy current problems is presented in this paper. The problem is formulated in terms of vector and scalar potentials approximated by edge and node based finite element basis functions. The application of Galerkin techniques leads to a large, nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in the time domain. The excitations are assumed to be time-periodic and the steady-state periodic solution is of interest only. This is represented either in the frequency domain as a finite Fourier series or in the time domain as a set of discrete time values within one period for each finite element degree of freedom. The former approach is the (continuous) harmonic balance method and, in the latter one, discrete Fourier transformation will be shown to lead to a discrete harmonic balance method. Due to the nonlinearity, all harmonics, both continuous and discrete, are coupled to each other. The harmonics would be decoupled if the problem were linear, therefore, a special nonlinear iteration technique, the fixed-point method is used to linearize the equations by selecting a time-independent permeability distribution, the so-called fixed-point permeability in each nonlinear iteration step. This leads to uncoupled harmonics within these steps. As industrial applications, analyses of large power transformers are presented. The first example is the computation of the electromagnetic field of a single-phase transformer in the time domain with the results compared to those obtained by traditional time-stepping techniques. In the second application, an advanced model of the same transformer is analyzed in the frequency domain by the harmonic balance method with the effect of the presence of higher harmonics on the losses investigated. Finally a third example tackles the case of direct current (DC) bias in the coils of a single-phase transformer. PMID

  2. Finite element solution of nonlinear eddy current problems with periodic excitation and its industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Bíró, Oszkár; Koczka, Gergely; Preis, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    An efficient finite element method to take account of the nonlinearity of the magnetic materials when analyzing three-dimensional eddy current problems is presented in this paper. The problem is formulated in terms of vector and scalar potentials approximated by edge and node based finite element basis functions. The application of Galerkin techniques leads to a large, nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in the time domain. The excitations are assumed to be time-periodic and the steady-state periodic solution is of interest only. This is represented either in the frequency domain as a finite Fourier series or in the time domain as a set of discrete time values within one period for each finite element degree of freedom. The former approach is the (continuous) harmonic balance method and, in the latter one, discrete Fourier transformation will be shown to lead to a discrete harmonic balance method. Due to the nonlinearity, all harmonics, both continuous and discrete, are coupled to each other. The harmonics would be decoupled if the problem were linear, therefore, a special nonlinear iteration technique, the fixed-point method is used to linearize the equations by selecting a time-independent permeability distribution, the so-called fixed-point permeability in each nonlinear iteration step. This leads to uncoupled harmonics within these steps. As industrial applications, analyses of large power transformers are presented. The first example is the computation of the electromagnetic field of a single-phase transformer in the time domain with the results compared to those obtained by traditional time-stepping techniques. In the second application, an advanced model of the same transformer is analyzed in the frequency domain by the harmonic balance method with the effect of the presence of higher harmonics on the losses investigated. Finally a third example tackles the case of direct current (DC) bias in the coils of a single-phase transformer.

  3. Simulation of Aircraft Landing Gears with a Nonlinear Dynamic Finite Element Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in computational speed have made aircraft and spacecraft crash simulations using an explicit, nonlinear, transient-dynamic, finite element analysis code more feasible. This paper describes the development of a simple landing gear model, which accurately simulates the energy absorbed by the gear without adding substantial complexity to the model. For a crash model, the landing gear response is approximated with a spring where the force applied to the fuselage is computed in a user-written subroutine. Helicopter crash simulations using this approach are compared with previously acquired experimental data from a full-scale crash test of a composite helicopter.

  4. Finite-element modeling of soft tissue rolling indentation.

    PubMed

    Sangpradit, Kiattisak; Liu, Hongbin; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Seneviratne, Lakmal D

    2011-12-01

    We describe a finite-element (FE) model for simulating wheel-rolling tissue deformations using a rolling FE model (RFEM). A wheeled probe performing rolling tissue indentation has proven to be a promising approach for compensating for the loss of haptic and tactile feedback experienced during robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery (H. Liu, D. P. Noonan, B. J. Challacombe, P. Dasgupta, L. D. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Rolling mechanical imaging for tissue abnormality localization during minimally invasive surgery, " IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 404-414, Feb. 2010; K. Sangpradit, H. Liu, L. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Tissue identification using inverse finite element analysis of rolling indentation," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. , Kobe, Japan, 2009, pp. 1250-1255; H. Liu, D. Noonan, K. Althoefer, and L. Seneviratne, "The rolling approach for soft tissue modeling and mechanical imaging during robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom., May 2008, pp. 845-850; H. Liu, P. Puangmali, D. Zbyszewski, O. Elhage, P. Dasgupta, J. S. Dai, L. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "An indentation depth-force sensing wheeled probe for abnormality identification during minimally invasive surgery," Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., H, vol. 224, no. 6, pp. 751-63, 2010; D. Noonan, H. Liu, Y. Zweiri, K. Althoefer, and L. Seneviratne, "A dual-function wheeled probe for tissue viscoelastic property identification during minimally invasive surgery," in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. , 2008, pp. 2629-2634; H. Liu, J. Li, Q. I. Poon, L. D. Seneviratne, and K. Althoefer, "Miniaturized force indentation-depth sensor for tissue abnormality identification," IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom., May 2010, pp. 3654-3659). A sound understanding of wheel-tissue rolling interaction dynamics will facilitate the evaluation of signals from rolling indentation. In this paper, we model the dynamic interactions between a wheeled probe and a

  5. Domain decomposition based iterative methods for nonlinear elliptic finite element problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, X.C.

    1994-12-31

    The class of overlapping Schwarz algorithms has been extensively studied for linear elliptic finite element problems. In this presentation, the author considers the solution of systems of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the finite element discretization of some nonlinear elliptic equations. Several overlapping Schwarz algorithms, including the additive and multiplicative versions, with inexact Newton acceleration will be discussed. The author shows that the convergence rate of the Newton`s method is independent of the mesh size used in the finite element discretization, and also independent of the number of subdomains into which the original domain in decomposed. Numerical examples will be presented.

  6. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  7. Efficient Finite Element Modelling of Elastodynamic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D and 3D scattering in isotropic material and guided wave scattering are presented.

  8. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  9. Multiphasic finite element modeling of concrete hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A. . E-mail: alain.sellier@insa-toulouse.fr; Escadeillas, G.; Turatsinze, A.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents a model predicting the development of hydration and its consequences on temperature and water content. As it considers the effects of climatic conditions, the proposed model is a promising tool to evaluate the temperature, hydric and hydration fields of structures in situ. The hydration model predicts the hydration evolution of several main species (not only clinker but also mineral additions like fly ash or silica fume for instance). For each component, the modeling considers hydration development and chemical interaction between reactions. It also takes into account temperature and water content effects on reaction kinetics through thermal and hydric activation. Hydration development in turn modifies the thermal and hydric states of material. The result is a numerical model coupling hydration, and the thermal and hydric states of cement-based material. The model was tested on a 27 m{sup 3} concrete block in situ equipped with temperature sensors situated in the core and close to the face exposed to solar radiation.

  10. Finite Element Modeling for Ultrasonic Transducers (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-27

    virtual prototyping of transducers . Fig. 18 shows a 3D model of a Tonpilz device for low frequency sensing in air. This classical design is usually used...coupled Tonpilz transducer . A thick, flexible matching layer is bonded to the face of the conical head-mass. 7. CONCLUSIONS This paper was intended as a...This is a preprint of a paper published in Proc. SPIE Int. Symp. Medical Imaging 1998, San Diego, Feb 21-27, 1998 Ultrasonic Transducer Engineering

  11. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-12-01

    During the last two decades, biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains; and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Give the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law ans a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMs are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested. 62 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-06-01

    During the last two decades. biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains-, and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Given the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law and a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMS are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested.

  13. Assessment of the non-linear behaviour of plastic ankle foot orthoses by the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Syngellakis, S; Arnold, M A; Rassoulian, H

    2000-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of plastic ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) are studied through finite element modelling and stress analysis. Particular attention is given to the modelling and prediction of non-linear AFO behaviour, which has been frequently observed in previous experimental studies but not fully addressed analytically. Both large deformation effects and material non-linearity are included in the formulation and their individual influence on results assessed. The finite element program is subsequently applied to the simulation of a series of tests designed to investigate the relation between AFO trimline location and stiffness for moderate and large rotations. Through careful consideration and identification of key modelling parameters, the developed finite element solution proves to be a reliable and effective alternative means of assessing variations of a typical plastic AFO design so that particular patient requirements could be met, in the long term.

  14. On finite element implementation and computational techniques for constitutive modeling of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Wilt, T.; Iskovitz, I.

    1989-01-01

    The research work performed during the past year on finite element implementation and computational techniques pertaining to high temperature composites is outlined. In the present research, two main issues are addressed: efficient geometric modeling of composite structures and expedient numerical integration techniques dealing with constitutive rate equations. In the first issue, mixed finite elements for modeling laminated plates and shells were examined in terms of numerical accuracy, locking property and computational efficiency. Element applications include (currently available) linearly elastic analysis and future extension to material nonlinearity for damage predictions and large deformations. On the material level, various integration methods to integrate nonlinear constitutive rate equations for finite element implementation were studied. These include explicit, implicit and automatic subincrementing schemes. In all cases, examples are included to illustrate the numerical characteristics of various methods that were considered.

  15. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  16. Modelling of orbital deformation using finite-element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Lindqvist, Christian; Kontio, Risto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite-element model (FEM) of the human orbit, containing the globe, to predict orbital deformation in subjects following a blunt injury. This study investigated the hypothesis that such deformation could be modelled using finite-element techniques. One patient who had CT-scan examination to the maxillofacial skeleton including the orbits, as part of her treatment, was selected for this study. A FEM of one of the orbits containing the globe was constructed, based on CT-scan images. Simulations were performed with a computer using the finite-element software NISA (EMRC, Troy, USA). The orbit was subjected to a blunt injury of a 0.5 kg missile with 30 m s−1 velocity. The FEM was then used to predict principal and shear stresses or strains at each node position. Two types of orbital deformation were predicted during different impact simulations: (i) horizontal distortion and (ii) rotational distortion. Stress values ranged from 213.4 to 363.3 MPa for the maximum principal stress, from −327.8 to −653.1 MPa for the minimum principal stress, and from 212.3 to 444.3 MPa for the maximum shear stress. This is the first finite-element study, which demonstrates different and concurrent patterns of orbital deformation in a subject following a blunt injury. Finite element modelling is a powerful and invaluable tool to study the multifaceted phenomenon of orbital deformation. PMID:16849235

  17. Stress concentration around an atelectatic region: a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Makiyama, A M; Gibson, L J; Harris, R S; Venegas, J G

    2014-09-15

    Lung parenchyma surrounding an atelectatic region is thought to be subjected to increased stress compared with the rest of the lung. Using 37 hexagonal cells made of linear springs, Mead et al. (1970) measured a stress concentration greater than 30% in the springs surrounding a stiffer central cell. We re-examine the problem using a 2D finite element model of 500 cells made of thin filaments with a non-linear stress-strain relationship. We study the consequences of increasing the central stiff region from one to nine contiguous cells in regular hexagonal honeycombs and random Voronoi honeycombs. The honeycomb structures were uniformly expanded with strains of 15%, 30%, 45% and 55% above their resting, non-deformed geometry. The curve of biaxial stress vs. fractional area change has a similar shape to that of the pressure-volume curve of the lung, showing an initial regime with relatively flat slope and a final regime with decreasing slope, tending toward an asymptote. Regular honeycombs had little variability in the maximum stress in radially oriented filaments adjacent to the central stiff region. In contrast, some filaments in random Voronoi honeycombs were subjected to stress concentration approximately 16 times the average stress concentration in the radially oriented filaments adjacent to the stiff region. These results may have implications in selecting the appropriate strategy for mechanical ventilation in ARDS and defining a "safe" level of alveolar pressure for ventilating atelectatic lungs.

  18. CUERVO: A finite element computer program for nonlinear scalar transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Sirman, M.B.; Gartling, D.K.

    1995-11-01

    CUERVO is a finite element code that is designed for the solution of multi-dimensional field problems described by a general nonlinear, advection-diffusion equation. The code is also applicable to field problems described by diffusion, Poisson or Laplace equations. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in CUERVO are outlined here; detailed instructions for use of the code are also presented. Example problems are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  19. Design Optimization of Coronary Stent Based on Finite Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhu, Bao; Wu, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an effective optimization method using the Kriging surrogate model combing with modified rectangular grid sampling to reduce the stent dogboning effect in the expansion process. An infilling sampling criterion named expected improvement (EI) is used to balance local and global searches in the optimization iteration. Four commonly used finite element models of stent dilation were used to investigate stent dogboning rate. Thrombosis models of three typical shapes are built to test the effectiveness of optimization results. Numerical results show that two finite element models dilated by pressure applied inside the balloon are available, one of which with the artery and plaque can give an optimal stent with better expansion behavior, while the artery and plaque unincluded model is more efficient and takes a smaller amount of computation. PMID:24222743

  20. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  1. Non-Linear finite element analysis of cone penetration in layered sandy loam soil-considering precompression stress state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Axisymmetric finite element (FE) method was developed using a commercial computer program to simulate cone penetration process in layered granular soil. Soil was considered as a non-linear elastic plastic material which was modeled using variable elastic parameters of Young’s Modulus and Poisson’s r...

  2. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  3. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  4. Finite Element Modeling and Exploration of Double Hearing Protection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-10

    broad frequency range were determined from this method. The elastomeric rubber material was cut into small wafers of 2 to 5mm thickness. A mass was... material (being 0.1 for soft elastomeric foams), G and E are the shear and elastic moduli of the material , respectively, D is the diameter of the...and to investigate the behavior of the modeled system. The foam earplug material properties for the finite element model are required in the same shear

  5. Faster, Easier Finite-Element Modeling Of Weld Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, C. Chen; Lichwala, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    In faster, easier technique, material in weld zone fictitiously softened to negligibly low modulus of elasticity, and material considered deformed to specified offset. Displacements caused by deformation computed by analysis of static stresses and strains in fictitiously deformed material, using specified offset as displacement boundary condition. Resulting displacements added to coordinates of corresponding nodes of original (nonoffset) mathematical model of welded part. Technique used to modify large finite-element mathematical model to any desired weld offset configuration in short time.

  6. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of Tire-Terrain Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    cent advancements in the contact formulations of general-purpose finite element codes (e.g. ABAQUS , HKS 1998) and increases in computer processing...are based on the models as implemented in ABAQUS (HKS 1998). Additional information on soil plasticity and critical state soil mechanics is given...snow interaction, however, the model must simulate snow deformation in a three-dimensional stress field. Initial simulations using the ABAQUS

  8. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  9. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  10. Finite Element Modeling, Simulation, Tools, and Capabilities at Superform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Hari; Barnes, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    Over the past thirty years Superform has been a pioneer in the SPF arena, having developed a keen understanding of the process and a range of unique forming techniques to meet varying market needs. Superform’s high-profile list of customers includes Boeing, Airbus, Aston Martin, Ford, and Rolls Royce. One of the more recent additions to Superform’s technical know-how is finite element modeling and simulation. Finite element modeling is a powerful numerical technique which when applied to SPF provides a host of benefits including accurate prediction of strain levels in a part, presence of wrinkles and predicting pressure cycles optimized for time and part thickness. This paper outlines a brief history of finite element modeling applied to SPF and then reviews some of the modeling tools and techniques that Superform have applied and continue to do so to successfully superplastically form complex-shaped parts. The advantages of employing modeling at the design stage are discussed and illustrated with real-world examples.

  11. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  12. Nonlinear finite element analysis of solids and structures. Volume 1: Essentials

    SciTech Connect

    Crisfield, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    This book is written for the practicing engineer. It is an attempt to bring together various strands of work on nonlinear finite elements. The developments in the book are related to computer applications; there are a number of Fortran listings, and many flow charts, for solving parts of nonlinear finite element problems. (Floppy disks with the Fortran source and data files are available from the publisher). This book takes an engineering rather than a mathematical approach to nonlinear finite elements. The first three chapters deal with truss elements. The author introduces basic concepts of nonlinear finite element analysis for simple truss systems with one degree of freedom. The solution schemes considered include an incremental (Euler), an iterative (Newton-Raphson), and a combined incremental and iteration approach (full or modified Newton-Raphson or the initial stress method). In chapter 2, the author introduces the shallow truss theory of chapter 1 to derive the finite element equations for a shallow truss slement with four degrees of freedom. A set of Fortran subroutines is given to solve simple bar-spring problems; some flowcharts are also provided. This chapter also contains data and solutions from a number of bar-spring problems.

  13. Finite element modeling of the deformation of magnetoelastic film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew I.; White, Daniel A.; Steigmann, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles, a magnetoelastic polymer, has been developed. This engineered material is formed into a thin film using spin casting. An applied magnetic field will deform the film. The magnetic deformation of this film has many possible applications, particularly in microfluidic pumps and pressure regulators. In this paper a finite element method suitable for the transient simulation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional magnetoelastic polymers subjected to time-varying magnetic fields is developed. The approach is similar to that employed in finite elment magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the key difference is a more complex hyperelastic material model. In order to confirm the validity of the approach, finite element solutions for an axially symmetric thin film are compared to an analytical solution based on the membrane (infinitely thin) approximation. For this particular problem the two approaches give qualitatively similar results and converge as the film thickness approaches zero.

  14. Building Finite Element Models to Investigate Zebrafish Jaw Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Roddy, Karen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal morphogenesis occurs through tightly regulated cell behaviors during development; many cell types alter their behavior in response to mechanical strain. Skeletal joints are subjected to dynamic mechanical loading. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational method, frequently used in engineering that can predict how a material or structure will respond to mechanical input. By dividing a whole system (in this case the zebrafish jaw skeleton) into a mesh of smaller 'finite elements', FEA can be used to calculate the mechanical response of the structure to external loads. The results can be visualized in many ways including as a 'heat map' showing the position of maximum and minimum principal strains (a positive principal strain indicates tension while a negative indicates compression. The maximum and minimum refer the largest and smallest strain). These can be used to identify which regions of the jaw and therefore which cells are likely to be under particularly high tensional or compressional loads during jaw movement and can therefore be used to identify relationships between mechanical strain and cell behavior. This protocol describes the steps to generate Finite Element models from confocal image data on the musculoskeletal system, using the zebrafish lower jaw as a practical example. The protocol leads the reader through a series of steps: 1) staining of the musculoskeletal components, 2) imaging the musculoskeletal components, 3) building a 3 dimensional (3D) surface, 4) generating a mesh of Finite Elements, 5) solving the FEA and finally 6) validating the results by comparison to real displacements seen in movements of the fish jaw. PMID:28060270

  15. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  16. Cost Considerations in Nonlinear Finite-Element Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; Melosh, R. J.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses computational requirements for finiteelement analysis using quasi-linear approach to nonlinear problems. Paper evaluates computational efficiency of different computer architecturtural types in terms of relative cost and computing time.

  17. Finite element modeling of the higher harmonic controlled OH-6A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferg, Douglas; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    An MSC/NASTRAN finite element model of the higher harmonic control configured OH-6A helicopter fuselage was developed. This finite element model was verified by performing various model checkouts and correlation with results from a ground vibration test.

  18. Finite-element model for phase-change recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusche, J. H.; Segal, A.; Urbach, H. P.

    2005-04-01

    The finite-element method is applied to model phase-change recording in a grooved recording stack. A rigorous model for the scattering of a three-dimensional focused spot by a one-dimensional periodic grating is used to determine the absorbed light in a three-dimensional region inside the phase-change layer. The optical model is combined with a three-dimensional thermal model to compute the temperature distribution. Land and groove recording and polarization dependence are studied, and the model is applied to the Blu-ray Disc.

  19. An approach for verification of finite-element analysis in nonlinear elasticity under large strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingerman, K. M.; Vershinin, A. V.; Levin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    An approach to verification of finite-element calculations of stress-strain state of nonlinear elastic bodies under large deformations is suggested. The problems that may be reduced to one-dimensional ones using a semi-inverse method are taken as test problems. An example of such a test problem is the Lame problem for a cylinder. Generally, this problem for compressible hyperelastic materials has no exact analytical solution, but it can be reduced to a boundary value problem for an ordinary second-order nonlinear differential equation, and in some cases - to the Cauchy problem. A numerical solution of this problem can be used as a test one for finite element calculations carried out in three-dimensional statement. Some results of such verification (finite element calculations were performed using the Fidesys CAE-system) are presented.

  20. Contact stress analysis of spiral bevel gears using nonlinear finite element static analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Kumar, A.; Reddy, S.; Handschuh, R.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure is presented for performing three-dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method. The procedure involves generating a finite element model by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Coordinate transformations are used to orientate the gear and pinion for gear meshing. Contact boundary conditions are simulated with gap elements. A solution technique for correct orientation of the gap elements is given. Example models and results are presented.

  1. The sensitivity method in finite element model updating: A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Link, Michael; Friswell, Michael I.

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity method is probably the most successful of the many approaches to the problem of updating finite element models of engineering structures based on vibration test data. It has been applied successfully to large-scale industrial problems and proprietary codes are available based on the techniques explained in simple terms in this article. A basic introduction to the most important procedures of computational model updating is provided, including tutorial examples to reinforce the reader's understanding and a large scale model updating example of a helicopter airframe.

  2. Space-time formulation for finite element modeling of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, Stephen P; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frederic; Laforest, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new model for computing the current density and field distributions in superconductors by means of a periodic space-time formulation for finite elements (FE). By considering a space dimension as time, we can use a static model to solve a time dependent problem. This allows overcoming one of the major problems of FE modeling of superconductors: the length of simulations, even for relatively simple cases. We present our first results and compare them to those obtained with a 'standard' time-dependent method and with analytical solutions.

  3. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Gaspar, James L.; Parks, Russel A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of nonconventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pre-test predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  4. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Area I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Gaspar, James L.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Parks, Russell A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of non-conventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pretest predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  5. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lughmani, W. A.; Bouazza-Marouf, K.; Ashcroft, I.

    2013-07-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. PC Windows finite element modeling of landfill gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, S.R.; Lang, R.J.; Vigil, S.A.; Cota, H.

    1996-09-01

    A two dimensional demonstration program, GAS, has been developed for the solution of landfill gas (LFG) flow problems on a personal computer (PC). The program combines a Windows{trademark} graphical user interface, object oriented programming (OOP) techniques, and finite element modeling (FEM) to demonstrate the practicality of performing LFG flow modeling on the PC. GAS is demonstrated on a sample LFG problem consisting of a landfill, one gas extraction well, the landfill liner, cap, and surrounding soil. Analyses of the program results are performed for successively finer grid resolutions. Element flux imbalance, execution time, and required memory are characterized as a function of grid resolution.

  7. Finite element modeling of hyper-viscoelasticity of peripheral nerve ultrastructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Tao; Chen, Yu-Hsing; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2015-07-16

    The mechanical characteristics of ultrastructures of rat sciatic nerves were investigated through animal experiments and finite element analyses. A custom-designed dynamic testing apparatus was used to conduct in vitro transverse compression experiments on the nerves. The optical coherence tomography (OCT) was utilized to record the cross-sectional images of nerve during the dynamic testing. Two-dimensional finite element models of the nerves were built based on their OCT images. A hyper-viscoelastic model was employed to describe the elastic and stress relaxation response of each ultrastructure of the nerve, namely the endoneurium, the perineurium and the epineurium. The first-order Ogden model was employed to describe the elasticity of each ultrastructure and a generalized Maxwell model for the relaxation. The inverse finite element analysis was used to estimate the material parameters of the ultrastructures. The results show the instantaneous shear modulus of the ultrastructures in decreasing order is perineurium, endoneurium, and epineurium. The FE model combined with the first-order Ogden model and the second-order Prony series is good enough for describing the compress-and-hold response of the nerve ultrastructures. The integration of OCT and the nonlinear finite element modeling may be applicable to study the viscoelasticity of peripheral nerve down to the ultrastructural level.

  8. Anisotropic constitutive model for nickel base single crystal alloys: Development and finite element implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    A tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel base single crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components is developed. This is achieved by a rate dependent anisotropic constitutive model implemented in a nonlinear three dimensional finite element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurigical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. A non Schmid's law formulation is used to model the tension/compression asymmetry and orientation dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is a good approximation to the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response, and strain rate sensitivity of these alloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are presented. The finite element implementation utilizes an initial strain method and twenty noded isoparametric solid elements. The ability to model piecewise linear load histories is included in the finite element code. The constitutive equations are accurately and economically integrated using a second order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method with a dynamic time incrementing procedure. Computed results from the finite element code are compared with experimental data for tensile, creep and cyclic tests at 760 deg C. The strain rate sensitivity and stress relaxation capabilities of the model are evaluated.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  10. A hybrid symbolic/finite-element algorithm for solving nonlinear optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1991-01-01

    The general code described is capable of solving difficult nonlinear optimal control problems by using finite elements and a symbolic manipulator. Quick and accurate solutions are obtained with a minimum for user interaction. Since no user programming is required for most problems, there are tremendous savings to be gained in terms of time and money.

  11. COYOTE: a finite-element computer program for nonlinear heat-conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program.

  12. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element method for solving large, nonlinear thermal-structural problems is presented. The algorithm is formulated for coupled transient and uncoupled quasistatic thermal-structural problems. Vectorizing strategies ensure computational efficiency. Two applications demonstrate the validity of the approach for analyzing transient and quasistatic thermal-structural problems.

  13. Evaluation of a Kinematically-Driven Finite Element Footstrike Model.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain; Harland, Andy; Price, Dan; Schlarb, Heiko; Lucas, Tim

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic finite element model of a shod running footstrike was developed and driven with 6 degree of freedom foot segment kinematics determined from a motion capture running trial. Quadratic tetrahedral elements were used to mesh the footwear components with material models determined from appropriate mechanical tests. Model outputs were compared with experimental high-speed video (HSV) footage, vertical ground reaction force (GRF), and center of pressure (COP) excursion to determine whether such an approach is appropriate for the development of athletic footwear. Although unquantified, good visual agreement to the HSV footage was observed but significant discrepancies were found between the model and experimental GRF and COP readings (9% and 61% of model readings outside of the mean experimental reading ± 2 standard deviations, respectively). Model output was also found to be highly sensitive to input kinematics with a 120% increase in maximum GRF observed when translating the force platform 2 mm vertically. While representing an alternative approach to existing dynamic finite element footstrike models, loading highly representative of an experimental trial was not found to be achievable when employing exclusively kinematic boundary conditions. This significantly limits the usefulness of employing such an approach in the footwear development process.

  14. Partitioning strategy for efficient nonlinear finite element dynamic analysis on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of unsymmetric structures on vector multiprocessor systems. The procedure is based on a novel hierarchical partitioning strategy in which the response of the unsymmetric and antisymmetric response vectors (modes), each obtained by using only a fraction of the degrees of freedom of the original finite element model. The three key elements of the procedure which result in high degree of concurrency throughout the solution process are: (1) mixed (or primitive variable) formulation with independent shape functions for the different fields; (2) operator splitting or restructuring of the discrete equations at each time step to delineate the symmetric and antisymmetric vectors constituting the response; and (3) two level iterative process for generating the response of the structure. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of the procedure on the CRAY X-MP/4 computers.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  16. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  17. Finite element modelling of a rotating piezoelectric ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Frangi, A; Corigliano, A; Binci, M; Faure, P

    2005-10-01

    The evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic motors as a function of input parameters such as the driving frequency, voltage input and pre-load on the rotor is of key importance to their development and is here addressed by means of a finite element three-dimensional model. First the stator is simulated as a fully deformable elastic body and the travelling wave dynamics is accurately reproduced; secondly the interaction through contact between the stator and the rotor is accounted for by assuming that the rotor behaves as a rigid surface. Numerical results for the whole motor are finally compared to available experimental data.

  18. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  19. A general purpose nonlinear rigid body mass finite element for application to rotary wing dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, B. K.; Straub, F. K.; Ruzicka, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System employs the present formulation of the general-purpose nonlinear rigid body mass finite element, which represents the hub masses, blade tip masses, and pendulum vibration absorbers. The rigid body mass element has six degrees of freedom, and accounts for gravitational as well as dynamic effects. A consequence of deriving the element's equations from various physical principles is that, prior to the transformation which couples the rigid body mass element to the rotor blade finite element, the forces obtained for each element are fundamentally different; this is true notwithstanding the degrees-of-freedom of each element are parameterized using the same coordinates.

  20. Validation of a finite element model of the human metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Barker, D S; Netherway, D J; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T C

    2005-03-01

    Implant loosening and mechanical failure of components are frequently reported following metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint replacement. Studies of the mechanical environment of the MCP implant-bone construct are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of a finite element model of the intact second human metacarpal to provide a validated baseline for further mechanical studies. A right index human metacarpal was subjected to torsion and combined axial/bending loading using strain gauge (SG) and 3D finite element (FE) analysis. Four different representations of bone material properties were considered. Regression analyses were performed comparing maximum and minimum principal surface strains taken from the SG and FE models. Regression slopes close to unity and high correlation coefficients were found when the diaphyseal cortical shell was modelled as anisotropic and cancellous bone properties were derived from quantitative computed tomography. The inclusion of anisotropy for cortical bone was strongly influential in producing high model validity whereas variation in methods of assigning stiffness to cancellous bone had only a minor influence. The validated FE model provides a tool for future investigations of current and novel MCP joint prostheses.

  1. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  2. A time domain vector finite element method for the full wave simulation of nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aaron C.

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with third order polarization terms. The method allows for discretization of complicated device geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields, and up to 4th order accurate time discretization. Additionally we have implemented a series of computational optimizations that significantly increase the scale of simulations that can be performed with this method. Among these optimizations is a new generalized mass lumping method that we developed which reduces the computational cost of the finite element system solve by a factor of 10x. In this dissertation we will present the Vector Finite Element Method, and the computational optimizations that we employed. Additionally, we will present a series of analyses and simulations that were performed to validate the method. Finally, we will present some production runs using this method, including nonlinear mode mixing in waveguides and supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber.

  3. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  4. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  5. Prediction of Colles' fracture load in human radius using cohesive finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani

    2009-01-05

    Osteoporotic and age-related fractures are a significant public health problem. One of the most common osteoporotic fracture sites in the aging population is distal radius. There is evidence in the literature that distal radius fractures (Colles' fracture) are an indicative of increased risk of future spine and hip fractures. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element method is applied to human radius to assess its fracture load as a function of cortical bone geometry and material properties. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling which explicitly represents the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The fracture loads found in the simulations (731-6793 N) were in the range of experimental values reported in the literature. The fracture loads predicted by the simulations decreased by 4-5% per decade based only on material level changes and by 6-20% per decade when geometrical changes were also included. Cortical polar moment of inertia at 15% distal radius showed the highest correlation to fracture load (r(2)=0.97). These findings demonstrate the strength of fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling and show that combining geometrical and material properties provides a better assessment of fracture risk in human radius.

  6. A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2015-07-23

    We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

  7. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  8. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  9. PLANS; a finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Armen, H., Jr.; Levy, A.; Levine, H.

    1977-01-01

    The PLANS system, rather than being one comprehensive computer program, is a collection of finite element programs used for the nonlinear analysis of structures. This collection of programs evolved and is based on the organizational philosophy in which classes of analyses are treated individually based on the physical problem class to be analyzed. Each of the independent finite element computer programs of PLANS, with an associated element library, can be individually loaded and used to solve the problem class of interest. A number of programs have been developed for material nonlinear behavior alone and for combined geometric and material nonlinear behavior. The usage, capabilities, and element libraries of the current programs include: (1) plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant, (2) three dimensional elastic-plastic analysis, (3) plastic analysis of bodies of revolution, and (4) material and geometric nonlinear analysis of built-up structures.

  10. Finite-element-analysis model and preliminary ground testing of controls-structures interaction evolutionary model reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Bailey, James P.

    1992-01-01

    Results of two different nonlinear finite element analyses and preliminary test results for the final design of the Controls-Structures Interaction Evolutionary Model are presented. Load-deflection data bases are generalized from analysis and testing of the 16-foot diameter, dish shaped reflector. Natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained from vibrational analysis. Experimental and analytical results show similar trends; however, future test hardware modifications and finite element model refinement would be necessary to obtain better correlation. The two nonlinear analysis procedures are both adequate techniques for the analysis of prestressed structures with complex geometries.

  11. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  12. Computation of Schenberg response function by using finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Magalhaes, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Schenberg is a detector of gravitational waves resonant mass type, with a central frequency of operation of 3200 Hz. Transducers located on the surface of the resonating sphere, according to a distribution half-dodecahedron, are used to monitor a strain amplitude. The development of mechanical impedance matchers that act by increasing the coupling of the transducers with the sphere is a major challenge because of the high frequency and small in size. The objective of this work is to study the Schenberg response function obtained by finite element modeling (FEM). Finnaly, the result is compared with the result of the simplified model for mass spring type system modeling verifying if that is suitable for the determination of sensitivity detector, as the conclusion the both modeling give the same results.

  13. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Finite element implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskovitz, I.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models is made in a general purpose finite element code for structural applications of metals deformed at elevated temperatures. Two constitutive models, Walker's and Robinson's models, are studied in conjunction with two implicit integration methods: the trapezoidal rule with Newton-Raphson iterations and an asymptotic integration algorithm. A comparison is made between the two integration methods, and the latter method appears to be computationally more appealing in terms of numerical accuracy and CPU time. However, in order to make the asymptotic algorithm robust, it is necessary to include a self adaptive scheme with subincremental step control and error checking of the Jacobian matrix at the integration points. Three examples are given to illustrate the numerical aspects of the integration methods tested.

  15. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  16. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  17. An alternative to Guyan reduction of finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jiguan Gene

    1988-01-01

    Structural modeling is a key part of structural system identification for large space structures. Finite-element structural models are commonly used in practice because of their general applicability and availability. The initial models generated by using a standard computer program such as NASTRAN, ANSYS, SUPERB, STARDYNE, STRUDL, etc., generally contain tens of thousands of degrees of freedom. The models must be reduced for purposes of identification. Not only does the magnitude of the identification effort grow exponentially as a function of the number of degrees of freedom, but numerical procedures may also break down because of accumulated round-off errors. Guyan reduction is usually applied after a static condensation. Misapplication of Guyan reduction can lead to serious modeling errors. It is quite unfortunate and disappointing, since the accuracy of the original detailed finite-element model one tries very hard to achieve is lost by the reduction. First, why and how Guyan reduction always causes loss of accuracy is examined. An alternative approach is then introduced. The alternative can be thought of as an improvement of Guyan reduction, the Rayleigh-Ritz method, and in particular the recent algorithm of Wilson, Yuan, and Dickens. Unlike Guyan reduction, the use of the alternative does not need any special insight, experience, or skill for partitioning the structural degrees of freedom. In addition to model condensation, this alternative approach can also be used for predicting analytically, quickly, and economically, what are those structural modes that are excitable by a force actuator at a given trial location. That is, in the excitation of the structural modes for identification, it can be used for guiding the placement of the force actuators.

  18. Accuracy of specimen-specific nonlinear finite element analysis for evaluation of radial diaphysis strength in cadaver material.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Takane; Ogawa, Yasufumi; Sukegawa, Koji; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki; Thoreson, Andrew Ryan; An, Kai-Nan; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of a user-specific finite element model for predicting the in situ strength of the radius after implantation of bone plates for open fracture reduction was established. The effect of metal artifact in CT imaging was characterized. The results were verified against biomechanical test data. Fourteen cadaveric radii were divided into two groups: (1) intact radii for evaluating the accuracy of radial diaphysis strength predictions with finite element analysis and (2) radii with a locking plate affixed for evaluating metal artifact. All bones were imaged with CT. In the plated group, radii were first imaged with the plates affixed (for simulating digital plate removal). They were then subsequently imaged with the locking plates and screws removed (actual plate removal). Fracture strength of the radius diaphysis under axial compression was predicted with a three-dimensional, specimen-specific, nonlinear finite element analysis for both the intact and plated bones (bones with and without the plate captured in the scan). Specimens were then loaded to failure using a universal testing machine to verify the actual fracture load. In the intact group, the physical and predicted fracture loads were strongly correlated. For radii with plates affixed, the physical and predicted (simulated plate removal and actual plate removal) fracture loads were strongly correlated. This study demonstrates that our specimen-specific finite element analysis can accurately predict the strength of the radial diaphysis. The metal artifact from CT imaging was shown to produce an overestimate of strength.

  19. Geometrically-linear and nonlinear analysis of linear viscoelastic composites using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerand, Daniel C.

    Over the past several decades, the use of composite materials has grown considerably. Typically, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are modeled as being linear elastic. However, it is well-known that polymers are viscoelastic in nature. Furthermore, the analysis of complex structures requires a numerical approach such as the finite element method. In the present work, a triangular flat shell element for linear elastic composites is extended to model linear viscoelastic composites. Although polymers are usually modeled as being incompressible, here they are modeled as compressible. Furthermore, the macroscopic constitutive properties for fiber-reinforced composites are assumed to be known and are not determined using the matrix and fiber properties along with the fiber volume fraction. Hygrothermo-rheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Both the temperature and moisture are taken to be prescribed. Hence, the heat energy generated by the viscoelastic deformations is not considered. When the deformations and rotations are small under an applied load history, the usual engineering stress and strain measures can be used and the time history of a viscoelastic deformation process is determined using the original geometry of the structure. If, however, sufficiently large loads are applied, the deflections and rotations will be large leading to changes in the structural stiffness characteristics and possibly the internal loads carried throughout the structure. Hence, in such a case, nonlinear effects must be taken into account and the appropriate stress and strain measures must be used. Although a geometrically-nonlinear finite element code could always be used to compute geometrically-linear deformation processes, it is inefficient to use such a code for small deformations, due to

  20. Adaptive superposition of finite element meshes in linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhihua

    2005-11-01

    The numerical analysis of transient phenomena in solids, for instance, wave propagation and structural dynamics, is a very important and active area of study in engineering. Despite the current evolutionary state of modern computer hardware, practical analysis of large scale, nonlinear transient problems requires the use of adaptive methods where computational resources are locally allocated according to the interpolation requirements of the solution form. Adaptive analysis of transient problems involves obtaining solutions at many different time steps, each of which requires a sequence of adaptive meshes. Therefore, the execution speed of the adaptive algorithm is of paramount importance. In addition, transient problems require that the solution must be passed from one adaptive mesh to the next adaptive mesh with a bare minimum of solution-transfer error since this form of error compromises the initial conditions used for the next time step. A new adaptive finite element procedure (s-adaptive) is developed in this study for modeling transient phenomena in both linear elastic solids and nonlinear elastic solids caused by progressive damage. The adaptive procedure automatically updates the time step size and the spatial mesh discretization in transient analysis, achieving the accuracy and the efficiency requirements simultaneously. The novel feature of the s-adaptive procedure is the original use of finite element mesh superposition to produce spatial refinement in transient problems. The use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to completely avoid the need for cumbersome multipoint constraint algorithms and mesh generators, which makes the s-adaptive procedure extremely fast. Moreover, the use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to minimize the solution-transfer error. In a series of different solid mechanics problem types including 2-D and 3-D linear elastic quasi-static problems, 2-D material nonlinear quasi-static problems

  1. Thermal buoyancy on Venus: Preliminary results of finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced surface temperatures and a thinner lithosphere on Venus relative to Earth have been cited as leading to increased lithospheric buoyancy. This would limit or prevent subduction on Venus and favor the construction of thickened crust through underthrusting. In order to evaluate the conditions distinguishing between underthrusting and subduction, we have modeled the thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction end member. This study considers the fate of a slab from the time it starts to subduct, but bypasses the question of subduction initiation. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into a mantle having a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and thus their overall buoyancy. Finite element modeling is then applied in a first approximation of the assessment of the relative rates of subduction as compared to the buoyant rise of the slab through a viscous mantle.

  2. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  3. Optimizing for minimum weight when two different finite element models and analyses are required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    1989-01-01

    The Finite Element Structural Optimization Program's (FESOP) ability to perform minimum weight optimization using two different finite element analyses and models is discussed. FESOP uses the ADS optimizer developed by Dr. Garret Vanderplaats to solve the nonlinear constrained optimization problem. The design optimization problem requires a response spectrum analysis and model to evaluate the stress and displacement constraints. However, the problem needs a frequency analysis and model to calculate the natural frequencies used to evaluate the frequency range constraints. The results of both the successful and unsuccessful approaches used to solve this difficult weight minimization problem are summarized. The results show that no one ADS optimization algorithm worked in all cases. However, the Sequential Convex Programming and Modified Method of Feasible Directions algorithms were the most successful.

  4. A novel arterial constitutive model in a commercial finite element package: Application to balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2011-10-07

    Recently, a novel linearized constitutive model with a new strain measure that absorbs the material nonlinearity was validated for arteries. In this study, the linearized arterial stress-strain relationship is implemented into a finite element method package, ANSYS, via the user subroutine USERMAT. The reference configuration is chosen to be the closed cylindrical tube (no-load state) rather than the open sector (zero-stress state). The residual strain is taken into account by analytic calculation and the incompressibility condition is enforced with Lagrange penalty method. Axisymmetric finite element analyses are conducted to demonstrate potential applications of this approach in a complex boundary value problem where angioplasty balloon interacts with the vessel wall. The model predictions of transmural circumferential and compressive radial stress distributions were also validated against an exponential-type Fung model, and the mean error was found to be within 6%.

  5. Workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling was held on 12 May 1987. It was held to discuss the geometric modeling requirements of the finite element modeling process and to better understand the technical aspects of the integration of these two areas. The 11 papers are presented except for one for which only the abstract is given.

  6. Finite Element Modeling and Optimization of Mechanical Joining Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenot, Jean-Loup; Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Massoni, Elisabeth; Mocellin, Katia; Lasne, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The main scientific ingredients are recalled for developing a general finite element code and model accurately large plastic deformation of metallic materials during joining processes. Multi material contact is treated using the classical master and slave approach. Rupture may occur in joining processes or even be imposed in self piercing riveting and it must be predicted to evaluate the ultimate strength of joins. Damage is introduced with a generalized uncoupled damage criterion, or by utilizing a coupled formulation with a Lemaître law. Several joining processes are briefly analyzed in term of specific scientific issues: riveting, self piercing riveting, clinching, crimping, hemming and screwing. It is shown that not only the joining process can be successfully simulated and optimized, but also the strength of the assembly can be predicted in tension and in shearing.

  7. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  8. NPLOT: an Interactive Plotting Program for NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.; Mcentire, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The NPLOT (NASTRAN Plot) is an interactive computer graphics program for plotting undeformed and deformed NASTRAN finite element models. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the program provides flexible element selection and grid point, ASET and SPC degree of freedom labelling. It is easy to use and provides a combination menu and command driven user interface. NPLOT also provides very fast hidden line and haloed line algorithms. The hidden line algorithm in NPLOT proved to be both very accurate and several times faster than other existing hidden line algorithms. A fast spatial bucket sort and horizon edge computation are used to achieve this high level of performance. The hidden line and the haloed line algorithms are the primary features that make NPLOT different from other plotting programs.

  9. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  10. Continuous deflation and plate spreading at the Askja volcanic system, Iceland: Constrains on deformation processes from finite element models using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, Vincent Jean Paul B.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is located on the mid Atlantic ridge, where the spreading rate is nearly 2 cm/yr. The high rate of magmatism in Iceland is caused by the interaction between the Iceland hotspot and the divergent mid-Atlantic plate boundary. Iceland hosts about 35 volcanoes or volcanic systems that are active. Most of these are aliened along the plate boundary. The best studied magma chamber of central volcanoes (e.g., Askja, Krafla, Grimsvötn, Katla) have verified (suggested) a shallow magma chamber (< 5 km), which has been model successfully with a Mogi source, using elastic and/or elastic-viscoelastic half-space. Maxwell and Newtonian viscosity is mainly considered for viscoelastic half-space. Therefore, rheology may be oversimplified. Our attempt is to study deformation of the Askja volcano together with plate spreading in Iceland using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology. It offers continuous variation of rheology, laterally and vertically from rift axis and surface. To implement it, we consider thermo-mechanic coupling models where rheology follows dislocation flow in dry condition based on a temperature distribution. Continuous deflation of the Askja volcanic system is associated with solidification of magma in the magma chamber and post eruption relaxation. A long time series of levelling data show its subsidence trend to exponentially. In our preliminary models, a magma chamber at 2.8 km depth with 0.5 km radius is introduced at the ridge axis as a Mogi source. Simultaneously far field of rift axis stretching by 18.4 mm/yr (measured during 2007 to 20013) is applied to reproduce plate spreading. Predicted surface deformation caused of combined effect of tectonic-volcanic activities is evaluated with GPS during 2003-2009 and RADARSAT InSAR data during 2000 to 2010. During 2003-2009, data from the GPS site OLAF (close to the centre of subsidence) shows average rate of subsidence 19±1 mm/yr relative to the ITRF2005 reference frame. The MASK (Mid ASKJA) site is

  11. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation.

  12. Applications of Parallel and Vector Algorithms in Nonlinear Structural Dynamics Using the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    the 3D isoparametric family of elements, and using a Total Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration of the global equations of motion. The...to be observed. NLDFEP, a NonLinear Dynamic Finite Element Program, is designed around the I three dimensional isoparametric family of elements...implemented in NLDFEP are the 8 and 20 node bricks. The program is structured so that additional elements, such as the 27 node brick or another family of

  13. Error estimations of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear problems of shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karchevsky, M.

    2016-11-01

    The variational formulations of problems of equilibrium of a shallow shell in the framework of the geometrically and physically nonlinear theory by boundary conditions of different main types, including non-classical, are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for their solvability are derived. Mixed finite element methods for the approximate solutions to these problems based on the use of second derivatives of the bending as auxiliary variables are proposed. Estimations of accuracy of approximate solutions are established.

  14. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1985-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element solution algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis of large, complex structural problems subjected to rapidly applied thermal-structural loads is described. The two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm is an application of an algorithm recently developed for problems in compressible fluid dynamics. The element integrals that appear in the algorithm can be evaluated in closed form for two and three dimensional elements.

  15. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  16. Nonlinear transient survival level seismic finite element analysis of Magellan ground based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Matt; Buleri, Christine; Baylor, Andrew; Gunnels, Steve; Hull, Charlie; Palunas, Povilas; Phillips, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The Magellan Telescopes are a set of twin 6.5 meter ground based optical/near-IR telescopes operated by the Carnegie Institution for Science at the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile. The primary mirrors are f/1.25 paraboloids made of borosilicate glass and a honeycomb structure. The secondary mirror provides both f/11 and f/5 focal lengths with two Nasmyth, three auxiliary, and a Cassegrain port on the optical support structure (OSS). The telescopes have been in operation since 2000 and have experienced several small earthquakes with no damage. Measurement of in situ response of the telescopes to seismic events showed significant dynamic amplification, however, the response of the telescopes to a survival level earthquake, including component level forces, displacements, accelerations, and stresses were unknown. The telescopes are supported with hydrostatic bearings that can lift up under high seismic loading, thus causing a nonlinear response. For this reason, the typical response spectrum analysis performed to analyze a survival level seismic earthquake is not sufficient in determining the true response of the structure. Therefore, a nonlinear transient finite element analysis (FEA) of the telescope structure was performed to assess high risk areas and develop acceleration responses for future instrument design. Several configurations were considered combining different installed components and altitude pointing directions. A description of the models, methodology, and results are presented.

  17. A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for nonlinear elastic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Bou Matar, Olivier; Guerder, Pierre-Yves; Li, YiFeng; Vandewoestyne, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2012-05-01

    A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DG-FEM) to solve the linear and nonlinear elastic wave equation in heterogeneous media with arbitrary high order accuracy in space on unstructured triangular or quadrilateral meshes is presented. This DG-FEM method combines the geometrical flexibility of the finite element method, and the high parallelization potentiality and strongly nonlinear wave phenomena simulation capability of the finite volume method, required for nonlinear elastodynamics simulations. In order to facilitate the implementation based on a numerical scheme developed for electromagnetic applications, the equations of nonlinear elastodynamics have been written in a conservative form. The adopted formalism allows the introduction of different kinds of elastic nonlinearities, such as the classical quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, or the quadratic hysteretic nonlinearities. Absorbing layers perfectly matched to the calculation domain of the nearly perfectly matched layers type have been introduced to simulate, when needed, semi-infinite or infinite media. The developed DG-FEM scheme has been verified by means of a comparison with analytical solutions and numerical results already published in the literature for simple geometrical configurations: Lamb's problem and plane wave nonlinear propagation.

  18. Finite element analysis of the non-linear vibrations of moderately thick unsymmetrically laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajbir; Venkateswara Rao, G.; Iyengar, N. G. R.

    1995-03-01

    The influence of finite amplitudes on the free flexural vibration response of moderately thick laminated plates is investigated. For this purpose, a simple higher order theory involving only four unknowns and satisfying the stress free conditions at the top and bottom surface of the composite plate is proposed. The proposed theory eliminates the use of shear correction factors which are otherwise required in Mindlin's plate theory. A rectangular four-node[formula]continuous finite element is developed based on this theory. The non-linear finite element equations are reduced to two non-linear ordinary differential equations governing the response of positive and negative deflection cycles. Direct numerical integration method is then employed to obtain the periods or non-linear frequencies. The finite element developed and the direct numerical integration method employed are validated for the case of isotropic rectangular plates. It is found that unsymmetrically laminated rectangular plates with hinged-hinged edge conditions oscillate with different amplitudes in the positive and negative deflection cycles. Furthermore, such plates would oscillate with a frequency less than the fundamental frequency for finite small amplitudes of oscillation. It is shown that this behaviour is strongly influenced by the boundary conditions. Results are presented for many configurations of composite plates.

  19. Three dimensional, non-linear, finite element analysis of compactable soil interaction with a hyperelastic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiroux, Robert Charles

    The objective of this research was to produce a three dimensional, non-linear, dynamic simulation of the interaction between a hyperelastic wheel rolling over compactable soil. The finite element models developed to produce the simulation utilized the ABAQUS/Explicit computer code. Within the simulation two separate bodies were modeled, the hyperelastic wheel and a compactable soil-bed. Interaction between the bodies was achieved by allowing them to come in contact but not to penetrate the contact surface. The simulation included dynamic loading of a hyperelastic, rubber tire in contact with compactable soil with an applied constant angular velocity or torque, including a tow load, applied to the wheel hub. The constraints on the wheel model produced a straight and curved path. In addition the simulation included a shear limit between the tire and soil allowing for the introduction of slip. Soil properties were simulated using the Drucker-Prager, Cap Plasticity model available within the ABAQUS/Explicit program. Numerical results obtained from the three dimensional model were compared with related experimental data and showed good correlation for similar conditions. Numerical and experimental data compared well for both stress and wheel rut formation depth under a weight of 5.8 kN and a constant angular velocity applied to the wheel hub. The simulation results provided a demonstration of the benefit of three-dimensional simulation in comparison to previous two-dimensional, plane strain simulations.

  20. Finite element modelling and analysis of composites toecaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. C.; Duhovic, M.; Lin, R. J. T.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2009-08-01

    Composite toe-caps have attracted considerable attention due to their advantageous properties over traditional metallic toe-caps. However, the anisotropic properties of composite materials also make the toe-cap performance more complex to analyse. This project aims at developing a Finite Element (FE) model for composite toe-caps with the aid of compression testing data. The geometry of the toe-cap was first scanned and imported into an FEA software package to create a workable FE model. The method was then validated by comparing the FE model with experimental results of steel toe-caps. Manufacturing, modelling and testing of custom-made composite toe-cap samples were then carried out. Modelling outputs of composite toe-caps were compared with compression test data for validation. The stress distributions and deformations of the toe-caps were also analysed. Modelling of the steel and composite toe-caps was realized using LS-DYNA Solver and PrePost®. All FE analyses were modelled with reference to European Standards. The developed FE models can in the future be used to model toe-caps with various materials to determine the effects of fibre orientation relating to structural strength, and to achieve structural optimisation.

  1. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a member of an emerging class of direct manufacturing processes known as solid freeform fabrication (SFF); another member of the class is the laser deposition process. Successful application of the EBF3 process requires precise control of a number of process parameters such as the EB power, speed, and metal feed rate in order to ensure thermal management; good fusion between the substrate and the first layer and between successive layers; minimize part distortion and residual stresses; and control the microstructure of the finished product. This is the only effort thus far that has addressed computer simulation of the EBF3 process. The models developed in this effort can assist in reducing the number of trials in the laboratory or on the shop floor while making high-quality parts. With some modifications, their use can be further extended to the simulation of laser, TIG (tungsten inert gas), and other deposition processes. A solid mechanics-based finite element code, ABAQUS, was chosen as the primary engine in developing these models whereas a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Fluent, was used in a support role. Several innovative concepts were developed, some of which are highlighted below. These concepts were implemented in a number of new computer models either in the form of stand-alone programs or as user subroutines for ABAQUS and Fluent codes. A database of thermo-physical, mechanical, fluid, and metallurgical properties of stainless steel 304 was developed. Computing models for Gaussian and raster modes of the electron beam heat input were developed. Also, new schemes were devised to account for the heat sink effect during the deposition process. These innovations, and others, lead to improved models for thermal management and prediction of transient/residual stresses and distortions. Two approaches for the prediction of microstructure were pursued. The first was an empirical approach involving the

  2. Development of a finite element model of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Lazoglu, Ismail; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2014-01-01

    The finite element model has been used as an effective tool in human spine biomechanics. Biomechanical finite element models have provided basic insights into the workings of the cervical spine system. Advancements in numerical methods during the last decade have enabled researchers to propose more accurate models of the cervical spine. The new finite element model of the cervical spine considers the accurate representation of each tissue regarding the geometry and material. The aim of this paper is to address the new advancements in the finite element model of the human cervical spine. The procedures for creating a finite element model are introduced, including geometric construction, material-property assignment, boundary conditions and validation. The most recent and published finite element models of the cervical spine are reviewed.

  3. Finite element modeling of the non collinear mixing method for detection and characterization of closed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanloeuil, P.; Meziane, A.

    2015-10-01

    The non-collinear mixing technique is applied for detection and characterization of closed cracks. The method is based on the nonlinear interaction of two shear waves generated with an oblique incidence. This interaction leads to the scattering of a longitudinal wave. A Finite Element model is used to demonstrate its application to a closed crack. Contact acoustic nonlinearity is the nonlinear effect considered here and is modeled using unilateral contact law with Coulomb's friction. Directivity patterns are computed using a two-step procedure. The Finite Element (FE) model provides the near-field solution on a circular boundary surrounding the closed crack. The solution in the far-field is then determined assuming that the material has a linear behavior. Directivity patterns will be used to analyze the direction of propagation of longitudinal wave(s) scattered from the closed crack. Numerical results show that the method is effective and promising when applied to a closed crack. Scattering of the longitudinal wave also enables us to image the crack, giving position and size indications. Finally, the method offers the possibility to distinguish classical nonlinearity from contact acoustic nonlinearity.

  4. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  5. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  6. Finite element models of wire rope for vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Fitz-Coy, N. G.; Cutchins, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of wire rope in shock and vibration isolation is briefly reviewed and its modeling for the purpose of vibration analysis is addressed. A model of a nominally straight segment of wire rope is described in which the rope structure is represented by a maiden, or central, strand of wire with one (or more) strand(s) wrapped around it in a helix (helices). The individual strands are modeled using finite elements and MSC NASTRAN. Small linear segments of each wire are modeled mathematically by dividing them lengthwise into triangular prisms representing each prism by a solid NASTRAN element. To model pretensioning and allow for extraction of internal force information from the NASTRAN model, the wound strands are connected to the maiden strand and each other using spring (scalar elastic) elements. Mode shapes for a length of wire rope with one and fixed to a moving base and the other attached to a point mass, are presented. The use of the NASTRAN derived mode shapes to approximate internal normal forces in equations of motion for vibration analyses is considered.

  7. Assessment of stochastically updated finite element models using reliability indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, X. G.; Wen, Q.; Ni, Y. Q.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Finite element (FE) model updating techniques have been a viable approach to correcting an initial mathematical model based on test data. Validation of the updated FE models is usually conducted by comparing model predictions with independent test data that have not been used for model updating. This approach of model validation cannot be readily applied in the case of a stochastically updated FE model. In recognizing that structural reliability is a major decision factor throughout the lifecycle of a structure, this study investigates the use of structural reliability as a measure for assessing the quality of stochastically updated FE models. A recently developed perturbation method for stochastic FE model updating is first applied to attain the stochastically updated models by using the measured modal parameters with uncertainty. The reliability index and failure probability for predefined limit states are computed for the initial and the stochastically updated models, respectively, and are compared with those obtained from the 'true' model to assess the quality of the two models. Numerical simulation of a truss bridge is provided as an example. The simulated modal parameters involving different uncertainty magnitudes are used to update an initial model of the bridge. It is shown that the reliability index obtained from the updated model is much closer to true reliability index than that obtained from the initial model in the case of small uncertainty magnitude; in the case of large uncertainty magnitude, the reliability index computed from the initial model rather than from the updated model is closer to the true value. The present study confirms the usefulness of measurement-calibrated FE models and at the same time also highlights the importance of the uncertainty reduction in test data for reliable model updating and reliability evaluation.

  8. Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Decha-Umphai, Kamolphan

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibration of a beam is analyzed by the finite element method. The geometric nonlinearity is investigated. Inplane displacement and inertia (IDI) are also considered in the formulation. Harmonic force matrix is derived and explained. Nonlinear free vibration can be simply treated as a special case of the general forced vibration by setting the harmonic force matrix equal to zero. The effect of the higher modes is more pronouced for the clamped supported beam than the simply supported one. Beams without IDI yield more effect of the higher modes than the one with IDI. The effects of IDI are to reduce nonlinearity. For beams with end supports restrained from axial movement (immovable cases), only the hardening type nonlinearity is observed. However, beams of small slenderness ratio (L/R = 20) with movable end supports, the softening type nonlinearity is found. The concentrated force case yields a more severe response than the uniformly distributed force case. Finite element results are in good agreement with the solution of simple elliptic response, harmonic balance method, and Runge-Kutte method and experiment.

  9. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  10. A finite element musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, F C

    1994-05-01

    The finite element method described in this study provides an easy method to simulate the kinetics of multibody mechanisms. It is used in order to develop a musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism. Each relevant morphological structure has been represented by an appropriate element. For the shoulder mechanism two special-purpose elements have been developed: a SURFACE element representing the scapulothoracic gliding plane and a CURVED-TRUSS element to represent muscles which are wrapped around bony contours. The model contains four bones, three joints, three extracapsular ligaments, the scapulothoracic gliding plane and 20 muscles and muscle parts. In the model, input variables are the positions of the shoulder girdle and humerus and the external load on the humerus. Output variables are muscles forces subject to an optimization procedure in which the mechanical stability of the glenohumeral joint is one of the constraints. Four different optimization criteria are compared. For 12 muscles, surface EMG is used to verify the model. Since the optimum muscle length and force-length relationship are unknown, and since maximal EMG amplitude is length dependent, verification is only possible in a qualitative sense. Nevertheless, it is concluded that a detailed model of the shoulder mechanism has been developed which provides good insight into the function of morphological structures.

  11. Finite element code development for modeling detonation of HMX composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Adam V.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a hydrodynamics code for modeling shock and detonation waves in HMX. A stable efficient solution strategy based on a Taylor-Galerkin finite element (FE) discretization was developed to solve the reactive Euler equations. In our code, well calibrated equations of state for the solid unreacted material and gaseous reaction products have been implemented, along with a chemical reaction scheme and a mixing rule to define the properties of partially reacted states. A linear Gruneisen equation of state was employed for the unreacted HMX calibrated from experiments. The JWL form was used to model the EOS of gaseous reaction products. It is assumed that the unreacted explosive and reaction products are in both pressure and temperature equilibrium. The overall specific volume and internal energy was computed using the rule of mixtures. Arrhenius kinetics scheme was integrated to model the chemical reactions. A locally controlled dissipation was introduced that induces a non-oscillatory stabilized scheme for the shock front. The FE model was validated using analytical solutions for SOD shock and ZND strong detonation models. Benchmark problems are presented for geometries in which a single HMX crystal is subjected to a shock condition.

  12. Calibration under uncertainty for finite element models of masonry monuments

    SciTech Connect

    Atamturktur, Sezer,; Hemez, Francois,; Unal, Cetin

    2010-02-01

    Historical unreinforced masonry buildings often include features such as load bearing unreinforced masonry vaults and their supporting framework of piers, fill, buttresses, and walls. The masonry vaults of such buildings are among the most vulnerable structural components and certainly among the most challenging to analyze. The versatility of finite element (FE) analyses in incorporating various constitutive laws, as well as practically all geometric configurations, has resulted in the widespread use of the FE method for the analysis of complex unreinforced masonry structures over the last three decades. However, an FE model is only as accurate as its input parameters, and there are two fundamental challenges while defining FE model input parameters: (1) material properties and (2) support conditions. The difficulties in defining these two aspects of the FE model arise from the lack of knowledge in the common engineering understanding of masonry behavior. As a result, engineers are unable to define these FE model input parameters with certainty, and, inevitably, uncertainties are introduced to the FE model.

  13. Customized Finite Element Modelling of the Human Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Simonini, Irene; Pandolfi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To construct patient-specific solid models of human cornea from ocular topographer data, to increase the accuracy of the biomechanical and optical estimate of the changes in refractive power and stress caused by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Method Corneal elevation maps of five human eyes were taken with a rotating Scheimpflug camera combined with a Placido disk before and after refractive surgery. Patient-specific solid models were created and discretized in finite elements to estimate the corneal strain and stress fields in preoperative and postoperative configurations and derive the refractive parameters of the cornea. Results Patient-specific geometrical models of the cornea allow for the creation of personalized refractive maps at different levels of IOP. Thinned postoperative corneas show a higher stress gradient across the thickness and higher sensitivity of all geometrical and refractive parameters to the fluctuation of the IOP. Conclusion Patient-specific numerical models of the cornea can provide accurate quantitative information on the refractive properties of the cornea under different levels of IOP and describe the change of the stress state of the cornea due to refractive surgery (PRK). Patient-specific models can be used as indicators of feasibility before performing the surgery. PMID:26098104

  14. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  15. Adaptation of a program for nonlinear finite element analysis to the CDC STAR 100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion of a nonlinear finite element program to the CDC STAR 100 pipeline computer is discussed. The program called DYCAST was developed for the crash simulation of structures. Initial results with the STAR 100 computer indicated that significant gains in computation time are possible for operations on gloval arrays. However, for element level computations that do not lend themselves easily to long vector processing, the STAR 100 was slower than comparable scalar computers. On this basis it is concluded that in order for pipeline computers to impact the economic feasibility of large nonlinear analyses it is absolutely essential that algorithms be devised to improve the efficiency of element level computations.

  16. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  17. Finite-element model of the active organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Baumgart, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear amplifier that provides our hearing with its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity is thought to be the result of an active biomechanical process within the sensory auditory organ, the organ of Corti. Although imaging techniques are developing rapidly, it is not currently possible, in a fully active cochlea, to obtain detailed measurements of the motion of individual elements within a cross section of the organ of Corti. This motion is predicted using a two-dimensional finite-element model. The various solid components are modelled using elastic elements, the outer hair cells (OHCs) as piezoelectric elements and the perilymph and endolymph as viscous and nearly incompressible fluid elements. The model is validated by comparison with existing measurements of the motions within the passive organ of Corti, calculated when it is driven either acoustically, by the fluid pressure or electrically, by excitation of the OHCs. The transverse basilar membrane (BM) motion and the shearing motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are calculated for these two excitation modes. The fully active response of the BM to acoustic excitation is predicted using a linear superposition of the calculated responses and an assumed frequency response for the OHC feedback. PMID:26888950

  18. Finite Element Modeling for Infrared Thermography of Gfrp Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Cheng L.; Halabe, Udaya B.

    2008-02-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks are increasingly being used as replacements for old concrete decks and for new construction. The service performance of the GFRP bridge decks can be adversely affected by the formation of debonds between the wearing surface and the underlying bridge deck. Past experimental studies by the authors have shown the usefulness of the infrared thermography technique in detecting the subsurface debonds prior to maintenance and rehabilitation work. This paper investigates the use of finite element (FE) heat transfer modeling to predict infrared thermography images from GFRP bridge decks with subsurface debonds. The paper includes measurement of thermal properties of the GFRP bridge deck and the wearing surface, and heat transfer FE modeling of decks with debonds of different thicknesses. The results show that FE modeling can be a useful tool for predicting surface temperature profile under different heating conditions and debond sizes. Such predictions can help determine the required heat intensity and detectable debond sizes prior to experimental data acquisition in the field using an infrared camera.

  19. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  20. Finite element modeling of superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Naceur, Ines Ben; Charfi, Amin; Bouraoui, Tarak; Elleuch, Khaled

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, superelastic Ni–Ti wire alloys have been successfully used in orthodontic treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and evaluate the level of orthodontic force applied to the bracket and teeth in order to achieve tooth movement. In this study, three dimensional finite element models with a Gibbs-potential-based-formulation and thermodynamic principles were used. The aim was to evaluate the influence of possible intraoral temperature differences on the forces exerted by NiTi orthodontic arch wires with different cross sectional shapes and sizes. The prediction made by this phenomenological model, for superelastic tensile and bending tests, shows good agreement with the experimental data. A bending test is simulated to study the force variation of an orthodontic NiTi arch wire when it loaded up to the deflection of 3 mm, for this task one half of the arch wire and the 3 adjacent brackets were modeled. The results showed that the stress required for the martensite transformation increases with the increase of cross-sectional dimensions and temperature. Associated with this increase in stress, the plateau of this transformation becomes steeper. In addition, the area of the mechanical hysteresis, measured as the difference between the forces of the upper and lower plateau, increases.

  1. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  2. Short-term creep of shotcrete - thermochemoplastic material modelling and nonlinear analysis of a laboratory test and of a NATM excavation by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, M.; Hellmich, Ch.; Mang, H. A.

    Embedded in a thermochemoplastic material law set up in the framework of thermodynamics, the focus of the work is on the creep characteristics of shotcrete. Short-term creep, with a characteristic duration of several days, turns out to be a fundamental feature for realistic modelling of the structural behaviour of tunnels driven according to the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM). Its origin is a stress-induced water movement within the capillary pores of concrete. This process is related to the accumulation of hydrates, which are initially free of micro-stress. Hence, an incremental formulation for aging viscoelasticity turns out to be a proper tool for modelling this kind of creep. The usefulness of this formulation is tested by re-analyzing a relaxation test with non-constant prescribed strains, showing quantitatively correct results for concrete and qualitatively correct results for shotcrete. The latter results indicate the necessity of classical creep tests for shotcrete.

  3. Finite-Element Analysis of a Mach-8 Flight Test Article Using Nonlinear Contact Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance

    1997-01-01

    A flight test article, called a glove, is required for a Mach-8 boundary-layer experiment to be conducted on a flight mission of the air-launched Pegasus(reg) space booster. The glove is required to provide a smooth, three-dimensional, structurally stable, aerodynamic surface and includes instrumentation to determine when and where boundary-layer transition occurs during the hypersonic flight trajectory. A restraint mechanism has been invented to attach the glove to the wing of the space booster. The restraint mechanism securely attaches the glove to the wing in directions normal to the wing/glove interface surface, but allows the glove to thermally expand and contract to alleviate stresses in directions parallel to the interface surface. A finite-element analysis has been performed using nonlinear contact elements to model the complex behavior of the sliding restraint mechanism. This paper provides an overview of the glove design and presents details of the analysis that were essential to demonstrate the flight worthiness of the wing-glove test article. Results show that all glove components are well within the allowable stress and deformation requirements to satisfy the objectives of the flight research experiment.

  4. Finite element modeling of a progressively expanding shape memory stent.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Philippe; Terriault, Patrick; Brailovski, Vladimir; Gallo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular stents are small cylindrical devices introduced in stenosed arteries to reopen the lumen and restore blood flow. However, this treatment presents complications, including restenosis, which is the reclosing of the artery's diameter after the insertion of a stent. The structure of the prosthesis penetrates into and injures the walls of the patient's artery. There then follows a proliferation of cells and the formation of scar tissue around the injury, similar to the scarring of other organic tissues. This reaction to the trauma subjects the artery to close. The proposed solution is to develop a Nitinol stent with a progressive expansion device made of polyethylene, allowing smooth and gradual contact between the stent and the artery's wall by creep effect. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology and methodology for the numerical study of this kind of stent through the finite element method. ANSYS 8.0 software is used to perform the analysis. The Nitinol is modeled with a superelastic law and the polyethylene with a yield hardening law. A first simulation determines the final geometry of the stent laser cut from a small tube. A second simulation examines the behavior of the prosthesis during surgery and over the 4 weeks following the operation. The results demonstrate that a compromise can be reached between a limited expansion prior the inflation of the expandable balloon and a significant expansion by creep of the polymer rings.

  5. Finite-element model for endometrial ablation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Platt, Robert C.; Humphries, Stanley, Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Ablation of the endometrium has become a viable treatment for dysfunctional bleeding of the uterus in women. Surgical applications of thermal ablation utilized a rolling electrode to ablate the inner uterine lining, but required practiced surgical skills and made it difficult to assess subsurface damage. Recently, various energy systems have been applied to the endometrium such as lasers, microwaves, RF electrodes, hot water balloons, and cryotherapy. A finite element model is presented to compare a multi-electrode, multiplexed RF device with a balloon containing hot fluid. The temperature fields in the uterine wall are plotted over time for various blood flow values. Assumptions of constant electrical conductivity are compared to temperature- dependent electrical conductivity. Temperatures are shown to be a maximum of about 10 - 20 degree(s)C higher when varying electrical conductivity is used. Results are also shown for cases with a 2 mm blood vessel in the field and how each device adjusts its operation to compensate for this heat sink. Damage integral results will be shown according to the time and temperature of the treatments.

  6. Finite Element Model and Validation of Nasal Tip Deformation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Badran, Alan; Ho, David; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-03-01

    Nasal tip mechanical stability is important for functional and cosmetic nasal airway surgery. Palpation of the nasal tip provides information on tip strength to the surgeon, though it is a purely subjective assessment. Providing a means to simulate nasal tip deformation with a validated model can offer a more objective approach in understanding the mechanics and nuances of the nasal tip support and eventual nasal mechanics as a whole. Herein we present validation of a finite element (FE) model of the nose using physical measurements recorded using an ABS plastic-silicone nasal phantom. Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to capture the geometry of the phantom at rest and while under steady state load. The silicone used to make the phantom was mechanically tested and characterized using a linear elastic constitutive model. Surface point clouds of the silicone and FE model were compared for both the loaded and unloaded state. The average Hausdorff distance between actual measurements and FE simulations across the nose were 0.39 ± 1.04 mm and deviated up to 2 mm at the outermost boundaries of the model. FE simulation and measurements were in near complete agreement in the immediate vicinity of the nasal tip with millimeter accuracy. We have demonstrated validation of a two-component nasal FE model, which could be used to model more complex modes of deformation where direct measurement may be challenging. This is the first step in developing a nasal model to simulate nasal mechanics and ultimately the interaction between geometry and airflow.

  7. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  8. Finite Element Modelling and Analysis of Conventional Pultrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishin, P.; Barkanov, E.; Bondarchuk, A.

    2015-11-01

    Pultrusion is one of many composite manufacturing techniques and one of the most efficient methods for producing fiber reinforced polymer composite parts with a constant cross-section. Numerical simulation is helpful for understanding the manufacturing process and developing scientific means for the pultrusion tooling design. Numerical technique based on the finite element method has been developed for the simulation of pultrusion processes. It uses the general purpose finite element software ANSYS Mechanical. It is shown that the developed technique predicts the temperature and cure profiles, which are in good agreement with those published in the open literature.

  9. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  10. Dental application of novel finite element analysis software for three-dimensional finite element modeling of a dentulous mandible from its computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kakigawa, Hiroshi; Masumi, Shin-ich

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on the application of novel finite-element analysis software for constructing a finite-element model from the computed tomography data of a human dentulous mandible. The finite-element model is necessary for evaluating the mechanical response of the alveolar part of the mandible, resulting from occlusal force applied to the teeth during biting. Commercially available patient-specific general computed tomography-based finite-element analysis software was solely applied to the finite-element analysis for the extraction of computed tomography data. The mandibular bone with teeth was extracted from the original images. Both the enamel and the dentin were extracted after image processing, and the periodontal ligament was created from the segmented dentin. The constructed finite-element model was reasonably accurate using a total of 234,644 nodes and 1,268,784 tetrahedral and 40,665 shell elements. The elastic moduli of the heterogeneous mandibular bone were determined from the bone density data of the computed tomography images. The results suggested that the software applied in this study is both useful and powerful for creating a more accurate three-dimensional finite-element model of a dentulous mandible from the computed tomography data without the need for any other software.

  11. Nonlinear finite element analysis of mechanical characteristics on CFRP composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-xia; Liang, Li; Li, Ming

    2010-06-01

    CFRP(Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic) composite pressure vessel was calculated using finite element program of ANSYS for their mechanical characteristics in this paper. The elastic-plastic model and elements of Solid95 were selected for aluminium alloys of gas cylinder. Also liner-elastic model and layer elements of Shell99 were adopted for carbon fibre/epoxy resin. The stress state of CFRP composite pressure vessel was calculated under different internal pressures include pre-stressing pressures, working pressures, test hydraulic pressures, minimum destructive pressures etcetera to determine the size of gas cylinder and layer parameter of carbon fibre. The mechanical characteristics CFRP composite vessel could were using to design and test of gas cylinder. Numerical results showed that finite element model and calculating method were efficient for study of CFRP gas cylinder and useful for engineering design.

  12. Finite element method for nonlinear Riesz space fractional diffusion equations on irregular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Yuan, Z.; Nie, Y.; Wang, J.; Zhu, X.; Liu, F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider two-dimensional Riesz space fractional diffusion equations with nonlinear source term on convex domains. Applying Galerkin finite element method in space and backward difference method in time, we present a fully discrete scheme to solve Riesz space fractional diffusion equations. Our breakthrough is developing an algorithm to form stiffness matrix on unstructured triangular meshes, which can help us to deal with space fractional terms on any convex domain. The stability and convergence of the scheme are also discussed. Numerical examples are given to verify accuracy and stability of our scheme.

  13. Nonlinear, three-dimensional finite-element analysis of air-cooled gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Cyclic stress-strain states in cooled turbine blades were calculated for a simulated mission of an advanced-technology commercial aircraft engine. The MARC, nonlinear, finite-element computer program was used for the analysis of impingement-cooled airfoils, with and without leading-edge film cooling. Creep was the predominant damage mode (ignoring hot corrosion), particularly artund film-cooling holes. Radially angled holes exhibited less creep than holes with axes normal to the surface. Beam-theory analyses of all-impingement-cooled airfoils gave fair agreement with MARC results for initial creep.

  14. Non-linear finite element analysis of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) superconductivity magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    A two-dimensional plane strain model of the SSC magnet (cold mass) was developed to determine the stresses and deflections under a variety of conditions. Cool down from room temperature to 4.35 K and the effects of quench in the coils were calculated using the computer code TACO -- a finite element heat transfer code. Pre-assembly loads, energization to 6.6 tesla, pressure due to liquid helium, Lorentz Forces on the copper plated beam tube, were incorporated in NIKE2D -- 2-D vectorized implicit finite element code. The model for material behavior was treated as thermo-elastic plastic which required material properties as a function of temperature. The programs were run remotely on the Cray computers in Livermore via the Vax computers at Berkeley.

  15. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  16. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  17. Implementation of the full viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamic equations in a nonlinear finite element code

    SciTech Connect

    Haverkort, J.W.; Blank, H.J. de; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Pratt, J.; Koren, B.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations form an indispensable tool to understand the behavior of a hot plasma that is created inside a tokamak for providing nuclear fusion energy. Various aspects of tokamak plasmas have been successfully studied through the reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The need for more complete modeling through the full MHD equations is addressed here. Our computational method is presented along with measures against possible problems regarding pollution, stability, and regularity. The problem of ensuring continuity of solutions in the center of a polar grid is addressed in the context of a finite element discretization of the full MHD equations. A rigorous and generally applicable solution is proposed here. Useful analytical test cases are devised to verify the correct implementation of the momentum and induction equation, the hyperdiffusive terms, and the accuracy with which highly anisotropic diffusion can be simulated. A striking observation is that highly anisotropic diffusion can be treated with the same order of accuracy as isotropic diffusion, even on non-aligned grids, as long as these grids are generated with sufficient care. This property is shown to be associated with our use of a magnetic vector potential to describe the magnetic field. Several well-known instabilities are simulated to demonstrate the capabilities of the new method. The linear growth rate of an internal kink mode and a tearing mode are benchmarked against the results of a linear MHD code. The evolution of a tearing mode and the resulting magnetic islands are simulated well into the nonlinear regime. The results are compared with predictions from the reduced MHD model. Finally, a simulation of a ballooning mode illustrates the possibility to use our method as an ideal MHD method without the need to add any physical dissipation.

  18. Linear and nonlinear finite element analysis of laminated composite structures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, Thomas Edmund

    The use of composite materials in aerospace applications, particularly engine components, is becoming more prevalent due to the materials high strength, yet low weight. In addition to thermomechanical deformation response, life prediction and damage modeling analysis is also required to assess the component's service life. These complex and computationally intensive analyses require the development of simple, efficient and robust finite element analysis capabilities. A simple robust finite element which can effectively model the multi-layer composite material is developed. This will include thermal gradient capabilities necessary for a complete thermomechanical analysis. In order to integrate the numerically stiff rate dependent viscoplastic equations, efficient, stable numerical algorithms are developed. In addition, consistent viscoplastic/plastic tangent matrices will also be formulated. The finite element is formulated based upon a generalized mixed variational principle with independently assumed displacements and layer number independent strains. A unique scheme utilizing nodal temperatures is used to model a linear thermal gradient through the thickness of the composite. The numerical integration algorithms are formulated in the context of a fully implicit backward Euler scheme. The consistent tangent matrices arise directly from the formulation. The multi-layer composite finite element demonstrates good performance in terms of static displacement and stress predictions, and dynamic response. Also, the element appears to be relatively insensitive to mesh distortions. The robustness and efficiency of the fully implicit integration algorithms is effectively demonstrated in the numerical results. That is, large time steps and a significant reduction in global iterations, as a direct result of utilizing the consistent tangent matrices, is shown.

  19. Flexible Finite-Element Modeling of Global Geomagnetic Depth Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

    Time-varying primary magnetic fields generated outside Earth by the magnetospheric ring current induce electrical currents in Earth's interior, which give rise to secondary magnetic fields with a complementary geometry. Geomagnetic depth sounding involves the analysis of magnetic field data to compute frequency-dependent response functions which yield information about the electrical conductivity of Earth's interior. I explore methods and results of forward-modeling global electromagnetic induction under a variety of assumptions about Earth conductivity and the spatial structure of the primary field. I begin by developing computational tools to perform time- and frequency-domain simulations of global induction in models with arbitrary conductivity and primary field structure using FlexPDE, a general-purpose software package that employs the finite-element method to solve partial differential equations. The method is shown to produce solutions with better than 1% accuracy when the simulated fields and response functions are compared to analytic solutions for a variety of problems in electromagnetic induction, and to qualitatively reproduce fields and response functions measured by satellites and observatories. The technique is employed in combination with analytic methods to explore the effect on the response of Earth models to primary fields with asymmetric structure. Standard methods of producing response functions from scalar and vector magnetic data are compared, and scalar methods are found to generate responses with significantly greater spatial bias for models with non-zonal fields. I develop the mathematical formulation for including Earth-rotation in the forward models, and use it to calculate frequency-dependent estimates of the amount of non-zonal structure required to produce previously reported local-time bias in empirical satellite response functions. Because it is difficult to validate solutions to induction problems that lack analytic solutions, we

  20. Large strain elastic-plastic theory and nonlinear finite element analysis based on metric transformation tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünig, M.

    The present paper is concerned with an efficient framework for a nonlinear finite element procedure for the rate-independent finite strain analysis of solids undergoing large elastic-plastic deformations. The formulation relies on the introduction of a mixed-variant metric transformation tensor which will be multiplicatively decomposed into a plastic and an elastic part. This leads to the definition of an appropriate logarithmic strain measure whose rate is shown to be additively decomposed into elastic and plastic strain rate tensors. The mixed-variant logarithmic elastic strain tensor provides a basis for the definition of a local isotropic hyperelastic stress response in the elastic-plastic solid. Additionally, the plastic material behavior is assumed to be governed by a generalized J2 yield criterion and rate-independent isochoric plastic strain rates are computed using an associated flow rule. On the numerical side, the computation of the logarithmic strain tensors is based on 1st and higher order Padé approximations. Estimates of the stress and strain histories are obtained via a highly stable and accurate explicit scalar integration procedure which employs a plastic predictor followed by an elastic corrector step. The development of a consistent elastic-plastic tangent operator as well as its implementation into a nonlinear finite element program will also be discussed. Finally, the numerical solution of finite strain elastic-plastic problems is presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  1. A survey of the core-congruential formulation for geometrically nonlinear TL finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Crivelli, Luis A.; Haugen, Bjorn

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the core-congruential formulation (CCF) for geometrically nonlinear mechanical finite elements based on the total Lagrangian (TL) kinematic description. Although the key ideas behind the CCF can be traced back to Rajasekaran and Murray in 1973, it has not subsequently received serious attention. The CCF is distinguished by a two-phase development of the finite element stiffness equations. The initial phase developed equations for individual particles. These equations are expressed in terms of displacement gradients as degrees of freedom. The second phase involves congruential-type transformations that eventually binds the element particles of an individual element in terms of its node-displacement degrees of freedom. Two versions of the CCF, labeled direct and generalized, are distinguished. The direct CCF (DCCF) is first described in general form and then applied to the derivation of geometrically nonlinear bar, and plane stress elements using the Green-Lagrange strain measure. The more complex generalized CCF (GCCF) is described and applied to the derivation of 2D and 3D Timoshenko beam elements. Several advantages of the CCF, notably the physically clean separation of material and geometric stiffnesses, and its independence with respect to the ultimate choice of shape functions and element degrees of freedom, are noted. Application examples involving very large motions solved with the 3D beam element display the range of applicability of this formulation, which transcends the kinematic limitations commonly attributed to the TL description.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of Intermuscular Interactions and Myofascial Force Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    obtained explain force differences at the distal and proximal tendons of muscles that have mechanical interaction. This is in agreement with experimental...consequence is that active force generated within one muscle may be exerted at the tendon of another muscle. Keywords- Finite element method...7]. Therefore, in vivo there is an additional route for force transmission out off the muscle, which completely bypasses the tendon of the muscle

  3. Calibration of dimensional change in finite element models using AGR moderator brick measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, K.; Hall, G.; Tan, E.; Marsden, B. J.; Warren, N.

    2014-08-01

    Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method, are often used to model changes in geometry and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (field variables), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of material properties. Historically, behaviour on material properties have been obtained from Materials Test Reactor (MTR) experiments, however data relating to samples trepanned from operating reactors are increasingly being used to improve models. Geometry measurements from operating reactors offer the potential for improving the coded relationship for dimensional change in FE models. A non-linear mixed-effect model is presented for calibrating the parameters of FE models that are sensitive to mid-brick diameter, using channel geometry measurements obtained from inspection campaigns. The work makes use of a novel technique: the development of a Bayesian emulator, which is a surrogate for the FE model. The use of an emulator allows the influence of the inputs to the finite element model to be evaluated, and delivers a substantial reduction in the computational burden of calibration.

  4. A three-dimensional, finite element model for coastal and estuarine circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a three-dimensional model for coastal and estuarine circulation. The model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for salt so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. The model is applied to a study of Delaware Bay, U.S.A., where salinity intrusion is the primary focus. ?? 1991.

  5. Finite element implementation of a multiscale model of the human lens capsule.

    PubMed

    Burd, H J; Regueiro, R A

    2015-11-01

    An axisymmetric finite element implementation of a previously described structural constitutive model for the human lens capsule (Burd in Biomech Model Mechanobiol 8(3):217-231, 2009) is presented. This constitutive model is based on a hyperelastic approach in which the network of collagen IV within the capsule is represented by an irregular hexagonal planar network of hyperelastic bars, embedded in a hyperelastic matrix. The paper gives a detailed specification of the model and the periodic boundary conditions adopted for the network component. Momentum balance equations for the network are derived in variational form. These balance equations are used to develop a nonlinear solution scheme to enable the equilibrium configuration of the network to be computed. The constitutive model is implemented within a macroscopic finite element framework to give a multiscale model of the lens capsule. The possibility of capsule wrinkling is included in the formulation. To achieve this implementation, values of the first and second derivatives of the strain energy density with respect to the in-plane stretch ratios need to be computed at the local, constitutive model, level. Procedures to determine these strain energy derivatives at equilibrium configurations of the network are described. The multiscale model is calibrated against previously published experimental data on isolated inflation and uniaxial stretching of ex vivo human capsule samples. Two independent example lens capsule inflation analyses are presented.

  6. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  7. On nonlinear finite element analysis in single-, multi- and parallel-processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; Melosh, R.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical solution of nonlinear equilibrium problems of structures by means of Newton-Raphson type iterations is reviewed. Each step of the iteration is shown to correspond to the solution of a linear problem, therefore the feasibility of the finite element method for nonlinear analysis is established. Organization and flow of data for various types of digital computers, such as single-processor/single-level memory, single-processor/two-level-memory, vector-processor/two-level-memory, and parallel-processors, with and without sub-structuring (i.e. partitioning) are given. The effect of the relative costs of computation, memory and data transfer on substructuring is shown. The idea of assigning comparable size substructures to parallel processors is exploited. Under Cholesky type factorization schemes, the efficiency of parallel processing is shown to decrease due to the occasional shared data, just as that due to the shared facilities.

  8. Finite element modeling of electromechanical behavior of a dielectric electroactive polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodhar, Aseem; York, Alexander; Hodgins, Micah; Seelecke, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric Electroactive Polymers (DEAP) will undergo large deformations when subject to an electric field making them an attractive material for use in novel actuator systems. There are many challenges with successful application and design of DEAP actuators resulting from their inherent electromechanical coupling and non-linear material behavior. FE modeling of the material behavior is a useful tool to better understand such systems and aid in the optimal design of prototypes. These modeling efforts must account for the electromechanical coupling in order to accurately predict their response to multiple loading conditions expected during real operating conditions. This paper presents a Finite Element model of a dielectric elastomer undergoing out-of-plane, axisymmetric deformation. The response of the elastomer was investigated while it was subjected to mechanical and electric fields and combined electro-mechanical actuation. The compliant electrodes have a large effect on the mechanical behavior of the EAP which needs to be taken into consideration while modeling the EAP as a system. The model is adapted to include the effect of electrode stiffness on the mechanical response of the actuator. The model was developed using the commercial Finite Element Modeling software, COMSOL. The results from the mechanical simulations are presented in the form of forcedisplacement curves and are validated with comparisons to experimental results. Electromechanical simulations are carried out and the stroke of the actuator for different electrode stiffness values is compared with experimental values when the EAP is biased with a constant force.

  9. Cohesive finite element modeling of age-related toughness loss in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani; Vashishth, Deepak

    2006-01-01

    Although the age-related loss of bone quality has been implicated in bone fragility, a mechanistic understanding of the relationship is necessary for developing diagnostic and treatment modalities in the elderly population at risk of fracture. In this study, a finite element based cohesive zone model is developed and applied to human cortical bone in order to capture the experimentally shown rising crack growth behavior and age-related loss of bone toughness. The cohesive model developed here is based on a traction-crack opening displacement relationship representing the fracture processes in the vicinity of a propagating crack. The traction-displacement curve, defining the cohesive model, is composed of ascending and descending branches that incorporate material softening and nonlinearity. The results obtained indicate that, in contrast to initiation toughness, the finite element simulations of crack growth in compact tension (CT) specimens successfully capture the rising R-curve (propagation toughness) behavior and the age-related loss of bone toughness. In close correspondence with the experimentally observed decrease of 14-15% per decade, the finite element simulation results show a decrease of 13% in the R-curve slope per decade. The success of the simulations is a result of the ability of cohesive models to capture and predict the parameters related to bone fracture by representing the physical processes occurring in the vicinity of a propagating crack. These results illustrate that fracture mechanisms in the process zone control bone toughness and any modification to these would cause age-related toughness loss.

  10. Finite Element Models and Properties of a Stiffened Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models were developed of a floor-equipped, frame and stringer stiffened composite cylinder including a coarse finite element model of the structural components, a coarse finite element model of the acoustic cavities above and below the beam-supported plywood floor, and two dense models consisting of only the structural components. The report summarizes the geometry, the element properties, the material and mechanical properties, the beam cross-section characteristics, the beam element representations and the boundary conditions of the composite cylinder models. The expressions used to calculate the group speeds for the cylinder components are presented.

  11. Solution of problems with material nonlinearities with a coupled finite element/boundary element scheme using an iterative solver. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The prediction of stresses and displacements around tunnels buried deep within the earth is an important class of geomechanics problems. The material behavior immediately surrounding the tunnel is typically nonlinear. The surrounding mass, even if it is nonlinear, can usually be characterized by a simple linear elastic model. The finite element method is best suited for modeling nonlinear materials of limited volume, while the boundary element method is well suited for modeling large volumes of linear elastic material. A computational scheme that couples the finite element and boundary element methods would seem particularly useful for geomechanics problems. A variety of coupling schemes have been proposed, but they rely on direct solution methods. Direct solution techniques have large storage requirements that become cumbersome for large-scale three-dimensional problems. An alternative to direct solution methods is iterative solution techniques. A scheme has been developed for coupling the finite element and boundary element methods that uses an iterative solution method. This report shows that this coupling scheme is valid for problems where nonlinear material behavior occurs in the finite element region.

  12. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  13. Finite Element Modeling Techniques for Analysis of VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, J.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major health concern for long-duration space missions. Currently, it is thought that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity causes elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) that is transmitted along the optic nerve sheath (ONS). We hypothesize that this in turn leads to alteration and remodeling of connective tissue in the posterior eye which impacts vision. Finite element (FE) analysis is a powerful tool for examining the effects of mechanical loads in complex geometries. Our goal is to build a FE analysis framework to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve head to elevations in ICP in VIIP.

  14. Efficient Computation of Info-Gap Robustness for Finite Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, Christopher J.; Hemez, Francois M.; Williams, Brian J.

    2012-07-05

    A recent research effort at LANL proposed info-gap decision theory as a framework by which to measure the predictive maturity of numerical models. Info-gap theory explores the trade-offs between accuracy, that is, the extent to which predictions reproduce the physical measurements, and robustness, that is, the extent to which predictions are insensitive to modeling assumptions. Both accuracy and robustness are necessary to demonstrate predictive maturity. However, conducting an info-gap analysis can present a formidable challenge, from the standpoint of the required computational resources. This is because a robustness function requires the resolution of multiple optimization problems. This report offers an alternative, adjoint methodology to assess the info-gap robustness of Ax = b-like numerical models solved for a solution x. Two situations that can arise in structural analysis and design are briefly described and contextualized within the info-gap decision theory framework. The treatments of the info-gap problems, using the adjoint methodology are outlined in detail, and the latter problem is solved for four separate finite element models. As compared to statistical sampling, the proposed methodology offers highly accurate approximations of info-gap robustness functions for the finite element models considered in the report, at a small fraction of the computational cost. It is noted that this report considers only linear systems; a natural follow-on study would extend the methodologies described herein to include nonlinear systems.

  15. Finite element modeling of the left atrium to facilitate the design of an endoscopic atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, S R; Buckner, G D; Eischen, J W; Cormier, D R

    2007-12-01

    With the worldwide prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, much attention has been focused on simulating the characteristics of the human heart to better understand and treat cardiac disorders. The purpose of this study is to build a finite element model of the left atrium (LA) that incorporates detailed anatomical features and realistic material characteristics to investigate the interaction of heart tissue and surgical instruments. This model is used to facilitate the design of an endoscopically deployable atrial retractor for use in minimally invasive, robotically assisted mitral valve repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a pressurized explanted porcine heart were taken to provide a 3D solid model of the heart geometry, while uniaxial tensile tests of porcine left atrial tissue were conducted to obtain realistic material properties for noncontractile cardiac tissue. A finite element model of the LA was constructed using ANSYS Release 9.0 software and the MRI data. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model was chosen to characterize the passive left atrial tissue; material constants were derived from tensile test data. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of a CardioVations Port Access retractor and a prototype endoscopic retractor were constructed to simulate interaction between each instrument and the LA. These contact simulations were used to compare the quality of retraction between the two instruments and to optimize the design of the prototype retractor. Model accuracy was verified by comparing simulated cardiac wall deflections to those measured by MRI. FEA simulations revealed that peak forces of approximately 2.85 N and 2.46 N were required to retract the LA using the Port Access and prototype retractors, respectively. These forces varied nonlinearly with retractor blade displacement. Dilation of the atrial walls and rigid body motion of the chamber were approximately the same for both retractors. Finite element analysis is shown to be an

  16. Efficient inversion of three-dimensional finite element models of volcano deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charco, M.; Galán del Sastre, P.

    2014-03-01

    Numerical techniques, as such as finite element method, allow for the inclusion of features, such as topography and/or mechanical heterogeneities, for the interpretation of volcanic deformation. However, models based on these numerical techniques usually are not suitable to be included in non-linear estimations of source parameters based on explorative optimization schemes because they require a calculation of the numerical approach for every evaluation of the misfit function. We present a procedure for finite element (FE) models that can be combined with explorative inversion schemes. The methodology is based on including a body force term representing an infinitesimal source in the model formulation that is responsible for pressure (volume) changes in the medium. This provides significant savings in both the time required for mesh generation and actual computational time of the numerical approach. Furthermore, we develop an inversion algorithm to estimate those parameters that characterize the changes in location and pressure (volume) of deformation sources. Both provide FE inversions in a single step, avoiding remeshing and assembly of the linear system of algebraic equations that define the numerical approach and/or the automatic mesh generation. After providing the theoretical basis for the model, the numerical approach and the algorithm for the inversions, we test the methodology using a synthetic example in a stratovolcano. Our results suggest that the FE inversion methodology can be considered suitable for efficiently save time in quantitative interpretations of volcano deformation.

  17. Multi-scale analysis of optic chiasmal compression by finite element modelling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Neely, Andrew J; McIlwaine, Gawn G; Lueck, Christian J

    2014-07-18

    The precise mechanism of bitemporal hemianopia (a type of partial visual field defect) is still not clear. Previous work has investigated this problem by studying the biomechanics of chiasmal compression caused by a pituitary tumour growing up from below the optic chiasm. A multi-scale analysis was performed using finite element models to examine both the macro-scale behaviour of the chiasm and the micro-scale interactions of the nerve fibres within it using representative volume elements. Possible effects of large deflection and non-linear material properties were incorporated. Strain distributions in the optic chiasm and optic nerve fibres were obtained from these models. The results of the chiasmal model agreed well with the limited experimental results available, indicating that the finite element modelling can be a useful tool for analysing chiasmal compression. Simulation results showed that the strain distribution in nasal (crossed) nerve fibres was much more nonuniform and locally higher than in temporal (uncrossed) nerve fibres. This strain difference between nasal and temporal nerve fibres may account for the phenomenon of bitemporal hemianopia.

  18. Three-dimensional finite element modelling of muscle forces during mastication.

    PubMed

    Röhrle, Oliver; Pullan, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of human mastication. Specifically, an anatomically realistic model of the masseter muscles and associated bones is used to investigate the dynamics of chewing. A motion capture system is used to track the jaw motion of a subject chewing standard foods. The three-dimensional nonlinear deformation of the masseter muscles are calculated via the finite element method, using the jaw motion data as boundary conditions. Motion-driven muscle activation patterns and a transversely isotropic material law, defined in a muscle-fibre coordinate system, are used in the calculations. Time-force relationships are presented and analysed with respect to different tasks during mastication, e.g. opening, closing, and biting, and are also compared to a more traditional one-dimensional model. The results strongly suggest that, due to the complex arrangement of muscle force directions, modelling skeletal muscles as conventional one-dimensional lines of action might introduce a significant source of error.

  19. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  20. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  1. Finite element simulation of non-linear acoustic generation in a horn loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Kagawa, Y.; Doi, M.; Tsuji, T.

    2003-10-01

    The loudspeaker is an electro-acoustic device for sound reproduction which requires the distortion as small as possible. The distortion may arise from the magnetic non-linearity of the york, the uneven magnetic field distribution, the mechanical non-linearity at the diaphragm suspension and the acoustic non-linearity due to the high sound pressure and velocity in the duct-radiation system. A horn is sometimes provided in front of the vibrating diaphragm radiator, which plays an important role to increase the efficiency by matching the acoustic impedance between the radiator and the ambient medium. The horn is in many cases folded twice or three times to shorten the length, which further degrades the reproduction quality. The sound intensity and velocity are apt to attain very high in the small cross-sectional area in the throat and in the folded regions, which may cause the distortion due to the non-linear effect of the medium. The present paper is to investigate the frequency characteristics of the loudspeaker numerically evaluating the generation of the harmonics and sub-harmonics. An axisymmetric folded horn is considered for which the wave equation with the non-linear term retained is solved by the finite element method. The solution is made in time domain in which the sound pressure calculated at the opening end of the horn is Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain to evaluate the distortion, while the wave marching in the horn is visualized.

  2. Finite element simulation of nonlinear wave propagation in thermoviscous fluids including dissipation.

    PubMed

    Hoffelner, J; Landes, H; Kaltenbacher, M; Lerch, R

    2001-05-01

    A recently developed finite element method (FEM) for the numerical simulation of nonlinear sound wave propagation in thermoviscous fluids is presented. Based on the nonlinear wave equation as derived by Kuznetsov, typical effects associated with nonlinear acoustics, such as generation of higher harmonics and dissipation resulting from the propagation of a finite amplitude wave through a thermoviscous medium, are covered. An efficient time-stepping algorithm based on a modification of the standard Newmark method is used for solving the non-linear semidiscrete equation system. The method is verified by comparison with the well-known Fubini and Fay solutions for plane wave problems, where good agreement is found. As a practical application, a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) source is considered. Impedance simulations of the piezoelectric transducer and the complete HIFU source loaded with air and water are performed and compared with measured data. Measurements of radiated low and high amplitude pressure pulses are compared with corresponding simulation results. The obtained good agreement demonstrates validity and applicability of the nonlinear FEM.

  3. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  4. Constitutive model for shape memory alloys and its use in design and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sudip; Santhanam, Sridhar

    2002-07-01

    A constitutive model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) has been developed and validated. The model uses an approach similar to Brinson, Liang and Rogers, and Tanaka. It links key thermomechanical variables: stress, strain, temperature, and martensite fraction. A basic differential form for the SMA constitutive behavior, developed by Tanaka, forms the foundation of the model. The model is completed with a definition of the rules governing the behavior of martensite fraction. Like Brinson, the model distinguishes between de-twinned and twinned martensite. The phase transition temperatures are assumed to be a linear function of applied stress. The forward and reverse phase transformations are described by piecewise exponential functions. There are a number of parameters in the model that need to be determined using experimental data. The critical transformation temperatures are determined by resistivity measurements. All other parameters are determined by mechanical tension testing followed by nonlinear least-squares estimations. Mechanical testing consisted of displacement controlled, tension tests on Nitinol wires at several temperatures. The effectiveness of this model is demonstrated by its use in the design of an SMA actuated robotic arm. The constitutive model is used in conjunction with a lumped heat transfer model, a kinematic model, and a dynamic model to predict the behavior of the arm. Comparison between predictions and experimentally observed behavior is very good indicating a sound constitutive model. The model is also built into a finite element code that simulates pseudoelastic SMA behavior. The code considers geometric and material nonlinearities. The behavior of a simple pseudoelastic device is shown to be well predicted by the finite element code.

  5. Development and application of a technique for reducing airframe finite element models for dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, Mostafa; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure for the reduction of large finite element models was developed. This procedure is used to obtain a significantly reduced model while retaining the essential global dynamic characteristics of the full-size model. This reduction procedure is applied to the airframe finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The resulting reduced model is then validated by application to a vibration reduction study.

  6. A Finite Element Model of the THOR-K Dummy for Aerospace and Aircraft Impact Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Jacob; Untaroiu, Costin D.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Pellettiere, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1) Update and Improve the THOR Finite Element (FE) model to specifications of the latest mod kit (THOR-K). 2) Evaluate the kinematic and kinetic response of the FE model in frontal, spinal, and lateral impact loading conditions.

  7. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  8. Development of the Dynamic Globularization Prediction Model for Ti-17 Titanium Alloy Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Weidong; Xu, Jianwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaoying

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a finite element method (FEM) model for predicting dynamic globularization of Ti-17 titanium alloy is established. For obtaining the microstructure evolution during dynamic globularization under varying processing parameters, isothermal hot compression tests and quantitative metallographic analysis were conducted on Ti-17 titanium alloy with initial lamellar microstructure. The prediction model, which quantitatively described the non-linear relationship between the dynamic globularization fraction and the deformation strain, temperature, and strain rate, was developed on the basis of the Avrami equation. Then the developed model was incorporated into DEFORM software as a user subroutine. Finally, the large-sized step-shaped workpiece was isothermally forged and corresponding FEM simulation was conducted to verify the reliability and accuracy of the integrated FEM model. The reasonable coincidence of the predicted results with experimental ones indicated that the established FEM model provides an easy and a practical method to predict dynamic globularization for Ti-17 titanium alloy with complex shape.

  9. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  10. An assessment of swaged connections in a nuclear fuel element using nonlinear finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    Large displacement, non-linear finite element analyses were performed to evaluate a swaging process used to fabricate connections between plates in the fuel elements for a test reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The force required to pull the fuel plate from the connection is referred to as the strength of the connection. Assurance that the integrity of the connections is maintained through reactor operation is provided by establishing a minimum acceptance requirement for this strength. Analysis results were used to assess the sensitivity of the strength of the swaged connections to variations in several manufacturing process parameters. The predicted strengths correlated well with results from tests where sample swaged connections were loaded to failure. Results from these investigations were used to assess the adequacy and need for various fabrication, testing, and quality control requirements.

  11. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  12. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  13. Finite element modeling of electromagnetic fields and waves using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. Thomas, Jr.; Schroeder, Erwin

    1989-01-01

    The various formulations of Maxwell's equations are reviewed with emphasis on those formulations which most readily form analogies with Navier's equations. Analogies involving scalar and vector potentials and electric and magnetic field components are presented. Formulations allowing for media with dielectric and conducting properties are emphasized. It is demonstrated that many problems in electromagnetism can be solved using the NASTRAN finite element code. Several fundamental problems involving time harmonic solutions of Maxwell's equations with known analytic solutions are solved using NASTRAN to demonstrate convergence and mesh requirements. Mesh requirements are studied as a function of frequency, conductivity, and dielectric properties. Applications in both low frequency and high frequency are highlighted. The low frequency problems demonstrate the ability to solve problems involving media inhomogeneity and unbounded domains. The high frequency applications demonstrate the ability to handle problems with large boundary to wavelength ratios.

  14. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering.

  15. Stabilized plane and axisymmetric Lobatto finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. C.; Sze, K. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.

    2015-11-01

    High order elements are renowned for their high accuracy and convergence. Among them, Lobatto spectral finite elements are commonly used in explicit dynamic analyses as their mass matrices when evaluated by the Lobatto integration rule are diagonal. While there are numerous advanced first and second order elements, advanced high order elements are rarely seen. In this paper, generic stabilization schemes are devised for the reduced integrated plane and axisymmetric elements. Static and explicit dynamic tests are considered for evaluating the relatively merits of the stabilized and conventional elements. The displacement errors of the stabilized elements are less than those of the conventional Lobatto elements. When the material is nearly incompressible, the stabilized elements are also more accurate in terms of the energy error norm. This advantage is of practical importance for bio-tissue and hydrated soil analyses.

  16. Finite-element modeling and analysis in nanomedicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andy H; Conway, Richard C; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a brief background to the current applications of finite-element analysis (FEA) in nanomedicine and dentistry. FEA was introduced in orthopedic biomechanics in the 1970s in order to assess the stresses and deformation in human bones during functional loadings and in the design and analysis of implants. Since then, it has been applied with great frequency in orthopedics and dentistry in order to analyze issues such as implant design, bone remodeling and fracture healing, the mechanical properties of biomedical coatings on implants and the interactions at the bone-implant interface. More recently, FEA has been used in nanomedicine to study the mechanics of a single cell and to gain fundamental insights into how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery.

  17. Nonlinear incompressible finite element for simulating loading of cardiac tissue--Part II: Three dimensional formulation for thick ventricular wall segments.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, A; Sheinman, I; Lanir, Y

    1988-02-01

    A three dimensional incompressible and geometrically as well as materially nonlinear finite element is formulated for future implementation in models of cardiac mechanics. The stress-strain relations in the finite element are derived from a recently proposed constitutive law which is based on the histological composition of the myocardium. The finite element is formulated for large deformations and considers incompressibility by introducing the hydrostatic pressure as an additional variable. The results of passive loading cases simulated by this element allow to analyze the mechanical properties of ventricular wall segments, the main of which are that the circumferential direction is stiffer than the longitudinal one, that its shear stiffness is considerably lower than its tensile and compressive stiffness and that, due to its mechanically prominent role, the collagenous matrix may affect the myocardial perfusion.

  18. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Pressurized Aircraft Fuselage Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aims to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration are not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One of the airframe concepts that might dramatically improve aircraft performance is a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presents inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a nonlinear finite element analysis of a large-scale test article being developed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. There are specific reasons why geometrically nonlinear analysis may be warranted for the hybrid wing body flat panel structure. In general, for sufficiently high internal pressure and/or mechanical loading, energy related to the in-plane strain may become significant relative to the bending strain energy, particularly in thin-walled areas such as the minimum gage skin extensively used in the structure under analysis. To account for this effect, a geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relationship is needed to properly couple large out-of-plane and in-plane deformations. Depending on the loading, this nonlinear coupling mechanism manifests itself in a distinct manner in compression- and tension-dominated sections of the structure. Under significant compression, nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately predict loss of stability and postbuckled deformation. Under significant tension, the nonlinear effects account for suppression of the out-of-plane deformation due to in-plane stretching. By comparing the present results with the previously

  19. COMGEN: A computer program for generating finite element models of composite materials at the micro level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    COMGEN (Composite Model Generator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or session files to be submitted to the finite element pre- and postprocessor PATRAN based on a few simple user inputs such as fiber diameter and percent fiber volume fraction of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned easily to the models within COMGEN. PATRAN uses a session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC.

  20. Models and finite element approximations for interacting nanosized piezoelectric bodies and acoustic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasedkin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This research presents the new size-dependent models of piezoelectric materials oriented to finite element applications. The proposed models include the facilities of taking into account different mechanisms of damping for mechanical and electric fields. The coupled models also incorporate the equations of the theory of acoustics for viscous fluids. In particular cases, these models permit to use the mode superposition method with full separation of the finite element systems into independent equations for the independent modes for transient and harmonic problems. The main boundary conditions were supplemented with the facilities of taking into account the coupled surface effects, allowing to explore the nanoscale piezoelectric materials in the framework of theories of continuous media with surface stresses and their generalizations. For the considered problems we have implemented the finite element technologies and various numerical algorithms to maintain a symmetrical structure of the finite element quasi-definite matrices (matrix structure for the problems with a saddle point).

  1. Demonstration of finite element simulations in MOOSE using crystallographic models of irradiation hardening and plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Anirban; Wen, Wei; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Tome, Carlos

    2016-05-31

    This report describes the implementation of a crystal plasticity framework (VPSC) for irradiation hardening and plastic deformation in the finite element code, MOOSE. Constitutive models for irradiation hardening and the crystal plasticity framework are described in a previous report [1]. Here we describe these models briefly and then describe an algorithm for interfacing VPSC with finite elements. Example applications of tensile deformation of a dog bone specimen and a 3D pre-irradiated bar specimen performed using MOOSE are demonstrated.

  2. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes. Part 2: Bearing element implementation overall numerical characteristics and benchmaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Adams, M.; Fertis, J.; Zeid, I.; Lam, P.

    1982-01-01

    Finite element codes are used in modelling rotor-bearing-stator structure common to the turbine industry. Engine dynamic simulation is used by developing strategies which enable the use of available finite element codes. benchmarking the elements developed are benchmarked by incorporation into a general purpose code (ADINA); the numerical characteristics of finite element type rotor-bearing-stator simulations are evaluated through the use of various types of explicit/implicit numerical integration operators. Improving the overall numerical efficiency of the procedure is improved.

  3. COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-03-01

    The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems

  4. Modeling and analysis of the space shuttle nose-gear tire with semianalytic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyun O.; Noor, Ahmed K.; Tanner, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of aircraft tires. The Space Shuttle Orbiter nose gear tire was modeled by using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in material and geometric parameters included. The four key elements of the procedure are: (1) semianalytic finite elements in which the shell variables are represented by Fourier series in the circumferential direction and piecewise polynominals in the meridional direction; (2) a mixed formulation with the fundamental unknowns consisting of strain parameters, stress-resultant parameters, and generalized displacements; (3) multilevel operator splitting to effect successive simplifications, and to uncouple the equations associated with different Fourier harmonics; and (4) multilevel iterative procedures and reduction techniques to generate the response of the shell. Numerical results of the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose gear tire model are compared with experimental measurements of the tire subjected to inflation loading.

  5. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  6. Finite element modeling of microstructured optical fibers: leaky modes, twisted geometries, and spatial Kerr solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, André; Zolla, Frédéric; Renversez, Gilles; Ould Agha, Yacoub; Drouart, Fabien

    2008-11-01

    Microstructured optical fibers have much more degrees of freedom concerning the geometries and index contrasts than step-index fibers. This richness opens totally new fields of application for fiber optics. The finite element method appears as an extremely versatile tool to compute the propagation modes in such systems as it allows to take into account arbitrary geometries of the cross section and also anisotropic and inhomogeneous (i.e. not only piecewise constant) dielectric permittivities. In this paper, we review some more advanced features: how to compute leaky modes (crucial for the understanding of such kind of fibers) by using perfectly matched layers, how to use helicoidal coordinate systems to determine the influence of a twist on the modes via a two-dimensional model (using equivalent materials), and how to compute spatial solitons in fibers involving Kerr optical medium by taking into account the refractive index inhomogeneities caused by the nonlinearity.

  7. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  8. PLANS: A finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Levine, H. S.; Armen, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The PLANS system is described which is a finite element program for nonlinear analysis. The system represents a collection of special purpose computer programs each associated with a distinct physical problem class. Modules of PLANS specifically referenced and described in detail include: (1) REVBY, for the plastic analysis of bodies of revolution; (2) OUT-OF-PLANE, for the plastic analysis of 3-D built-up structures where membrane effects are predominant; (3) BEND, for the plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant; (4) HEX, for the 3-D elastic-plastic analysis of general solids; and (5) OUT-OF-PLANE-MG, for material and geometrically nonlinear analysis of built-up structures. The SATELLITE program for data debugging and plotting of input geometries is also described. The theoretical foundations upon which the analysis is based are presented. Discussed are the form of the governing equations, the methods of solution, plasticity theories available, a general system description and flow of the programs, and the elements available for use.

  9. Potential of minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohkorb, G. A.; Noor, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of using a minicomputer/array-processor system for the efficient solution of large-scale, nonlinear, finite-element problems is studied. A Prime 750 is used as the host computer, and a software simulator residing on the Prime is employed to assess the performance of the Floating Point Systems AP-120B array processor. Major hardware characteristics of the system such as virtual memory and parallel and pipeline processing are reviewed, and the interplay between various hardware components is examined. Effective use of the minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear analysis requires the following: (1) proper selection of the computational procedure and the capability to vectorize the numerical algorithms; (2) reduction of input-output operations; and (3) overlapping host and array-processor operations. A detailed discussion is given of techniques to accomplish each of these tasks. Two benchmark problems with 1715 and 3230 degrees of freedom, respectively, are selected to measure the anticipated gain in speed obtained by using the proposed algorithms on the array processor.

  10. Finite Element Procedures Applicable to Nonlinear Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shell Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    details. 1- 4-9 Section 4: FINITE-ELEMENT IMPLEMENTATION 4-10 4.3.2 9-Node Elements The Heterosis element [10], which combines Lagrange (biquadratic...M., "The ’ Heterosis ’ Family of Plate Finite Elements," Proc. ASCE Electronic Computations Conference, St. Louis, MO, August 6-8, 1979. 1111 Kraus H

  11. TerraFERMA: The Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler for multiphysics problems in Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Cian R.; Spiegelman, Marc; van Keken, Peter E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and describe a new software infrastructure TerraFERMA, the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler, for the rapid and reproducible description and solution of coupled multiphysics problems. The design of TerraFERMA is driven by two computational needs in Earth sciences. The first is the need for increased flexibility in both problem description and solution strategies for coupled problems where small changes in model assumptions can lead to dramatic changes in physical behavior. The second is the need for software and models that are more transparent so that results can be verified, reproduced, and modified in a manner such that the best ideas in computation and Earth science can be more easily shared and reused. TerraFERMA leverages three advanced open-source libraries for scientific computation that provide high-level problem description (FEniCS), composable solvers for coupled multiphysics problems (PETSc), and an options handling system (SPuD) that allows the hierarchical management of all model options. TerraFERMA integrates these libraries into an interface that organizes the scientific and computational choices required in a model into a single options file from which a custom compiled application is generated and run. Because all models share the same infrastructure, models become more reusable and reproducible, while still permitting the individual researcher considerable latitude in model construction. TerraFERMA solves partial differential equations using the finite element method. It is particularly well suited for nonlinear problems with complex coupling between components. TerraFERMA is open-source and available at http://terraferma.github.io, which includes links to documentation and example input files.

  12. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION.

    PubMed

    Holst, Michael; McCammon, James Andrew; Yu, Zeyun; Zhou, Youngcheng; Zhu, Yunrong

    2012-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L(∞) estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  13. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, MICHAEL; MCCAMMON, JAMES ANDREW; YU, ZEYUN; ZHOU, YOUNGCHENG; ZHU, YUNRONG

    2011-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L∞ estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  14. A nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics - User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-04-14

    This report provides a user`s manual for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Over twenty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a factorization method, for which case bandwidth minimization is optional. Data may be stored either in or out of core memory to allow for large analyses.

  15. TORO II: A finite element computer program for nonlinear quasi-static problems in electromagnetics: Part 1, Theoretical background

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, TORO II, is presented in detail. TORO II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear, electromagnetic field problems described by the quasi-static form of Maxwell`s equations. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in TORO II are also outlined. Instructions for the use of the code are documented in SAND96-0903; examples of problems analyzed with the code are also provided in the user`s manual. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Evaluation of flow characteristics of perforations including nonlinear effects with the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, S.M.

    1987-05-01

    This study presents results of finite-element modeling of steady-state flow in perforated natural completions. Use of a mesh chosen carefully by grid sensitivity analysis permits evaluation of flow with more precision than that achieved by previous investigators. Also, for the first time, flow characteristics of perforated completions are evaluated with the non-Darcy effect resulting form converging flow around the perforation taken into account. The results indicate confirmation of Locke's results qualitatively but 5 to 10% overprediction by the nomograph, the importance of angular phasing between adjacent perforations, the uncertainty in generally accepted severe permeability impairment in the compacted zone, and a significant reduction in productivity owing to a non-Darcy effect around the perforation for high-rate gas wells.

  17. Evaluation of flow characteristics of perforations including nonlinear effects using finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, S.M.

    1984-04-01

    This study presents results of finite element modelling of steady-state flow in perforated natural completions. Use of a carefully chosen mesh based on grid sensitivity analysis permits evaluation of flow with more precision than achieved by previous investigators. Also, for the first time, evaluation of flow characterstics of perforated completion is made taking into account the non-Darcy effect due to converging flow around the perforation. The results indicate: (1) confirmation of Locke's findings qualitatively but 5-10% overprediction by the nomograph (2) importance of angular phasing between adjacent perforations, (3) untenability of generally accepted severe permeability impairment in the compacted zone, and (4) significant reduction in productivity due to non-Darcy effect around the perforation for high-rate wells.

  18. Plan, formulate, discuss and correlate a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 360 helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P. F.; Smith, L. A.; Reed, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopter, together with other United States helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to emplace in the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The activities relating to planning and creating a finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 36-0 composite airframe are summarized, along with the subsequent analytical correlation with ground shake test data.

  19. Nonlinear micromechanics-based finite element analysis of the interfacial behaviour of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Baky, Hussien

    This research work is devoted to theoretical and numerical studies on the flexural behaviour of FRP-strengthened concrete beams. The objectives of this research are to extend and generalize the results of simple experiments, to recommend new design guidelines based on accurate numerical tools, and to enhance our comprehension of the bond performance of such beams. These numerical tools can be exploited to bridge the existing gaps in the development of analysis and modelling approaches that can predict the behaviour of FRP-strengthened concrete beams. The research effort here begins with the formulation of a concrete model and development of FRP/concrete interface constitutive laws, followed by finite element simulations for beams strengthened in flexure. Finally, a statistical analysis is carried out taking the advantage of the aforesaid numerical tools to propose design guidelines. In this dissertation, an alternative incremental formulation of the M4 microplane model is proposed to overcome the computational complexities associated with the original formulation. Through a number of numerical applications, this incremental formulation is shown to be equivalent to the original M4 model. To assess the computational efficiency of the incremental formulation, the "arc-length" numerical technique is also considered and implemented in the original Bazant et al. [2000] M4 formulation. Finally, the M4 microplane concrete model is coded in FORTRAN and implemented as a user-defined subroutine into the commercial software package ADINA, Version 8.4. Then this subroutine is used with the finite element package to analyze various applications involving FRP strengthening. In the first application a nonlinear micromechanics-based finite element analysis is performed to investigate the interfacial behaviour of FRP/concrete joints subjected to direct shear loadings. The intention of this part is to develop a reliable bond--slip model for the FRP/concrete interface. The bond

  20. Solute transport in intervertebral disc: experiments and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Das, D B; Welling, A; Urban, J P G; Boubriak, O A

    2009-04-01

    Loss of nutrient supply to the human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells is thought to be a major cause of disc degeneration in humans. To address this issue, transport of molecules of different size have been analyzed by a combination of experimental and modeling studies. Solute transport has been compared for steady-state and transient diffusion of several different solutes with molecular masses in the range 3-70 kDa, injected into parts of the disc where degeneration is thought most likely to occur first and into the blood supply to the disc. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescently tagged dextran molecules of different molecular weights have been measured in vitro using the concentration gradient technique in thin specimens of disc outer annulus and nucleus pulposus. Diffusion coefficients were found to decrease with molecular weight following a nonlinear relationship. Diffusion coefficients changed more rapidly for solutes with molecular masses less than 10 kDa. Although unrealistic or painful, solutes injected directly into the disc achieve the largest disc coverage with concentrations that would be high enough to be of practical use. Although more practical, solutes injected into the blood supply do not penetrate to the central regions of the disc and their concentrations dissipate more rapidly. Injection into the disc would be the best method to get drugs or growth factors to regions of degeneration in IVDs quickly; else concentrations of solute must be kept at a high value for several hours in the blood supply to the discs.

  1. Finite Element Modeling of a Cylindrical Contact Using Hertzian Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The turbine blades in the high-pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump (HPFTP/AT) are subjected to hot gases rapidly flowing around them. This flow excites vibrations in the blades. Naturally, one has to worry about resonance, so a damping device was added to dissipate some energy from the system. The foundation is now laid for a very complex problem. The damper is in contact with the blade, so now there are contact stresses (both normal and tangential) to contend with. Since these stresses can be very high, it is not all that difficult to yield the material. Friction is another non-linearity and the blade is made out of a Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy that is orthotropic. A few approaches exist to solve such a problem and computer models, using contact elements, have been built with friction, plasticity, etc. These models are quite cumbersome and require many hours to solve just one load case and material orientation. A simpler approach is required. Ideally, the model should be simplified so the analysis can be conducted faster. When working with contact problems determining the contact patch and the stresses in the material are the main concerns. Closed-form solutions for non-conforming bodies, developed by Hertz, made out of isotropic materials are readily available. More involved solutions for 3-D cases using different materials are also available. The question is this: can Hertzian1 solutions be applied, or superimposed, to more complicated problems-like those involving anisotropic materials? That is the point of the investigation here. If these results agree with the more complicated computer models, then the analytical solutions can be used in lieu of the numerical solutions that take a very long time to process. As time goes on, the analytical solution will eventually have to include things like friction and plasticity. The models in this report use no contact elements and are essentially an applied load problem using Hertzian assumptions to

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Deformation of a Thin Magnetoelastic Film Compared to a Membrane Model

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, M; White, D; Steigmann, D; Rudd, R

    2009-04-08

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles (magnetoelastomer) was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This new material was formed as a thin film using spin casting. The deformation of this material using a magnetic field has many possible applications to microfluidics. Two methods will be used to calculate the deformation of a circular magneto-elastomeric film subjected to a magnetic field. The first method is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method (FEM) and the second is based on nonlinear continuum electromagnetism and continuum elasticity in the membrane limit. The comparison of these two methods is used to test/validate the finite element method.

  3. Explicit Nonlinear Finite Element Geometric Analysis of Parabolic Leaf Springs under Various Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y. S.; Omar, M. Z.; Chua, L. B.; Abdullah, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the effects of bounce, brake, and roll behavior of a bus toward its leaf spring suspension systems. Parabolic leaf springs are designed based on vertical deflection and stress; however, loads are practically derived from various modes especially under harsh road drives or emergency braking. Parabolic leaf springs must sustain these loads without failing to ensure bus and passenger safety. In this study, the explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element (FE) method is implemented because of the complexity of experimental testing A series of load cases; namely, vertical push, wind-up, and suspension roll are introduced for the simulations. The vertical stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is related to the vehicle load-carrying capability, whereas the wind-up stiffness is associated with vehicle braking. The roll stiffness of the parabolic leaf springs is correlated with the vehicle roll stability. To obtain a better bus performance, two new parabolic leaf spring designs are proposed and simulated. The stress level during the loadings is observed and compared with its design limit. Results indicate that the newly designed high vertical stiffness parabolic spring provides the bus a greater roll stability and a lower stress value compared with the original design. Bus safety and stability is promoted, as well as the load carrying capability. PMID:24298209

  4. Nonlinear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Valero, C; Javierre, E; García-Aznar, J M; Gómez-Benito, M J

    2014-06-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which a new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work, we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Because of the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem; while allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction, we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the nonlinear problem, we use the finite element method (FEM) and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds.

  5. Non-linear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Due to the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross-section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem while maintaining allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the non-linear problem we use the Finite Element Method and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds. PMID:24443355

  6. Development of an Equivalent Composite Honeycomb Model: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenackers, G.; Peeters, J.; Ribbens, B.; Vuye, C.

    2016-12-01

    Finite element analysis of complex geometries such as honeycomb composites, brings forth several difficulties. These problems are expressed primarily as high calculation times but also memory issues when solving these models. In order to bypass these issues, the main goal of this research paper is to define an appropriate equivalent model in order to minimize the complexity of the finite element model and thus minimize computation times. A finite element study is conducted on the design and analysis of equivalent layered models, substituting the honeycomb core in sandwich structures. A comparison is made between available equivalent models. An equivalent model with the right set of material property values is defined and benchmarked, consisting of one continuous layer with orthotropic elastic properties based on different available approximate formulas. This way the complex geometry does not need to be created while the model yields sufficiently accurate results.

  7. Analytical model and finite element computation of braking torque in electromagnetic retarder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lezhi; Yang, Guangzhao; Li, Desheng

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed for analyzing the braking torque in electromagnetic retarder by flux tube and armature reaction method. The magnetic field distribution in air gap, the eddy current induced in the rotor and the braking torque are calculated by the developed model. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element models for retarder have also been developed. Results from the analytical model are compared with those from finite element models. The validity of these three models is checked by the comparison of the theoretical predictions and the measurements from an experimental prototype. The influencing factors of braking torque have been studied.

  8. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  9. Finite element model of intramuscular pressure during isometric contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jenkyn, Thomas R; Koopman, Bart; Huijing, Peter; Lieber, Richard L; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2002-11-21

    The measurement of in vivo intramuscular pressure (IMP) has recently become practical and IMP appears well correlated with muscle tension. A numerical model of skeletal muscle was developed to examine the mechanisms producing IMP. Unipennate muscle is modelled as a two-dimensional material continuum that is incompressible and nonlinearly anisotropic. The finite element technique is used to calculate IMP and muscle stress during passive stretch and during isometric contraction. A novel element models the contractile portion of muscle, incorporating sarcomere length-force and velocity-force relations. A range of unipennate muscle geometries can be modelled. The model was configured to simulate the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle over a range of lengths. Simulated IMP and stress results were validated against animal experimentation data. The simulation agreed well with the experimental data over the range of 0.8-1.1 of the optimal length. Severe pressure gradients were produced near the musculo-tendinous junctions while IMP was more uniform in the central muscle belly. IMP and muscle stress in relaxed (unstimulated) muscle increased nonlinearly with muscle length. IMP and stress in isometrically contracting muscle showed a local maximum at optimal length and were reduced at shorter lengths. At muscle lengths longer than optimal, stress and IMP increased predominately due to tension in the passive elastic structures.

  10. Slave finite elements for nonlinear analysis of engine structures, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1991-01-01

    A 336 degrees of freedom slave finite element processing capability to analyze engine structures under severe thermomechanical loading is presented. Description of the theoretical development and demonstration of that element is presented in this volume.

  11. A comparative study on dynamic stiffness in typical finite element model and multi-body model of C6-C7 cervical spine segment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawei; Wang, Lizhen; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Fan, Yubo

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to numerous researches on static or quasi-static stiffness of cervical spine segments, very few investigations on their dynamic stiffness were published. Currently, scale factors and estimated coefficients were usually used in multi-body models for including viscoelastic properties and damping effects, meanwhile viscoelastic properties of some tissues were unavailable for establishing finite element models. Because dynamic stiffness of cervical spine segments in these models were difficult to validate because of lacking in experimental data, we tried to gain some insights on current modeling methods through studying dynamic stiffness differences between these models. A finite element model and a multi-body model of C6-C7 segment were developed through using available material data and typical modeling technologies. These two models were validated with quasi-static response data of the C6-C7 cervical spine segment. Dynamic stiffness differences were investigated through controlling motions of C6 vertebrae at different rates and then comparing their reaction forces or moments. Validation results showed that both the finite element model and the multi-body model could generate reasonable responses under quasi-static loads, but the finite element segment model exhibited more nonlinear characters. Dynamic response investigations indicated that dynamic stiffness of this finite element model might be underestimated because of the absence of dynamic stiffen effect and damping effects of annulus fibrous, while representation of these effects also need to be improved in current multi-body model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of a combination of continuum and truss finite elements in a model of passive and active muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, S; Halldin, P; Brolin, K

    2008-12-01

    The numerical method of finite elements (FE) is a powerful tool for analysing stresses and strains in the human body. One area of increasing interest is the skeletal musculature. This study evaluated modelling of skeletal muscle tissue using a combination of passive non-linear, viscoelastic solid elements and active Hill-type truss elements, the super-positioned muscle finite element (SMFE). The performance of the combined materials and elements was evaluated for eccentric motions by simulating a tensile experiment from a published study on a stimulated rabbit muscle including three different strain rates. It was also evaluated for isometric and concentric contractions. The resulting stress-strain curves had the same overall pattern as the experiments, with the main limitation being sensitivity to the active force-length relation. It was concluded that the SMFE could model active and passive muscle tissue at constant rate elongations for strains below failure, as well as isometric and concentric contractions.

  13. Singularity-free finite element model of bone through automated voxel-based reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L; Bifulco, P; Gargiulo, P; Fraldi, M

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides both anatomical and density information about tissues. Bone is segmented by raw images and Finite Element Method (FEM) voxel-based meshing technique is achieved by matching each CT voxel to a single finite element (FE). As a consequence of the automated model reconstruction, unstable elements - i.e. elements insufficiently anchored to the whole model and thus potentially involved in partial rigid body motion - can be generated, a crucial problem in obtaining consistent FE models, hindering mechanical analyses. Through the classification of instabilities on topological connections between elements, a numerical procedure is proposed in order to avoid unconstrained models.

  14. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  15. Non-linear finite element analysis for prediction of seismic response of buildings considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelebi, E.; Göktepe, F.; Karahan, N.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this paper focuses primarily on the numerical approach based on two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method for analysis of the seismic response of infinite soil-structure interaction (SSI) system. This study is performed by a series of different scenarios that involved comprehensive parametric analyses including the effects of realistic material properties of the underlying soil on the structural response quantities. Viscous artificial boundaries, simulating the process of wave transmission along the truncated interface of the semi-infinite space, are adopted in the non-linear finite element formulation in the time domain along with Newmark's integration. The slenderness ratio of the superstructure and the local soil conditions as well as the characteristics of input excitations are important parameters for the numerical simulation in this research. The mechanical behavior of the underlying soil medium considered in this prediction model is simulated by an undrained elasto-plastic Mohr-Coulomb model under plane-strain conditions. To emphasize the important findings of this type of problems to civil engineers, systematic calculations with different controlling parameters are accomplished to evaluate directly the structural response of the vibrating soil-structure system. When the underlying soil becomes stiffer, the frequency content of the seismic motion has a major role in altering the seismic response. The sudden increase of the dynamic response is more pronounced for resonance case, when the frequency content of the seismic ground motion is close to that of the SSI system. The SSI effects under different seismic inputs are different for all considered soil conditions and structural types.

  16. Application of a data base management system to a finite element model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In today's software market, much effort is being expended on the development of data base management systems (DBMS). Most commercially available DBMS were designed for business use. However, the need for such systems within the engineering and scientific communities is becoming apparent. A potential DBMS application that appears attractive is the handling of data for finite element engineering models. The applications of a commercially available, business-oriented DBMS to a structural engineering, finite element model is explored. The model, DBMS, an approach to using the DBMS, advantages and disadvantages are described. Plans for research on a scientific and engineering DBMS are discussed.

  17. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  18. Solution of a few nonlinear problems in aerodynamics by the finite elements and functional least squares methods. Ph.D. Thesis - Paris Univ.; [mathematical models of transonic flow using nonlinear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Periaux, J.

    1979-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the transonic flows of idealized fluids and of incompressible viscous fluids, by the nonlinear least squares methods is presented. The nonlinear equations, the boundary conditions, and the various constraints controlling the two types of flow are described. The standard iterative methods for solving a quasi elliptical nonlinear equation with partial derivatives are reviewed with emphasis placed on two examples: the fixed point method applied to the Gelder functional in the case of compressible subsonic flows and the Newton method used in the technique of decomposition of the lifting potential. The new abstract least squares method is discussed. It consists of substituting the nonlinear equation by a problem of minimization in a H to the minus 1 type Sobolev functional space.

  19. Influence of Material Models Used in Finite Element Modeling on Cutting Forces in Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivishov, Vusal; Rzayev, Elchin

    2016-08-01

    Finite element modeling of machining is significantly influenced by various modeling input parameters such as boundary conditions, mesh size and distribution, as well as properties of workpiece and tool materials. The flow stress model of the workpiece material is the most critical input parameter. However, it is very difficult to obtain experimental values under the same conditions as in machining operations.. This paper analyses the influence of different material models for two steels (AISI 1045 and hardened AISI 52100) in finite element modelling of cutting forces. In this study, the machining process is scaled by a constant ratio of the variable depth of cut h and cutting edge radius rβ. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. This comparison illustrates some of the capabilities and limitations of FEM modelling.

  20. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics: Nonlinear finite elements and finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; Broughton, J Q

    2005-05-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) is a technique developed as a concurrent multiscale model that couples conventional molecular dynamics (MD) to a more coarse-grained description of the periphery. The coarse-grained regions are modeled on a mesh in a formulation that generalizes conventional finite element modeling (FEM) of continuum elasticity. CGMD is derived solely from the MD model, however, and has no continuum parameters. As a result, it provides a coupling that is smooth and provides control of errors that arise at the coupling between the atomistic and coarse-grained regions. In this article, we elaborate on the formulation of CGMD, describing in detail how CGMD is applied to anharmonic solids and finite temperature simulations. As tests of CGMD, we present in detail the calculation of the phonon spectra for solid argon and tantalum in 3D, demonstrating how CGMD provides a better description of the elastic waves than that provided by FEM. We also present elastic wave scattering calculations that show the elastic wave scattering is more benign in CGMD than FEM. We also discuss the dependence of scattering on the properties of the mesh. We introduce a rigid approximation to CGMD that eliminates internal relaxation, similar to the Quasicontinuum technique, and compare it to the full CGMD.

  1. A new approach to finite element modeling, analysis and post-processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Gil

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in both hardware and software have opened the door to a new generation of finite element modeling systems. INTERGRAPH CORP has combined an innovative programming concept with a stand alone workstation hardware platform to produce a new standard in finite element modeling called I/FEM. The system offers the COSMIC NASTRAN user full integration between design and analysis. I/FEM not only addresses the needs of the NASTRAN user of today, it also provides for continued evolution of the COSMIC NASTRAN product.

  2. A flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration method for the SN transport equations discretized with discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; Ortensi, Javier; Baker, Benjamin; Laboure, Vincent; Wang, Congjian; DeHart, Mark; Martineau, Richard

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) method that discretizes both the SN transport equation and the diffusion equation using the discontinuous finite element method (DFEM). The method is flexible in that the diffusion equation can be discretized on a coarser mesh with the only restriction that it is nested within the transport mesh and the FEM shape function orders of the two equations can be different. The consistency of the transport and diffusion solutions at convergence is defined by using a projection operator mapping the transport into the diffusion FEM space. The diffusion weak form is based on the modified incomplete interior penalty (MIP) diffusion DFEM discretization that is extended by volumetric drift, interior face, and boundary closure terms. In contrast to commonly used coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) methods, the presented NDA method uses a full FEM discretized diffusion equation for acceleration. Suitable projection and prolongation operators arise naturally from the FEM framework. Via Fourier analysis and numerical experiments for a one-group, fixed source problem the following properties of the NDA method are established for structured quadrilateral meshes: (1) the presented method is unconditionally stable and effective in the presence of mild material heterogeneities if the same mesh and identical shape functions either of the bilinear or biquadratic type are used, (2) the NDA method remains unconditionally stable in the presence of strong heterogeneities, (3) the NDA method with bilinear elements extends the range of effectiveness and stability by a factor of two when compared to CMFD if a coarser diffusion mesh is selected. In addition, the method is tested for solving the C5G7 multigroup, eigenvalue problem using coarse and fine mesh acceleration. While NDA does not offer an advantage over CMFD for fine mesh acceleration, it reduces the iteration count required for convergence by almost a factor of two in

  3. Optimization of an electromagnetic linear actuator using a network and a finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, Holger; Kamusella, Alfred; Lienig, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Model based design optimization leads to robust solutions only if the statistical deviations of design, load and ambient parameters from nominal values are considered. We describe an optimization methodology that involves these deviations as stochastic variables for an exemplary electromagnetic actuator used to drive a Braille printer. A combined model simulates the dynamic behavior of the actuator and its non-linear load. It consists of a dynamic network model and a stationary magnetic finite element (FE) model. The network model utilizes lookup tables of the magnetic force and the flux linkage computed by the FE model. After a sensitivity analysis using design of experiment (DoE) methods and a nominal optimization based on gradient methods, a robust design optimization is performed. Selected design variables are involved in form of their density functions. In order to reduce the computational effort we use response surfaces instead of the combined system model obtained in all stochastic analysis steps. Thus, Monte-Carlo simulations can be applied. As a result we found an optimum system design meeting our requirements with regard to function and reliability.

  4. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  5. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  6. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  7. Performance of a parallel algebraic multilevel preconditioner for stabilized finite element semiconductor device modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Paul T.; Shadid, John N.; Sala, Marzio; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Hennigan, Gary L.; Hoekstra, Robert J.

    2009-09-01

    In this study results are presented for the large-scale parallel performance of an algebraic multilevel preconditioner for solution of the drift-diffusion model for semiconductor devices. The preconditioner is the key numerical procedure determining the robustness, efficiency and scalability of the fully-coupled Newton-Krylov based, nonlinear solution method that is employed for this system of equations. The coupled system is comprised of a source term dominated Poisson equation for the electric potential, and two convection-diffusion-reaction type equations for the electron and hole concentration. The governing PDEs are discretized in space by a stabilized finite element method. Solution of the discrete system is obtained through a fully-implicit time integrator, a fully-coupled Newton-based nonlinear solver, and a restarted GMRES Krylov linear system solver. The algebraic multilevel preconditioner is based on an aggressive coarsening graph partitioning of the nonzero block structure of the Jacobian matrix. Representative performance results are presented for various choices of multigrid V-cycles and W-cycles and parameter variations for smoothers based on incomplete factorizations. Parallel scalability results are presented for solution of up to 108 unknowns on 4096 processors of a Cray XT3/4 and an IBM POWER eServer system.

  8. Quasi-Static Viscoelastic Finite Element Model of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell mixed finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at the element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses is included in the mixed variational functional. The nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the nonlinear elastic equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to computationally simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  9. Probabilistic Failure Analysis of Bone Using a Finite Element Model of Mineral-Collagen Composites

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Neil; Guda, Teja; Millwater, Harry R.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2009-01-01

    Microdamage accumulation is a major pathway for energy dissipation during the post-yield deformation of bone. In this study, a two-dimensional probabilistic finite element model of a mineral-collagen composite was developed to investigate the influence of the tissue and ultrastructural properties of bone on the evolution of microdamage from an initial defect in tension. The probabilistic failure analyses indicated that the microdamage progression would be along the plane of the initial defect when the debonding at mineral-collagen interfaces was either absent or limited in the vicinity of the defect. In this case, the formation of a linear microcrack would be facilitated. However, the microdamage progression would be scattered away from the initial defect plane if interfacial debonding takes place at a large scale. This would suggest the possible formation of diffuse damage. In addition to interfacial debonding, the sensitivity analyses indicated that the microdamage progression was also dependent on the other material and ultrastructural properties of bone. The intensity of stress concentration accompanied with microdamage progression was more sensitive to the elastic modulus of the mineral phase and the nonlinearity of the collagen phase, whereas the scattering of failure location was largely dependent on the mineral to collagen ratio and the nonlinearity of the collagen phase. The findings of this study may help understanding the post-yield behavior of bone at the ultrastructural level and shed light on the underlying mechanism of bone fractures. PMID:19058806

  10. Finite element modelling of human auditory periphery including a feed-forward amplification of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Wang, Liling; Zhou, Jianjun; Hu, Yujin

    2014-08-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model is developed for the simulation of the sound transmission through the human auditory periphery consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear and cochlea. The cochlea is modelled as a straight duct divided into two fluid-filled scalae by the basilar membrane (BM) having an orthotropic material property with dimensional variation along its length. In particular, an active feed-forward mechanism is added into the passive cochlear model to represent the activity of the outer hair cells (OHCs). An iterative procedure is proposed for calculating the nonlinear response resulting from the active cochlea in the frequency domain. Results on the middle-ear transfer function, BM steady-state frequency response and intracochlear pressure are derived. A good match of the model predictions with experimental data from the literatures demonstrates the validity of the ear model for simulating sound pressure gain of middle ear, frequency to place map, cochlear sensitivity and compressive output for large intensity input. The current model featuring an active cochlea is able to correlate directly the sound stimulus in the ear canal with the vibration of BM and provides a tool to explore the mechanisms by which sound pressure in the ear canal is converted to a stimulus for the OHCs.

  11. An Integrated Magnetic Circuit Model and Finite Element Model Approach to Magnetic Bearing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Kenny, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    A code for designing magnetic bearings is described. The code generates curves from magnetic circuit equations relating important bearing performance parameters. Bearing parameters selected from the curves by a designer to meet the requirements of a particular application are input directly by the code into a three-dimensional finite element analysis preprocessor. This means that a three-dimensional computer model of the bearing being developed is immediately available for viewing. The finite element model solution can be used to show areas of magnetic saturation and make more accurate predictions of the bearing load capacity, current stiffness, position stiffness, and inductance than the magnetic circuit equations did at the start of the design process. In summary, the code combines one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling methods for designing magnetic bearings.

  12. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    This study presents a comprehensive investigation of performance and behavior of steel-fiber reinforced concrete pipes (SFRCP). The main goal of this study is to develop the material constitutive model for steel fiber reinforced concrete used in dry-cast application. To accomplish this goal a range of pipe sizes varying from 15 in. (400 mm) to 48 in. (1200 mm) in diameter and fiber content of 0.17%, 0.25%, 0.33%, 0.5%, 0.67% and 83% by volume were produced. The pipes were tested in three-edge bearing condition to obtain the load-deformation response and overall performance of the pipe. The pipes were also subjected to hydrostatic joint and joint shear tests to evaluate the performance of the fiber-pipe joints for water tightness and under differential displacements, respectively. In addition, testing on hardened concrete was performed to obtain the basic mechanical material properties. High variation in the test results for material testing was identified as a part of experimental investigation. A three-dimensional non-linear finite element model of the pipe under the three edge bearing condition was developed to identify the constitutive material relations of fiber-concrete composite. A constitutive model of concrete implementing the concrete plasticity and continuum fracture mechanics was considered for defining the complex non-linear behavior of fiber-concrete. Three main concrete damage algorithms were examined: concrete brittle cracking, concrete damaged plasticity with adaptive meshing technique and concrete damaged plasticity with visco-plastic regularization. The latter was identified as the most robust and efficient to model the post-cracking behavior of fiber reinforced concrete and was used in the subsequent studies. The tension stiffening material constitutive law for composite concrete was determined by converging the FEM solution of load-deformation response with the results of experimental testing. This was achieved by iteratively modifying the non-linear

  13. Automated finite element modeling of the lumbar spine: Using a statistical shape model to generate a virtual population of models.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Q; Petrella, A J

    2016-09-06

    Population-based modeling of the lumbar spine has the potential to be a powerful clinical tool. However, developing a fully parameterized model of the lumbar spine with accurate geometry has remained a challenge. The current study used automated methods for landmark identification to create a statistical shape model of the lumbar spine. The shape model was evaluated using compactness, generalization ability, and specificity. The primary shape modes were analyzed visually, quantitatively, and biomechanically. The biomechanical analysis was performed by using the statistical shape model with an automated method for finite element model generation to create a fully parameterized finite element model of the lumbar spine. Functional finite element models of the mean shape and the extreme shapes (±3 standard deviations) of all 17 shape modes were created demonstrating the robust nature of the methods. This study represents an advancement in finite element modeling of the lumbar spine and will allow population-based modeling in the future.

  14. Finite element modeling of truss structures with frequency-dependent material damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    1991-01-01

    A physically motivated modelling technique for structural dynamic analysis that accommodates frequency dependent material damping was developed. Key features of the technique are the introduction of augmenting thermodynamic fields (AFT) to interact with the usual mechanical displacement field, and the treatment of the resulting coupled governing equations using finite element analysis methods. The AFT method is fully compatible with current structural finite element analysis techniques. The method is demonstrated in the dynamic analysis of a 10-bay planar truss structure, a structure representative of those contemplated for use in future space systems.

  15. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the Multi Utility Technology Test-bed, X-56A aircraft, is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, while other properties such as center of gravity location, total weight, and offdiagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was a more improved and desirable structural dynamic finite element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  16. Dynamic and thermal response finite element models of multi-body space structural configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is structural dynamics modeling of two multibody space structural configurations. The first configuration is a generic space station model of a cylindrical habitation module, two solar array panels, radiator panel, and central connecting tube. The second is a 15-m hoop-column antenna. Discussed is the special joint elimination sequence used for these large finite element models, so that eigenvalues could be extracted. The generic space station model aided test configuration design and analysis/test data correlation. The model consisted of six finite element models, one of each substructure and one of all substructures as a system. Static analysis and tests at the substructure level fine-tuned the finite element models. The 15-m hoop-column antenna is a truss column and structural ring interconnected with tension stabilizing cables. To the cables, pretensioned mesh membrane elements were attached to form four parabolic shaped antennae, one per quadrant. Imposing thermal preloads in the cables and mesh elements produced pretension in the finite element model. Thermal preload variation in the 96 control cables was adjusted to maintain antenna shape within the required tolerance and to give pointing accuracy.

  17. Finite-element model for three-dimensional optical scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiuhong; Wachters, Arthur J; Urbach, H Paul

    2007-03-01

    We present a three-dimensional model based on the finite-element method for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell equation in optics. It applies to isotropic or anisotropic dielectrics and metals and to many configurations such as an isolated scatterer in a multilayer, bi-gratings, and crystals. We discuss the application of the model to near-field optical recording.

  18. A Finite-Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we present a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide followed by the stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis. This fully coupled model considers the geomechanical response, fluid flow, and thermal transport relevant to geological sequestration. Both analytical solutions and numerical approach via finite element model are introduced for solving the thermal-hydro-mechanical model. Analytical solutions for pressure, temperature, deformation, and stress field were obtained for a simplified typical geological sequestration scenario. The finite element model is more general and can be used for arbitrary geometry. It was built on an open-source finite element code, Elmer, and was designed to simulate the entire period of CO2 injection (up to decades) both stably and accurately—even for large time steps. The shear-slip failure analysis was implemented based on the numerical results from the finite element model. The analysis reveals the potential failure zone caused by the fluid injection and thermal effect. From the simulation results, the thermal effect is shown to enhance well injectivity, especially at the early time of the injection. However, it also causes some side effects, such as the appearance of a small failure zone in the caprock. The coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model improves prediction of displacement, stress distribution, and potential failure zone compared to the model that neglects non-isothermal effects, especially in an area with high geothermal gradient.

  19. Creating a Test-Validated Finite-Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in a finite-element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression and, therefore, in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground-vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model-tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, whereas other properties such as c.g. location, total weight, and off-diagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was an improved structural dynamic finite-element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  20. Design and Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Design and Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging by...Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Reuben H. Kraft and Amy M. Dagro...Implementation of a Numerical Technique to Inform Anisotropic Hyperelastic Finite Element Models using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging AH80Reuben H. Kraft and

  1. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision.

    PubMed

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas; Visseq, Vincent; Erleben, Kenny

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of voice pathologies may require vocal fold models that include relevant features such as vocal fold asymmetric collision. The present study numerically addresses the problem of frictionless asymmetric collision in a self-sustained three-dimensional continuum model of the vocal folds. Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold dynamics is examined by different variational methods for inequality constrained minimization problems, namely, the Lagrange multiplier method and the penalty method. In contrast to the penalty solution, which is related to classical spring-like contact forces, numerical examples show that the parameter-independent Lagrange multiplier solution is more robust and accurate in the estimation of dynamical and mechanical features at vocal fold contact. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the temporal integration schemes in relation to the contact problem, the results suggesting an advantage of highly diffusive schemes. Finally, vocal fold contact enforcement is shown to affect asymmetric oscillations. The present model may be adapted to existing vocal fold models, which may contribute to a better understanding of the effect of the nonlinear contact phenomenon on phonation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  3. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B; Cook, Mark J; Wolters, Carsten H; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery.

  4. Development and validation of a weight-bearing finite element model for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Woiczinski, M; Steinbrück, A; Weber, P; Müller, P E; Jansson, V; Schröder, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful procedure for osteoarthritis. However, some patients (19%) do have pain after surgery. A finite element model was developed based on boundary conditions of a knee rig. A 3D-model of an anatomical full leg was generated from magnetic resonance image data and a total knee prosthesis was implanted without patella resurfacing. In the finite element model, a restarting procedure was programmed in order to hold the ground reaction force constant with an adapted quadriceps muscle force during a squat from 20° to 105° of flexion. Knee rig experimental data were used to validate the numerical model in the patellofemoral and femorotibial joint. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses of Young's modulus of the patella cartilage, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stiffness, and patella tendon origin were performed. Pearson's correlations for retropatellar contact area, pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were near to 1. Lowest root mean square error for retropatellar pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were found for the baseline model setup with Young's modulus of 5 MPa for patella cartilage, a downscaled PCL stiffness of 25% compared to the literature given value and an anatomical origin of the patella tendon. The results of the conducted finite element model are comparable with the experimental results. Therefore, the finite element model developed in this study can be used for further clinical investigations and will help to better understand the clinical aspects after TKA with an unresurfaced patella.

  5. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  6. Hybrid-finite-element analysis of some nonlinear and 3-dimensional problems of engineering fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Nakagaki, M.; Kathiresan, K.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, efficient numerical methods for the analysis of crack-closure effects on fatigue-crack-growth-rates, in plane stress situations, and for the solution of stress-intensity factors for arbitrary shaped surface flaws in pressure vessels, are presented. For the former problem, an elastic-plastic finite element procedure valid for the case of finite deformation gradients is developed and crack growth is simulated by the translation of near-crack-tip elements with embedded plastic singularities. For the latter problem, an embedded-elastic-singularity hybrid finite element method, which leads to a direct evaluation of K-factors, is employed.

  7. Progress in Finite Element Modeling of the Lower Extremities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT  Human body modeling efforts for the purpose of Soldier protection need to address the current threats...as well as have a vision for the future. Modeling the human body is a challenging endeavor due to its geometric complexity, numerous interacting...has the capability to take a collection of source body part meshes that may have different resolutions, deform the meshes based on the individual to

  8. Evaluation of the finite element software ABAQUS for biomechanical modelling of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Herzog, W; Epstein, M

    1998-02-01

    The biphasic cartilage model proposed by Mow et al. (1980) has proven successful to capture the essential mechanical features of articular cartilage. In order to analyse the joint contact mechanics in real, anatomical joints, the cartilage model needs to be implemented into a suitable finite element code to approximate the irregular surface geometries of such joints. However, systematic and extensive evaluation of the capacity of commercial software for modelling the contact mechanics with biphasic cartilage layers has not been made. This research was aimed at evaluating the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for analysing biphasic soft tissues. The solutions obtained using ABAQUS were compared with those obtained using other finite element models and analytical solutions for three numerical tests: an unconfined indentation test, a test with the contact of a spherical cartilage surface with a rigid plate, and an axi-symmetric joint contact test. It was concluded that the biphasic cartilage model can be implemented into the commercial finite element software ABAQUS to analyse practical joint contact problems with biphasic articular cartilage layers.

  9. Finite element modelling of internal and multiple localized cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloustros, Savvas; Pelà, Luca; Cervera, Miguel; Roca, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Tracking algorithms constitute an efficient numerical technique for modelling fracture in quasi-brittle materials. They succeed in representing localized cracks in the numerical model without mesh-induced directional bias. Currently available tracking algorithms have an important limitation: cracking originates either from the boundary of the discretized domain or from predefined "crack-root" elements and then propagates along one orientation. This paper aims to circumvent this drawback by proposing a novel tracking algorithm that can simulate cracking starting at any point of the mesh and propagating along one or two orientations. This enhancement allows the simulation of structural case-studies experiencing multiple cracking. The proposed approach is validated through the simulation of a benchmark example and an experimentally tested structural frame under in-plane loading. Mesh-bias independency of the numerical solution, computational cost and predicted collapse mechanisms with and without the tracking algorithm are discussed.

  10. An Investigation of Dimensional Scaling Using Cervical Spine Motion Segment Finite Element Models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilaver; Cronin, Duane S

    2017-02-15

    The paucity of experimental data for validating computational models of different statures underscores the need for appropriate scaling methods so that models can be verified and validated using experimental data. Scaling was investigated using 50(th) percentile male (M50) and 5(th) percentile female (F05) cervical spine motion segment (C4-C5) finite element models subject to tension, flexion and extension loading. Two approaches were undertaken: geometric scaling of the models to investigate size effects (volumetric scaling) and scaling of the force-displacement or moment-angle model results (data scaling). Three sets of scale factors were considered: global (body mass), regional (neck dimensions) and local (segment tissue dimensions). Volumetric scaling of the segment models from M50 to F05, and vice-versa, produced correlations that were good or excellent in both tension and flexion (0.825-0.991); however, less agreement was found in extension (0.550-0.569). The reduced correlation in extension was attributed to variations in shape between the models leading to nonlinear effects such as different time to contact for the facet joints and posterior processes. Data scaling of the responses between the M50 and F05 models produced similar trends to volumetric scaling, with marginally greater correlations. Overall, the local tissue level and neck region level scale factors produced better correlations than the traditional global scaling. The scaling methods work well for a given subject, but are limited in applicability between subjects with different morphology, where nonlinear effects may dominate the response.

  11. Feasibility Study of a Knowledge Based Finite Element Modeling Assistant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    girders interact with floor slabs, the ways in which an inside core interacts with outside frames, or the ways ini which two beams on top of each other...hierarchically decomposed into descriptions in two orthogonal directions (e.g, frames, walls), and then into components (e.g, beams , columns... diagonals ). The top level gravity description representing the alternate overall gravity functional models (e.g., one-way reinforced concrete slab, two way

  12. Meso-damage modelling of polymer based particulate composites using finite element technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Chi Pong

    To develop a new particulate polymer composite (PPC) with desired mechanical properties is usually accomplished by an experimental trial-and-error approach. A new technique, which predicts the damage mechanism and its effects on the mechanical properties of PPC, has been proposed. This meso-mechanical modelling technique, which offers a means to bridge the micro-damage mechanism and the macro-structural behaviour, has been implemented in a finite element code. A three-dimensional finite element meso-cell model has been designed and constructed to simulate the damage mechanism of PPC. The meso-cell model consists of a micro-particle, an interface, and a matrix. The initiation of the particle/polymer matrix debonding process has been predicted on the basis of a tensile criterion. By considering the meso-cell model as a representative volume element (RVE), the effects of damage on the macro-structural constitutive behaviour of PPC have been determined. An experimental investigation has been made on glass beads (GB) reinforced polyphenylene oxides (PPO) for verification of the meso-cell model and the meso-mechanical finite element technique. The predicted constitutive relation has been found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The results of the in-situ microscopic test also verify the correctness of the meso-cell model. The application of the meso-mechanical finite element modelling technique has been extended to a macro-structural analysis to simulate the response an engineering structure made of PPC under a static load. In the simulation, a damage variable has been defined in terms of the computational results of the cell model in meso-scale. Hence, the damage-coupled constitutive relation of the GB/PPO composite could be derived. A user-defined subroutine VUMAT in FORTRAN language describing the damage-coupled constitutive behaviour has then been incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element code. On a macro-scale, the ABAQUS finite element code

  13. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  14. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology. Appendix C -- Finite Element Models Solution Database File, Appendix D -- Benchmark Finite Element Models Solution Database File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  15. Modeling electromagnetic rail launchers at speed using 3D finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in moving conductors is described. This has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis. The application of the technique to railgun launchers is illustrated.

  16. Correlation of experimental data and three-dimensional finite element modeling of a spinning quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, W. L.; Lieu, D. K.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    A permanent magnet quadrupole spinning over an aluminum disk was constructed, and drag torque was measured for various speeds and gap sizes. The experiment was modeled using a three-dimensional finite element program. Experimental and analytical results were compared, and the effect of magnet polarity was determined.

  17. An efficient finite element approach for modeling fibrotic clefts in the heart.

    PubMed

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O; Prassl, Anton J; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-03-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify microstructural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method, this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort.

  18. Assessment of the performance of rigid pavement back-calculation through finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; William, Gergis W.; Martinelli, David R.

    1999-02-01

    This study focuses on examining the behavior of rigid pavement layers during the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) test. Factors affecting the design of a concrete slab, such as whether the joints are doweled or undoweled and the spacing between the transverse joints, were considered in this study. Explicit finite element analysis was employed to investigate pavement layers' responses to the action of the impulse of the FWD test. Models of various dimensions were developed to satisfy the factors under consideration. The accuracy of the finite element models developed in this investigation was verified by comparing the finite element- generated deflection basin with that experimentally measured during an actual test. The results showed that the measured deflection basin can be reproduced through finite element modeling of the pavement structure. The resulting deflection basins from the use FE modeling was processed in order to backcalculate pavement layer moduli. This approach provides a method for the evaluation of the performance of existing backcalculation programs which are based on static elastic layer analysis. Based upon the previous studies conducted for the selection of software, three different backcalculation programs were chosen for the evaluation: MODULUS5.0, EVERCALC4.0, and MODCOMP3. The results indicate that ignoring the dynamic nature of the load may lead to crude results, especially during backcalculation procedures.

  19. An Efficient Finite Element Approach for Modeling Fibrotic Clefts in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify micro-structural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort. PMID:24557691

  20. Development and experimental validation of a finite element model of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Alexandre; Larrea, Xabier; Guerdat, Jonas; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-02-07

    Total ankle replacement remains a less satisfactory solution compared to other joint replacements. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model of total ankle replacement, for future testing of hypotheses related to clinical issues. To validate the finite element model, an experimental setup was specifically developed and applied on 8 cadaveric tibias. A non-cemented press fit tibial component of a mobile bearing prosthesis was inserted into the tibias. Two extreme anterior and posterior positions of the mobile bearing insert were considered, as well as a centered one. An axial force of 2kN was applied for each insert position. Strains were measured on the bone surface using digital image correlation. Tibias were CT scanned before implantation, after implantation, and after mechanical tests and removal of the prosthesis. The finite element model replicated the experimental setup. The first CT was used to build the geometry and evaluate the mechanical properties of the tibias. The second CT was used to set the implant position. The third CT was used to assess the bone-implant interface conditions. The coefficient of determination (R-squared) between the measured and predicted strains was 0.91. Predicted bone strains were maximal around the implant keel, especially at the anterior and posterior ends. The finite element model presented here is validated for future tests using more physiological loading conditions.

  1. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  2. Modelling the electromagnetic performance of moving rail gun launchers using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in 'smooth rotor' conductors moving at constant velocity is described. A method for joining discontinuous A fields at the interface between conductors in sliding electrical contact has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis.

  3. Application of physical parameter identification to finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; Lukich, Michael S.; Kuritz, Steven P.

    1987-01-01

    The time domain parameter identification method described previously is applied to TRW's Large Space Structure Truss Experiment. Only control sensors and actuators are employed in the test procedure. The fit of the linear structural model to the test data is improved by more than an order of magnitude using a physically reasonable parameter set. The electro-magnetic control actuators are found to contribute significant damping due to a combination of eddy current and back electro-motive force (EMF) effects. Uncertainties in both estimated physical parameters and modal behavior variables are given.

  4. Using Plate Finite Elements for Modeling Fillets in Design, Optimization, and Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Seugling, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology has been developed that allows the use of plate elements instead of numerically inefficient solid elements for modeling structures with 90 degree fillets. The technique uses plate bridges with pseudo Young's modulus (Eb) and thickness (tb) values placed between the tangent points of the fillets. These parameters are obtained by solving two nonlinear simultaneous equations in terms of the independent variables rlt and twallt. These equations are generated by equating the rotation at the tangent point of a bridge system with that of a fillet, where both rotations are derived using beam theory. Accurate surface fits of the solutions are also presented to provide the user with closed-form equations for the parameters. The methodology was verified on the subcomponent level and with a representative filleted structure, where the technique yielded a plate model exhibiting a level of accuracy better than or equal to a high-fidelity solid model and with a 90-percent reduction in the number of DOFs. The application of this method for parametric design studies, optimization, and dynamic analysis should prove extremely beneficial for the finite element practitioner. Although the method does not attempt to produce accurate stresses in the filleted region, it can also be used to obtain stresses elsewhere in the structure for preliminary analysis. A future avenue of study is to extend the theory developed here to other fillet geometries, including fillet angles other than 90 and multifaceted intersections.

  5. Numerical modeling of shallow magma intrusions with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tielin; Cheng, Shaozhen; Fang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng

    2017-03-01

    A numerical approach for simulation of magma intrusion process, considering the couplings of the stress distribution, the viscous fluid flow of magma, and the fracturing of host rock, has been developed to investigate the mechanisms of fracture initiation and propagation in host rock during magma intrusion without pre-placing a set of fractures. The study focused on the dike intrusions filled with injected viscous magma in shallow sediments. A series of numerical modellings were carried out to simulate the process of magma intrusion in host rocks, with particular attention on the magma propagation processes and the formation of intrusion shapes. The model materials were Mohr-Coulomb materials with tension failure and shear failure. The scenarios of both stochastically heterogeneous host rocks and layered host rocks were analyzed. The injected magma formed intrusions shapes of (a) dyke, (b) sill, (c) cup-shaped intrusion, (d) saucer-shaped intrusion. The numerical results were in agreement with the experimental and field observed results, which confirmed the adequacy and the power of the numerical approach.

  6. Thermal effects on nonlinear vibration of a carbon nanotube-based mass sensor using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Keun; Kim, Chang-Wan; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2017-01-01

    In the present study we carried out a dynamic analysis of a CNT-based mass sensor by using a finite element method (FEM)-based nonlinear analysis model of the CNT resonator to elucidate the combined effects of thermal effects and nonlinear oscillation behavior upon the overall mass detection sensitivity. Mass sensors using carbon nanotube (CNT) resonators provide very high sensing performance. Because CNT-based resonators can have high aspect ratios, they can easily exhibit nonlinear oscillation behavior due to large displacements. Also, CNT-based devices may experience high temperatures during their manufacture and operation. These geometrical nonlinearities and temperature changes affect the sensing performance of CNT-based mass sensors. However, it is very hard to find previous literature addressing the detection sensitivity of CNT-based mass sensors including considerations of both these nonlinear behaviors and thermal effects. We modeled the nonlinear equation of motion by using the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relation, taking into account the additional axial force associated with the thermal effect. The FEM was employed to solve the nonlinear equation of motion because it can effortlessly handle the more complex geometries and boundary conditions. A doubly clamped CNT resonator actuated by distributed electrostatic force was the configuration subjected to the numerical experiments. Thermal effects upon the fundamental resonance behavior and the shift of resonance frequency due to attached mass, i.e., the mass detection sensitivity, were examined in environments of both high and low (or room) temperature. The fundamental resonance frequency increased with decreasing temperature in the high temperature environment, and increased with increasing temperature in the low temperature environment. The magnitude of the shift in resonance frequency caused by an attached mass represents the sensing performance of a mass sensor, i.e., its mass detection

  7. Finite Element Modeling of a Microhotplate for Microfluidic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Manginell, R.P.; Rosato, D.A.

    1999-03-09

    A hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab) is being developed that utilizes a silicon- nitride-supported microhotplate in the front-end, gas sampling and preconcentration stage. Device constraints include low-power (<200mW at 5V), rapid heating (<20msec), and a relatively uniform temperature distribution throughout the heated area ({approximately}3mm{sup 2}). To optimize for these criteria, the electro-thermal behavior of the microhotplate was modeled using Thermal Analysis System (TAS). Predicted steady-state and transient behavior agree well with infrared (IR) microscope data and measured transient response for a low-stress silicon nitride thermal conductivity of k{sub n} = 6.4 x 10{sup {minus}2} W x (cm x {degree}C){sup {minus}1} and a convection coefficient of h{sub cv} = 3.5 x 10{sup {minus}3} W x (cm{sup 2} x {degree}C){sup {minus}1}. The magnitude of h{sub cv} is framed in the context of vacuum measurements and empirical data. Details and limitations of the IR measurement are discussed. Finally, the efficacy of methods for reducing thermal gradients in the microhotplate's active area is presented.

  8. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  9. Finite-element modeling of bones from CT data: sensitivity to geometry and material uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Fulvia; Martelli, Saulo; Reggiani, Barbara; Cristofolini, Luca; Viceconti, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze how the uncertainties in modelling the geometry and the material properties of a human bone affect the predictions of a finite-element model derived from computed tomography (CT) data. A sensitivity analysis, based on a Monte Carlo method, was performed using three femur models generated from in vivo CT datasets, each subjected to two different loading conditions. The geometry, the density and the mechanical properties of the bone tissue were considered as random input variables. Finite-element results typically used in biomechanics research were considered as statistical output variables, and their sensitivity to the inputs variability assessed. The results showed that it is not possible to define a priori the influence of the errors related to the geometry definition process and to the material assignment process on the finite-element analysis results. The errors in the geometric representation of the bone are always the dominant variables for the stresses, as was expected. However, for all the variables, the results seemed to be dependent on the loading condition and to vary from subject to subject. The most interesting result is, however, that using the proposed method to build a finite-element model of a femur from a CT dataset of the quality typically achievable in the clinical practice, the coefficients of variation of the output variables never exceed the 9%. The presented method is hence robust enough to be used for investigating the mechanical behavior of bones with subject-specific finite-element models derived from CT data taken in vivo.

  10. A progress report on estuary modeling by the finite-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, William G.

    1978-01-01

    Various schemes are investigated for finite-element modeling of two-dimensional surface-water flows. The first schemes investigated combine finite-element spatial discretization with split-step time stepping schemes that have been found useful in finite-difference computations. Because of the large number of numerical integrations performed in space and the large sparse matrices solved, these finite-element schemes were found to be economically uncompetitive with finite-difference schemes. A very promising leapfrog scheme is proposed which, when combined with a novel very fast spatial integration procedure, eliminates the need to solve any matrices at all. Additional problems attacked included proper propagation of waves and proper specification of the normal flow-boundary condition. This report indicates work in progress and does not come to a definitive conclusion as to the best approach for finite-element modeling of surface-water problems. The results presented represent findings obtained between September 1973 and July 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Improved Finite Element Modeling of the Turbofan Engine Inlet Radiation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Indranil Danda; Eversman, Walter; Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements have been made in the finite element model of the acoustic radiated field from a turbofan engine inlet in the presence of a mean flow. The problem of acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet is difficult to model numerically because of the large domain and high frequencies involved. A numerical model with conventional finite elements in the near field and wave envelope elements in the far field has been constructed. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, both the mean flow and the acoustic perturbation problem have been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of the velocity potential; thereby minimizing computer storage and time requirements. The finite element mesh has been altered in search of an improved solution. The mean flow problem has been reformulated with new boundary conditions to make it theoretically rigorous. The sound source at the fan face has been modeled as a combination of positive and negative propagating duct eigenfunctions. Therefore, a finite element duct eigenvalue problem has been solved on the fan face and the resulting modal matrix has been used to implement a source boundary condition on the fan face in the acoustic radiation problem. In the post processing of the solution, the acoustic pressure has been evaluated at Gauss points inside the elements and the nodal pressure values have been interpolated from them. This has significantly improved the results. The effect of the geometric position of the transition circle between conventional finite elements and wave envelope elements has been studied and it has been found that the transition can be made nearer to the inlet than previously assumed.

  12. Nonlinear incompressible finite element for simulating loading of cardiac tissue--Part I: Two dimensional formulation for thin myocardial strips.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, A; Sheinman, I; Lanir, Y; Perl, M; Sideman, S

    1988-02-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible plane-stress finite element is formulated for the simulation of the passive-state mechanics of thin myocardial strips. The formulation employs a total Lagrangian and materially nonlinear approach, being based on a recently proposed structural material law, which is derived from the histological composition of the tissue. The ensuing finite element allows to demonstrate the mechanical properties of a single myocardial layer containing uniformly directed fibers by simulating various loading cases such as tension, compression and shear. The results of these cases show that the fiber direction is considerably stiffer than the cross-fiber direction, that there is significant coupling between these two directions, and that the shear stiffness of the tissue is lower than its tensile and compressive stiffness.

  13. Simplified and refined finite element approaches for determining stresses and internal forces in geometrically nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods for determining stresses and internal forces in geometrically nonlinear structural analysis are presented. The simplified approach uses the mid-deformed structural position to evaluate strains when rigid body rotation is present. The important feature of this approach is that it can easily be used with a general-purpose finite-element computer program. The refined approach uses element intrinsic or corotational coordinates and a geometric transformation to determine element strains from joint displacements. Results are presented which demonstrate the capabilities of these potentially useful approaches for geometrically nonlinear structural analysis.

  14. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  15. Tsunami Wave Propagation: Recent applications of a Finite Element Tsunami Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, S.; Androsov, A.; Fuchs, A.; Immerz, A.; Rakowsky, N.; Behrens, J.; Hiller, W.; Danilov, S.

    2012-04-01

    The devastating tsunami in December 2004 triggered numerous activities aiming at the installation of a tsunami early warning system in the Indian Ocean. Since the time available for early warning is very short especially along the Indonesian coast facing the Sunda trench, first estimates of the tsunami impact after an earthquake are based on precomputed tsunami simulations. These can rely only on a thoroughly tuned and verified model. The wave propagation model TsunAWI is based on finite elements and employs a triangular discretization of the model domain which is very flexible with respect to resolution and allows for an excellent representation of complicated coastlines and bathymetry. In addition to convergence tests, benchmark cases and laboratory experiments data obtained from real events played an important role in its validation. The key issue in modelling the tsunami is wetting and drying. The original algorithm to solve this problem is discussed. Full and reduced formulation of the momentum advection for finite elements and parameterization of horizontal diffusion are presented. Using the well-known Okushiri test case, the influence of nonlinearity on the wave propagation is demonstrated. The TsunAWI simulation results of the Indian Ocean tsunami were compared to available data from satellite altimetry, tide gauge records and inundation measurements obtained in field surveys. It turns out that the model operating on the variable resolution mesh is able to capture different scales of the wave propagation without employing nesting techniques. Large scale wave propagation as well as inundation results in the Northern tip of Sumatra agree well with available data. A typical tsunami wave is much shorter than tidal waves, which is why they are usually neglected in tsunami modelling. However, in coastal areas with strong tidal activity, nonlinear interactions of tidal and tsunami waves can amplify the magnitude of inundation. The effect can come from the

  16. Finite element analysis and modeling of water absorption by date pits during a soaking process.

    PubMed

    Waezi-Zadeh, Motahareh; Ghazanfari, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Shahin

    2010-07-01

    Date pits for feed preparation or oil extraction are soaked in water to soften before milling or extrusion. Knowledge of water absorption by the date pits helps in better managing the soaking duration. In this research, the process of water absorption by date pits was modeled and analyzed using Fick's second law of diffusion, finite element approach, and Peleg model. The moisture content of the pits reached to its saturation level of 41.5% (wet basis) after 10 d. The estimated coefficient of diffusion was 9.89x10(-12) m(2)/s. The finite element model with a proposed ellipsoid geometry for a single date pit and the analytical model fitted better to the experimental data with R(2) of 0.98. The former model slightly overestimated the moisture content of the pits during the initial stages of the soaking and the latter model generally underestimated this variable through the entire stages of soaking process.

  17. A Strategy for Integrating a Large Finite Element Model: X-33 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The X-33 vehicle is an advanced technology demonstrator sponsored by NASA. For the past three years the Structural Dynamics & Loads Group of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had the task of integrating the X-33 vehicle structural finite element model. In that time, five versions of the integrated vehicle model have been produced and a strategy has evolved that would benefit anyone given the task of integrating structural finite element models that have been generated by various modelers and companies. The strategy that has been presented here consists of six decisions that need to be made. These six decisions are: purpose of model, units, common material list, model numbering, interface control, and archive format. This strategy has been proved and expanded from experience on the X-33 vehicle.

  18. Bayesian model selection for a finite element model of a large civil aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, F. M.; Rutherford, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Nine aircraft stiffness parameters have been varied and used as inputs to a finite element model of an aircraft to generate natural frequency and deflection features (Goge, 2003). This data set (147 input parameter configurations and associated outputs) is now used to generate a metamodel, or a fast running surrogate model, using Bayesian model selection methods. Once a forward relationship is defined, the metamodel may be used in an inverse sense. That is, knowing the measured output frequencies and deflections, what were the input stiffness parameters that caused them?

  19. AQUIFEM-SALT; a finite-element model for aquifers containing a seawater interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    Described are modifications to AQUIFEM, a finite element areal ground-water flow model for aquifer evaluation. The modified model, AQUIFEM-SALT, simulates an aquifer containing a freshwater body that freely floats on seawater. Parts of the freshwater lens may be confined above and below by less permeable units. Theory, code modifications, and model verification are discussed. A modified input data list is included. This report is intended as a companion to the original AQUIFEM documentation. (USGS)

  20. A Finite-Element Model for Evaluation of Middle Ear Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    function. The computer model will be used for implant design. Keywords- Ossicular chain, finite element modeling, middle ear I. INTRODUCTION Defects...sound pressure level (SPL) was uniformly applied across the surface of the eardrum. The cochlear load was not modeled. III. RESULTS A. Displacement...ligamental attachments and the cochlear load. Eardrum displacement is found to be higher than stapes displacement, as expected. The simulated stapes

  1. Plan, formulate, and discuss a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christ, Richard A.; Ferg, Douglas A.; Kilroy, Kevin A.; Toossi, Mostafa; Weisenburger, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of modeling plan objectives, followed by a description of the AH-64A aircraft including all general features, major components, and primary and structure definitions are presented. Following the aircraft description, a discussion of the modeling guidelines and model checkout procedure are provided. The NASTRAN finite element analysis is set up to be suitable to predict both static internal loads and vibrations. Finally, the results, schedule, and planned versus actual manhours for this work are presented.

  2. A comparison of two finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics using a North Sea data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Werner, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Using the region of the English Channel and the southern bight of the North Sea, we systematically compare the results of two independent finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics. The model intercomparison provides a means for increasing our understanding of the relevant physical processes in the region in question as well as a means for the evaluation of certain algorithmic procedures of the two models. ?? 1989.

  3. Equivalent Continuum Finite Element Modelling of Plate-Like Space Lattice Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    regulation cost of the structure as a function of the structural design parameters. A micropolar plate continuum model of large plate-like repetitive space...lattice structures with rigid joints is derived. A plate finite element is derived based on this continuum model with micropolar rotations and transverse...by rigid joints which makes use of the higher order micropolar beam continuum formulation. 8 Detailed Models For this research the baseline against

  4. Material Models and Properties in the Finite Element Analysis of Knee Ligaments: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Galbusera, Fabio; Freutel, Maren; Dürselen, Lutz; D’Aiuto, Marta; Croce, Davide; Villa, Tomaso; Sansone, Valerio; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Knee ligaments are elastic bands of soft tissue with a complex microstructure and biomechanics, which are critical to determine the kinematics as well as the stress bearing behavior of the knee joint. Their correct implementation in terms of material models and properties is therefore necessary in the development of finite element models of the knee, which has been performed for decades for the investigation of both its basic biomechanics and the development of replacement implants and repair strategies for degenerative and traumatic pathologies. Indeed, a wide range of element types and material models has been used to represent knee ligaments, ranging from elastic unidimensional elements to complex hyperelastic three-dimensional structures with anatomically realistic shapes. This paper systematically reviews literature studies, which described finite element models of the knee, and summarizes the approaches, which have been used to model the ligaments highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25478560

  5. Finite Element Model for Failure Study of Two-Dimensional Triaxially Braided Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuetao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    A new three-dimensional finite element model of two-dimensional triaxially braided composites is presented in this paper. This meso-scale modeling technique is used to examine and predict the deformation and damage observed in tests of straight sided specimens. A unit cell based approach is used to take into account the braiding architecture as well as the mechanical properties of the fiber tows, the matrix and the fiber tow-matrix interface. A 0 deg / plus or minus 60 deg. braiding configuration has been investigated by conducting static finite element analyses. Failure initiation and progressive degradation has been simulated in the fiber tows by use of the Hashin failure criteria and a damage evolution law. The fiber tow-matrix interface was modeled by using a cohesive zone approach to capture any fiber-matrix debonding. By comparing the analytical results to those obtained experimentally, the applicability of the developed model was assessed and the failure process was investigated.

  6. Planning, creating and documenting a NASTRAN finite element model of a modern helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabal, R.; Reed, D.; Ricks, R.; Kesack, W.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code are widely used by the helicopter industry to calculate static internal loads and vibration of airframe structure. The internal loads are routinely used for sizing structural members. The vibration predictions are not yet relied on during design. NASA's Langley Research Center sponsored a program to conduct an application of the finite element method with emphasis on predicting structural vibration. The Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter was used as the modeling subject. The objective was to engender the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establish a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process.

  7. Planning, creating and documenting a NASTRAN finite element model of a modern-helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Reed, D.; Ricks, R.; Kesack, W.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code are widely used by the helicopter industry to calculate static internal loads and vibration of airframe structure. The internal loads are routinely used for sizing structural members. The vibration predictions are not yet relied on during design. NASA's Langley Research Center sponsored a program to conduct an application of the finite element method with emphasis on predicting structural vibration. The Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter was used as the modeling subject. The objective was used to engender the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establish a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process.

  8. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  9. Method for patient-specific finite element modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Tisch, Stephen; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Wårdell, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.

  10. Coupled multiphysics finite element model and experimental testing of a thermo-magnetically triggered piezoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon-Hernandez, Adrian; Basrour, Skandar

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the coupled multiphysics finite element modeling and the experimental testing of a thermo-magnetically triggered piezoelectric generator. The model presented here, which has been developed in ANSYS software and experimentally validated, promotes a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of proposed generator. Special attention was put into the coupled multiphysics interactions, for instance, the thermal-dependent demagnetization of soft magnetic material, the piezoelectric transduction and the output power. In order to characterize the power generator, many finite element simulations were conducted, included modal and transient analysis. To verify the effectiveness of the model, a prototype was built and tested. The findings thus obtained were compared with simulation results. Obtained results describe for the first time a fully coupled model of an innovative approach for thermomagnetic energy harvesting. Moreover, the total volume of our harvester (length × width × height: 20 × 4 × 2 mm) is 85 times lower than that of previous experimental harvester.

  11. Finite element modeling of mitral leaflet tissue using a layered shell approximation

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents a finite element model of mitral leaflet tissue, which incorporates the anisotropic material response and approximates the layered structure. First, continuum mechanics and the theory of layered composites are used to develop an analytical representation of membrane stress in the leaflet material. This is done with an existing anisotropic constitutive law from literature. Then, the concept is implemented in a finite element (FE) model by overlapping and merging two layers of transversely isotropic membrane elements in LS-DYNA, which homogenizes the response. The FE model is then used to simulate various biaxial extension tests and out-of-plane pressure loading. Both the analytical and FE model show good agreement with experimental biaxial extension data, and show good mutual agreement. This confirms that the layered composite approximation presented in the current study is able to capture the exponential stiffening seen in both the circumferential and radial directions of mitral leaflets. PMID:22971896

  12. A Computational Framework to Model Degradation of Biocorrodible Metal Stents Using an Implicit Finite Element Solver.

    PubMed

    Debusschere, Nic; Segers, Patrick; Dubruel, Peter; Verhegghe, Benedict; De Beule, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    Bioresorbable stents represent an emerging technological development within the field of cardiovascular angioplasty. Their temporary presence avoids long-term side effects of non-degradable stents such as in-stent restenosis, late stent thrombosis and fatigue induced strut fracture. Several numerical modelling strategies have been proposed to evaluate the transitional mechanical characteristics of biodegradable stents using a continuum damage framework. However, these methods rely on an explicit finite-element integration scheme which, in combination with the quasi-static nature of many simulations involving stents and the small element size needed to model corrosion mechanisms, results in a high computational cost. To reduce the simulation times and to expand the general applicability of these degradation models, this paper investigates an implicit finite element solution method to model degradation of biodegradable stents.

  13. Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs.

  14. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  15. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the aerostructures test wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  16. Finite element structural model of a large, thin, completely free, flat plate. [for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element structural model of a 30.48 m x 30.48 m x 2.54 mm completely free aluminum plate is described and modal frequencies and mode shape data for the first 44 modes are presented. An explanation of the procedure for using the data is also presented. The model should prove useful for the investigation of controller design approaches for large flexible space structures.

  17. A Monte Carlo-finite element model for strain energy controlled microstructural evolution - 'Rafting' in superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a specialized microstructural lattice model, MCFET (Monte Carlo finite element technique), which simulates microstructural evolution in materials in which strain energy has an important role in determining morphology. The model is capable of accounting for externally applied stress, surface tension, misfit, elastic inhomogeneity, elastic anisotropy, and arbitrary temperatures. The MCFET analysis was found to compare well with the results of analytical calculations of the equilibrium morphologies of isolated particles in an infinite matrix.

  18. Finite Element Modeling Used to Study Stress Distribution on the Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Nelson; Davis, Brian; Tajaddini, Azita

    2004-01-01

    A method to study the stress distribution inside the forefoot during walking was developed at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation by a researcher from the NASA Glenn Research Center. In this method, a semiautomated process was outlined to create a three-dimensional, patient-specific, finite element model (FEM) of the forefoot using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The images were processed in Matlab using the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification algorithm and Sobel edge detection to separate the different tissue types: bone, skin, fat, and muscle. This information was used to create curves and surfaces that were exported to an FEM preprocessor known as Truegrid. In Truegrid, eight-noded or brick elements were created by using surface mapping. The FEM was processed and postprocessed in Abaqus. Material properties of the models were obtained from past experiments such as fat pad confined compression, skin axial and biaxial tests, muscle in vivo compressive tests, and reference literature (bone properties). Nonlinear (hyperelastic) material models were used for the skin (epidermis and dermis), fat, and muscles; and a linear elastic model was used for the bones. Muscle activation during walking yielded uncertainties in the muscle material model since contracted muscles are stiffer than relaxed muscles. These uncertainties were resolved by performing a sensitivity analysis of the muscle material properties. The original properties were multiplied by arbitrary factors of 2, 3, 0.5, and 0.33. The strain and stress distributions, as well as the locations of peak values, were similar in all cases. The peak contact pressure P obtained for each case varied with respect to the applied factor f as follows:

  19. Static simulation and analyses of mower's ROPS behavior in a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ayers, P; Womac, A R

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this research was to numerically predict the maximum lateral force acting on a mower rollover protective structure (ROPS) and the energy absorbed by the ROPS during a lateral continuous roll. A finite element (FE) model of the ROPS was developed using elastic and plastic theories including nonlinear relationships between stresses and strains in the plastic deformation range. Model validation was performed using field measurements of ROPS behavior in a lateral continuous roll on a purpose-designed test slope. Field tests determined the maximum deformation of the ROPS of a 900 kg John Deere F925 mower with a 183 cm (72 in.) mowing deck during an actual lateral roll on a pad and on soil. In the FE model, lateral force was gradually added to the ROPS until the field-measured maximum deformation was achieved. The results from the FE analysis indicated that the top corners of the ROPS enter slightly into the plastic deformation region. Maximum lateral forces acting on the ROPS during the simulated impact with the pad and soil were 19650 N and 22850 N, respectively. The FE model predicted that the energy absorbed by the ROPS (643 J) in the lateral roll test on the pad was less than the static test requirements (1575 J) of Organization for Economic Development (OECD) Code 6. In addition, the energy absorbed by the ROPS (1813 J) in the test on the soil met the static test requirements (1575 J). Both the FE model and the field test results indicated that the deformed ROPS of the F925 mower with deck did not intrude into the occupant clearance zone during the lateral continuous or non-continuous roll.

  20. Sensitivity-based finite element model updating using constrained optimization with a trust region algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakir, Pelin Gundes; Reynders, Edwin; De Roeck, Guido

    2007-08-01

    The use of changes in dynamic system characteristics to detect damage has received considerable attention during the last years. Within this context, FE model updating technique, which belongs to the class of inverse problems in classical mechanics, is used to detect, locate and quantify damage. In this study, a sensitivity-based finite element (FE) model updating scheme using a trust region algorithm is developed and implemented in a complex structure. A damage scenario is applied on the structure in which the stiffness values of the beam elements close to the beam-column joints are decreased by stiffness reduction factors. A worst case and complex damage pattern is assumed such that the stiffnesses of adjacent elements are decreased by substantially different stiffness reduction factors. The objective of the model updating is to minimize the differences between the eigenfrequency and eigenmodes residuals. The updating parameters of the structure are the stiffness reduction factors. The changes of these parameters are determined iteratively by solving a nonlinear constrained optimization problem. The FE model updating algorithm is also tested in the presence of two levels of noise in simulated measurements. In all three cases, the updated MAC values are above 99% and the relative eigenfrequency differences improve substantially after model updating. In cases without noise and with moderate levels of noise; detection, localization and quantification of damage are successfully accomplished. In the case with substantially noisy measurements, detection and localization of damage are successfully realized. Damage quantification is also promising in the presence of high noise as the algorithm can still predict 18 out of 24 damage parameters relatively accurately in that case.

  1. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  2. Analysis of Uncertainty and Variability in Finite Element Computational Models for Biomedical Engineering: Characterization and Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Mangado, Nerea; Piella, Gemma; Noailly, Jérôme; Pons-Prats, Jordi; Ballester, Miguel Ángel González

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling has become a powerful tool in biomedical engineering thanks to its potential to simulate coupled systems. However, real parameters are usually not accurately known, and variability is inherent in living organisms. To cope with this, probabilistic tools, statistical analysis and stochastic approaches have been used. This article aims to review the analysis of uncertainty and variability in the context of finite element modeling in biomedical engineering. Characterization techniques and propagation methods are presented, as well as examples of their applications in biomedical finite element simulations. Uncertainty propagation methods, both non-intrusive and intrusive, are described. Finally, pros and cons of the different approaches and their use in the scientific community are presented. This leads us to identify future directions for research and methodological development of uncertainty modeling in biomedical engineering. PMID:27872840

  3. Analysis of Uncertainty and Variability in Finite Element Computational Models for Biomedical Engineering: Characterization and Propagation.

    PubMed

    Mangado, Nerea; Piella, Gemma; Noailly, Jérôme; Pons-Prats, Jordi; Ballester, Miguel Ángel González

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling has become a powerful tool in biomedical engineering thanks to its potential to simulate coupled systems. However, real parameters are usually not accurately known, and variability is inherent in living organisms. To cope with this, probabilistic tools, statistical analysis and stochastic approaches have been used. This article aims to review the analysis of uncertainty and variability in the context of finite element modeling in biomedical engineering. Characterization techniques and propagation methods are presented, as well as examples of their applications in biomedical finite element simulations. Uncertainty propagation methods, both non-intrusive and intrusive, are described. Finally, pros and cons of the different approaches and their use in the scientific community are presented. This leads us to identify future directions for research and methodological development of uncertainty modeling in biomedical engineering.

  4. Numerical implementation of energy-based models in finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    Soil is one of the most complex materials including several characteristics which are not only effect on stress-strain relationship but also volume changed such as contraction and dilation. Those characteristics depend on so many factors such as stress history, drained condition, current effective stress state, stress paths as well as void ratio, etc. In finite element analysis, the relevant constitutive model which includes relevant factors as mentioned above is one of the main key that will provide the accurate predicting of strength and deformation characteristic of geotechnical structure. For modern finite element program, the user-defined material subroutines have been provided when the material models included in the material library could not accurately predict the rather complex behavior of material. The objective of this study is to implement the elasto-plastic work-hardening-softening constitutive model into ABAQUS via VUMAT subroutine. The simulated results were verified by the experimental results of Toyoura sand under plane strain condition.

  5. An assessment of finite-element modeling techniques for thick-solid/thin-shell joints analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    The subject of finite-element modeling has long been of critical importance to the practicing designer/analyst who is often faced with obtaining an accurate and cost-effective structural analysis of a particular design. Typically, these two goals are in conflict. The purpose is to discuss the topic of finite-element modeling for solid/shell connections (joints) which are significant for the practicing modeler. Several approaches are currently in use, but frequently various assumptions restrict their use. Such techniques currently used in practical applications were tested, especially to see which technique is the most ideally suited for the computer aided design (CAD) environment. Some basic thoughts regarding each technique are also discussed. As a consequence, some suggestions based on the results are given to lead reliable results in geometrically complex joints where the deformation and stress behavior are complicated.

  6. Finite element modelling of the foot for clinical application: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behforootan, Sara; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis; Naemi, Roozbeh; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades finite element modelling has been widely used to give new insight on foot and footwear biomechanics. However its actual contribution for the improvement of the therapeutic outcome of different pathological conditions of the foot, such as the diabetic foot, remains relatively limited. This is mainly because finite element modelling has only been used within the research domain. Clinically applicable finite element modelling can open the way for novel diagnostic techniques and novel methods for treatment planning/optimisation which would significantly enhance clinical practice. In this context this review aims to provide an overview of modelling techniques in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics and to investigate their applicability in a clinical setting. Even though no integrated modelling system exists that could be directly used in the clinic and considerable progress is still required, current literature includes a comprehensive toolbox for future work towards clinically applicable finite element modelling. The key challenges include collecting the information that is needed for geometry design, the assignment of material properties and loading on a patient-specific basis and in a cost-effective and non-invasive way. The ultimate challenge for the implementation of any computational system into clinical practice is to ensure that it can produce reliable results for any person that belongs in the population for which it was developed. Consequently this highlights the need for thorough and extensive validation of each individual step of the modelling process as well as for the overall validation of the final integrated system.

  7. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  8. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  9. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF.

  10. Finite Element Modelling and Residual Stress Prediction in End Milling of Ti6Al4Valloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Sripathi, J.; Vijay, P.; Ramachandran, K. I.

    2016-09-01

    Titanium and its alloys are materials that exhibit unique combination of mechanical and physical properties that enable their usage in various fields. In spite of having a lot of advantages, their usage is limited because they are difficult to machine due to their inherent properties of high specific heat capacity, reactivity with tool and low thermal conductivity thereby causing excessive tool wear. To facilitate the process of machining, it becomes necessary to find out and relieve the residual stress caused during machining. Since experiments cannot be performed for each instance, creation of an FE model is desirable. In this paper a finite element analysis (FEA) of the machining of Ti6Al4V for different cutting speeds is presented. A 3D finite element model is developed with the Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) as the workpiece and a four flute carbide tip end mill cutter as the tool to predict the residual stress developed within the titanium alloy after machining. The finite element model utilises the Johnson-Cook model to depict the plasticity and the damage criteria and implements the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation to increase the accuracy of the model. The FE model has been developed and the findings are presented. The results indicate that residual stresses are maximum at the surface and decrease linearly along the depth and increase as the cutting speed and depth of cut are increased.

  11. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  12. Nonlinear quasi-static finite element simulations predict in vitro strength of human proximal femora assessed in a dynamic sideways fall setup.

    PubMed

    Varga, Peter; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Fliri-Hofmann, Ladina; Widmer, Daniel; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporotic proximal femur fractures are caused by low energy trauma, typically when falling on the hip from standing height. Finite element simulations, widely used to predict the fracture load of femora in fall, usually include neither mass-related inertial effects, nor the viscous part of bone׳s material behavior. The aim of this study was to elucidate if quasi-static non-linear homogenized finite element analyses can predict in vitro mechanical properties of proximal femora assessed in dynamic drop tower experiments. The case-specific numerical models of 13 femora predicted the strength (R(2)=0.84, SEE=540N, 16.2%), stiffness (R(2)=0.82, SEE=233N/mm, 18.0%) and fracture energy (R(2)=0.72, SEE=3.85J, 39.6%); and provided fair qualitative matches with the fracture patterns. The influence of material anisotropy was negligible for all predictions. These results suggest that quasi-static homogenized finite element analysis may be used to predict mechanical properties of proximal femora in the dynamic sideways fall situation.

  13. Seismic damage analysis of the outlet piers of arch dams using the finite element sub-model method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liangfeng; Wu, Mingxin; Wang, Jinting; Xu, Yanjie

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to analyze seismic damage of reinforced outlet piers of arch dams by the nonlinear finite element (FE) sub-model method. First, the dam-foundation system is modeled and analyzed, in which the effects of infinite foundation, contraction joints, and nonlinear concrete are taken into account. The detailed structures of the outlet pier are then simulated with a refined FE model in the sub-model analysis. In this way the damage mechanism of the plain (unreinforced) outlet pier is analyzed, and the effects of two reinforcement measures (i.e., post-tensioned anchor cables and reinforcing bar) on the dynamic damage to the outlet pier are investigated comprehensively. Results show that the plain pier is damaged severely by strong earthquakes while implementation of post-tensioned anchor cables strengthens the pier effectively. In addition, radiation damping strongly alleviates seismic damage to the piers.

  14. Dynamic Modelling of Tooth Deformation Using Occlusal Kinematics and Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental biomechanics based on finite element (FE) analysis is attracting enormous interest in dentistry, biology, anthropology and palaeontology. Nonetheless, several shortcomings in FE modeling exist, mainly due to unrealistic loading conditions. In this contribution we used kinematics information recorded in a virtual environment derived from occlusal contact detection between high resolution models of an upper and lower human first molar pair (M1 and M1, respectively) to run a non-linear dynamic FE crash colliding test. Methodology MicroCT image data of a modern human skull were segmented to reconstruct digital models of the antagonistic right M1 and M1 and the dental supporting structures. We used the Occlusal Fingerprint Analyser software to reconstruct the individual occlusal pathway trajectory during the power stroke of the chewing cycle, which was applied in a FE simulation to guide the M1 3D-path for the crash colliding test. Results FE analysis results showed that the stress pattern changes considerably during the power stroke, demonstrating that knowledge about chewing kinematics in conjunction with a morphologically detailed FE model is crucial for understanding tooth form and function under physiological conditions. Conclusions/Significance Results from such advanced dynamic approaches will be applicable to evaluate and avoid mechanical failure in prosthodontics/endodontic treatments, and to test material behavior for modern tooth restoration in dentistry. This approach will also allow us to improve our knowledge in chewing-related biomechanics for functional diagnosis and therapy, and it will help paleoanthropologists to illuminate dental adaptive processes and morphological modifications in human evolution. PMID:27031836

  15. Development and Validation of Statistical Models of Femur Geometry for Use with Parametric Finite Element Models.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katelyn F; Hu, Jingwen; Reed, Matthew P; Hoff, Carrie N; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Statistical models were developed that predict male and female femur geometry as functions of age, body mass index (BMI), and femur length as part of an effort to develop lower-extremity finite element models with geometries that are parametric with subject characteristics. The process for developing these models involved extracting femur geometry from clinical CT scans of 62 men and 36 women, fitting a template finite element femur mesh to the surface geometry of each patient, and then programmatically determining thickness at each nodal location. Principal component analysis was then performed on the thickness and geometry nodal coordinates, and linear regression models were developed to predict principal component scores as functions of age, BMI, and femur length. The average absolute errors in male and female external surface geometry model predictions were 4.57 and 4.23 mm, and the average absolute errors in male and female thickness model predictions were 1.67 and 1.74 mm. The average error in midshaft cortical bone areas between the predicted geometries and the patient geometries was 4.4%. The average error in cortical bone area between the predicted geometries and a validation set of cadaver femur geometries across 5 shaft locations was 2.9%.

  16. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  17. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  18. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  19. Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling Based on a Harmonic Field for Patient-Specific Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wanqiu; Zou, Beiji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study examined the influence of anisotropic material for human sclera. Method. First, the individual geometry of patient-specific sclera was reproduced from a laser scan. Then, high quality finite element modeling of individual sclera was performed using a convenient automatic hexahedral mesh generator based on harmonic field and integrated with anisotropic material assignment function. Finally, comparison experiments were designed to investigate the effects of anisotropy on finite element modeling of sclera biomechanics. Results. The experimental results show that the presented approach can generate high quality anisotropic hexahedral mesh for patient-specific sclera. Conclusion. The anisotropy shows significant differences for stresses and strain distribution and careful consideration should be given to its use in biomechanical FE studies. PMID:28271067

  20. User manual for ATILA, a finite-element code for modeling piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decarpigny, Jean-Noel; Debus, Jean-Claude

    1987-09-01

    This manual for the user of the finite-element code ATILA provides instruction for entering information and running the code on a VAX computer. The manual does not include the code. The finite element code ATILA has been specifically developed to aid the design of piezoelectric devices, mainly for sonar applications. Thus, it is able to perform the model analyses of both axisymmetrical and fully three-dimensional piezoelectric transducers. It can also provide their harmonic response under radiating conditions: nearfield and farfield pressure, transmitting voltage response, directivity pattern, electrical impedance, as well as displacement field, nodal plane positions, stress field and various stress criteria...Its accuracy and its ability to describe the physical behavior of various transducers (Tonpilz transducers, double headmass symmetrical length expanders, free flooded rings, flextensional transducers, bender bars, cylindrical and trilaminar hydrophones...) have been checked by modelling more than twenty different structures and comparing numerical and experimental results.

  1. Planetary gear modal vibration experiments and correlation against lumped-parameter and finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Tristan M.; Parker, Robert G.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental modal analysis techniques are applied to characterize the planar dynamic behavior of two spur planetary gears. Rotational and translational vibrations of the sun gear, carrier, and planet gears are measured. Experimentally obtained natural frequencies, mode shapes, and dynamic response are compared to the results from lumped-parameter and finite element models. Two qualitatively different classes of mode shapes in distinct frequency ranges are observed in the experiments and confirmed by the lumped-parameter model, which considers the accessory shafts and fixtures in the system to capture all of the natural frequencies and modes. The finite element model estimates the high-frequency modes that have significant tooth mesh deflection without considering the shafts and fixtures. The lumped-parameter and finite element models accurately predict the natural frequencies and modal properties established by experimentation. Rotational, translational, and planet mode types presented in published mathematical studies are confirmed experimentally. The number and types of modes in the low-frequency and high-frequency bands depend on the degrees of freedom in the central members and planet gears, respectively. The accuracy of natural frequency prediction is improved when the planet bearings have differing stiffnesses in the tangential and radial directions, consistent with the bearing load direction.

  2. A finite element formulation for modeling dynamic wetting on flexible substrates and in deformable porous media.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Cairncross, Richard A.; Madasu, S.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes research advances pursued with award funding issued by the DOE to Drexel University through the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) program. Professor Rich Cairncross was the recipient of this award in 1997. With it he pursued two related research topics under Sandia's guidance that address the outstanding issue of fluid-structural interactions of liquids with deformable solid materials, focusing mainly on the ubiquitous dynamic wetting problem. The project focus in the first four years was aimed at deriving a predictive numerical modeling approach for the motion of the dynamic contact line on a deformable substrate. A formulation of physical model equations was derived in the context of the Galerkin finite element method in an arbitrary Lagrangian/Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference. The formulation was successfully integrated in Sandia's Goma finite element code and tested on several technologically important thin-film coating problems. The model equations, the finite-element implementation, and results from several applications are given in this report. In the last year of the five-year project the same physical concepts were extended towards the problem of capillary imbibition in deformable porous media. A synopsis of this preliminary modeling and experimental effort is also discussed.

  3. Fracture toughness determination of dental materials by laboratory testing and finite element models.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, R M; Beatty, M W

    1995-03-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of finite element analysis in predicting the stress intensity factor (KIC) for three types of dental materials: a glass ionomer, a dental amalgam, and a composite resin. Laboratory tests were conducted on small single-edge notch specimens loaded in three-point bending to determine values for fracture toughness (KQ). Using the dimensions measured for each laboratory specimen, a J integral approach was employed to calculate KIC using finite element analysis. Both two-dimensional plane strain and three-dimensional models were used in determining KIC for each specimen, and these values were compared to the KQ values obtained from laboratory tests. The results indicated that no significant differences existed between laboratory results and those obtained from both two- and three-dimensional finite element models (P > .85). For the three-dimensional model, values for KIC were found to vary across the specimen thickness, with the values at the center of the specimen closely paralleling those obtained from the two-dimensional plane strain model. It was concluded that the two-dimensional plane strain J integral technique was as effective as the three-dimensional technique in calculating values for KIC.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of Viscoelastic Behavior and Interface Damage in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Interface Damage in Adhesively Bonded Joints Feifei Cheng, Ö. Özgü Özsoy and J.N. Reddy* Advanced Computational Mechanics Laboratory, Department of...the adhesive and damage analysis of adhesive-adherend interfaces in adhesively bonded joints. First, viscoelastic finite element analysis of a model...nominal stress criterion and mixed-mode energy criterion are used to determine the damage initiation and evolution at the interface, respectively

  5. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  6. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  7. Fission-Fusion Adaptivity in Finite Elements for Nonlinear Dynamics of Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-30

    where mesh refinement will prove useful. In fact, the deviation of a bilinear element from a smooth shell midsurface can be related to the angle between...comparisons with nonadaptive meshes. Conclusions and further discussions are given in Section 6. -5- 2. FINITE ELEMENT FORMULATION The shape of the midsurface ...8217 22 , and e3 is defined so that e, and e2 are tangent to the midsurface and rotate with the element; 2. for each node, a triad b i is defined so that

  8. Closed form expressions for a consistent stress material nonlinear finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipe, Richard Lee

    Finite element expressions for two dimensional elasto-plasticity problems were implemented in closed form. These closed form expressions are based upon a distribution of the elasto-plastic constitutive relationship that is consistent with the interpolating functions used for the displacement. Closed form expressions for the element tangent stiffness matrix and initial stress nodal load vector were developed for the non hierarchic constant, linear, and quadratic strain triangle. Decreased solution times were obtained when using the closed form expressions instead of expressions based on numerical integration. The quality of the solutions obtained from the closed form expressions was measured against published solutions for two dimensional elasto-plasticity problems.

  9. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  10. The finite element method for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, B; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative ultrasound for bone assessment is based on the correlations between ultrasonic parameters and the properties (mechanical and physical) of cancellous bone. To elucidate the correlations, understanding the physics of ultrasound in cancellous bone is demanded. Micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been so far utilized as one of the approaches in this regard. However, the FDTD method accompanies two disadvantages: staircase sampling of cancellous bone by finite difference grids leads to generation of wave artifacts at the solid-fluid interface inside the bone; additionally, this method cannot explicitly satisfy the needed perfect-slip conditions at the interface. To overcome these disadvantages, the finite element method (FEM) is proposed in this study. Three-dimensional finite element models of six water-saturated cancellous bone samples with different bone volume were created. The values of speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) were calculated through the finite element simulations of ultrasound propagation in each sample. Comparing the results with other experimental and simulation studies demonstrated the capabilities of the FEM for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound in water-saturated cancellous bone.

  11. Distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P; Hanson, Floyd B

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method. The dynamic model comprises system of three coupled reaction-diffusion models, involving the tumor cells, the normal tissues and the drug concentration. An optimal control problem is formulated with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell density and reducing the side effects of the drug. A distributed parameters method based on the application of variational calculus is used on an integral-Hamiltonian, which is then used to obtain an optimal coupled system of forward state equations and backward co-state equations. The Galerkin finite element method is used to realistically represent the brain structure as well as to facilitate computation. Finally a three-dimensional test case is considered and partitioned into a set of spherical finite elements, using tri-linear basis functions, except for the elements affected by singularities of polar and azimuthal angles, as well as the origin.

  12. Selection of finite-element mesh parameters in modeling the growth of hydraulic fracturing cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurguzov, V. D.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of the mesh geometry on the accuracy of solutions obtained by the finite-element method for problems of linear fracture mechanics is investigated. The guidelines have been formulated for constructing an optimum mesh for several routine problems involving elements with linear and quadratic approximation of displacements. The accuracy of finite-element solutions is estimated based on the degree of the difference between the calculated stress-intensity factor (SIF) and its value obtained analytically. In problems of hydrofracturing of oil-bearing formation, the pump-in pressure of injected water produces a distributed load on crack flanks as opposed to standard fracture mechanics problems that have analytical solutions, where a load is applied to the external boundaries of the computational region and the cracks themselves are kept free from stresses. Some model pressure profiles, as well as pressure profiles taken from real hydrodynamic computations, have been considered. Computer models of cracks with allowance for the pre-stressed state, fracture toughness, and elastic properties of materials are developed in the MSC.Marc 2012 finite-element analysis software. The Irwin force criterion is used as a criterion of brittle fracture and the SIFs are computed using the Cherepanov-Rice invariant J-integral. The process of crack propagation in a linearly elastic isotropic body is described in terms of the elastic energy release rate G and modeled using the VCCT (Virtual Crack Closure Technique) approach. It has been found that the solution accuracy is sensitive to the mesh configuration. Several parameters that are decisive in constructing effective finite-element meshes, namely, the minimum element size, the distance between mesh nodes in the vicinity of a crack tip, and the ratio of the height of an element to its length, have been established. It has been shown that a mesh that consists of only small elements does not improve the accuracy of the solution.

  13. Correlation of experimental data and three-dimensional finite element modeling of a spinning magnet array

    SciTech Connect

    Lorimer, W.L.; Lieu, D.K.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Drag forces due to eddy currents induced by the relative motion of a conductor and a magnetic field occur in many practical devices: motors, brakes, magnetic bearings, and magnetically levitated vehicles. Here, a magnet array was spun above an aluminum disk, and the drag torque was measured for various speeds and gap sizes. Drag torques calculated using a three-dimensional finite element program were consistent with measured values. The finite element model was also used to determine the effects of the polarity and position of magnets in the source array. The peak torque was shown to occur when magnets are located at a radius equal to 70% of the disk radius. A magnet array with alternate magnets reversed was shown to produce more than twice the drag of an array comprised of parallel magnets. An approximation for fields under the magnet centers was obtained using a two-dimensional analytical solution.

  14. Thermoviscoelastic finite element modeling of laser-generated ultrasound in viscoelastic plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi

    2010-12-15

    Laser-generated ultrasound in a thin composite plate with thermoviscoelastic property has been studied quantitatively. According to thermoviscoelastic theory, considering the viscoelastic and thermophysical properties of materials, a numerical model for the laser-generated Lamb waves is established in the frequency domain by using a finite element method. It is confirmed that the temperature and displacement fields calculated in the frequency domain coincide well with those obtained in the time domain. In the numerical simulations of thermoviscoelastically generated Lamb waves, the effects of viscoelastic and elastic stiffness moduli, and the thickness of the materials have been taken into account in details. The characteristics of the Lamb waves in the numerical results agree well with the features of the disperse curves. The results show that the finite element method in this paper provides a useful technique to characterize mechanical properties of composite materials.

  15. Subject-specific multi-validation of a finite element model of ovine cervical functional spinal units.

    PubMed

    Mengoni, Marlène; Vasiljeva, Ksenija; Jones, Alison C; Tarsuslugil, Sami M; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2016-01-25

    The complex motion and geometry of the spine in the cervical region makes it difficult to determine how loads are distributed through adjacent vertebrae or between the zygapophysial (facet) joints and the intervertebral disc. Validated finite element modes can give insight on this distribution. The aim of this contribution was to produce direct validation of subject-specific finite element models of Functional Spinal Units (FSU׳s) of the cervical spine and to evaluate the importance of including fibre directionality in the mechanical description of the annulus fibrosus. Eight specimens of cervical FSU׳s were prepared from five ovine spines and mechanically tested in axial compression monitoring overall load and displacements as well as local facet joints pressure and displacement. Subject-specific finite element models were produced from microCT image data reproducing the experimental setup and measuring global axial force and displacement as well as local facet joints displacement and contact forces. Material models and parameters were taken from the literature, testing isotropic and anisotropic materials for the annulus fibrosus. The validated models showed that adding the direction of the fibres to their non-linear behaviour in the description of the annulus fibrosus improves the predictions at large strain values but not at low strain values. The load transferred through the facet joints was always accurate, irrespective of the annulus material model, while the predicted facet displacement was larger than the measured one but not significantly. This is, to the authors׳ knowledge, the first subject-specific direct validation study on a group of specimens, accounting for inter-subject variability.

  16. Simulation of planar soft tissues using a structural constitutive model: Finite element implementation and validation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-06-27

    Computational implementation of physical and physiologically realistic constitutive models is critical for numerical simulation of soft biological tissues in a variety of biomedical applications. It is well established that the highly nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical behaviors of soft tissues are an emergent behavior of the underlying tissue microstructure. In the present study, we have implemented a structural constitutive model into a finite element framework specialized for membrane tissues. We noted that starting with a single element subjected to uniaxial tension, the non-fibrous tissue matrix must be present to prevent unrealistic tissue deformations. Flexural simulations were used to set the non-fibrous matrix modulus because fibers have little effects on tissue deformation under three-point bending. Multiple deformation modes were simulated, including strip biaxial, planar biaxial with two attachment methods, and membrane inflation. Detailed comparisons with experimental data were undertaken to insure faithful simulations of both the macro-level stress-strain insights into adaptations of the fiber architecture under stress, such as fiber reorientation and fiber recruitment. Results indicated a high degree of fidelity and demonstrated interesting microstructural adaptions to stress and the important role of the underlying tissue matrix. Moreover, we apparently resolve a discrepancy in our 1997 study (Billiar and Sacks, 1997. J. Biomech. 30 (7), 753-756) where we observed that under strip biaxial stretch the simulated fiber splay responses were not in good agreement with the experimental results, suggesting non-affine deformations may have occurred. However, by correctly accounting for the isotropic phase of the measured fiber splay, good agreement was obtained. While not the final word, these simulations suggest that affine fiber kinematics for planar collagenous tissues is a reasonable assumption at the macro level. Simulation tools such as these are

  17. Finite element models predict the location of microdamage in cancellous bone following uniaxial loading.

    PubMed

    Goff, M G; Lambers, F M; Sorna, R M; Keaveny, T M; Hernandez, C J

    2015-11-26

    High-resolution finite element models derived from micro-computed tomography images are often used to study the effects of trabecular microarchitecture and loading mode on tissue stress, but the degree to which existing finite element methods correctly predict the location of tissue failure is not well characterized. In the current study, we determined the relationship between the location of highly strained tissue, as determined from high-resolution finite element models, and the location of tissue microdamage, as determined from three-dimensional fluoroscopy imaging, which was performed after the microdamage was generated in-vitro by mechanical testing. Fourteen specimens of human vertebral cancellous bone were assessed (8 male donors, 2 female donors, 47-78 years of age). Regions of stained microdamage, were 50-75% more likely to form in highly strained tissue (principal strains exceeding 0.4%) than elsewhere, and generally the locations of the regions of microdamage were significantly correlated (p<0.05) with the locations of highly strained tissue. This spatial correlation was stronger for the largest regions of microdamage (≥1,000,000μm(3) in volume); 87% of large regions of microdamage were located near highly strained tissue. Together, these findings demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between regions of microdamage and regions of high strain in human cancellous bone, particularly for the biomechanically more important large instances of microdamage.

  18. A finite element modeling of a multifunctional hybrid composite beam with viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-04-01

    The multifunctional hybrid composite structure studied here consists of a ceramic outer layer capable of withstanding high temperatures, a functionally graded ceramic layer combining shape memory alloy (SMA) properties of NiTi together with Ti2AlC (called Graded Ceramic/Metal Composite, or GCMeC), and a high temperature sensor patch, followed by a polymer matrix composite laced with vascular cooling channels all held together with various epoxies. Due to the recoverable nature of SMA and adhesive properties of Ti2AlC, the damping behavior of the GCMeC is largely viscoelastic. This paper presents a finite element formulation for this multifunctional hybrid structure with embedded viscoelastic material. In order to implement the viscoelastic model into the finite element formulation, a second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to describe the viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification, a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. The curve-fitting aspects of both GHM and ADF show good agreement with experimental data obtained from dynamic mechanics analysis. The performance of the finite element of the layered multifunctional beam is verified through experimental model analysis.

  19. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number.

  20. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  1. Dynamic finite element simulations of composite stiffened panels with a transverse-isotropic viscoelastic energy dissipation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas; Doreille, Mathias; Merazzi, Silvio; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for predicting the damped response and energy dissipation of laminated composite structures, subjected to dynamic loads. Starting from simple coupon tests to characterize the material, the numerical simulation of damping properties is made possible by a novel linear viscoelastic model that has been developed and implemented in the finite element code B2000++. A nonlinear optimization procedure is adopted to fit experimental data and define the exponential Maxwell parameter model. To illustrate the potentialities of the method, the post-buckling analysis of a relatively complex aeronautical panel is presented, accounting not only for geometric nonlinearities, but also for viscoelastic effects. The results illustrate the effects due to material dissipation, their relation to the effects of inertia, and the influence of geometric imperfections on the response of the panel.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of In-Situ Stresses near Salt Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, P.; Gray, G.; Albertz, M.

    2011-12-01

    The in-situ stress field is modified around salt bodies because salt rock has no ability to sustain shear stresses. A reliable prediction of stresses near salt is important for planning safe and economic drilling programs. A better understanding of in-situ stresses before drilling can be achieved using finite element models that account for the creeping salt behavior and the elastoplastic response of the surrounding sediments. Two different geomechanical modeling techniques can be distinguished: "dynamic" modeling and "static" modeling. "Dynamic" models, also known as forward models, simulate the development of structural processes in geologic time. This technique provides the evolution of stresses and so it is used to simulate the initiation and development of structural features, such as, faults, folds, fractures, and salt diapers. The original or initial configuration and the unknown final configuration of forward models are usually significantly different therefore geometric non-linearities need to be considered. These models may be difficult to constrain when different tectonic, deposition, and erosion events, and the timing among them, needs to be accounted for. While dynamic models provide insight into the stress evolution, in many cases is very challenging, if not impossible, to forward model a configuration to its known present-day geometry; particularly in the case of salt layers that evolve into highly irregular and complex geometries. Alternatively, "static" models use the present-day geometry and present-day far-field stresses to estimate the present-day in-situ stress field inside a domain. In this case, it is appropriate to use a small deformation approach because initial and final configurations should be very similar, and more important, because the equilibrium of stresses should be stated in the present-day initial configuration. The initial stresses and the applied boundary conditions are constrained by the geologic setting and available data

  3. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi; Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon; Laghrouche, Omar

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  4. Finite element modeling of bending failure at HPFRC plates using 2-dimensional isoparametric element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisnamurti, Soehardjono, Agoes; Zacoeb, Achfas; Wibowo, Ari

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents finite element modeling of the bending failure on High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC) plate subjected to monotonic loading. Plate analysis is commonly used approach to plate bending theory. The results are sometimes less in accordance with laboratory tests. The aim of this study is to analyze the behavior of bending until failure which occurred at HPFRC plate, and load-displacement relation caused by variations of plate depth. Analysis carried out by 2-D isoparametric finite element method, with the approach of plane strain condition. The analysis was done by decreasing the stiffness of plate elements layer gradually in accordance with the development of maximum stress in the element due to workload. The rigidity of plate elements layer will be close to zero when maximum stress reaches a maximum tensile strength of HPFRC. Validation testing program conducted on plate specimen with a span length of 600 mm, width 300 mm and thickness variation of 40 mm, 50 mm and 60 mm. HPFRC compressive strength is 93.045 MPa, and splitting tensile strength is 6.018 MPa. Test performed with four points bending pattern at a distance of 1/3 span length. Comparison between the calculation by the finite element method and laboratory testing showed very consistent results.

  5. Parallel eigenanalysis of finite element models in a completely connected architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, F. A.; Morel, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel algorithm is presented for the solution of the generalized eigenproblem in linear elastic finite element analysis, (K)(phi) = (M)(phi)(omega), where (K) and (M) are of order N, and (omega) is order of q. The concurrent solution of the eigenproblem is based on the multifrontal/modified subspace method and is achieved in a completely connected parallel architecture in which each processor is allowed to communicate with all other processors. The algorithm was successfully implemented on a tightly coupled multiple-instruction multiple-data parallel processing machine, Cray X-MP. A finite element model is divided into m domains each of which is assumed to process n elements. Each domain is then assigned to a processor or to a logical processor (task) if the number of domains exceeds the number of physical processors. The macrotasking library routines are used in mapping each domain to a user task. Computational speed-up and efficiency are used to determine the effectiveness of the algorithm. The effect of the number of domains, the number of degrees-of-freedom located along the global fronts and the dimension of the subspace on the performance of the algorithm are investigated. A parallel finite element dynamic analysis program, p-feda, is documented and the performance of its subroutines in parallel environment is analyzed.

  6. A preliminary investigation of finite-element modeling for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    The results from an initial phase of an in-house study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of elastic couplings are presented. Large degree of freedom shell finite element models of an extension twist coupled composite tube were developed and analyzed using MSC/NASTRAN. An analysis employing a simplified beam finite element representation of the specimen with the equivalent engineering stiffness was additionally performed. Results from the shell finite element normal modes and frequency analysis were compared to those obtained experimentally, showing an agreement within 13 percent. There was appreciable degradation in the frequency prediction for the torsional mode, which is elastically coupled. This was due to the absence of off-diagonal coupling terms in the formulation of the equivalent engineering stiffness. Parametric studies of frequency variation due to small changes in ply orientation angle and ply thickness were also performed. Results showed linear frequency variations less than 2 percent per 1 degree variation in the ply orientation angle, and 1 percent per 0.0001 inch variation in the ply thickness.

  7. Manual for automatic generation of finite element models of spiral bevel gears in mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Reddy, S.; Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop computer programs that generate finite element models suitable for doing 3D contact analysis of faced milled spiral bevel gears in mesh. A pinion tooth and a gear tooth are created and put in mesh. There are two programs: Points.f and Pat.f to perform the analysis. Points.f is based on the equation of meshing for spiral bevel gears. It uses machine tool settings to solve for an N x M mesh of points on the four surfaces, pinion concave and convex, and gear concave and convex. Points.f creates the file POINTS.OUT, an ASCI file containing N x M points for each surface. (N is the number of node points along the length of the tooth, and M is nodes along the height.) Pat.f reads POINTS.OUT and creates the file tl.out. Tl.out is a series of PATRAN input commands. In addition to the mesh density on the tooth face, additional user specified variables are the number of finite elements through the thickness, and the number of finite elements along the tooth full fillet. A full fillet is assumed to exist for both the pinion and gear.

  8. Development of Modeling and Simulation for Magnetic Particle Inspection Using Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun-Youl

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a widely used nondestructive inspection method for aerospace applications essentially limited to experiment-based approaches. The analysis of MPI characteristics that affect sensitivity and reliability contributes not only reductions in inspection design cost and time but also improvement of analysis of experimental data. Magnetic particles are easily attracted toward a high magnetic field gradient. Selection of a magnetic field source, which produces a magnetic field gradient large enough to detect a defect in a test sample or component, is an important factor in magnetic particle inspection. In this work a finite element method (FEM) has been employed for numerical calculation of the MPI simulation technique. The FEM method is known to be suitable for complicated geometries such as defects in samples. This thesis describes the research that is aimed at providing a quantitative scientific basis for magnetic particle inspection. A new FEM solver for MPI simulation has been developed in this research for not only nonlinear reversible permeability materials but also irreversible hysteresis materials that are described by the Jiles-Atherton model. The material is assumed to have isotropic ferromagnetic properties in this research (i.e., the magnetic properties of the material are identical in all directions in a single crystal). In the research, with a direct current field mode, an MPI situation has been simulated to measure the estimated volume of magnetic particles around defect sites before and after removing any external current fields. Currently, this new MPI simulation package is limited to solving problems with the single current source from either a solenoid or an axial directional current rod.

  9. Estimation of periodontal ligament’s equivalent mechanical parameters for finite element modeling

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zeyang; Jiang, Feifei; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Young’s modulus (E) and Poisson’s ratio (v) of the periodontal ligament are needed in a finite element analysis for investigating the biomechanical behavior of a tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex. However, large discrepancies in E (0.01–1,750 MPa) and v (0.28–0.49) were reported previously. The objective of this study was to narrow the ranges and to provide equivalent E and v pairs suitable for finite element modeling of a tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex by using a reported crown load-displacement relationship as the criterion. Methods A 3-dimensional finite element model of a 3-tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex, consisting of a maxillary central incisor with 2 adjacent teeth, from a cone-beam computed tomography scan was created. The dimensions, constraints, and loading condition were kept similar to those reported in the human study. With the load applied to the crown, both v and E were adjusted independently, and the corresponding crown displacements were calculated. The resulting load-displacement curves were compared with those reported in the human study. The mean absolute displacement difference method was used to find the best fit. The E and v pairs that generated the minimum mean absolute displacement difference were identified. Results The finite element model with 1 of the 3 E and v pairs (v = 0.35, E = 0.87 MPa; v = 0.4, E = 0.71 MPa; and v = 0.45, E = 0.47 MPa) simulated the tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex well. The mean absolute displacement differences were 0.0135, 0.0138, and 0.0138 mm, respectively; these are less than 8% of 0.175 mm, which was the crown displacement of the tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex under the load of 500 cN. Conclusions The E and v values close to the 3 pairs might be used for finite element modeling of the tooth, periodontal ligament, and bone complex. PMID:23561409

  10. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  11. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  12. A musculo-mechanical model of esophageal transport based on an immersed boundary-finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-11-01

    This work extends a fiber-based immersed boundary (IB) model of esophageal transport by incorporating a continuum model of the deformable esophageal wall. The continuum-based esophagus model adopts finite element approach that is capable of describing more complex and realistic material properties and geometries. The leakage from mismatch between Lagrangian and Eulerian meshes resulting from large deformations of the esophageal wall is avoided by careful choice of interaction points. The esophagus model, which is described as a multi-layered, fiber-reinforced nonlinear elastic material, is coupled to bolus and muscle-activation models using the IB approach to form the esophageal transport model. Cases of esophageal transport with different esophagus models are studied. Results on the transport characteristics, including pressure field and esophageal wall kinematics and stress, are analyzed and compared. Support from NIH grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 is gratefully acknowledged. BEG is supported by NSF award ACI 1460334.

  13. Explicit mixed strain-displacement finite element for dynamic geometrically non-linear solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafontaine, N. M.; Rossi, R.; Cervera, M.; Chiumenti, M.

    2015-03-01

    Low-order finite elements face inherent limitations related to their poor convergence properties. Such difficulties typically manifest as mesh-dependent or excessively stiff behaviour when dealing with complex problems. A recent proposal to address such limitations is the adoption of mixed displacement-strain technologies which were shown to satisfactorily address both problems. Unfortunately, although appealing, the use of such element technology puts a large burden on the linear algebra, as the solution of larger linear systems is needed. In this paper, the use of an explicit time integration scheme for the solution of the mixed strain-displacement problem is explored as an alternative. An algorithm is devised to allow the effective time integration of the mixed problem. The developed method retains second order accuracy in time and is competitive in terms of computational cost with the standard irreducible formulation.

  14. IFEMS, an Interactive Finite Element Modeling System Using a CAD/CAM System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckellip, S.; Schuman, T.; Lauer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of coupling a CAD/CAM system with a general purpose finite element mesh generator is described. The three computer programs which make up the interactive finite element graphics system are discussed.

  15. Techniques for modeling muscle-induced forces in finite element models of skeletal structures.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Ian R; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Coletta, Chris; Tolleson, Alex

    2007-09-01

    This work introduces two mechanics-based approaches to modeling muscle forces exerted on curvilinear bone structures and compares the results with two traditional ad hoc methods of muscle loading. These new models use a combination of tensile, tangential, and normal traction loads to account for muscle fibers wrapped around curved bone surfaces. A computer program was written to interface with a commercial finite element analysis tool to automatically apply traction loads to surface faces of elements in muscle attachment regions according to the various muscle modeling methods. We modeled a highly complex skeletal structure, the skull of a Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), to compare the four muscle-loading methods. While reasonable qualitative agreement was found in the states of stress of the skull between the four muscle load modeling methods, there were substantial quantitative differences predicted in the stress states in some high stressed regions of the skull. Furthermore, our mechanics-based models required significantly less total applied muscle force to generate a bite-point reaction force identical to those produced by the ad hoc muscle loading models. Although the methods are not validated by in vivo data, we submit that muscle-load modeling methods that account for the underlying physics of muscle wrapping on curved bone surfaces are likely to provide more realistic results than ad hoc approaches that do not. We also note that, due to the geometric complexity of many bone structures--such as the skull analyzed here--load transmission paths are difficult to conceptualize a priori. Consequently, it is difficult to predict spatially where the results of finite element analyses are likely to be compromised by using ad hoc muscle modeling methods. For these reasons, it is recommended that a mechanics-based method be adopted for determination of the proper traction loads to be applied to skeletal structures due to muscular activity.

  16. Simulation of dynamic fracture using peridynamics, finite element modeling, and contact.

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John

    2010-11-01

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical solid mechanics that allows for the modeling of bodies in which discontinuities occur spontaneously. Because the peridynamic expression for the balance of linear momentum does not contain spatial derivatives and is instead based on an integral equation, it is well suited for modeling phenomena involving spatial discontinuities such as crack formation and fracture. In this study, both peridynamics and classical finite element analysis are applied to simulate material response under dynamic blast loading conditions. A combined approach is utilized in which the portion of the simulation modeled with peridynamics interacts with the finite element portion of the model via a contact algorithm. The peridynamic portion of the analysis utilizes an elastic-plastic constitutive model with linear hardening. The peridynamic interface to the constitutive model is based on the calculation of an approximate deformation gradient, requiring the suppression of possible zero-energy modes. The classical finite element portion of the model utilizes a Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Simulation results are validated by direct comparison to expanding tube experiments. The coupled modeling approach successfully captures material response at the surface of the tube and the emerging fracture pattern. The coupling of peridynamics and finite element analysis via a contact algorithm has been shown to be a viable means for simulating material fracture in a high-velocity impact experiment. A combined peridynamics/finite element approach was applied to model an expanding tube experiment performed by Vogler, et al., in which loading on the tube is a result of Lexan slugs impacting inside the tube. The Lexan portion of the simulation was modeled with finite elements and a Johnson-Cook elastic-plastic material model in conjunction with an equation-of-state law. The steel tube portion of the simulation was modeled with peridynamics, an elastic

  17. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  18. Finite Element Prediction of Sheet Forming Defects Using Elastic-Plastic, Damage and Localization Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, Badis; Abed-Meraim, Farid; Balan, Tudor

    2007-05-01

    In this work, an advanced anisotropic elastic-plasticity model is combined with a damage model and a strain localization criterion in the aim to describe accurately the mechanical behavior of sheet metals. Large strain, fully three-dimensional, implicit time integration algorithms are developed for this model and implemented in the finite element code Abaqus. The resulting code is used to predict the strain localization limits as well as the springback after forming of sheet steels. The impact of strain-path dependent hardening models on the limit strains and on the amount of springback is addressed.

  19. Reproducibility for linear and nonlinear micro-finite element simulations with density derived material properties of the human radius.

    PubMed

    Christen, David; Zwahlen, Alexander; Müller, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Finite element (FE) simulations based on high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed-tomography (HRpQCT) measurements provide an elegant and direct way to estimate bone strength. Parallel solvers for nonlinear FE simulations allow the assessment not only of the initial linear elastic behavior of the bone but also materially and geometrically nonlinear effects. The reproducibility of HRpQCT measurements, as well as their analysis of microarchitecture using linear-elastic FE simulations with a homogeneous elastic modulus has been investigated before. However, it is not clear to which extent density-derived and nonlinear FE simulations are reproducible. In this study, we introduced new mechanical indices derived from nonlinear FE simulations that describe the onset of yielding and the behavior at maximal load. Using 14 embalmed forearms that were imaged three times, we found that in general the in vitro reproducibility of the nonlinear FE simulations is as good as the reproducibility of linear FE. For the nonlinear simulations precision errors (PEs) ranged between 0.4 and 3.2% and intraclass correlation coefficients were above 0.9. In conclusion, nonlinear FE simulations with density derived material properties contain important additional information that is independent from the results of the linear simulations.

  20. Experimental validation of finite element model analysis of a steel frame in simulated post-earthquake fire environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Bevans, W. J.; Xiao, Hai; Zhou, Zhi; Chen, Genda

    2012-04-01

    During or after an earthquake event, building system often experiences large strains due to shaking effects as observed during recent earthquakes, causing permanent inelastic deformation. In addition to the inelastic deformation induced by the earthquake effect, the post-earthquake fires associated with short fuse of electrical systems and leakage of gas devices can further strain the already damaged structures during the earthquakes, potentially leading to a progressive collapse of buildings. Under these harsh environments, measurements on the involved building by various sensors could only provide limited structural health information. Finite element model analysis, on the other hand, if validated by predesigned experiments, can provide detail structural behavior information of the entire structures. In this paper, a temperature dependent nonlinear 3-D finite element model (FEM) of a one-story steel frame is set up by ABAQUS based on the cited material property of steel from EN 1993-1.2 and AISC manuals. The FEM is validated by testing the modeled steel frame in simulated post-earthquake environments. Comparisons between the FEM analysis and the experimental results show that the FEM predicts the structural behavior of the steel frame in post-earthquake fire conditions reasonably. With experimental validations, the FEM analysis of critical structures could be continuously predicted for structures in these harsh environments for a better assistant to fire fighters in their rescue efforts and save fire victims.

  1. Development and Calibration of a System-Integrated Rotorcraft Finite Element Model for Impact Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber (DEA) under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. The presence of this energy absorbing device reduced the peak impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system-integrated finite element model of the test article developed in parallel with the test program. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests were conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components and subsystems, including new crush tubes and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined for the system-integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the full-scale crash test without the DEA. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods identified modeling deficiencies, evaluated parameter importance, and proposed required model changes. The multidimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were

  2. The modelling of VLF Trimpis using both finite element and 3D Born Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, M.

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the Great Circle Path. Two different codes are used. The first is a 2D finite element method (FEM) code, whose solutions are valid in the non-Born limit. The second is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices have a comparable structure, and indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code delineates the Born regime. For a LIE with a radius of 100kms, the Born approximation becomes invalid at an electron density perturbation of about 8 el/cc.

  3. Using pseudo transient continuation and the finite element method to solve the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Milovich, J L; Noy, A

    2000-12-27

    The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is solved using Pseudo Transient Continuation. The PB solver is constructed by modifying the nonlinear diffusion module of a 3D, massively parallel, unstructured-grid, finite element, radiation-hydrodynamics code. The solver also computes the electrostatic energy and evaluates the force on a user-specified contour. Either Dirichlet or mixed boundary conditions are allowed. The latter specifies surface charges, approximates far-field conditions, or linearizes conditions ''regulating'' the surface charge. The code may be run in either Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. The potential and force due to a conical probe interacting with a flat plate is computed and the result compared with direct force measurements by chemical force microscopy.

  4. A continuum three-dimensional, fully coupled, dynamic, non-linear finite element formulation for magnetostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Aparicio, José L.; Sosa, Horacio

    2004-06-01

    Magnetostriction is a phenomenon observed in all ferromagnetic materials. It couples elastic, electric, magnetic and in some situations also thermal fields and is of great industrial interest for use in sensors, actuators, adaptive or functional structures, robotics, transducers and MEMS. In this work, the governing equations of the three-field problem (i.e., the interactions of elastic, electric and magnetic effects) are formulated in three dimensions, accounting for non-linear (through magnetic body forces represented by the Maxwell tensor) and dynamic effects, and with constitutive equations resembling those of piezoelectricity. Through manipulation of Maxwell equations it is possible to find suitable expressions for developing the numerical weak, Galerkin and matrix forms in a natural way, including seven residuals (one for each nodal degree of freedom) and non-symmetric tangent, 'capacity' and mass consistent matrices. Simple backward Euler and central difference schemes can be used for the time domain integration. The only assumption made in this work for simplification is that the time variation of electric induction is negligible. This is justified by the relatively low frequencies ({\\ll }1 GHz) under which magnetostrictive materials usually work. The principal feature of the equations is the use of a magnetic potential (without much physical meaning) that allows a complete 'displacement' finite element formulation: all elastic, electric and magnetic nodal unknowns are zero derivatives. This allows the algorithm to be treated in a standard way, and important effects such as eddy currents can be obtained naturally. The formulation is implemented in the research finite element code FEAP. Although seven degrees of freedom per node is computer expensive to solve (especially for 3D problems), the current trend in the performance of computers, even personal ones, makes it worthwhile to build complete finite elements following the well-established (in mechanics

  5. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  6. Finite element modeling of the influence of hand position and bone properties on the Colles' fracture load during a fall.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Drew; Ural, Ani

    2010-08-01

    Distal forearm fracture is one of the most frequently observed osteoporotic fractures, which may occur as a result of low energy falls such as falls from a standing height and may be linked to the osteoporotic nature of the bone, especially in the elderly. In order to prevent the occurrence of radius fractures and their adverse outcomes, understanding the effect of both extrinsic and intrinsic contributors to fracture risk is essential. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element model is applied to human radius to assess the influence of extrinsic factors (load orientation and load distribution between scaphoid and lunate) and intrinsic bone properties (age-related changes in fracture properties and bone geometry) on the Colles' fracture load. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created, and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling, which explicitly represented the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The simulation results showed that the load direction with respect to the longitudinal and dorsal axes of the radius influenced the fracture load. The fracture load increased with larger angles between the resultant load and the dorsal axis, and with smaller angles between the resultant load and longitudinal axis. The fracture load also varied as a function of the load ratio between the lunate and scaphoid, however, not as drastically as with the load orientation. The fracture load decreased as the load ratio (lunate/scaphoid) increased. Multiple regression analysis showed that the bone geometry and the load orientation are the most important variables that contribute to the prediction of the fracture load. The findings in this study establish a robust computational fracture risk assessment method that combines the effects of intrinsic properties of bone with extrinsic factors associated with a fall, and may be elemental in the identification of high fracture risk individuals

  7. A Finite Element Model for Mixed Porohyperelasticity with Transport, Swelling, and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Michelle Hine; Buganza Tepole, Adrián; Kuhl, Ellen; Simon, Bruce R.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to establish a unified theory of porohyperelasticity with transport and growth and to demonstrate the capability of this theory using a finite element model developed in MATLAB. We combine the theories of volumetric growth and mixed porohyperelasticity with transport and swelling (MPHETS) to derive a new method that models growth of biological soft tissues. The conservation equations and constitutive equations are developed for both solid-only growth and solid/fluid growth. An axisymmetric finite element framework is introduced for the new theory of growing MPHETS (GMPHETS). To illustrate the capabilities of this model, several example finite element test problems are considered using model geometry and material parameters based on experimental data from a porcine coronary artery. Multiple growth laws are considered, including time-driven, concentration-driven, and stress-driven growth. Time-driven growth is compared against an exact analytical solution to validate the model. For concentration-dependent growth, changing the diffusivity (representing a change in drug) fundamentally changes growth behavior. We further demonstrate that for stress-dependent, solid-only growth of an artery, growth of an MPHETS model results in a more uniform hoop stress than growth in a hyperelastic model for the same amount of growth time using the same growth law. This may have implications in the context of developing residual stresses in soft tissues under intraluminal pressure. To our knowledge, this manuscript provides the first full description of an MPHETS model with growth. The developed computational framework can be used in concert with novel in-vitro and in-vivo experimental approaches to identify the governing growth laws for various soft tissues. PMID:27078495

  8. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  9. Modelling Of Displacement Washing Of Pulp Bed Using Orthogonal Collocation On Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Shelly; Potůček, František; Dhaliwal, S. S.; Kukreja, V. K.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanism of displacement washing of packed bed of porous, compressible and cylindrical particles, e.g., fibers is presented with the help of an axial dispersion model involving Peclet number (Pe) and Biot number (Bi). Bulk fluid concentration and intra-pore solute concentration are related by Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Model equations have been solved using orthogonal collocation on finite elements using Lagrangian interpolating polynomials as base functions. Displacement washing has been simulated using a laboratory washing cell and experiments have been performed on pulp beds formed from unbeaten, unbleached kraft fibers. Model predicted values have been compared with experimental values to check the applicability of the method.

  10. A VISUAL BASIC program to pre-process MRI data for finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Todd, B A; Wang, H

    1996-11-01

    Investigators use non-invasive imaging to collect geometric data for finite element models. A preprocessor is described to facilitate model generation of anatomical regions from serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data stored in a bitmap format. The MRI Data Transfer System is a stand-alone Windows-based program developed in VISUAL BASIC 3.0 which generates a NASTRAN input file. The program can be modified to generate input files for other solvers. The software will executive on any IBM-compatible computer which runs Windows Version 3.1 or higher. To demonstrate the software, model generation of a portion of a tibia is described.

  11. Finite element modeling of evaporation and condensation during sol-gel film and fiber formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, P.R.; Hurd, A.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Rao, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    Free surfaces, multicomponent phase change, volume expansion and compression, and surface tension gradients make for challenging application of the finite element method to sol-gel (ceramic) film and fiber formation. The microstructure of the final product is largely controlled by the competition between the drying, curing, and underlying fluid mechanics of formation. Sol-gel materials are peculiar because they often contain more than one solvent, each solvent differing in volatility and surface tension. Hence, nonuniform evaporation can produce surface tension gradients that dramatically change the meniscus shape. These processes are complicated further by a volume change that accompanies evaporation and condensation, making for shock-like discontinuities in concentration and velocity at the free surface. Computer-aided predictions of film formation by dip coating and of fiber spinning (see Figure 1) are made for alcohol-water mixtures with one non-volatile species. The Navier-Stokes system is augmented with two convective-diffusion equations to track the concentration of alcohol and water, and an energy equation to monitor temperature changes. The equations are solved in both phases by discretizing them first with the Galerkin/finite element method. The resulting non-linear algebraic equation set is solved with Newton`s method. The subdomaining technique is based on elliptic grid generation and is designed to parameterize the moving meniscus. Special treatment of the functional representations of velocity and concentration within the elements lining the free surface are made to accommodate the volume change that accompanies mass exchange between phases.

  12. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM).

  13. Finite element modeling of thermal fatigue and damage of solder joints in a ceramic ball grid array package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bor Zen

    1997-07-01

    A nonlinear finite element model is presented for analyzing the cyclic and thermal fatigue loading and for viscoplastic damage characterization of the lead-tin (Pb-Sn) solder joints in a ceramic ball grid array (CBGA) surface mount package. An approach using a Δ ∈{eq/in}-modified Coffin-Manson equation is proposed to estimate the fatigue life of the solder joints. The Δ ∈{eq/in} represents a saturated equivalent inelastic strain range as determined by the finite element model. The present study shows that the predictied fatigue life and the associated damage mechanism of the solder joint agree reasonably well with the test data for the 18,25, and 32 mm CBGA packages run at a cyclic temperature load of 0°C/100°C with a frequency of 1.5 cycles per hour. Analysis also shows that a preferred failure site is expected to occur in and around the Pb37-Sn63 solder attachment of the solder joint. A time-dependent (creep induced) damage mechanism is found to be more pronounced than the time-independent (plastic deformation) mechanism.

  14. Discrete/Finite Element Modelling of Rock Cutting with a TBM Disc Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labra, Carlos; Rojek, Jerzy; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents advanced computer simulation of rock cutting process typical for excavation works in civil engineering. Theoretical formulation of the hybrid discrete/finite element model has been presented. The discrete and finite element methods have been used in different subdomains of a rock sample according to expected material behaviour, the part which is fractured and damaged during cutting is discretized with the discrete elements while the other part is treated as a continuous body and it is modelled using the finite element method. In this way, an optimum model is created, enabling a proper representation of the physical phenomena during cutting and efficient numerical computation. The model has been applied to simulation of the laboratory test of rock cutting with a single TBM (tunnel boring machine) disc cutter. The micromechanical parameters have been determined using the dimensionless relationships between micro- and macroscopic parameters. A number of numerical simulations of the LCM test in the unrelieved and relieved cutting modes have been performed. Numerical results have been compared with available data from in-situ measurements in a real TBM as well as with the theoretical predictions showing quite a good agreement. The numerical model has provided a new insight into the cutting mechanism enabling us to investigate the stress and pressure distribution at the tool-rock interaction. Sensitivity analysis of rock cutting performed for different parameters including disc geometry, cutting velocity, disc penetration and spacing has shown that the presented numerical model is a suitable tool for the design and optimization of rock cutting process.

  15. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  16. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  17. Finite elements for a beam system with nonlinear contact under periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazim, H.; Rousselet, B.

    Solar arrays are structures which are connected to satellites; during launch, they are in a folded position and submitted to high vibrations. In order to save mass, the flexibility of the panels is not negligible and they may strike each other; this may damage the structure. To prevent this, rubber snubbers are mounted at well chosen points of the structure; a prestress is applied to the snubber; but it is quite difficult to check the amount of prestress and the snubber may act only on one side; they will be modeled as one sided springs (see figure 2). In this article, some analysis for responses (displacements) in both time and frequency domains for a clamped-clamped Euler-Bernoulli beam model with a spring are presented. This spring can be unilateral or bilateral fixed at a point. The mounting (beam +spring) is fixed on a rigid support which has a sinusoidal motion of constant frequency. The system is also studied in the frequency domain by sweeping frequencies between two fixed values, in order to save the maximum of displacements corresponding to each frequency. Numerical results are compared with exact solutions in particular cases which already exist in the literature. On the other hand, a numerical and theoretical investigation of nonlinear normal mode (NNM) can be a new method to describe nonlinear behaviors, this work is in progress.

  18. The Importance of Craniofacial Sutures in Biomechanical Finite Element Models of the Domestic Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial sutures are a ubiquitous feature of the vertebrate skull. Previous experimental work has shown that bone strain magnitudes and orientations often vary when moving from one bone to another, across a craniofacial suture. This has led to the hypothesis that craniofacial sutures act to modify the strain environment of the skull, possibly as a mode of dissipating high stresses generated during feeding or impact. This study tests the hypothesis that the introduction of craniofacial sutures into finite element (FE) models of a modern domestic pig skull would improve model accuracy compared to a model without sutures. This allowed the mechanical effects of sutures to be assessed in isolation from other confounding variables. These models were also validated against strain gauge data collected from the same specimen ex vivo. The experimental strain data showed notable strain differences between adjacent bones, but this effect was generally not observed in either model. It was found that the inclusion of sutures in finite element models affected strain magnitudes, ratios, orientations and contour patterns, yet contrary to expectations, this did not improve the fit of the model to the experimental data, but resulted in a model that was less accurate. It is demonstrated that the presence or absence of sutures alone is not responsible for the inaccuracies in model strain, and is suggested that variations in local bone material properties, which were not accounted for by the FE models, could instead be responsible for the pattern of results. PMID:22363727

  19. A one-dimensional mixed porohyperelastic transport swelling finite element model with growth

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J.L.; Simon, B.R.; Vande Geest, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional, large-strain, mixed porohyperelastic transport and swelling (MPHETS) finite element model was developed in MATLAB and incorporated with a well-known growth model for soft tissues to allow the model to grow (increase in length) or shrink (decrease in length) at constant material density. By using the finite element model to determine the deformation and stress state, it is possible to implement different growth laws in the program in the future to simulate how soft tissues grow and behave when exposed to various stimuli (e.g. mechanical, chemical, or electrical). The essential assumptions needed to use the MPHETS model with growth are clearly identified and explained in this paper. The primary assumption in this work, however, is that the stress upon which growth acts is the stress in the solid skeleton, i.e. the effective stress, Seff. It is shown that significantly different amounts of growth are experienced for the same loading conditions when using a porohyperelastic model as compared to a purely solid model. In one particular example, approximately 51% less total growth occurred in the MPHETS model than in the solid model even though both problems were subjected to the same external loading. This work represents a first step in developing more sophisticated models capable of capturing the complex mechanical and biochemical environment in growing and remodeling tissues. PMID:23778062

  20. Laser generation of Lamb waves for defect detection: experimental methods and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Susan E; Dutton, Ben; Dixon, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of Lamb waves generated by a pulsed laser beam in an aluminum sheet is modeled using finite element analysis, and the interaction with defects is studied and compared to experimental results. The ultrasonic Lamb waves are detected by an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). The frequency content of the received wave is shown to be enhanced when the generation point is situated directly over the defect in both the modeled and experimental cases. Time-frequency analysis using a Wigner transform has enabled individual modes to be identified.

  1. IA-FEMesh: An open-source, interactive, multiblock approach to anatomic finite element model development

    PubMed Central

    Grosland, Nicole M.; Shivanna, Kiran H.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; DeVries, Nicole A.; Tadepalli, Srinivas C.; Lisle, Curtis

    2009-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis is a valuable tool in musculoskeletal research. The demands associated with mesh development, however, often prove daunting. In an effort to facilitate anatomic FE model development we have developed an open source software toolkit (IA-FEMesh). IA-FEMesh employs a multiblock meshing scheme aimed at hexahedral mesh generation. An emphasis has been placed on making the tools interactive, in an effort to create a user friendly environment. The goal is to provide an efficient and reliable method for model development, visualization, and mesh quality evaluation. While these tools have been developed, initially, in the context of skeletal structures they can be applied to countless applications. PMID:19157630

  2. Application of the hybrid-Trefftz finite element model to thin shell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Gabor

    The paper presents the results of a preliminary study on thin shallow shell element based on the hybrid-Trefftz (HT) model. This model adopts an assumed nonconforming displacement field which satisfies a priori the governing differential equations. The interelement continuity and the boundary conditions are enforced by frame fields defined in terms of the conventional nodal freedoms. In the p-extension, the frame functions involve an optional number of hierarchic displacement modes. Numerical results present the capability of the new shell element which can be implemented in existing finite element codes.

  3. An efficient finite-element algorithm for 3D layered complex structure modelling.

    PubMed

    Sahalos, J N; Kyriacou, G A; Vafiadis, E

    1994-05-01

    In this paper an efficient finite-element method (FEM) algorithm for complicated three-dimensional (3D) layered type models has been developed. Its unique feature is that it can handle, with memory requirements within the abilities of a simple PC, arbitrarily shaped 3D elements. This task is achieved by storing only the non-zero coefficients of the sparse FEM system of equations. The algorithm is applied to the solution of the Laplace equation in models with up to 79 layers of trilinear general hexahedron elements. The system of equations is solved with the Gauss-Seidel iterative technique.

  4. Evaluating the accuracy of finite element models at reduced length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Connor

    Finite element models are used frequently in both engineering and scientific research. While they can provide useful information as to the performance of materials, as length scales are decreased more sophisticated model descriptions are required. It is also important to develop methods by which existing models may be verified against experimental findings. The present study evaluates the ability of various finite element models to predict materials behaviour at length scales ranging from several microns to tens of nanometers. Considering this motivation, this thesis is provided in manuscript form with the bulk of material coming from two case studies. Following an overview of relevant literature in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 considers the nucleation of delta-zirconium hydrides in a Zircaloy-2 matrix. Zirconium hydrides are an important topic in the nuclear industry as they form a brittle phase which leads to delayed hydride cracking during reactor start-up and shut-down. Several FE models are used to compare present results with literature findings and illustrate the weaknesses of standard FE approaches. It is shown that standard continuum techniques do not sufficiently capture the interfacial effects of an inclusion-matrix system. By using nano-scale material descriptions, nucleation lattice strains are obtained which are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The motivation for Chapter 4 stems from a recognized need to develop a method for modeling corrosion behaviour of materials. Corrosion is also an issue for reactor design and an ability to predict failure points is needed. Finite element models could be used for this purpose, provided model accuracy is verified first. In Chapter 4 a technique is developed which facilitates the extraction of sub-micron resolution strain data from correlation images obtained during in-situ tensile deformation. By comparing image correlation results with a crystal plasticity finite element code it is found that good

  5. Finite