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Sample records for nonlinear wave-packet interferometry

  1. Two-dimensional attosecond electron wave-packet interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  2. Two-Dimensional Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  3. Behavior of a Moist Kelvin Wave Packet with Nonlinear Heating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Xue, Yan

    1992-04-01

    The effects of nonlinear (positive only or conditional) heating on moist Kelvin waves are examined with a simple equatorial zonal-plane model describing the gravest baroclinic mode.The unstable perturbation subject to nonlinear beating emerges as a wave packet. A typical amplifying, eastward-moving wave packet is characterized by an asymmetric structure: 1) the ascending branch (wet region) is much narrower than the two descending ones (dry regions); and 2) the circulation cell to the east of the wet region center is smaller and stronger than its counterpart to the west of the center. The wet-dry asymmetry is primarily caused by the nonlinear beating effect, while the east-west asymmetry is a result of the movement of the wave packet relative to mean flow. The existence of Newtonian cooling and Rayleigh friction enhances the structural asymmetries.The unstable wave packet is characterized by two zonal length scales: the ascending branch length (ABL) and total circulation extent (TCE). For a given basic state, the growth rate of a wave packet increases with decreasing ABL or TCE. However, up to a moderate growth rate (order of day1) the energy spectra of all wave packets are dominated by zonal wavenumber one regardless of ABL size. In particular, the slowly growing (low frequency) wave packets normally exhibit TCEs of planetary scale and ABLs of synoptic scale.Observed equatorial intraseasonal disturbances often display a narrow convection region in between two much broader dry regions and a total circulation of planetary scale. These structure and scale characteristics are caused by the effects of nonlinear heating and the cyclic geometry of the equator. It is argued that the unstable disturbance found in numerical experiments (e.g., Lau and Peng; Hayashi and Sumi) is a manifestation of the nonlinear wave packet.

  4. Nonlinear single Compton scattering of an electron wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioi, A.; Mackenroth, F.; Di Piazza, A.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear single Compton scattering has been thoroughly investigated in the literature under the assumption that the electron initially has a definite momentum. Here, we study a more general initial state and consider the electron as a wave packet. In particular, we investigate the energy spectrum of the emitted radiation and show that, in typical experimental situations, some features of the spectra shown in previous works are almost completely washed out. Moreover, we show that, at comparable relative uncertainties, the one in the momentum of the incoming electron has a larger impact on the photon spectra at a fixed observation direction than the one on the laser frequency.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of Airy-vortex 3D wave packets: emission of vortex light waves.

    PubMed

    Driben, Rodislav; Meier, Torsten

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of 3D Airy-vortex wave packets is studied under the action of strong self-focusing Kerr nonlinearity. Emissions of nonlinear 3D waves out of the main wave packets with the topological charges were demonstrated. Because of the conservation of the total angular momentum, charges of the emitted waves are equal to those carried by the parental light structure. The rapid collapse imposes a severe limitation on the propagation of multidimensional waves in Kerr media. However, the structure of the Airy beam carrier allows the coupling of light from the leading, most intense peak into neighboring peaks and consequently strongly postpones the collapse. The dependence of the critical input amplitude for the appearance of a fast collapse on the beam width is studied for wave packets with zero and nonzero topological charges. Wave packets carrying angular momentum are found to be much more resistant to the rapid collapse.

  6. Wave packet interferometry and quantum state reconstruction by acousto-optic phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Dyke, Thomas R.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2006-11-21

    Studies of wave packet dynamics often involve phase-selective measurements of coherent optical signals generated from sequences of ultrashort laser pulses. In wave packet interferometry (WPI), the separation between the temporal envelopes of the pulses must be precisely monitored or maintained. Here we introduce a new (and easy to implement) experimental scheme for phase-selective measurements that combines acousto-optic phase modulation with ultrashort laser excitation to produce an intensity-modulated fluorescence signal. Synchronous detection, with respect to an appropriately constructed reference, allows the signal to be simultaneously measured at two phases differing by 90 deg. Our method effectively decouples the relative temporal phase from the pulse envelopes of a collinear train of optical pulse pairs. We thus achieve a robust and high signal-to-noise scheme for WPI applications, such as quantum state reconstruction and electronic spectroscopy. The validity of the method is demonstrated, and state reconstruction is performed, on a model quantum system - atomic Rb vapor. Moreover, we show that our measurements recover the correct separation between the absorptive and dispersive contributions to the system susceptibility.

  7. Phase-modulated electronic wave packet interferometry reveals high resolution spectra of free Rb atoms and Rb*He molecules.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Lukas; Mudrich, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Phase-modulated wave packet interferometry is combined with mass-resolved photoion detection to investigate rubidium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets in a molecular beam experiment. The spectra of atomic Rb electronic states show a vastly enhanced sensitivity and spectral resolution when compared to conventional pump-probe wave packet interferometry. Furthermore, the formation of Rb*He exciplex molecules is probed and for the first time a fully resolved vibrational spectrum for transitions between the lowest excited 5Π3/2 and the high-lying electronic states 2(2)Π, 4(2)Δ, 6(2)Σ is obtained and compared to theory. The feasibility of applying coherent multidimensional spectroscopy to dilute cold gas phase samples is demonstrated in these experiments.

  8. Unidirectional transport of wave packets through tilted discrete breathers in nonlinear lattices with asymmetric defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Malomed, Boris A.; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-09-01

    We consider the transfer of lattice wave packets through a tilted discrete breather (TDB) in opposite directions in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model with asymmetric defects, which may be realized as a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a deep optical lattice, or as optical beams in a waveguide array. A unidirectional transport mode is found, in which the incident wave packets, whose energy belongs to a certain interval between full reflection and full passage regions, pass the TDB only in one direction, while in the absence of the TDB, the same lattice admits bidirectional propagation. The operation of this mode is accurately explained by an analytical consideration of the respective energy barriers. The results suggest that the TDB may emulate the unidirectional propagation of atomic and optical beams in various settings. In the case of the passage of the incident wave packet, the scattering TDB typically shifts by one lattice unit in the direction from which the wave packet arrives, which is an example of the tractor-beam effect, provided by the same system, in addition to the rectification of incident waves.

  9. Nonlinear plasma-assisted collapse of ring-Airy wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, Paris; Couairon, Arnaud; Kolesik, Miroslav; Papazoglou, Dimitris G.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-03-01

    We numerically demonstrate that femtosecond ring-Airy wave packets are able to overcome the reference intensity clamping of 4 ×1013 W/cm2 for filaments generated with Gaussian beams at low numerical apertures and form an intense sharp intensity peak on axis. Numerical simulations, with unidirectional propagation models for the pulse envelope and the carrier resolved electric field, reveal that the driving mechanism for this unexpected intensity increase is due to the self-generated plasma. The plasma formation, in conjunction with the circular geometry of the beam, force the wave packet into a multistage collapse process which takes place faster than the saturating mechanisms can compensate. We report here a nonstandard mechanism that increases the intensity of a collapsing wave packet, due to the joint contributions of the cubic phase of the Airy beam and the formation of a partially reflecting plasma.

  10. Read and write amplitude and phase information by using high-precision molecular wave-packet interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Kenji; Hosaka, Kouichi; Chiba, Hisashi

    2007-07-15

    We demonstrate an experimental approach to read and write populations and relative phases of vibrational eigenstates within a wave packet created in the B state of the iodine molecule by using a pair of phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses. Our highly stabilized optical interferometer provides attosecond stability and resolution in the interpulse delay. The stability and resolution have realized an exquisite tuning of the interference of two vibrational wave packets to manipulate the relative populations and the relative quantum phases among the vibrational eigenstates within the wave packets. These populations and phases have been retrieved by measuring fluorescence from the upper E state induced by another nanosecond (ns) or femtosecond (fs) probe laser pulse. The bandwidth of the ns probe pulse is narrow enough to select only a small portion of the rotational progression of a particular vibrational band of the E-B transition. By scanning the probe wavelength, we measure the population distribution of the vibrational eigenstates within the wave packet. The fs probe pulse is used to measure quantum beats arising from the temporal evolution of the wave packet. Combining these two complementary measurements, we can read both population and phase information written and stored in the wave packet.

  11. Nonlinear wave-packet dynamics for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system and its application to the hydrogen atom in a weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dupret, K.; Delande, D.

    1996-03-01

    We study the time propagation of an initially localized wave packet for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system, using the {open_quote}{open_quote}nonlinear wave-packet dynamics{close_quote}{close_quote} [S. Tomsovic and E. J. Heller, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 67}, 664 (1991)], a semiclassical approximation using a local linearization of the wave packet in the vicinity of classical reference trajectories. Several reference trajectories are needed to describe the behavior of the full wave packet. The introduction of action-angle variables allows us to obtain a simple analytic expression for the autocorrelation function, and to show that a universal behavior (quantum collapses, quantum revivals, etc.) is obtained via interferences between the reference trajectories. A connection with the standard WKB approach is established. Finally, we apply the nonlinear wave-packet dynamics to the case of the hydrogen atom in a weak magnetic field, and show that the semiclassical expressions obtained by nonlinear wave-packet dynamics are extremely accurate. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Exploring Divisibility and Summability of 'Photon' Wave Packets in Nonlinear Optical Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2009-01-01

    Formulations for second and higher harmonic frequency up and down conversions, as well as multi photon processes directly assume summability and divisibility of photons. Quantum mechanical (QM) interpretations are completely congruent with these assumptions. However, for linear optical phenomena (interference, diffraction, refraction, material dispersion, spectral dispersion, etc.), we have a profound dichotomy. Most optical engineers innovate and analyze all optical instruments by propagating pure classical electromagnetic (EM) fields using Maxwell s equations and gives only lip-service to the concept "indivisible light quanta". Further, irrespective of linearity or nonlinearity of the phenomena, the final results are always registered through some photo-electric or photo-chemical effects. This is mathematically well modeled by a quadratic action (energy absorption) relation. Since QM does not preclude divisibility or summability of photons in nonlinear & multi-photon effects, it cannot have any foundational reason against these same possibilities in linear optical phenomena. It implies that we must carefully revisit the fundamental roots behind all light-matter interaction processes and understand the common origin of "graininess" and "discreteness" of light energy.

  13. Quantum wave packet revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (‘minipackets’ or ‘clones’) is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  14. Particlelike wave packets in complex scattering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, Benoît; Laurent, Jérôme; Ambichl, Philipp; Prada, Claire; Rotter, Stefan; Aubry, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    A wave packet undergoes a strong spatial and temporal dispersion while propagating through a complex medium. This wave scattering is often seen as a nightmare in wave physics whether it be for focusing, imaging, or communication purposes. Controlling wave propagation through complex systems is thus of fundamental interest in many areas, ranging from optics or acoustics to medical imaging or telecommunications. Here, we study the propagation of elastic waves in a cavity and a disordered waveguide by means of laser interferometry. From the direct experimental access to the time-delay matrix of these systems, we demonstrate the existence of particlelike wave packets that remain focused in time and space throughout their complex trajectory. Due to their limited dispersion, their selective excitation will be crucially relevant for all applications involving selective wave focusing and efficient information transfer through complex media.

  15. Self-Interfering Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, David; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of noninteracting polariton wave packets. We show how two qualitatively different concepts of mass that arise from the peculiar polariton dispersion lead to a new type of particlelike object from noninteracting fields—much like self-accelerating beams—shaped by the Rabi coupling out of Gaussian initial states. A divergence and change of sign of the diffusive mass results in a "mass wall" on which polariton wave packets bounce back. Together with the Rabi dynamics, this yields propagation of ultrafast subpackets and ordering of a spacetime crystal.

  16. Self-Interfering Wave Packets.

    PubMed

    Colas, David; Laussy, Fabrice P

    2016-01-15

    We study the propagation of noninteracting polariton wave packets. We show how two qualitatively different concepts of mass that arise from the peculiar polariton dispersion lead to a new type of particlelike object from noninteracting fields-much like self-accelerating beams-shaped by the Rabi coupling out of Gaussian initial states. A divergence and change of sign of the diffusive mass results in a "mass wall" on which polariton wave packets bounce back. Together with the Rabi dynamics, this yields propagation of ultrafast subpackets and ordering of a spacetime crystal. PMID:26824554

  17. Controlling plasmonic wave packets in silver nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L.; Nome, R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Scherer, N. F.

    2010-09-01

    Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations were performed to explore the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in long silver (Ag) nanowires. In particular, we show that it is possible to generate plasmonic wave packets that can propagate along the nanowire by exciting superpositions of surface plasmon resonances. By using an appropriately chirped pulse, it is possible to transiently achieve localization of the excitation at the distal end of the nanowire. Such designed coherent superpositions will allow realizing spatiotemporal control of plasmonic excitations for enhancing nonlinear responses in plasmonic 'circuits'.

  18. Dynamics of quantum wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnell, T.R.; Taylor, A.J.; Rodriguez, G.; Clement, T.S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop ultrafast laser techniques for the creation and measurement of quantum vibrational wave packets in gas phase diatomic molecules. Moreover, the authors sought to manipulate the constitution of these wave packets in terms of harmonic-oscillator basis wavefunctions by manipulating the time-dependent amplitude and phase of the incident ultrashort laser pulse. They specifically investigated gaseous diatomic potassium (K{sub 2}), and discovered variations in the shape of the wave packets as a result of changing the linear chirp in the ultrashort preparation pulse. In particular, they found evidence for wave-packet compression for a specific degree of chirp. Important ancillary results include development of new techniques for denoising and deconvolution of femtosecond time traces and techniques for diagnosing the phase and amplitude of the electric field of femtosecond laser pulses.

  19. On quantization of nondispersive wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Altaisky, M. V.

    2013-10-15

    Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

  20. Second Harmonic Generation of Nanoscale Phonon Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojahr, A.; Gohlke, M.; Leitenberger, W.; Pudell, J.; Reinhardt, M.; von Reppert, A.; Roessle, M.; Sander, M.; Gaal, P.; Bargheer, M.

    2015-11-01

    Phonons are often regarded as delocalized quasiparticles with certain energy and momentum. The anharmonic interaction of phonons determines macroscopic properties of the solid, such as thermal expansion or thermal conductivity, and a detailed understanding becomes increasingly important for functional nanostructures. Although phonon-phonon scattering processes depicted in simple wave-vector diagrams are the basis of theories describing these macroscopic phenomena, experiments directly accessing these coupling channels are scarce. We synthesize monochromatic acoustic phonon wave packets with only a few cycles to introduce nonlinear phononics as the acoustic counterpart to nonlinear optics. Control of the wave vector, bandwidth, and consequently spatial extent of the phonon wave packets allows us to observe nonlinear phonon interaction, in particular, second harmonic generation, in real time by wave-vector-sensitive Brillouin scattering with x-rays and optical photons.

  1. Exciton-polariton localized wave packets in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronych, Oksana; Buraczewski, Adam; Matuszewski, MichałÂ; Stobińska, Magdalena

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of creating X waves, or localized wave packets, in resonantly excited exciton-polariton superfluids. We demonstrate the existence of X-wave traveling solutions in the coupled exciton-photon system past the inflection point, where the effective mass of lower polaritons is negative in the direction perpendicular to the wave vector of the pumping beam. Contrary to the case of bright solitons, X waves do not require nonlinearity for sustaining their shape. Nevertheless, we show that nonlinearity is important for their dynamics, as it allows for their spontaneous formation from an initial Gaussian wave packet. Unique properties of exciton-polaritons may lead to applications of their X waves in long-distance signal propagation inside novel integrated optoelectronic circuits based on excitons.

  2. Nondispersive wave packets -- control through chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchleitner, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Nondispersive wave packets were predicted to emerge in periodically driven Rydberg atoms a little more than 10 years ago [1], and have now been observed in the laboratory [2]. I shall illustrate how these robust, generic ``quantum particles'' and their relatives naturally emerge from the theory of chaotic quantum systems [3], and thus open new perspectives for robust quantum control in various experimental settings -- from one and two-electron [4] atoms under periodic or impulsive [5] driving to cold atoms in flashing periodic potentials, possibly amended by harmonic confinement [6]. Besides the fundamental underlying (nonlinear) resonance phenomena also some more subtle properties will be discussed, including open questions within the realm of spectral theory. *[1] A. Buchleitner, thèse de doctorat, Universit'e Paris 6 (1993); I. Bialynicki-Birula, M. Kalinski, and J. H. Eberly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1777 (1994); D. Delande and A. Buchleitner, Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 85 (1994). *[2] H. Maeda and T. F. Gallagher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 133004 (2004). *[3] A. Buchleitner, D. Delande, and J. Zakrzewski, Phys. Rep. 386, 409 (2002). *[4] J. Madroñero, PhD thesis, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (2004), http://edoc.ub.uni-muenchen.de/archive/00002187. *[5] D.G. Arb'o et al., Phys. Rev. A 67, 63401 (2003). *[6] A.R.R. de Carvalho and A. Buchleitner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 204101 (2004).

  3. Dynamics of Attosecond Electron Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritsson, Johan

    2005-05-01

    We present results from some of the first experimental studies of attosecond electron wave packets created via the absorption of ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light pulses [1]. The pulses, made via high harmonic generation, form an attosecond pulse train (APT) whose properties we can manipulate by a combination of spatial and spectral filtering. For instance, we show that on-target attosecond pulses of 170 as duration, which is close to the single cycle limit, can be produced [2]. The electron wave packets created when such an APT is used to ionize an atom are different from the tunneling wave packets familiar from strong field ionization. We show how to measure the dynamics of these wave packets in a strong infrared (IR) field, where the absorption of energy above the ionization threshold is found to depend strongly on the APT-IR delay [3]. We also demonstrate that altering the properties of the initial electron wave packet by manipulating the APT changes the subsequent continuum electron dynamics. Finally, we show how the phase of a longer, femtosecond electron wave packet can be modulated by a moderately strong IR pulse with duration comparable to or shorter than that of the electron wave packet. This experiment reveals how the normal ponderomotive shift of an XUV ionization event is modified when the IR pulse is shorter than the XUV pulse.[1] The experiments were done at Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden.[2] R. López-Martens, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 033001 (2005)[3] P. Johnsson, et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.

  4. High Angular Momentum Rydberg Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyker, Brendan

    2011-12-01

    High angular momentum Rydberg wave packets are studied. Application of carefully tailored electric fields to low angular momentum, high- n (n ˜ 300) Rydberg atoms creates coherent superpositions of Stark states with near extreme values of angular momentum, ℓ. Wave packet components orbit the parent nucleus at rates that depend on their energy, leading to periods of localization and delocalization as the components come into and go out of phase with each other. Monitoring survival probability signals in the presence of position dependent probing leads to observation of characteristic oscillations based on the composition of the wave packet. The discrete nature of electron energy levels is observed through the measurement of quantum revivals in the wave packet localization signal. Time-domain spectroscopy of these signals allows determination of both the population and phase of individual superposition components. Precise manipulation of wave packets is achieved through further application of pulsed electric fields. Decoherence effects due to background gas collisions and electrical noise are also detailed. Quantized classical trajectory Monte-Carlo simulations are introduced and agree remarkably well with experimental results.

  5. Trajectory description of the quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-08-01

    The quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum-classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum-classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference.

  6. Test particle simulation study of whistler wave packets observed near Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaya, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions of water group ions with large-amplitude whistler wave packets detected at the leading edge of steepened magnetosonic waves observed near Comet Giacobini-Zinner (GZ) are studied using test particle simulations of water-ion interactions with a model wave based on GZ data. Some of the water ions are found to be decelerated in the steepened portion of the magnetosonic wave to the resonance velocity with the whistler wave packets. Through resonance and related nonlinear interaction with the large-amplitude whistler waves, the water ions become trapped by the packet. An energy balance calculation demonstrates that the trapped ions lose their kinetic energy during the trapped motion in the packet. Thus, the nonlinear trapping motion in the wave structure leads to effective energy transfer from the water group ions to the whistler wave packets in the leading edge of the steepened MHD waves.

  7. Simulation of the collapse and dissipation of Langmuir wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Winglee, R. M.; Robinson, P. A.; Glanz, J.; Goldman, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and Zakharov's partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to investigate the collapse of isolated Langmuir wave packets in two dimensions. Collapse thresholds are determined numerically, and the roles of enhanced Langmuir wave damping and nonlinearities not included in the standard Zakharov equations are discussed. The Langmuir wave and ion dynamics in PIC simulations are compared with the predictions of PDE simulations incorporating enhanced Langmuir damping. Electron heating and coherent acceleration in the PIC simulations are discussed and compared with predictions of the transit-time theory.

  8. Controllably accelerating and decelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fu; Yu, Weihao; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-11-01

    By solving the (3  +  1)D free-space Schrödinger equation in polar coordinates analytically, we have investigated the propagation of 3D controllably accelerating and decelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian (CAiBG) wave packets, even CAiBG wave packets, odd CAiBG wave packets and the superposition of several CAiBG wave packets in free space. The CAiBG wave packets are constructed with the Airy pulses with initial velocity in temporal domain and the Bessel–Gaussian beams in space domain. Due to the initial velocity on Airy pulses, we can obtain decelerating and accelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian wave packets by selecting different initial velocities. Moreover, by superposing several CAiBG wave packets, we can obtain the rotating wave packets.

  9. Steering attosecond electron wave packets with light.

    PubMed

    Kienberger, R; Hentschel, M; Uiberacker, M; Spielmann, Ch; Kitzler, M; Scrinzi, A; Wieland, M; Westerwalbesloh, Th; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U; Drescher, M; Krausz, F

    2002-08-16

    Photoelectrons excited by extreme ultraviolet or x-ray photons in the presence of a strong laser field generally suffer a spread of their energies due to the absorption and emission of laser photons. We demonstrate that if the emitted electron wave packet is temporally confined to a small fraction of the oscillation period of the interacting light wave, its energy spectrum can be up- or downshifted by many times the laser photon energy without substantial broadening. The light wave can accelerate or decelerate the electron's drift velocity, i.e., steer the electron wave packet like a classical particle. This capability strictly relies on a sub-femtosecond duration of the ionizing x-ray pulse and on its timing to the phase of the light wave with a similar accuracy, offering a simple and potentially single-shot diagnostic tool for attosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  10. Teleportation of nonclassical wave packets of light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noriyuki; Benichi, Hugo; Takeno, Yuishi; Takeda, Shuntaro; Webb, James; Huntington, Elanor; Furusawa, Akira

    2011-04-15

    We report on the experimental quantum teleportation of strongly nonclassical wave packets of light. To perform this full quantum operation while preserving and retrieving the fragile nonclassicality of the input state, we have developed a broadband, zero-dispersion teleportation apparatus that works in conjunction with time-resolved state preparation equipment. Our approach brings within experimental reach a whole new set of hybrid protocols involving discrete- and continuous-variable techniques in quantum information processing for optical sciences.

  11. Testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellstede, Gerold O.; Perlick, Volker; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the theoretical foundations for testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry. Apart from some nondegeneracy conditions to be imposed, our discussion applies to all nonlinear electrodynamical theories of the Plebański class, i.e., to all Lagrangians that depend only on the two Lorentz-invariant scalars quadratic in the field strength. The main idea of the experiment proposed here is to use the fact that, according to nonlinear electrodynamics, the phase velocity of light should depend on the strength and on the direction of an electromagnetic background field. There are two possible experimental setups for testing this prediction with Michelson interferometry. The first possibility is to apply a strong electromagnetic field to the beam in one arm of the interferometer and to compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off. The second possibility is to place the whole interferometer in a strong electromagnetic field and to rotate it. If an electromagnetic field is placed in one arm, the interferometer could have the size of a gravitational wave detector, i.e., an arm length of several hundred meters. If the whole interferometer is placed in an electromagnetic field, one would have to do the experiment with a tabletop interferometer. As an alternative to a traditional Michelson interferometer, one could use a pair of optical resonators that are not bigger than a few centimeters. Then the whole apparatus would be placed in the background field and one would either compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off or one would rotate the apparatus with the field kept switched on. We derive the theoretical foundations for these types of experiments, in the context of an unspecified nonlinear electrodynamics of the Plebański class, and we discuss their feasibility. A null result of the experiment would place bounds on the parameters of the

  12. Pressure fluctuations beneath turbulent spots and instability wave packets in a hypersonic boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-12-01

    The development of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large turbulent spots that can be readily measured with pressure transducers. Measurements of naturally occurring wave packets and developing turbulent spots were made. The peak frequencies of these natural wave packets were in agreement with second-mode computations. For a controlled study, the breakdown of disturbances created by spark and glow perturbations were studied at similar freestream conditions. The spark perturbations were the most effective at creating large wave packets that broke down into turbulent spots. The flow disturbances created by the controlled perturbations were analyzed to obtain amplitude criteria for nonlinearity and breakdown as well as the convection velocities of the turbulent spots. Disturbances first grew into linear instability waves and then quickly became nonlinear. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broad-band frequencies. Instability waves are still visible on either side of the growing turbulent spots during this breakdown process.

  13. Microwave Ionization of an Atomic Electron Wave Packet

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Michael W.; Ko, Lung; Gallagher, T. F.

    2001-07-23

    A short microwave pulse is used to ionize a lithium Rydberg wave packet launched from the core at a well-defined phase of the field. We observe a strong dependence on the relative phase between the motion of the wave packet and the oscillations of the field. This phase dependent ionization is also studied as a function of the relative frequency. Our experimental observations are in good qualitative agreement with a one-dimensional classical model of wave packet ionization.

  14. Exact Results for `Bouncing' Gaussian Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, M.; Doncheski, M. A.; Robinett, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    We consider time-dependent Gaussian wave packet solutions of the Schrödinger equation, with arbitrary initial central position, x0, and momentum, p0, for an otherwise free particle, but with an infinite wall at x = 0, so-called bouncing wave packets. We show how difference or mirror solutions of the form ψ(x,t) - ψ(-x,t) can, in this case, be normalized exactly, allowing for the evaluation of a number of time-dependent expectation values and other quantities in closed form. For example, we calculate langp2rangt explicitly which illustrates how the free-particle kinetic (and hence total energy) is affected by the presence of the distant boundary. We also discuss the time dependence of the expectation values of position, langxrangt, and momentum, langprangt, and their relation to the impulsive force during the `collision' with the wall. Finally, the x0, p0 → 0 limit is shown to reduce a special case of a non-standard free-particle Gaussian solution. The addition of this example to the literature then expands of the relatively small number of Gaussian solutions to quantum mechanical problems with familiar classical analogs (free particle, uniform acceleration, harmonic oscillator, unstable oscillator, and uniform magnetic field) available in closed form.

  15. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes. PMID:22680719

  16. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes.

  17. Observation of Quantum Interference between Separated Mechanical Oscillator Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzler, D.; Flühmann, C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Lo, H.-Y.; Marinelli, M.; Nadlinger, D.; Home, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We directly observe the quantum interference between two well-separated trapped-ion mechanical oscillator wave packets. The superposed state is created from a spin-motion entangled state using a heralded measurement. Wave packet interference is observed through the energy eigenstate populations. We reconstruct the Wigner function of these states by introducing probe Hamiltonians which measure Fock state populations in displaced and squeezed bases. Squeezed-basis measurements with 8 dB squeezing allow the measurement of interference for Δ α =15.6 , corresponding to a distance of 240 nm between the two superposed wave packets.

  18. Realization of localized Bohr-like wave packets.

    PubMed

    Mestayer, J J; Wyker, B; Lancaster, J C; Dunning, F B; Reinhold, C O; Yoshida, S; Burgdörfer, J

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate a protocol to create localized wave packets in very-high-n Rydberg states which travel in nearly circular orbits around the nucleus. Although these wave packets slowly dephase and eventually lose their localization, their motion can be monitored over several orbital periods. These wave packets represent the closest analog yet achieved to the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, i.e., an electron in a circular classical orbit around the nucleus. The possible extension of the approach to create "planetary atoms" in highly correlated stable multiply excited states is discussed.

  19. Observation of Quantum Interference between Separated Mechanical Oscillator Wave Packets.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, D; Flühmann, C; Negnevitsky, V; Lo, H-Y; Marinelli, M; Nadlinger, D; Home, J P

    2016-04-01

    We directly observe the quantum interference between two well-separated trapped-ion mechanical oscillator wave packets. The superposed state is created from a spin-motion entangled state using a heralded measurement. Wave packet interference is observed through the energy eigenstate populations. We reconstruct the Wigner function of these states by introducing probe Hamiltonians which measure Fock state populations in displaced and squeezed bases. Squeezed-basis measurements with 8 dB squeezing allow the measurement of interference for Δα=15.6, corresponding to a distance of 240 nm between the two superposed wave packets.

  20. Wave-packet formation at the zero-dispersion point in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2015-05-01

    The long-time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual emergence of a coherent, steadily propagating, nonlinear wave packet. There is currently no entirely satisfactory explanation as to why these wave packets form. Here the initial value problem is considered within the context of the Gardner-Ostrovsky, or rotation-modified extended Korteweg-de Vries, equation. The linear Gardner-Ostrovsky equation has maximum group velocity at a critical wave number, often called the zero-dispersion point. It is found here that a nonlinear splitting of the wave-number spectrum at the zero-dispersion point, where energy is shifted into the modulationally unstable regime of the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation, is responsible for the wave-packet formation. Numerical comparisons of the decay of a solitary wave in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation and a derived nonlinear Schrödinger equation at the zero-dispersion point are used to confirm the spectral splitting.

  1. Wave-packet formation at the zero-dispersion point in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A J; Johnson, E R

    2015-05-01

    The long-time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual emergence of a coherent, steadily propagating, nonlinear wave packet. There is currently no entirely satisfactory explanation as to why these wave packets form. Here the initial value problem is considered within the context of the Gardner-Ostrovsky, or rotation-modified extended Korteweg-de Vries, equation. The linear Gardner-Ostrovsky equation has maximum group velocity at a critical wave number, often called the zero-dispersion point. It is found here that a nonlinear splitting of the wave-number spectrum at the zero-dispersion point, where energy is shifted into the modulationally unstable regime of the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation, is responsible for the wave-packet formation. Numerical comparisons of the decay of a solitary wave in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation and a derived nonlinear Schrödinger equation at the zero-dispersion point are used to confirm the spectral splitting. PMID:26066112

  2. Initial phase and free-particle wave packet evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Theodore L.

    2009-06-01

    The evolution of the free-particle wave function in one dimension is the same as scalar Fresnel diffraction from a one-dimensional structure. Quantum mechanics courses often explore the propagation of Gaussian wave packets, but the diffractionlike mathematics is sufficiently tractable to investigate the propagation of other wave packets, both numerically and analytically. More importantly, the diffraction analogy facilitates the development of an intuitive understanding of the role that the initial phase plays in free-particle wave packet evolution. This article considers some of the effects of the initial phase function on the subsequent evolution of free-particle wave packets in the position representation. These considerations reinforce the idea that the classical mechanics limit embodied in the correspondence principle and formalized in the Ehrenfest theorem is necessarily an incomplete representation of quantum behavior.

  3. Localization of wave packets in one-dimensional random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Juan Pablo Ramírez; Wellens, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We study the expansion of an initially strongly confined wave packet in a one-dimensional weak random potential with short correlation length. At long times, the expansion of the wave packet comes to a halt due to destructive interferences leading to Anderson localization. We develop an analytical description for the disorder-averaged localized density profile. For this purpose, we employ the diagrammatic method of Berezinskii which we extend to the case of wave packets, present an analytical expression of the Lyapunov exponent which is valid for small as well as for high energies, and, finally, develop a self-consistent Born approximation in order to analytically calculate the energy distribution of our wave packet. By comparison with numerical simulations, we show that our theory describes well the complete localized density profile, not only in the tails but also in the center.

  4. Analytic approach to the wave packet formalism in oscillation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardini, A.E.; Leo, S. de

    2004-09-01

    We introduce an approximation scheme to perform an analytic study of the oscillation phenomena in a pedagogical and comprehensive way. By using Gaussian wave packets, we show that the oscillation is bounded by a time-dependent vanishing function which characterizes the slippage between the mass-eigenstate wave packets. We also demonstrate that the wave packet spreading represents a secondary effect which plays a significant role only in the nonrelativistic limit. In our analysis, we note the presence of a new time-dependent phase and calculate how this additional term modifies the oscillating character of the flavor conversion formula. Finally, by considering box and sine wave packets we study how the choice of different functions to describe the particle localization changes the oscillation probability.

  5. Theory for low-frequency modulated Langmuir wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with low frequency modulations (or beats) observed in the Jovian foreshock are argued to be direct evidence for the Langmuir wave decay L yields L-prime + S. In this decay, 'pump' Langmuir waves L, driven by an electron beam, produce backscattered product Langmuir waves L-prime and ion sound waves S. The L and L-prime waves beat at the frequency and wavevector of the S waves, thereby modulating the wave packets. Beam speeds calculated using the modulated Jovian wave packets (1) are reasonable, at 4-10 times the electron thermal speed, (2) are consistent with theoretical limits on the decay process, and (3) decrease with increasing foreshock depth, as expected theoretically. These results strongly support the theory. The modulation depth of some wave packets suggests saturation by the decay L yields L-prime + S. Applications to modulated Langmuir packets in the Venusian and terrestrial foreshocks and in a type III radio source are proposed.

  6. Direct observation of an attosecond electron wave packet in a nitrogen molecule

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Tomoya; Furukawa, Yusuke; Nabekawa, Yasuo; Miyabe, Shungo; Amani Eilanlou, A.; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Capturing electron motion in a molecule is the basis of understanding or steering chemical reactions. Nonlinear Fourier transform spectroscopy using an attosecond-pump/attosecond-probe technique is used to observe an attosecond electron wave packet in a nitrogen molecule in real time. The 500-as electronic motion between two bound electronic states in a nitrogen molecule is captured by measuring the fragment ions with the same kinetic energy generated in sequential two-photon dissociative ionization processes. The temporal evolution of electronic coherence originating from various electronic states is visualized via the fragment ions appearing after irradiation of the probe pulse. This observation of an attosecond molecular electron wave packet is a critical step in understanding coupled nuclear and electron motion in polyatomic and biological molecules to explore attochemistry. PMID:26601262

  7. On Latitudinal Dependence of Secular Variations Induced by a Dissipating Gravity Wave Packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Hickey, M. P.

    2003-12-01

    A time evolution of the response of the minor species and the OH airglow to a dissipating gravity wave packet can be simulated with a 2-dimensional, time-dependent, fully nonlinear OH model developed recently by Huang and Hickey [2002]. The wave packet was simulated using a spectral full-wave model described by Hickey et al. [2000] and Hickey and Walterscheid [2001], and then input to a 2-D chemistry model to study the secular variation of the minor species and OH nightglow. Previous studies of OH nightglow at high latitudes show strong secular variations of minor species and also of the OH brightness induced by wave transience and dissipation [Huang and Hickey, 2002]. We plan to employ the same models to study the secular variations of minor species and the OH nightglow at mid- and low-latitudes. The latitudinal dependence of the secular variations can thus be deduced. Satellite observations reveal much larger OH brightness at mid-latitudes compared to those at high and low latitudes. Therefore, we expect greater secular variations induced by the same wave packet at mid-latitudes.

  8. Two Color Interferometry with Nonlinear Refractive Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    2002-01-01

    Using nonlinear refractive properties of salt-water solution at two wavelengths, numerical analysis has been performed to extract temperature and concentration from virtual interferometric fringe data. The theoretical study, using a commercially available equation solving tool, starts with critical fringe counting needs and the role of nonlinear refractive properties in such measurements. Finally, methodology of the analysis, developed codes, and fringe counting accuracy needs are described in detail.

  9. Rydberg wave packets and half-cycle electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Chandra Shekar

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation summarizes an examination of the dynamics of atomic Rydberg wave packets with coherent pulses of THz electromagnetic radiation consisting of less than a single cycle of the electric field. The bulk of the energy is contained in just a half-cycle. Previous work (1, 10) has shown how these half-cycle pulses can be used to ionize the highly excited states of an atom, and that a classical view of electronic motion in the atom explains the ionization mechanism. To further probe the boundary between classical trajectories and quantum mechanics, in this work we investigate dynamical combinations of Rydberg states, or Rydberg wave packets, and how they ionize under the influence of a half-cycle electromagnetic pulse. With time-domain techniques we are able to extract the dynamics of the wave packet from the ionization rate. We then observe wave packet motion in both the electronic radial and angular coordinates, and can view it directly with the half-cycle pulse anywhere on its trajectory. This is the unique feature of half- cycle pulse ionization. Semiclassical ideas of ionization in conjunction with quantum descriptions of the wave packet, are capable of reproducing the main trends in our data, and in the absence of a rigorous model we rely on these. Experiments of this nature provide examples of the ongoing effort to use the coherent properties of radiation to control electronic motion in an atom, as well as to probe the boundaries between quantum and classical mechanics.

  10. Coda wave interferometry for estimating nonlinear behavior in seismic velocity.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel; Grêt, Alexandre; Douma, Huub; Scales, John

    2002-03-22

    In coda wave interferometry, one records multiply scattered waves at a limited number of receivers to infer changes in the medium over time. With this technique, we have determined the nonlinear dependence of the seismic velocity in granite on temperature and the associated acoustic emissions. This technique can be used in warning mode, to detect the presence of temporal changes in the medium, or in diagnostic mode, where the temporal change in the medium is quantified.

  11. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wave packets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Katya M.

    During atmospheric reentry, hypersonic vehicles are subjected to high levels of boundary-layer pressure fluctuations that cause vibration of internal components. Current models are not adequate to predict these fluctuations. A more physics-based approach can be obtained by using a turbulent-spot model of transition. In order to gain a better understanding of the pressure-fluctuation field and the growth of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, the development of disturbances was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. For a controlled study, disturbances were created by pulsed glow perturbations and studied at various freestream conditions. Both the centerline and the spanwise distribution of pressure fluctuations were measured as boundary-layer disturbances grew from linear instability wave packets into turbulent spots. A disturbance first grows into a linear instability wave packet and then quickly becomes nonlinear. At this point, the wave packet is still concentrated near the disturbance centerline, but weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the center. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. Breakdown to turbulence begins in the core of the wave packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broadband frequencies. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction at a spreading angle. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a turbulent spot with a typical arrowhead shape. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch

  12. Semiclassical Dynamics of Electron Wave Packet States with Phase Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.; Bliokh, Yury P.; Savel'ev, Sergey; Nori, Franco

    2007-11-09

    We consider semiclassical higher-order wave packet solutions of the Schroedinger equation with phase vortices. The vortex line is aligned with the propagation direction, and the wave packet carries a well-defined orbital angular momentum (OAM) ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})l (l is the vortex strength) along its main linear momentum. The probability current coils around the momentum in such OAM states of electrons. In an electric field, these states evolve like massless particles with spin l. The magnetic-monopole Berry curvature appears in momentum space, which results in a spin-orbit-type interaction and a Berry/Magnus transverse force acting on the wave packet. This brings about the OAM Hall effect. In a magnetic field, there is a Zeeman interaction, which, can lead to more complicated dynamics.

  13. Propagation velocity of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Nakagawa, H. ); Tanaka, M. )

    1994-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the behavior of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma due to ion--neutral-atom collisions. It is urged that the central frequency of the packet is observed to gradually decrease with traveling distance in the absorption range of frequencies because of a differential damping among the Fourier components, and that the measured average velocity of its peak amplitude is not accounted for by the conventional group velocity, but by the prediction derived by Tanaka, Fujiwara, and Ikegami [Phys. Rev. A 34, 4851 (1986)]. Furthermore, when the initial central frequency is close to the critical frequency in the anomalous dispersion, the wave packet apparently collapses when traveling along the magnetic field; however, we have found that it is decomposed into another two wave packets with the central frequencies being higher or lower than the critical frequency.

  14. Chiral wave-packet scattering in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Dong; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Haiwen; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.

    2016-05-01

    In quantum mechanics, a particle is best described by the wave packet instead of the plane wave. Here, we study the wave-packet scattering problem in Weyl semimetals with the low-energy Weyl fermions of different chiralities. Our results show that the wave packet acquires a chirality-protected shift in the single-impurity scattering process. More importantly, the chirality-protected shift can lead to an anomalous scattering probability, and thus affects the transport properties in Weyl semimetals. We find that the ratio between the transport lifetime and the quantum lifetime increases sharply when the Fermi energy approaches the Weyl nodes, providing an explanation of the experimentally observed ultrahigh mobility in topological (Weyl or Dirac) semimetals.

  15. Wave packet propagation across barriers by semiclassical initial value methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G.

    2015-07-01

    Semiclassical initial value representation (IVR) formulas for the propagator have difficulty describing tunneling through barriers. A key reason is that these formulas do not automatically reduce, in the classical limit, to the version of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller (VVG) propagator required to treat barrier tunneling, which involves trajectories that have complex initial conditions and that follow paths in complex time. In this work, a simple IVR expression, that has the correct tunneling form in the classical limit, is derived for the propagator in the case of one-dimensional barrier transmission. Similarly, an IVR formula, that reduces to the Generalized Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics (GGWPD) expression [D. Huber, E. J. Heller, and R. Littlejohn, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2003 (1988)] in the classical limit, is derived for the transmitted wave packet. Uniform semiclassical versions of the IVR formulas are presented and simplified expressions in terms of real trajectories and WKB penetration factors are described. Numerical tests show that the uniform IVR treatment gives good results for wave packet transmission through the Eckart and Gaussian barriers in all cases examined. In contrast, even when applied with the proper complex trajectories, the VVG and GGWPD treatments are inaccurate when the mean energy of the wave packet is near the classical transmission threshold. The IVR expressions for the propagator and wave packet are cast as contour integrals in the complex space of initial conditions and these are generalized to potentially allow treatment of a larger variety of systems. A steepest descent analysis of the contour integral formula for the wave packet in the present cases confirms its relationship to the GGWPD method, verifies its semiclassical validity, and explains results of numerical calculations.

  16. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  17. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  18. Symmetry and conservation laws in semiclassical wave packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, Tomoki

    2015-03-15

    We formulate symmetries in semiclassical Gaussian wave packet dynamics and find the corresponding conserved quantities, particularly the semiclassical angular momentum, via Noether’s theorem. We consider two slightly different formulations of Gaussian wave packet dynamics; one is based on earlier works of Heller and Hagedorn and the other based on the symplectic-geometric approach by Lubich and others. In either case, we reveal the symplectic and Hamiltonian nature of the dynamics and formulate natural symmetry group actions in the setting to derive the corresponding conserved quantities (momentum maps). The semiclassical angular momentum inherits the essential properties of the classical angular momentum as well as naturally corresponds to the quantum picture.

  19. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel; Sanz, Angel S.

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  20. Short-time Chebyshev wave packet method for molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-08-01

    In this letter we present the extended usage of short-time Chebyshev wave packet method in the laser induced molecular photoionization dynamics. In our extension, the polynomial expansion of the exponential in the time evolution operator, the Hamiltonian operator can act on the wave packet directly which neatly avoids the matrix diagonalization. This propagation scheme is of obvious advantages when the dynamical system has large Hamiltonian matrix. Computational simulations are performed for the calculation of photoelectronic distributions from intense short pulse ionization of K2 and NaI which represent the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) model and Non-BO one, respectively.

  1. Perfect wave-packet splitting and reconstruction in a one-dimensional lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Compagno, Enrico; Bose, Sougato

    2015-05-01

    Particle delocalization is a common feature of quantum random walks in arbitrary lattices. However, in the typical scenario a particle spreads over multiple sites and its evolution is not directly useful for controlled quantum interferometry, as may be required for technological applications. In this paper we devise a strategy to perfectly split the wave packet of an incoming particle into two components, each propagating in opposite directions, which reconstruct the shape of the initial wavefunction after a particular time t*. Therefore, a particle in a δ -like initial state becomes exactly delocalized between two distant sites after t*. We find the mathematical conditions to achieve the perfect splitting, which are satisfied by viable example Hamiltonians with static site-dependent interaction strengths. Our results pave the way for the generation of peculiar many-body interference patterns in a many-site atomic chain (such as the Hanbury Brown and Twiss and quantum Talbot effects) as well as for the distribution of entanglement between remote sites. Thus, as for the case of perfect state transfer, the perfect wave-packet splitting can be a new tool for varied applications.

  2. Nonlinear interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Tacla, Alexandre B.; Boixo, Sergio; Datta, Animesh; Shaji, Anil; Caves, Carlton M.

    2010-11-15

    We analyze a proposed experiment [Boixo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 040403 (2008)] for achieving sensitivity scaling better than 1/N in a nonlinear Ramsey interferometer that uses a two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of N atoms. We present numerical simulations that confirm the analytical predictions for the effect of the spreading of the BEC ground-state wave function on the ideal 1/N{sup 3/2} scaling. Numerical integration of the coupled, time-dependent, two-mode Gross-Pitaevskii equations allows us to study the several simplifying assumptions made in the initial analytic study of the proposal and to explore when they can be justified. In particular, we find that the two modes share the same spatial wave function for a length of time that is sufficient to run the metrology scheme.

  3. Asymmetric Acoustic Propagation of Wave Packets Via the Self-Demodulation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, Thibaut; Tournat, Vincent; Richoux, Olivier; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    This Letter presents the experimental characterization of nonreciprocal elastic wave transmission in a single-mode elastic waveguide. This asymmetric system is obtained by coupling a selection layer with a conversion layer: the selection component is provided by a phononic crystal, while the conversion is achieved by a nonlinear self-demodulation effect in a 3D unconsolidated granular medium. A quantitative experimental study of this acoustic rectifier indicates a high rectifying ratio, up to 1 06, with wide band (10 kHz) and an audible effect. Moreover, this system allows for wave-packet rectification and extends the future applications of asymmetric systems.

  4. Modulation instability of wave packets in a Gires-Tournois interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotovskii, I. O.; Lapin, V. A.; Sementsov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    We study the specific features of the perturbation dynamics of a wave packet in a Gires-Tournois interferometer. We obtain a dispersion relationship that relates the perturbation parameters to the parameters of the structure and pump wave, the analytical expressions for the gain increment of a harmonic perturbation and other important characteristics that determine the dynamics of the modulation instability of the reflected wave. Based on numerical simulation, we plot the dependences of the dispersion and nonlinearity parameters and the gain increment on the spacing between the interferometer mirrors, the angle of incidence of the radiation onto the mirrors, and the radiation intensity.

  5. Wave packet motion in harmonic potential and computer visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuru, Hideo; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    Wave packet motions of a single electron in harmonic potentials or a magnetic field are obtained analytically. The phase of the wave function which depends on both time and space is also presented explicitly. The probability density of the electron changes its width and central position periodically. These results are visualized using computer animation techniques.

  6. Resonance-assisted decay of nondispersive wave packets.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, Sandro; Schlagheck, Peter; Eltschka, Christopher; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2006-07-28

    We present a quantitative semiclassical theory for the decay of nondispersive electronic wave packets in driven, ionizing Rydberg systems. Statistically robust quantities are extracted combining resonance-assisted tunneling with subsequent transport across chaotic phase space and a final ionization step.

  7. Exploring multiple degrees of freedom in Rydberg wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haidan

    2006-12-01

    Recent advances in the study of Rydberg atoms have focused on the control, manipulation and detection of Rydberg wave packets using novel external fields such as half-cycle pulses. The radial degree of freedom has been controlled and used to process information encoded in Rydberg states. However, these previous experiments make use of only a single degree of freedom, restricting the potential of other degrees of freedom for quantum computing in Rydberg atoms. In this dissertation, we explore the control and detection of other degrees of freedom in an electron wave packet, such as the angular momentum quantum number ℓ, the magnetic quantum number m and the electron spin; so that the full range of quantum numbers can participate in information processing. We first propose an interferometric control of the population of angular momentum states using two time-delayed phase-locked ultrafast laser pulses. The population of arbitrary angular momentum states can be greatly enhanced by optimizing the time delay and the relative phases between two laser pulses. We then qualitatively measure the evolution of angular momentum components in Stark wave packets by a weak half-cycle pulse (HCP). This measurement utilizes a time-delayed HCP and is proved to be effective for detecting various aspects of wave packet dynamics, particularly, the evolution of non-stationary states. The technique relies on the fact that the HCP redistributes the eigenstate populations and induced the population variation which reflects the evolution of eigenstate phases. Finally, we find that the dynamics of m-states could be highly correlated with the internal degree of freedom of the electron, the spin. We study the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the wave packet dynamics and observe the angular precession of a Rydberg wave packet. The population redistribution from p to s states is highly sensitive to the polarization of the HCP and changes with the precession of the electron orbit. We obtain the

  8. Background-free nonlinear microspectroscopy with vibrational molecular interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Mukamel, Shaul; Herek, Jennifer L.; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a method for performing nonlinear microspectroscopy that provides an intuitive and unified description of the various signal contributions, and allows the direct extraction of the vibrational response. Three optical fields create a pair of Stokes Raman pathways that interfere in the same vibrational state. Frequency modulating one of the fields leads to amplitude modulations on all of the fields. This vibrational molecular interferometry (VMI) technique allows imaging at high speed free of non-resonant background, and is able to distinguish between electronic and vibrational contributions to the total signal.

  9. Theoretical and numerical studies of wave-packet propagation in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.; Zonca, F.; Cardinali, A.

    2012-04-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of wave-packet propagation are presented to analyze the time varying 2D mode structures of electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak plasmas, using general flux coordinates. Instead of solving the 2D wave equations directly, the solution of the initial value problem is used to obtain the 2D mode structure, following the propagation of wave-packets generated by a source and reconstructing the time varying field. As application, the 2D WKB method is applied to investigate the shaping effects (elongation and triangularity) of tokamak geometry on the lower hybrid wave propagation and absorption. Meanwhile, the mode structure decomposition (MSD) method is used to handle the boundary conditions and simplify the 2D problem to two nested 1D problems. The MSD method is related to that discussed earlier by Zonca and Chen [Phys. Fluids B 5, 3668 (1993)] and reduces to the well-known "ballooning formalism" [J. W. Connor et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 396 (1978)], when spatial scale separation applies. This method is used to investigate the time varying 2D electrostatic ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode structure with a mixed WKB-full-wave technique. The time varying field pattern is reconstructed, and the time asymptotic structure of the wave-packet propagation gives the 2D eigenmode and the corresponding eigenvalue. As a general approach to investigate 2D mode structures in tokamak plasmas, our method also applies for electromagnetic waves with general source/sink terms either by an internal/external antenna or a nonlinear wave interaction with zonal structures.

  10. Wave packet dynamics in the optimal superadiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, V.; Goddard, B. D.; Manthe, U.

    2016-06-01

    We explain the concept of superadiabatic representations and show how in the context of electronically non-adiabatic transitions they lead to an explicit formula that can be used to predict transitions at avoided crossings. Based on this formula, we present a simple method for computing wave packet dynamics across avoided crossings. Only knowledge of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces near the avoided crossing is required for the computation. In particular, this means that no diabatization procedure is necessary, the adiabatic electronic energies can be computed on the fly, and they only need to be computed to higher accuracy when an avoided crossing is detected. We test the quality of our method on the paradigmatic example of photo-dissociation of NaI, finding very good agreement with results of exact wave packet calculations.

  11. Probing surface states with many-body wave packet scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damon, F.; Georgeot, B.; Guéry-Odelin, D.

    2016-07-01

    The scattering of 1D matter wave bright solitons on attractive potentials enables one to populate bound states, a feature impossible with noninteracting wave packets. Compared to noninteracting states, the populated states are renormalized by the attractive interactions between atoms and keep the same topology. This renormalization can even transform a virtual state into a bound state. By switching off adiabatically the interactions, the trapped wave packets converge towards the true noninteracting bound states. Our numerical studies show how such scattering experiments can reveal and characterize the surface states of a periodic structure whose translational invariance has been broken. We provide evidence that the corresponding 3D regime should be accessible with current techniques.

  12. Wave packet dynamics in the optimal superadiabatic approximation.

    PubMed

    Betz, V; Goddard, B D; Manthe, U

    2016-06-14

    We explain the concept of superadiabatic representations and show how in the context of electronically non-adiabatic transitions they lead to an explicit formula that can be used to predict transitions at avoided crossings. Based on this formula, we present a simple method for computing wave packet dynamics across avoided crossings. Only knowledge of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces near the avoided crossing is required for the computation. In particular, this means that no diabatization procedure is necessary, the adiabatic electronic energies can be computed on the fly, and they only need to be computed to higher accuracy when an avoided crossing is detected. We test the quality of our method on the paradigmatic example of photo-dissociation of NaI, finding very good agreement with results of exact wave packet calculations. PMID:27305998

  13. Stochastic acceleration of ions driven by Pc1 wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, G. V. Sibeck, D. G.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2015-07-15

    The stochastic motion of protons and He{sup +} ions driven by Pc1 wave packets is studied in the context of resonant particle heating. Resonant ion cyclotron heating typically occurs when wave powers exceed 10{sup −4} nT{sup 2}/Hz. Gyroresonance breaks the first adiabatic invariant and energizes keV ions. Cherenkov resonances with the electrostatic component of wave packets can also accelerate ions. The main effect of this interaction is to accelerate thermal protons to the local Alfven speed. The dependencies of observable quantities on the wave power and plasma parameters are determined, and estimates for the heating extent and rate of particle heating in these wave-particle interactions are shown to be in reasonable agreement with known empirical data.

  14. The Interference of the Dynamically Squeezed Vibrational Wave Packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, An. V.; Janszky, J.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic excitation of a molecule by a sequence of two femtosecond phase-locked laser pulses is considered. In this case the interference between the vibrational wave packets induced by each of the subpulses within a single molecule takes place. It is shown that due to the dynamical squeezing effect of a molecular vibrational state the interference of the vibrational wave packets allows one to measure the duration of a femtosecond laser pulse. This can be achieved experimentally by measuring the dependence of the integral fluorescence of the excited molecule on the delay time between the subpulses. The interference can lead to a sharp peak (or to a down-fall) in that dependence, the width of which is equal to the duration of the laser pulse. It is shown that finite temperature of the medium is favorable for such an experiment.

  15. Formation of wave packets in electron diffraction on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, Robert; Bahrim, Cristian

    2012-02-01

    Measurements of electron diffraction typically reveal the atomic structure of crystals and allow finding the length of chemical bonds. The effective electronic charge of each atom in the crystal acts upon the incident electron beam as a netting of narrow pinholes, and Fourier transforms the unique deBroglie wavelength of the projectile electron accelerated at fixed voltage into a wave packet. Using the uncertainty principle one can understand the mechanism that makes an incident electron to become a wave packet travelling inside the crystal at a group velocity identical with the initial speed of the projectile electron. Furthermore, the Pauli Exclusion Principle allows us to understand the fast passage of the projectile electron through the crystal and also, it allows the evaluation of the characteristic time for electron transmission. The project was sponsored by the STAIRSTEP program under the NSF-DUE grant# 0757057.

  16. Spin-orbit states of neutron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsofini, Joachim; Sarenac, Dusan; Wood, Christopher J.; Cory, David G.; Arif, Muhammad; Clark, Charles W.; Huber, Michael G.; Pushin, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to prepare an entangled spin-orbit state between the spin and the orbital angular momenta of a neutron wave packet. This spin-orbit state is created by passing neutrons through the center of a quadrupole magnetic field, which provides a coupling between the spin and orbital degrees of freedom. A Ramsey-fringe-type measurement is suggested as a means of verifying the spin-orbit correlations.

  17. Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interference Observed by Transient Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Holler, M.; Schapper, F.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.

    2011-03-25

    We perform attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy around the first ionization threshold of helium and observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time delay with respect to a superimposed, moderately strong infrared laser field. The phase relation between the absorption modulation of individual harmonics gives direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wave packets as the mechanism behind the absorption modulation.

  18. Attosecond electron wave-packet interference observed by transient absorption.

    PubMed

    Holler, M; Schapper, F; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2011-03-25

    We perform attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy around the first ionization threshold of helium and observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time delay with respect to a superimposed, moderately strong infrared laser field. The phase relation between the absorption modulation of individual harmonics gives direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wave packets as the mechanism behind the absorption modulation.

  19. Accelerating Airy-Gauss-Kummer localized wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi; Huang, Tingwen

    2014-01-01

    A general approach to generating three-dimensional nondiffracting spatiotemporal solutions of the linear Schrödinger equation with an Airy-beam time-dependence is reported. A class of accelerating optical pulses with the structure of Airy-Gauss-Kummer vortex beams is obtained. Our results demonstrate that the optical field contributions to the Airy-Gauss-Kummer accelerating optical wave packets of the cylindrical symmetry can be characterized by the radial and angular mode numbers.

  20. Generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics: Integrable and chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Harinder; Vyas, Manan; Tomsovic, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate semiclassical wave packet propagation technique is a complex, time-dependent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method known as generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics (GGWPD). It requires overcoming many technical difficulties in order to be carried out fully in practice. In its place roughly twenty years ago, linearized wave packet dynamics was generalized to methods that include sets of off-center, real trajectories for both classically integrable and chaotic dynamical systems that completely capture the dynamical transport. The connections between those methods and GGWPD are developed in a way that enables a far more practical implementation of GGWPD. The generally complex saddle-point trajectories at its foundation are found using a multidimensional Newton-Raphson root search method that begins with the set of off-center, real trajectories. This is possible because there is a one-to-one correspondence. The neighboring trajectories associated with each off-center, real trajectory form a path that crosses a unique saddle; there are exceptions that are straightforward to identify. The method is applied to the kicked rotor to demonstrate the accuracy improvement as a function of ℏ that comes with using the saddle-point trajectories.

  1. Geometrical aspects in optical wave-packet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Masaru; Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    We construct a semiclassical theory for propagation of an optical wave packet in a nonconducting medium with a periodic structure of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, i.e., a nonconducting photonic crystal. We employ a quantum-mechanical formalism in order to clarify its link to those of electronic systems. It involves the geometrical phase, i.e., Berry's phase, in a natural way, and describes an interplay between orbital motion and internal rotation. Based on the above theory, we discuss the geometrical aspects of the optical Hall effect. We also consider a reduction of the theory to a system without periodic structure and apply it to the transverse shift of an optical beam at an interface reflection or refraction. For a generic incident beam with an arbitrary polarization, an identical result for the transverse shift of each reflected or transmitted beam is given by the following different approaches: (i) analytic evaluation of wave-packet dynamics, (ii) total angular momentum (TAM) conservation for individual photons, and (iii) numerical simulation of wave-packet dynamics. It is consistent with a result by classical electrodynamics. This means that the TAM conservation for individual photons is already taken into account in wave optics, i.e., classical electrodynamics. Finally, we show an application of our theory to a two-dimensional photonic crystal, and propose an optimal design for the enhancement of the optical Hall effect in photonic crystals.

  2. Electronically nonadiabatic wave packet propagation using frozen Gaussian scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondorskiy, Alexey D.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-09-01

    We present an approach, which allows to employ the adiabatic wave packet propagation technique and semiclassical theory to treat the nonadiabatic processes by using trajectory hopping. The approach developed generates a bunch of hopping trajectories and gives all additional information to incorporate the effect of nonadiabatic coupling into the wave packet dynamics. This provides an interface between a general adiabatic frozen Gaussian wave packet propagation method and the trajectory surface hopping technique. The basic idea suggested in [A. D. Kondorskiy and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8937 (2004)] is revisited and complemented in the present work by the elaboration of efficient numerical algorithms. We combine our approach with the adiabatic Herman-Kluk frozen Gaussian approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the resulting method is demonstrated by applying it to popular benchmark model systems including three Tully's models and 24D model of pyrazine. It is shown that photoabsorption spectrum is successfully reproduced by using a few hundreds of trajectories. We employ the compact finite difference Hessian update scheme to consider feasibility of the ab initio "on-the-fly" simulations. It is found that this technique allows us to obtain the reliable final results using several Hessian matrix calculations per trajectory.

  3. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul E.; Markmann, Andreas; Morozov, Igor V.; Valuev, Ilya A.; Fichtl, Christopher A.; Richards, David F.; Batista, Victor S.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method provides a variational approximation to the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Its application in the field of high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading), which results in diminishing electron-nuclear interactions. Electron spreading has previously been ascribed to a shortcoming of the WPMD method and has been counteracted by various heuristic additions to the models used. We employ more accurate methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted by them and how WPMD can be improved. A scattering process involving a single dynamic electron interacting with a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison. We compare the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the framework of the TDVP, we use the standard variational form of WPMD, the single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as a sum of Gaussian WPs, as in the split WP method. Wave packet spreading is predicted by all methods, so it is not the source of the unphysical diminishing of electron-nuclear interactions in WPMD at high temperatures. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to correctly reproduce breakup of the electron's probability density into localized density near the protons is responsible for the deviation from more accurate predictions. Extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup to occur in order to yield dynamics that lead to accurate electron densities.

  4. Generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics: Integrable and chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harinder; Vyas, Manan; Tomsovic, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate semiclassical wave packet propagation technique is a complex, time-dependent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method known as generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics (GGWPD). It requires overcoming many technical difficulties in order to be carried out fully in practice. In its place roughly twenty years ago, linearized wave packet dynamics was generalized to methods that include sets of off-center, real trajectories for both classically integrable and chaotic dynamical systems that completely capture the dynamical transport. The connections between those methods and GGWPD are developed in a way that enables a far more practical implementation of GGWPD. The generally complex saddle-point trajectories at its foundation are found using a multidimensional Newton-Raphson root search method that begins with the set of off-center, real trajectories. This is possible because there is a one-to-one correspondence. The neighboring trajectories associated with each off-center, real trajectory form a path that crosses a unique saddle; there are exceptions that are straightforward to identify. The method is applied to the kicked rotor to demonstrate the accuracy improvement as a function of ℏ that comes with using the saddle-point trajectories.

  5. Electronically nonadiabatic wave packet propagation using frozen Gaussian scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, Alexey D.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-09-21

    We present an approach, which allows to employ the adiabatic wave packet propagation technique and semiclassical theory to treat the nonadiabatic processes by using trajectory hopping. The approach developed generates a bunch of hopping trajectories and gives all additional information to incorporate the effect of nonadiabatic coupling into the wave packet dynamics. This provides an interface between a general adiabatic frozen Gaussian wave packet propagation method and the trajectory surface hopping technique. The basic idea suggested in [A. D. Kondorskiy and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8937 (2004)] is revisited and complemented in the present work by the elaboration of efficient numerical algorithms. We combine our approach with the adiabatic Herman-Kluk frozen Gaussian approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the resulting method is demonstrated by applying it to popular benchmark model systems including three Tully’s models and 24D model of pyrazine. It is shown that photoabsorption spectrum is successfully reproduced by using a few hundreds of trajectories. We employ the compact finite difference Hessian update scheme to consider feasibility of the ab initio “on-the-fly” simulations. It is found that this technique allows us to obtain the reliable final results using several Hessian matrix calculations per trajectory.

  6. Rydberg Wave Packets and Half-Cycle Electromagnetic Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Chandra S.

    1998-05-01

    This dissertation summarizes an examination of the dynamics of atomic Rydberg wave packets with coherent pulses of THz electromagnetic radiation consisting of less than a single cycle of the electric field. The bulk of the energy is contained in just a half-cycle. Previous work ( R. Jones, D. You, and P. Bucksbaum, ``Ionization of Rydberg atoms by subpicosecond half-cycle electromagnetic pulses,'' Phys. Rev. Lett.), vol. 70, 1993. had shown how these half-cycle pulses can be used to ionize the highly excited states of an atom, and that a classical view of electronic motion in the atom explains the ionization mechanism. To further probe the boundary between classical trajectories and quantum mechanics, in this work I investigate dynamical combinations of Rydberg states, or Rydberg wave packets, and how they ionize under the influence of a half-cycle electromagnetic pulse. With time-domain techniques I am able to extract the dynamics of the wave packet from the ionization rate, and to observe wave packet motion in both the electronic radial ( C. Raman, C. Conover, C. Sukenik, and P. Bucksbaum, ``Ionization of Rydberg wavepackets by sub-picosecond half-cycle electromagnetic pulses,'' Phys. Rev. Lett.), vol. 76, 1996.and angular ( C. Raman, T. Weinacht, and P. Bucksbaum, ``Stark wavepackets viewed with half cycle pulses.'' Phys. Rev. A), vol. 55, No. 6, 1997. coordinates. This is the first time a wavepacket technique has been used to view electron motion everywhere on its trajectory, and not just at the nucleus. This is the principal feature of half-cycle pulse ionization. Semiclassical ideas of ionization in conjunction with quantum descriptions of the wave packet, are capable of reproducing the main trends in the data, and in the absence of a rigorous model I rely on these. Experiments of this nature provide examples of the ongoing effort to use the coherent properties of radiation to control electronic motion in an atom, as well as to probe the boundaries between

  7. Engineering biphoton wave packets with an electromagnetically induced grating

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Xiao Min; Zhai Yanhua; Du Shengwang

    2010-10-15

    We propose to shape biphoton wave packets with an electromagnetically induced grating in a four-level double-{Lambda} cold atomic system. We show that the induced hybrid grating plays an essential role in directing the new fields into different angular positions, especially for the zeroth-order diffraction. A number of interesting features appears in the shaped two-photon wave forms. For example, broadening or narrowing the spectrum would be possible in the proposed scheme even without the use of a cavity.

  8. Wave-packet evolution in non-Hermitian quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Graefe, Eva-Maria; Schubert, Roman

    2011-06-15

    The quantum evolution of the Wigner function for Gaussian wave packets generated by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian is investigated. In the semiclassical limit ({h_bar}/2{pi}){yields}0 this yields the non-Hermitian analog of the Ehrenfest theorem for the dynamics of observable expectation values. The lack of Hermiticity reveals the importance of the complex structure on the classical phase space: The resulting equations of motion are coupled to an equation of motion for the phase-space metric - a phenomenon having no analog in Hermitian theories.

  9. Selection of ionization paths of K2 on superfluid helium droplets by wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Marek Bastian; Dufour, Adrien; Achazi, Georg; Patas, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2016-08-01

    We report on the control of wave packet dynamics for the ionization of K2 attached to the surface of superfluid helium droplets. The superfluid helium matrix acts as a heat sink and reduces the coherence time of molecular processes by dissipation. We use tailor-shaped pulses in order to activate or inhibit different ionization paths by constructive or destructive wave packet interference. A drastic change of the wave packet dynamics is observed by shifting the phase between the exciting sub pulses.

  10. Encoding and Decoding Information in High-n Circular Wave Packets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Burgdorfer, J.; Wyker, B.; Dunning, F. B.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the extraction of detailed information on the density matrix of very-high-n(> 300) near-circular Rydberg wave packets through Fourier analysis of the quantum beat and quantum revival signal. The remarkably long coherence times associated with circular wave packets facilitate the preservation and read-out of information encoded in this matrix. We illustrate the power of the method by determining the angular localization of the components of a wave packet.

  11. Wave-packet dynamics on Chern-band lattices in a trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Moessner, Roderich; Haque, Masudul

    2015-12-01

    The experimental realization of lattices with Chern bands in ultracold-atom and photonic systems has motivated the study of time-dependent phenomena, such as spatial propagation, in lattices with nontrivial topology. We study the dynamics of Gaussian wave packets on the Haldane honeycomb Chern-band lattice model, in the presence of a harmonic trap. We focus on the transverse response to a force, which is due partly to the Berry curvature and partly to the transverse component of the energy band curvature. We evaluate the accuracy of a semiclassical description, which treats the wave packet as a point particle in both real and momentum space, in reproducing the motion of a realistic wave packet with finite extent. We find that, in order to accurately capture the wave-packet dynamics, the extent of the wave packet in momentum space needs to be taken into account: The dynamics is sensitive to the interplay of band dispersion and Berry curvature over the finite region of momentum (reciprocal) space where the wave packet has support. Moreover, if the wave packet is prepared with a finite initial momentum, the semiclassical analysis reproduces its motion as long as it has a large overlap with the eigenstates of a single band. The semiclassical description generally improves with increasing real-space size of the wave packet, as long as the external conditions (e.g., external force) remain uniform throughout the spatial extent of the wave packet.

  12. Time behavior of a Gaussian wave packet accompanying the generalized coherent state for the inverted oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Bouguerra, Yacine; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-06-01

    A Gaussian wave packet of the inverted oscillator is investigated using the invariant operator method together with the unitary transformation method. A simple wave packet directly derived from the eigenstates of the invariant operator of the system corresponds to a plane wave that is fully delocalized. However, we can construct a weighted wave packet in terms of such plane waves, which corresponds to a Gaussian wave. This wave packet is associated with the generalized coherent state, which can be crucially utilized for investigating the classical limit of quantum wave mechanics. Various quantum properties of the system, such as fluctuations of the canonical variables, the uncertainty product, and the motion of the wave packet or quantum particle, are analyzed by means of this wave packet. We have confirmed that the time behavior of such a wave packet is very similar to the counterpart classical state. The wave packet runs away from the origin in the positive or negative direction in the 1D coordinate depending on the condition of the initial state. We have confirmed that this wave packet not only moves acceleratively but also spreads out during its propagation.

  13. Field structure of collapsing wave packets in 3D strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Robinson, P. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is constructed for the electric fields in the collapsing wave packets found in 3D simulations of driven and damped isotropic strong Langmuir turbulence. This model, based on a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential, accounts for the distribution of wave-packet shapes observed in the simulations, particularly the predominance of oblate wave packets. In contrast with predictions for undamped and undriven subsonic collapse of scalar fields, oblate vector-field wave packets do not flatten during collapse but, instead, remain approximately self-similar and rigid.

  14. Transport of time-varying plasma currents by whistler wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Rousculp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between pulsed currents and electromagnetic waves is examined in a regime characterized by electron MHD. Pulsed currents are generated by (1) collection/emission of charged particles by/from biased electrodes and (2) induction of currents by time-varying and moving magnetic fields. Pulsed currents are observed to propagate at the speed of whistler wave packets. Their field structure forms ropelike configurations which are electromagnetically force-free. Moving sources induce 'eddy' currents which excite waves and form Cerenkov-like whistler 'wings'. The radiation patterns of moving magnetic antennas and electrodynamic tethers are investigated. Nonlinear effects of large-amplitude, antenna-launched whistler pulses are observed. These involve a new modulational instability in which a channel of high conductivity which permits the wave/currents to penetrate deeply into a collisional plasma is formed.

  15. Scattering of wave packets on atoms in the Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovets, D. V.; Kotkin, G. L.; Serbo, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that 200 -300 keV electrons with the unusual spatial profiles can be produced and even focused to a subnanometer scale—namely, electrons carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum and also the so-called Airy beams. Since the wave functions of such electrons do not represent plane waves, the standard Born formula for scattering of them off a potential field is no longer applicable and, hence, needs modification. In the present paper, we address the generic problem of elastic scattering of a wave packet of a fast nonrelativistic particle off a potential field. We obtain simple and convenient formulas for a number of events and an effective cross section in such a scattering, which represent generalization of the Born formula for a case when finite sizes and spatial inhomogeneity of the initial packet should be taken into account. As a benchmark, we consider two simple models corresponding to scattering of a Gaussian wave packet on a Gaussian potential and on a hydrogen atom, and perform a detailed analysis of the effects brought about by the limited sizes of the incident beam and by the finite impact parameter between the potential center and the packet's axis.

  16. Non-Hermitian wave packet approximation of Bloch optical equations

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Eric; Sukharev, Maxim

    2013-01-14

    We introduce a non-Hermitian approximation of Bloch optical equations. This approximation provides a complete description of the excitation, relaxation, and decoherence dynamics of ensembles of coupled quantum systems in weak laser fields, taking into account collective effects and dephasing. In the proposed method, one propagates the wave function of the system instead of a complete density matrix. Relaxation and dephasing are taken into account via automatically adjusted time-dependent gain and decay rates. As an application, we compute the numerical wave packet solution of a time-dependent non-Hermitian Schroedinger equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a quantum nano-structure, and compare the calculated transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra with those obtained from the numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. It is shown that the proposed wave packet scheme is significantly faster than the propagation of the full density matrix while maintaining small error. We provide the key ingredients for easy-to-use implementation of the proposed scheme and identify the limits and error scaling of this approximation.

  17. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markmann, Andreas; Grabowski*, P. E.; Morozov, I. V.; Valuev, I. A.; Fichtl, C. A.; Batista, V. S.; Graziani, F. R.; Murillo, M. S.; Cimarron Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method solves the time-dependent Schrödinger equation via a variational approximation. Application to high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading) with diminished electron-nuclear interaction. This was previously ascribed to a shortcoming of WPMD and has been counteracted by heuristic additions to the model. We employ various methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted. Single electron scattering on a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison via the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the TDVP, we use as ansätze the standard form of WPMD, a single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as the split WP method, a linear combination of Gaussian WPs. Spreading is predicted by all methods, so is not the cause of unphysical diminishing interactions in WPMD. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to reproduce breakup of the density into fragments localized near ions is responsible for the deviation between methods. Hence, extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup. Authors contributed equally.

  18. Creation of multihole molecular wave packets via strong-field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus; Gonzalez, Leticia; Nichols, Sarah

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate the creation of vibrational wave packets on multiple electronic states of a molecule via strong-field ionization. Furthermore, we show that the relative contribution of the different electronic states depends on the shape of the laser pulse which launches the wave packets.

  19. On the Behavior of Three-dimensional Wave Packets in Viscously Spreading Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    We consider analytically the evolution of a three-dimensional wave packet generated by an impulsive source in a mixing layer. The base flow is assumed to be spreading due to viscous diffusion. The analysis is restricted to small disturbances (linearized theory). A suitable high-frequency ansatz is used to describe the packet; the key elements of this description are a complex phase and a wave action density. It is found that the product of this density and an infinitesimal material volume convecting at the local group velocity is not conserved: there is a continuous interaction between the base flow and the wave action. This interaction is determined by suitable mode-weighted averages of the second and fourth derivatives of the base-flow velocity profile. Although there is some tendency for the dominant wave number in the packet to shift from the most unstable value toward the neutral value, this shift is quite moderate. In practice, wave packets do not become locally neutral in a diverging base flow (as do instability modes), therefore, they are expected to grow more suddenly than pure instability modes and do not develop critical layers. The group velocity is complex; the full significance of this is realized by analytically continuing the equations for the phase and wave action into a complex domain. The implications of this analytic continuation are discussed vis-a-vis the secondary instabilities of the packet: very small scale perturbations on the phase can grow very rapidly initially, but saturate later because most of the energy in these perturbations is convected away by the group velocity. This remark, as well as the one regarding critical layers, has consequences for the nonlinear theories.

  20. Quantum dynamics of charge transfer on the one-dimensional lattice: Wave packet spreading and recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, N. Likhachev; O, I. Shevaleevskii; G, A. Vinogradov

    2016-01-01

    The wave function temporal evolution on the one-dimensional (1D) lattice is considered in the tight-binding approximation. The lattice consists of N equal sites and one impurity site (donor). The donor differs from other lattice sites by the on-site electron energy E and the intersite coupling C. The moving wave packet is formed from the wave function initially localized on the donor. The exact solution for the wave packet velocity and the shape is derived at different values E and C. The velocity has the maximal possible group velocity v = 2. The wave packet width grows with time ˜ t1/3 and its amplitude decreases ˜ t-1/3. The wave packet reflects multiply from the lattice ends. Analytical expressions for the wave packet front propagation and recurrence are in good agreement with numeric simulations.

  1. Magnetic helicity conservation and inverse energy cascade in electron magnetohydrodynamic wave packets.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2011-05-13

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluidlike description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. An EMHD wave propagates along magnetic field lines. The direction of propagation can be either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field lines. We numerically study propagation of three-dimensional (3D) EMHD wave packets moving in one direction. We obtain two major results. (1) Unlike its magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) counterpart, an EMHD wave packet is dispersive. Because of this, EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction create opposite-traveling wave packets via self-interaction and cascade energy to smaller scales. (2) EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction clearly exhibit inverse energy cascade. We find that the latter is due to conservation of magnetic helicity. We compare inverse energy cascade in 3D EMHD turbulence and two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence.

  2. Flavor entanglement in neutrino oscillations in the wave packet description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    The wave packet approach to neutrino oscillations provides an enlightening description of quantum decoherence induced, during propagation, by localization effects. Within this approach, we show that a deeper insight into the dynamical aspects of particle mixing can be obtained if one investigates the behavior of quantum correlations associated to flavor oscillations. By identifying the neutrino three-flavor modes with (suitably defined) three-qubit modes, the exploitation of tools of quantum information theory for mixed states allows a detailed analysis of the dynamical behavior of flavor entanglement during free propagation. This provides further elements leading to a more complete understanding of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, and a basis for possible applicative implementations. The analysis is carried out by studying the distribution of the flavor entanglement; to this aim, we perform combined investigations of the behaviors of the two-flavor concurrence and of the logarithmic negativities associated with specific bipartitions of the three flavors.

  3. Quantum oscillations and wave packet revival in conical graphene structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Debabrata; Berche, Bertrand

    2016-03-01

    We present analytical expressions for the eigenstates and eigenvalues of electrons confined in a graphene monolayer in which the crystal symmetry is locally modified by replacing a hexagon by a pentagon, square or heptagon. The calculations are performed in the continuum limit approximation in the vicinity of the Dirac points, solving Dirac equation by freezing out the carrier radial motion. We include the effect of an external magnetic field and show the appearance of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and find out the conditions of gapped and gapless states in the spectrum. We show that the gauge field due to a disclination lifts the orbital degeneracy originating from the existence of two valleys. The broken valley degeneracy has a clear signature on quantum oscillations and wave packet dynamics.

  4. Hydrodynamic view of wave-packet interference: quantum caves.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Sanz, Angel S; Miret-Artés, Salvador; Wyatt, Robert E

    2009-06-26

    Wave-packet interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism using a hydrodynamic description. Quantum interference leads to the formation of the topological structure of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. These caves consist of the vortical and stagnation tubes originating from the isosurfaces of the amplitude of the wave function and its first derivative. Complex quantum trajectories display counterclockwise helical wrapping around the stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near the vortical tubes. The string of alternating stagnation and vortical tubes is sufficient to generate divergent trajectories. Moreover, the average wrapping time for trajectories and the rotational rate of the nodal line in the complex plane can be used to define the lifetime for interference features. PMID:19659057

  5. Simulation of wave packet tunneling of interacting identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Filinov, A. V.; Arkhipov, A. S.

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate a different method of simulation of nonstationary quantum processes, considering the tunneling of two interacting identical particles, represented by wave packets. The used method of quantum molecular dynamics (WMD) is based on the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. In the context of this method ensembles of classical trajectories are used to solve quantum Wigner-Liouville equation. These classical trajectories obey Hamiltonian-like equations, where the effective potential consists of the usual classical term and the quantum term, which depends on the Wigner function and its derivatives. The quantum term is calculated using local distribution of trajectories in phase space, therefore, classical trajectories are not independent, contrary to classical molecular dynamics. The developed WMD method takes into account the influence of exchange and interaction between particles. The role of direct and exchange interactions in tunneling is analyzed. The tunneling times for interacting particles are calculated.

  6. Nonlinear wave dynamics in honeycomb lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-15

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in honeycomb lattices and show that, in quasi-one-dimensional configurations, the waves propagating in the lattice can be separated into left-moving and right-moving waves, and any wave packet composed of only left (or only right) movers does not change its intensity structure in spite of the nonlinear evolution of its phase. We show that the propagation of a general wave packet can be described, within a good approximation, as a superposition of left- and right-moving self-similar (nonlinear) wave packets. Finally, we find that Klein tunneling is not suppressed by nonlinearity.

  7. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-07-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant Λ-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to 10-5c (c is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packet consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated and controlled by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field.

  8. Eliminating the dipole phase in attosecond pulse characterization using Rydberg wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Stefan; Dahlström, Jan Marcus

    2016-07-01

    We propose a technique to fully characterize the temporal structure of extreme ultraviolet pulses by ionizing a bound coherent electronic wave packet. The influence of the dipole phase, which is the main obstacle for state-of-the-art pulse characterization schemes, can be eliminated by angle integration of the photoelectron spectrum. We show that in particular, atomic Rydberg wave packets are ideal and that wave packets involving multiple electronic states provide redundant information that can be used to cross-check the consistency of the phase reconstruction.

  9. Riemann {zeta} function from wave-packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, R.; Schleich, W. P.; Dahl, J. P.; Moya-Cessa, H.; Strunz, W. T.; Walser, R.

    2010-09-15

    We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann {zeta} function {zeta}(s,a). Indeed, the autocorrelation function at a time t is determined by {zeta}({sigma}+i{tau},a), where {sigma} is governed by the temperature of the thermal phase state and {tau} is proportional to t. We use the JWKB method to solve the inverse spectral problem for a general logarithmic energy spectrum; that is, we determine a family of potentials giving rise to such a spectrum. For large distances, all potentials display a universal behavior; they take the shape of a logarithm. However, their form close to the origin depends on the value of the Hurwitz parameter a in {zeta}(s,a). In particular, we establish a connection between the value of the potential energy at its minimum, the Hurwitz parameter and the Maslov index of JWKB. We compare and contrast exact and approximate eigenvalues of purely logarithmic potentials. Moreover, we use a numerical method to find a potential which leads to exact logarithmic eigenvalues. We discuss possible realizations of Riemann {zeta} wave-packet dynamics using cold atoms in appropriately tailored light fields.

  10. Coriolis-coupled wave packet dynamics of H + HLi reaction.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, R; Mahapatra, S

    2006-05-11

    We investigated the effect of Coriolis coupling (CC) on the initial state-selected dynamics of H+HLi reaction by a time-dependent wave packet (WP) approach. Exact quantum scattering calculations were obtained by a WP propagation method based on the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and ab initio potential energy surface of the reacting system. Partial wave contributions up to the total angular momentum J=30 were found to be necessary for the scattering of HLi in its vibrational and rotational ground state up to a collision energy approximately 0.75 eV. For each J value, the projection quantum number K was varied from 0 to min (J, K(max)), with K(max)=8 until J=20 and K(max)=4 for further higher J values. This is because further higher values of K do not have much effect on the dynamics and also because one wishes to maintain the large computational overhead for each calculation within the affordable limit. The initial state-selected integral reaction cross sections and thermal rate constants were calculated by summing up the contributions from all partial waves. These were compared with our previous results on the title system, obtained within the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting approximations, to demonstrate the impact of CC on the dynamics of this system.

  11. Discrete wave-packet representation in nuclear matter calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müther, H.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Kukulin, V. I.; Pomerantsev, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the nucleon-nucleon t matrix as well as the corresponding Bethe-Goldstone equation to determine the Brueckner reaction matrix in nuclear matter are reformulated in terms of the resolvents for the total two-nucleon Hamiltonians defined in free space and in medium correspondingly. This allows one to find solutions at many energies simultaneously by using the respective Hamiltonian matrix diagonalization in the stationary wave-packet basis. Among other important advantages, this approach simplifies greatly the whole computation procedures both for the coupled-channel t matrix and the Brueckner reaction matrix. Therefore this principally novel scheme is expected to be especially useful for self-consistent nuclear matter calculations because it allows one to accelerate in a high degree single-particle potential iterations. Furthermore the method provides direct access to the properties of possible two-nucleon bound states in the nuclear medium. The comparison between reaction matrices found via the numerical solution of the Bethe-Goldstone integral equation and the straightforward Hamiltonian diagonalization shows a high accuracy of the method suggested. The proposed fully discrete approach opens a new way to an accurate treatment of two- and three-particle correlations in nuclear matter on the basis of the three-particle Bethe-Faddeev equation by an effective Hamiltonian diagonalization procedure.

  12. Alfvénic wave packets collision in a kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Servidio, Sergio; Valentini, Francesco; Malara, Francesco; Matthaeus, William H.; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    The problem of two colliding and counter-propagating Alfvénic wave packets has been investigated in detail since the late Seventies. In particular Moffatt [1] and Parker [2] showed that, in the framework of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), nonlinear interactions can develop only during the overlapping of the two packets. Here we describe a similar problem in the framework of the kinetic physics. The collision of two quasi-Alfvénic packets has been analyzed by means of MHD, Hall-MHD and kinetic simulations performed with two different hybrid codes: a PIC code [3] and a Vlasov-Maxwell code [4]. Due to the huge computational cost, only a 2D-3V phase space is allowed (two dimensions in the physical space, three dimensions in the velocity space). Preliminary results suggest that, as well as in the MHD case, the most relevant nonlinear effects occur during the overlapping of the two packets. For both the PIC and Vlasov cases, strong temperature anisotropies are present during the evolution of the wave packets. Moreover, due to the absence of numerical noise, Vlasov simulations show that the collision of the counter-propagating solitary waves produces a significant beam in the velocity distribution functions [5], which, instead, cannot be appreciated in PIC simulations. We remark that, beyond the interest of studying a well-known MHD problem in the realm of the kinetic physics, our results allows also to compare different numerical codes. [1] H.K. Moffatt, Field generation in electrically conducting fluids (Cambridge University Press, 1978). [2] E.N. Parker, Cosmical magnetic fields: their origin and their activity (Oxford University Press, 1979). [3] T.N. Parashar, M.A. Shay, P.A. Cassak and W.H. Matthaeus, Physics of Plasmas 16, 032310 (2009). [4] F. Valentini, P. Trávníček, F. Califano, P. Hellinger & A. Mangeney, Journal of Computational Physics 225, 753-770 (2007). [5] J. He, C. Tu, E. Marsch, C.H. Chen, L. Wang, Z. Pei, L. Zhang, C.S. Salem and S

  13. Wave-packet squeezing by iterative pump-dump control in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Bo Y.; Lee, Sungyul; Sola, Ignacio R.; Santamaria, Jesus

    2006-02-15

    Iterative vibrational wave packet squeezing by a sequence of femtosecond pulses is proposed. Analytic formulas are derived for the harmonic oscillator case, and the practical implementation of the scheme is tested on different electronic transitions in Rb{sub 2}.

  14. Oriented rotational wave-packet dynamics studies via high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Frumker, E; Hebeisen, C T; Kajumba, N; Bertrand, J B; Wörner, H J; Spanner, M; Villeneuve, D M; Naumov, A; Corkum, P B

    2012-09-14

    We produce oriented rotational wave packets in CO and measure their characteristics via high harmonic generation. The wave packet is created using an intense, femtosecond laser pulse and its second harmonic. A delayed 800 nm pulse probes the wave packet, generating even-order high harmonics that arise from the broken symmetry induced by the orientation dynamics. The even-order harmonic radiation that we measure appears on a zero background, enabling us to accurately follow the temporal evolution of the wave packet. Our measurements reveal that, for the conditions optimum for harmonic generation, the orientation is produced by preferential ionization which depletes the sample of molecules of one orientation. PMID:23005628

  15. Femtosecond wave-packet dynamics in cesium dimers studied through controlled stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Luqi; Wang Xi; Patnaik, Anil K.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Murawski, Robert K.; Pestov, Dmitry; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics of wave packets in cesium dimers using a femtosecond-controlled pump-probe technique. We implement configurations with one pulse (pump) or two pulses (pump and control) to produce vibrational wave packets on the electronic excited state. The transmission of an additional, variable-delay probe pulse is measured to monitor the time evolution of the wave packets. In the case of the pump-control-probe configuration, a superposition of two independent wave packets is observed. In order to elucidate the observed experimental data, we develop a theory based on the Liouville equation for the density matrix associated with the Franck-Condon factors. Both the numerical and analytical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental results.

  16. Temporal and spatial manipulation of the recolliding wave packet in strong-field photoelectron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingrui; Li, Yang; Zhou, Yueming; Li, Min; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically demonstrate temporal and spatial manipulation of electron wave packets involved in strong-field photoelectron holography (SFPH) with the orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. By varying the relative phase of the two-color fields, the recollision time of the returning wave packet can be accurately controlled, which allows us to switch off and on the holographic interference. Moreover, the recollision angles of the returning electron wave packet can be arbitrarily controlled via changing the relative intensity of the two-color fields, and thus the structure information of the target is encoded in the hologram by the recollision electron wave packet from different angles. This makes the SFPH a powerful technique of imaging the molecular structure as well as ultrafast dynamics on an attosecond time scale.

  17. Beam dynamics and wave packet splitting in a periodically curved optical waveguide: multimode effects.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, M; Janner, D; Ramponi, R; Laporta, P; Longhi, S; Cianci, E; Foglietti, V

    2005-08-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of beam dynamics and wave packet splitting of light in a periodically bent optical waveguide, a phenomenon recently observed [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 073002 (2005)] which is the optical equivalent of adiabatic stabilization of atoms in intense and high-frequency laser fields, is presented in the multimode operational regime. Inhibition of wave packet splitting is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed for higher-order mode excitation.

  18. Observation of wave packet distortion during a negative-group-velocity transmission.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dexin; Salamin, Yannick; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Qiao, Shan; Zheng, Guoan; Ran, Lixin

    2015-01-29

    In Physics, causality is a fundamental postulation arising from the second law of thermodynamics. It states that, the cause of an event precedes its effect. In the context of Electromagnetics, the relativistic causality limits the upper bound of the velocity of information, which is carried by electromagnetic wave packets, to the speed of light in free space (c). In anomalously dispersive media (ADM), it has been shown that, wave packets appear to propagate with a superluminal or even negative group velocity. However, Sommerfeld and Brillouin pointed out that the "front" of such wave packets, known as the initial point of the Sommerfeld precursor, always travels at c. In this work, we investigate the negative-group-velocity transmission of half-sine wave packets. We experimentally observe the wave front and the distortion of modulated wave packets propagating with a negative group velocity in a passive artificial ADM in microwave regime. Different from previous literature on the propagation of superluminal Gaussian packets, strongly distorted sinusoidal packets with non-superluminal wave fronts were observed. This result agrees with Brillouin's assertion, i.e., the severe distortion of seemingly superluminal wave packets makes the definition of group velocity physically meaningless in the anomalously dispersive region.

  19. Observation of Wave Packet Distortion during a Negative-Group-Velocity Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dexin; Salamin, Yannick; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Qiao, Shan; Zheng, Guoan; Ran, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    In Physics, causality is a fundamental postulation arising from the second law of thermodynamics. It states that, the cause of an event precedes its effect. In the context of Electromagnetics, the relativistic causality limits the upper bound of the velocity of information, which is carried by electromagnetic wave packets, to the speed of light in free space (c). In anomalously dispersive media (ADM), it has been shown that, wave packets appear to propagate with a superluminal or even negative group velocity. However, Sommerfeld and Brillouin pointed out that the ``front'' of such wave packets, known as the initial point of the Sommerfeld precursor, always travels at c. In this work, we investigate the negative-group-velocity transmission of half-sine wave packets. We experimentally observe the wave front and the distortion of modulated wave packets propagating with a negative group velocity in a passive artificial ADM in microwave regime. Different from previous literature on the propagation of superluminal Gaussian packets, strongly distorted sinusoidal packets with non-superluminal wave fronts were observed. This result agrees with Brillouin's assertion, i.e., the severe distortion of seemingly superluminal wave packets makes the definition of group velocity physically meaningless in the anomalously dispersive region.

  20. Correlation of femtosecond wave packets and fluorescence interference in a conjugated polymer: Towards the measurement of site homogeneous dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milota, F.; Sperling, J.; Szöcs, V.; Tortschanoff, A.; Kauffmann, H. F.

    2004-05-01

    Probing electronic femtosecond (fs) coherence among segmental sites that are congested by static and dynamic site disorder and subject to structural relaxation is a big, experimental challenge in the study of photophysics of poly(p-phenylenevinylene). In this work, fs-wave-packet fluorescence interferometry experiments are presented that measure macroscopic coherent kernels and their phase-relaxation in the low-temperature, bottom-state regime of the density-of-states below the migrational threshold energy where downhill site-to-site transfer is marginal. By using freely propagating and tunable 70 fs excitation/probing pulses and employing narrow-band spectral filtering of wave packets, fluorescence interferograms with strongly damped beatings can be observed. The coherences formally follow the in-phase superpositions of two site-optical free-induction-decays and originate from distinct pairs of coherent doorway-states, different in energy and space, each of them being targeted, by two discrete quantum-arrival-states 1α and 1β, via independent, isoenergetic 0→1 fluorescence transitions. The coherent transients are explained as site-to-site polarization beatings, caused by the interference of two fluorescence correlation signals. The numerical analysis of the damping regime, based upon second-order perturbational solutions, reveals the lower limit value of homogeneous dephasing in the range from T2≃100 fs to T2≃200 fs depending on the site-excitation energy of the bottom-states. The experiments enable to look into the formation of the relaxed state as a special molecular process of electron-phonon coupling and hence open-up a quite new perspective in the puzzle of multichromophore optical dynamics and structural relaxation in conjugated polymers.

  1. Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  2. Optical control of molecular dynamics: Molecular cannons, reflectrons, and wave-packet focusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Jeffrey L.; Whitnell, Robert M.; Wilson, Kent R.; Yan, YiJing; Mukamel, Shaul

    1993-11-01

    We consider the control of molecular dynamics using tailored light fields, based on a phase space theory of control [Y. J. Yan et al., J. Phys. Chem. 97, 2320 (1993)]. This theory enables us to calculate, in the weak field (one-photon) limit, the globally optimal light field that produces the best overlap for a given phase space target. We present as an illustrative example the use of quantum control to overcome the natural tendency of quantum wave packets to delocalize on excited state potential energy curves. Three cases are studied: (i) a ``molecular cannon'' in which we focus an outgoing continuum wave packet of I2 in both position and momentum, (ii) a ``reflectron'' in which we focus an incoming bound wave packet of I2, and (iii) the focusing of a bound wave packet of Na2 at a turning point on the excited state potential using multiple light pulses to create a localized wave packet with zero momentum. For each case, we compute the globally optimal light field and also how well the wave packet produced by this light field achieves the desired target. These globally optimal fields are quite simple and robust. While our theory provides the globally optimal light field in the linear, weak field regime, experiment can in reality only provide a restricted universe of possible light fields. We therefore also consider the control of molecular quantum dynamics using light fields restricted to a parametrized functional form which spans a set of fields that can be experimentally realized. We fit the globally optimal electric field with a functional form consisting of a superposition of subpulses with variable parameters of amplitude, center time, center frequency, temporal width, relative phase, and linear and quadratic chirp. The best fit light fields produce excellent quantum control and are within the range of experimental possibility. We discuss relevant experiments such as ultrafast spectroscopy and ultrafast electron and x-ray diffraction which can in principle

  3. Phase Structure of Strong-Field Tunneling Wave Packets from Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Min; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Staudte, André; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-04-01

    We study the phase structure of the tunneling wave packets from strong-field ionization of molecules and present a molecular quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo model to describe the laser-driven dynamics of photoelectron momentum distributions of molecules. Using our model, we reproduce and explain the alignment-dependent molecular frame photoelectron spectra of strong-field tunneling ionization of N2 reported by M. Meckel et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 594 (2014)]. In addition to modeling the low-energy photoelectron angular distributions quantitatively, we extract the phase structure of strong-field molecular tunneling wave packets, shedding light on its physical origin. The initial phase of the tunneling wave packets at the tunnel exit depends on both the initial transverse momentum distribution and the molecular internuclear distance. We further show that the ionizing molecular orbital has a critical effect on the initial phase of the tunneling wave packets. The phase structure of the photoelectron wave packet is a key ingredient for modeling strong-field molecular photoelectron holography, high-harmonic generation, and molecular orbital imaging.

  4. Phase Structure of Strong-Field Tunneling Wave Packets from Molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Min; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Staudte, André; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-04-22

    We study the phase structure of the tunneling wave packets from strong-field ionization of molecules and present a molecular quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo model to describe the laser-driven dynamics of photoelectron momentum distributions of molecules. Using our model, we reproduce and explain the alignment-dependent molecular frame photoelectron spectra of strong-field tunneling ionization of N_{2} reported by M. Meckel et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 594 (2014)]. In addition to modeling the low-energy photoelectron angular distributions quantitatively, we extract the phase structure of strong-field molecular tunneling wave packets, shedding light on its physical origin. The initial phase of the tunneling wave packets at the tunnel exit depends on both the initial transverse momentum distribution and the molecular internuclear distance. We further show that the ionizing molecular orbital has a critical effect on the initial phase of the tunneling wave packets. The phase structure of the photoelectron wave packet is a key ingredient for modeling strong-field molecular photoelectron holography, high-harmonic generation, and molecular orbital imaging.

  5. Higher order dispersion in the propagation of a gravity wave packet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Dong, B.

    1989-01-01

    To the first order of approximation, the complex amplitude of a wave packet in an anisotropic and dispersive medium is convected with the group of velocity. However, a gravity wave is a vector wave. Its wave packet must be formed by superposition of various wave numbers with corresponding frequencies, as is the case for scalar waves, and additionally by superposing many eigenmodes which also depend on the wave number. To represent the vector wave packet self-consistently, it is found that a gradient term must be included in the expansion. For a Guassian wave packet, this gradient term is shown to have important implications on the velocity vector as represented by its hodograph. Numerical results show that the hodograph is influenced by the location of the relative position of interest from the center of a Gaussian pulse. Higher order expansion shows that an initial Gaussian wave packet will retain its Gaussian shape as it propagates, but the pulse will spread in all directions with its major axis undergoing a rotation. Numerical results indicate that these higher order dispersive effects may be marginally observable in the atmosphere.

  6. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  7. Observing the phase space trajectory of an entangled matter wave packet.

    PubMed

    Poschinger, U; Walther, A; Singer, K; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2010-12-31

    We observe the phase space trajectory of an entangled wave packet of a trapped ion with high precision. The application of a spin-dependent light force on a superposition of spin states allows for coherent splitting of the matter wave packet such that two distinct components in phase space emerge. We observe such motion with a precision of better than 9% of the wave packet extension in both momentum and position, corresponding to a 0.8 nm position resolution. We accurately study the effect of the initial ion temperature on the quantum entanglement dynamics. Furthermore, we map out the phonon distributions throughout the action of the displacement force. Our investigation shows corrections to simplified models of the system evolution. The precise knowledge of these dynamics may improve quantum gates for ion crystals and lead to entangled matter wave states with large displacements. PMID:21231660

  8. Observation of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Gould, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    Experimental observation of ICRF wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma is reported. Studies were carried out in the Caltech Research Tokamak in a pure hydrogen plasma and in a regime where fast-wave damping was sufficiently small to permit multiple toroidal transits of the wave-packet. Waves were launched by exciting a small loop antenna with a short burst of rf current and were detected with shielded magnetic probes. Probe scans revealed a large increase in wave-packet amplitude at smaller minor radii, and the packet velocity was found to be independent of radial position. Measurement of the packet transit time yielded direct information about the wave group velocity. Packet velocity was investigated as a function of the fundamental excitation frequency, plasma density, and toroidal magnetic field. Results are compared with the predictions of a cold plasma model which includes a vacuum layer at the edge. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Scattering of intense laser radiation by a single-electron wave packet

    SciTech Connect

    Corson, John P.; Peatross, Justin; Mueller, Carsten; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2011-11-15

    A quantum theoretical description of photoemission by a single laser-driven electron wave packet is presented. Energy-momentum conservation ensures that the partial emissions from individual momentum components of the electron wave packet do not interfere when the driving field is unidirectional. In other words, light scattering by an electron packet is independent of the phases of the pure momentum states comprising the packet; the size of the electron wave packet does not matter. This result holds also in the case of high-intensity multiphoton scattering. Our analysis is first presented in the QED framework. Since QED permits the second-quantized entangled electron-photon final state to be projected onto pure plane-wave states, the Born probability interpretation requires these projections to be first squared and then summed to find an overall probability of a scattering event. The QED treatment indicates how a semiclassical framework can be developed to recover the key features of the correct result.

  10. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Experimental observation of simultaneous wave and particle behavior in a narrowband single-photon wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Liao, Kaiyu; Deng, Zhitao; He, Junyu; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Light's wave-particle duality is at the heart of quantum mechanics and can be well illustrated by Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment: The choice of inserting or removing the second classical (quantum) beam splitter in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer determines the classical (quantum) wave-particle behavior of a photon. In this paper, we report our experiment on directly observing simultaneous wave and particle behavior in a narrowband single-photon wave packet by classically inserting or removing the second beam splitter when part of the wave packet passes through it. Our experiment demonstrates that the produced wave-particle state can be utilized in encoding quantum information.

  12. Generation of Quasiclassical Bohr-Like Wave Packets Using Half-Cycle Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, J. J.; Wyker, B.; Dunning, F. B.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate the experimental realization of Bohr-like atoms by applying a pulsed unidirectional field, termed a half-cycle pulse (HCP), to atoms in quasi-two-dimensional near-circular states. This leads to creation of localized wave packets that travel in near-circular orbits and mimic the dynamics of an electron in the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom. This motion can be followed for several orbital periods before the localization of the wave packet is lost due to dephasing. We show, however, that localization can be recovered by application of further HCPs.

  13. Time-dependent treatment of scattering. II - Novel integral equation approach to quantum wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharafeddin, Omar A.; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Hoffman, David K.

    1990-01-01

    The novel wave-packet propagation scheme presented is based on the time-dependent form of the Lippman-Schwinger integral equation and does not require extensive matrix inversions, thereby facilitating application to systems in which some degrees of freedom express the potential in a basis expansion. The matrix to be inverted is a function of the kinetic energy operator, and is accordingly diagonal in a Bessel function basis set. Transition amplitudes for various orbital angular momentum quantum numbers are obtainable via either Fourier transform of the amplitude density from the time to the energy domain, or the direct analysis of the scattered wave packet.

  14. Motion of an Atomic Wave Packet in a Standing-Wave Cavity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chough, Young-Tak

    2007-11-01

    We present an in-depth study on the behavior of an atomic wave packet which is placed in a standing wave cavity prepared in various states of light. We extract a simple classical oscillator model out of the dynamics of the quantum system. We quantitatively resolve the states of the spatially reorganized wave packet by the dressed state spatial probability distribution functions we developed. We also report a novel type of the “quantum collapse and revival” behavior of the Rabi nutation which is originated from the effect of the quantized atomic center-of-mass motion on the atomic internal motion.

  15. Gaussian wave packet states of scalar fields in a universe of de Sitter

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, C. E. F.; Pedrosa, I. A.; Furtado, C.; Carvalho de M, A. M.

    2009-08-15

    In this work, we study quantum effects of a massive scalar field in the de Sitter spacetime. We reduce the problem to that of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator and use exact linear invariants and the dynamic invariant method to derive the corresponding Schroedinger states in terms of solutions of a second order ordinary differential equation. Afterwards, we construct Gaussian wave packet states and calculate the quantum dispersions as well as the quantum correlations for each mode of the quantized scalar field. It is further shown that the center of the Gaussian wave packet remains trapped in the origin.

  16. Mesoscopic superposition and sub-Planck-scale structure in molecular wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Suranjana; Banerji, J.; Panigrahi, P. K.; Chiruvelli, Aravind

    2006-01-15

    We demonstrate the possibility of realizing sub-Planck-scale structures in the mesoscopic superposition of molecular wave packets involving vibrational levels. The time evolution of the wave packet, taken here as the SU(2) coherent state of the Morse potential describing hydrogen iodide molecules, produces macroscopic-quantum-superposition-like states, responsible for the above phenomenon. We investigate the phase-space dynamics of the coherent state through the Wigner function approach and identify the interference phenomena behind the sub-Planck-scale structures. The optimal parameter ranges are specified for observing these features.

  17. A Gaussian wave packet phase-space representation of quantum canonical statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Coughtrie, David J.; Tew, David P.

    2015-07-28

    We present a mapping of quantum canonical statistical averages onto a phase-space average over thawed Gaussian wave-packet (GWP) parameters, which is exact for harmonic systems at all temperatures. The mapping invokes an effective potential surface, experienced by the wave packets, and a temperature-dependent phase-space integrand, to correctly transition from the GWP average at low temperature to classical statistics at high temperature. Numerical tests on weakly and strongly anharmonic model systems demonstrate that thermal averages of the system energy and geometric properties are accurate to within 1% of the exact quantum values at all temperatures.

  18. The Many Faces of Ice and Nonlinear Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Mary Jane

    Ice is likely the most ubiquitous solid in the Universe, yet even here on Earth its surface contains many mysteries. At atmospheric pressure, the stable form of ice is hexagonal ice; known as Ih. This contribution will present data about (i) equilibrium growth at the ice-water interface, (ii) procedures to generate any targeted ice face, and (iii) vibrational spectra of the ice-air interface. Contrary to common belief, the stable ice-water interfaces does not consist of the basal face; rather it consists of pyramidal or prism faces. Growth results from a balance between the molecular density and the top half-bilayer configuration. Arguments reminiscent of Pauling's residual entropy of ice generate the configurational contribution. Prism faces are favored due to greater entropy. Ice grows cryptomorphologically: the macroscopic sample does not reveal the crystalline axes. Locating the crystal axes as well as generating authentic faces for fundamental studies use a combination of the birefringence of ice and etch profiles. Surface vibrational spectroscopy supports an ice model consisting of extended, cooperative motion and beyond-bonding-partner determination of hydrogen bond strength. The surface vibrational spectrum is probed with the nonlinear spectroscopy sum frequency generation (SFG). Currently, nonlinearity limits use of SFG to diagnose interactions. This limitation can be circumvented by measuring the full, complex spectrum. We will report initial results from a newly invented nonlinear interferometer that reveals the full complex spectrum.

  19. Spectral bandwidth scaling laws and reconstruction of THz wave packets generated from two-color laser plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouklidis, A. D.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Tzortzakis, S.

    2016-03-01

    We find the spectral bandwidth scaling laws of the THz wave packets, produced from two-color laser filaments, as a function of the input laser-pulse duration and demonstrate how one can fully recover the original broadband THz wave packets even using narrow-band detection techniques such as the widespread electro-optic sampling.

  20. Space-time correlations in inflationary spectra: A wave-packet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, David; Parentani, Renaud

    2004-11-15

    The inflationary mechanism of mode amplification predicts that the state of each mode with a given wave vector is correlated to that of its partner mode with the opposite vector. This implies nonlocal correlations which leave their imprint on temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. Their spatial properties are best revealed by using local wave packets. This analysis shows that all density fluctuations giving rise to the large scale structures originate in pairs which are born near the reheating. In fact each local density fluctuation is paired with an oppositely moving partner with opposite amplitude. To obtain these results we first apply a 'wave packet transformation' with respect to one argument of the two-point correlation function. A finer understanding of the correlations is then reached by making use of coherent states. A knowledge of the velocity field is required to extract the contribution of a single pair of wave packets. Otherwise, there is a two-folded degeneracy which gives three aligned wave packets arising from two pairs. The applicability of these methods to observational data is briefly discussed.

  1. Motion of an Electron Wave Packet in a Uniform Electric Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, John N.

    1978-01-01

    Energy eigenstates are superimposed in order to form a wave packet for an electron propagating in one dimension under the influence of a uniform, time-dependent electric field. A graphical method is presented by which one can obtain both the position and shape of the envelope. (BB)

  2. Wave-packet dynamics of noninteracting ultracold bosons in an amplitude-modulated parabolic optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    The recent Aarhus experiment [Phys. Rev. A 88, 023620 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023620] produced wave packets by applying amplitude modulation to a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb using an optical lattice. The present paper renders a theoretical account of this experimental production of wave packets and their subsequent time evolution, focusing on a one-dimensional noninteracting bosonic system as a fundamental starting point for accurate quantum analysis. Since experimental manipulation requires efficient wave-packet creation, we introduce the "single-Q Rabi model" to give a simple and reliable description of the interband transition. As a natural extension, we demonstrate enhancement of the wave-packet production by the "two-step Rabi oscillation method" using either one or two frequencies. The subsequent time evolution is affected by the intertwining of Bragg reflection and the Landau-Zener transition at each band gap, which is analyzed with the aid of a semiclassical theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 085302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.085302].

  3. Time-evolution of wave-packets in topological insulators (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Penteado, Poliana H.; Egues, José Carlos

    2015-09-01

    The electronic structure of topological insulators (TIs) are well described Dirac-like equations, e.g. the BHZ model, with a mass term that changes sign at some interface. This simplistic description includes a pseudo-spin-orbit coupling that is intrinsic to the Dirac Hamiltonian. Consequently, the TIs share common properties with the Dirac equation. Among them, the interference between positive and negative energy bands leads to the relativistic oscillatory motion known as the Zitterbewegung. Here we discuss the ballistic time-evolution (pico and nanoseconds) of wave-packets in TIs in the presence of an external electric field. We show that the guiding center of large wave-packets have a finite motion transversal to the electric field equivalent to side-jump in Rashba GaAs. However, for narrow wave-packets the dynamics change and the guiding center description is not complete. We also discuss the reflection of a wave-packet colliding with the edge of the system and the effects of the edge states. Acknowledgement: We acknowledge support from CAPES, CPNq, FAPEMIG, FAPESP, and NAP Q-NANO from PRP/USP.

  4. Proliferation of atomic wave packets at the nodes of a standing light wave

    SciTech Connect

    Prants, S. V.

    2009-11-15

    A quantum analysis is presented of the motion and internal state of a two-level atom in a strong standing-wave light field. Coherent evolution of the atomic wave-packet, atomic dipole moment, and population inversion strongly depends on the ratio between the detuning from atom-field resonance and a characteristic atomic frequency. In the basis of dressed states, atomic motion is represented as wave-packet motion in two effective optical potentials. At exact resonance, coherent population trapping is observed when an atom with zero momentum is centered at a standing-wave node. When the detuning is comparable to the characteristic atomic frequency, the atom crossing a node may or may not undergo a transition between the potentials with probabilities that are similar in order of magnitude. In this detuning range, atomic wave packets proliferate at the nodes of the standing wave. This phenomenon is interpreted as a quantum manifestation of chaotic transport of classical atoms observed in earlier studies. For a certain detuning range, there exists an interval of initial momentum values such that the atom simultaneously oscillates in an optical potential well and moves as a ballistic particle. This behavior of a wave packet is a quantum analog of a classical random walk of an atom, when it enters and leaves optical potential wells in a seemingly irregular manner and freely moves both ways in a periodic standing light wave. In a far-detuned field, the transition probability between the potentials is low, and adiabatic wave-packet evolution corresponding to regular classical motion of an atom is observed.

  5. Recollision dynamics of electron wave packets in high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2009-11-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of recollision of an electron in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) for an H atom and a molecular ion H2+ using a short (ten optical cycles), and intense (I0≥1014W/cm2) , z -polarized linear laser pulse with wavelength 800 nm by accurately solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. A time-frequency analysis obtained via Gabor transforms is employed to identify electron recollision and recombination times responsible for the generation of harmonics. We find that the HHG spectra are mainly attributed to the recollision of an inner electron wave packet with the parent ion in agreement with the classical recollision model. A time delay of the electron recollision occurs between wave packets in inner and outer regions, near to and far from the parent ion, due to different phase of the acceleration (as well as dipole velocity) of the electron. Inner wave packets at recollision contain mainly short and long trajectories whereas outer wave packets contain only single trajectories. Lower-order harmonics are generated mainly by single recollisions near field extrema, i.e., in strong electric fields whereas higher-order harmonics are generated by double trajectories with different intensities. In the case of H2+ at a critical nuclear distance for charge resonance enhanced ionization, we also find that HHG mainly comes from contributions of the inner electron wave packet, but with more complex recollision trajectories due to the presence of more than one Coulomb center. Triple recollision trajectories are shown to occur generally for the latter.

  6. Proliferation of atomic wave packets at the nodes of a standing light wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2009-11-01

    A quantum analysis is presented of the motion and internal state of a two-level atom in a strong standing-wave light field. Coherent evolution of the atomic wave-packet, atomic dipole moment, and population inversion strongly depends on the ratio between the detuning from atom-field resonance and a characteristic atomic frequency. In the basis of dressed states, atomic motion is represented as wave-packet motion in two effective optical potentials. At exact resonance, coherent population trapping is observed when an atom with zero momentum is centered at a standing-wave node. When the detuning is comparable to the characteristic atomic frequency, the atom crossing a node may or may not undergo a transition between the potentials with probabilities that are similar in order of magnitude. In this detuning range, atomic wave packets proliferate at the nodes of the standing wave. This phenomenon is interpreted as a quantum manifestation of chaotic transport of classical atoms observed in earlier studies. For a certain detuning range, there exists an interval of initial momentum values such that the atom simultaneously oscillates in an optical potential well and moves as a ballistic particle. This behavior of a wave packet is a quantum analog of a classical random walk of an atom, when it enters and leaves optical potential wells in a seemingly irregular manner and freely moves both ways in a periodic standing light wave. In a far-detuned field, the transition probability between the potentials is low, and adiabatic wave-packet evolution corresponding to regular classical motion of an atom is observed.

  7. Carrier-envelope offset frequency stabilization in a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator without nonlinear interferometry.

    PubMed

    Balskus, Karolis; Fleming, Melissa; McCracken, Richard A; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2016-03-01

    By exploiting the correlation between changes in the wavelength and the carrier-envelope offset frequency (f(CEO)) of the signal pulses in a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator, we show that f(CEO) can be stabilized indefinitely to a few megahertz in a 333 MHz repetition-rate system. Based on a position-sensitive photodiode, the technique is easily implemented, requires no nonlinear interferometry, has a wide capture range, and is compatible with feed-forward techniques that can enable f(CEO) stabilization at loop bandwidths far exceeding those currently available to OPO combs. PMID:26974092

  8. Properties of whistler mode wave packets at the leading edge of steepened magnetosonic waves - Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Smith, Edward J.; Brinca, Armando L.; Thorne, Richard M.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    The physical characteristics of high-frequency wave packets detected at the steepened edge of magnetosonic waves near Comet Giacobini-Zinner are explored, based on an examination of over 45 well-defined events. The results suggest that the wave packets play an important role in the reorientation and reduction in field magnitude from the steepened magnetosonic waves to the upstream ambient field. The observed properties of the wave packets are shown to be consistent with anomalously Doppler-shifted right-hand polarized waves.

  9. Quantum dynamics of solid Ne upon photo-excitation of a NO impurity: A Gaussian wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect

    Unn-Toc, W.; Meier, C.; Halberstadt, N.; Uranga-Pina, Ll.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2012-08-07

    A high-dimensional quantum wave packet approach based on Gaussian wave packets in Cartesian coordinates is presented. In this method, the high-dimensional wave packet is expressed as a product of time-dependent complex Gaussian functions, which describe the motion of individual atoms. It is applied to the ultrafast geometrical rearrangement dynamics of NO doped cryogenic Ne matrices after femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The static deformation of the solid due to the impurity as well as the dynamical response after femtosecond excitation are analyzed and compared to reduced dimensionality studies. The advantages and limitations of this method are analyzed in the perspective of future applications to other quantum solids.

  10. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.-C.; Tsui, Ka Ming; Wong, Chan Fai; Xu, Jianyi

    2016-06-01

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level.

  11. Wave packet construction in three-dimensional quantum billiards: Visualizing the closed orbit, collapse and revival of wave packets in the cubical billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Arora, Bindiya; Mian, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    We examine the dynamical evolution of wave packets in a cubical billiard where three quantum numbers ($n_x,n_y,n_z$) determine its energy spectrum and consequently its dynamical behavior. We have constructed the wave packet in the cubical billiard and have observed its time evolution for various closed orbits. The closed orbits are possible for certain specific values of quantum numbers ($n_x,n_y,n_z$) and initial momenta ($k_x,k_y,k_z$). We observe that a cubical billiard exhibits degenerate energy levels and the path lengths of the closed orbits for these degenerate energy levels are identical. In spite of the identical path lengths, the shapes of the closed orbits for degenerate levels are different and depend upon angles $\\theta$ and $\\phi$ which we term as the sweep and the elevation angle respectively. These degenerate levels owe their origin to the symmetries prevailing in the cubical billiard and degenerate levels disappear completely or partially for a parallelepiped billiard as the symmetry breaks due to commensurate or incommensurate ratio of sides.

  12. Wave packet dynamics of an atomic ion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.; Rahali, G.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical simulations of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we study the full quantum dynamics of the motion of an atomic ion in a linear Paul trap. Such a trap is based on a time-varying, periodic electric field and hence corresponds to a time-dependent potential for the ion, which we model exactly. We compare the center-of-mass motion with that obtained from classical equations of motion, as well as to results based on a time-independent effective potential. We also study the oscillations of the width of the ion’s wave packet, including close to the border between stable (bounded) and unstable (unbounded) trajectories. Our results confirm that the center-of-mass motion always follows the classical trajectory, that the width of the wave packet is bounded for trapping within the stability region, and therefore that the classical trapping criterion is fully applicable to quantum motion.

  13. Decoherence and the fate of an infalling wave packet: Is Alice burning or fuzzing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Borun D.; Puhm, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski, and Sully have suggested a Gedankenexperiment to test black hole complementarity. They claim that the postulates of black hole complementarity are mutually inconsistent and choose to give up the “absence of drama” for an infalling observer. According to them, the black hole is shielded by a firewall no later than Page time. This has generated some controversy. We find that an interesting picture emerges when we take into account objections from the advocates of fuzzballs. We reformulate Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski, and Sully’s Gedankenexperiment in the decoherence picture of quantum mechanics and find that low energy wave packets interact with the radiation quanta rather violently while high energy wave packets do not. This is consistent with Mathur’s recent proposal of fuzzball complementarity for high energy quanta falling into fuzzballs.

  14. Complex time dependent wave packet technique for thermal equilibrium systems - Electronic spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, J. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Heller, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time dependent wave packet method is presented for the rapid calculation of the properties of systems in thermal equilibrium and is applied, as an illustration, to electronic spectra. The thawed Gaussian approximation to quantum wave packet dynamics combined with evaluation of the density matrix operator by imaginary time propagation is shown to give exact electronic spectra for harmonic potentials and excellent results for both a Morse potential and for the band contours of the three transitions of the visible electronic absorption spectrum of the iodine molecule. The method, in principle, can be extended to many atoms (e.g., condensed phases) and to other properties (e.g., infrared and Raman spectra and thermodynamic variables).

  15. Five-wave-packet linear optics quantum-error-correcting code

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Thomas A.; Braunstein, Samuel L.

    2010-06-15

    In this article we outline a method for generating linear optics circuits that encode quantum-error-correcting codes. Using this method we produce a single-error-correcting code encoding one wave packet over five which can be implemented using linear optics and feed-forward correction. This code improves on the capacity of the best known code that can be implemented using linear optics and saturates the lower bound for the number of carriers needed for a single-error-correcting code. Our code can correct arbitrary single errors that occur randomly on each wave packet corresponding to a non-Gaussian error model, thus circumventing the so-called no-go theorem for Gaussian quantum-error correction.

  16. Reconstruction of an excited-state molecular wave packet with attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Chini, Michael; Wang, Xiaowei; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-08-01

    Attosecond science promises to allow new forms of quantum control in which a broadband isolated attosecond pulse excites a molecular wave packet consisting of a coherent superposition of multiple excited electronic states. This electronic excitation triggers nuclear motion on the molecular manifold of potential energy surfaces and can result in permanent rearrangement of the constituent atoms. Here, we demonstrate attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS) as a viable probe of the electronic and nuclear dynamics initiated in excited states of a neutral molecule by a broadband vacuum ultraviolet pulse. Owing to the high spectral and temporal resolution of ATAS, we are able to reconstruct the time evolution of a vibrational wave packet within the excited B'Σ1u+ electronic state of H2 via the laser-perturbed transient absorption spectrum.

  17. Covariant asymmetric wave packet for a field-theoretical description of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Vadim A.; Shkirmanov, Dmitry S.

    2015-06-01

    We consider a class of models for the relativistic covariant wave packets (WPs) which can be used as asymptotically free in and out states in the quantum field theoretical formalisms for description of the neutrino flavor oscillation phenomenon. We demonstrate that the new “asymmetric” wave packet (AWP) is an appropriate alternative to the more conventional “symmetric” WPs, like the so-called relativistic Gaussian packet (RGP) widely used in the quantum field theory (QFT)-based approaches to neutrino oscillations. We show that RGP is not a particular case of AWP, although many properties of these models are almost identical in the quasistable regime. We discuss some features of AWP distinguishing it from RGP.

  18. Quantum-electrodynamic treatment of photoemission by a single-electron wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, John P.; Peatross, Justin

    2011-11-01

    A quantum-field-theory description of photoemission by a laser-driven single-electron wave packet is presented. We show that, when the incident light is represented with multimode coherent states then, to all orders of perturbation theory, the relative phases of the electron's constituent momenta have no influence on the amount of scattered light. These results are extended using the Furry picture, where the (unidirectional) arbitrary incident light pulse is treated nonperturbatively with Volkov functions. This analysis increases the scope of our prior results in [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.84.053831 84, 053831 (2011)], which demonstrate that the spatial size of the electron wave packet does not influence photoemission.

  19. Extracting amplitudes for single and double ionization from a time-dependent wave packet

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, A.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2007-10-15

    A method is described for extracting double ionization amplitudes from a quantum wave packet for an atom after a short radiation pulse, but while the electrons are still interacting. The procedure involves the use of exterior complex scaling to effectively propagate the field-free solution to infinite times, and allows the use of existing integral formulas for double ionization amplitudes for two electron atoms and molecules.

  20. System-level physics of autonomous nanorobots for hard chemistry and wave packet engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    1994-08-01

    The operation of the prospective autonomous molecular robots that would represent the most advanced achievement of the molecular manufacturing conception is examined at various levels of physical description: the thermodynamic, the hydrodynamic, and the kinetic (Boltzmann) level down to local nonequilibrium thermodynamical and/or mechanical conditions possibly arising in work in some circumstances. The concept of wave packet engineering is suggested as a special technique in the exploitation of molecular robots possibilities, which are generally characterized as 'hard chemistry'.

  1. Measured photoemission from electron wave packets in a strong laser field.

    PubMed

    Ware, Michael; Cunningham, Eric; Coburn, Caleb; Peatross, Justin

    2016-02-15

    We present calibrated measurements of single-photon Thomson scattering from free electrons driven by a laser with intensity 1018  W/cm2. The measurements demonstrate that individual electrons radiate with the strength of point emitters, even when their wave packets spread to the scale of the driving-laser wavelength. The result agrees with predictions of quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26872164

  2. Flow patterns of rotating time-dependent Hartree-Fock wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, M.; Bouten, M.; Van Leuven, P.

    1982-12-01

    A soluble model (Elliott's model in two dimensions) is used to study how well flow patterns and features of rotational motion are represented by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. Due to the spreading of the wave packet in the exact Schrödinger time-evolution, the agreement is good only for phenomena which probe the current during a short time interval.

  3. Interference effects in tunneling of Schrödinger cat wave-packet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, D.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze tunneling of a single particle, whose initial state is given by a superposition of spatially separated wave-packet modes. It is shown that "pile up" of different components in the scatterer may change the tunneling probabilities, making such states a convenient tool for probing the barrier's scattering times. Interference effects arising in resonance tunneling are studied in detail. The analysis allows us to gain further insight into the origin of interference effects in scattering of several identical particles.

  4. Observation of autoionization dynamics and sub-cycle quantum beating in electronic molecular wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reduzzi, M.; Chu, W.-C.; Feng, C.; Dubrouil, A.; Hummert, J.; Calegari, F.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Kornilov, O.; Nisoli, M.; Lin, C.-D.; Sansone, G.

    2016-03-01

    The coherent interaction with ultrashort light pulses is a powerful strategy for monitoring and controlling the dynamics of wave packets in all states of matter. As light presents an oscillation period of a few femtoseconds (T = 2.6 fs in the near infrared spectral range), an external optical field can induce changes in a medium on the sub-cycle timescale, i.e. in a few hundred attoseconds. In this work, we resolve the dynamics of autoionizing states on the femtosecond timescale and observe the sub-cycle evolution of a coherent electronic wave packet in a diatomic molecule, exploiting a tunable ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulse and a synchronized infrared field. The experimental observations are based on measuring the variations of the extreme ultraviolet radiation transmitted through the molecular gas. The different mechanisms contributing to the wave packet dynamics are investigated through theoretical simulations and a simple three level model. The method is general and can be extended to the investigation of more complex systems.

  5. Initial dynamics of the Norrish Type I reaction in acetone: probing wave packet motion.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Sølling, Theis I; Møller, Klaus B

    2011-02-10

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S(1) (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels toward the S(1) minimum in less than 30 fs and stays there for more than 100 picoseconds [Chem. Phys. Lett.2008, 461, 193]. In this work we present simulated TRMS and TRPES signals based on ab initio multiple spawning simulations of the dynamics during the first 200 fs after excitation, getting quite good agreement with the experimental signals. We can explain the ultrafast decay of the experimental signals in the following manner: the wave packet simply travels, mainly along the deplanarization coordinate, out of the detection window of the ionizing probe. This window is so narrow that subsequent revival of the signal due to the coherent deplanarization vibration is not observed, meaning that from the point of view of the experiment the wave packets travels directly to the S(1) minimum. This result stresses the importance of pursuing a closer link to the experimental signal when using molecular dynamics simulations in interpreting experimental results.

  6. Structure of Langmuir and electromagnetic collapsing wave packets in two-dimensional strong plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, H.; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Skjaeraasen, O.; Sobhanian, S.

    2007-07-01

    Nucleating and collapsing wave packets relevant to electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are studied theoretically in two dimensions. Model collapsing Langmuir and transverse potentials are constructed as superpositions of approximate eigenstates of a spherically symmetric density well. Electrostatic and electromagnetic potentials containing only components with azimuthal quantum numbers m =0, 1, 2 are found to give a good representation of the electric fields of nucleating collapsing wave packets in turbulence simulations. The length scales of these trapped states are related to the electron thermal speed ve and the length scale of the density well. It is shown analytically that the electromagnetic trapped states change with ve and that for ve≲0.17c they are delocalized, in accord with recent simulations. In this case, the Langmuir mode collapses independently, as in electrostatic plasma turbulence. For ve≳0.17c, the Langmuir and transverse modes remain coupled during collapse, with autocorrelation lengths in a constant ratio. An investigation of energy transfer to packets localized in density wells shows that the strongest power transfer to the nucleating state occurs for Langmuir waves. Energy transitions between different trapped and free states for collapsing wave packets are studied, and the transition rate from trapped Langmuir to free plane electromagnetic waves is calculated and related to the emission of electromagnetic waves at the plasma frequency.

  7. Spread of highly localized wave-packet in the tight-binding lattice: Entropic and information-theoretical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas, F.A.; Curilef, S.; Plastino, A.R.

    2011-10-15

    The spread of a wave-packet (or its deformation) is a very important topic in quantum mechanics. Understanding this phenomenon is relevant in connection with the study of diverse physical systems. In this paper we apply various 'spreading measures' to characterize the evolution of an initially localized wave-packet in a tight-binding lattice, with special emphasis on information-theoretical measures. We investigate the behavior of both the probability distribution associated with the wave packet and the concomitant probability current. Complexity measures based upon Renyi entropies appear to be particularly good descriptors of the details of the delocalization process. - Highlights: > Spread of highly localized wave-packet in the tight-binding lattice. > Entropic and information-theoretical characterization is used to understand the delocalization. > The behavior of both the probability distribution and the concomitant probability current is investigated. > Renyi entropies appear to be good descriptors of the details of the delocalization process.

  8. Dynamical phase diagram of Gaussian wave packets in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, H.; Neff, T.; Fleischmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the dynamics of self-trapping in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) loaded in deep optical lattices with Gaussian initial conditions, when the dynamics is well described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE). In the literature an approximate dynamical phase diagram based on a variational approach was introduced to distinguish different dynamical regimes: diffusion, self-trapping, and moving breathers. However, we find that the actual DNLSE dynamics shows a completely different diagram than the variational prediction. We calculate numerically a detailed dynamical phase diagram accurately describing the different dynamical regimes. It exhibits a complex structure that can readily be tested in current experiments in BECs in optical lattices and in optical waveguide arrays. Moreover, we derive an explicit theoretical estimate for the transition to self-trapping in excellent agreement with our numerical findings, which may be a valuable guide as well for future studies on a quantum dynamical phase diagram based on the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian.

  9. ACCELERATION OF THE SOLAR WIND BY ALFVEN WAVE PACKETS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2013-01-20

    A scale separation kinetic model of the solar wind acceleration is presented. The model assumes an isotropic Maxwellian distribution of protons and a constant influx of outward propagating Alfven waves with a single exponent Kolmogorov-type spectrum at the base of a coronal acceleration region ({approx}2 R {sub Sun }). Our results indicate that nonlinear cyclotron resonant interaction taking energy from Alfven waves and depositing it into mostly perpendicular heating of protons in initially weakly expanding plasma in a spherically non-uniform magnetic field is able to produce the typical fast solar wind velocities for the typical plasma and wave conditions after expansion to about 5-10 solar radii R {sub Sun }. The acceleration model takes into account the gravity force and the ambipolar electric field, as well as the mirror force, which plays the most important role in driving the solar wind acceleration. Contrary to the recent claims of Isenberg, the cold plasma dispersion only slightly slows down the acceleration and actually helps in obtaining the more realistic fast solar wind speeds.

  10. Nonlinear Internal Wave Behavior near the South of Hai-Nan Island and Simulating the Effect on Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Ma, Li

    2010-09-01

    An internal wave observation experiment was performed near the south of Hai-Nan Island in the South China Sea in July 2004. Three vertical thermistor arrays were moored to estimate internal wave propagation direction and velocity. A nonlinear internal wave packet was observed in this experiment. It appeared at flood tide time of wee hours. Computation indicated that the nonlinear internal wave packet's velocity was 0.54 m/s and its propagation direction was northwest. From its propagation direction, we estimated that the nonlinear internal wave packet was generated near Xi-Sha Islands. The dnoidal model of KdV(Korteweg-deVries) equation was used to simulate the waveform of thid nonlinear internal wave. Measured data shows the crest interval of nonlinear internal waves was shorter when they propagated. In the last section of this paper we simulate a nonlinear internal wave packet's effect on sound propagation and analyzed mode coupling led by the nonlinear internal wave packet.

  11. Numerical approximation of the Schrödinger equation with the electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhennan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we approximate the semi-classical Schrödinger equation in the presence of electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets approach. By operator splitting, the Hamiltonian is divided into the modified part and the residual part. The modified Hamiltonian, which is the main new idea of this paper, is chosen by the fact that Hagedorn wave packets are localized both in space and momentum so that a crucial correction term is added to the truncated Hamiltonian, and is treated by evolving the parameters associated with the Hagedorn wave packets. The residual part is treated by a Galerkin approximation. We prove that, with the modified Hamiltonian only, the Hagedorn wave packets dynamics give the asymptotic solution with error O(ε{sup 1/2}), where ε is the scaled Planck constant. We also prove that, the Galerkin approximation for the residual Hamiltonian can reduce the approximation error to O(ε{sup k/2}), where k depends on the number of Hagedorn wave packets added to the dynamics. This approach is easy to implement, and can be naturally extended to the multidimensional cases. Unlike the high order Gaussian beam method, in which the non-constant cut-off function is necessary and some extra error is introduced, the Hagedorn wave packets approach gives a practical way to improve accuracy even when ε is not very small.

  12. Time-dependent wave packet averaged vibrational frequencies from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Chao; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) on the Stokes side arises from a third order polarization, P(3)(t), which is given by an overlap of a first order wave packet, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > , prepared by a narrow band (ps) Raman pump pulse, Epu(t), on the upper electronic e2 potential energy surface (PES), with a second order wave packet, <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | , that is prepared on the lower electronic e1 PES by a broadband (fs) probe pulse, Epr(t), acting on the first-order wave packet. In off-resonant FSRS, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > resembles the zeroth order wave packet |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > on the lower PES spatially, but with a force on |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > along the coordinates of the reporter modes due to displacements in the equilibrium position, so that <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | will oscillate along those coordinates thus giving rise to similar oscillations in P(3)(t) with the frequencies of the reporter modes. So, by recovering P(3)(t) from the FSRS spectrum, we are able to deduce information on the time-dependent quantum-mechanical wave packet averaged frequencies, ω ¯ j ( t ) , of the reporter modes j along the trajectory of |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > . The observable FSRS Raman gain is related to the imaginary part of P(3)(ω). The imaginary and real parts of P(3)(ω) are related by the Kramers-Kronig relation. Hence, from the FSRS Raman gain, we can obtain the complex P(3)(ω), whose Fourier transform then gives us the complex P(3)(t) to analyze for ω ¯ j ( t ) . We apply the theory, first, to a two-dimensional model system with one conformational mode of low frequency and one reporter vibrational mode of higher frequency with good results, and then we apply it to the time-resolved FSRS spectra of the cis-trans isomerization of retinal in rhodopsin [P. Kukura et al., Science 310, 1006 (2005)]. We obtain the vibrational

  13. Relaxation of an electron wave packet at the quantum Hall edge at filling factor ν =2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodeniuk, Artur O.; Idrisov, Edvin G.; Sukhorukov, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    We address the recent experiment (S. Tewari et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 035420 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.035420) where the suppression of phase coherence of a single-electron wave packet created at the edge of a quantum Hall (QH) system at filling factor 2 has been investigated with the help of an electronic Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. The authors of the experiment have observed an unexpected behavior of phase coherence that saturates at high energies instead of vanishing, presumably suggesting the relaxation of a wave packet to the ground state before it arrives to the MZ interferometer. Here, we theoretically investigate this situation using the model of edge states [I. P. Levkivskyi and E. V. Sukhorukov, Phys. Rev. B 78, 045322 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.78.045322], which accounts for the strong Coulomb interaction between the two electron channels at the edge of a QH system. We conclude that the observed phenomenon cannot be explained within this model for the reason that under an assumption of linearity of the electron spectrum at low energies, the system remains integrable in terms of the collective charge excitations and therefore full relaxation to the ground state is not possible, despite strong interactions. As a result, the degree of the phase coherence decreases with the energy of the initial state in a power-law manner. Since this does not happen in the experiment, a different physical phenomenon may take place at the edge of a QH state, which deserves further investigation. We support our findings by calculating the energy distribution and the Wigner function of the outgoing nonequilibrium state of the single-electron wave packet.

  14. Complex time paths for semiclassical wave packet propagation with complex trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G.

    2014-08-01

    The use of complex-valued trajectories in semiclassical wave packet methods can lead to problems that prevent calculation of the wave function in certain regions of the configuration space. We investigate this so-called bald spot problem in the context of generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics. The analysis shows that the bald spot phenomenon is essentially due to the complex nature of the initial conditions for the trajectories. It is, therefore, expected to be a general feature of several semiclassical methods that rely on trajectories with such initial conditions. A bald region is created when a trajectory, needed to calculate the wave function at a given time, reaches a singularity of the potential energy function in the complex plane at an earlier, real time. This corresponds to passage of a branch point singularity across the real axis of the complex time plane. The missing portions of the wave function can be obtained by deforming the time path for the integration of the equations of motion into the complex plane so that the singularity is circumvented. We present examples of bald spots, singularity times, and suitable complex time paths for one-dimensional barrier transmission in the Eckart and Gaussian systems. Although the bald regions for the Eckart system are often localized, they are found to be semi-infinite for the Gaussian system. For the case of deep tunneling, the bald regions for both systems may encompass the entire portion of space occupied by the transmitted wave packet. Thus, the use of complex time paths becomes essential for a treatment of barrier tunneling.

  15. Photon wave-packet manipulation via dynamic electromagnetically induced transparency in multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bariani, Francesco; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2010-01-15

    We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of a light pulse propagating through a multilayer system consisting of alternating blocks of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) media and vacuum. We study the effect of a dynamical modulation of the EIT control field on the shape of the wave packet. Interesting effects due to the group velocity mismatch at the interfaces are found. Modulation schemes that can be realized in ultracold atomic samples with standard experimental techniques are proposed and discussed. Calculations are performed using a modified slowly varying envelope approximation of the Maxwell-Bloch equations and are compared to an effective description based on a continuity equation for the polariton flow.

  16. Loss of wave-packet coherence in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Fabre, I.; Navarrete, F.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    The projectile beam coherence effects occurring in ion-atom collisions are analyzed on the basis of the recent theory of Karlovets et al. [Phys. Rev. A 92, 052703 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.052703] developed for the elastic scattering of wave packets of particles off a potential field. This theory is generalized to estimate the loss of coherence for inelastically scattered projectiles in ionizing collisions. The results obtained by the suggested model are compared with experimental data for the ionization of hydrogen atoms and molecules by 75-keV proton impact. Significantly improved agreement is observed between the theory and experiment.

  17. Effects of periodic kicking on dispersion and wave packet dynamics in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Bhattacharya, Utso; Dutta, Amit; Sen, Diptiman

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of δ -function periodic kicks on the Floquet energy-momentum dispersion in graphene. We find that a rich variety of dispersions can appear depending on the parameters of the kicking: at certain points in the Brillouin zone, the dispersion can become linear but anisotropic, linear in one direction and quadratic in the perpendicular direction, gapped with a quadratic dispersion, or completely flat (called dynamical localization). We show all these results analytically and demonstrate them numerically through the dynamics of wave packets propagating in graphene. We propose experimental methods for producing these effects.

  18. Wave-Packet Collapse Based on Weak Repeatability or Covariant Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhao-Qi; Zhu, Chuan-Xi; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-01

    The conflict between the dynamics postulate (unitary evolution) and the measurement postulate (wave-packet collapse) of quantum mechanics has been reconciled by Zurek from an information transfer perspective [Phys. Rev. A 76 (2007) 052110], and has further been extended to a more general scenario [Phys. Rev. A 87 (2013) 052111]. In this paper, we reconsider Zurek's new derivation by using weak repeatability postulate or covariant condition instead of repeatability postulate. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11461045, 11326099, 11361042, 11265010, and Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province of China under Grant Nos. 20142BAB211016, 20132BAB201001, 20132BAB212009

  19. Universality of returning electron wave packet in high-order harmonic generation with midinfrared laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh-Thu; Wei, Hui; Jin, Cheng; Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Morishita, Toru; Lin, C D

    2014-07-18

    We show that a returning electron wave packet in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) with midinfrared laser pulses converges to a universal limit for a laser wavelength above about 3 μm. The results are consistent among the different methods: a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, the strong-field approximation, and the quantum orbits theory. We further analyze how the contribution from different electron "trajectories" survives the macroscopic propagation in the medium. Our result thus provides a new framework for investigating the wavelength scaling law for the HHG yields.

  20. Time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packets for free-space quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, N; Alber, G; Agarwal, G S; Leuchs, G

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols.

  1. Imaging and control of interfering wave packets in a dissociating molecule.

    PubMed

    Skovsen, Esben; Machholm, Mette; Ejdrup, Tine; Thøgersen, Jan; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2002-09-23

    Using two identical 110 femtosecond (fs) optical pulses separated by 310 fs, we launch two dissociative wave packets in I2. We measure the square of the wave function as a function of both the internuclear separation, /Psi(R)/(2), and of the internuclear velocity, /Psi(v(R))/(2), by ionizing the dissociating molecule with an intense 20 fs probe pulse. Strong interference is observed in both /Psi(R)/(2) and in /Psi(v(R))/(2). The interference, and therefore the shape of the wave function, is controlled through the phase difference between the two dissociation pulses in good agreement with calculations.

  2. Fully differential study of wave packet scattering in ionization of helium by proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthanayaka, T.; Lamichhane, B. R.; Hasan, A.; Gurung, S.; Remolina, J.; Borbély, S.; Járai-Szabó, F.; Nagy, L.; Schulz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a fully differential study of projectile coherence effects in ionization in p + He collisions. The experimental data are qualitatively reproduced by a non-perturbative ab initio time-dependent model, which treats the projectile coherence properties in terms of a wave packet. A comparison between first- and higher-order treatments shows that the observed interference structures are primarily due to a coherent superposition of different impact parameters leading to the same scattering angle. Higher-order contributions have a significant effect on the interference term.

  3. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. II - Collisionless dissipation of wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion equation of Barnes (1966) is used to study the dissipation of asymptotic wave packets generated by localized periodic sources. The solutions of the equation are linear waves, damped by Landau and transit-time processes, in a collisionless warm plasma. For the case of an ideal MHD system, most of the waves emitted from a source are shown to cancel asympotically through destructive interference. The modes transporting significant flux to asymptotic distances are found to be Alfven waves and fast waves with theta (the angle between the magnetic field and the characteristics of the far-field waves) of about 0 and about pi/2.

  4. Resonant Tunneling of Spin-Wave Packets via Quantized States in Potential Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ulf-Hendrik; Gatzen, Marius; Demidov, Vladislav E.; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the tunneling of spin-wave pulses through a system of two closely situated potential barriers. The barriers represent two areas of inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field, where the existence of spin waves is forbidden. We show that for certain values of the spin-wave frequency corresponding to the quantized spin-wave states existing in the well formed between the barriers, the tunneling has a resonant character. As a result, transmission of spin-wave packets through the double-barrier structure is much more efficient than the sequent tunneling through two single barriers.

  5. Stochastic wave packet vs. direct density matrix solution of Liouville-von Neumann equations for photodesorption problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter

    1996-11-01

    The performance of stochastic wave packet approaches is contrasted with a direct method to numerically solve quantum open system Liouville-von Neumann equations for photodesorption problems. As a test case a simple one-dimensional two-state state model representative for NO/Pt(111) is adopted. Both desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) treated by a single-dissipative channel model, and desorption induced by multiple electronic transitions (DIMET) treated by a double-dissipative channel model, are considered. It is found that stochastic wave packets are a memory-saving alternative to direct matrix propagation schemes. However, if statistically rare events as for example the bond breaking in NO/Pt(111) are of interest, the former converges only slowly to the exact results. We also find that - in the case of coordinate-independent rates - Gadzuk's "jumping wave packet and weighted average" procedure frequently employed to describe DIET dynamics, is a rapidly converging variant of the stochastic wave packet approach, and therefore rigorously equivalent to the exact solution of a Liouville-von Neumann equation. The usual stochastic (Monte Carlo) wave packet approach, however, is more generally applicable, and allows for example to quantify the notion of "multiple" in DIMET processes.

  6. Wave Packet Dynamics in the Infinite Square Well with the Wigner Quasi-probability Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Mario; Doncheski, Michael; Robinett, Richard

    2004-05-01

    Over the past few years a number of authors have been interested in the time evolution and revivals of Gaussian wave packets in one-dimensional infinite wells and in two-dimensional infinite wells of various geometries. In all of these circumstances, the wave function is guaranteed to revive at a time related to the inverse of the system's ground state energy, if not sooner. To better visualize these revivals we have calculated the time-dependent Wigner quasi-probability distribution for position and momentum, P_W(x; p), for Gaussian wave packet solutions of this system. The Wigner quasi-probability distribution clearly demonstrates the short-term semi-classical time dependence, as well as longer-term revival behavior and the structure during the collapsed state. This tool also provides an excellent way of demonstrating the patterns of highly-correlated Schrödinger-cat-like `mini-packets' which appear at fractional multiples of the exact revival time. This research is supported in part by a Research Corporation Cottrell College Science Award (CC5470) and the National Science Foundation under contracts DUE-0126439 and DUE-9950702.

  7. The phase delay and its complex time: From stationary states up to wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Grossel, Ph.

    2013-03-15

    Complex time is often invoked about tunneling effect where the classical phase delay is completed with a crucial filter effect. Usually the complex times are obtained by considering the flux-flux correlation function, but this can be obtained by a very simple approach using the search of the maximum of the generalized complex phase function, including the amplitude of the wave function. Various aspects of the phase delay are presented in the case of wave packets impinging on simple or resonant quantum barriers. Formal links with the classical mechanics give birth to quasi-trajectories of the quantum particle, totally compatible with the quantum mechanics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stationary phase method is extended in including the variations of the spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex phase delay leads to a complex trajectory inside and out-side the barrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of quasi-trajectories are given in case of different quantum barriers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase delays are specified for resonant tunneling or above-barrier wave-packets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coherence between the quasi-trajectories and quantum mechanics is shown.

  8. Phase mixing of relativistically intense longitudinal wave packets in a cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Sengupta, Sudip

    2016-09-01

    Phase mixing of relativistically intense longitudinal wave packets in a cold homogeneous unmagnetized plasma has been studied analytically and numerically using the Dawson Sheet Model. A general expression for phase mixing time ( ω p t m i x ) as a function of amplitude of the wave packet (δ) and width of the spectrum ( Δ k / k ) has been derived. It is found that the phase mixing time crucially depends on the relative magnitude of amplitude "δ" and the spectral width " Δ k / k ". For Δ k / k ≤ 2 ωp 2 δ 2 / c 2 k 2 , ω p t m i x scales with δ as ˜ 1 / δ 5 , whereas for Δ k / k > 2 ωp 2 δ 2 / c 2 k 2 , ω p t m i x scales with δ as ˜ 1 / δ 3 , where ωp is the non-relativistic plasma frequency and c is the speed of light in vacuum. We have also verified the above theoretical scalings using numerical simulations based on the Dawson Sheet Model.

  9. Quantum dynamics of electronic transitions with Gauss-Hermite wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Peluso, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    A new methodology based on the superposition of time-dependent Gauss-Hermite wave packets is developed to describe the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave function parameters are obtained by employing the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is applied to study the quantum dynamical behaviour of model systems with two interacting electronic states characterized by a relatively large reorganization energy and a range of energy biases. The favourable scaling properties make it a promising tool for the study of the dynamics of chemico-physical processes in molecular systems.

  10. Time-of-Flight Measurements of Single-Electron Wave Packets in Quantum Hall Edge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, M.; Johnson, N.; Emary, C.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Pepper, M.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report time-of-flight measurements on electrons traveling in quantum Hall edge states. Hot-electron wave packets are emitted one per cycle into edge states formed along a depleted sample boundary. The electron arrival time is detected by driving a detector barrier with a square wave that acts as a shutter. By adding an extra path using a deflection barrier, we measure a delay in the arrival time, from which the edge-state velocity v is deduced. We find that v follows 1 /B dependence, in good agreement with the E →×B → drift. The edge potential is estimated from the energy dependence of v using a harmonic approximation.

  11. Depth migration with Gaussian wave packets based on Poincaré wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodnitskiy, Evgeny; Perel, Maria; Geng, Yu; Wu, Ru-Shan

    2016-04-01

    An approach to depth migration, based on an integral representation of seismic data, that is, wavefields recorded on the boundary, is presented in terms of Poincaré wavelets. Each wavelet is taken as a boundary datum for a high-frequency asymptotic solution of the wave equation. This solution, which we call the quasiphoton or the Gaussian wave packet, decreases in a Gaussian manner away from a point running along a ray that is launched from the surface. The deformation of the propagating packet is taken into account in the migration algorithm. A numerical example of zero-offset migration with synthetic seismograms calculated for the 2-D SEG/EAGE salt model is presented. The result, which uses only 3.9 per cent of the total number of coefficients, is a satisfactory image, with a threshold of 0.75 per cent.

  12. Five-wave-packet quantum error correction based on continuous-variable cluster entanglement.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuhong; Su, Xiaolong; Tian, Caixing; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-10-26

    Quantum error correction protects the quantum state against noise and decoherence in quantum communication and quantum computation, which enables one to perform fault-torrent quantum information processing. We experimentally demonstrate a quantum error correction scheme with a five-wave-packet code against a single stochastic error, the original theoretical model of which was firstly proposed by S. L. Braunstein and T. A. Walker. Five submodes of a continuous variable cluster entangled state of light are used for five encoding channels. Especially, in our encoding scheme the information of the input state is only distributed on three of the five channels and thus any error appearing in the remained two channels never affects the output state, i.e. the output quantum state is immune from the error in the two channels. The stochastic error on a single channel is corrected for both vacuum and squeezed input states and the achieved fidelities of the output states are beyond the corresponding classical limit.

  13. Multidimensional wave packet dynamics within the fluid dynamical formulation of the Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Askar, Attila; Rabitz, H.

    1998-11-01

    This paper explores the quantum fluid dynamical (QFD) representation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of a wave packet in a high dimensional space. A novel alternating direction technique is utilized to single out each of the many dimensions in the QFD equations. This technique is used to solve the continuity equation for the density and the equation for the convection of the flux for the quantum particle. The ability of the present scheme to efficiently and accurately describe the dynamics of a quantum particle is demonstrated in four dimensions where analytical results are known. We also apply the technique to the photodissociation of NOCl and NO2 where the systems are reduced to two coordinates by freezing the angular variable at its equilibrium value.

  14. Probing the Spatial Structure of a Molecular Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Using Shaped Recollision Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, Hiromichi; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.

    2011-08-01

    Using orthogonally polarized 800 nm and 400 nm laser pulses, we have generated high harmonics in ethane (C2H6). We observe that the intensity of each harmonic order modulates with the attosecond delay between the two laser fields. The modulation period of the low even harmonics is twice that of the period of modulation of the other harmonics. By comparing with theoretical calculation, we show that the double periodicity is a result of the electron wave packet motion in the valence shell of C2H6 on the attosecond time-scale. Our method is a general approach to measuring internal electron dynamics which does not require molecular alignment, making it applicable to more complex molecules than previous approaches.

  15. A Gaussian Wave Packet Propagation Approach to Vibrationally Resolved Optical Spectra at Non-Zero Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ch Sridhar; Prasad, M Durga

    2016-04-28

    An effective time dependent approach based on a method that is similar to the Gaussian wave packet propagation (GWP) technique of Heller is developed for the computation of vibrationally resolved electronic spectra at finite temperatures in the harmonic, Franck-Condon/Hertzberg-Teller approximations. Since the vibrational thermal density matrix of the ground electronic surface and the time evolution operator on that surface commute, it is possible to write the spectrum generating correlation function as a trace of the time evolved doorway state. In the stated approximations, the doorway state is a superposition of the harmonic oscillator zero and one quantum eigenfunctions and thus can be propagated by the GWP. The algorithm has an O(N(3)) dependence on the number of vibrational modes. An application to pyrene absorption spectrum at two temperatures is presented as a proof of the concept. PMID:27035861

  16. Quantum statistical effects in multichannel wave-packet scattering of noninteracting identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, D.; Baskin, L. M.

    2016-08-01

    For a number of noninteracting identical particles entering a multichannel scatterer in various wave-packet states, we construct a generating function for the probabilities of various scattering outcomes. This is used to evaluate the mean numbers of particles, n¯m, scattered into a given (m th ) channel, single-channel statistics, and interchannel correlations. We show that for initially uncorrelated particles, indistinguishability changes single-channel statistics without altering the value of n¯m. For uncorrelated bosons and fermions, bunching and antibunching behavior can be detected in the extreme-case probabilities, to have all particles scattered into the same channel, or none of particles scattered into a channel, or channels. As an example, we consider a cavity with a single long-lived resonance accessible to the particles, which allows them to "pile up" inside the scatterer.

  17. Quantum dynamics of electronic transitions with Gauss-Hermite wave packets.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Peluso, Andrea

    2016-03-21

    A new methodology based on the superposition of time-dependent Gauss-Hermite wave packets is developed to describe the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave function parameters are obtained by employing the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is applied to study the quantum dynamical behaviour of model systems with two interacting electronic states characterized by a relatively large reorganization energy and a range of energy biases. The favourable scaling properties make it a promising tool for the study of the dynamics of chemico-physical processes in molecular systems. PMID:27004857

  18. Goos-Haenchen shifts in frustrated total internal reflection studied with wave-packet propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Li Chunfang; Wei Rongrong; Zhang Yan

    2009-07-15

    We have investigated the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts in frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) studied with wave-packet propagation. In the first-order approximation of the transmission coefficient, the GH shift is exactly the expression given by a stationary phase method, thus saturating an asymptotic constant in two different ways depending on the angle of incidence. Taking the second-order approximation into account, the GH shift does not saturate with increasing gap width when the small beam size is used. The GH shift increases by decreasing the beamwidth at the small incidence angles, while for the large incidence angles it reveals a strong decrease by decreasing the beamwidth. These phenomena offer the better understanding of the GH shift and tunneling delay time in FTIR.

  19. Electronic excitation by short x-ray pulses: from quantum beats to wave packet revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, P.; Iqbal, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    We propose a simple way to determine the periodicities of wave packets (WPs) in quantum systems directly from the energy differences of the states involved. The resulting classical periods and revival times are more accurate than those obtained with the traditional expansion of the energies about the central quantum number \\overline{n}, especially when \\overline{n} is low. The latter type of WP motion occurs upon excitation of highly charged ions with short XUV or x-ray pulses. Moreover, we formulate the WP dynamics in such a form that it directly reveals the origin of phase shifts in the maxima of the autocorrelation function, a phenomenon most prominent in the low \\overline{n} WP dynamics.

  20. Wave-packet analysis of strong-field ionization of sodium in the quasistatic regime*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunjac, Andrej; Popović, Duška B.; Simonović, Nenad S.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field ionization of the sodium atom in the tunnelling and over-the-barrier regimes is studied by examining the valence electron wave-packet dynamics in the static electric field. The lowest state energy and the ionization rate determined by this method for different strengths of the applied field agree well with the results obtained using other methods. The initial period of the nonstationary decay after switching the field on is analyzed and discussed. It is demonstrated that, if the Keldysh parameter is significantly lower than one (quasistatic regime), the probability of ionization by a laser pulse can be obtained from the static rates. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  1. Scattered-wave-packet formalism with applications to barrier scattering and quantum transistors.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2011-11-01

    The scattered wave formalism developed for a quantum subsystem interacting with reservoirs through open boundaries is applied to one- or two-dimensional barrier scattering and quantum transistors. The total wave function is divided into incident and scattered components. Markovian outgoing wave boundary conditions are imposed on the scattered or total wave function by either the ratio or polynomial methods. For barrier scattering problems, accurate time-dependent transmission probabilities are obtained through the integration of the modified time-dependent Schrödinger equations for the scattered wave function. For quantum transistors, the time-dependent transport is studied for a quantum wave packet propagating through the conduction channel of a field effect transistor. This study shows that the scattered wave formalism significantly reduces computational effort relative to other open boundary methods and demonstrates wide applications to quantum dynamical processes.

  2. Wave packet methods for charge exchange processes in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloı̈tcha, E.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Vaeck, N.

    2001-05-01

    The efficiency of different time-independent and time-dependent wave packet methods to calculate charge-exchange cross sections is discussed. The time-independent spectral projection method is based on the Chebyshev expansion of the resolvent function and represents an interesting alternative to the usual Fourier method which involves a time propagation. On the other hand, the flux operator method still requires propagation in time but uses the properties of absorbing potentials in order to calculate the flux operator matrix elements. We show the necessity of introducing the appropriate Hankel-Riccati functions when the full Hamiltonian contains a centrifugal term in 1/R2 in order to reduce the computational time. The collisional system Si4++He is studied as a test case.

  3. Wave packet dynamics for a system with position and time-dependent effective mass in an infinite square well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vubangsi, M.; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C.; Pisma'k, Yu. M.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of a particle with position and time-dependent effective mass in a one-dimensional infinite square well is treated by means of a quantum canonical formalism. The dynamics of a launched wave packet of the system reveals a peculiar revival pattern that is discussed.

  4. Monitoring attosecond dynamics of coherent electron-nuclear wave packets by molecular high-order-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bredtmann, Timm; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2011-08-15

    A pump-probe scheme for preparing and monitoring electron-nuclear motion in a dissociative coherent electron-nuclear wave packet is explored from numerical solutions of a non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A mid-ir intense few-cycle probe pulse is used to generate molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) from a coherent superposition of two or more dissociative coherent electronic-nuclear wave packets, prepared by a femtosecond uv pump pulse. Varying the time delay between the intense ir probe pulse and the uv pump pulse by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude, thus showing the high sensitivity to electron-nuclear dynamics in coherent electron-nuclear wave packets. We relate this high sensitivity of MHOHG spectra to opposing electron velocities (fluxes) in the electron wave packets of the recombining (recolliding) ionized electron and of the bound electron in the initial coherent superposition of two electronic states.

  5. Direct observation of isolated Damon-Eshbach and backward volume spin-wave packets in ferromagnetic microstripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Philipp; Vogel, Andreas; Tödt, Jan-Niklas; Wieland, Marek; Meier, Guido; Drescher, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of isolated spin-wave packets is crucial for the understanding of magnetic transport phenomena and is particularly interesting for applications in spintronic and magnonic devices, where isolated spin-wave packets implement an information processing scheme with negligible residual heat loss. We have captured microscale magnetization dynamics of single spin-wave packets in metallic ferromagnets in space and time. Using an optically driven high-current picosecond pulse source in combination with time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy probed by femtosecond laser pulses, we demonstrate phase-sensitive real-space observation of spin-wave packets in confined permalloy (Ni80Fe20) microstripes. Impulsive excitation permits extraction of the dynamical parameters, i.e. phase- and group velocities, frequencies and wave vectors. In addition to well-established Damon-Eshbach modes our study reveals waves with counterpropagating group- and phase-velocities. Such unusual spin-wave motion is expected for backward volume modes where the phase fronts approach the excitation volume rather than emerging out of it due to the negative slope of the dispersion relation. These modes are difficult to excite and observe directly but feature analogies to negative refractive index materials, thus enabling model studies of wave propagation inside metamaterials.

  6. Wave packet dynamics for a system with position and time-dependent effective mass in an infinite square well

    SciTech Connect

    Vubangsi, M.; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C.; Pisma’k, Yu. M.

    2015-12-15

    The problem of a particle with position and time-dependent effective mass in a one-dimensional infinite square well is treated by means of a quantum canonical formalism. The dynamics of a launched wave packet of the system reveals a peculiar revival pattern that is discussed. .

  7. Direct observation of isolated Damon-Eshbach and backward volume spin-wave packets in ferromagnetic microstripes

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Philipp; Vogel, Andreas; Tödt, Jan-Niklas; Wieland, Marek; Meier, Guido; Drescher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of isolated spin-wave packets is crucial for the understanding of magnetic transport phenomena and is particularly interesting for applications in spintronic and magnonic devices, where isolated spin-wave packets implement an information processing scheme with negligible residual heat loss. We have captured microscale magnetization dynamics of single spin-wave packets in metallic ferromagnets in space and time. Using an optically driven high-current picosecond pulse source in combination with time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy probed by femtosecond laser pulses, we demonstrate phase-sensitive real-space observation of spin-wave packets in confined permalloy (Ni80Fe20) microstripes. Impulsive excitation permits extraction of the dynamical parameters, i.e. phase- and group velocities, frequencies and wave vectors. In addition to well-established Damon-Eshbach modes our study reveals waves with counterpropagating group- and phase-velocities. Such unusual spin-wave motion is expected for backward volume modes where the phase fronts approach the excitation volume rather than emerging out of it due to the negative slope of the dispersion relation. These modes are difficult to excite and observe directly but feature analogies to negative refractive index materials, thus enabling model studies of wave propagation inside metamaterials. PMID:26906113

  8. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions: Nonrearrangement scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-08-01

    A general single-center close-coupling approach based on a continuum-discretization procedure is developed to calculate excitation and ionization processes in ion-atom collisions. The continuous spectrum of the target is discretized using stationary wave packets constructed from the Coulomb wave functions, the eigenstates of the target Hamiltonian. Such continuum discretization allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. These features are ideal for detailed differential ionization studies. The approach starts from the semiclassical three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wave function and leads to a set of coupled differential equations for the transition probability amplitudes. To demonstrate its utility the method is applied to calculate collisions of antiprotons with atomic hydrogen. A comprehensive set of benchmark results from integrated to fully differential cross sections for antiproton-impact ionization of hydrogen in the energy range from 1 keV to 1 MeV is provided. Contrary to previous predictions, we find that at low incident energies the singly differential cross section has a maximum away from the zero emission energy. This feature could not be seen without a fine discretization of the low-energy part of the continuum.

  9. Rotating wave packet caused by the superposition of two Bessel-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuiqin; Cai, Yi; Li, Ying; Li, Jingzhen; Zheng, Guoliang; Chen, Hongyi; Xu, Shixiang

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents, theoretically, a rotating wave packet by overlapping two Bessel-Gauss beams with different longitudinal wave vectors and topological charges. Our results show that the angular velocity of this kind of packet varies with propagating distance, and that Gauss amplitude modulation thus depends strongly on the Fresnel number N f. In the far field, the angular velocity of the packet tends to zero, so the packet will no longer rotate. If N f > 3.18, the packet will rotate with a constant velocity or have a stable rotating velocity along the propagation distance. Interestingly, if appropriate Gauss waist size and propagating distance z are chosen so that 0.006 < N f < 3.18, both the amplitude and the direction of the rotating angular velocity can be manipulated for given topological charges and longitudinal wave vectors. The small Gauss waist radius can induce angular velocity dispersion, causing radial rotation with out-sync and thereby the phase distortion of the BG beam.

  10. Multistate vibronic interactions and nonadiabatic wave packet dynamics in the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Susanta; Ritschel, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    We report theoretical investigations on the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide molecule by ab initio quantum dynamical methods. This band exhibits a highly complex structure and represents a composite portrait of five excited energetically close-lying electronic states of ClO 2+. Much of this complexity is likely to be arising due to strong vibronic interactions among these electronic states - which we address and examine herein. The near equilibrium MRCI potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these five cationic states reported by Peterson and Werner [J. Chem. Phys. 99 (1993) 302] for the C2v configuration, are extended for the Cs geometry assuming a harmonic vibration along the asymmetric stretching mode. The strength of the vibronic coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian are calculated by ab initio CASSCF-MRCI method and conical intersections of the PESs are established. The diabatic Hamiltonian matrix is constructed within a linear vibronic coupling scheme and the resulting PESs are employed in the nuclear dynamical simulations, carried out with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach. Companion calculations are performed for transitions to the uncoupled electronic states in order to reveal explicitly the impact of the nonadiabatic coupling on the photoelectron dynamics. The theoretical findings are in good accord with the experimental observations. The femtosecond nonradiative decay dynamics of ClO 2+ excited electronic states mediated by conical intersections is also examined and discussed.

  11. Close-coupling wave-packet study of He and Ne sticking on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bret

    1992-11-01

    A fully quantum-mechanical study is made of light particles sticking on a model Cu surface. The full molecule-metal wave function is expanded to include states corresponding to elastic scattering and the creation or annihilation of single phonons. The coupled-channel equations for this system are evolved in time numerically using well-known wave-packet techniques. For light particles and low energies, where only single-phonon interactions are important, this is a rigorous treatment of the dynamics and can serve as a benchmark. Probability distributions for energy transfer are computed from the reduced density matrix. These distributions exhibit resonances which correspond to transitions into the gas-metal bound states. The trapping probability is studied as a function of particle mass, energy, and surface temperature for a flat Cu surface. A comparison is made with the forced oscillator model and other approximate methods which are shown to give poor results for the sticking probability of light particles.

  12. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schroter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; et al

    2016-06-22

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as pg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval ofmore » the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. As a result, while this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.« less

  13. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A.-T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.

  14. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect.

  15. Phonon wave-packet scattering and energy dissipation dynamics in carbon nanotube oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Matukumilli V. D.; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-12-01

    Friction in carbon nanotube (CNT) oscillators can be explained in terms of the interplay between low frequency mechanical motions and high frequency vibrational modes of the sliding surfaces. We analyze single mode phonon wave packet dynamics of CNT based mechanical oscillators, with cores either stationary or sliding with moderate velocities, and study how various individual phonons travel through the outer CNT, interact with the inner nanostructure, and undergo scattering. Two acoustic modes (longitudinal and transverse) and one optical mode (flexural optical) are found to be responsible for the major portion of friction in these oscillators: the transmission functions display a significant dip in the rather narrow frequency range of 5-15 meV. We also find that the profile of the dip is characteristic of the inner core. In contrast, radial breathing and twisting modes, which are dominant in thermal transport, display ideal transmission at all frequencies. We also observe polarization dependent scattering and find that the scattering dynamics comprises of an oscillating decay of localized energy inside the inner CNT. This work provides a way towards engineering CNT linear oscillators with better tribological properties.

  16. Wave-packet dynamical analysis of ultracold scattering in cylindrical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Kim, J. I.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-11-15

    A wave-packet propagation method is developed and applied to investigate the quantum dynamics of scattering processes of identical and distinguishable atoms in harmonic waveguides. The quantum dynamics of the confinement-induced resonances (CIRs) for ultracold collisions of identical particles, s-wave CIRs for bosons and p-wave CIRs for fermions, is explored in detail. Our multigrid approach allows us to fully take into account the coupling between the center-of-mass (c.m.) and relative motions in the case of distinguishable atoms. The latter includes, in particular, s- and p-partial-wave mixing, caused by the confining trap, which acts differently on the different atomic species. Specifically, we explore in detail the recently discovered [J. I. Kim, V. S. Melezhik, and P. Schmelcher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 193203 (2006)] dual CIR, which is based on a destructive interference mechanism leading to complete transmission in the waveguide, although the corresponding scattering in free space exhibits strong s- and p-wave scattering.

  17. Discrete wave packets at the proton cyclotron frequency at Comet P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazelle, C.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present the first experimental evidence for wave packets near the local proton cyclotron frequency in the plasma environment of a comet. The observations have been made by the Giotto magnetometer experiment around Comet P/Halley on both sides of closest approach. The waves are always left-handed in the spacecraft frame, elliptically or nearly circularly polarized, and propagate at small angles from the ambient magnetic field. Their period in the spacecraft frame always closely fits the local proton cyclotron period. The possible generation mechanisms of these waves are discussed. They can be consistently interpreted as waves generated by a resonant helical beam instability fed by the cometary pick-up protons. These waves are intrinsically right-handed waves in the plasma rest frame and are anomalously Doppler-shifted from the plasma frame to the spacecraft frame because their phase velocity is small compared to the local solar wind speed. A generation by a resonance with heavy (water group) ions introducing a temperature effect is also discussed but is less satisfactory.

  18. Trojan Wave Packets in the Quantum Cavity within the Extended Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinski, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Some time ago we have developed the theory of the Trojan Wave Packets (TWP) in the classical strong Circularly Polarized electromagnetic field in terms of the Mathieu generating functions. We have discovered that by the proper partitioning of the Coulomb spectrum i.e. by considering the deviation from the circularity and the vertical tilt of the undressed states as the new quantum numbers we can reduce the problem to the problem of several non-interacting quantum pendula for the Stark-Zeeman field dressed states. The TWP in the infinite physical space however turned out to be weakly unstable due to the spontaneous emission. Here we develop the theory in which the TWP is truly eternal when the electromagnetic interactions are considered quantum and the field is confined by the perfect quantum cavity boundary conditions. First we extend the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model from the two to the infinite number of levels interacting with the one or two perfectly resonant quantum modes of the electromagnetic field. Similarly the model of JC and our previous pendular model the dressed electron-field eigenstates are constructed within the weakly interacting manifolds. Superpositions of those states are possible with the quantum electron density moving on the circular trajectories.

  19. On the accuracy of dynamic mode decomposition in estimating instability of wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Xue, Dong; Wang, Jinjun

    2015-08-01

    Lots of unstable flows in both nature and engineering pose multi-scale perturbations with infinitesimal initial amplitude, which compete and interact with each other during their unstable evolution. Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) analysis can be used to extract these components' temporal/spatial growth rate. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy performance and confidence limit of DMD algorithm in the circumstance of multi-scale instability wave packet. In the present study, we use a linear combination of a sinusoidal unstable wave and its high-order harmonics as a prototype, based on which an error analysis of DMD algorithm is taken. In first, different numerical algorithms of DMD analysis are compared in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. The accuracy evaluation of the classical DMD algorithm in a large parameter domain is followed. It is found that the superimposition of finer structures with less energy dominance might damage the estimation accuracy of the primary structures' growth rate. Strong evidences suggest that even in a linear circumstance, resolving the dynamics of small-scale structures is comparably more difficult than that of the primary structures, i.e., DMD algorithm has a preference for structures with energetic dominance. Finally, the recommended thresholds for the sampling/discretizing parameters are summarized for practical usage.

  20. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets.

    PubMed

    Pullen, M G; Wolter, B; Le, A-T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  1. A new method for wave packet dynamics: Derivative propagation along quantum trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trahan, Corey J.; Hughes, Keith; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2003-06-01

    A new method is proposed for computing the time evolution of quantum mechanical wave packets. Equations of motion for the real-valued functions C and S in the complex action S=C(r,t)+iS(r,t)/ℏ, with ψ(r,t)=exp(S), involve gradients and curvatures of C and S. In previous implementations of the hydrodynamic formulation, various time-consuming fitting techniques of limited accuracy were used to evaluate these derivatives around each fluid element in an evolving ensemble. In this study, equations of motion are developed for the spatial derivatives themselves and a small set of these are integrated along quantum trajectories concurrently with the equations for C and S. Significantly, quantum effects can be included at various orders of approximation, no spatial fitting is involved, there are no basis set expansions, and single quantum trajectories (rather than correlated ensembles) may be propagated, one at a time. Excellent results are obtained when the derivative propagation method is applied to anharmonic potentials involving barrier transmission.

  2. Transient super-ballistic spreading of wave packets with large spreading exponents in some hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ba Phi; Ngo, Quang Minh; Kim, Kihong

    2016-02-01

    We consider the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices. We consider two diffrent kinds of quasiperiodic sequences, which are the Cantor and the period-doubling sequences. From numerical calculations based on the discrete Schrödinger equation, we demonstrate that hybrid ordered-quasiperiodic lattices can support the super-ballistic spreading of a wave packet with very large spreading exponents for certain transient time windows. Remarkably, in the case of the sublattice with the on-site potential obeying the period-doubling quasiperiodic sequence, we find that the super-ballistic exponent can be larger than six. We also point out that previous explanations of this phenomenon based on a generalized version of the point source model are incorrect.

  3. Coherent control of interfering wave packets in dissociating HD+ molecules: the role of phase and delay time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chaochao; Zhang, Lili; Qiu, Xuejun; Zhang, Xianzhou; Liu, Yufang

    2016-02-01

    The coherent control of interference between dissociating wave packets of the HD+ molecules generated by a pair of time-delayed and phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically studied by using the time-dependent quantum wave packet method. The density function in both coordinate and momentum representation are presented and discussed. It is demonstrated that the interference pattern is observed in both coordinate and momentum density functions. The interference undergoes a π-phase shift when the delay time between the two phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is changed by half an optical period. In particular, the number of interference fringes, the fringe spacing in the R-dependent density distribution |ψ(R)|2, and the modulation period of the energy-dependent distribution of the fragments P(E) can be tuned by two phase-locked femtosecond pulses.

  4. Intrinsic thermal Hall conductivity in the mixed state of d -wave superconductors: From wave-packet dynamics to scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2015-11-01

    Recent numerical calculation of the intrinsic thermal Hall conductivity of nodal d -wave superconductors in the mixed state revealed a rapid increase of this quantity above an onset temperature. Interestingly, this defines a measurable energy scale in an otherwise gapless state. Using the mathematics of magnetic coherent states, in this paper such energy scale is related to a dynamical process associated with the Andreev scattering of an electron wave packet moving along the constant energy contours in the momentum space. This energy scale is then used to obtain an improved scaling collapse of numerically calculated thermal Hall conductivity in a tight-binding model as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and the d -wave pairing amplitude at various band fillings. The results indicate that the mentioned onset temperature is associated with the ability of the quasiparticle wave packet to complete its semiclassical orbit before it is appreciably scattered by the superconducting condensate.

  5. The Nosé–Hoover looped chain thermostat for low temperature thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coughtrie, David J.; Tew, David P.

    2014-05-21

    We have used a generalised coherent state resolution of the identity to map the quantum canonical statistical average for a general system onto a phase-space average over the centre and width parameters of a thawed Gaussian wave packet. We also propose an artificial phase-space density that has the same behaviour as the canonical phase-space density in the low-temperature limit, and have constructed a novel Nosé–Hoover looped chain thermostat that generates this density in conjunction with variational thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics. This forms a new platform for evaluating statistical properties of quantum condensed-phase systems that has an explicit connection to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, whilst retaining many of the appealing features of path-integral molecular dynamics.

  6. The Nosé-Hoover looped chain thermostat for low temperature thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Coughtrie, David J; Tew, David P

    2014-05-21

    We have used a generalised coherent state resolution of the identity to map the quantum canonical statistical average for a general system onto a phase-space average over the centre and width parameters of a thawed Gaussian wave packet. We also propose an artificial phase-space density that has the same behaviour as the canonical phase-space density in the low-temperature limit, and have constructed a novel Nosé-Hoover looped chain thermostat that generates this density in conjunction with variational thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics. This forms a new platform for evaluating statistical properties of quantum condensed-phase systems that has an explicit connection to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, whilst retaining many of the appealing features of path-integral molecular dynamics.

  7. Nuclear-wave-packet dynamics mapped out by two-center interference in the HeH2+ molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Pavlyukh, Y.; Berakdar, J.

    2014-06-01

    Photoemission from diatomic molecules closely resembles the Young-type double-slit experiment where each of the two atomic sites represents a coherent emission source. When the photoelectron wavelength becomes commensurate with the effective interatomic distance, the resulting spatial interference gives rise to oscillations in the photoionization total and differential cross sections. This phenomenon provides detailed information on the molecular geometry, a fact that can be utilized for probing the nuclear dynamics triggered by the interaction with a laser field. We demonstrate how this coherent wave-packet evolution can be traced by observing the photoelectron angular distribution. Based on ab initio scattering calculations we perform a proof-of-principle reconstruction of the nuclear-wave-packet evolution in the HeH2+ molecule.

  8. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Interference of dissociating wave packets in the I2 molecule driven by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Hu, Wen-Hui; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lm

    2009-11-01

    The interference between two dissociating wave packets of the I2 molecule driven by femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically studied by using the time-dependent quantum wave packet method. Both the internuclear distance- and velocity-dependent density functions are calculated and discussed. It is demonstrated that the interference pattern is determined by the phase difference and the delay time between two pump pulses. With two identical pulses with a delay time of 305 fs and a FWHM of 20 fs, more interference fringes can be observed, while with two pump pulses with a delay time of 80 fs and a FWHM of 20 fs, only a few interference fringes can be observed.

  9. Dynamics of zero-energy nonspreading non-Gaussian wave packets for a class of central potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, Adam J. Pepłowski, Piotr

    2013-10-15

    Zero-energy wave packets, coherent states, are constructed in such a way that they retain their shape during the time evolution for a large class of central potentials. The packets are not of the Gaussian type with −r{sup 2} dependence but, instead, their shape is determined by −r{sup 1/(μ+1/2)} with −1/2<μ<1/2. A very close quantum–classical correspondence is also shown, i.e., the well localized states travel along suitable classical trajectories. -- Highlights: •Central potentials are considered. •Nonspreading, non-Gaussian wave packets are constructed. •Time evolution of the zero-energy packets is studied. •Quantum–classical correspondence is discussed.

  10. Performance of higher order Monte Carlo wave packet methods for surface science problems: A test for photoinduced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, I.; Saalfrank, P.

    2003-01-01

    Aiming to treat multidimensional quantum dissipative dynamics of adsorbates at surfaces, we consider application of several variants of the Monte Carlo wave packet method to an exemplary problem, the desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of NO from a Pt(1 1 1) surface with a two-state two-dimensional model. We investigate the convergence of stochastic unravelling schemes of different order for 'rare' observables characteristic for this test system.

  11. Femtosecond plasmon and photon wave packets excited by a high-energy electron on a metal or dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenny, Benjamin J. M.; Polman, Albert; García de Abajo, F. Javier

    2016-10-01

    Swift electrons generate coherent transition radiation (TR) when crossing a material surface, as well as surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) when the material is metallic. We present analytical and numerical calculations that describe the time- and space-dependent electric fields of TR and SPPs induced by 30-300 keV electrons on a Drude metal surface. The generated SPPs form wave packets a few-hundred femtoseconds in duration, depending on the material permittivity. High-frequency components close to the plasmon resonance are strongly damped, causing the wave packets to shift to lower frequencies as they propagate further. TR is emitted to the far field as ultrashort wave packets consisting of just a few optical cycles, with an intensity and angle dependence that is determined by the material permittivity. The excitation reaches its peak amplitude within a few femtoseconds and then drops off strongly for longer times. From a correlation between material permittivity and the calculated emission behavior, we determine qualitative predictions of the TR evolution for any given material. The results presented here provide key insights into the mechanisms enabling swift electrons to serve as nanoscale optical excitation sources.

  12. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  13. Time-dependent simulation and analytical modelling of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometry with edge-states wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggi, Andrea; Bordone, Paolo; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We compute the exact single-particle time-resolved dynamics of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on Landau edge-states transport, and assess the effect of the spatial localization of carriers on the interference pattern. The exact carrier dynamics is obtained by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a suitable 2D potential profile reproducing the interferometer design. An external magnetic field, driving the system to the quantum Hall regime with filling factor one, is included. The injected carriers are represented by a superposition of edge states, and their interference pattern—controlled via magnetic field and/or area variation—reproduces the one of (Ji et al 2003 Nature 422 415). By tuning the system towards different regimes, we find two additional features in the transmission spectra, both related to carrier localization, namely a damping of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with increasing difference in the arms length, and an increased mean transmission that we trace to the energy-dependent transmittance of quantum point contacts. Finally, we present an analytical model, also accounting for the finite spatial dispersion of the carriers, able to reproduce the above effects.

  14. Time-dependent simulation and analytical modelling of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometry with edge-states wave packets.

    PubMed

    Beggi, Andrea; Bordone, Paolo; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We compute the exact single-particle time-resolved dynamics of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on Landau edge-states transport, and assess the effect of the spatial localization of carriers on the interference pattern. The exact carrier dynamics is obtained by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a suitable 2D potential profile reproducing the interferometer design. An external magnetic field, driving the system to the quantum Hall regime with filling factor one, is included. The injected carriers are represented by a superposition of edge states, and their interference pattern-controlled via magnetic field and/or area variation-reproduces the one of (Ji et al 2003 Nature 422 415). By tuning the system towards different regimes, we find two additional features in the transmission spectra, both related to carrier localization, namely a damping of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with increasing difference in the arms length, and an increased mean transmission that we trace to the energy-dependent transmittance of quantum point contacts. Finally, we present an analytical model, also accounting for the finite spatial dispersion of the carriers, able to reproduce the above effects.

  15. Time dependent three-dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The first successful application of the three-dimensional quantum body frame wave packet approach to reactive scattering is reported for the H + H2 exchange reaction on the LSTH potential surface. The method used is based on a procedure for calculating total reaction probabilities from wave packets. It is found that converged, vibrationally resolved reactive probabilities can be calculated with a grid that is not much larger than required for the pure inelastic calculation. Tabular results are presented for several energies.

  16. The dynamics and spectral characteristics of the GPS TEC wave packets excited by the solar terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Edemsky, I. K.; Voeykov, S. V.; Yasukevich, Y. V.; Zhivetiev, I. V.

    2009-04-01

    The great variety of solar terminator (ST) -linked phenomena in the atmosphere gave rise to a num¬ber of studies on the analysis of ionosphere parameter variations obtained by different ionosphere sounding methods. Main part of experimental data was obtained using methods for analyzing the spectrum of ionosphere parameter variations in separate local points. To identify ST-generated wave disturbances it is necessary to measure the dynamic and spectral characteristics of the wave disturbances and to compare it with spatial-temporal characteristics of ST. Using TEC measurements from the dense network of GPS sites GEONET (Japan), we have obtained the first GPS-TEC image of the space structure of medium-scale traveling wave packets (MS TWP) excited by the solar terminator. We use two known forms of the 2D GPS-TEC image for our presentation of the space structure of ST-generated MS TWP: 1) - the diagram "distance-time"; 2) - the 2D-space distribution of the values of filtered TEC series dI (λ, φ, t) on the latitude φ and longitude λ for each 30-sec TEC counts. We found that the time period and wave-length of ST-generated wave packets are about 10-20 min and 200-300 km, respectively. Dynamic images analysis of dI (λ, φ, t) gives precise estimation of velocity and azimuth of TWP wave front propagation. We use the method of determining velocity of traveling ionosphere disturbances (SADM-GPS), which take into account the relative moving of subionosphere points. We found that the velocity of the TWP phase front, traveling along GEONET sites, varies in accordance with the velocity of the ST line displacement. The space image of MS TWP manifests itself in pronounced anisotropy and high coherence over a long distance of about 2000 km. The TWP wave front extends along the ST line with the angular shift of about 20°. The hypothesis on the connection between the TWP generation and the solar terminator can be tested in the terminator local time (TLT) system: d

  17. Reconstruction and control of a time-dependent two-electron wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Argenti, Luca; Raith, Philipp; Meyer, Kristina; Laux, Martin; Zhang, Yizhu; Blättermann, Alexander; Hagstotz, Steffen; Ding, Thomas; Heck, Robert; Madroñero, Javier; Martín, Fernando; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The concerted motion of two or more bound electrons governs atomic and molecular non-equilibrium processes including chemical reactions, and hence there is much interest in developing a detailed understanding of such electron dynamics in the quantum regime. However, there is no exact solution for the quantum three-body problem, and as a result even the minimal system of two active electrons and a nucleus is analytically intractable. This makes experimental measurements of the dynamics of two bound and correlated electrons, as found in the helium atom, an attractive prospect. However, although the motion of single active electrons and holes has been observed with attosecond time resolution, comparable experiments on two-electron motion have so far remained out of reach. Here we show that a correlated two-electron wave packet can be reconstructed from a 1.2-femtosecond quantum beat among low-lying doubly excited states in helium. The beat appears in attosecond transient-absorption spectra measured with unprecedentedly high spectral resolution and in the presence of an intensity-tunable visible laser field. We tune the coupling between the two low-lying quantum states by adjusting the visible laser intensity, and use the Fano resonance as a phase-sensitive quantum interferometer to achieve coherent control of the two correlated electrons. Given the excellent agreement with large-scale quantum-mechanical calculations for the helium atom, we anticipate that multidimensional spectroscopy experiments of the type we report here will provide benchmark data for testing fundamental few-body quantum dynamics theory in more complex systems. They might also provide a route to the site-specific measurement and control of metastable electronic transition states that are at the heart of fundamental chemical reactions.

  18. ‘Superluminal paradox’ in wave packet propagation and its quantum mechanical resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovski, D.; Akhmatskaya, E.

    2013-12-15

    We analyse in detail the reshaping mechanism leading to apparently ‘superluminal’ advancement of a wave packet traversing a classically forbidden region. In the coordinate representation, a barrier is shown to act as an effective beamsplitter, recombining envelopes of the freely propagating pulse with various spacial shifts. Causality ensures that none of the constituent envelopes are advanced with respect to free propagation, yet the resulting pulse is advanced due to a peculiar interference effect, similar to the one responsible for ‘anomalous’ values which occur in Aharonov’s ‘weak measurements’. In the momentum space, the effect is understood as a bandwidth phenomenon, where the incident pulse probes local, rather than global, analytical properties of the transmission amplitude T(p). The advancement is achieved when T(p) mimics locally an exponential behaviour, similar to the one occurring in Berry’s ‘superoscillations’. Seen in a broader quantum mechanical context, the ‘paradox’ is but a consequence of an attempt to obtain ‘which way?’ information without destroying the interference between the pathways of interest. This explains, to a large extent, the failure to adequately describe tunnelling in terms of a single ‘tunnelling time’. -- Highlights: •Apparent superluminality is described in the language of quantum measurements. •A barrier acts as a beamsplitter delaying copies of the initial pulse. •In the coordinate space the effect is similar to what occurs in ‘weak measurements’. •In the momentum space it relies on superoscillations in the transmission amplitude. •It is an interference effect, unlikely to be explained in simpler physical terms.

  19. Overall non-linear correction of phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system based on displacement feedback control combined with fuzzy PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningfang; Luo, Xinkai; Li, Huipeng; Li, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    The non-linearity of the phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system can seriously affect the measuring accuracy of the system. In this paper, the correcting method is to combine the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology. Displacement feedback control mechanism and fuzzy PID controller are designed and then try to figure it out through Matlab simulation and experiment.. The result shows that combining the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology can fulfill decent overall non-linear correction in the white light interferometry measuring system. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the correction is high and the non-linearity drop from 2% to 0.1%.

  20. Observation of laser transverse modes analogous to a SU(2) wave packet of a quantum harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Lan, Y.P.

    2002-11-01

    We report the generation of a new type of laser transverse mode that is analogous to a SU(2) elliptical wave packet of a quantum harmonic oscillator. Experimental results show that using a doughnut pump profile to excite an isotropic microchip laser in a spherical cavity can generate the elliptical transverse modes. The formation of elliptical transverse modes is found to be a spontaneous locking process of Hermite-Gaussian modes within the same family. The chaotic relaxation oscillation caused by the interaction of two nearly degenerate elliptical modes is also observed.

  1. Real-Time Quadrature Measurement of a Single-Photon Wave Packet with Continuous Temporal-Mode Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hisashi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Miyata, Kazunori; Taguchi, Masahiro; Makino, Kenzo; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization has been limited by mode mismatch between the temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wave packet induced by photon detection by utilizing continuous temporal-mode matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.

  2. Noncommutative geometry and non-Abelian Berry phase in the wave-packet dynamics of Bloch electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindou, Ryuichi; Imura, Ken-Ichiro

    2005-08-01

    Motivated by a recent proposal on the possibility of observing a monopole in the band structure, and by an increasing interest in the role of Berry phase in spintronics, we studied the adiabatic motion of a wave packet of Bloch functions, under a perturbation varying slowly and incommensurately to the lattice structure. We show, using only the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, that the effective wave-packet dynamics is conveniently described by a set of equations of motion (EOM) for a semiclassical particle coupled to a non-Abelian gauge field associated with a geometric Berry phase. Our EOM can be viewed as a generalization of the standard Ehrenfest's theorem, and their derivation was asymptotically exact in the framework of linear response theory. Our analysis is entirely based on the concept of local Bloch bands, a good starting point for describing the adiabatic motion of a wave packet. One of the advantages of our approach is that the various types of gauge fields were classified into two categories by their different physical origin: (i) projection onto specific bands, (ii) time-dependent local Bloch basis. Using those gauge fields, we write our EOM in a covariant form, whereas the gauge-invariant field strength stems from the noncommutativity of covariant derivatives along different axes of the reciprocal parameter space. On the other hand, the degeneracy of Bloch bands makes the gauge fields non-Abelian. For the purpose of applying our wave-packet dynamics to the analyses on transport phenomena in the context of Berry phase engineering, we focused on the Hall-type and polarization currents. Our formulation turned out to be useful for investigating and classifying various types of topological current on the same footing. We highlighted their symmetries, in particular, their behavior under time reversal ( T) and space inversion ( I). The result of these analyses was summarized as a set of cancellation rules. We also introduced the concept of parity

  3. Coherent and incoherent contributions to the carrier-envelope phase control of wave packet localization in quantum double wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, K.; Engel, V.

    2014-05-14

    We study laser excitation processes in a double well potential. The possibility to influence localization via the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a laser pulse is investigated for various situations which differ in the nature of the initial state prior to the laser interactions. In more detail, the CEP-dependence of asymmetries in the case where initially the system is described by localized wave packets, eigenstates, or incoherent mixtures are calculated and interpreted within time-dependent perturbation theory. It is investigated which contributions to the asymmetry exist and how they can be modified to reveal a more or less pronounced CEP-effect.

  4. Coherent electronic wave packet motion in C(60) controlled by the waveform and polarization of few-cycle laser fields.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mignolet, B; Wachter, G; Skruszewicz, S; Zherebtsov, S; Süssmann, F; Kessel, A; Trushin, S A; Kling, Nora G; Kübel, M; Ahn, B; Kim, D; Ben-Itzhak, I; Cocke, C L; Fennel, T; Tiggesbäumker, J; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Lemell, C; Burgdörfer, J; Levine, R D; Remacle, F; Kling, M F

    2015-03-27

    Strong laser fields can be used to trigger an ultrafast molecular response that involves electronic excitation and ionization dynamics. Here, we report on the experimental control of the spatial localization of the electronic excitation in the C_{60} fullerene exerted by an intense few-cycle (4 fs) pulse at 720 nm. The control is achieved by tailoring the carrier-envelope phase and the polarization of the laser pulse. We find that the maxima and minima of the photoemission-asymmetry parameter along the laser-polarization axis are synchronized with the localization of the coherent electronic wave packet at around the time of ionization. PMID:25860740

  5. Real-Time Quadrature Measurement of a Single-Photon Wave Packet with Continuous Temporal-Mode Matching.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisashi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Miyata, Kazunori; Taguchi, Masahiro; Makino, Kenzo; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Yoshikawa, Jun-Ichi; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-06-10

    Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization has been limited by mode mismatch between the temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wave packet induced by photon detection by utilizing continuous temporal-mode matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.

  6. Quantum state-to-state cross sections for atom-diatom reactions: A Chebyshev real wave-packet approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shiying; Guo Hua

    2006-08-15

    We describe the implementation of a quantum mechanical method to calculate state-to-state differential cross sections for atom-diatom reactive scattering processes. The key ingredient of this approach is the efficient and accurate propagation of a real scattering wave packet in the Chebyshev order domain, from which the S-matrix elements can be extracted. This approach is implemented with Open MP and applied to compute differential and integral cross sections for the direct H+H{sub 2} abstraction reaction and the more challenging N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2} insertion reaction.

  7. Fusion reaction of halo nuclei: A real-time wave-packet method for three-body tunneling dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Ito, Makoto; Ueda, Manabu

    2006-08-14

    We investigate fusion cross section of a nucleus with a valence neutron, using the time-dependent wave-packet method. For a stable projectile, in which the valence neutron is tightly bound ({epsilon}n < -3 MeV), the neutron could enhance the fusion probability when the matching condition of orbital energies are satisfied. In contrast, for a halo nucleus, in which the binding energy of the neutron is very small ({epsilon}n > -1 MeV), the fusion probability is hindered by the presence of the weakly bound neutron.

  8. Calculation of state-to-state differential and integral cross sections for atom-diatom reactions with transition-state wave packets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-21

    A recently proposed transition-state wave packet method [R. Welsch, F. Huarte-Larrañaga, and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064117 (2012)] provides an efficient and intuitive framework to study reactive quantum scattering at the state-to-state level. It propagates a few transition-state wave packets, defined by the eigenfunctions of the low-rank thermal flux operator located near the transition state, into the asymptotic regions of the reactant and product arrangement channels separately using the corresponding Jacobi coordinates. The entire S-matrix can then be assembled from the corresponding flux-flux cross-correlation functions for all arrangement channels. Since the transition-state wave packets can be defined in a relatively small region, its transformation into either the reactant or product Jacobi coordinates is accurate and efficient. Furthermore, the grid/basis for the propagation, including the maximum helicity quantum number K, is much smaller than that required in conventional wave packet treatments of state-to-state reactive scattering. This approach is implemented for atom-diatom reactions using a time-dependent wave packet method and applied to the H + D2 reaction with all partial waves. Excellent agreement with benchmark integral and differential cross sections is achieved.

  9. Calculation of state-to-state differential and integral cross sections for atom-diatom reactions with transition-state wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Guo, Hua E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2014-06-21

    A recently proposed transition-state wave packet method [R. Welsch, F. Huarte-Larrañaga, and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064117 (2012)] provides an efficient and intuitive framework to study reactive quantum scattering at the state-to-state level. It propagates a few transition-state wave packets, defined by the eigenfunctions of the low-rank thermal flux operator located near the transition state, into the asymptotic regions of the reactant and product arrangement channels separately using the corresponding Jacobi coordinates. The entire S-matrix can then be assembled from the corresponding flux-flux cross-correlation functions for all arrangement channels. Since the transition-state wave packets can be defined in a relatively small region, its transformation into either the reactant or product Jacobi coordinates is accurate and efficient. Furthermore, the grid/basis for the propagation, including the maximum helicity quantum number K, is much smaller than that required in conventional wave packet treatments of state-to-state reactive scattering. This approach is implemented for atom-diatom reactions using a time-dependent wave packet method and applied to the H + D{sub 2} reaction with all partial waves. Excellent agreement with benchmark integral and differential cross sections is achieved.

  10. Dissipative Bohmian mechanics within the Caldirola–Kanai framework: A trajectory analysis of wave-packet dynamics in viscid media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Martínez-Casado, R.; Peñate-Rodríguez, H.C.; Rojas-Lorenzo, G.; Miret-Artés, S.

    2014-08-15

    Classical viscid media are quite common in our everyday life. However, we are not used to find such media in quantum mechanics, and much less to analyze their effects on the dynamics of quantum systems. In this regard, the Caldirola–Kanai time-dependent Hamiltonian constitutes an appealing model, accounting for friction without including environmental fluctuations (as it happens, for example, with quantum Brownian motion). Here, a Bohmian analysis of the associated friction dynamics is provided in order to understand how a hypothetical, purely quantum viscid medium would act on a wave packet from a (quantum) hydrodynamic viewpoint. To this purpose, a series of paradigmatic contexts have been chosen, such as the free particle, the motion under the action of a linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, or the superposition of two coherent wave packets. Apart from their analyticity, these examples illustrate interesting emerging behaviors, such as localization by “quantum freezing” or a particular type of quantum–classical correspondence. The reliability of the results analytically determined has been checked by means of numerical simulations, which has served to investigate other problems lacking of such analyticity (e.g., the coherent superpositions). - Highlights: • A dissipative Bohmian approach is developed within the Caldirola–Kanai model. • Some simple yet physically insightful systems are then studied analytically. • Dissipation leads to spatial localization in free-force regimes. • Under the action of linear forces, dissipation leads to uniform motion. • In harmonic potentials, the system decays unavoidable to the well minimum.

  11. Time-resolved imaging of laser-induced vibrational wave packets in neutral and ionic states of iodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kananka Raju, P.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Light-driven vibrational wave packets play an important role in molecular imaging and coherent control applications. Here we present the results of a pump-probe experiment characterizing laser-induced vibrational wave packets in both, neutral and ionic states of CH3 I (iodomethane), one of the prototypical polyatomic systems. Measuring yields and kinetic energies of all ionic fragments as a function of the time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we map vibrational motion of the molecule, and identify the states involved by channel-resolved Fourier spectroscopy. In the Coulomb explosion channels we observe features with ~ 130 fs periodicity resulting from C-I symmetric stretch (ν3 mode) of the electronically excited cationic state. However the Fourier transform of the low-energy I+ ion yield produced by the dissociative ionization of CH3 I reveals the signatures of the same vibrational mode in the ground electronic states of both, neutral and cation, reflected in 65-70 fs oscillations. We observe the degeneration of the oscillatory structures from the cationic states within ~ 2 ps and discuss most likely reasons for this behavior. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049.

  12. Quantum wave packet method for state-to-state reactive scattering calculations on AB + CD --> ABC + D reactions.

    PubMed

    Cvitas, Marko T; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2009-04-23

    We describe a quantum wave packet method for computing the state-to-state quantum dynamics of 4-atom AB + CD --> ABC + D reactions. The approach is an extension to 4-atom reactions of a version of the reactant-product decoupling (RPD) approach, applied previously to 3-atom reactions ( J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114 , 1601 ). The approach partitions the coordinate space of the reaction into separate reagent, strong-interaction, and product regions, using a system of artificial absorbing and reflecting potentials. It employs a partitioned version of the split-operator propagator, which is more efficient than partitioning the (exact) time-dependent Schrodinger equation. The wave packet bounces off a reflecting potential in the entrance channel, which generates a source term; this is transformed efficiently from reagent to product Jacobi coordinates by exploiting some simple angular momentum properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated by numerical tests on the benchmark OH + H(2) --> H(2)O + H reaction.

  13. Pairwise entanglement and readout of atomic-ensemble and optical wave-packet modes in traveling-wave Raman interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wasilewski, Wojciech; Raymer, M. G.

    2006-06-15

    We analyze quantum entanglement of Stokes light and atomic electronic polarization excited during single-pass, linear-regime, stimulated Raman scattering in terms of optical wave-packet modes, and atomic-ensemble spatial modes. The output of this process is confirmed to be decomposable into multiple discrete, Bosonic mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution into a two-mode squeezed state. For this we extend the Bloch-Messiah reduction theorem, previously known for discrete linear systems [S. L. Braunstein, Phys. Rev. A 71, 055801 (2005)]. We present typical mode functions in the case of one-dimensional scattering in an atomic vapor. We find that in the absence of dispersion, one mode pair dominates the process, leading to a simple interpretation of entanglement in this continuous-variable system. However, many mode pairs are excited in the presence of dispersion-induced temporal walkoff of the Stokes, as witnessed by the photon-count statistics. We also consider the readout of the stored atomic polarization using the anti-Stokes scattering process. We prove that the readout process can also be decomposed into multiple mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution analogous to a beam-splitter transformation. We show that this process can have unit efficiency under realistic experimental conditions. The shape of the output light wave packet can be predicted. In the case of unit readout efficiency it contains only excitations originating from a specified atomic excitation mode.

  14. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  15. Dynamic Symmetry Breaking Hidden in Fano Resonance of a Molecule: S1 State of Diazirine Using Quantum Wave Packet Propagation.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Choon; An, Heesun; Lee, Yoon Sup; Baeck, Kyung Koo

    2016-02-18

    Fano resonance in the predissociation of the S1 state of diazirine was studied by applying a time-dependent wave packet propagation method, and dynamic symmetry breaking (DSB) around the stationary structure of S1 was disclosed in a detailed analysis of this theoretical result. The DSB was found to originate in coupling between the asymmetric C-N2 stretching and CH2 wagging modes, suggesting that there is a slight time gap between ring opening and the concurrent dragging of two H atoms of the CH2 moiety. Although the depth of the double well due to DSB is just 0.011 eV, its presence noticeably affects the early time dynamics and observed spectrum. PMID:26820379

  16. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  17. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-01

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H2) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H2. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H2 liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  18. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-01

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H2) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H2. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H2 liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  19. A comparison of three time-dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Mcgarrah, Dorothy B.; Sharafeddin, Omar A.; Kouri, Donald J.; Hoffman, David K.

    1991-01-01

    Three time-dependent wave packet methods for performing elastic scattering calculations from screened Coulomb potentials are compared. The three methods are the time-dependent amplitude density method (TDADM), a Cayley-transform method (CTM), and the Chebyshev propagation method of Tal-Ezer and Kosloff. Both the TDADM and the CTM are based on a time-dependent integral equation for the wave function. In the first, the time-dependent amplitude density is propagated, while in the other two, the wave function is propagated. As a numerical example, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated using a screened Coulomb, Yukawa type potential over the range 200-1000 eV. It is found that, in most cases, all three methods yield comparable accuracy and are about equally efficient computationally. However for l = 0, where the Coulomb well is not screened by the centrifugal potential, the TDADM requires smaller grid spacings to maintain accuracy.

  20. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  2. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Study of the H2 + CH3 → H + CH4 Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Chen, Jun; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-12-17

    The initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method has been developed to study the H2 + CH3 → H + CH4 reaction, by employing the seven- and eight-dimensional models proposed by Palma and Clary in which the nonreacting CH3 moiety is restricted in C3v symmetry. Total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections were calculated for the ground and a number of vibrationally excited initial states to investigate the effects of vibrational excitations of both reagents on the reaction. The eight-dimensional calculations showed that the CH stretching excitation does not have any important effect on the reaction and the seven-dimensional model with the CH bond length fixed works very well for the reaction. The excitation of H2 vibrations could enhance the reaction but is less effective than the translation in the low energy region. In contrast, the first umbrella excitation is very effective on reducing the reaction threshold. The calculated rate constants are found to be in good agreement with available experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  3. Coulomb explosion imaging of bound and continuum nuclear wave packets in strong-field ionization of iodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Zohrabi, M.; Pearson, W. L.; Kaderiya, B.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2015-05-01

    As a prototypical polyatomic system with well-studied photodissociation dynamics, the iodomethane molecule (CH3I) has recently been used to test novel quantum control schemes, and to investigate charge transfer processes after X-ray absorption. These applications require a detailed understanding of CH3I behavior in intense laser pulses. Here we present the results of a time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging experiment that maps both, bound and dissociating nuclear wave packets in singly and doubly charged ionic states of CH3I. Measuring energies and emission angles of coincident ionic fragments as a function of time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we track the propagation of different dissociation pathways, vibrational motion of the molecule and its impulsive alignment. In particular, a periodic (~ 130 fs) feature in the delay-dependent ion energy spectra can be assigned to C-I stretching vibrations in the two lowest cationic states, and exhibits intriguing correlation with the oscillations observed in the laser pump/X-ray probe experiment on charge transfer at LCLS. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Spatiotemporal interference of photoelectron wave packets and the time scale of nonadiabatic transitions in the high-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai

    2016-10-01

    The method of the envelope Hamiltonian [K. Toyota, U. Saalmann, and J. M. Rost, New J. Phys. 17, 073005 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073005] is applied to further study a detachment dynamics of a model negative ion in one dimension in the high-frequency regime. This method is based on the Floquet approach, but the time dependency of an envelope function is explicitly kept for arbitrary pulse durations. Therefore, it is capable of describing not only a photon absorption or emission, but also a nonadiabatic transition which is induced by the time-varying envelope of the pulse. It was shown that the envelope Hamiltonian accurately retrieves the results obtained by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the underlying physics were well understood by the adiabatic approximation based on the envelope Hamiltonian. In this paper, we explore two more aspects of the detachment dynamics, which were not considered in our previous work. First, we determine the features of both a spatial and temporal interference of photoelectron wave packets in a photon-absorption process. We conclude that both of the interference mechanisms are universal in ionization dynamics in the high-frequency regime. Second, we extract a pulse duration which maximizes a yield of the nonadiabatic transition as a function of a pulse duration. It is shown that it becomes maximum when the pulse duration is comparable to a time scale of an electron.

  5. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Study of the H2 + CH3 → H + CH4 Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Chen, Jun; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-12-17

    The initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method has been developed to study the H2 + CH3 → H + CH4 reaction, by employing the seven- and eight-dimensional models proposed by Palma and Clary in which the nonreacting CH3 moiety is restricted in C3v symmetry. Total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections were calculated for the ground and a number of vibrationally excited initial states to investigate the effects of vibrational excitations of both reagents on the reaction. The eight-dimensional calculations showed that the CH stretching excitation does not have any important effect on the reaction and the seven-dimensional model with the CH bond length fixed works very well for the reaction. The excitation of H2 vibrations could enhance the reaction but is less effective than the translation in the low energy region. In contrast, the first umbrella excitation is very effective on reducing the reaction threshold. The calculated rate constants are found to be in good agreement with available experimental measurements and other theoretical results. PMID:26495964

  6. ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.; Bulut, N.; Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J.; Roncero, O.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

  7. Quantification of a propagating spin-wave packet created by an ultrashort laser pulse in a thin film of a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iihama, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Sugihara, A.; Kamimaki, A.; Ando, Y.; Mizukami, S.

    2016-07-01

    Coherent spin-wave generation by focused ultrashort laser pulse irradiation was investigated for a permalloy thin film at micrometer scale using an all-optical space- and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope. The spin-wave packet propagating perpendicular to the magnetization direction was clearly observed; however, that propagating parallel to the magnetization direction was not observed. The propagation length, group velocity, center frequency, and packet width of the observed spin-wave packet were evaluated and quantitatively explained in terms of the propagation of a magnetostatic spin wave driven by the ultrafast change of an out-of-plane demagnetization field induced by the focused-pulse laser.

  8. A time-dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities - Theory and application to the H + H2(J = 0) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the study of atom-diatom reactive collisions in three dimensions employing wave packets and the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The method uses a projection operator approach to couple the inelastic and reactive portions of the total wave function and optical potentials to circumvent the necessity of using product arrangement coordinates. Reactive transition probabilities are calculated from the state resolved flux of the wave packet as it leaves the interaction region in the direction of the reactive arrangement channel. The present approach is used to obtain such vibrationally resolved probabilities for the three-dimensional H + H2 (J = 0) hydrogen exchange reaction, using a body-fixed system of coordinates.

  9. Quantifying the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C sub-Coulomb fusion with the time-dependent wave-packet method

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis; Wiescher, Michael

    2012-10-20

    This contribution provides a preliminary study of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C sub-Coulomb fusion reaction using the time-dependent wave-packet method within a nuclear molecular picture. The theoretical sub-Coulomb fusion resonances seem to correspond well with observations. The present method might be a more suitable tool for expanding the cross-section predictions towards lower energies than the commonly used potential-model approximation.

  10. Determination of the effective transverse coherence of the neutron wave packet as employed in reflectivity investigations of condensed-matter structures. II. Analysis of elastic scattering using energy-gated wave packets with an application to neutron reflection from ruled gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present a general approach to analyzing elastic scattering for those situations where the incident beam is prepared as an incoherent ensemble of wave packets of a given arbitrary shape. Although wave packets, in general, are not stationary solutions of the Schrödinger equation, the analysis of elastic scattering data treats the scattering as a stationary-state problem. We thus must gate the wave packet, coherently distorting its shape in a manner consistent with the elastic condition. The resulting gated scattering amplitudes (e.g., reflection coefficients) thus are weighted coherent sums of the constituent plane-wave scattering amplitudes, with the weights determined by the shape of the incident wave packet as "filtered" by energy gating. We develop the gating formalism in general and apply it to the problem of neutron scattering from ruled gratings described by Majkrzak et al. in a companion paper. The required exact solution of the associated problem of plane-wave reflection from gratings also is derived.

  11. Non-Gaussian wave packet dynamics in anharmonic potential: Cumulant expansion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-03-01

    This manuscript utilizes cumulant expansion as an alternative algebraic approach to evaluating integrals and solving a system of nonlinear differential equations for probing anharmonic dynamics in condensed phase systems using Morse oscillator. These integrals and differential equations become harder to solve as the anharmonicity of the system goes beyond that of Morse oscillator description. This algebraic approach becomes critically important in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics and numerical uncertainties at low temperatures. The autocorrelation function is calculated algebraically and compared to the exact one for they match perfectly. It is also compared to the approximate autocorrelation function using the differential equations technique reported in Toutounji (2014) for weak and strong electron-phonon coupling cases. It is found that the present cumulant method is more efficient, and easier to use, than the exact expression. Deviation between the approximate autocorrelation function and the exact autocorrelation function starts to arise as the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. The autocorrelation function obtained using cumulants identically matches the exact autocorrelation function, thereby surpassing the approach presented in Toutounji (2014). The advantage of the present methodology is its applicability to various types of electron-phonon coupling cases. Additionally, the herein approach only uses algebraic techniques, thereby avoiding both the divergence integral and solving a set of linear first- and second-order partial differential equations as was done in previous work. Model calculations are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the herein work.

  12. Linear and nonlinear light bullets: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalache, Dumitru

    2013-06-01

    The spatiotemporal optical solitons (alias nonlinear "light bullets") are nondiffracting and nondispersing wave packets propagating in nonlinear optical media. The three-dimensional spatiotemporal solitons are localized (self-guided) in two transverse (spatial) dimensions and in the direction of propagation due to the balance of anomalous group-velocity dispersion of the medium in which they form and nonlinear self-phase modulation. The formation of fully threedimensional spatiotemporal optical solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices was reported in recent experiments. Also, linear light bullets, which are robust and versatile localized wave packets combining Bessel beams in the transverse plane with temporal Airy pulses have been reported experimentally. A brief up-to-date survey of recent theoretical and experimental studies of the formation, stability and robustness of linear and nonlinear light bullets in various physical settings is given.

  13. Semiquantal molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen-bond dynamics in liquid water using multi-dimensional Gaussian wave packets.

    PubMed

    Ono, Junichi; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    A semiquantal (SQ) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method based on an extended Hamiltonian formulation has been developed using multi-dimensional thawed gaussian wave packets (WPs), and applied to an analysis of hydrogen-bond (H-bond) dynamics in liquid water. A set of Hamilton's equations of motion in an extended phase space, which includes variance-covariance matrix elements as auxiliary coordinates representing anisotropic delocalization of the WPs, is derived from the time-dependent variational principle. The present theory allows us to perform real-time and real-space SQMD simulations and analyze nuclear quantum effects on dynamics in large molecular systems in terms of anisotropic fluctuations of the WPs. Introducing the Liouville operator formalism in the extended phase space, we have also developed an explicit symplectic algorithm for the numerical integration, which can provide greater stability in the long-time SQMD simulations. The application of the present theory to H-bond dynamics in liquid water is carried out under a single-particle approximation in which the variance-covariance matrix and the corresponding canonically conjugate matrix are reduced to block-diagonal structures by neglecting the interparticle correlations. As a result, it is found that the anisotropy of the WPs is indispensable for reproducing the disordered H-bond network compared to the classical counterpart with the use of the potential model providing competing quantum effects between intra- and intermolecular zero-point fluctuations. In addition, the significant WP delocalization along the out-of-plane direction of the jumping hydrogen atom associated with the concerted breaking and forming of H-bonds has been detected in the H-bond exchange mechanism. The relevance of the dynamical WP broadening to the relaxation of H-bond number fluctuations has also been discussed. The present SQ method provides the novel framework for investigating nuclear quantum dynamics in the many

  14. Accurate Time-Dependent Wave Packet Calculations for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H Ion-Molecule Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulut, N; Castillo, J F; Jambrina, P G; Kłos, J; Roncero, O; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L

    2015-12-17

    Accurate quantum reactive scattering time-dependent wave packet close-coupling calculations have been carried out to determine total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H reaction in a range of collision energies from 10(-3) eV up to 1.0 eV for the H2 rovibrational states (v = 0; j = 0, 1, 2) and (v = 1; j = 0) using the potential energy surface (PES) by Martı́nez et al. As expected for a barrierless reaction, the reaction cross section decays rapidly with collision energy, Ec, following a behavior that nearly corresponds to that predicted by the Langevin model. Rotational excitation of H2 into j = 1, 2 has a very moderate effect on reactivity, similarly to what happens with vibrational excitation below Ec ≈ 0.3 eV. However, at higher collision energies the cross section increases notably when H2 is promoted to v = 1. This effect is explained by resorting to the effective potentials in the entrance channel. The integral cross sections have been used to calculate rate constants in the temperature range 200-1000 K. A good overall agreement has been found with the available experimental data on integral cross sections and rate constants. In addition, time-independent quantum mechanical and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been performed on the same PES aimed to compare the various methodologies and to discern the detailed mechanism of the title reaction. In particular, the analysis of individual trajectories has made it possible to explain, in terms of the coupling between reagent relative velocity and the topography of the PES, the presence of a series of alternating maxima and minima in the collision energy dependence of the QCT reaction probabilities for the reactions with H2(v=0,1,j=0), which are absent in the quantum mechanical calculations.

  15. Nonspreading Wave Packets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, M. V.; Balazs, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains properties of the Airy packet that show that quantum wave functions correspond to a family of orbits and not to a single particle. Introducing the Airy packet into elementary quantum mechanics courses is recommended. (HM)

  16. Determination of the effective transverse coherence of the neutron wave packet as employed in reflectivity investigations of condensed-matter structures. I. Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkrzak, Charles F.; Metting, Christopher; Maranville, Brian B.; Dura, Joseph A.; Satija, Sushil; Udovic, Terrence; Berk, Norman F.

    2014-03-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation is to determine the effective coherent extent of the neutron wave packet transverse to its mean propagation vector k when it is prepared in a typical instrument used to study the structure of materials in thin film form via specular reflection. There are two principal reasons for doing so. One has to do with the fundamental physical interest in the characteristics of a free neutron as a quantum object, while the other is of a more practical nature, relating to the understanding of how to interpret elastic scattering data when the neutron is employed as a probe of condensed-matter structure on an atomic or nanometer scale. Knowing such a basic physical characteristic as the neutron's effective transverse coherence can dictate how to properly analyze specular reflectivity data obtained for material film structures possessing some amount of in-plane inhomogeneity. In this study we describe a means of measuring the effective transverse coherence length of the neutron wave packet by specular reflection from a series of diffraction gratings of different spacings. Complementary nonspecular measurements of the widths of grating reflections were also performed, which corroborate the specular results. (This paper principally describes measurements interpreted according to the theoretical picture presented in a companion paper.) Each grating was fabricated by lift-off photolithography patterning of a nickel film (approximately 1000 Å thick) formed by physical vapor deposition on a flat silicon crystal surface. The grating periods ranged from 10 μm (5 μm Ni stripe, 5 μm intervening space) to several hundred microns. The transverse coherence length, modeled as the width of the wave packet, was determined from an analysis of the specular reflectivity curves of the set of gratings.

  17. Expectation value analysis of wave packet solutions for the quantum bouncer: Short-term classical and long-term revival behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doncheski, M. A.; Robinett, R. W.

    2001-10-01

    We discuss the time development of Gaussian wave packet solutions of the "quantum bouncer" (a quantum mechanical particle subject to a uniform downward force, above an impermeable flat surface). We focus on the evaluation and visualization of the expectation values and uncertainties of position and momentum variables during a single quasi-classical period as well as during the long-term collapsed phase and several revivals. This approach complements existing analytic and numerical analyses of this system, as well as being useful for comparison with similar results for the harmonic oscillator and infinite well cases.

  18. Dynamic interference in the photoionization of He by coherent intense high-frequency laser pulses: Direct propagation of the two-electron wave packets on large spatial grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Hochstuhl, David; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Demekhin, Philipp V.

    2016-04-01

    The direct ionization of the helium atom by intense coherent high-frequency short laser pulses is investigated theoretically from first principles. To this end, we solve numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the two-electron wave packet and its interaction with the linearly polarized pulse by the efficient time-dependent restricted-active-space configuration-interaction method (TD-RASCI). In particular, we consider photon energies which are nearly resonant for the 1 s →2 p excitation in the He+ ion. Thereby, we investigate the dynamic interference of the photoelectrons of the same kinetic energy emitted at different times along the pulse in the two-electron system. In order to enable observation of the dynamic interference in the computed spectrum, the electron wave packets were propagated on large spatial grids over long times. The computed photoionization spectra of He exhibit pronounced interference patterns the complexity of which increases with the decrease of the photon energy detuning and with the increase of the pulse intensity. Our numerical results pave the way for experimental verification of the dynamic interference effect at presently available high-frequency laser pulse sources.

  19. Wave packet and statistical quantum calculations for the He + NeH{sup +} → HeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on the ground electronic state

    SciTech Connect

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N.; Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás

    2014-09-21

    A real wave packet based time-dependent method and a statistical quantum method have been used to study the He + NeH{sup +} (v, j) reaction with the reactant in various ro-vibrational states, on a recently calculated ab initio ground state potential energy surface. Both the wave packet and statistical quantum calculations were carried out within the centrifugal sudden approximation as well as using the exact Hamiltonian. Quantum reaction probabilities exhibit dense oscillatory pattern for smaller total angular momentum values, which is a signature of resonances in a complex forming mechanism for the title reaction. Significant differences, found between exact and approximate quantum reaction cross sections, highlight the importance of inclusion of Coriolis coupling in the calculations. Statistical results are in fairly good agreement with the exact quantum results, for ground ro-vibrational states of the reactant. Vibrational excitation greatly enhances the reaction cross sections, whereas rotational excitation has relatively small effect on the reaction. The nature of the reaction cross section curves is dependent on the initial vibrational state of the reactant and is typical of a late barrier type potential energy profile.

  20. A reactant-coordinate-based wave packet method for full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of tetra-atomic reactions: Application to both the abstraction and exchange channels in the H + H2O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2016-02-01

    An efficient and accurate wave packet method is proposed for the calculation of the state-to-state S-matrix elements in bimolecular reactions involving four atoms. This approach propagates an initial state specific wave packet in reactant Jacobi coordinates. The projection in product channels is carried out on projection planes, which have one less degree of freedom, by transforming both the time-dependent wave packet and final product states into a set of intermediate coordinates. This reactant-coordinate-based method is more efficient than product-coordinate-based methods because it typically requires a smaller number of basis functions or grid points and allows the determination of S-matrix elements for multiple product channels from a single propagation. This method is demonstrated in calculating the (Jtot = 0) state-to-state S-matrix elements for both the abstraction and exchange channels of the H + H2O reaction.

  1. Justification of the Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation for the Evolution of Gravity Driven 2D Surface Water Waves in a Canal of Finite Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düll, Wolf-Patrick; Schneider, Guido; Wayne, C. Eugene

    2016-05-01

    In 1968 V.E. Zakharov derived the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the two-dimensional water wave problem in the absence of surface tension, that is, for the evolution of gravity driven surface water waves, in order to describe slow temporal and spatial modulations of a spatially and temporarily oscillating wave packet. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the wave packets in the two-dimensional water wave problem in a canal of finite depth can be approximated over a physically relevant timespan by solutions of the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  2. Interferometry concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2014-09-01

    This paper serves as an introduction to the current book. It provides the basic notions of long-baseline optical/infrared interferometry prior to reading all the subsequent chapters, and is not an extended introduction to the field.

  3. Selective pumping and spatial hole burning for generation of photon wave packets with ray-wave duality in solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Tuan, P. H.; Chang, F. L.; Huang, K. F.; Lu, T. H.; Chen, Y. F.

    2016-02-01

    The selective pumping and the spatial hole burning are thoroughly considered to determine the excited transverse and longitudinal eigenmodes. By using the mode locking of the excited eigenmodes, an analytical wave representation is derived to manifest the ray-wave duality of the optical wave packet dynamics in the laser resonator. The derived wave function is employed to extract the parametric formula for the periodic ray orbits that reveal the subtle origin between the hyperbolic caustics and linear trajectories. Moreover, the temporal dynamics of the output beam for the total mode-locked state is theoretically demonstrated by combining with the parametric formula and the derived wave function. More importantly, an experiment based on the self-mode-locked laser is performed to make a comparison with theoretical analysis.

  4. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Hochstuhl, David

    2015-06-28

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules.

  5. Evidence of dispersion and refraction of a spectrally broad gravity wave packet in the mesopause region observed by the Na lidar and Mesospheric Temperature Mapper above Logan, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Heale, C. J.; Snively, J. B.; Cai, X.; Pautet, P.-D.; Fish, C.; Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Wickwar, V.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Gravity wave packets excited by a source of finite duration and size possess a broad frequency and wave number spectrum and thus span a range of temporal and spatial scales. Observing at a single location relatively close to the source, the wave components with higher frequency and larger vertical wavelength dominate at earlier times and at higher altitudes, while the lower frequency components, with shorter vertical wavelength, dominate during the latter part of the propagation. Utilizing observations from the Na lidar at Utah State University and the nearby Mesospheric Temperature Mapper at Bear Lake Observatory (41.9°N, 111.4°W), we investigate a unique case of vertical dispersion for a spectrally broad gravity wave packet in the mesopause region over Logan, Utah (41.7°N, 111.8°W), that occurred on 2 September 2011, to study the waves' evolution as it propagates upward. The lidar-observed temperature perturbation was dominated by close to a 1 h modulation at 100 km during the early hours but gradually evolved into a 1.5 h modulation during the second half of the night. The vertical wavelength also decreased simultaneously, while the vertical group and phase velocities of the packet apparently slowed, as it was approaching a critical level during the second half of the night. A two-dimensional numerical model is used to simulate the observed gravity wave processes, finding that the location of the lidar relative to the source can strongly influence which portion of the spectrum can be observed at a particular location relative to a source.

  6. A three-dimensional wave-packet method for the CH overtone spectroscopy and intramolecular vibrational relaxation dynamics of the fluoroform molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solá, I. R.; Muñoz-Crego, C.; Díaz, A.; Muñoz-Sanz, R.; Santamaría, J.

    1997-01-01

    The overtone spectroscopy and intramolecular vibrational relaxation dynamics of CH chromophore in the fluoroform molecule is studied by a three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent wave-packet method, and the results are compared with the experiment and with those of a 2D (stretch-bend) wave-packet method. A third mode (CF symmetrical stretch) is included in order to explain the long time dynamics and the combination bands between the CF stretch fundamental and the Fermi polyad frequencies. The comparison with the 2D study is carried out by the use of a full set of dynamical and spectroscopic variables, based on the autocorrelation function of the bright states of each polyad. The spectroscopic variables then follow by Fourier transforming the autocorrelation function, while the dynamical ones emerge via survival probability in the frame of the dynamical statistical ensemble. These include several relaxation times and the number of cells and rates of phase-space exploration. The specific effect of the third mode is monitored by following the reduced dynamics of the system irrespective of the polyad stretch-bend dynamics, through population evolution. Dynamical results clearly reveal the third mode effects at very short and long times. In the last regime, we can observe a great span of different behaviors, depending on how the third mode excited states are involved. This richer variety of dynamical patterns cannot be observed in a two-mode model and justifies the present work. The spectroscopic results of both models are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Computational Improvements to Quantum Wave Packet ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Using a Potential-Adapted, Time-Dependent Deterministic Sampling Technique.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2006-09-01

    In a recent publication, we introduced a computational approach to treat the simultaneous dynamics of electrons and nuclei. The method is based on a synergy between quantum wave packet dynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Atom-centered density-matrix propagation or Born-Oppenheimer dynamics can be used to perform ab initio dynamics. In this paper, wave packet dynamics is conducted using a three-dimensional direct product implementation of the distributed approximating functional free-propagator. A fundamental computational difficulty in this approach is that the interaction potential between the two components of the methodology needs to be calculated frequently. Here, we overcome this problem through the use of a time-dependent deterministic sampling measure that predicts, at every step of the dynamics, regions of the potential which are important. The algorithm, when combined with an on-the-fly interpolation scheme, allows us to determine the quantum dynamical interaction potential and gradients at every dynamics step in an extremely efficient manner. Numerical demonstrations of our sampling algorithm are provided through several examples arranged in a cascading level of complexity. Starting from a simple one-dimensional quantum dynamical treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) and [CH3-H-Cl](-) along with simultaneous dynamical treatment of the electrons and classical nuclei, through a complete three-dimensional treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) as well as treatment of a hydrogen atom undergoing donor-acceptor transitions in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1), we benchmark the algorithm thoroughly. Apart from computing various error estimates, we also compare vibrational density of states, inclusive of full quantum effects from the shared proton, using a novel unified velocity-velocity, flux-flux autocorrelation function. In all cases, the potential-adapted, time-dependent sampling procedure is seen to improve the

  8. Nonlinear modes of the tensor Dirac equation and CPT violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifler, Frank J.; Morris, Randall D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that Dirac's bispinor equation can be expressed, in an equivalent tensor form, as a constrained Yang-Mills equation in the limit of an infinitely large coupling constant. It was also shown that the free tensor Dirac equation is a completely integrable Hamiltonian system with Lie algebra type Poisson brackets, from which Fermi quantization can be derived directly without using bispinors. The Yang-Mills equation for a finite coupling constant is investigated. It is shown that the nonlinear Yang-Mills equation has exact plane wave solutions in one-to-one correspondence with the plane wave solutions of Dirac's bispinor equation. The theory of nonlinear dispersive waves is applied to establish the existence of wave packets. The CPT violation of these nonlinear wave packets, which could lead to new observable effects consistent with current experimental bounds, is investigated.

  9. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. I. Conservative systems with time-independent Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Hans; Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2015-09-15

    The sensitivity of the evolution of quantum uncertainties to the choice of the initial conditions is shown via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation leading to a reformulation of quantum dynamics. This sensitivity is demonstrated for systems with exact analytic solutions with the form of Gaussian wave packets. In particular, one-dimensional conservative systems with at most quadratic Hamiltonians are studied.

  10. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karzova, M.; Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V.; Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph.

    2015-10-28

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime.

  11. Effect of nonlinear instability on gravity-wave momentum transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear instability of internal gravity waves and the effects of their nonlinear interaction on momentum flux, using simple theoretical and numerical models. From the result of an analysis of parametric instability of a two-dimensional internal gravity wave as discussed by Yeh and Liu (1981) and Klostermeyer (1982), a group trajectory length scale for a gravity wave packet was determined, expressed in terms of the dominant vertical wavelenght and the degree of convective saturation. It is shown that this analysis justifies the Eikonal saturation method for relatively transient packets, that are well below the saturation amplitude, propagating in a slowly varying mean flow. Conversely, linear theory fails for persistent disturbances and trasient wave packets near convective saturation.

  12. Current-driven Langmuir oscillations and formation of wave packets via modulational instability: Relevance to STEREO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K.; Sydora, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been shown that Langmuir oscillations (LOs) at the plasma frequency can be driven by an electron current without any electrostatic instability. This current may appear due to a (small) drift of the whole electron population against the ions or by beam electrons after their relaxation to a plateau-like distribution. The consequences of LOs for nonlinear wave phenomena in this scenario are studied by means of kinetic plasma simulations. It is shown that the electric field of LOs can act as a pump wave and generate Langmuir envelope solitons via the modulational instability. In this way, both counterstreaming Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves arise with the same wave number. For solar wind conditions the Doppler shift leads to the generation of satellite peaks with frequencies symmetric around the plasma frequency. Simultaneously, a peak appears in the ion-acoustic branch. These results agree well with recent STEREO observations in the solar wind.

  13. A 2A2<--X 2B1 absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule: A three-dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Lou, Nanquan; Nyman, Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    Time-dependent wave packet calculations of the (A 2A2←X 2B1) absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule are reported. The Fourier grid Hamiltonian method in three dimensions is employed. The X 2B1 ground state ab initio potential energy surface reported by Peterson [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8864 (1998)] is used together with his corresponding A 2A2 state surface or the revised surface of the A 2A2 state by Xie and Guo [Chem. Phys. Lett. 307, 109 (1999)]. Radau coordinates are used to describe the vibrations of a nonrotating OClO molecule. The split-operator method combined with fast Fourier transform is applied to propagate the wave function. We find that the ab initio A 2A2 potential energy surface better reproduces the detailed structures of the absorption spectrum at long wavelength, while the revised surface of the A 2A2 state, consistent with the work of Xie and Guo, better reproduces the overall shape and the energies of the vibrational levels. Both surfaces of the A 2A2 state can reasonably reproduce the experimental Raman spectra but neither does so in detail for the numerical model employed in the present work.

  14. Rotational excitations in para-H2+para-H2 collisions: Full- and reduced-dimensional quantum wave packet studies comparing different potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2008-02-01

    We study the process of rotational excitation in the collisions of para-H2 with para-H2 by propagating wave packets with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) algorithm. Transition probabilities are then calculated by the method of Tannor and Weeks based on time-correlation functions. Calculations were carried out up to a total angular momentum of J =70 to compute integral cross sections up to 1.2eV in collision energy and thermal rate coefficients from 100to3000K. The process is studied on the full-dimensional potential energy surface of Boothroyd-Martin-Keogh-Peterson (BMKP) as well as on the rigid rotor surface of Diep and Johnson. We test the validity of the rigid rotor approximation by also considering two rigid rotor restrictions of the BMKP potential energy surface (PES). Additionally, we investigate a variant of the BMKP PES suggested by Pogrebnya and Clary [Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 523 (2002)] with reduced anisotropy. We compare our results with previous theoretical data for the cross sections and with experimental data for the rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  15. Quantum wave packet propagation study of the photochemistry of phenol: isotope effects (Ph-OD) and the direct excitation to the 1πσ* state.

    PubMed

    An, Heesun; Baeck, Kyoung Koo

    2011-11-24

    An earlier time-dependent quantum wave packet propagation study of the photochemistry of Ph-OH [J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 224315] is extended to investigate isotope effects (for Ph-OD) and the dynamics initiated by direct (vibronically induced) excitation to the (1)πσ* state. The isotope effect is significant only when the initially excited state is (1)ππ*, that is, there are noticeable changes not only in the time scale but also in the branching ratio (Ã/X̃) for the electronic states of the product Ph-O radical. In contrast, the isotope effect on the dynamics initiated by direct excitation to the (1)πσ* state is very small. Our most important observation for the dynamics initiated by direct excitation to the (1)πσ* state is that the initial excitation of the O-H stretch mode does not result in a noticeable enhancement of the product Ph-O radical in the à state, which corresponds to a dissociating H atom with low kinetic energy. The initial excitation of the CCOH torsion mode is the main reason for the enhancement of the product Ph-O radical in the à state that was observed in a vibrationally mediated two-photon experiment [J. Chem. Phys.2008, 128, 104307].

  16. Geometric phase effects in the H+H2 reaction: quantum wave-packet calculations of integral and differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    Juanes-Marcos, Juan Carlos; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2005-05-22

    We report quantum wave-packet calculations on the H+H(2) reaction, aimed at resolving the controversy over whether geometric phase (GP) effects can be observed in this reaction. Two sets of calculations are reported of the state-to-state reaction probabilities, and integral and differential cross sections (ICSs and DCSs). One set includes the GP using the vector potential approach of Mead and Truhlar; the other set neglects the phase. We obtain unequivocal agreement with recent results of Kendrick [J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 6739 (2003)], predicting GP effects in the state-to-state reaction probabilities, which cancel exactly on summing the partial waves to yield the ICS. Our results therefore contradict those of Kuppermann and Wu [Chem. Phys. Lett. 349 537 (2001)], which predicted pronounced GP effects in the cross sections. We also agree with Kendrick in predicting that there are no significant GP effects in the full DCS at energies below 1.8 eV, and in the partial (0

  17. Stark-assisted population control of coherent CS(2) 4f and 5p Rydberg wave packets studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W; Wen, Patrick; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-09-28

    A two-color (3+1(')) pump-probe scheme is employed to investigate Rydberg wave packet dynamics in carbon disulfide (CS(2) (*)). The state superpositions are created within the 4f and 5p Rydberg manifolds by three photons of the 400 nm pump pulse, and their temporal evolution is monitored with femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using an 800 nm ionizing probe pulse. The coherent behavior of the non-stationary superpositions are observed through wavepacket revivals upon ionization to either the upper (12) or lower (32) spin-orbit components of CS(2) (+). The results show clearly that the composition of the wavepacket can be efficiently controlled by the power density of the excitation pulse over a range from 500 GWcm(2) to 10 TWcm(2). The results are consistent with the anticipated ac-Stark shift for 400 nm light and demonstrate an effective method for population control in molecular systems. Moreover, it is shown that Rydberg wavepackets can be formed in CS(2) with excitation power densities up to 10 TWcm(2) without significant fragmentation. The exponential 1e population decay (T(1)) of specific excited Rydberg states are recovered by analysis of the coherent part of the signal. The dissociation lifetimes of these states are typically 1.5 ps. However, a region exhibiting a more rapid decay ( approximately 800 fs) is observed for states residing in the energy range of 74 450-74 550 cm(-1), suggestive of an enhanced surface crossing in this region.

  18. State-to-state quantum wave packet dynamics of the LiH + H reaction on two AB initio potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Carrasco, S.; González-Sánchez, L.; Roncero, O.

    2014-03-20

    The dynamics and kinetics of the LiH + H reaction have been studied by using an accurate quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet method on the ab initio ground electronic state potential energy surfaces (PES) developed earlier. Reaction probabilities for the two possible reaction channels, the LiH + H→ H{sub 2} + Li depletion process and the LiH + H→H + LiH hydrogen exchange reaction, have been calculated from 1 meV up to 1.0 eV collision energies for total angular momenta J from 0 to 80. State-to-state and total integral cross sections for the LiH-depletion and H-exchange channels of the reaction have been calculated over this collision energy range. It is found that the LiH-depletion channel is dominant in the whole range of collision energies for both PESs. Accurate total rate coefficients have been calculated on both surfaces from 100 K to 2000 K and are significantly larger than previous empirical estimates and previous J-shifting results. In addition, the present accurate calculations present noticeable differences with previous calculations using the centrifugal sudden approximation.

  19. Photodissociation of water. II. Wave packet calculations for the photofragmentation of H2O and D2O in the B˜ band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C.

    2000-04-01

    A complete three-dimensional quantum mechanical description of the photodissociation of water in the B˜ band, starting from its rotational ground state, is presented. In order to include B˜-X˜ vibronic coupling and the B˜-Ã Renner-Teller coupling, diabatic electronic states have been constructed from adiabatic electronic states and matrix elements of the electronic angular momentum operators, following the procedure developed by A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles [Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997)], using the ab initio results discussed in the preceding paper. The dynamics is studied using wave packet methods, and the evolution of the time-dependent wave function is discussed in detail. Results for the H2O and D2O absorption spectra, OH(A)/OH(X) and OD(A)/OD(X) branching ratios, and rovibrational distributions of the OH and OD fragments are presented and compared with available experimental data. The present theoretical results agree at least qualitatively with the experiments. The calculations show that the absorption spectrum and the product state distributions are strongly influenced by long-lived resonances on the adiabatic B˜ state. It is also shown that molecular rotation plays an important role in the photofragmentation process, due to both the Renner-Teller B˜-X˜ mixing, and the strong effect of out-of-plane molecular rotations (K>0) on the dynamics at near linear HOH and HHO geometries.

  20. Time-dependent wave packet calculation for state-to-state reaction of Cl+H2 using the reactant-product decoupling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yici; Zhang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Qinggang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2001-11-01

    We present in this paper the application of the reactant-product decoupling (RPD) method [T. Peng and J. Z. H. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6072 (1996)] in a time-dependent wave packet calculation of the state-to-state reaction of Cl+H2→HCl+H on the G3 potential energy surface. In the RPD approach, the wave function is split into two components: the reactant ψR, which comprises the reagent and interaction regions, and the product ψP, which comprises the product region. The propagation of the reactant component ψR is separated (decoupled) from that of the product component ψP through the use of absorbing potential. The propagation ψP is entirely in the product space using the product Jacobi coordinates by using a coordinate transformation on the absorbed piece of wave function. The reaction probabilities from the ground state of H2 to specific rovibrational states of the product ClH are presented in detail. All calculations are done for total angular momentum J=0 on the G3 potential energy surface.

  1. Calculation of the state-to-state S-matrix for tetra-atomic reactions with transition-state wave packets: H₂/D₂ + OH → H/D + H₂O/HOD.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2014-10-21

    This work is concerned with the calculation of state-to-state S-matrix elements for four-atom reactions using a recently proposed method based on the quantum transition-state theory. In this approach, the S-matrix elements are computed from the thermal flux cross-correlation functions obtained in both the reactant and product arrangement channels. Since transition-state wave packets are propagated with only single arrangement channels, the bases/grids required are significantly smaller than those needed in state-to-state approaches based on a single set of scattering coordinates. Furthermore, the propagation of multiple transition-state wave packets can be carried out in parallel. This method is demonstrated for the H2/D2 + OH → H/D + H2O/HOD reactions (J = 0) and the reaction probabilities are in excellent agreement with benchmark results.

  2. Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion of temperature and salinity structure of an internal solitary wave packet from marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qunshu; Hobbs, Richard; Zheng, Chan; Biescas, Berta; Caiado, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Marine seismic reflection technique is used to observe the strong ocean dynamic process of nonlinear internal solitary waves (ISWs or solitons) in the near-surface water. Analysis of ISWs is problematical because of their transient nature and limitations of classical physical oceanography methods. This work explores a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to recover the temperature and salinity of ISW field using the seismic reflectivity data and in situ hydrographic data. The MCMC approach is designed to directly sample the posterior probability distributions of temperature and salinity which are the solutions of the system under investigation. The principle improvement is the capability of incorporating uncertainties in observations and prior models which then provide quantified uncertainties in the output model parameters. We tested the MCMC approach on two acoustic reflectivity data sets one synthesized from a CTD cast and the other derived from multichannel seismic reflections. This method finds the solutions faithfully within the significantly narrowed confidence intervals from the provided priors. Combined with a low frequency initial model interpreted from seismic horizons of ISWs, the MCMC method is used to compute the finescale temperature, salinity, acoustic velocity, and density of ISW field. The statistically derived results are equivalent to the conventional linearized inversion method. However, the former provides us the quantified uncertainties of the temperature and salinity along the whole section whilst the latter does not. These results are the first time ISWs have been mapped with sufficient detail for further analysis of their dynamic properties.

  3. Speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Rajpal S.

    2002-03-01

    Illumination of a rough surface by a coherent monochromatic wave creates a grainy structure in space termed a speckle pattern. It was considered a special kind of noise and was the bane of holographers. However, its information-carrying property was soon discovered and the phenomenon was used for metrological applications. The realization that a speckle pattern carried information led to a new measurement technique known as speckle interferometry (SI). Although the speckle phenomenon in itself is a consequence of interference among numerous randomly dephased waves, a reference wave is required in SI. Further, it employs an imaging geometry. Initially SI was performed mostly by using silver emulsions as the recording media. The double-exposure specklegram was filtered to extract the desired information. Since SI can be configured so as to be sensitive to the in-plane displacement component, the out-of-plane displacement component or their derivatives, the interferograms corresponding to these were extracted from the specklegram for further analysis. Since the speckle size can be controlled by the F number of the imaging lens, it was soon realized that SI could be performed with electronic detection, thereby increasing its accuracy and speed of measurement. Furthermore, a phase-shifting technique can also be incorporated. This technique came to be known as electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). It employed the same experimental configurations as SI. ESPI found many industrial applications as it supplements holographic interferometry. We present three examples covering diverse areas. In one application it has been used to measure residual stress in a blank recordable compact disk. In another application, microscopic ESPI has been used to study the influence of relative humidity on paint-coated figurines and also the effect of a conservation agent applied on top of this. The final application is to find the defects in pipes. These diverse applications

  4. Femtosecond wave-packet propagation in spin-orbit-coupled electronic states of 39,39K2 and 39,41K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, Soeren; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Schreiber, Elmar

    1996-07-01

    Applying femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, we investigated via three-photon ionization (3PI) and high mass selection the vibrational dynamics of the potassium dimer's electronic A1Σ+u state separately for two of its isotopoes, 39,39K2 and 39,41K2. The fast oscillation with TA=500 fs, observed for both isotopes, reflects the wave-packet propagation prepared on the potential-energy surface of the A state. The long-time dynamics, however, of the isotopes is totally different. While for 39,39K2 a beat structure with TBS=10 ps is superimposed, for 39,41K2 a rather fast decay and revivals at 38 ps, 60 ps, and 82 ps could be resolved. A detailed Fourier analysis of the 200-ps scans with a resolution of 0.1 cm-1 enables the identification of the excited vibrational levels of the A state in detail, including their energetic shifts due to spin-orbit coupling with the crossing b3Πu state. Theoretical simulations of the pump-probe spectra on the basis of fully quantum-dynamical calculations reproduce well the experimental data. The reason for the slight differences can be identified as deviations between the real potential-energy surfaces and the ab initio data, used for the simulations and demonstrates the very high sensitivity of the femtosecond spectroscopy to investigate vibrational states and their perturbation. Furthermore, the theoretical investigations reveal the details of the ultrafast intersystem crossing process in real time.

  5. A quantum time-dependent wave-packet study of intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P0, 1, 2) + D2(v = 0, j = 0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan

    2013-04-01

    We investigated spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing effects in the title reaction by the time-dependent wave-packet method combined with an extended split operator scheme. We performed non-adiabatic calculations of the fine-structure-resolved cross section and adiabatic calculations of integral cross section. The calculations are based on the potential energy surfaces of 3A' and the two degenerate 3A'' states [S. Rogers, D. Wang, A. Kuppermann, and S. Walch, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2308 (2000)], 10.1021/jp992985g, together with the spin-orbit coupling matrix [B. Maiti and G. C. Schatz, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 12360 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1623481 and singlet 1A' potential energy surface [J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Faraday Discuss. 110, 247 (1998)]. The results of the O(3P) + D2 are similar to those of the O(3P) + H2 reaction. The product spin state-resolved reaction cross section and the total reaction cross section both show that the adiabatic channel is dominant in all cases, and the non-adiabatic channels have cross sections of several orders of magnitude smaller than the adiabatic channels at high collision energy. Although the cross sections caused by the intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P) + D2 reaction are larger than those in the O(3P) + H2 reaction, the differences in non-adiabaticity between these two reaction systems are quite modest. Based on the results of the O(3P) + H2 reaction, we can predict that the influence of spin-orbit on the total reaction cross sections of the O(3P) + D2 reaction is also insignificant. However, these non-adiabatic effects can be reflected in the presence of some forward-scattering in the angular distribution for the OD product.

  6. State-resolved dynamics study of the H + HS reaction on the 3A' and 3A″ states with time-dependent quantum wave packet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Duan, Zhi-Xin; Yin, Shu-Hui; Zhao, Guang-Jiu

    2016-09-01

    The quantum dynamics calculations of the H + HS (v = 0, j = 0) reaction on the 3A' and 3A″ potential energy surfaces (PESs) are performed using the reactant coordinate based time-dependent wave packet method. State-averaged and state-resolved results for both channels of the title reaction are presented in the 0.02-1.0 eV collision energy range and compared with those carried out with quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method. Total integral cross sections (ICSs) for both channels are in excellent agreement with previous quantum mechanical (QM)-Coriolis coupling results while poorly agree with the QCT ICSs of the exchange channel, particularly near the threshold energy region. The product rotational distributions show that for the abstraction channel, the agreement between our QM and the QCT results improves with increasing collision energy. For the exchange channel, our calculations predict colder rotational distributions as compared to those obtained by QCT calculations. Although the QM total differential cross sections (DCSs) are in qualitatively good agreement with the QCT results, the two sets of the state-to-state DCSs with several peaks exhibit great divergences. The origin of the divergences are traced by analyzing the QM DCS for the H + HS (v = 0, j = 0) → H2 (v' = 0, j' = 0) + S reaction on the 3A″ PES at Ec = 1.0 eV. It is discovered that several groups of J partial waves are involved in the reaction and the shape of the DCS is greatly altered by quantum interferences between them.

  7. Differential cross sections and product rotational polarization in A + BC reactions using wave packet methods: H+ + D2 and Li + HF examples.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, A; Roncero, O; González-Lezana, T; Rodríguez-López, A; Aguado, A; Sanz-Sanz, C; Gómez-Carrasco, S

    2009-12-31

    The state-to-state differential cross sections for some atom + diatom reactions have been calculated using a new wave packet code, MAD-WAVE3, which is described in some detail and uses either reactant or product Jacobi coordinates along the propagation. In order to show the accuracy and efficiency of the coordinate transformation required when using reactant Jacobi coordinates, as recently proposed [ J. Chem. Phys. 2006 , 125 , 054102 ], the method is first applied to the H + D(2) reaction as a benchmark, for which exact time-independent calculations are also performed. It is found that the use of reactant coordinates yields accurate results, with a computational effort slightly lower than that when using product coordinates. The H(+) + D(2) reaction, with the same masses but a much deeper insertion well, is also studied and exhibits a completely different mechanism, a complex-forming one which can be treated by statistical methods. Due to the longer range of the potential, product Jacobi coordinates are more efficient in this case. Differential cross sections for individual final rotational states of the products are obtained based on exact dynamical calculations for some selected total angular momenta, combined with the random phase approximation to save the high computational time required to calculate all partial waves with very long propagations. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with available exact time-independent calculations. Finally, the method is applied to the Li + HF system for which reactant coordinates are very well suited, and quantum differential cross sections are not available. The results are compared with recent quasiclassical simulations and experimental results [J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 244304]. Furthermore, the polarization of the product angular momenta is also analyzed as a function of the scattering angle.

  8. Complex master slave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rivet, Sylvain; Maria, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    A general theoretical model is developed to improve the novel Spectral Domain Interferometry method denoted as Master/Slave (MS) Interferometry. In this model, two functions, g and h are introduced to describe the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time and due to dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MS method. A first improvement consists in reducing the number of channeled spectra necessary to be collected at Master stage. In previous MSI implementation, the number of channeled spectra at the Master stage equated the number of depths where information was selected from at the Slave stage. The paper demonstrates that two experimental channeled spectra only acquired at Master stage suffice to produce A-scans from any number of resolved depths at the Slave stage. A second improvement is the utilization of complex signal processing. Previous MSI implementations discarded the phase. Complex processing of the electrical signal determined by the channeled spectrum allows phase processing that opens several novel avenues. A first consequence of such signal processing is reduction in the random component of the phase without affecting the axial resolution. In previous MSI implementations, phase instabilities were reduced by an average over the wavenumber that led to reduction in the axial resolution.

  9. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  10. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  11. Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, F. P.; Jin, F.; Wang, Q.; Zhu, N.

    Before the milestone work of Leedertz in 1970 coherent speckles generated from a laser illuminated object are considered noise to be eliminated or minimized. Leedertz shows that coherent speckles are actually information carriers. Since then the speckle technique has found many applications to fields of mechanics, metrology, nondestructive evaluation and material sciences. Speckles need not be coherent. Artificially created socalled white light speckles can also be used as information carriers. In this paper we present two recent developments of speckle technique with applications to micromechanics problems using SIEM (Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy), to nondestructive evaluation of crevice corrosion and composite disbond and vibration of large structures using TADS (Time-Average Digital Specklegraphy).

  12. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  13. Spatial versus temporal deterministic wave breakup of nonlinearly coupled light waves.

    PubMed

    Salerno, D; Minardi, S; Trull, J; Varanavicius, A; Tamosauskas, G; Valiulis, G; Dubietis, A; Caironi, D; Trillo, S; Piskarskas, A; Di Trapani, P

    2003-10-01

    We investigate experimentally the competition between spatial and temporal breakup due to modulational instability in chi((2)) nonlinear mixing. The modulation of the wave packets caused by the energy exchange between fundamental and second-harmonic components is found to be the prevailing trigger mechanism which, according to the relative weight of diffraction and dispersion, leads to the appearance of a multisoliton pattern in the low-dimensional spatial or temporal domain.

  14. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  15. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  16. Selection rules for the nonlinear interaction of internal gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Marcus, Philip S

    2009-03-27

    Two intersecting beams of internal gravity waves will generically create two wave packets by nonlinear interaction. The frequency of one packet will be the sum and that of the other packet will be the difference of the frequencies of the intersecting beams. In principle, each packet should form an "X" pattern, or "St. Andrew's cross" consisting of four beams outgoing from the point of intersection. Here we derive selection rules and show that most of the expected nonlinear beams are forbidden. These rules can also be applied to the reflection of a beam from a boundary.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Nonlinear Lamb Waves Used in a Thin Plate for Detecting Buried Micro-Cracks

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Guanghua; Tse, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Compared with conventional linear ultrasonic inspection methods, which are sensitive only to severe defects, nonlinear ultrasonic inspection methods are better for revealing micro-cracks in thin plates. However, most nonlinear ultrasonic inspection methods have only been experimentally investigated using bulk or Rayleigh waves. Numerical studies, especially numerical simulations of Lamb ultrasonic waves, have seldom been reported. In this paper, the interaction between nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves and micro-cracks of various lengths and widths buried in a thin metallic plate was simulated using the finite element method (FEM). The numerical results indicate that after interacting with a micro-crack, a new wave-packet was generated in addition to the S0 mode wave-packet. The second harmonics of the S0 mode Lamb waves and the new wave-packet were caused by nonlinear acoustic effects at the micro-crack. An amplitude ratio indicator is thus proposed for the early detection of buried micro-cracks. PMID:24834908

  18. Kinetic effects on Alfven wave nonlinearity. II - The modified nonlinear wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1990-01-01

    A previously developed Vlasov theory is used here to study the role of resonant particle and other kinetic effects on Alfven wave nonlinearity. A hybrid fluid-Vlasov equation approach is used to obtain a modified version of the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The differences between a scalar model for the plasma pressure and a tensor model are discussed. The susceptibilty of the modified nonlinear wave equation to modulational instability is studied. The modulational instability normally associated with the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation will, under most circumstances, be restricted to left circularly polarized waves. The nonlocal term in the modified nonlinear wave equation engenders a new modulational instability that is independent of beta and the sense of circular polarization. This new instability may explain the occurrence of wave packet steepening for all values of the plasma beta in the vicinity of the earth's bow shock.

  19. Acoustic multipath arrivals in the horizontal plane due to approaching nonlinear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Lynch, James F

    2011-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic wave transmissions and a nonlinear internal wave packet approaching an along-shelf acoustic path during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are reported. The incoming internal wave packet acts as a moving frontal layer reflecting (or refracting) sound in the horizontal plane. Received acoustic signals are filtered into acoustic normal mode arrivals. It is shown that a horizontal multipath interference is produced. This has previously been called a horizontal Lloyd's mirror. The interference between the direct path and the refracted path depends on the mode number and frequency of the acoustic signal. A mechanism for the multipath interference is shown. Preliminary modeling results of this dynamic interaction using vertical modes and horizontal parabolic equation models are in good agreement with the observed data.

  20. Time-dependent wave-packet quantum dynamics study of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction: including the coriolis coupling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Pei-Yu

    2014-07-10

    The dynamics of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction has been investigated in detail by using an accurate time-dependent wave-packet method on the ground 1(2)A' potential energy surface. Comparisons between the Coriolis coupling results and the centrifugal-sudden ones reveal that Coriolis coupling effect can influence reaction dynamics of the NeD2(+) system. Integral cross sections have been evaluated for the Ne + D2(+) reaction and its isotopic variant Ne + H2(+), and a considerable intermolecular isotopic effect has been found. Also obvious is the great enhancement of the reactivity due to the reagent vibrational excitation. Besides, a comparison with previous theoretical results is also presented and discussed.

  1. Generalized coherent states for time-dependent and nonlinear Hamiltonian operators via complex Riccati equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio; Schuch, Dieter; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2013-02-01

    Based on the Gaussian wave packet solution for the harmonic oscillator and the corresponding creation and annihilation operators, a generalization is presented that also applies for wave packets with time-dependent width as they occur for systems with different initial conditions, time-dependent frequency or in contact with a dissipative environment. In all these cases, the corresponding coherent states, position and momentum uncertainties and quantum mechanical energy contributions can be obtained in the same form if the creation and annihilation operators are expressed in terms of a complex variable that fulfils a nonlinear Riccati equation which determines the time-evolution of the wave packet width. The solutions of this Riccati equation depend on the physical system under consideration and on the (complex) initial conditions and have close formal similarities with general superpotentials leading to isospectral potentials in supersymmetric quantum mechanics. The definition of the generalized creation and annihilation operator is also in agreement with a factorization of the operator corresponding to the Ermakov invariant that exists in all cases considered.

  2. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  3. Propagation of femtosecond pulse with self-similar shape in medium with nonlinear absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Zakharova, Irina G.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the propagation of laser pulse with self-similar shape in homogeneous medium with various mechanisms of nonlinear absorption: multi-photon absorption or resonant nonlinearity under detuning the frequency, corresponding to energy transition, from the current frequency of wave packet, or nonlinear absorption with its saturation. Both types of sign for frequency detuning are considered. This results in appearance of a refractive index grating which induced a laser pulse self-action. We analyze also the influence of the laser pulse self-modulation due to cubic nonlinearity on existence of the laser pulse propagation mode with self-similar shape. We develop an analytical solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenfunction problem for laser pulse propagation in medium with nonlinear absorption. This solution is confirmed by computer simulation of the eigenfunction problem for Schrödinger equation with considered nonlinearity. This mode of laser pulse propagation is very important for powerful TW laser pulse propagating in glass.

  4. Holograph and Interferometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a method to create holograms for use in different interferometry techniques. Students utilize these techniques in experiments to study the structural integrity of a clarinet reed and the effects of temperature on objects. (MDH)

  5. Progress in electron- and ion-interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselbach, Franz

    2010-01-01

    sources. In the context of holography, methods have been developed to record holograms without modulation of the biprism fringes by waves diffracted at the edges of the biprism filament. This simplifies the reconstruction of holograms and the evaluation of interferograms (taken, e.g. to extract a spectrum by Fourier analysis of the fringe system) significantly. A major section is devoted to the influence of electromagnetic and gravito-inertial potentials and fields on the quantum mechanical phase of matter waves: the Aharonov-Bohm effect, the inertial Aharonov-Bohm effect and its realization, the Sagnac effect and Sagnac experiments with atoms, superfluid helium, Bose-Einstein condensates, electrons and ions and their potential as rotation sensors are discussed. Möllenstedt and Wohland discovered in a crossed beam analyzer (Wien filter) an optical element for charged particles that shifts wave packets longitudinally that transverse a Wien filter on laterally separated paths. This new optical element rendered it possible to measure coherence lengths and the spectrum of charged particle waves by visibility- and Fourier-spectroscopy, to perform a 'Welcher Weg' experiment, to re-establish seemingly lost longitudinal coherence in an interferometer for charged particles and to realize a decoherence free quantum eraser. A precision test of decoherence according to a proposal from Anglin and Zurek and biprism interferences with helium atoms close the section on first-order coherence experiments. The topics of the last section are Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlations and an antibuching experiment of free electrons.

  6. Time-dependent quantum wave packet and quasiclassical trajectory studies of the Au(2S) + H2(X1∑+g) → AuH(X1∑+g) + H(2S) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiuchuang; Cheng, Dahai; Sun, Zhigang; Chen, Maodu

    2014-11-01

    The time-dependent quantum wave packet (TDWP) and quasiclassical trajectory calculations (QCT) are carried out for the Au(2S) + H2(X1∑+g) → AuH(X1∑+g) + H(2S) reaction on a global potential energy surface. The reaction probabilities at a series of J values, integral cross sections (ICSs) and differential cross sections of the title reaction are calculated by the TDWP method. For reaction probabilities, there are a mass of sharp oscillations at low collision energy, which can be attributed to resonances supported by the potential well. Due to the endothermicity of the title reaction, the total ICS shows a threshold about 1.53 eV. In order to further investigate the reactive mechanism, the lifetime of complex is calculated by QCT method. At the low collision energy, most intermediate complexes are long lived, which implies that the reaction is governed by indirect reactive mechanism. With the collision energy increasing, the direct reactive mechanism occupies the dominant position. Due to the change of the reactive mechanism, the angular distribution shifts toward the forward direction with collision energy increasing. The isotopic variant, Au + D2→AuD + D reaction, is also calculated by TDWP method. The calculated reaction probabilities and ICSs show that the isotope effect reduces the reactivity.

  7. Time-dependent wave packet state-to-state quantum dynamics study of the abstraction reaction S(3P) + H2(v = 0, j = 0) on 13A″ electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Liang, Dongyue; Zhang, Pei-Yu

    2015-05-01

    The state-to-state quantum dynamics of the abstraction channel of S(3P) + H2(v = 0, j = 0) reaction is studied on the potential energy surface (PES) constructed by Lv et al. (2012), utilizing the product Jacobi coordinate based time-dependent wave packet method. Reaction probabilities and total integral cross section (ICS) agree well with previous results (Lv et al., 2012) for collision energies ranging from 0.8 to 1.4 eV. Results show that total differential cross sections (DCSs) for small collision energies have backward structures, whereas those for large collision energies are sideways peaked. Although the summed-over-all-final-state DCS for single collision energy is smoothly varied, the DCS of the product HS of a selected final state shows strong oscillations. For the selected final state, the opacity function derived by reaction probability multiplied by (2J + 1), shows that different mechanisms relevant to several sets of J partial waves lead to the maxima in the differential cross section in the collision process.

  8. Quantum wave packet and quasiclassical trajectory studies of the reaction H(2S) + CH(X2 Π; v = 0, j = 1) → C(1D) + H2 (X1 Σg+): Coriolis coupling effects and stereodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruifeng; Wang, Yunhui; Deng, Kaiming

    2013-07-30

    The quantum mechanics (QM) and quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out for the title reaction with the ground minimal allowed rotational state of CH (j = 1) on the 1 (1)A' potential energy surface. For the reaction probability at total angular momentum J = 0, a similar trend of the QM and QCT calculations is observed, and the QM results are larger than the latter almost in the whole considered energy range (0.1-1.5 eV). The QCT integral cross sections are larger than the QM results with centrifugal sudden approximation, while smaller than those from QM method including Coriolis coupling for collision energies bigger than 0.25 eV. The quantum wave-packet computations show that the Coriolis coupling effects get more and more pronounced with increasing of J. In addition to the scalar properties, the stereodynamical properties, such as the average rotational alignment factor , the angular distributions P(θr ), P(ϕr ), P(θr ,ϕr ), and the polarization-dependent generalized differential cross sections have been explored in detail by QCT approach.

  9. Calculation of the state-to-state S-matrix for tetra-atomic reactions with transition-state wave packets: H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} + OH → H/D + H{sub 2}O/HOD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2014-10-21

    This work is concerned with the calculation of state-to-state S-matrix elements for four-atom reactions using a recently proposed method based on the quantum transition-state theory. In this approach, the S-matrix elements are computed from the thermal flux cross-correlation functions obtained in both the reactant and product arrangement channels. Since transition-state wave packets are propagated with only single arrangement channels, the bases/grids required are significantly smaller than those needed in state-to-state approaches based on a single set of scattering coordinates. Furthermore, the propagation of multiple transition-state wave packets can be carried out in parallel. This method is demonstrated for the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} + OH → H/D + H{sub 2}O/HOD reactions (J = 0) and the reaction probabilities are in excellent agreement with benchmark results.

  10. Nonlinear Aharonov-Bohm Scattering by Optical Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Neshev, Dragomir; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2001-07-23

    We study linear and nonlinear wave scattering by an optical vortex in a self-defocusing nonlinear Kerr medium. In the linear case, we find a splitting of a plane-wave front at the vortex proportional to its circulation, similar to what occurs in the scattered wave of electrons for the Aharonov-Bohm effect. For larger wave amplitudes, we study analytically and numerically the scattering of a dark-soliton stripe (a nonlinear analog of a small-amplitude wave packet) by a vortex and observe a significant asymmetry of the scattered wave. Subsequently, a wave-front splitting of the scattered wave develops into transverse modulational instability, ''unzipping'' the stripe into trains of vortices with opposite charges.

  11. Wave packet dynamics of the N({sup 4}S){plus}O{sub 2}(X{sup 3}{summation}{over g}){r_arrow}NO(X{sup 2}{Pi}){plus}O({sup 3}P) reaction on the X{sup 2}A' potential energy surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Defazio, P.; Petrongolo, C.; Gray, S.; Oliva, C.; Chemistry; Univ. di Siena; Univ. de Barcelona

    2001-08-15

    We report three-dimensional quantum calculations of total angular momentum J = 0 reaction probabilities, J-shifting cross sections, and rate constants of the title reaction. Employing the real wave packet approach, we propagate wave packets corresponding to several O{sub 2}(v,j) initial levels on the X{sup 2}A' potential surface of Sayos et al. As collision energy increases, the average probabilities first increase monotonically and then become nearly constant, while the cross sections rise in the overall energy range. Numerous probability resonances point out the formation of NOO collision complexes and NO final states. Rotational excitation in O{sub 2} decreases the collisional energy thresholds and enhances the state-resolved rate constants, mainly at low temperature. O{sub 2} vibrational excitation inhibits the reactivity, although the energy thresholds are still reduced. With respect to previous quasiclassical and mixed quantum-classical studies, we obtain lower thresholds and cross sections but similar rate constants, which are however lower than experimental rates. By inspection of the average properties of the wave packets, we suggest a qualitative reaction mechanism, we propose a modified J-shifting approximation, and we find a possible explanation of the low quantum reactivity on the present potential.

  12. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  13. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. II. Dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Hans; Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    In our former contribution (Cruz et al., 2015), we have shown the sensitivity to the choice of initial conditions in the evolution of Gaussian wave packets via the nonlinear Riccati equation. The formalism developed in the previous work is extended to effective approaches for the description of dissipative quantum systems. By means of simple examples we show the effects of the environment on the quantum uncertainties, correlation function, quantum energy contribution and tunnelling currents. We prove that the environmental parameter γ is strongly related with the sensitivity to the choice of initial conditions.

  14. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  15. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides.

  16. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides. PMID:27369163

  17. Nonlinear phonon interferometry at the Heisenberg limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Chang, Laura; Chakram, Srivatsan; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    Interferometers operating at or close to quantum limits of precision have found wide application in tabletop searches for physics beyond the standard model, the study of fundamental forces and symmetries of nature and foundational tests of quantum mechanics. The limits imposed by quantum fluctuations and measurement backaction on conventional interferometers (δϕ 1 /√{ N}) have spurred the development of schemes to circumvent these limits through quantum interference, multiparticle interactions and entanglement. Here, we realize a prominent example of such schemes, the so-called SU(1,1) interferometer, in a fundamentally new platform in which the interfering arms are distinct flexural modes of a millimeter-scale mechanical resonator. We realize up to 15.4(3) dB of noise squeezing and demonstrate the Heisenberg scaling of interferometric sensitivity (δϕ 1 / N), corresponding to a 6-fold improvement in measurement precision over a conventional interferometer. We describe how our work extends the optomechanical toolbox and how it presents new avenues for studies of optomechanical sensing and studies of nonequilibrium dynamics of multimode optomechanical systems. This work was supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO, the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium manybody dynamics and an NSF INSPIRE award.

  18. Effects of reagent rotational excitation on the H + CHD{sub 3} → H{sub 2} + CD{sub 3} reaction: A seven dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-10-14

    Seven-dimensional time-dependent wave packet calculations have been carried out for the title reaction to obtain reaction probabilities and cross sections for CHD{sub 3} in J{sub 0} = 1, 2 rotationally excited initial states with k{sub 0} = 0 − J{sub 0} (the projection of CHD{sub 3} rotational angular momentum on its C{sub 3} axis). Under the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, the initial states with the projection of the total angular momentum on the body fixed axis (K{sub 0}) equal to k{sub 0} are found to be much more reactive, indicating strong dependence of reactivity on the orientation of the reagent CHD{sub 3} with respect to the relative velocity between the reagents H and CHD{sub 3}. However, at the coupled-channel (CC) level this dependence becomes much weak although in general the K{sub 0} specified cross sections for the K{sub 0} = k{sub 0} initial states remain primary to the overall cross sections, implying the Coriolis coupling is important to the dynamics of the reaction. The calculated CS and CC integral cross sections obtained after K{sub 0} averaging for the J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states with all different k{sub 0} are essentially identical to the corresponding CS and CC results for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state, meaning that the initial rotational excitation of CHD{sub 3} up to J{sub 0} = 2, regardless of its initial k{sub 0}, does not have any effect on the total cross sections for the title reaction, and the errors introduced by the CS approximation on integral cross sections for the rotationally excited J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states are the same as those for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state.

  19. Generalized parametric down conversion, many particle interferometry, and Bell's theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Hyung Sup

    1992-01-01

    A new field of multi-particle interferometry is introduced using a nonlinear optical spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) of a photon into more than two photons. The study of SPDC using a realistic Hamiltonian in a multi-mode shows that at least a low conversion rate limit is possible. The down converted field exhibits many stronger nonclassical phenomena than the usual two photon parametric down conversion. Application of the multi-particle interferometry to a recently proposed many particle Bell's theorem on the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen problem is given.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics near the stability margin in rotating pipe flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Leibovich, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of marginally unstable wave packets in rotating pipe flow is studied. These flows depend on two control parameters, which may be taken to be the axial Reynolds number R and a Rossby number, q. Marginal stability is realized on a curve in the (R, q)-plane, and the entire marginal stability boundary is explored. As the flow passes through any point on the marginal stability curve, it undergoes a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and the steady base flow is replaced by a traveling wave. The envelope of the wave system is governed by a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. The Ginzburg-Landau equation admits Stokes waves, which correspond to standing modulations of the linear traveling wavetrain, as well as traveling wave modulations of the linear wavetrain. Bands of wavenumbers are identified in which the nonlinear modulated waves are subject to a sideband instability.

  1. Nonlinear plasmonics in a two-dimensional plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, Chuan Sheng

    2016-05-01

    The nonlinear electron dynamics in a two-dimensional (2D) plasma layer are investigated theoretically and numerically. In contrast to the Langmuir oscillations in a three-dimensional (3D) plasma, a well-known feature of the 2D system is the square root dependence of the frequency on the wavenumber, which leads to unique dispersive properties of 2D plasmons. It is found that for large amplitude plasmonic waves there is a nonlinear frequency upshift similar to that of periodic gravity waves (Stokes waves). The periodic wave train is subject to a modulational instability, leading to sidebands growing exponentially in time. Numerical simulations show the breakup of a 2D wave train into localized wave packets and later into wave turbulence with immersed large amplitude solitary spikes. The results are applied to systems involving massless Dirac fermions in graphene as well as to sheets of electrons on liquid helium.

  2. Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulko, Oleksandra

    The present work describes a novel imaging technique for label-free no-UV vibration-insensitive imaging of live cells in an epi-illumination geometry. This technique can be implemented in a variety of imaging applications. For example, it can be used for cell targeting as a part of a platform for targeted cell irradiations - single-cell microbeam. The goal of microbeam facilities is to provide biological researchers with tools to study the effects of ionizing radiation on live cells. A common way of cell labeling - fluorescent staining - may alter cellular metabolism and UV illumination presents potential damage for the genetic material. The new imaging technique will allow the researchers to separate radiation-induced effects from the effects caused by confounding factors like fluorescent staining or UV light. Geometry of irradiation endstations at some microbeam facilities precludes the use of transmitted light, e.g. in the Columbia University's Radiological Research Accelerator Facility microbeam endstation, where the ion beam exit window is located just below the sample. Imaging techniques used at such endstations must use epi-illumination. Mirau Interferometry is an epi-illumination, non-stain imaging modality suitable for implementation at a microbeam endstation. To facilitate interferometry and to maintain cell viability, it is desirable that cells stay in cell growth medium during the course of an experiment. To accommodate the use of medium, Immersion Mirau Interferometry has been developed. A custom attachment for a microscope objective has been designed and built for interferometric imaging with the possibility of immersion of the apparatus into cell medium. The implemented data collection algorithm is based on the principles of Phase-Shifting Interferometry. The largest limitation of Phase-Shifting Interferometry is its sensitivity to the vertical position of the sample. In environments where vibration isolation is difficult, this makes image

  3. Dynamical phase interferometry of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    London, Uri; Gat, Omri

    2011-12-15

    We study the propagation of cold-atom wave packets in an interferometer with a Mach-Zehnder topology based on the dynamical phase of Bloch oscillation in a weakly forced optical lattice with a narrow potential barrier that functions as a cold-atom wave-packet splitter. We calculate analytically the atomic wave function, and show that the expected number of atoms in the two outputs of the interferometer oscillates rapidly as a function of the angle between the potential barrier and the forcing direction with period proportional to the external potential difference across a lattice spacing divided by the lattice band energy scale. The interferometer can be used as a high-precision force probe whose principle of operation is different from current interferometers based on the overall position of Bloch oscillating wave packets.

  4. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  5. A LISA Interferometry Primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for all gravitational wave detectors in the detection of changes in the fractional difference between pairs of test masses with sufficient precision to measure astrophysical strains with amplitudes on the order of approx.10(exp -21). ln the case of the five million km arms of LISA, this equates to distance measurements on the ten picometer level. LISA interferometry utilizes a decentralized topology, in which each of the sciencecraft houses its own light sources, detectors, and electronics. The measurements made at each of the sciencecraft are then telemetered to ground and combined to extract the strain experienced by the constellation as a whole. I will present an overview of LISA interferometry and highlight some of the key components and technologies that make it possible.

  6. Recent advances in interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.

    2013-02-01

    Observations of spectroscopic double stars with long baseline optical interferometry have resolved many pairs, allowing their orbits to be measured and stellar masses and distances to be derived. A number of these measurements have accuracies worthy of comparison with high quality results from eclipsing binaries, thus able challenge stellar evolution models. I will review the contributions, and also show recent results, among them observations of massive O-stars and multiple systems.

  7. First principle nonlinear quantum dynamics using a correlation-based von Neumann entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, Till; Manthe, Uwe

    2012-05-01

    A new concept to describe the quantum dynamics in complex systems is suggested. It extends established schemes based on the Dirac-Frenkel variation principle, e.g., the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach. The concept is based on a correlation-based von Neumann entropy (CvN-entropy) definition measuring the complexity of the wavefunction. Equations of motion are derived using a CvN-entropy constraint in the variational principle and result in a generally applicable effective Hamiltonian. It consists of the standard Hamilton operator and an additional nonlinear operator which limits the complexity of the wavefunction. Effectively, this nonlinear operator absorbs complex structures which are emerging in the wavefunction and allows one to introduce non-norm conserving equations of motion. Important aspects of the new concept are outlined studying the wave packet propagation on the diabatic B2 potential energy surfaces of NO2. First, it is demonstrated that during standard wave packet propagation the CvN-entropy increases strongly with time roughly independent of the coordinate systems employed. Second, one finds that employing CvN-entropy constrained MCTDH propagation yields improved wave function accuracy on longer time scales while compromising on the short time accuracy. Third, the loss of the wavefunction's norm is directly related to the overlap with the exact wavefunction. This provides an error estimate available without knowing an exact reference.

  8. First principle nonlinear quantum dynamics using a correlation-based von Neumann entropy.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Till; Manthe, Uwe

    2012-05-28

    A new concept to describe the quantum dynamics in complex systems is suggested. It extends established schemes based on the Dirac-Frenkel variation principle, e.g., the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach. The concept is based on a correlation-based von Neumann entropy (CvN-entropy) definition measuring the complexity of the wavefunction. Equations of motion are derived using a CvN-entropy constraint in the variational principle and result in a generally applicable effective Hamiltonian. It consists of the standard Hamilton operator and an additional nonlinear operator which limits the complexity of the wavefunction. Effectively, this nonlinear operator absorbs complex structures which are emerging in the wavefunction and allows one to introduce non-norm conserving equations of motion. Important aspects of the new concept are outlined studying the wave packet propagation on the diabatic B(2) potential energy surfaces of NO(2). First, it is demonstrated that during standard wave packet propagation the CvN-entropy increases strongly with time roughly independent of the coordinate systems employed. Second, one finds that employing CvN-entropy constrained MCTDH propagation yields improved wave function accuracy on longer time scales while compromising on the short time accuracy. Third, the loss of the wavefunction's norm is directly related to the overlap with the exact wavefunction. This provides an error estimate available without knowing an exact reference. PMID:22667549

  9. Instability and dynamics of two nonlinearly coupled intense laser beams in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunliang; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2013-01-15

    We consider nonlinear interactions between two relativistically strong laser beams and a quantum plasma composed of degenerate electron fluids and immobile ions. The collective behavior of degenerate electrons is modeled by quantum hydrodynamic equations composed of the electron continuity, quantum electron momentum (QEM) equation, as well as the Poisson and Maxwell equations. The QEM equation accounts the quantum statistical electron pressure, the quantum electron recoil due to electron tunneling through the quantum Bohm potential, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects caused by electron spin, and relativistic ponderomotive forces (RPFs) of two circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) beams. The dynamics of the latter are governed by nonlinear wave equations that include nonlinear currents arising from the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM wave fields, as well as from the beating of the electron quiver velocity and electron density variations reinforced by the RPFs of the two CPEM waves. Furthermore, nonlinear electron density variations associated with the driven (by the RPFs) quantum electron plasma oscillations obey a coupled nonlinear Schroedinger and Poisson equations. The nonlinearly coupled equations for our purposes are then used to obtain a general dispersion relation (GDR) for studying the parametric instabilities and the localization of CPEM wave packets in a quantum plasma. Numerical analyses of the GDR reveal that the growth rate of a fastest growing parametrically unstable mode is in agreement with the result that has been deduced from numerical simulations of the governing nonlinear equations. Explicit numerical results for two-dimensional (2D) localized CPEM wave packets at nanoscales are also presented. Possible applications of our investigation to intense laser-solid density compressed plasma experiments are highlighted.

  10. Instability and dynamics of two nonlinearly coupled intense laser beams in a quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2013-01-01

    We consider nonlinear interactions between two relativistically strong laser beams and a quantum plasma composed of degenerate electron fluids and immobile ions. The collective behavior of degenerate electrons is modeled by quantum hydrodynamic equations composed of the electron continuity, quantum electron momentum (QEM) equation, as well as the Poisson and Maxwell equations. The QEM equation accounts the quantum statistical electron pressure, the quantum electron recoil due to electron tunneling through the quantum Bohm potential, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects caused by electron spin, and relativistic ponderomotive forces (RPFs) of two circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) beams. The dynamics of the latter are governed by nonlinear wave equations that include nonlinear currents arising from the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM wave fields, as well as from the beating of the electron quiver velocity and electron density variations reinforced by the RPFs of the two CPEM waves. Furthermore, nonlinear electron density variations associated with the driven (by the RPFs) quantum electron plasma oscillations obey a coupled nonlinear Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The nonlinearly coupled equations for our purposes are then used to obtain a general dispersion relation (GDR) for studying the parametric instabilities and the localization of CPEM wave packets in a quantum plasma. Numerical analyses of the GDR reveal that the growth rate of a fastest growing parametrically unstable mode is in agreement with the result that has been deduced from numerical simulations of the governing nonlinear equations. Explicit numerical results for two-dimensional (2D) localized CPEM wave packets at nanoscales are also presented. Possible applications of our investigation to intense laser-solid density compressed plasma experiments are highlighted.

  11. Spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    A bibliographic guide is presented to publications of spatial interferometry techniques applied to optical astronomy. Listings appear in alphabetical order, by first author, as well as in specific subject categories listed in chronological order, including imaging theory and speckle interferometry, experimental techniques, and observational results of astronomical studies of stars, the Sun, and the solar system.

  12. The evolution of nonlinear Alfven waves subject to growth and damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of wave amplification (by streaming particle distributions) and damping (by ion-cyclotron resonance absorption) on the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves are investigated theoretically. The results of numerical simulations based on the derivative-Schroedinger-equation model of Spangler and Sheerin (1983 and 1985) are presented graphically and characterized in detail, with an emphasis on astrophysical applications. Three phases of wave-packet evolution (linear, nonlinear-saturation, and postsaturation quasi-steady) are identified, and nonlinearity is found to transfer wave energy from growing or amplified wavenumbers to wavenumbers affected by damping. It is pointed out that although there are similarities between the solitonlike pulses predicted by the simulations and short-wavelength shocklet structures observed in the earth bow shock, the model does not explain why low-frequency waves stop growing in the vicinity of the bow shock.

  13. Evolution of nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary wave propagation in rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Nag, Apratim

    2006-08-15

    A simple unmagnetized plasma rotating around an axis at an angle {theta} with the propagation direction of the acoustic mode has been taken. The nonlinear wave mode has been derived as an equivalent Sagdeev potential equation. A special procedure, known as the tanh method, has been developed to study the nonlinear wave propagation in plasma dynamics. Further, under small amplitude approximation, the nonlinear plasma acoustic mode has been exploited to study the evolution of soliton propagation in the plasma. The main emphasis has been given to the interaction of Coriolis force on the changes of coherent structure of the soliton. The solitary wave solution finds the different nature of solitons called compressive and rarefactive solitons as well as its explosions or collapses along with soliton dynamics and these have been showing exciting observations in exhibiting a narrow wave packet with the generation of high electric pressure and the growth of high energy which, in turn, yields the phenomena of radiating soliton in dynamics.

  14. Spectral and modulational stability of periodic wavetrains for the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christopher K. R. T.; Marangell, Robert; Miller, Peter D.; Plaza, Ramón G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper is a detailed and self-contained study of the stability properties of periodic traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation utt-uxx+V‧(u)=0, where u is a scalar-valued function of x and t, and the potential V(u) is of class C2 and periodic. Stability is considered both from the point of view of spectral analysis of the linearized problem (spectral stability analysis) and from the point of view of wave modulation theory (the strongly nonlinear theory due to Whitham as well as the weakly nonlinear theory of wave packets). The aim is to develop and present new spectral stability results for periodic traveling waves, and to make a solid connection between these results and predictions of the (formal) modulation theory, which has been developed by others but which we review for completeness.

  15. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability in magnetic fluids with uniform horizontal and vertical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhefnawy, Abdel R. F.

    1993-05-01

    A weakly nonlinear evolution of two dimensional wave packets on the surface of a magnetic fluid in the presence of an uniform magnetic field is presented, taking into account the surface tension. The method used is that of multiple scales to derive two partial differential equations. These differential equations can be combined to yield two alternate nonlinear Schroedinger equations. The first equation is valid near the cutoff wavenumber while the second equation is used to show that stability of uniform wave trains depends on the wavenumber, the density, the surface tension and the magnetic field. At the critical point, a generalized formulation of the evolution equation governing the amplitude is developed which leads to the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. From the latter equation, the various stability criteria are obtained.

  16. Generalized creation and annihilation operators via complex nonlinear Riccati equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2013-06-01

    Based on Gaussian wave packet solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, a generalization of the conventional creation and annihilation operators and the corresponding coherent states can be obtained. This generalization includes systems where also the width of the coherent states is time-dependent as they occur for harmonic oscillators with time-dependent frequency or systems in contact with a dissipative environment. The key point is the replacement of the frequency ω0 that occurs in the usual definition of the creation/annihilation operator by a complex time-dependent function that fulfils a nonlinear Riccati equation. This equation and its solutions depend on the system under consideration and on the (complex) initial conditions. Formal similarities also exist with supersymmetric quantum mechanics. The generalized creation and annihilation operators also allow to construct exact analytic solutions of the free motion Schrödinger equation in terms of Hermite polynomials with time-dependent variable.

  17. Tunable, nonlinear Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehri, D.; Pletyukhov, M.; Gritsev, V.; Blatter, G.; Schmidt, S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the two-photon scattering properties of a Jaynes-Cummings (JC) nonlinearity consisting of a two-level system (qubit) interacting with a single-mode cavity, which is coupled to two waveguides, each containing a single incident photon wave packet initially. In this scattering setup, we study the interplay between the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect arising due to quantum interference and effective photon-photon interactions induced by the presence of the qubit. We calculate the two-photon scattering matrix of this system analytically and identify signatures of interference and interaction in the second-order auto- and cross-correlation functions of the scattered photons. In the dispersive regime, when qubit and cavity are far detuned from each other, we find that the JC nonlinearity can be used as an almost linear, in situ tunable beam splitter giving rise to ideal Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, generating a highly path-entangled two-photon NOON state of the scattered photons. The latter manifests itself in strongly suppressed waveguide cross-correlations and Poissonian photon number statistics in each waveguide. If the two-level system and the cavity are on resonance, the JC nonlinearity strongly modifies the ideal HOM conditions leading to a smaller degree of path entanglement and sub-Poissonian photon number statistics. In the latter regime, we find that photon blockade is associated with bunched autocorrelations in both waveguides, while a two-polariton resonance can lead to bunched as well as antibunched correlations.

  18. Intellectual property in holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya; Hunt, David

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of patents and patent applications on holographic interferometry, and highlights the possibilities offered by patent searching and analysis. Thousands of patent documents relevant to holographic interferometry were uncovered by the study. The search was performed in the following databases: U.S. Patent Office, European Patent Office, Japanese Patent Office and Korean Patent Office for the time frame from 1971 through May 2006. The patent analysis unveils trends in patent temporal distribution, patent families formation, significant technological coverage within the market of system that employ holographic interferometry and other interesting insights.

  19. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  20. Portable intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Camarata, Matthew A.

    2012-07-01

    A limitation of the current generation of long baseline optical interferometers is the need to make the light interfere prior to detection. This is unlike the radio regime where signals can be recorded fast enough to use electronics to accomplish the same result. This paper describes a modern optical intensity interferometer based on electronics with picosecond timing resolution. The instrument will allow for portable optical interferometry with much larger baselines than currently possible by using existing large telescopes. With modern electronics, the limiting magnitude of the technique at a 4-m aperture size becomes competitive with some amplitude-based interferometers. The instrumentation will permit a wireless mode of operation with GPS clocking technology, extending the work to extremely large baselines. We discuss the basic observing strategy, a planned observational program at the Lowell Observatory 1.8-m and 1.0-m telescopes, and the science that can realistically be done with this instrumentation.

  1. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  2. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  3. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  4. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Optical Interferometry Motivation and History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A history and motivation of stellar interferometry is presented. The topics include: 1) On Tides, Organ Pipes, and Soap Bubbles; 2) Armand Hippolyte Fizeau (1819-1896); 3) Fizeau Suggests Stellar Interferometry 1867; 4) Edouard Stephan (1837-1923); 5) Foucault Refractor; 6) Albert A. Michelson (1852-1931); 7) On the Application of Interference Methods to Astronomy (1890); 8) Moons of Jupiter (1891); 9) Other Applications in 19th Century; 10) Timeline of Interferometry to 1938; 11) 30 years goes by; 12) Mount Wilson Observatory; 13) Michelson's 20 ft Interferometer; 14) Was Michelson Influenced by Fizeau? 15) Work Continues in the 1920s and 30s; 16) 50 ft Interferometer (1931-1938); 17) Light Paths in the 50 ft Interferometer; 18) Ground-level at the 50 ft; 19) F.G. Pease (1881-1938); 20) Timeline of Optical Interferometry to 1970; 21) A New Type of Stellar Interferometer (1956); 22) Intensity Interferometer (1963- 1976; 23) Robert Hanbury Brown; 24) Interest in Optical Interferometry in the 1960s; 25) Interferometry in the Early 1970s; and 26) A New Frontier is Opened up in 1974.

  6. Effect of nonlinear wave collapse on line shapes in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, I.; Stamm, R.; Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of waves can change the structural and radiative properties of plasmas. We describe the main features of a fully ionized unmagnetized plasma affected by strong Langmuir turbulence characterized by nonlinear wave collapse, and propose a simple model for evaluating the changes expected on a hydrogen line shape affected by such conditions. Our model is based on a stochastic renewal model using an exponential waiting time distribution and a half-normal probability density function for the electric-field magnitude of the turbulent wave packet. The first results obtained with a simulation calculation of the hydrogen \\text{L}α line show that strong Langmuir turbulence can provide an additional broadening to a Stark profile.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K A

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  8. Geometric time delay interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using time delay interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the interspacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new and intuitive approach to extend this interpretation to all TDI observables. Unlike the standard algebraic formalism, Geometric TDI provides a combinatorial algorithm to explore exhaustively the space of second-generation TDI observables (i.e., those that cancel laser noise in LISA-like interferometers with time-dependent arm lengths). Using this algorithm, I survey the space of second-generation TDI observables of length (i.e., number of component phase measurements) up to 24, and I identify alternative, improved forms of the standard second-generation TDI observables. The alternative forms have improved high-frequency gravitational-wave sensitivity in realistic noise conditions (because they have fewer nulls in the gravitational-wave and noise response functions), and are less susceptible to instrumental gaps and glitches (because their component phase measurements span shorter time periods).

  9. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-09-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  10. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  11. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  12. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  13. Three-color differential interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, J M

    1997-10-01

    It is shown that differential interferometry using a Wollaston prism and a three-color laser source is an optical technique that has all the advantages of differential interferometry in polarized white light and of classical monochromatic interferometry. The interference fringe pattern obtained is very large and colored and presents a central white fringe that enables easy identification of the zero order of the interferogram. The three-color source is obtained by filtering the unwanted lines of the ionized laser (mixed argon and krypton) and balancing the three red, green, and blue lines by a technique that involves placing birefringent plates between the polarizer and the analyzer, the thickness of which has been calculated to create a natural filter. The unsteady aerodynamic flow downstream of a diamond shape airfoil has been visualized with this technique, which shows that the power of the light source is sufficient to record the interferograms at a high rate. PMID:18264221

  14. 100-Picometer Interferometry for EUVL

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G E; Phillion, D W; Johnson, M A; Nguyen, N O; Barty, A; Snell, F J; Dillon, D R; Bradsher, L S

    2002-03-18

    Future extreme ultraviolet lithography (EWL) steppers will, in all likelihood, have six-mirror projection cameras. To operate at the diffraction limit over an acceptable depth of focus each aspheric mirror will have to be fabricated with an absolute figure accuracy approaching 100 pm rms. We are currently developing visible light interferometry to meet this need based on modifications of our present phase shifting diffraction interferometry (PSDI) methodology where we achieved an absolute accuracy of 250pm. The basic PSDI approach has been further simplified, using lensless imaging based on computational diffractive back-propagation, to eliminate auxiliary optics that typically limit measurement accuracy. Small remaining error sources, related to geometric positioning, CCD camera pixel spacing and laser wavelength, have been modeled and measured. Using these results we have estimated the total system error for measuring off-axis aspheric EUVL mirrors with this new approach to interferometry.

  15. Three-color differential interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, J M

    1997-10-01

    It is shown that differential interferometry using a Wollaston prism and a three-color laser source is an optical technique that has all the advantages of differential interferometry in polarized white light and of classical monochromatic interferometry. The interference fringe pattern obtained is very large and colored and presents a central white fringe that enables easy identification of the zero order of the interferogram. The three-color source is obtained by filtering the unwanted lines of the ionized laser (mixed argon and krypton) and balancing the three red, green, and blue lines by a technique that involves placing birefringent plates between the polarizer and the analyzer, the thickness of which has been calculated to create a natural filter. The unsteady aerodynamic flow downstream of a diamond shape airfoil has been visualized with this technique, which shows that the power of the light source is sufficient to record the interferograms at a high rate.

  16. Precision measurement with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Development of atom interferometry and its application in precision measurement are reviewed in this paper. The principle, features and the implementation of atom interferometers are introduced, the recent progress of precision measurement with atom interferometry, including determination of gravitational constant and fine structure constant, measurement of gravity, gravity gradient and rotation, test of weak equivalence principle, proposal of gravitational wave detection, and measurement of quadratic Zeeman shift are reviewed in detail. Determination of gravitational redshift, new definition of kilogram, and measurement of weak force with atom interferometry are also briefly introduced. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB832805) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11227803).

  17. Techniques in Broadband Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2004-01-04

    This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

  18. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  19. Electromagnetic particle simulation of the linear mode conversion and the nonlinear parametric decay instability of lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jian; Lin, Zhihong; Kuley, Animesh; Wang, Zhixuan

    2015-11-01

    An electromagnetic fluid-kinetic model is developed to study the lower hybrid (LH) waves in tokamaks with low numerical noise, in which electron density is pushed forward by the continuity equation, and the kinetic markers are introduced for closure. A generalized weight-based particle-in-cell scheme is also applied to the simulation for the local high resolution in phase space. This new model has been successfully implemented into the global gyro-kinetic toroidal code (GTC), and the electromagnetic particle simulations of the LH waves have been carried out with a realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. The simulation shows that toroidal effects induce an upshift of the parallel reflective index when LH waves propagate from the tokamak edge toward the core, which modifies the radial position for the mode conversion between slow and fast LH waves. The broadening of the poloidal spectrum of the wave-packet due to the wave diffraction is also observed in the simulation of LH wave propagation, and both the toroidal upshift and broadening effects of the wave-packet spectrum modify the parallel phase velocity and thus the linear absorption of LH waves by electrons through Landau resonance. In the nonlinear simulation, the LH wave can drive a net current during the propagation when its phase velocity gets closed to the local electron thermal speed. Finally, the parametric decay instability is observed when we increase the power of LH waves, in which a LH sideband and a low frequency ion plasma waves are generated.

  20. The Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is the next major space mission in NASA's Origins program after SIRTF. The SIM architecture uses three Michelson interferometers in low-earth orbit to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute astrometric measurements on approx. 40,000 stars. SIM will also provide synthesis imaging in the visible waveband to a resolution of 10 milliarcsecond, and interferometric nulling to a depth of 10(exp -4). A near-IR (1-2 micron) capability is being considered. Many key technologies will be demonstrated by SIM that will be carried over directly or can be readily scaled to future Origins missions such as TPF. The SIM spacecraft will carry a triple Michelson interferometer with baselines in the 10 meter range. Two interferometers act as high precision trackers, providing attitude information at all time, while the third one conducts the science observations. Ultra-accurate laser metrology and active systems monitor the systematic errors and to control the instrument vibrations in order to reach the 4 microarcsecond level on wide-angle measurements. SIM will produce a wealth of new astronomical data. With an absolute positional precision of 4 microarcsecond, SIM will improve on the best currently available measures (the Hipparcos catalog) by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude, providing parallaxes accurate to 10% and transverse velocities to 0.2 km/s anywhere in the Galaxy, to stars as faint as 20th magnitude. With the addition of radial velocities, knowledge of the 6-dimension phase space for objects of interest will allow us to attack a wide array of previously inaccessible problems such as: search for planets down to few earth masses; calibration of stellar luminosities and by means of standard candles, calibration of the cosmic distance scale; detecting perturbations due to spiral arms, disk warps and central bar in our galaxy; probe of the gravitational potential of the Galaxy, several kiloparsecs out of the galactic plane; synthesis imaging

  1. Meteorology Gauges for Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometers have been commercially available for many years. In addition, many versions have been built at JPL for various projects. This activity is aimed at improving the accuracy of such interferometers from the 1-30 nanometer level to the picometer level for use in the proposes Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) as metrology gauges.

  2. AIPY: Astronomical Interferometry in PYthon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    AIPY collects together tools for radio astronomical interferometry. In addition to pure-python phasing, calibration, imaging, and deconvolution code, this package includes interfaces to MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) and HEALPix (ascl:1107.018), and math/fitting routines from SciPy.

  3. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  4. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  5. Integrated optics for astronomical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, P. V. S.; Ghasempour, A.; Alexandre, D.; Leite, A. M. P.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Reynaud, F.

    2011-05-01

    Integrated optics is a well established technology that finds its main applications in the fields of optical communication and sensing. However, it is expanding into new areas, and in the last decade application in astronomical interferometry has been explored. In particular, several examples have been demonstrated in the areas of beam control and combination. In this paper, different examples of application integrated optics devices for fabrication of beam combiners for astronomical interferometry is given. For the multiaxial beam combiners, a UV laser direct writing unit is used for mask fabrication. The operation principles of the coaxial combiners fabricated in hybrid sol-gel were validated using an interferometric set-up. These results demonstrate that hybrid sol-gel technology can produce quality devices, opening the possibility of rapid prototyping of new designs and concepts.

  6. Virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Mark; Blotter, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is an out-of-plane displacement measurement technique that consists of differencing reference and deformed images of a grid pattern projected onto the test object. In conventional PMI, a tedious process of computing the fringe sensitivity coefficient (FSC), which requires moving the test object or the reference plane to known displacements, is used. We present a new technique for computing the FSC values that is called virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry (VCPMI). VCPMI is based on computer simulations of the conventional PMI process and does not require moving the actual test object or reference plane. We validate the VCPMI approach by comparing results for a flat plate and an airfoil with those made by use of other measurement methods.

  7. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  8. Experimental demonstration of deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Schwarze, Thomas S; Mehmet, Moritz; Heinzel, Gerhard; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán

    2016-01-25

    Experiments for space and ground-based gravitational wave detectors often require a large dynamic range interferometric position readout of test masses with 1 pm/√Hz precision over long time scales. Heterodyne interferometer schemes that achieve such precisions are available, but they require complex optical set-ups, limiting their scalability for multiple channels. This article presents the first experimental results on deep frequency modulation interferometry, a new technique that combines sinusoidal laser frequency modulation in unequal arm length interferometers with a non-linear fit algorithm. We have tested the technique in a Michelson and a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer topology, respectively, demonstrated continuous phase tracking of a moving mirror and achieved a performance equivalent to a displacement sensitivity of 250 pm/Hz at 1 mHz between the phase measurements of two photodetectors monitoring the same optical signal. By performing time series fitting of the extracted interference signals, we measured that the linearity of the laser frequency modulation is on the order of 2% for the laser source used. PMID:26832546

  9. Chameleon dark energy and atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Benjamin; Khoury, Justin; Haslinger, Philipp; Jaffe, Matt; Müller, Holger; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Atom interferometry experiments are searching for evidence of chameleon scalar fields with ever-increasing precision. As experiments become more precise, so too must theoretical predictions. Previous work has made numerous approximations to simplify the calculation, which in general requires solving a three-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equation. This paper calculates the chameleonic force using a numerical relaxation scheme on a uniform grid. This technique is more general than previous work, which assumed spherical symmetry to reduce the partial differential equation to a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation. We examine the effects of approximations made in previous efforts on this subject and calculate the chameleonic force in a setup that closely mimics the recent experiment of Hamilton et al. Specifically, we simulate the vacuum chamber as a cylinder with dimensions matching those of the experiment, taking into account the backreaction of the source mass, its offset from the center, and the effects of the chamber walls. Remarkably, the acceleration on a test atomic particle is found to differ by only 20% from the approximate analytical treatment. These results allow us to place rigorous constraints on the parameter space of chameleon field theories, although ultimately the constraint we find is the same as the one we reported in Hamilton et al. because we had slightly underestimated the size of the vacuum chamber. This computational technique will continue to be useful as experiments become even more precise and will also be a valuable tool in optimizing future searches for chameleon fields and related theories.

  10. General Relativistic Effects in Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-03-17

    Atom interferometry is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. We begin by explaining the non-relativistic calculation of the phase shift in an atom interferometer and deriving its range of validity. From this we develop a method for calculating the phase shift in general relativity. This formalism is then used to find the relativistic effects in an atom interferometer in a weak gravitational field for application to laboratory tests of general relativity. The potentially testable relativistic effects include the non-linear three-graviton coupling, the gravity of kinetic energy, and the falling of light. We propose experiments, one currently under construction, that could provide a test of the principle of equivalence to 1 part in 10{sup 15} (300 times better than the present limit), and general relativity at the 10% level, with many potential future improvements. We also consider applications to other metrics including the Lense-Thirring effect, the expansion of the universe, and preferred frame and location effects.

  11. Testing of fibers reinforced composite vessel by fringes projection and speckle shear interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainov, Ventseslav; Harizanova, Jana; Ossikovska, Sonja; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris; Boone, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    Fringes projection and speckle shear interferometry are used for testing of subjected to cycling loading (pressure) composite vessel. As the sensitivity of the applied methods could vary in broad limits in comparison with the other interferometric techniques, the inspection is realized in a wide dynamic range. Two spacing phase stepping fringes projection interferometry is applied for absolute coordinate measurement. Derivatives of in-plane and out-of-the-plane components of the displacement vector over the object surface are obtained by lateral speckle shear interferometry in static loading (pressure). Non-linear mechanical response and fatigue of composite material are clearly detected after cyclic sinusoidal loading by macro measurement using lateral speckle shear interferometry. Fringes projection and speckle-shear interferometry are suitable for shape and normal displacements measurements in a wider dynamic range. The other advantage of the shown methods is connected with the possibility to realize compact and portable devices for in-situ inspection of investigated objects - machine parts and constructions.

  12. Nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses from an erbium fibre laser to the range of 0.8 - 1 {mu}m in silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    We consider different mechanisms of nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses emitted by an erbium fibre system ({lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m) to the range of 0.8 - 1.2 {mu}m in nonlinear silica fibres. The generation efficiency and the centre frequencies of dispersive waves are found as functions of the parameters of the fibre and the input pulse. Simple analytical estimates are obtained for the spectral distribution of the intensity and the frequency shift of a wave packet in the region of normal dispersion during the emission of a high-order soliton under phase matching conditions. In the geometrical optics approximation the frequency shifts are estimated in the interaction of dispersive waves with solitons in various regimes. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2006-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  14. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2014-03-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  15. Astronomical imaging by pupil plane interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez

    1989-01-01

    Comparing rotational shear interferometry to standard speckle interferometry, it is found that it is easier in the first case to separate the atmospheric phases from the object transform phases. Phase closure and blind deconvolution should be directly applicable. Laboratory simulations were conducted to verify theoretical predictions and computer simulations for the phase closure case, and preliminary results show promise.

  16. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  17. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  18. 50 years of holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Robert L. Powell and I discovered holographic interferometry while working at the Radar Laboratory of the University of Michigan's Institute of Science and Technology. I have worked in this field for this entire time span, watched it grow from an unexplored technology to become a widespread industrial testing method, and I have contributed to these developments. In this paper, I will trace my history in this field from our discovery to my involvement in its theory and applications. I will conclude with a discussion of digital holography, which is currently replacing photographic holography for most research and industrial applications.

  19. Radio interferometry depth sounding. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossiter, J. R.; Annan, A. P.; Latorraca, G. A.; Simmons, G.; Strangway, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results from an analog scale model and from field tests on two glaciers using radio-frequency interferometry (RFI) are interpreted on the basis of previously described theoretical results. The RFI technique is found to be a practical method with which to study layering in low-loss dielectrics. Three parameters of the upper layer can be estimated from the data: the dielectric constant, the loss tangent, and an estimate of the thickness to a reflector. The method is an inexpensive way to sound ice sheets less than a few hundred meters thick, and could be used to study low-loss layers on the moon.

  20. Golographic interferometry of physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the contribution of Yuri Ostrovsky to holographic interferometry, one of the fundamental scientific and practical applications of holography. The title of this paper is the same as the title of his doctoral thesis that he defended in 1974, and, as it seems to me, reflects most of the specific features of the majority of his scientific publications, viz., an inseparable link of the methods developed by him with the results obtained with the help of these methods in a wide range of investigations of physical processes and phenomena.

  1. An Interferometry Imaging Beauty Contest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Cotton, William D.; Hummel, Christian A.; Monnier, John D.; Zhaod, Ming; Young, John S.; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Meimon, Serge C.; Mugnier, Laurent; LeBesnerais, Guy; Thiebaut, Eric; Tuthill, Peter G.; Hani, Christopher A.; Pauls, Thomas; DuvertI, Gilles; Garcia, Paulo; Kuchner, Marc

    2004-01-01

    We present a formal comparison of the performance of algorithms used for synthesis imaging with optical/infrared long-baseline interferometers. Six different algorithms are evaluated based on their performance with simulated test data. Each set of test data is formated in the interferometry Data Exchange Standard and is designed to simulate a specific problem relevant to long-baseline imaging. The data are calibrated power spectra and bispectra measured with a ctitious array, intended to be typical of existing imaging interferometers. The strengths and limitations of each algorithm are discussed.

  2. Vibration analysis using moire interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Cheung, M. T.

    The present use of moire interferometry for low amplitude vibration and analysis demonstrates the possibility of obtaining out-of-plane displacement contours whose sensitivity is comparable to that of holographic methods. A major advantage of the present system, is the obviation of prior knowledge of resonant frequencies, as called for in time-average holography. The experimental apparatus employed encompasses a laser beam, a parabolic mirror, a high frequency (600 line/mm) grating, and a camera, in addition to the test model.

  3. Coherent control of ultracold {sup 85}Rb trap-loss collisions with nonlinearly frequency-chirped light

    SciTech Connect

    Pechkis, J. A.; Carini, J. L.; Rogers, C. E. III; Gould, P. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2011-06-15

    We present results on coherent control of ultracold trap-loss collisions using 40-ns pulses of nonlinearly frequency-chirped light. The chirps, either positive or negative, sweep {approx}1 GHz in 100 ns and are centered at various detunings below the D{sub 2} line of {sup 85}Rb. At each center detuning, we compare the collisional rate constant {beta} for chirps that are linear in time, concave-down, and concave-up. For positive chirps, we find that {beta} generally depends very little on the shape of the chirp. For negative chirps, however, we find that {beta} can be enhanced by up to 50(20)% for the case of the concave-down shape. This occurs at detunings where the evolution of the wave packet is expected to be coherent. An enhancement at these detunings is also seen in quantum-mechanical simulations of the collisional process.

  4. Monitoring with Coda Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gret, A.; Snieder, R.

    2004-12-01

    Aki has been a pioneer in monitoring the subsurface with coda waves and with guided waves. His analysis of temporal and spatial variations in coda Q has proven to be a powerful tool for monitoring purposes. We have extended his technique in new method called coda wave interferometry where changes in the full waveforms of coda waves are used to monitor changes in the subsurface. We have developed and implemented the theory to use this technique to monitor the following changes: a change in the seismic velocity, a change in scatterer locations, and a change in the location of earthquakes. As shown by Aki, the seismic coda is dominated by shear waves. Therefore our technique is primarily sensitive to changes in the S-velocity. Aki also worked on wave propagation in volcanoes. We have used coda wave interferometry to monitor two active volcanoes, Arenal (Costa Rica) and Mt. Erebus (Antarctica). I will give several examples to illustrate how coda waves can be used for monitoring purposes.

  5. Bibliography of spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    The Bibliography of Spatial Interferometry in Optical Astronomy is a guide to the published literature in applications of spatial interferometry techniques to astronomical observations, theory and instrumentation at visible and infrared wavelengths. The key words spatial and optical define the scope of this discipline, distinguishing it from spatial interferometry at radio wavelengths, interferometry in the frequency domain applied to spectroscopy, or more general electro-optics theoretical and laboratory research. The main bibliography is a listing of all technical articles published in the international scientific literature and presented at the major international meetings and workshops attended by the spatial interferometry community. Section B summarizes publications dealing with the basic theoretical concepts and algorithms proposed and applied to optical spatial interferometry and imaging through a turbulent atmosphere. The section on experimental techniques is divided into twelve categories, representing the most clearly identified major areas of experimental research work. Section D, Observations, identifies publications dealing specifically with observations of astronomical sources, in which optical spatial interferometry techniques have been applied.

  6. Influence of the Coriolis force in atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shau-Yu; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Estey, Brian; Haslinger, Philipp; Müller, Holger

    2012-03-01

    In a light-pulse atom interferometer, we use a tip-tilt mirror to remove the influence of the Coriolis force from Earth's rotation and to characterize configuration space wave packets. For interferometers with a large momentum transfer and large pulse separation time, we improve the contrast by up to 350% and suppress systematic effects. We also reach what is to our knowledge the largest space-time area enclosed in any atom interferometer to date. We discuss implications for future high-performance instruments.

  7. Electron and hole Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, T.; Rech, J.; Wahl, C.; Martin, T.

    2012-09-01

    We consider the electronic analog of the quantum optics Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer in a realistic condensed matter device based on single electron emission in chiral edge states. For electron-electron collisions we show that the measurement of the zero-frequency current correlations at the output of a quantum point contact produces a dip giving precious information on the electronic wave packets and coherence. As a feature truly unique to Fermi statistics and condensed matter, we show that two-particle interferences between electron and hole in the Fermi sea can produce a positive peak in the current correlations, which we study for realistic experimental parameters.

  8. Nonlinear sound--vortex interactions in an inviscid isentropic fluid: A two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarenko, S.V.; Zabusky, N.J.; Scheidegger, T.

    1995-10-01

    A new two-fluid model is developed to describe the nonlinear interaction of acoustic waves and vortices. Analytical and computational results are presented for a sound pulse interacting with and being modified by a vortex. A novel numerical method based on a particle-in-cell discretization of the acoustic field is developed and used to study the nonlinear scattering of sound by a cylindrical vortex. Equations for the sound wave packet propagating in an axially symmetric mean flow are integrated analytically. Nonlinear modification of the vortex flow by the high-frequency sound is found to be mediated by growing pressure disturbances generated by the radiative forcing on the high gradient regions of the acoustic pulse. The total energy of the vortex mean flow grows monotonically, as the acoustic component loses its energy. The changes in the kinetic and internal energies of the vortex are greater than the changes in its total energy, although these changes are reversible in lowest order of the nonlinear vortex--acoustic interaction. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Interference signal frequency tracking for extracting phase in frequency scanning interferometry using an extended Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Zhigang; Deng, Zhongwen; Tao, Long

    2016-04-10

    Optical frequency scanning nonlinearity seriously affects interference signal phase extraction accuracy in frequency-scanning interferometry systems using external cavity diode lasers. In this paper, an interference signal frequency tracking method using an extended Kalman filter is proposed. The interferometric phase is obtained by integrating the estimated instantaneous frequency over time. The method is independent of the laser's optical frequency scanning nonlinearity. The method is validated through simulations and experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the relative phase extraction error in the fractional part is <1.5% with the proposed method and the standard deviation of absolute distance measurement is <2.4  μm. PMID:27139864

  10. Interference signal frequency tracking for extracting phase in frequency scanning interferometry using an extended Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Zhigang; Deng, Zhongwen; Tao, Long

    2016-04-10

    Optical frequency scanning nonlinearity seriously affects interference signal phase extraction accuracy in frequency-scanning interferometry systems using external cavity diode lasers. In this paper, an interference signal frequency tracking method using an extended Kalman filter is proposed. The interferometric phase is obtained by integrating the estimated instantaneous frequency over time. The method is independent of the laser's optical frequency scanning nonlinearity. The method is validated through simulations and experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the relative phase extraction error in the fractional part is <1.5% with the proposed method and the standard deviation of absolute distance measurement is <2.4  μm.

  11. Field fluctuations measured by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauber, R. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Vogel, K.; Schleich, W. P.; Walther, H.

    2010-09-01

    We derive the complete photon count statistics of an interferometer based on two beam splitters. As a special case we consider a joint intensity-electric field measurement. Our approach is based on the transformation properties of state vectors as well as field operators at a beam splitter. The work presented here was stimulated by discussions during the Lake Garda Conference 2001. The recent experimental interest in six-port interferometry has moved us to return to the problem. We feel, moreover, that the topic is appropriate for the Festschrift in honour of Stig Stenholm since he can truly be considered a pioneer in the field of quantum networks. We hope that our discussion may pique his interest.

  12. Michelson interferometry with Keck I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.; Monnier, John D.; Danchi, William C.; Haniff, Christopher A.

    1998-07-01

    We have used the technique of aperture masking to transform the 10m Keck telescope into a separate-element, multiple aperture Michelson interferometer. This has allowed a dramatic gain in signal-to-noise to be achieved as compared to conventional full-pupil interferometry for bright targets such as evolved giant and supergiant stars. Preliminary results from a program of near-IR diffraction-limited imaging of such stars are presented. Multi-wavelength images in the IR JHK and L bands have revealed complex and asymmetric morphologies in the inner dust shells surrounding a number of proto-typical dust-enshrouded IR stars. In addition, we have imaged the stellar photospheres of some of our largest target stars, allowing us to measure diameters and search for structure, such as giant convective cells, on the stellar surface.

  13. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  14. Differential spacecraft tracking by interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Border, James S.; Folkner, William M.

    1990-01-01

    This study estimates measurement system errors for two space vehicles on the surface of Mars, and for two Mars orbiting spacecraft, which are being tracked by differential interferometry. In these examples, signals from all spacecraft lie within the same beamwidth of an earth-based radio antenna. The measurements of all spacecraft signals are made simultaneously; errors that scale with angular source separation or with temporal separation between measurement epochs are practically removed. It is shown that errors due to system thermal noise and to systematic effects within ground receiver electronics dominate, except for geometries when signals pass close to the sun, when solar plasma becomes the dominant error source. The instantaneous relative position of two orbiters may be measured to within ten meters, leading to 50-meter three-dimensional orbital accuracy.

  15. Uncertainty formulations for multislit interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biniok, Johannes C. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of (far-field) multislit interferometry we investigate the utility of two formulations of uncertainty in accounting for the complementarity of spatial localization and fringe width. We begin with a characterization of the relevant observables and general considerations regarding the suitability of different types of measures. The detailed analysis shows that both of the discussed uncertainty formulations yield qualitatively similar results, confirming that they correctly capture the relevant tradeoff. One approach, based on an idea of Aharonov and co-workers, is intuitively appealing and relies on a modification of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. The other approach, developed by Uffink and Hilgevoord for single- and double-slit experiments, is readily applied to multislits. However, it is found that one of the underlying concepts requires generalization and that the choice of the parameters requires more consideration than was known.

  16. Signal competition in heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Khanna, Shyam M.; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2006-06-01

    The Organ of Corti is a complex structure with many reflecting surfaces characterized by a wide range of reflectivities. Heterodyne interferometry has been the primary technique for measuring motion of the cochlear sensory tissue for some time. We would like to know under what conditions reflections from out-of-focus surfaces affect the measured velocity of the in-focus surface. Heterodyne interferometry uses interference between two laser beams (object and reference). The velocity of the test object shifts the frequency of the object beam due to the Doppler effect. The heterodyne signal (a frequency modulated (FM) wave) is decoded using a frequency demodulator. By reviewing the theory of FM demodulation and showing tests with our Revox FM demodulator, we demonstrate that the influence of a secondary signal on a measurement depends on the modulation index (ratio of the frequency deviation (Δf=2V °/λ) to the modulation frequency, f m where V ° is the velocity amplitude and λ is the laser wavelength). For high-modulation-index signals, the fundamental component of the FM demodulator output is not affected by a secondary signal unless the secondary signal's power is nearly as large as that of the primary signal. However, the output waveform can be distorted. For a low-modulation-index signal, a secondary competing signal can have a relatively large effect on the fundamental component of the output signal, but the output signal waveform is not distorted. The results underscore the benefit of steep optical sectioning to reduce contamination by out-of-focus signals.

  17. Fringe Formation in Dual-Hologram Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    A first order geometrical optics treatment of holograms combined with the generation of interference fringes by two point sources is used to describe reference fringe formation in non-diffuse dual-hologram interferometry.

  18. Fringe formation in dual-hologram interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1990-01-01

    Reference-fringe formation in nondiffuse dual-hologram interferometry is described by combining a first-order geometrical hologram treatment with interference fringes generated by two point sources. The first-order imaging relationships can be used to describe reference-fringe patterns for the geometry of the dual-hologram interferometry. The process can be completed without adjusting the two holograms when the reconstructing wavelength is less than the exposing wavelength, and the process is found to facilitate basic intereferometer adjustments.

  19. Evolution of Nonlinear Internal Waves in China Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Hsu, Ming-K.; Liang, Nai K.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from ERS-I have been used to study the characteristics of internal waves of Taiwan in the East China Sea, and east of Hainan Island in the South China Sea. Rank-ordered packets of internal solitons propagating shoreward from the edge of the continental shelf were observed in the SAR images. Based on the assumption of a semidiurnal tidal origin, the wave speed can be estimated and is consistent with the internal wave theory. By using the SAR images and hydrographic data, internal waves of elevation have been identified in shallow water due to a thicker mixed layer as compared with the bottom layer on the continental shelf. The generation mechanism includes the influences of the tide and the Kuroshio intrusion across the continental shelf for the formations of elevation internal waves. The effects of water depth on the evolution of solitons and wave packets are modeled by nonlinear Kortweg-deVries (KdV) type equation and linked to satellite image observations. The numerical calculations of internal wave evolution on the continental shelf have been performed and compared with the SAR observations. For a case of depression waves in deep water, the solitons first disintegrate into dispersive wave trains and then evolve to a packet of elevation waves in the shallow water area after they pass through a turning point of approximately equal layer depths has been observed in the SAR image and simulated by numerical model.

  20. New exact solutions of fractional Davey-Stewartson equation with power-law nonlinearity and new integrable Davey-Stewartson-type equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha Ray, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the Jacobi elliptic function method viz. the mixed dn-sn method has been presented for finding the travelling wave solutions of the Davey-Stewartson equations. As a result, some solitary wave solutions and doubly periodic solutions are obtained in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Moreover, solitary wave solutions are obtained as simple limits of doubly periodic functions. These solutions can be useful to explain some physical phenomena, viz. evolution of a three-dimensional wave packet on water of finite depth. The proposed Jacobi elliptic function method is efficient, powerful and can be used in order to establish newer exact solutions for other kinds of nonlinear fractional partial differential equations arising in mathematical physics.

  1. Nonlinear propagation of coherent electromagnetic waves in a dense magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.

    2012-07-15

    We present an investigation of the nonlinear propagation of high-frequency coherent electromagnetic waves in a uniform quantum magnetoplasma. Specifically, we consider nonlinear couplings of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic-electron-cyclotron (CPEM-EC) waves with dispersive shear Alfven (DSA) and dispersive compressional Alfven (DCA) perturbations in plasmas composed of degenerate electron fluids and non-degenerate ion fluids. Such interactions lead to amplitude modulation of the CPEM-EC wave packets, the dynamics of which is governed by a three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with the frequency shift arising from the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM-EC fields and density perturbations associated with the DSA and DCA perturbations. Accounting for the electromagnetic and quantum forces, we derive the evolution equation for the DSA and DCA waves in the presence of the magnetic field-aligned ponderomotive force of the CPEM-EC waves. The NLSE and the driven DSA and DCA equations are then used to investigate the modulational instability. The relevance of our investigation to laser-plasma interaction experiments and the cores of white dwarf stars is pointed out.

  2. Nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering in a multidimensional geometrya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénisti, D.; Morice, O.; Gremillet, L.; Friou, A.; Lefebvre, E.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we derive coupled envelope equations modeling the growth of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a multi-dimensional geometry and accounting for nonlinear kinetic effects. In particular, our envelope equations allow for the nonlinear reduction of the Landau damping rate, whose decrease with the plasma wave amplitude depends on the rate of side-loss. Account is also made of the variations in the extent of the plasma wave packet entailed by the collisionless dissipation due to trapping. The dephasing between the electron plasma wave (EPW) and the laser drive, as well as the self-focussing of the plasma wave, both induced by the EPW nonlinear frequency shift, are also included in our envelope equations. These equations are solved in a multi-dimensional geometry using our code dubbed BRAMA, whose predictions regarding the evolution of Raman reflectivity as a function of the laser intensity are compared against previously published particle in cell results, thus illustrating the ability of BRAMA simulations to provide the correct laser threshold intensity for SRS as well as the right order of magnitude of Raman reflectivity above threshold.

  3. Over-reflection of barotropic Rossby wave packet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, K.; Uryu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Interference of stationary and traveling waves of sufficiently large amplitude can cause vacillations in the instantaneous EP-flux and its divergence. Such fluctuations may provide an explanation for some of the vacillations in transport and in the mean flow observed in the stratosphere. While there has been a focus on a simple two-component system, in reality several spectral components are likely to be present. For sufficiently large mean flow deceleration, the local wave field and the quasi-linear description developed here would presumably break down.

  4. Single attosecond pulse generation via continuum wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengpeng; Yang, Yujun; Ding, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    A single attosecond pulse generation via continuum-continuum interference is investigated theoretically by exposing a single-electron atom in a femtosecond laser field with the intensity in over-the-barrier ionization regime. We show that the ground state of the atom is depleted in such intense laser field and the high-order harmonics (HHG) via continuum to continuum coherence are generated. In a few-cycle monochromatic laser field (5 fs/800 nm, 1.2×1016 W cm-2), a single attosecond pulse with duration of 49 as is obtained from the HHG. With a two-color laser field combined by 1200 nm (8 fs/7.5×1015 W cm-2) and 800 nm (5 fs/1.0×1016 W cm-2), a shorter single pulse with duration of 29 as can further be produced by changing the relative carrier envelope phase of two laser pulses as a result of controlling the electronic quantum path in the intense electric field. Our results also show that a short single attosecond pulse can be generated in a wide range of the relative carrier envelope phase of the two laser pulses.

  5. Quantum teleportation of nonclassical wave packets: An effective multimode theory

    SciTech Connect

    Benichi, Hugo; Takeda, Shuntaro; Lee, Noriyuki; Furusawa, Akira

    2011-07-15

    We develop a simple and efficient theoretical model to understand the quantum properties of broadband continuous variable quantum teleportation. We show that, if stated properly, the problem of multimode teleportation can be simplified to teleportation of a single effective mode that describes the input state temporal characteristic. Using that model, we show how the finite bandwidth of squeezing and external noise in the classical channel affect the output teleported quantum field. We choose an approach that is especially relevant for the case of non-Gaussian nonclassical quantum states and we finally back-test our model with recent experimental results.

  6. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  7. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  8. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  9. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  10. Precision optical interferometry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    POINTS, an astrometric Optical interferometer with a nominal measurement accuracy of 5 microarcseconds for the angle between a pair of stars separated by about 90 deg, is presently under consideration by two divisions of NASA-OSSA. It will be a powerful new multi-disciplinary tool for astronomical research. If chosen as the TOPS-1 (Toward Other Planetary Systems) instrument by the Solar-System Exploration Division, it will perform a definitive search for extra-solar planetary systems, either finding and characterizing a large number of them or showing that they are far less numerous than now believed. If chosen as the AIM (Astrometric Interferometry Mission) by the Astrophysics Division, POINTS will open new areas of astrophysical research and change the nature of the questions being asked in some old areas. In either case. it will be the first of a new class of powerful instruments in space and will prove the technology for the larger members of that class to follow. Based on a preliminary indication of the observational needs of the two missions, we find that a single POINTS mission will meet the science objectives of both TOPS-1 and AIM. The instrument detects dispersed fringe (channel led spectrum) and therefore can tolerate large pointing errors.

  11. Nonlinear Landau damping and modulation of electrostatic waves in a nonextensive electron-positron-pair plasma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debjani; Misra, A P

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of amplitude modulation of electrostatic wave envelopes in a collisionless electron-positron (EP) pair plasma is studied by using a set of Vlasov-Poisson equations in the context of Tsallis' q-nonextensive statistics. In particular, the previous linear theory of Langmuir oscillations in EP plasmas [Saberian and Esfandyari-Kalejahi, Phys. Rev. E 87, 053112 (2013)] is rectified and modified. Applying the multiple scale technique (MST), it is shown that the evolution of electrostatic wave envelopes is governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with a nonlocal nonlinear term ∝P∫|ϕ(ξ',τ)|(2)dξ'ϕ/(ξ-ξ') [where P denotes the Cauchy principal value, ϕ is the small-amplitude electrostatic (complex) potential, and ξ and τ are the stretched coordinates in MST], which appears due to the wave-particle resonance. It is found that a subregion 1/3nonlinear term and the nonextensive parameter q are examined on the modulational instability of wave envelopes, as well as on the solitary wave solution of the NLS equation. It is found that the modulated wave packet is always unstable (nonlinear Landau damping) due to the nonlocal nonlinearity in the NLS equation. Furthermore, the effect of the nonlinear Landau damping is to slow down the amplitude of the wave envelope, and the corresponding decay rate can be faster the larger is the number of superthermal particles in pair plasmas.

  12. Nonlinear Landau damping and modulation of electrostatic waves in a nonextensive electron-positron-pair plasma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debjani; Misra, A P

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of amplitude modulation of electrostatic wave envelopes in a collisionless electron-positron (EP) pair plasma is studied by using a set of Vlasov-Poisson equations in the context of Tsallis' q-nonextensive statistics. In particular, the previous linear theory of Langmuir oscillations in EP plasmas [Saberian and Esfandyari-Kalejahi, Phys. Rev. E 87, 053112 (2013)] is rectified and modified. Applying the multiple scale technique (MST), it is shown that the evolution of electrostatic wave envelopes is governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with a nonlocal nonlinear term ∝P∫|ϕ(ξ',τ)|(2)dξ'ϕ/(ξ-ξ') [where P denotes the Cauchy principal value, ϕ is the small-amplitude electrostatic (complex) potential, and ξ and τ are the stretched coordinates in MST], which appears due to the wave-particle resonance. It is found that a subregion 1/3nonlinear term and the nonextensive parameter q are examined on the modulational instability of wave envelopes, as well as on the solitary wave solution of the NLS equation. It is found that the modulated wave packet is always unstable (nonlinear Landau damping) due to the nonlocal nonlinearity in the NLS equation. Furthermore, the effect of the nonlinear Landau damping is to slow down the amplitude of the wave envelope, and the corresponding decay rate can be faster the larger is the number of superthermal particles in pair plasmas. PMID:26764841

  13. Nonlinear Landau damping and modulation of electrostatic waves in a nonextensive electron-positron-pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Debjani; Misra, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of amplitude modulation of electrostatic wave envelopes in a collisionless electron-positron (EP) pair plasma is studied by using a set of Vlasov-Poisson equations in the context of Tsallis' q -nonextensive statistics. In particular, the previous linear theory of Langmuir oscillations in EP plasmas [Saberian and Esfandyari-Kalejahi, Phys. Rev. E 87, 053112 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.053112] is rectified and modified. Applying the multiple scale technique (MST), it is shown that the evolution of electrostatic wave envelopes is governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with a nonlocal nonlinear term ∝P ∫|ϕ (ξ',τ ) |2d ξ'ϕ /(ξ -ξ') [where P denotes the Cauchy principal value, ϕ is the small-amplitude electrostatic (complex) potential, and ξ and τ are the stretched coordinates in MST], which appears due to the wave-particle resonance. It is found that a subregion 1 /3 nonlinear term and the nonextensive parameter q are examined on the modulational instability of wave envelopes, as well as on the solitary wave solution of the NLS equation. It is found that the modulated wave packet is always unstable (nonlinear Landau damping) due to the nonlocal nonlinearity in the NLS equation. Furthermore, the effect of the nonlinear Landau damping is to slow down the amplitude of the wave envelope, and the corresponding decay rate can be faster the larger is the number of superthermal particles in pair plasmas.

  14. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Using SENTINEL-1 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosetto, M.; Monserrat, O.; Devanthéry, N.; Cuevas-González, M.; Barra, A.; Crippa, B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on deformation monitoring using a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique and the interferometric SAR data acquired by the Sentinel-1 satellite of the European Space Agency. The first part of the paper describes the procedure used to process and analyze Sentinel-1 interferometric SAR data. Two main approaches are described. The first one is a simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach that exploits two key properties of the Sentinel-1 data: the high coherence of the 12-day interferograms and the reduced orbital tube. The second approach is a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach, where a more sophisticate data treatment is employed. The second part of the paper illustrates the results obtained with the two processing approaches. Two case studies are described. The first one concerns landslide detection and monitoring. In this case, the simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used. The second one regards the deformation monitoring of an urban area. In this case, a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used.

  15. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  16. Measuring subwavelength spatial coherence with plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, Drew; Li, Dongfang; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    Optical interferometry has enabled quantification of the spatial and temporal correlations of electromagnetic fields, which laid the foundations for the theory of optical coherence. Despite significant advances in fundamental theories and applications, the measurement of nanoscale coherence lengths for highly incoherent optical fields has remained elusive. Here, we employ plasmonic interferometry (that is, optical interferometry with surface plasmons) to characterize the spatial degree of coherence of light beams down to subwavelength scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼330 nm for an incident wavelength of 500 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact coherence meter that integrates this method with an image sensor. Precise determination of spatial coherence can advance high-resolution imaging and tomographic schemes, and provide an experimental platform for the development and testing of optical coherence theories at the nanoscale.

  17. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  18. Advances in Small-Telescope Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David J.

    2016-06-01

    The current revolution in CMOS camera technology has enabled a new generation of small telescope systems targeted at the measurement of close binary systems using the techniques of speckle interferometry and bispectrum analysis. These inexpensive, ultra-sensitive, high resolution cameras are now outperforming CCD technology, and come at a truly affordable price. In addition, dedicated, user-friendly speckle interferometry reduction software has been developed for the amateur, making it easy to perform the otherwise complicated data processing tasks. This talk will address these recent advances in hardware and software, and describe some of the results of the informal amateur-professional collaboration that has formed around them.

  19. Global astrometry with the space interferometry mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boden, A.; Unwin, S.; Shao, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prospects for global astrometric measurements with the space interferometry mission (SIM) are discussed. The SIM mission will perform four microarcsec astrometric measurements on objects as faint as 20 mag using the optical interferometry technique with a 10 m baseline. The SIM satellite will perform narrow angle astrometry and global astrometry by means of an astrometric grid. The sensitivities of the SIM global astrometric performance and the grid accuracy versus instrumental parameters and sky coverage schemes are reported on. The problems in finding suitable astrometric grid objects to support microarcsec astrometry, and related ground-based observation programs are discussed.

  20. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  1. Holographic interferometry: A user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.

    1993-10-01

    This manual describes the procedures and components necessary to produce a holographic interferogram of a flow field in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. In contrast to classical interferometry, holographic interferometry records the amplitude and phase distribution of a lightwave passing through the flow field at some instant of time. This information can then be reconstructed outside the wind tunnel for visual analysis and digital processing, yielding precise characterizations of aerodynamic phenomena. The reconstruction and subsequent hologram image storage process is discussed, with particular attention paid to the digital image processor and the data reduction technique.

  2. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  3. Characteristics of second harmonic generation of Lamb waves in nonlinear elastic plates.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin F; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2010-04-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of the second harmonic generation of Lamb waves in a plate with quadratic nonlinearity. Analytical asymptotic solutions to Lamb waves are first obtained through the use of a perturbation method. Then, based on a careful analysis of these asymptotic solutions, it is shown that the cross-modal generation of a symmetric second harmonic mode by an antisymmetric primary mode is possible. These solutions also demonstrate that modes showing internal resonance-nonzero power flux to the second harmonic mode, plus phase velocity matching-are most useful for measurements. In addition, when using finite wave packets, which is the case in most experimental measurements, group velocity matching is required for a cumulative increase in the second harmonic amplitude with propagation distance. Finally, five mode types (which are independent of material properties) that satisfy all three requirements for this cumulative increase in second harmonic amplitude-nonzero power flux, plus phase and group velocity matching-are identified. These results are important for the development of an experimental procedure to measure material nonlinearity with Lamb waves.

  4. Multiple Beam Interferometry in Elementary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolansky, S.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses a relatively simple technique for demonstrating multiple beam interferometry. The technique can be applied to measuring (1) radii of curvature of lenses, (2) surface finish of glass, and (3) differential phase change on reflection. Microtopographies, modulated fringe systems and opaque objects may also be observed by this technique.…

  5. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  6. Detection of deoxynivalenol using biolayer interferometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biolayer interferometry allows for the real time monitoring of the interactions between molecules without the need for reagents with enzymatic, fluorescent, or radioactive labels. The technology is based upon the changes in interference pattern of light reflected from the surface of an optical fiber...

  7. Radio interferometry: Techniques for Geodesy. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the development and application of radio interferometry as a tool for geophysical research is reported and discussed. Among the topics reviewed are: Surveys of is the Seventies, Movements, Terrestrial and Celestial, Degrees Kelvin and Degrees of Phase, the Mark 3 VLBI System, Waves of the Future and other Emissions, and Adherence and Coherence in Networks, and Plans.

  8. Interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Müntinga, H; Ahlers, H; Krutzik, M; Wenzlawski, A; Arnold, S; Becker, D; Bongs, K; Dittus, H; Duncker, H; Gaaloul, N; Gherasim, C; Giese, E; Grzeschik, C; Hänsch, T W; Hellmig, O; Herr, W; Herrmann, S; Kajari, E; Kleinert, S; Lämmerzahl, C; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Malcolm, J; Meyer, N; Nolte, R; Peters, A; Popp, M; Reichel, J; Roura, A; Rudolph, J; Schiemangk, M; Schneider, M; Seidel, S T; Sengstock, K; Tamma, V; Valenzuela, T; Vogel, A; Walser, R; Wendrich, T; Windpassinger, P; Zeller, W; van Zoest, T; Ertmer, W; Schleich, W P; Rasel, E M

    2013-03-01

    Atom interferometers covering macroscopic domains of space-time are a spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of matter. Because of their unique coherence properties, Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal sources for an atom interferometer in extended free fall. In this Letter we report on the realization of an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer operated with a Bose-Einstein condensate in microgravity. The resulting interference pattern is similar to the one in the far field of a double slit and shows a linear scaling with the time the wave packets expand. We employ delta-kick cooling in order to enhance the signal and extend our atom interferometer. Our experiments demonstrate the high potential of interferometers operated with quantum gases for probing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and general relativity. PMID:23496709

  9. Ramsey interferometry for resonant Auger decay through core-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron dynamics in Ne atoms involving core-excited states through the Ramsey scheme with a pair of time-delayed x-ray pulses. Irradiation of Ne atoms by the ˜1 femtosecond x-ray pulse simultaneously populates two core-excited states, and an identical but time-delayed x-ray pulse probes the dynamics of the core-excited electron wave packet which is subject to the resonant Auger decay. The energy-integrated total Auger electron yield and energy-resolved Auger electron spectra in the time domain show periodic structures due to the temporal evolution of the wave packet, from which we can obtain the counterpart in the frequency domain through the Fourier transformation. The Auger electron energy spectra in the time as well as frequency domains show the interference patterns between the two Auger electron wave packets released into the continuum from the superposition of two core-excited states at different times. These spectra are important to clarify the individual contribution of the different Auger decay channels upon core excitation by the x-ray pulse.

  10. The Doubling of 846 nm Light to Produce 423 nm Light for use in Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Birrell, Jeremey; Tang, Rebecca; Erickson, Chris; Goggins, Landon; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    We present progress on a 423 nm fluorescence probe/cooling laser for use in our neutral calcium atom interferometer. The finished system will include an 846 nm diode laser that is coupled to a tapered amplifier. This light will be sent to a buildup cavity where we will achieve second-harmonic generation (SHG) using either a BBO non-linear crystal or a periodically-poled KTP crystal. We will discuss the theoretical considerations relating to the doubling of light in a crystal and the construction of our buildup cavity. We will also discuss its proposed application for use in atom interferometry.

  11. Mechanical Reaction Of Human Skull Bones To External Load Examined By Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podbielska, Halina; von Bally, Gert; Kasprzak, Henryk

    1988-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to study the mechanical properties of human calvaria samples taken from macerated skulls. Deformations caused by static loading as well as their derivative functions are calculated from the recorded holographic interferograms. Elliptically shaped interference fringe patterns indicate the.generation of a shallow funnel around the point of force introduction. The lowest point of this impression is shifted sagittally in anterior direction with increased load. The load deformation curve is nonlinear before entering a linear range, demonstrating that in this experiment the calvaria can be regarded as a so called Kelvin body.

  12. Future Looks Bright for Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Light for the PRIMA instrument The PRIMA instrument [1] of the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) recently saw "first light" at its new home atop Cerro Paranal in Chile. When fully operational, PRIMA will boost the capabilities of the VLTI to see sources much fainter than any previous interferometers, and enable astrometric precision unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility. PRIMA will be a unique tool for the detection of exoplanets. First Light of the PRIMA Instrument ESO PR Photo 29a/08 Preparing for PRIMA "PRIMA is specifically designed to see if one star 'wobbles' to and fro because it is has unseen planetary companions", says instrument scientist Gerard van Belle. "This allows us to not only detect exoplanets, but to measure their mass." PRIMA's expected astrometric precision of tens of micro-arcseconds is unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility, whether on the ground or in orbit [2]. In addition to taking astrometric measurements PRIMA will be the key to the imaging of faint sources with the VLTI using the science instruments AMBER and MIDI. Interferometry combines the light received by two or more telescopes, concentrating on tiny differences between the signals to measure angles with exquisite precision. Using this technique PRIMA can pick out details as sharply as a single telescope with a diameter equivalent to the largest distance between the telescopes. For the VLTI, the distance between the two telescope elements is about 200 metres. The PRIMA instrument is unique amongst the VLTI instruments, in that it is effectively two interferometers in one. PRIMA will take data from two sources on the sky simultaneously: the brighter source can be used for tracking, allowing the interferometer to "stare" at the fainter source for longer than is now possible with conventional interferometers. Although there have been earlier pathfinder experiments to test this technique, PRIMA represents the first facility

  13. Rogue waves in electronegative space plasmas: The link between the family of the KdV equations and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the likelihood of the ion-acoustic rogue waves propagation in a non-Maxwellian electronegative plasma in the framework of the family of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations (KdV/modified KdV/Extended KdV equation). For this purpose, we use the reductive perturbation technique to carry out this study. It is known that the family of the KdV equations have solutions of distinct structures such as solitons, shocks, kinks, cnoidal waves, etc. However, the dynamics of the nonlinear rogue waves is governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Thus, the family of the KdV equations is transformed to their corresponding NLSE developing a weakly nonlinear wave packets. We show the possible region for the existence of the rogue waves and define it precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. We investigate numerically the effects of relevant physical parameters, namely, the negative ion relative concentration, the nonthermal parameter, and the mass ratio on the propagation of the rogue waves profile. The present study should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the nonlinear structures such as, ion-acoustic solitary waves, shock waves, and rogue waves in space and in laboratory plasma where two distinct groups of ions, i.e. positive and negative ions, and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons are present.

  14. Comparing laser interferometry and atom interferometry approaches to space-based gravitational-wave measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ira Thorpe, James; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul; Baker, John G.

    2012-07-01

    The science enabled by a space-based low-frequency gravitational-wave instrument is a high-priority objective of the international astronomy community. Mission concepts based on laser interferometry, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), have been thoroughly studied and determined to be capable of delivering significant science returns. Ongoing developments in laboratory atom interferometry techniques have inspired new gravitational-wave mission concepts. We present a comparative analysis of LISA-like light interferometer systems and atom interferometer systems for gravitational-wave detection. Specific attention is paid to the sources of instrumental noise that are most important for light interferometer systems. We find that the response to laser frequency noise is identical in light interferometer and atom interferometer systems and that similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple-arm interferometers) must be employed to reach interesting gravitational wave sensitivities. Response to acceleration of the optical platforms is slightly different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but the acceleration noise requirements are similar. Based on this analysis, we find no clear advantage of the atom interferometry approach over traditional laser interferometry.

  15. Station keeping strategy for multiple spacecraft interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decou, Anthony B.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of multiple spacecraft stationkeeping for submillimeter and optical interferometry is examined. A condition for interferometry is that two or more spacecraft must control their relative positions with better than 1 mn accuracy indefinitely in both radial and transverse directions although separated by as much as 1 Km in LEO and 100 Km in GEO. They must also maneuver through a useful area of the U-V plane of an arbitrary astronomical source. The problem is first outlined and a solution which utilizes gravity gradient forces to do most of the work and ion thrusters for additional maneuvering is proposed. All the perturbing forces are shown to be small compared to the ion thruster requirements. An inertial position and attitude control strategy is suggested which utilizes existing or soon to be available sensors and actuators. Finally, the fuel and power system mass requirements are estimated and found to be within reason for a 10 year mission.

  16. Speckle Interferometry with Amateur-Class Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshaw, Richard; Wuthrich, Ethan; Dolbear, Kyle

    2015-05-01

    The relatively young field of speckle interferometry of close double stars has up to now been the domain of large telescopes and expensive scientific CCD cameras. With the advent of relatively inexpensive and high-performance CCD cameras, the domain of speckle interferometry has been extended into the serious amateur realm allowing amateurs with equipment as small as 8-inches aperture to do actual speckle analysis of binary star systems. This paper describes the work of one such team of amateur astronomers and students as part of their course work for an on-line scientific research experience course provided on-line by Cuesta College of San Luis Obispo, California. An explanation of speckle and how it works is followed by a discussion of how the camera was calibrated, then a discussion of the research methodology. Results of calibration and double star measurements are then given and implications of the process and results discussed.

  17. Near-Earth Object Astrometric Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    Using astrometric interferometry on near-Earth objects (NEOs) poses many interesting and difficult challenges. Poor reflectance properties and potentially no significant active emissions lead to NEOs having intrinsically low visual magnitudes. Using worst case estimates for signal reflection properties leads to NEOs having visual magnitudes of 27 and higher. Today the most sensitive interferometers in operation have limiting magnitudes of 20 or less. The main reason for this limit is due to the atmosphere, where turbulence affects the light coming from the target, limiting the sensitivity of the interferometer. In this analysis, the interferometer designs assume no atmosphere, meaning they would be placed at a location somewhere in space. Interferometer configurations and operational uncertainties are looked at in order to parameterize the requirements necessary to achieve measurements of low visual magnitude NEOs. This analysis provides a preliminary estimate of what will be required in order to take high resolution measurements of these objects using interferometry techniques.

  18. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Planetary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Harbeck, D; Lloyd, J

    2005-07-06

    We describe a plan to study the radial velocity of low mass stars and brown dwarfs using a combination of interferometry and multichannel dispersive spectroscopy, Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI). The EDI technology allows implementation of precision velocimetry and spectroscopy on existing moderate-resolution echelle or linear grating spectrograph over their full and simultaneous bandwidth. We intend to add EDI to the new Cornell TripleSpec infrared simultaneous JHK-band spectrograph at the Palomar Observatory 200'' telescope for a science-demonstration program that will allow a unique Doppler-search for planets orbiting low mass faint M, L and T type stars. The throughput advantage of EDI with a moderate resolution spectrograph is critical to achieving the requisite sensitivity for the low luminosity late L and T dwarfs.

  19. Subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feng; Lu, Xiaoyun; Dong, Bin; Ma, Xichao; Xiao, Wen

    2016-11-01

    A novel subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography is developed to measure the deformation of spherical surfaces. The subaperture measurement is performed by off-axis digital holography on single exposure. Then, the subaperture phase maps are obtained by digital holographic reconstruction, in which the phase aberration caused by position errors of each subaperture measurement is effectively compensated by the method of numerical parametric lens. After that, the full aperture phase map is retrieved by a subaperture stitching algorithm, in which the relative alignment errors of adjacent subapertures are eliminated with an iterative process of stitching optimization. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed interferometry, which provides a rapid and robust way to measure spherical surfaces with high resolution and precision. A practical example is given to demonstrate the performance of this method. The stitching result shows good agreement with the full-aperture result.

  20. Nanoscale optical interferometry with incoherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongfang; Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    Optical interferometry has empowered an impressive variety of biosensing and medical imaging techniques. A widely held assumption is that devices based on optical interferometry require coherent light to generate a precise optical signature in response to an analyte. Here we disprove that assumption. By directly embedding light emitters into subwavelength cavities of plasmonic interferometers, we demonstrate coherent generation of surface plasmons even when light with extremely low degrees of spatial and temporal coherence is employed. This surprising finding enables novel sensor designs with cheaper and smaller light sources, and consequently increases accessibility to a variety of analytes, such as biomarkers in physiological fluids, or even airborne nanoparticles. Furthermore, these nanosensors can now be arranged along open detection surfaces, and in dense arrays, accelerating the rate of parallel target screening used in drug discovery, among other high volume and high sensitivity applications.

  1. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  2. Nanoscale optical interferometry with incoherent light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongfang; Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Optical interferometry has empowered an impressive variety of biosensing and medical imaging techniques. A widely held assumption is that devices based on optical interferometry require coherent light to generate a precise optical signature in response to an analyte. Here we disprove that assumption. By directly embedding light emitters into subwavelength cavities of plasmonic interferometers, we demonstrate coherent generation of surface plasmons even when light with extremely low degrees of spatial and temporal coherence is employed. This surprising finding enables novel sensor designs with cheaper and smaller light sources, and consequently increases accessibility to a variety of analytes, such as biomarkers in physiological fluids, or even airborne nanoparticles. Furthermore, these nanosensors can now be arranged along open detection surfaces, and in dense arrays, accelerating the rate of parallel target screening used in drug discovery, among other high volume and high sensitivity applications. PMID:26880171

  3. Defect Depth Measurement Using White Light Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the White Light Interferometry project are the following: (1) Demonstrate a small hand-held instrument capable of performing inspections of identified defects on Orbiter outer pane window surfaces. (2) Build and field-test a prototype device using miniaturized optical components. (3) Modify the instrument based on field testing and begin the conversion of the unit to become a certified shop-aid.

  4. Kaon decay interferometry as meson dynamics probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ambrosio, G.; Paver, N.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the time-dependent interferences between KL and KS in the decays in 3π and ππγ, to be studied at interferometry machines such as the φ factory and CERN LEAR. We emphasize the possibilities and the advantages of using interferences, in comparision with width measurements, to obtain information both on CP-conserving and CP-violating amplitudes. Comparision with present data and suggestions for future experiments are made.

  5. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry using vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, René; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Belenguer, Tomás

    2011-12-01

    We show that it is possible to perform electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) using, for the first time to our knowledge, vortex beams as the reference beam. The technique we propose is easy to implement, and the advantages obtained are, among others, environmental stability, lower processing time, and the possibility to switch between traditional ESPI and spiral ESPI. The experimental results clearly show the advantages of using the proposed technique for deformation studies of complex structures.

  6. Moire interferometry for thermal expansion of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Tenney, D. R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    Moire interferometry by reflection has been demonstrated using a real reference grating of 1200 lines/mm. The method is shown to be well adapted to thermal environments. Thermal expansion coefficients of graphite-epoxy composites have been measured with high precision over a wide range from nearly zero to 3300 microstrains in the temperature range 297-422 K. Random errors characterized by one standard deviation can be as small as one microstrain.

  7. Precision surveying using very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R.; Ma, C.; Robertson, D. S.; Corey, B. E.; Counselman, C. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Wittels, J. J.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Radio interferometry measurements were used to measure the vector baselines between large microwave radio antennas. A 1.24 km baseline in Massachusetts between the 36 meter Haystack Observatory antenna and the 18 meter Westford antenna of Lincoln Laboratory was measured with 5 mm repeatability in 12 separate experiments. Preliminary results from measurements of the 3,928 km baseline between the Haystack antenna and the 40 meter antenna at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California are presented.

  8. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  9. Interferometry theory for the block 2 processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the interferometry theory for the Block 2 processor, including a high-level functional description and a discussion of data structure. The analysis covers the major processing steps: cross-correlation, fringe counter-rotation, transformation to the frequency domain, phase calibration, bandwidth synthesis, and extraction of the observables of amplitude, phase, phase rate, and delay. Also included are analyses for fractional bitshift correction, station clock error, ionosphere correction, and effective frequencies for the observables.

  10. GPS radio interferometry of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Palamartchouk, K. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry (SADM-GPS) is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Subsequently, velocity and direction distributions are constructed and analyzed to verify the hypothesis of whether there is a predominant displacement. If it exists, then the pattern can be considered to be travelling, and the mean travel velocity can be determined from the velocity distribution. Through a computer simulation it was shown that multi-satellite GPS radio interferometry in conjunction with the SADM-GPS algorithm allows the detection and measurement of the velocity vector of TIDs in virtually the entire azimuthal range of possible TID propagation directions. The use of the proposed method is exemplified by an investigation of TIDs during the solar eclipse of 9 March 1997, using the GPS-radio interferometer GPSINT at Irkutsk.

  11. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques have been applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large-scale wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used in the study of two-dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Company DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The excellent agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real-time interferometric data in large-scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real-time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results revealed the details of the jet interaction with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  12. Gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Jason

    2016-05-01

    The advent of gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe. Low frequency gravitational waves below 10 Hz are expected to offer rich science opportunities both in astrophysics and cosmology, complementary to signals in LIGO's band. Detector designs based on atom interferometry have a number of advantages over traditional approaches in this band, including the possibility of substantially reduced antenna baseline length in space and high isolation from seismic noise for a terrestrial detector. In particular, atom interferometry based on the clock transition in group II atoms offers tantalizing new possibilities. Such a design is expected to be highly immune to laser frequency noise because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This would allow for a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry in a 10-meter drop tower has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 50 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  13. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques were applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used to study 2 dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Co. DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real time interferometric data in large scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results reveals the details of the jet interacting with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  14. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Weber, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for determining temperature and concentration in crystal growth experiments designed for space. The method measures refractive index changes within the fluid of an experimental test cell resulting from temperature and/or concentration changes. When the refractive index changes are caused by simultaneous temperature and concentration changes, the contributions of the two effects cannot be separated by single wavelength interferometry. By using two wavelengths, however, two independent interferograms can provide the additional independent equation required to determine the two unknowns. There is no other technique available that provides this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort were to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry (TCHI) and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. In the foregoing study, the theory of TCHI has been tested experimentally over a range of interest for materials processing in space where measurements of temperature and concentration in a solution are required. New techniques were developed and applied to stretch the limits beyond what could be done with existing procedures. The study resulted in the production of one of the most advanced, enhanced sensitivity holographic interferometers in existence. The interferometric measurements made at MSFC represent what is believed to be the most accurate holographic interferometric measurements made in a fluid to date. The tests have provided an understanding of the limitations of the technique in practical use.

  15. Development of Speckle Interferometry Algorithm and System

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsir, A. A. M.; Jafri, M. Z. M.; Lim, H. S.

    2011-05-25

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) method is a wholefield, non destructive measurement method widely used in the industries such as detection of defects on metal bodies, detection of defects in intergrated circuits in digital electronics components and in the preservation of priceless artwork. In this research field, this method is widely used to develop algorithms and to develop a new laboratory setup for implementing the speckle pattern interferometry. In speckle interferometry, an optically rough test surface is illuminated with an expanded laser beam creating a laser speckle pattern in the space surrounding the illuminated region. The speckle pattern is optically mixed with a second coherent light field that is either another speckle pattern or a smooth light field. This produces an interferometric speckle pattern that will be detected by sensor to count the change of the speckle pattern due to force given. In this project, an experimental setup of ESPI is proposed to analyze a stainless steel plate using 632.8 nm (red) wavelength of lights.

  16. Holographic Interferometry Applications In External Osteosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, P.; Rastogi, P. K.; Pflug, L.

    1985-08-01

    In order to maintain fragments of fractured bones in a state of immobilization, the use of an external rigid frame has proved to be very advantageous. Confronted by contradictory requirements, the conception of external fixation has, however, been a difficult task. The present paper aims to show, through three examples of varied bearings, the interest of holographic interferometry in external osteosynthesis. The first example deals with the mechanical behavior of a key element of the fixation device the ball joint submitted to realistic loads. The last two examples compare two models of ball joints as to their characteristics of rigidity and of resistance to slipping. Whereas in the former case holographic interferometry primarily fulfills the function of a prelude to the modelization work, in the latter cases it serves to formulate an engineering diagnostic. The findings relate to the remarkable elastic behavior of the ball joint, to the effectiveness of a lightened bowl design, and to the fact that cousin models may behave quite differently as to their resistance to slipping rotations of the bar. In comparison with other experimental methods, holographic interferometry appears to be very competitive and result-oriented and, as such, is expected to multiply applications in similar evaluation tasks.

  17. Atom Interferometry on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dennis; Seidel, Stephan; Lachmann, Maike; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The universality of free fall is one of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature. The comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry comprises a method to precisely test this assumption. By performing the experiments in a microgravity environment the sensitivity of such an atom interferometric measurement can be increased. In order to fully utilize the potential of these experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein condensate as the initial state of the atom interferometer is necessary. As a step towards the transfer of such a system in space an atom optical experiment is currently being prepared as the scientific payload for a sounding rocket mission. This mission is aiming at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein condensate in space and using this quantum degenerate matter as a source for atom interferometry. The launch of the rocket is planned for 2015 from ESRANGE. This first mission will be followed by two more that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures in space and simultaneous atom interferometry with two atomic species. Their success would mark a major advancement towards a precise measurement of the universality of free fall with a space-born atom interferometer. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under grant number DLR 50 1131-37.

  18. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for the measurement of temperature and concentration in various crystal growth experiments destined for space. The method measures refractive index changes in the experiment test cell. A refractive index change can be caused by concentration changes, temperature changes, or a combination of temperature and concentration changes. If the refractive index changes are caused by temperature and concentration changes occurring simultaneously in the experiment test cell, the contributions by the two effects cannot be separated by conventional measurement methods. By using two wavelengths, two independent interferograms can be produced from the reconstruction of the hologram. The two interferograms will be different due to dispersion properties of fluid materials. These differences provide the additional information that allows the separation of simultaneously occurring temperature and concentration gradients. There is no other technique available that can provide this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort are to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. To achieve these objectives, the accuracy and sensitivity of the technique must be determined for geometry's and materials that are relevant to the Materials Processing in the Space program of NASA. This will be achieved through the use of a specially designed two-color holographic interferometry breadboard optical system. In addition to experiments to achieve the primary goals, the breadboard will also provide inputs to the design of an optimum space flight system.

  19. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  20. Passive vibration compensation in scanning white-light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tereschenko, Stanislav; Lehmann, Peter; Zellmer, Lisa; Brueckner-Foit, Angelika

    2016-08-10

    We present a passive vibration compensation approach in scanning white-light interferometry (SWLI). A pointwise distance measuring interferometer (DMI) obtains fast temporal distance changes during the white-light depth-scan of an aerial-measuring Michelson white-light interferometer for topography measurement. Both interferometers share a part of the optical path so that the measurement spot of the DMI is within the field of view of SWLI. With the real positions of the interferometer with respect to the measuring object during the depth scan known from DMI measurements, we can compensate for the influence of unintentional distance changes caused by environmental vibrations or scanner nonlinearities. By reordering of the captured image frames and improved correlogram interpolation, we are able to reconstruct correct signals from completely distorted (and unusable) SWLI signals. Although the basic idea of the system already has been published, we improved the signal reconstruction technique so that the specimen's topography measurement can be obtained with the same accuracy as without any vibrations or scan distortions influence. In addition, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach by different practical measurements with and without vibrations. PMID:27534457

  1. Passive vibration compensation in scanning white-light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tereschenko, Stanislav; Lehmann, Peter; Zellmer, Lisa; Brueckner-Foit, Angelika

    2016-08-10

    We present a passive vibration compensation approach in scanning white-light interferometry (SWLI). A pointwise distance measuring interferometer (DMI) obtains fast temporal distance changes during the white-light depth-scan of an aerial-measuring Michelson white-light interferometer for topography measurement. Both interferometers share a part of the optical path so that the measurement spot of the DMI is within the field of view of SWLI. With the real positions of the interferometer with respect to the measuring object during the depth scan known from DMI measurements, we can compensate for the influence of unintentional distance changes caused by environmental vibrations or scanner nonlinearities. By reordering of the captured image frames and improved correlogram interpolation, we are able to reconstruct correct signals from completely distorted (and unusable) SWLI signals. Although the basic idea of the system already has been published, we improved the signal reconstruction technique so that the specimen's topography measurement can be obtained with the same accuracy as without any vibrations or scan distortions influence. In addition, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach by different practical measurements with and without vibrations.

  2. Fundamental aspects of resolution and precision in vertical scanning white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Tereschenko, Stanislav; Xie, Weichang

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the height and lateral resolution that can be achieved in vertical scanning white-light interferometry (SWLI). With respect to interferometric height resolution, phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) is assumed to provide the highest accuracy. However, if the noise dependence of SWLI phase evaluation and PSI algorithms is considered, SWLI measurements can be shown to be more precise. With respect to lateral resolution, the determination of the coherence peak position of SWLI signals seems to lead to better results compared to phase based-interferometric measurements. This can be attributed to the well-known batwing effect. Since batwing is a nonlinear effect applying nonlinear filters, e.g. a median filter, it reduces them significantly. If filtering is applied prior to the fringe order determination and phase evaluation, the number of artefacts known as ghost steps can be eliminated without changing the modulus of the phase. Finally, we discuss the dependence of measured height values on surface slope. We show that in interference microscopy there are additional limitations which are more rigid compared to the maximum surface slope angle resulting from the numerical aperture of the objective lens. As a consequence, the measurement precision breaks down at slope changes of steeper flanks even if the modulation depth of the interference signals is still good enough for signal analysis.

  3. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  4. Phase-Shift Interferometry with a Digital Photocamera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A phase-shift interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration with additional polarization components. A guideline is provided to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses. (Contains 5 figures.)

  5. Practical aspects of laser holographic interferometry in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licursi, J.; Lee, G.

    1985-01-01

    Practical aspects of using laser holographic interferometry in some NASA Ames wind tunnels are presented. These aspects include the development of techniques for dual-plate interferometry, optics alignment, and laser alignment. In addition, methods to alleviate problems associated with vibration, photographic processing, photographic drying, and photographic reconstruction are discussed.

  6. Nonlinear airglow signatures of ducted gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Hickey, M. P.; Taylor, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Signatures of short-period gravity waves are detected frequently in airglow data, revealing typical horizontal wavelengths of ˜15-35 km and periods of ˜4-8 minutes [e.g., Simkhada et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 3213, 2009]. Many of such waves are ducted within the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region [e.g., Walterscheid and Hickey, 114, D19109, 2009], and typical airglow intensity perturbations suggest amplitudes on the order of a few to tens of Kelvin within the airglow layers. At these amplitudes, trapped small-scale waves may be intermittently subject to nonlinear dissipation, potentially contributing to the local small-scale dynamics and variability of the lower thermosphere. For exceptionally strong small-scale waves, nonlinear behavior may become detectable in airglow data, including examples of wave breakdown [e.g., Yamada et al., GRL, 28(11), 2153, 2001], or apparent bore formation [e.g., Smith et al., JGR, 108(A2), 1083, 2003]. For moderately strong gravity waves with principally-linear propagation characteristics, however, airglow signatures may also exhibit nonlinearity in the form of harmonics, due to strong perturbations of reacting minor species at steep gradients of density [Huang et al., JGR, 108(A5), 1173, 2003; Snively et al., JGR, In Press, 2010]. Two scenarios are investigated numerically, using a nonlinear photochemical-dynamical model to simulate ducted gravity wave perturbations to the hydroxyl airglow layer. First, signatures of ducted waves are considered that exhibit nonlinearity associated with the wave perturbations to minor species participating in the emission processes. In this case, the nonlinear signatures are not indicative of changes in the wave packet spectrum. Second, we consider signatures of ducted waves at sufficient amplitudes to exhibit nonlinear propagation as they approach dissipation. In this second case, observable nonlinearity in the airglow signatures arise simultaneously from the overall wave perturbation and

  7. Feasibility of satellite interferometry for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalapillai, S.; Ruck, G. T.; Mourad, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using a satellite borne interferometry system for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control applications was investigated. The evaluation was comprised of: (1) a two part systems analysis (software and hardware); (2) a survey of competitive navigation systems (both experimental and planned); (3) a comparison of their characteristics and capabilities with those of an interferometry system; and (4) a limited survey of potential users to determine the variety of possible applications for the interferometry system and the requirements which it would have to meet. Five candidate or "strawman" interferometry systems for various applications with various capabilities were configured (on a preliminary basis) and were evaluated. It is concluded that interferometry in conjunction with a geostationary satellite has an inherent ability to provide both a means for navigation/position location and communication. It offers a very high potential for meeting a large number of user applications and requirements for navigation and related functions.

  8. Agile interferometry: a non-traditional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-11-01

    A new approach called agile interferometry is introduced to attain interferometric information with high sensitivity and scenario-based intelligence. Compared to traditional interferometric techniques, the proposed method thrives on dynamic control of the reference signal strength and detector integration time for efficient interferometric detection with high signal-to-noise ratio and significantly improved detected signal dynamic range capabilities. Theoretical analysis is presented with the operational methodology of the new approach. A high-speed optical attenuator is required in the interferometer reference arm to implement the proposed agile interferometer.

  9. Report on ''European Radio Interferometry School 2015''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, R.; Richards, A.

    2016-03-01

    The sixth European Interferometry School (ERIS2015) was held at ESO for the first time. As usual the school was aimed at graduate students and early-career postdocs, but this year the emphasis was on enhanced wide-bandwidth interferometers covering metre to submillimetre wavebands. More than 100 participants attended ERIS2015. The topics of the school are briefly described here. They covered a wide range, from an introduction to radio interferometric techniques through packages for data reduction and analysis to hands-on workshop sessions and proposal writing.

  10. Breast cancer detection by holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woisetschlaeger, Jakob; Sheffer, Daniel B.; Mikati, H.; Somasundaram, Kavitha; Loughry, C. William; Chawla, Surendra K.; Wesolowski, Piotr J.

    1993-02-01

    The overall breast cancer mortality rate has remained unchanged the last 50 years. The most significant factor in the treatment is its early detection which will alter the mortality rate. In this investigation, the feasibility of holographic interferometry for the purpose of detecting breast cancer was examined. Optical setups were developed to enable the collection of holographic interferograms in vivo of asymptomatic breasts and those containing cancerous lesions. Different stressing concepts of holographic nondestructive testing and their applicability for the detection of breast cancer were tested.

  11. Phase shifting interferometry of cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Ku, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Chi-Yuan; Shiau, Bor-Wen; Han, Dian-Jiun

    2011-02-14

    We propose a scheme to engage phase shifting interferometry on cold atomic samples and present the simulation results under several experimentally achievable conditions nowadays. This method allows far-detuning, low power probing, and is intrinsically nondestructive. This novel detection means yields image quality superior to the conventional phase contrast imaging at certain conditions and could be experimentally realized. Furthermore, the longitudinal resolution of imaging by this manner is mainly set by optical interference and can be better than the diffraction limit. This scheme also provides special advantages to diagnose the surface-trapped clouds, with which phase imaging on the fabricated wires and atoms altogether is possible as well.

  12. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  13. The critical angle in seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wijk, K.; Calvert, A.; Haney, M.; Mikesell, D.; Snieder, R.

    2008-01-01

    Limitations with respect to the characteristics and distribution of sources are inherent to any field seismic experiment, but in seismic interferometry these lead to spurious waves. Instead of trying to eliminate, filter or otherwise suppress spurious waves, crosscorrelation of receivers in a refraction experiment indicate we can take advantage of spurious events for near-surface parameter extraction for static corrections or near-surface imaging. We illustrate this with numerical examples and a field experiment from the CSM/Boise State University Geophysics Field Camp.

  14. Atom interferometry with polarizing beam splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Ruschewitz, F.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1998-06-01

    A special kind of atomic beam splitter using a four-level atomic system in combination with polarized light fields is demonstrated. These specific atom optical elements are used to operate an atom interferometer where the beam-splitting mechanism acts selectively on specific paths only and therefore allows for several different interferometer geometries. Based on a Ramsey-Bordé configuration, the experimental data show considerably better accuracy and a contrast enhanced by 65% compared to the two-level interferometer. Our concept appears to be especially interesting in the context of metrological aspects in matter-wave interferometry.

  15. A simple laser system for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, S.; Volodimer, L.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2014-07-01

    We present here a simple laser system for a laser-cooled atom interferometer, where all functions (laser cooling, interferometry and detection) are realized using only two extended cavity laser diodes, amplified by a common tapered amplifier. One laser is locked by frequency modulation transfer spectroscopy, the other being phase locked with an offset frequency determined by an field-programmable gate array-controlled direct digital synthesizer, which allows for efficient and versatile tuning of the laser frequency. Raman lasers are obtained with a double pass acoustooptic modulator. We demonstrate a gravimeter using this laser system, with performances close to the state of the art.

  16. Space Interferometry Mission: Measuring the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, James; Dallas, Saterios; Laskin, Robert; Unwin, Stephen; Yu, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be the NASA Origins Program's first space based long baseline interferometric observatory. SIM will use a 10 m Michelson stellar interferometer to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute position measurements of stars down to 20th magnitude over its 5 yr. mission lifetime. SIM will also provide technology demonstrations of synthesis imaging and interferometric nulling. This paper describes the what, why and how of the SIM mission, including an overall mission and system description, science objectives, general description of how SIM makes its measurements, description of the design concepts now under consideration, operations concept, and supporting technology program.

  17. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A. E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  18. Moire interferometry for vibration analysis of plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Cheung, M. T.

    1987-12-01

    Moire interferometry is used to locate nodal regions and measure vibration amplitudes of sinusoidally vibrating square plates. The high sensitivity afforded by this technique makes possible the study of plate vibrations at high frequencies and low amplitudes. The initial pattern is modulated by the zero-order Bessel function representing the vibratory motion. The fringe (or fringes) with best contrast indicate the nodal regions, while the higher order fringes, describing loci of points vibrating with the same amplitude, have decreasing contrast which is improved by spatial filtering.

  19. Towards the nonlinear acousto-magneto-plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnov, Vasily V.; Razdolski, Ilya; Pezeril, Thomas; Makarov, Denys; Seletskiy, Denis; Melnikov, Alexey; Nelson, Keith A.

    2016-09-01

    We review the recent progress in experimental and theoretical research of interactions between the acoustic, magnetic and plasmonic transients in hybrid metal-ferromagnet multilayer structures excited by ultrashort laser pulses. The main focus is on understanding the nonlinear aspects of the acoustic dynamics in materials as well as the peculiarities in the nonlinear optical and magneto-optical response. For example, the nonlinear optical detection is illustrated in detail by probing the static magneto-optical second harmonic generation in gold–cobalt–silver trilayer structures in Kretschmann geometry. Furthermore, we show experimentally how the nonlinear reshaping of giant ultrashort acoustic pulses propagating in gold can be quantified by time-resolved plasmonic interferometry and how these ultrashort optical pulses dynamically modulate the optical nonlinearities. An effective medium approximation for the optical properties of hybrid multilayers enables the understanding of novel optical detection techniques. In the discussion we also highlight recent works on the nonlinear magneto-elastic interactions, and strain-induced effects in semiconductor quantum dots.

  20. Towards the nonlinear acousto-magneto-plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnov, Vasily V.; Razdolski, Ilya; Pezeril, Thomas; Makarov, Denys; Seletskiy, Denis; Melnikov, Alexey; Nelson, Keith A.

    2016-09-01

    We review the recent progress in experimental and theoretical research of interactions between the acoustic, magnetic and plasmonic transients in hybrid metal-ferromagnet multilayer structures excited by ultrashort laser pulses. The main focus is on understanding the nonlinear aspects of the acoustic dynamics in materials as well as the peculiarities in the nonlinear optical and magneto-optical response. For example, the nonlinear optical detection is illustrated in detail by probing the static magneto-optical second harmonic generation in gold-cobalt-silver trilayer structures in Kretschmann geometry. Furthermore, we show experimentally how the nonlinear reshaping of giant ultrashort acoustic pulses propagating in gold can be quantified by time-resolved plasmonic interferometry and how these ultrashort optical pulses dynamically modulate the optical nonlinearities. An effective medium approximation for the optical properties of hybrid multilayers enables the understanding of novel optical detection techniques. In the discussion we also highlight recent works on the nonlinear magneto-elastic interactions, and strain-induced effects in semiconductor quantum dots.