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Sample records for nonmagnetic iii-v semiconductor

  1. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  2. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  3. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electrical magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic III V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, D.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2006-07-01

    Introduction of a high concentration of manganese in III-V semiconductors, such as InAs and GaAs, results in carrier-induced ferromagnetism, which allows us to integrate ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic heterostructures and which modifies their magnetic properties through electric-field control of carrier concentration. The properties of ferromagnetism can in many cases be semi-quantitatively understood by the p-d Zener model, which is qualitatively different from conventional ferromagnetic metals. These ferromagnetic III-V semiconductors also offer the unique opportunity of examining spin-dependent phenomena observed so far only in metallic systems. Here, we review our experimental study on electrical manipulation of magnetization in these ferromagnetic III-V semiconductors. We first describe the results of electrically assisted magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic semiconductor (In, Mn)As field-effect transistor structures. The coercivity as well as ferromagnetic transition temperature can be controlled through the modification of carrier concentration by applied electric fields in a gated structure. We then present electrical magnetization reversal by spin-transfer torque exerted by spin-polarized currents at low threshold current density (~105 A cm-2) in (Ga, Mn)As-based magnetic tunnel junctions.

  5. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  6. III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, Mark; Martin, Trevor; Smowton, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductor devices with silicon is one of the most topical challenges in current electronic materials research. The combination has the potential to exploit the unique optical and electronic functionality of III-V technology with the signal processing capabilities and advanced low-cost volume production techniques associated with silicon. Key industrial drivers include the use of high mobility III-V channel materials (InGaAs, InAs, InSb) to extend the performance of Si CMOS, the unification of electronics and photonics by combining photonic components (GaAs, InP) with a silicon platform for next-generation optical interconnects and the exploitation of large-area silicon substrates and high-volume Si processing capabilities to meet the challenges of low-cost production, a challenge which is particularly important for GaN-based devices in both power management and lighting applications. The diverse nature of the III-V and Si device approaches, materials technologies and the distinct differences between industrial Si and III-V processing have provided a major barrier to integration in the past. However, advances over the last decade in areas such as die transfer, wafer fusion and epitaxial growth have promoted widespread renewed interest. It is now timely to bring some of these topics together in a special issue covering a range of approaches and materials providing a snapshot of recent progress across the field. The issue opens a paper describing a strategy for the epitaxial integration of photonic devices where Kataria et al describe progress in the lateral overgrowth of InP/Si. As an alternative, Benjoucef and Reithmaier report on the potential of InAs quantum dots grown direct onto Si surfaces whilst Sandall et al describe the properties of similar InAs quantum dots as an optical modulator device. As an alternative to epitaxial integration approaches, Yokoyama et al describe a wafer bonding approach using a buried oxide concept, Corbett

  7. III-V semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility and desirability of space growth of bulk IR semiconductor crystals for use as substrates for epitaxial IR detector material were researched. A III-V ternary compound (GaInSb) and a II-VI binary compound were considered. Vapor epitaxy and quaternary epitaxy techniques were found to be sufficient to permit the use of ground based binary III-V crystals for all major device applications. Float zoning of CdTe was found to be a potentially successful approach to obtaining high quality substrate material, but further experiments were required.

  8. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites ( III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites ( V I I I q) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III V q defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V I I I q under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  9. III-V aresenide-nitride semiconductor materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor crystals, methods for producing such crystals and devices employing such crystals. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  10. Optically enhanced oxidation of III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Mitsuo; Takahei, Kenichiro

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation of III-V compound semiconductor (110) cleaved surfaces under light irradiation is studied. The light irradiation enhanced the reaction rate of oxidation but the relationship between oxide growth and oxidation time under logarithmic law scarcely changed within this experimental range. The oxidation trend observed under light irradiation is similar to that of thermal oxidation for GaP, GaAs, InP, InAs, InGaAs, and InGaAsP. Semiconductors having As as the V element tend to be easily oxidized, while those of the above mentioned six kinds of materials having Ga as the III element are quickly oxidized in their initial stage. Ternary and quaternary compound semiconductors have less tendency to be oxidized compared to their constituent binary materials. off

  11. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si{sub Ga} shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  12. Carbon doping of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Focus of the study is C acceptor doping of GaAs, since C diffusion coefficient is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of other common p-type dopants in GaAs. C ion implantation results in a concentration of free holes in the valence band < 10% of that of the implanted C atoms for doses > 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Rutherford backscattering, electrical measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were amonth the techniques used. Ga co-implantation increased the C activation in two steps: first, the additional radiation damage creates vacant As sites that the implanted C can occupy, and second, it maintains the stoichiometry of the implanted layer, reducing the number of compensating native defects. In InP, the behavior of C was different from that in GaAs. C acts as n-type dopant in the In site; however, its incorporation by implantation was difficult to control; experiments using P co-implants were inconsistent. The lattice position of inactive C in GaAs in implanted and epitaxial layers is discussed; evidence for formation of C precipitates in GaAs and InP was found. Correlation of the results with literature on C doping in III-V semiconductors led to a phenomenological description of C in III-V compounds (particularly GaAs): The behavior of C is controlled by the chemical nature of C and the instrinsic Fermi level stabilization energy of the material.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of III-V semiconductor nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, Shanna Marie

    III-V semiconductor materials form a broad basis for optoelectronic applications, including the broad basis of the telecom industry as well as smaller markets for high-mobility transistors. In a somewhat analogous manner as the traditional silicon logic industry has so heavily depended upon process manufacturing development, optoelectronics often relies instead on materials innovations. This thesis focuses particularly on III-V semiconductor nanomaterials, detailed characterization of which is invaluable for translating the exhibited behavior into useful applications. Specifically, the original research described in these thesis chapters is an investigation of semiconductors at a fundamental materials level, because the nanostructures in which they appear crystallize in quite atypical forms for the given semiconductors. Rather than restricting the experimental approaches to any one particular technique, many different types of optical spectroscopies are developed and applied where relevant to elucidate the connection between the crystalline structure and exhibited properties. In the first chapters, for example, a wurtzite crystalline form of the prototypical zincblende III-V binary semiconductor, GaAs, is explored through polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy and temperature-dependent photoluminescence, as well as second-harmonic generation (SHG). The altered symmetry properties of the wurtzite crystalline structure are particularly evident in the Raman and SHG polarization dependences, all within a bulk material realm. A rather different but deeply elegant aspect of crystalline symmetry in GaAs is explored in a separate study on zincblende GaAs samples quantum-confined in one direction, i.e. quantum well structures, whose quantization direction corresponds to the (110) direction. The (110) orientation modifies the low-temperature electron spin relaxation mechanisms available compared to the usual (001) samples, leading to altered spin coherence times explored

  14. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-07

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  15. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  16. Thermal oxidation of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, O.R.M.

    1988-11-01

    Thermal oxidation of III-V compound semiconductors has been studied in the temperature range of 300/degree/C to 600/degree/C. Two members of this class of materials, namely InP and GaAs, were the object of the experimental work carried out here. The main analytical tools used were transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). TEM was employed to access microstructural changes and SIMS to access the composition redistribution that takes place as a consequence of the oxidation reaction. Below 400/degree/C oxidation of both materials led to the formation of amorphous scales, which consisted of a mixture of gallium and arsenic oxides in the case of GaAs, and indium phosphate and oxide in the case of InP. The oxidation kinetics of InP was found to be slower than that of GaAs. In the high temperature regime, i.e., above 400/degree/C, the oxidation of both materials resulted in crystalline products. Precipitation of the group V element at the scale/semiconductor interface took place during oxidation. At the GaAs/Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/interface, As precipitates were formed with a truncated square pyramid shape bound by /l brace/111/r brace//sub GaAs/ planes. The precipitates found at the InPO/sub 4//InP interface were either a phosphorus rich phase or red phosphorus. Strong vaporization under the electron beam prohibited a more accurate determination. The morphology of those precipitates were very similar to the As ones in GaAs. 83 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  18. Investigation of III-V semiconductor heterostructures for post-Si-CMOS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Kunal

    Silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology in the past few decades has been driven by aggressive device scaling to increase performance, reduce cost and lower power consumption. However, as devices are scaled below the 100 nm region, performance gain has become increasingly difficult to obtain by traditional scaling. As we move towards advanced technology nodes, materials innovation and physical architecture are becoming the primary enabler for performance enhancement in CMOS technology rather than scaling. One class of materials that can potentially result in improved electrical performance are III-V semiconductors, which are ideal candidates for replacing the channel in Si CMOS owing to their high electron mobilities and capabilities for band-engineering. This work is aimed towards the growth and characterization of III-V semiconductor heterostructures and their application in post-Si-CMOS devices. The two main components of this study include the integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon for tunnel-junction Esaki diodes, and the investigation of carrier transport properties in low-power III-V n-channel FETs under uniaxial strain for advanced III-V CMOS solutions. The integration of III-V compound semiconductors with Si can combine the cost advantage and maturity of the Si technology with the superior performance of III-V materials. We have demonstrated high quality epitaxial growth of GaAs and GaSb on Si (001) wafers through the use of various buffer layers including AlSb and crystalline SrTiO3. These GaSb/Si virtual substrates were used for the fabrication and characterization of InAs/GaSb broken-gap Esaki-tunnel diodes as a possible solution for heterojunction Tunnel-FETs. In addition, the carrier transport properties of InAs channels were evaluated under uniaxial strain for the potential use of strain solutions in III-V CMOS.

  19. Vibrational, mechanical, and thermal properties of III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1989-02-01

    Theories of the mechanical, vibrational, and electronic properties of 3 to 5 semiconductors were developed and applied to: (1) help determine the feasibility of InN-based visible and ultraviolet lasers and light detectors, (2) develop a theory of phonons in semiconductor alloys, (3) understand surface reconstruction of semiconductors, (4) predict the effects of atomic correlations on the light-scattering (Raman) properties of semiconductive alloys, (5) develop a new first principles pseudo-function implementation of local-density theory, (6) study the oxidation of GaAs, (7) develop a theory of scanning tunneling microscope images, and (8) understand the electronic and optical properties of highly strained artificial semiconductors and small semiconductor particles.

  20. III-V nitride semiconductors for solar hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameshwaran, Vijay; Gallinat, Chad; Enck, Ryan W.; Sampath, Anand V.; Shen, Paul H.; Kuykendall, Tevye; Aloni, Shaul; Wraback, Michael; Clemens, Bruce M.

    2012-06-01

    Photoelectrochemical cells are devices that can convert solar radiation to hydrogen gas through a water decomposition process. In this process, energy is converted from incident photons to the bonds of the generated H2 molecules. The solar radiation absorption, electron-hole pair splitting, and photoelectrolysis half reactions all occur in the vicinity of the electrode-electrolyte interface. As a result, engineering the electrode material and its interaction with the electrolyte is important in investigating and improving the energy conversion process in these devices. III-V nitride materials are promising candidates for photoelectrochemical energy applications. We demonstrate solar-to-hydrogen conversion in these cells using p-type GaN and n-type InGaN as a photocathode and photoanode material, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate heteroepitaxial MOCVD growth of GaP on Si, enabling future work in developing GaPN as a photocathode material.

  1. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  2. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  3. Dislocation effects in FinFETs for different III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-04-01

    While Si-based devices are facing the limits of scaling, III-V materials, having high mobility, have attracted more and more attention. However, their advantages are obtained by ignoring the drawbacks of inevitably present dislocations. In this paper, we present a theoretical model that describes the degradation in carrier mobility caused by these inevitable charged dislocations in nanometer-sized, quantum-confined III-V compound semiconductor fin-shaped field effect transistors. We conclude that the Fermi-level pinning effect needs to be resolved to give carriers high enough energy (Fermi energy in the channel) to effectively ignore Coulomb scattering of charges at dislocations in a channel made by III-V compound semiconductors.

  4. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  5. Carbon films grown from plasma on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Warner, J. D.; Liu, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric carbon films were grown on n- and p-type GaAs and InP substrates using plasmas generated at 30 KHz from gaseous hydrocarbons. The effect of gas source, flow rate, and power on film growth were investigated. Methane and n-butane gases were utilized. The flow rate and power ranged from 30 to 50 sccm and 25 to 300 W, respectively. AES measurements show only carbon to be present in the films. The relative Ar ion sputtering rate (3 KeV) of carbon depends on the ratio power/pressure. In addition, the degree of asymmetry associated with the carbon-semiconductor interface is approximately power-independent. SIMS spectra indicate different H-C bonding configurations to be present in the films. Band gaps as high as 3.05 eV are obtained from optical absorption studies.

  6. Luminescence of thulium in III-V semiconductors and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomrenke, Gernot S.; Silkowski, E.; Colon, J. E.; Topp, D. J.; Yeo, Y. K.; Hengehold, R. L.

    1992-02-01

    Thulium (Tm) emissions were investigated in 390 keV, Tm-implanted AlGaAs, GaAs, InP, and Si using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The emissions in the different semiconductors were observed in the 1.20 to 1.35-μm region and are attributed to transitions between the crystal-field-split spin-orbit levels 3H5- 3H6 of Tm3+ (4f12). The main emission in GaAs is located at 1.233 μm and shows doublet structure with a width for each component of better than 0.15 meV at 6 K. Anneal temperature dependent studies identify multiple sites as the source of the Tm3+ emissions. The optimum anneal temperatures of Tm-implanted GaAs and AlGaAs are between 725 and 750 °C, for 10- or 15-min anneals, whereas InP:Tm appears to have the strongest emissions in the 575 to 625 °C temperature range. The intracenter Tm3+ emissions for Si:Tm were observed at 850 °C. Sample temperature dependent studies of Tm3+ emissions show that the sharp emissions can be seen to as high a temperature as 240 K for specific samples. Luminescence intensity studies as a function of excitation laser power in GaAs:Tm and AlGaAs:Tm exhibit a sublinear relationship. Lifetime measurements at 10 K of the main 1.233-μm line found two decay components with times of 0.5±0.3 μs and 2.6±0.3 μs. Selective excitation studies indicate that free carriers and/or excitons are involved in the excitation of the Tm centers.

  7. III-V Nanowire Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Transistors Monolithically Integrated on Si.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johannes; Dey, Anil W; Jacobsson, Daniel; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2015-12-01

    III-V semiconductors have attractive transport properties suitable for low-power, high-speed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) implementation, but major challenges related to cointegration of III-V n- and p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) on low-cost Si substrates have so far hindered their use for large scale logic circuits. By using a novel approach to grow both InAs and InAs/GaSb vertical nanowires of equal length simultaneously in one single growth step, we here demonstrate n- and p-type III-V MOSFETs monolithically integrated on a Si substrate with high I(on)/I(off) ratios using a dual channel, single gate-stack design processed simultaneously for both types of transistors. In addition, we demonstrate fundamental CMOS logic gates, such as inverters and NAND gates, which illustrate the viability of our approach for large scale III-V MOSFET circuits on Si. PMID:26595174

  8. Methods for forming group III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III--arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  9. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager Iii, Joel W; Chrzan, Daryl C; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  10. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager, Joel W., III; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth.

  11. Generic technique to grow III-V semiconductor nanowires in a closed glass vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Xing, Yingjie; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline III-V semiconductor nanowires have great potential in fabrication of nanodevices for applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, and for studies of novel physical phenomena. Sophisticated epitaxy techniques with precisely controlled growth conditions are often used to prepare high quality III-V nanowires. The growth process and cost of these experiments are therefore dedicated and very high. Here, we report a simple but generic method to synthesize III-V nanowires with high crystal quality. The technique employs a closed evacuated tube vessel with a small tube carrier containing a solid source of materials and another small tube carrier containing a growth substrate inside. The growth of nanowires is achieved after heating the closed vessel in a furnace to a preset high temperature and then cooling it down naturally to room temperature. The technique has been employed to grow InAs, GaAs, and GaSb nanowires on Si/SiO2 substrates. The as-grown nanowires are analyzed by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy and the results show that the nanowires are high quality zincblende single crystals. No particular condition needs to be adjusted and controlled in the experiments. This technique provides a convenient way of synthesis of III-V semiconductor nanowires with high material quality for a wide range of applications.

  12. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  13. Conductivity (ac and dc) in III-V amorphous semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, J. J.

    1985-02-01

    Variable-range hopping, as evidenced by a resistivity proportional to exp(T-1/4), has been induced in many III-V amorphous semiconductors (InSb, AlSb, and GaAs) and even in chalcogenide glasses (As2Te3, As2Te3-xSex, and GeTe) by depositing films at 77 K. It is therefore remarkable that the same procedure failed to generate variable-range hopping in GaSb, which is one of the less ionic III-V semiconductors. Besides differences in the dc conductivity, there are also different behaviors in the ac conductivity of amorphous semiconductors. The low-temperature ac conductivity of all amorphous semiconductors is proportional to ωsTn with s~=1 and n<1, which is consistent with a model of correlated barrier hopping of electron pairs between paired and random defects. However, in the case of a-SiO2 and a-GeSe2 one finds, in addition, that the capacitance obeys the scaling relation C=A ln(Tω-1), which would suggest a conduction mechanism by tunneling relaxation. Furthermore, this scaling relation cannot be fitted to the data for a-As2Te3, a-InSb, and a-GaSb although the functional dependence of C on T and ω are similar.

  14. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  15. Electronic Structure and Valence of Mn impurities in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2003-11-01

    Mn doped III-V semiconductors have recently become very popular materials since they are ferromagnetic at reasonably high temperatures and in some cases show carrier induced magnetism, where the Curie temperature can be altered by changes in the carrier concentration. It is expected that these materials will play an important role in Spintronics devices. Substitutional Mn impurities in III-V semiconductors can acquire either a divalent or a trivalent configuration. For example, it is generally accepted that Mn in GaAs is in a (d^5+h) configuration with five occupied Mn d-orbitals and a delocalized hole in the valence band. In contrast, Mn in GaN is believed to be in a d^4 configuration with a deep impurity state that has d-character. But there have recently been some discussions about the possibility of having some Mn ion in GaN assuming a divalent (d^5+h) type configuration. In order to achieve carrier induced ferromagnetism, the desired state of the Mn ions in III-V semiconductors is the (d^5+h) configuration. We have therefore performed ab-initio calculations of the Mn valence when it substitutes Ga in various III-V semiconductor hosts. We use the self-interaction corrected local spin density (SIC-LSD) method which is able to treat localized impurity orbitals properly. In particular we find that the method is capable of predicting the (d^5+h) state of Mn in GaAs. For Mn in GaP and GaN the calculations predict a trivalent d^4 state in the idealized system. The energy differences between d^4 and (d^5+h) configurations in GaP are, however, very small. Introduction of defects or donors does change the valence of Mn in GaP, favoring the divalent state under certain circumstances. Work done in collaboration with W. Temmerman and S. Szotek, Daresbury Laboratory, G. M. Stocks, ORNL, and W. H. Butler, MINT Center University of Alabama. This work supported by the Defense Advanced Research Agency and by DOE Office of Science trough ASCR/MICS and BES/DMSE under Contract No

  16. X-point deformation potentials of III-V semiconductors in a tight-binding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. C.; Armelles, G.

    1993-07-01

    The hydrostatic E1 and shear E2 deformation potentials of the III-V semiconductor compounds are calculated within a nearest-neighbor tight-binding approach. In the sp3s* parametrization, analytical expressions for both E1 and E2 are derived. The scaling law of the s*p interaction is modified in such a way that it provides deformation potentials at X in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. This phenomenological term takes into account the physical behavior of the actual excited states under strain and consequently, it allows us to describe accurately the dependence of the band-edge states under (001) biaxial strain.

  17. Empirical modeling of the cross section of damage formation in ion implanted III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, E.; Wendler, L.

    2012-05-07

    In this letter, the cross section of damage formation per individual ion is measured for III-V compound semiconductors ion implanted at 15 K, applying Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. An empirical model is proposed that explains the measured cross sections in terms of quantities representing the primary energies deposited in the displacement of lattice atoms and in electronic interactions. The resulting formula allows the prediction of damage formation for low temperatures and low ion fluences in these materials and can be taken as a starting point for further quantitative modeling of damage formation including secondary effects such as temperature and ion flux.

  18. Characteristics and device applications of erbium doped III-V semiconductors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, S.; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied the properties of molecular beam epitaxially (MBE)-grown Erdoped III-V semiconductors for optoelectronic applications. Optically excited Er3+ in insulating materials exhibits optical emission chiefly around 1.54 μm, in the range of minimum loss in silica fiber. It was thought, therefore, that an electrically pumped Er-doped semiconductor laser would find great applicability in fiber-optic communication systems. Exhaustive photoluminescence (PL) characterization was conducted on several of As-based III-V semiconductors doped with Er, on bulk as well as quantum-well structures. We did not observe any Errelated PL emission at 1.54 μm for any of the materials/structures studied, a phenomenon which renders impractical the realization of an Er-doped III-V semiconductor laser. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies were performed on GaAs and AlGaAs co-doped with Er and Si to investigate the presence of any Er-related deep levels. The lack of band-edge luminescence in the GaAs:Er films led us to perform carrier-lifetime measurements by electro-optic sampling of photoconductive transients generated in these films. We discovered lifetimes in the picosecond regime, tunable by varying the Er concentration in the films. We also found the films to be highly resistive, the resistivity increasing with increasing Er-concentration. Intensive structural characterization (double-crys-tal x-ray and transmission electron microscopy) performed by us on GaAs:Er epilayers indicates the presence of high-density nanometer-sized ErAs precipitates in MBE-grown GaAs:Er. These metallic nanoprecipitates probably form internal Schottky barriers within the GaAs matrix, which give rise to Shockley-Read-Hall recombination centers, thus accounting for both the high resistivities and the ultrashort carrier lifetimes. Optoelectronic devices fabricated included novel tunable (in terms of speed and responsivity) high-speed metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes made with Ga

  19. a Study of Erbium Doped Iii-V Semiconductors for Optoelectronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sanjay

    1995-11-01

    This dissertation presents work done on materials and novel devices made with MBE-grown Er-doped III-V semiconductors for optoelectronic applications. Optically-excited Er ^{3+} in insulating materials exhibits optical emission chiefly around 1.54 mum, in the range of minimum loss in silica fiber. It was thought, therefore, that an electrically -pumped Er-doped semiconductor laser would find great applicability in fiber-optic communication systems. Exhaustive photoluminescence (PL) characterization was conducted on the entire gamut of As-based III-V semiconductors doped with Er, on bulk as well as quantum-well structures. We did not observe any Er-related PL emission at 1.54 μm for any of the materials/structures studied, a phenomenon which renders impractical the realization of an Er-doped III-V semiconductor laser. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies were performed on GaAs and AlGaAs co-doped with Er and Si to investigate the presence of any Er-related deep levels. The lack of band-edge luminescence in the GaAs:Er films led us to perform carrier-lifetime measurements by electro-optic sampling of photoconductive transients generated in these films. We discovered lifetimes in the picosecond regime, tunable by varying the Er concentration in the films. We also found the films to be highly resistive, the resistivity increasing with increasing Er-concentration. Intensive structural characterization (Double -crystal X-ray and TEM) performed by us on GaAs:Er epilayers indicates the presence of high-density nanometer-sized ErAs precipitates in MBE-grown GaAs:Er. These metallic nanoprecipitates probably form internal Schottky barriers within the GaAs matrix, which give rise to Shockley-Read -Hall recombination centers, thus accounting for both the high resistivities and the ultrashort carrier lifetimes. Optoelectronic devices fabricated included novel tunable (in terms of speed and responsivity) high-speed metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes made with Ga

  20. Engineering the cell-semiconductor interface: a materials modification approach using II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lauren E; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-02-18

    Developing functional biomedical devices based on semiconductor materials requires an understanding of interactions taking place at the material-biosystem interface. Cell behavior is dependent on the local physicochemical environment. While standard routes of material preparation involve chemical functionalization of the active surface, this review emphasizes both biocompatibility of unmodified surfaces as well as use of topographic features in manipulating cell-material interactions. Initially, the review discusses experiments involving unmodified II-VI and III-V semiconductors - a starting point for assessing cytotoxicity and biocompatibility - followed by specific surface modification, including the generation of submicron roughness or the potential effect of quantum dot structures. Finally, the discussion turns to more recent work in coupling topography and specific chemistry, enhancing the tunability of the cell-semiconductor interface. With this broadened materials approach, researchers' ability to tune the interactions between semiconductors and biological environments continues to improve, reaching new heights in device function.

  1. III-V compound semiconductors for mass-produced nano-electronics: theoretical studies on mobility degradation by dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-02-01

    As silicon-based electronics approach the limit of scaling for increasing the performance and chip density, III-V compound semiconductors have started to attract significant attention owing to their high carrier mobility. However, the mobility benefits of III-V compounds are too easily accepted, ignoring a harmful effect of unavoidable threading dislocations that could fundamentally limit the applicability of these materials in nanometer-scale electronics. In this paper, we present a theoretical model that describes the degradation of carrier mobility by charged dislocations in quantum-confined III-V semiconductor metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Based on the results, we conclude that in order for III-V compound MOSFETs to outperform silicon MOSFETs, Fermi level pinning in the channel should be eliminated for yielding carriers with high injection velocity.

  2. Defect Analysis in III-V Semiconductor Thin Films Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Kevin Louis

    Hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is an epitaxial growth technique renowned for its ability to grow III-V semiconductors at high growth rates using lower cost reagents compared to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), the current industry standard. Recent interest in III-V photovoltaics has led to increased attention on HVPE. While the technique came to maturity in the 70s, much is unknown about how defects incorporate in HVPE-grown materials. Further understanding of how defects incorporate in III-V materials grown by HVPE is necessary to facilitate wider adoption of the technique. This information would inform strategies for minimizing and eliminating defects in HVPE materials, allowing for the formation of high performance devices. This investigation presents a study of multiple defects in III-V semiconductors grown by HVPE in the context of specific device applications, spanning point defects comprised of individual atoms to extended defects which propagate throughout the crystal. The incorporation of the arsenic anti-site defect, AsGa, intrinsic point defect was studied in high growth rate GaAs layers with potential photovoltaic applications. Relationships between growth conditions and incorporation of AsGa in GaAs epilayers were determined. The incorporation of AsGa depended strongly on the growth conditions employed, and a model was developed to predict the concentration of anti-site defects as a function of those growth conditions. Dislocations and anti-phase domain boundaries (APDBs), two types of extended defects, were investigated in the heteroepitaxial GaAs/Ge system. It was found that the use of 6° miscut substrates and specific growth temperatures led to elimination of APDBs. Dislocation densities were reduced through the use of high growth temperatures. The third and final application investigated was the growth of InxGa1-xAs metamorphic buffer layers (MBLs) by HVPE. The relationships between the growth conditions and the alloy composition

  3. Epitaxial growth of rare-earth trifluorides on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Sayuri

    Epitaxial growths of rare-earth trifluorides on III--V semiconductors have been investigated. Synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy showed a complete coverage of III--V substrates by LaF3 and ErF3 films and interfacial chemical reactions at the interface. In the LaF 3 films on GaAs(111) substrates, residual tensile strains were detected by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) contrary to the expected compressive strains in the case of a pseudomorphic growth. The tensile strains are interpreted as being due to the differential thermal contractions of the fluorides and the semiconductors during cooling. The correlations between the bulk structure and the surface structure of the LaF3 films on GaAs and InP substrates have been studied by X-ray rocking curve measurements, grazing incidence X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy. The lateral coherence lengths in the LaF3 films from the X-ray rocking curves and the height-height surface correlation lengths from the X-ray scattering and the atomic force microscopy were comparable to each other and were associated with the lattice mismatch of the system at the growth temperature. The results are interpreted in terms of strain relieving defects surrounding the columns of coherent crystals. The kinetics of LaF3 film growths on III--V semiconductors were investigated using the self-affine surface structure analysis for the X-ray specular/diffuse scattering and the atomic force microscopy. The scaling exponents for the film growth obtained from the analysis were closest to the exponents predicted by the Villain-Lai-Das Sarma model in which the surface diffusion of deposited particles is the most important process in the film growth. InP single crystal islands have been grown on LaF3/InP(111) heterostructures. The InP islands are observed to be faceted with three-fold symmetry as expected for (111) orientation. A small broadening of the InP substrate diffraction peak is interpreted as being due to inhomogeneous

  4. Vapor transport epitaxy: an advanced growth process for III-V and II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurary, Alexander; Tompa, Gary S.; Nelson, Craig R.; Stall, Richard A.; Lu, Yicheng; Liang, Shaohua

    1992-09-01

    The Vapor Transport Epitaxy (VTE) thin film deposition technique for the deposition of III - V and II - VI compound semiconductors and material results are reviewed. The motivation for development of the VTE technique is the elimination of several problems common to molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition systems. In VTE, vapors from sources feed through throttling valves into a common manifold which is located directly below the inverted wafer. A high degree of film uniformity is achieved by controlling the flux distribution from the common manifold. The technique operates in the 10-4 - 10-6 Torr range using elemental, metalorganic or gaseous precursors. The system is configurated for 2 inch diameter wafers but the geometry may easily be scaled for larger diameters. Using elemental sources, we have demonstrated oval defect free growth of GaAs on GaAs (100) and (111) 2 degree(s) off substrates, through several microns of thickness at growth rates up to ten microns per hour. GaAs films which were grown without the manifold exhibit classic oval defects. The deposition rate of ZnSe films as a function of elemental flux, VI/II ratio, and growth temperature are described. The ZnSe films exhibited smooth surface morphologies on GaAs (100) 2 degree(s) off substrates. X- ray analysis shows that III - V and II - VI films exhibited crystallinities comparable to films produced by molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  5. Structure Analysis of Composition Modulation in Epitaxially-Grown III-V Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Asahi, Hajime; Sato, Kazuhisa; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2013-11-01

    It has been reported that composition modulation is naturally formed in some of the epitaxially-grown thin films. Structural characterization of these materials is necessary for controlling their nanostructures precisely. Here, we prepared epitaxially-grown III-V semiconductor alloys and characterized their atomistic structures by means of diffraction crystallography and electron microscopy techniques. As a consequence, we found that the following quantum well structures are spontaneously formed: (1) ultrashort period lateral composition modulation (LCM) with a modulation period of ˜1 nm; (2) complex vertical composition modulated (VCM) structures consisting of two modulated structures with a different period (˜4 and ˜25 nm). The former LCM structure is created via nanoscale phase separation at the growth surface, while the shorter-period modulation in the later VCM structure is induced by rotating a substrate through an inhomogeneous distribution of the anion flux within a chamber.

  6. Nucleation and growth of dielectric films on III-V semiconductors during atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados Alpizar, Bernal

    In order to continue with metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) transistor scaling and to reduce the power density, the channel should be replaced with a material having a higher electron mobility, such as a III-V semiconductor. However, the integration of III-V's is a challenge because these materials oxidize rapidly when exposed to air and the native oxide produced is characterized by a high density of defects. Deposition of high-k materials on III-V semiconductors using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) reduces the thickness of these oxides, improving the semiconductor/oxide interface quality and the transistor electrical characteristics. In this work, ALD is used to deposit two dielectrics, Al 2O3 and TiO2, on two III-V materials, GaAs and InGaAs, and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ thermal programmed desorption (TPD) are used for interface characterization. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of GaAs(100) and brief reoxidation in air produces a 9.0 ±1.6 Å-thick oxide overlayer containing 86% As oxides. The oxides are removed by 1 s pulses of trimethylaluminum (TMA) or TiCl4. TMA removes the oxide overlayer while depositing a 7.5 ± 1.6 Å thick aluminum oxide. The reaction follows a ligand exchange mechanism producing nonvolatile Al-O species that remain on the surface. TiCl4 exposure removes the oxide overlayer in the temperature range 89°C to 300°C, depositing approximately 0.04 monolayer of titanium oxide for deposition temperatures from 89°C to 135°C, but no titanium oxide is present from 170 °C to 230 °C. TiCl4 forms a volatile oxychloride product and removes O from the surface while leaving Cl atoms adsorbed to an elemental As layer, chemically passivating the surface. The native oxide of In0.53Ga0.47As(100) is removed using liquid HF and gas phase HF before deposition of Al2O3 using TMA and H2O at 170 °C. An aluminium oxide film with a thickness of 7.2 ± 1.2 Å and 7.3 ± 1.2 Å is deposited during the first pulse of TMA on

  7. A model of axial heterostructure formation in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    A kinetic model of the formation of axial heterostructures in nanocrystalline wires (nanowires, NWs) of III-V semiconductor compounds growing according to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is proposed. A general system of nonstationary equations for effective fluxes of two elements of the same group (e.g., group III) is formulated that allows the composition profile of a heterostructure to be calculated as a function of the coordinate and epitaxial growth conditions, including the flux of a group V element. Characteristic times of the composition relaxation, which determine the sharpness of the heteroboundary (heterointerface), are determined in the linear approximation. A temporal interruption (arrest) of fluxes during the switching of elements for a period exceeding these relaxation times must increase sharpness of the heteroboundary. Model calculations of the composition profile in a double GaAs/InAs/GaAs axial heterostructure have been performed for various NW radii.

  8. Analytical Electron Diffraction from Iii-V and II-Vi Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellward, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a number of new TEM-based techniques for the measurement of composition in ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. New methods of polarity determination in binary and ternary compounds are also presented. The theory of high energy electron diffraction is outlined, with particular emphasis on zone axis diffraction from well-defined strings. An account of TEM microstructural studies of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te and CdTe epitaxial layers, which provided the impetus for developing the diffraction-based analytical techniques, is given. The wide range of TEM-based compositional determination techniques is described. The use of HOLZ deficiency lines to infer composition from a lattice parameter measurement is evaluated. In the case of Cd_{ rm x}Hg_{rm 1-x}Te, it is found to be inferior to other techniques developed. Studies of dynamical aspects of HOLZ diffraction can yield information about the dispersion surface from which a measure of composition may be obtained. This technique is evaluated for Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As, in which it is found to be of some use, and for Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te, in which the large Debye-Waller factor associated with mercury in discovered to render the method of little value. A number of critical voltages may be measured in medium voltage TEMs. The (111) zone axis critical voltage of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te is found to vary significantly with x and forms the basis of an accurate technique for composition measurement in that ternary compound. Other critical voltage phenomena are investigated. In Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As and other light ternaries, a non-systematic critical voltage is found to vary with x, providing a good indicator of composition. Critical voltage measurements may be made by conventional CBED or by various other techniques, which may also simultaneously yield information on the spatial variation of composition. The

  9. Deoxidation of (001) III-V semiconductors in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, Christian; Pristovsek, Markus; Richter, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    We studied the deoxidation of several (001) III-V semiconductors in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy using in-situ reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy and in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The oxide desorption started as soon as kBT reaches 1/15th of the bond strength of the crystal if there is hydrogen or group V precursor present. The oxide thickness decreases first and afterwards the surface slowly reconstructs. At a constant temperature the oxide thickness decreased according to a second order reaction. We found two processes on InAs and GaAs, but only a single one on InP. The activation energy for the removal of epi-ready oxide under group V flux was 0.64 eV, 1.1 eV, and 1.3 eV on InAs, GaAs, and InP, respectively. The end of oxide desorption is determined by the removal of the last metal rich oxides, at temperatures of 500 °C for InAs/InP and 600 °C for GaAs/GaP.

  10. Electron g factor anisotropy in asymmetric III-V semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloza Sandoval, M. A.; Silva, E. A. de Andrada e.; Ferreira da Silva, A.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    The electron effective g factor tensor in asymmetric III-V semiconductor quantum wells (AQWs) and its tuning with the structure parameters and composition are investigated with envelope-function theory and the 8× 8 {k}\\cdot {p} Kane model. The spin-dependent terms in the electron effective Hamiltonian in the presence of an external magnetic field are treated as a perturbation and the g factors {g}\\perp * and {g}\\parallel * , for the magnetic field in the QW plane and along the growth direction, are obtained analytically as a function of the well width L. The effects of the structure inversion asymmetry (SIA) on the electron g factor are analyzed. For the g-factor main anisotropy {{Δ }}g={g}\\perp * -{g}\\parallel * in AQWs, a sign change is predicted in the narrow well limit due to SIA, which can explain recent measurements and be useful in spintronic applications. Specific results for narrow-gap {{AlSb}}/{{InAs}}/{{GaSb}} and {{{Al}}}x{{{Ga}}}1-x{{As}}/{{GaAs}}/{{{Al}}}y{{{Ga}}}1-y{{As}} AQWs are presented and discussed with the available experimental data; in particular InAs QWs are shown to not only present much larger g factors but also a larger g-factor anisotropy, and with the opposite sign with respect to GaAs QWs.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of III-V semiconductor alloys grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Toshihiro; Dandy, David S.

    2000-10-01

    A thermodynamic analysis has been applied to systematically study III-V semiconductor alloy deposition, including nitrides grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The predicted solid compositions of a number of ternary and quaternary alloys, including AlxGa1-xPyAs1-y, are compared with experimental data. For phosphorus-containing alloys, introduction of a parameter f representing incomplete PH3 pyrolysis yields good agreement with experimental data. It is shown that the input mole fraction of the group III metalorganic sources influences the incorporation of P into the solid for these alloys. Solid composition is also calculated for nitride alloys as a function of inlet gas concentration. To date, thermodynamic models have been applied solely to predict N solubility limits for nitride alloys where mixing occurs on the group V sublattice. The present model is used to predict N solid compositions in ternary and quaternary alloys, and it is demonstrated that these values are below the theoretical solubility limits for In-containing nitrides. The role of H2 in the carrier gas is investigated for III-N-V, III-III-N-V, and III-N-V-V systems.

  12. The Development of III-V Semiconductor MOSFETs for Future CMOS Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Andrew M.

    Alternative channel materials with superior transport properties over conventional strained silicon are required for supply voltage scaling in low power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. Group III-V compound semiconductor systems offer a potential solution due to their high carrier mobility, low carrier effective mass and large injection velocity. The enhancement in transistor drive current at a lower overdrive voltage allows for the scaling of supply voltage while maintaining high switching performance. This thesis focuses on overcoming several material and processing challenges associated with III-V semiconductor development including a low thermal processing budget, high interface trap state density (Dit), low resistance source/drain contacts and growth on lattice mismatched substrates. Non-planar In0.53Ga0.47As FinFETs were developed using both "gate-first" and "gate-last" fabrication methods for n-channel MOSFETs. Electron beam lithography and anisotropic plasma etching processes were optimized to create highly scaled fins with near vertical sidewalls. Plasma damage was removed using a wet etch process and improvements in gate efficiency were characterized on MOS capacitor structures. A two-step, selective removal of the pre-grown n+ contact layer was developed for "gate-last" recess etching. The final In0.53Ga 0.47As FinFET devices demonstrated an ION = 70 mA/mm, I ON/IOFF ratio = 15,700 and sub-threshold swing = 210 mV/dec. Bulk GaSb and strained In0.36Ga0.64Sb quantum well (QW) heterostructures were developed for p-channel MOSFETs. Dit was reduced to 2 - 3 x 1012 cm-2eV-1 using an InAs surface layer, (NH4)2S passivation and atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. A self-aligned "gate-first" In0.36Ga0.64Sb MOSFET fabrication process was invented using a "T-shaped" electron beam resist patterning stack and intermetallic source/drain contacts. Ni contacts annealed at 300°C demonstrated an ION = 166 mA/mm, ION/IOFF ratio = 1

  13. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ∼2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  14. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (<100 nm) particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  15. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    SciTech Connect

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-07

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  16. A model describing the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for the group III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Wei, Tong; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Sha-Sha; Lu, Ke-Qing

    2016-08-01

    A model describing the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for the group III-V semiconductors has been developed. It is found that the model describes the pressure dependence of the band gap energy very well. It is also found that, although the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for both the conventional III-V semiconductors and the dilute nitride alloys can be described well by the model in this work, the physical mechanisms for them are different. In addition, the influence of the nonlinear compression of the lattice on the band gap energy is smaller than that of the coupling interaction between the N level and the conduction band minimum of the host material.

  17. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  18. Metabolomic and proteomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: Chemical-specific porphyrinurias and proteinurias

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A. . E-mail: bxf9@cdc.gov; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-07

    A pressing need exists to develop and validate molecular biomarkers to assess the early effects of chemical agents, both individually and in mixtures. This is particularly true for new and chemically intensive industries such as the semiconductor industry. Previous studies from this laboratory and others have demonstrated element-specific alterations of the heme biosynthetic pathway for the III-V semiconductors gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) with attendant increased urinary excretion of specific heme precursors. These data represent an example of a metabolomic biomarker to assess chemical effects early, before clinical disease develops. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intratracheal or subcutaneous administration of GaAs and InAs particles to hamsters produces the induction of the major stress protein gene families in renal proximal tubule cells. This was monitored by 35-S methionine labeling of gene products followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after exposure to InAs particles. The present studies examined whether these effects were associated with the development of compound-specific proteinuria after 10 or 30 days following subcutaneous injection of GaAs or InAs particles in hamsters. The results of these studies demonstrated the development of GaAs- and InAs-specific alterations in renal tubule cell protein expression patterns that varied at 10 and 30 days. At the 30-day point, cells in hamsters that received InAs particles showed marked attenuation of protein expression, suggesting inhibition of the stress protein response. These changes were associated with GaAs and InAs proteinuria patterns as monitored by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The intensity of the protein excretion patterns increased between the 10- and 30-day points and was most pronounced for animals in the 30-day InAs treatment group. No overt morphologic signs of cell death were seen in renal tubule cells of these animals

  19. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  20. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  1. Optical and Magnetic Resonance Studies of Defects in Iii-V Compound Semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Honjiang

    This dissertation describes experimental studies of the basic properties of impurities and defects in III -V compound semiconductors, using a variety of optical and magnetic resonance techniques. The materials used include InP, GaP, and the Al-GaAs alloy. The methods of investigation include absorption, PL, laser spectroscopy, polarization, electron-irradiation, MCD, ODMR, and ODENDOR. The ODENDOR technique is used to investigate a phosphorus antisite-related defect in as-grown p-type GaP. The defect has been previously identified as arising from an excited S = 1 state via luminescence at ~ 1.1eV. It is established that the observed ODENDOR transitions arise from the M_{s} = 0 state, causing unusual magnetic field and orientation effects. Analysis to high-order perturbation theory and/or matrix diagonalization is required. Hyperfine interactions with the central P and several shells of both P and Ga neighbors are observed confirming that the defect has a P_{Ga}-Y_ {p} structure and that the electronic wave function is highly localized. Two antisite structures in InP have been observed and identified using ODENDOR investigation. One of these is the isolated P_{In} antisite previously studied in as-grown and electron-irradiated p-type InP. Another is the perturbed one observed only in electron-irradiated InP. The energy position of the P_sp{In}{+}/P_sp {In}{++}<=vel of the isolated antisite is estimated to be E_{V} + 1.1 +/- 0.05 eV and that of the P_sp{In}{0}/P _sp{In}{+}<=vel is estimated to be E_{V} + 1.39 +/- 0.01 eV. The dependence of the ODENDOR signals of the perturbed antisite on irradiation dose, detection wavelength, and illumination suggests that at least two slightly different such defects are present after the electron irradiation. Our results indicate that the defects are produced by the electron irradiation and are not initially present in the as-grown materials. In as-grown n-type InP:Sn, a broad (Delta B = 360G), structureless, and isotropic g = 1

  2. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-07-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  3. Spin-dependent shot noise in diluted magnetic semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures with a nonmagnetic barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Guo, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We investigate quantum size effect on the spin-dependent shot noise in the diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS)/semiconductor heterostructure with a nonmagnetic semiconductor (NMS) barrier in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields. The results demonstrate that the NMS barrier plays a quite different role from the DMS layer in the electron transport process. It is found that spin-down shot noise shows relatively regular oscillations as the width of DMS layer increases, while the spin-up shot noise deceases monotonically. However, as the width of NMS layer increases, the spin-down shot noise displays irregular oscillations at first and then decreases while the spin-up shot noise decreases at a quite different rate. The results indicate that the shot noise can be used as a sensitive probe in detecting material type and its size.

  4. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure. [GaAs:Si; InP:S

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si[sub Ga] shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  5. Integrating III-V compound semiconductors with silicon using wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yucai

    2000-12-01

    From Main Street to Wall Street, everyone has felt the effects caused by the Internet revolution. The Internet has created a new economy in the New Information Age and has brought significant changes in both business and personal life. This revolution has placed strong demands for higher bandwidth and higher computing speed due to high data traffic on today's information highway. In order to alleviate this problem, growing interconnection bottlenecks in digital designs have to be solved. The most feasible and practical way is to replace the conventional electrical interconnect with an optical interconnect. Since silicon does not have the optical properties necessary to accommodate these optical interconnect requirements, III-V based devices, most of which are GaAs-based or InP-based, must be intimately interconnected with the Si circuit at chip level. This monolithic integration technology enables the development of both intrachip and interchip optical connectors to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth provided by both high-performance very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits and allied fiber and free-space optical technologies. However, lattice mismatch and thermal expansion mismatches between III-V materials and Si create enormous challenges for developing a feasible technology to tackle this problem. Among all the available approaches today, wafer bonding distinguishes itself as the most promising technology for integration due to its ability to overcome the constraints of both lattice constant mismatch and thermal expansion coefficient differences and even strain due to the crystal orientation. We present our development of wafer bonding technology for integrating III-V with Si in my dissertation. First, the pick-and-place multiple-wafer bonding technology was introduced. Then we systematically studied the wafer bonding of GaAs and InP with Si. Both high temperature wafer fusion and low/room temperature (LT/RT) wafer bonding have been investigated for

  6. Parallel nanogap fabrication with nanometer size control using III-V semiconductor epitaxial technology.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Iván; González, Yolanda; Briones, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    A nanogap fabrication process using strained epitaxial III-V beams is reported. The process is highly reproducible, allowing parallel fabrication and nanogap size control. The beams are fabricated from MBE-grown (GaAs/GaP)/AlGaAs strained heterostructures, standard e-beam lithography and wet etching. During the wet etching process, the relaxation of the accumulated stress at the epitaxial heterostructure produces a controlled beam breakage at the previously defined beam notch. After the breakage, the relaxed strain is proportional to the beam length, allowing nanogap size control. The starting structure is similar to a mechanically adjustable break junction but the stress causing the breakage is, in this case, built into the beam. This novel technique should be useful for molecular-scale electronic devices.

  7. The impact of energy barrier height on border traps in the metal insulator semicondoctor gate stacks on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Minari, Hideki; Lin, Dennis; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Watanabe, Heiji; Nakazawa, Masashi; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a thin interfacial layer (IL) made of silicon or germanium between high-k dielectrics and III-V semiconductors on the frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves in detail. We demonstrated experimentally that the frequency dispersion at accumulation voltage is strongly dependent on the energy barrier height (ΦB) between high-k dielectrics and semiconductors. It was revealed that the improvement of frequency dispersion for n-type III-V semiconductors with IL is attributed to the increase in ΦB realized by inserting Ge IL. Moreover, the border trap density did not necessarily decrease with IL through the assessment of border trap density using a distributed bulk-oxide trap model. Finally, we proved that it is important to increase ΦB to suppress the carrier exchange and improve high-k/III-V gate stack reliability.

  8. Surface atomic order of compound III-V semiconductor alloys at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John C.; Millunchick, Joanna Mirecki; Modine, Normand A.; van der Ven, Anton

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the role of alloying, atomic-size mismatch strain, and thermal effects on ordering and reconstruction stability of As-rich (2×4) surfaces on (InxGa1-x)As (001) ternary III-V alloys (in the dilute limit) using a first-principles cluster-expansion and Monte Carlo simulations. The cluster expansion accounts for configurational degrees of freedom associated with As dimer adsorption/desorption as well as Ga-In disorder in subsurface cation sites. We analyze the α2(2×4)-β2(2×4) transition at finite temperature and directly examine the entropy and cation-site filling in both reconstructions. A compositionally dependent “zigzag” ordering of dimers in the α2(2×4) is predicted as well as a hybrid α2(2×4)-β2(2×4) reconstruction, found to be stable in a reasonably large chemical-potential range. The hybrid dimer ordering drives pronounced nanoscale composition modulation of surface cations.

  9. Semiconductor structural damage attendant to contact formation in III-V solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to keep the resistive losses in solar cells to a minimum, it is often necessary for the ohmic contacts to be heat treated to lower the metal-semiconductor contact resistivity to acceptable values. Sintering of the contacts, however can result in extensive mechanical damage of the semiconductor surface under the metallization. An investigation of the detailed mechanisms involved in the process of contact formation during heat treatment may control the structural damage incurred by the semiconductor surface to acceptable levels, while achieving the desired values of contact resistivity for the ohmic contacts. The reaction kinetics of sintered gold contacts to InP were determined. It was found that the Au-InP interaction involves three consecutive stages marked by distinct color changes observed on the surface of the Au, and that each stage is governed by a different mechanism. A detailed description of these mechanisms and options to control them are presented.

  10. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup →}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1−y} lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  11. Hybrid integration of III-V semiconductor lasers on silicon waveguides using optofluidic microbubble manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngho; Shim, Jaeho; Kwon, Kyungmook; You, Jong-Bum; Choi, Kyunghan; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-07-01

    Optofluidic manipulation mechanisms have been successfully applied to micro/nano-scale assembly and handling applications in biophysics, electronics, and photonics. Here, we extend the laser-based optofluidic microbubble manipulation technique to achieve hybrid integration of compound semiconductor microdisk lasers on the silicon photonic circuit platform. The microscale compound semiconductor block trapped on the microbubble surface can be precisely assembled on a desired position using photothermocapillary convective flows induced by focused laser beam illumination. Strong light absorption within the micro-scale compound semiconductor object allows real-time and on-demand microbubble generation. After the assembly process, we verify that electromagnetic radiation from the optically-pumped InGaAsP microdisk laser can be efficiently coupled to the single-mode silicon waveguide through vertical evanescent coupling. Our simple and accurate microbubble-based manipulation technique may provide a new pathway for realizing high precision fluidic assembly schemes for heterogeneously integrated photonic/electronic platforms as well as microelectromechanical systems.

  12. Hybrid integration of III-V semiconductor lasers on silicon waveguides using optofluidic microbubble manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngho; Shim, Jaeho; Kwon, Kyungmook; You, Jong-Bum; Choi, Kyunghan; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-01-01

    Optofluidic manipulation mechanisms have been successfully applied to micro/nano-scale assembly and handling applications in biophysics, electronics, and photonics. Here, we extend the laser-based optofluidic microbubble manipulation technique to achieve hybrid integration of compound semiconductor microdisk lasers on the silicon photonic circuit platform. The microscale compound semiconductor block trapped on the microbubble surface can be precisely assembled on a desired position using photothermocapillary convective flows induced by focused laser beam illumination. Strong light absorption within the micro-scale compound semiconductor object allows real-time and on-demand microbubble generation. After the assembly process, we verify that electromagnetic radiation from the optically-pumped InGaAsP microdisk laser can be efficiently coupled to the single-mode silicon waveguide through vertical evanescent coupling. Our simple and accurate microbubble-based manipulation technique may provide a new pathway for realizing high precision fluidic assembly schemes for heterogeneously integrated photonic/electronic platforms as well as microelectromechanical systems. PMID:27431769

  13. Hybrid integration of III-V semiconductor lasers on silicon waveguides using optofluidic microbubble manipulation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngho; Shim, Jaeho; Kwon, Kyungmook; You, Jong-Bum; Choi, Kyunghan; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-01-01

    Optofluidic manipulation mechanisms have been successfully applied to micro/nano-scale assembly and handling applications in biophysics, electronics, and photonics. Here, we extend the laser-based optofluidic microbubble manipulation technique to achieve hybrid integration of compound semiconductor microdisk lasers on the silicon photonic circuit platform. The microscale compound semiconductor block trapped on the microbubble surface can be precisely assembled on a desired position using photothermocapillary convective flows induced by focused laser beam illumination. Strong light absorption within the micro-scale compound semiconductor object allows real-time and on-demand microbubble generation. After the assembly process, we verify that electromagnetic radiation from the optically-pumped InGaAsP microdisk laser can be efficiently coupled to the single-mode silicon waveguide through vertical evanescent coupling. Our simple and accurate microbubble-based manipulation technique may provide a new pathway for realizing high precision fluidic assembly schemes for heterogeneously integrated photonic/electronic platforms as well as microelectromechanical systems. PMID:27431769

  14. Defect state passivation at III-V oxide interfaces for complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Guo, Y.; Lin, L.

    2015-03-21

    The paper describes the reasons for the greater difficulty in the passivation of interface defects of III–V semiconductors like GaAs. These include the more complex reconstructions of the starting surface which already possess defect configurations, the possibility of injecting As antisites into the substrate which give rise to gap states, and the need to avoid As-As bonds and As dangling bonds which give rise to gap states. The nature of likely defect configurations in terms of their electronic structure is described. The benefits of diffusion barriers and surface nitridation are discussed.

  15. Orthogonal and Non-Orthogonal Tight Binding Parameters for III-V Semiconductors Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, A. S.; Fellows, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    A simulated annealing (SA) approach is employed in the determination of different tight binding (TB) sets of parameters for the nitride semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, as well their limitations and potentialities are also discussed. Two kinds of atomic basis set are considered: (i) the orthogonal sp 3 s∗ with interaction up to second neighbors and (ii) a spd non-orthogonal set, with the Hamiltonian matrix elements calculated within the Extended Hückel Theory (EHT) prescriptions. For the non-orthogonal method, TB parameters are given for both zincblend and wurtzite crystalline structures.

  16. A survey of ohmic contacts to III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Briggs, R.D.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    A survey of ohmic contact materials and properties to GaAs, InP, GaN will be presented along with critical issues pertaining to each semiconductor material. Au-based alloys (e.g., GeAuNi for n-type GaAs) are the most commonly used contacts for GaAs and InP materials for both n- and p-type contacts due to the excellent contact resistivity, reliability, and usefulness over a wide range of doping levels. Research into new contacting schemes for these materials has focused on addressing limitations of the conventional Au-alloys in thermal stability, propensity for spiking, poor edge definition, and new approaches for a non-alloyed contact. The alternative contacts to GaAs and InP include alloys with higher temperature stability, contacts based on solid phase regrowth, and contacts that react with the substrate to form lower bandgap semiconductors alloys at the interface. A new area of contact studies is for the wide bandgap group III-Nitride materials. At present, low resistivity ohmic contact to p-type GaN has not been obtained primarily due to the large acceptor ionization energy and the resultant difficulty in achieving high free hole concentrations at room temperature. For n-type GaN, however, significant progress has been reported with reactive Ti-based metalization schemes or the use of graded InGaN layers. The present status of these approaches will be reviewed.

  17. Atomic scale strain relaxation in axial semiconductor III-V nanowire heterostructures.

    PubMed

    de la Mata, María; Magén, César; Caroff, Philippe; Arbiol, Jordi

    2014-11-12

    Combination of mismatched materials in semiconductor nanowire heterostructures offers a freedom of bandstructure engineering that is impossible in standard planar epitaxy. Nevertheless, the presence of strain and structural defects directly control the optoelectronic properties of these nanomaterials. Understanding with atomic accuracy how mismatched heterostructures release or accommodate strain, therefore, is highly desirable. By using atomic resolution high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with geometrical phase analyses and computer simulations, we are able to establish the relaxation mechanisms (including both elastic and plastic deformations) to release the mismatch strain in axial nanowire heterostructures. Formation of misfit dislocations, diffusion of atomic species, polarity transfer, and induced structural transformations are studied with atomic resolution at the intermediate ternary interfaces. Two nanowire heterostructure systems with promising applications (InAs/InSb and GaAs/GaSb) have been selected as key examples.

  18. Electric field control of spin splitting in III-V semiconductor quantum dots without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick

    2015-10-01

    We provide an alternative means of electric field control for spin manipulation in the absence of magnetic fields by transporting quantum dots adiabatically in the plane of two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the spin splitting energy of moving quantum dots is possible due to the presence of quasi-Hamiltonian that might be implemented to make the next generation spintronic devices of post CMOS technology. Such spin splitting energy is highly dependent on the material properties of semiconductor. It turns out that this energy is in the range of meV and can be further enhanced with increasing pulse frequency. In particular, we show that quantum oscillations in phonon mediated spin-flip behaviors can be observed. We also confirm that no oscillations in spin-flip behaviors can be observed for the pure Rashba or pure Dresselhaus cases.

  19. Near-infrared optical parametric oscillator in a III-V semiconductor waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanier, M.; Ozanam, C.; Lanco, L.; Lafosse, X.; Andronico, A.; Favero, I.; Ducci, S.; Leo, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate a near-infrared integrated optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a direct gap semiconductor. Based on a selectively oxidized GaAs/AlGaAs waveguide and monolithic SiO2/TiO2 dichroic Bragg mirrors, this device combines a strong non-resonant quadratic nonlinearity and form-birefringent type-I phase matching. With a TM00 pump around 1 μm and TE00 signal and idler around 2 μm in a single-pass-pump doubly resonant scheme, we observe an oscillation threshold of 210 mW at degeneracy in the continuous-wave regime. This result represents a significant milestone in the perspective of an electrically injected OPO on chip.

  20. Iii-V Compound Semiconductor Integrated Charge Storage Structures for Dynamic and Non-Volatile Memory Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Dale Laird

    This thesis presents an investigation into a novel group of GaAs charge storage devices. These devices, which are an integration of bipolar and junction field effect transistor structures were conceived, designed, fabricated, and tested within this study. The purpose was to analyse new types of charge storage devices, which are suitable for fabrication and lead to the development of dynamic and nonvolatile memories in III-V compound semiconductors. Currently, III-V semiconductor storage devices consist only of capacitors, where data is destroyed during reading and electrical erasure is difficult. In this work, four devices types were demonstrated that exhibit nondestructive reading, and three of the prototypes can be electrically erased. All types use the junction field effect transistor (JFET) for charge sensing, with each having different bipolar or epitaxial layer structure controlling the junction gate. The bottom epitaxial layer in each case served as the JFET channel. Two of the device types have three alternately doped layers, while the remaining two have four alternately doped layers. In all cases, removal of majority carriers from the middle layers constitutes stored charge. The missing carriers deplete the current carrying a region of the JFET channel. Drain current of the JFET becomes an indicator of stored charge. The basic function of each JFET memory element type is independent of interchanging n- and p- type doping within the structure type. Some performance advantage can be realized, however, by sensing with an n-type channel as compared to p- type due to increased carrier mobility. All device types exhibit storage time characteristics of order ten seconds. Devices are constructed in epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) reactors. The design of the epitaxial layers is an intrinsic part, together with the electrical design, of the storage device concept. These concepts are implemented first with photolithography masks which are used

  1. The role of the substrate on the dispersion in accumulation in III-V compound semiconductor based metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Igor; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2015-09-07

    Dispersion in accumulation is a widely observed phenomenon in metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks based on III-V compound semiconductors. The physical origin of this phenomenon is attributed to border traps located in the dielectric material adjacent to the semiconductor. Here, we study the role of the semiconductor substrate on the electrical quality of the first layers at atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics. For this purpose, either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} dielectrics with variable thicknesses were deposited simultaneously on two technology important semiconductors—InGaAs and InP. Significantly larger dispersion was observed in InP based gate stacks compared to those based on InGaAs. The observed difference is attributed to a higher border trap density in dielectrics deposited on InP compared to those deposited on InGaAs. We therefore conclude that the substrate plays an important role in the determination of the electrical quality of the first dielectric monolayers deposited by ALD. An additional observation is that larger dispersion was obtained in HfO{sub 2} based capacitors compared to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} based capacitors, deposited on the same semiconductor. This phenomenon is attributed to the lower conduction band offset rather than to a higher border trap density.

  2. Growth and Characterization of III-V Semiconductors for Device Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The research goal was to achieve a fundamental understanding of the physical processes occurring at the surfaces and interfaces of epitaxially grown InGaAs/GaAs (100) heterostructures. This will facilitate the development of quantum well devices for infrared optical applications and provide quantitative descriptions of key phenomena which impact their performance. Devices impacted include high-speed laser diodes and modulators for fiber optic communications at 1.55 micron wavelengths and intersub-band lasers for longer infrared wavelengths. The phenomenon of interest studied was the migration of indium in InGaAs structures. This work centered on the molecular beam epitaxy reactor and characterization apparatus donated to CAU by AT&T Bell Laboratories. The material characterization tool employed was secondary ion mass spectrometry. The training of graduate and undergraduate students was an integral part of this program. The graduate students received a thorough exposure to state-of-the-art techniques and equipment for semiconductor materials analysis as part of the Master''s degree requirement in physics. The undergraduates were exposed to a minority scientist who has an excellent track record in this area. They also had the opportunity to explore surface physics as a career option. The results of the scientific work was published in a refereed journal and several talks were presented professional conferences and academic seminars.

  3. Spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ping-Fan; Guo, Yong; Zhu, Rui

    2015-07-15

    We propose a spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier (DMS/NB) superlattices subjected to an external magnetic field. We find that the periodic DMS/NB superlattices can achieve 100% spin filtering over a dramatically broader range of incident energies than the diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor (DMS/S) case studied previously. And the positions and widths of spin-filtering bands can be manipulated effectively by adjusting the geometric parameters of the system or the strength of external magnetic field. Such a compelling filtering feature stems from the introduction of nonmagnetic barrier and the spin-dependent giant Zeeman effect induced by the external magnetic field. We also find that the external electric field can exert a significant influence on the spin-polarized transport through the DMS/NB superlattices.

  4. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends onmore » several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.« less

  5. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.

  6. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.

  7. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  8. Covalent Attachment to GaP(110) - Engineering the Chemical Functionalization of a III-V Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. J.; Ugeda, M. M.; Liu, Wenjun; Yu, Min; Tilley, T. Don; Pérez, Rubén; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Crommie, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    With its 2.3 eV bulk bandgap, relatively high conduction band edge, and low chemical reactivity, the (110) surface of GaP is an excellent candidate for many UV and visible light applications, such as photo-catalysis and light-induced chemical reduction. However, the reconstruction and resulting charge transfer of the surface makes it difficult to covalently attach the required molecules. Indeed, very little work has been done to understand either covalent functionalization or passivation of this surface. Here we report on a Staudinger-type, thermally-driven covalent attachment of perfluorophenyl azide (pfpa) to GaP(110). We have studied the adsorption of pfpa molecules by means of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combination with first principles calculations. We show a progression from a physisorbed state at room temperature to a covalently attached state after exposure to slightly higher temperatures (~ 50°C). The developed approach is expected to be valid for various other functional groups attached to the azide, as well as other III-V semiconductors.

  9. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    PubMed Central

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades. PMID:26670948

  10. Nonradiative lifetime extraction using power-dependent relative photoluminescence of III-V semiconductor double-heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. W.; Heckelmann, S.; Karcher, C.; Höhn, O.; Went, C.; Niemeyer, M.; Bett, A. W.; Lackner, D.

    2016-04-01

    A power-dependent relative photoluminescence measurement method is developed for double-heterostructures composed of III-V semiconductors. Analyzing the data yields insight into the radiative efficiency of the absorbing layer as a function of laser intensity. Four GaAs samples of different thicknesses are characterized, and the measured data are corrected for dependencies of carrier concentration and photon recycling. This correction procedure is described and discussed in detail in order to determine the material's Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime as a function of excitation intensity. The procedure assumes 100% internal radiative efficiency under the highest injection conditions, and we show this leads to less than 0.5% uncertainty. The resulting GaAs material demonstrates a 5.7 ± 0.5 ns nonradiative lifetime across all samples of similar doping (2-3 × 1017 cm-3) for an injected excess carrier concentration below 4 × 1012 cm-3. This increases considerably up to longer than 1 μs under high injection levels due to a trap saturation effect. The method is also shown to give insight into bulk and interface recombination.

  11. Materials and device design with III-V and II-VI compound-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2002-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carrier induced ferromagnetism in (In, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)As, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have been of much interest from the industrial viewpoint because of their potentiality as a new functional material (spintronics). In this paper, the magnetism in DMS is investigated based on the first principles calculations, and materials and device design with the DMS is proposed toward the spintronics. The electronic structure is calculated by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation based on the local spin density approximation. We calculate the electronic structure of ferromagnetic and spin-glass DMS, and total energy difference between them is calculated to estimate whether the ferromagnetic state is stable or not. It is shown that V-, Cr- and Mn-doped III-V compounds, V- and Cr-doped II-VI compounds and Fe-, Co- and Ni-doped ZnO are promising candidates for a high-Curie temperature ferromagnet. A chemical trend in the ferromagnetism is well understood based on the double exchange mechanism [1]. Based upon this material design, some prototypes of the spintronics devices, such as a spin-FET, a photo-induced-magnetic memory and a coherent-spin-infection device, are proposed. [1] K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) L555, 40 (2001) L334, L485 and L651.

  12. Surface reactions during the atomic layer deposition of high-kappa dielectrics on III-V semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liwang

    The quality of the dielectric/semiconductor interface is one of the most critical parameters for the fabrication of high-speed and low-power-consumption III-V semiconductor based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), as it determines the device performance. This dissertation contains investigations of the deposition and interface of binary oxide films on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces aiming at understanding the removal of the surface native oxides during certain atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. To accomplish that, two complementary experimental approaches have been used. Initially, films were deposited in a conventional ALD reactor and characterized ex situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The systems examined were Ta2O 5 on GaAs(100) surfaces from pentakis(dimethylamino) tantalum (Ta(N(CH 3)2)5, PDMAT) and TiO2 on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces from tetrakis(dimethylamino) titanium (Ti(N(CH 3)2)4, TDMAT). For these systems, deposition at the optimal ALD temperature resulted in practically sharp interfaces. Indium oxides were found to diffuse through ~ 6 nm of TiO2 film and accumulate on the topmost film layer. For the ALD of Ta2O5 on GaAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced at deposition temperatures above the ALD window; for ALD of TiO2 on both GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced as the deposition temperatures increased up to 250 A°C, while oxidation of the interface was observed for deposition above 300 A°C due to the formation of noncontinuous films. To elucidate the surface reactions occurring during the deposition, an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy apparatus was constructed and used to investigate the surface reactions during the ALD of TiO2 and HfO2 on GaAs(100) surfaces. The

  13. Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Reactive Ion Etching of III-V Semiconductors by Cyclic Injection of CH4/H2/Ar and O2 with Constant Ar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneji, Nobuo; Segami, Goh; Ide, Tomoyoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Arakawa, Taro; Tada, Kunio; Shimogaki, Yukihiro; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2003-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance-reactive ion etching (ECR-RIE) is very useful for fabricating semiconductor photonic devices and integrated circuits (PICs). The mixture gas of CH4/H2 is used for etching III-V semiconductors, but the carbon polymer film deposited on the surface during the etching process presents some problems. Thus, the polymer film must be ashed off using an O2 plasma. We introduced the cyclic injection of CH4/H2/Ar and O2 to ECR-RIE, and demonstrated that it was very useful for etching of InP. However, compound semiconductors containing Al (e.g., AlGaAs and InAlAs) react with oxygen and an alumina layer is formed, which cannot be etched by CH4/H2 etching. Therefore, we used a new cyclic etching process with constant Ar flow in the chamber to remove this alumina layer by Ar ion etching, and obtained good results for etching rate and surface morphology for the compound semiconductors containing Al. We also proposed a suitable combination of three cyclic etching procedures (continuous etching, cyclic etching without constant Ar flow and cyclic etching with constant Ar flow) for etching the multilayer heterostructure of III-V semiconductors including InP and/or compound semiconductors containing Al.

  14. Lattice Matched Iii-V IV Semiconductor Heterostructures: Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition and Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the growth and characterization of wide gap III-V compound semiconductors such as aluminum gallium arsenide (Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As), gallium nitride (GaN), and gallium phosphide (GaP), deposited by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). In the first part of the thesis, the optimization of GaAs and Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As hetero -epitaxial layers on Ge substrates is described in the context of the application in the construction of cascade solar cells. The emphasis on this study is on the trade-offs in the choice of the temperature related to increasing interdiffusion/autodoping and increasing perfection of the epilayer with increasing temperature. The structural, chemical, optical, and electrical properties of the heterostructures are characterized by x-ray rocking curve measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron beam induced current (EBIC), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM), Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Based on the results of this work the optimum growth temperature is 720^circC. The second part of the thesis describes the growth of GaN and GaP layers on silicon and sapphire substrates and the homoepitaxy of GaP by remote PECVD. I have designed and built an ultra high vacuum (UHV) deposition system which includes: the gas supply system, the pumping system, the deposition chamber, the load-lock chamber, and the waste disposal system. The work on the deposition of GaN on Si and sapphire focuses onto the understanding of the growth kinetics. In addition, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for surface analysis, x-ray diffraction methods and microscopic analyses using SEM and TEM for structural characterization, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption measurements for optical characterization, and electrical characterization results

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy engineered III-V semiconductor structures for low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Device approaches are investigated for optically addressed SLMs based on molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photooptic effects can be achieved in periodically delta-doped multiple-quantum-well structures, but are still insufficient for high-contrast modulation with only single- or double-pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. The asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach is employed to permit extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. This approach is realized with an all-MBE-grown structure consisting of GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror. High-contrast modulation is achieved using a low-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser for the control signal.

  16. Generation of new spatial and temporal coherent light states using III-V semiconductor laser technology: VORTEX, continuum, dual frequency for THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnache, Arnaud; Seghilani, Mohamed; Paquet, Romain; Sellhai, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Myara, Mikhal; Blin, Stephane; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Gregoire; Legratiet, Luc; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    We take advantage of III-V VeCSEL technology integrating at-photonics for the generation of new coherent states, thanks to insertion of intracavity functions based on at photonics. These new kinds of coherent light states target many applications including optical tweezers, telecommunications, fundamental physics, sensors For this purpose, we extended the VeCSEL semiconductor technology, designing active sections, sub-wavelength metallic masks and photonic crystal, enabling to control the electrical field inside the cavity. This leads to the generation and control of highly coherent single high-order Laguerre- or Hermite-Gauss mode, VORTEX beam carrying controlled orbital-angular-momentum, as well as of coherent dual-frequency wave for THz, and of coherent continuum modeless source.

  17. Calculating Effect of Point Defects on Optical Absorption Spectra of III-V Semiconductor Superlattices Based on (8x8) k-dot-p Band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, David; Krishna, Sanjay

    For a superlattice which is composed of layered zinc-blende structure III-V semiconductor materials, its realistic anisotropic band structures around the Gamma-point are calculated by using the (8x8)k-dot-p method with the inclusion of the self-consistent Hartree potential and the spin-orbit coupling. By including the many-body screening effect, the obtained band structures are further employed to calculate the optical absorption coefficient which is associated with the interband electron transitions. As a result of a reduced quasiparticle lifetime due to scattering with point defects in the system, the self-consistent vertex correction to the optical response function is also calculated with the help of the second-order Born approximation.

  18. III-V semiconductor nanoresonators-a new strategy for passive, active, and nonlinear all-dielectric metamaterials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Sheng; Keeler, Gordon A.; Reno, John L.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate 2D and multilayer dielectric metamaterials made from III–V semiconductors using a monolithic fabrication process. The resulting structures could be used to recompress chirped femtosecond optical pulses and in a variety of other optical applications requiring low loss. Moreover, these III–V all-dielectric metamaterials could enable novel active applications such as efficient nonlinear frequency converters, light emitters, detectors, and modulators.

  19. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  20. A thermodynamic analysis of native point defect and dopant solubilities in zinc-blende III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hurle, D. T. J.

    2010-06-15

    A thermodynamic model is used to analyze available experimental data relevant to point defects in the binary zinc-blende III-V compounds (Ga,In)-(P,As,Sb). The important point defects and their complexes in each of the materials are identified and included in the model. Essentially all of the available experimental data on dopant solubility, crystal density, and lattice parameter of melt and solution grown crystals and epilayers are reproduced by the model. It extends an earlier study [Hurle, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 6957 (1999)] devoted solely to GaAs. Values for the enthalpy and entropy of formation of both native and dopant related point defects are obtained by fitting to experimental data. In undoped material, vacancies, and interstitials on the Group V sublattice dominate in the vicinity of the melting point (MP) in both the phosphides and arsenides, whereas, in the antimonides, vacancies on both sublattices dominate. The calculated concentrations of the native point defects are used to construct the solidus curves of all the compounds. The charged native point defect concentrations at the MP in four of the six materials are significantly higher than their intrinsic carrier concentrations. Thus the usually assumed high temperature 'intrinsic' electroneutrality condition for undoped material (n=p) is not valid for these materials. In GaSb, the Ga{sub Sb} antisite defect appears to be grown-in from the melt. This contrasts with the As{sub Ga} defect in GaAs for which the concentration grown-in at the MP is negligibly small. Compensation of donor-doped material by donor-Group III vacancy complexes is shown to exist in all the compounds except InP where Group VI doped crystals are uncompensated and in InSb where there is a lack of experimental data. The annealing effects in n{sup +} GaAs, including lattice superdilation, which were shown in the earlier paper to be due to Group III vacancy undersaturation during cooling, are found to be present also in GaSb and In

  1. Self-Interaction Corrections to the Electronic Structure of II-VI and III-V Nitride Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, J.

    1998-03-01

    II-VI and group-III nitride semiconductors have paramount technological potential for applications in micro- and optoelectronics. A most accurate description of their bulk electronic structure as a basis for studying defect properties, band-edge properties in respective ternary or quaternary alloys and electronic properties of their surfaces and interfaces is of major importance, therefore. Standard LDA band-structure calculations for these wide-band-gap compounds using nonlocal normconserving pseudopotentials yield gap energies and semicore d-band positions that are largely at variance with experimental data. Actually, InN even turns out to be a semimetal with a negative gap of about --0.4 eV in standard LDA, in contrast to the experimental gap of 1.9 eV. To improve the theoretical basis for the above mentioned studies, we have developed self-interaction- and relaxation-corrected pseudopotentials (SIRC-PPs) which are very efficient and physically well-founded. The properties of the constituent atoms are incorporated in these SIRC-PPs as accurately as possible from the start by taking atomic SIC contributions and electronic relaxation in the atoms fully into account. By this construction, we arrive at very useful pseudopotentials and effective one-particle Hamiltonians for the solids that can readily be employed in ab-initio LDA codes. This approach is computationally not more involved than any LDA calculation and, nevertheless, overcomes to a large extent the above mentioned shortcomings of standard LDA calculations employing 'state-of-the-art' pseudopotentials. Applications of our approach to II-VI and group-III nitride semiconductors have shown very gratifying results. The approach has also proven very useful for Hg-chalcogenides, as well as, for Ag- and Cu-halides. The calculations yield band structures, d-band positions, gap energies, densities of states, lattice constants, bulk moduli and effective masses in very good agreement with experiment. Due to the

  2. Spin-polarized transport in inhomogeneous magnetic semiconductors: theory of magnetic/nonmagnetic p-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Zutić, Igor; Fabian, Jaroslav; Das Sarma, S

    2002-02-11

    A theory of spin-polarized transport in inhomogeneous magnetic semiconductors is developed and applied to magnetic/nonmagnetic p-n junctions. Several phenomena with possible spintronic applications are predicted, including spin-voltaic effect, spin valve effect, exponential and giant magnetoresistance. It is demonstrated that only nonequilibrium spin can be injected across the space-charge region of a p-n junction, so that there is no spin injection (or extraction) at low bias. PMID:11863835

  3. Strain engineering of magnetic anisotropy: The epitaxial growth of cobalt-manganese-gallium Heusler alloy films on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, David Michael

    This research is the first step towards manipulating thin film magnetic anisotropy through control of uniform epitaxial strain. Pseudomorphic Co 2MnGa films with thicknesses of 300 A have been grown on several III-V semiconductors to generate coherently-strained epitaxial films. Growth of Co2MnGa films at 200°C both directly on GaAs substrates and on thermodynamically stable Sc0.3Er0.7As interlayers resulted in similar physical and magnetic properties. The epitaxial strain generated an induced perpendicular anisotropy and magnetic stripe domains. This resulted in a reduced in-plane remnant magnetization, high coercivity, and a relatively low saturation field for the out-of-plane magnetization. For higher temperature growths, the interlayer was required to minimize interfacial reactions and maintain the magnetic properties of the films. When the growth temperature on the Sc0.3Er0.7As interlayers was increased from 0 to 400°C, the subsequent films had improved L21 atomic ordering, decreased out-of-plane lattice parameters, and enhanced strain-induced perpendicular anisotropy. Dramatic variations in the magnetic anisotropy were observed for films grown on different III-V semiconductors due to controlled strain-induced perpendicular anisotropy. For Co2MnGa films grown under tension on InP, the magnetization barely saturated out-of-plane with a field of 1.75 Tesla. These films displayed clear in-plane anisotropy and low coercivity switching. For films grown under compression on GaAs, the magnetization easily saturated out-of-plane with a field of a few thousand Oe. These films displayed no in-plane anisotropy in the hysteresis loops and had large coercivities. For comparison, bulk-like unstrained Co2MnGa films were grown on relaxed ErAs interlayers on InAs. These films displayed properties intermediate between films grown on GaAs and InP. Finally, growth of films on GaP resulted in partial relaxation, thereby reducing the induced perpendicular anisotropy and verifying

  4. Scattering amplitudes and static atomic correction factors for the composition-sensitive 002 reflection in sphalerite ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schowalter, M; Müller, K; Rosenauer, A

    2012-01-01

    Modified atomic scattering amplitudes (MASAs), taking into account the redistribution of charge due to bonds, and the respective correction factors considering the effect of static atomic displacements were computed for the chemically sensitive 002 reflection for ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. MASAs were derived from computations within the density functional theory formalism. Binary eight-atom unit cells were strained according to each strain state s (thin, intermediate, thick and fully relaxed electron microscopic specimen) and each concentration (x = 0, …, 1 in 0.01 steps), where the lattice parameters for composition x in strain state s were calculated using continuum elasticity theory. The concentration dependence was derived by computing MASAs for each of these binary cells. Correction factors for static atomic displacements were computed from relaxed atom positions by generating 50 × 50 × 50 supercells using the lattice parameter of the eight-atom unit cells. Atoms were randomly distributed according to the required composition. Polynomials were fitted to the composition dependence of the MASAs and the correction factors for the different strain states. Fit parameters are given in the paper.

  5. Investigating the growth, structural and electrical properties of III-V semiconductor nanopillars for the next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Andrew

    Extensive research efforts have been devoted to the study and development of III-V compound semiconductor nanowires (NWs) and nanopillars (NPs) because of their unique physical properties and ability to form high quality, highly lattice-mismatched axial and radial heterostructures. These advantages lead to precise nano-bandgap engineering to achieve new device functionalities. One unique and powerful approach to realize these NPs is by catalyst-free, selective-area epitaxy (SAE) via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, in which the NP location and diameter can be precisely controlled lithographically. Early demonstrations of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on these NPs, however, are often inferior compared to their planar counterparts due to a few factors: (1) interface/surface states, (2) inaccurate doping calibration, and (3) increased carrier scattering and trapping from stacking fault formation in the NPs. In this study, the detailed growth mechanisms of different III-As, III-Sb and III-P NPs and their heterostructures are investigated. These NPs are then fabricated into single-NP field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe their electrical properties. It is shown that these devices are highly diameter-dependent, mainly because of the effects of surface states. By growing a high band-gap shell around the NP cores to passivate the surface, the device performance can be significantly improved. Further fabrication and characterization of vertical surround-gate FETs using a high-mobility InAs/InP NP channel is also discussed. Aside from the radial NP heterostructures, different approaches to achieve purely axial heterostructures in InAs/In(As)P materials are also presented with excellent interface quality. Both single barrier and double barrier structures are realized and fabricated into devices that show carrier transport characteristics over a barrier and even resonant tunneling behavior. Antimonide-based NPs are also studied for their immense

  6. III-V semiconductor Quantum Well systems: Physics of Gallium Arsenide two-dimensional hole systems and engineering of mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, YenTing

    This dissertation examines two types of III-V semiconductor quantum well systems: two-dimensional holes in GaAs, and mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers. GaAs holes have a much reduced hyperfine interaction with the nuclei due to the p-like orbital, resulting in a longer hole spin coherence time comparing to the electron spin coherence time. Therefore, holes' spins are promising candidates for quantum computing qubits, but the effective mass and the Lande g-factor, whose product determines the spin-susceptibility of holes, are not well known. In this thesis, we measure the effective hole mass through analyzing the temperature dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in a relatively strong interacting two-dimensional hole systems confined to a 20 nm-wide, (311)A GaAs quantum well. The holes in this system occupy two nearly-degenerate spin subbands whose effective mass we measure to be ˜ 0.2 me. We then apply a sufficiently strong parallel magnetic field to fully depopulate one of the spin subbands, and the spin susceptibility of the two-dimensional hole system is deduced from the depopulation field. We also confine holes in closely spaced bilayer GaAs quantum wells to study the interlayer tunneling spectrum as a function of interlayer bias and in-plane magnetic field, in hope of probing the hole's Fermi contour. Quantum Cascade lasers are one of the major mid-infrared light sources well suited for applications in health and environmental sensing. One of the important factors that affect Quantum Cascade laser performance is the quality of the interfaces between the epitaxial layers. What has long been neglected is that interface roughness causes intersubband scattering, and thus affecting the relation between the lifetimes of the upper and lower laser states, which determines if population inversion is possible. We first utilize strategically added interface roughness in the laser design to engineer the intersubband scattering lifetimes. We further

  7. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  8. Magneto-optical studies of magnetic and non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Giti

    2005-03-01

    In light of the growing interest in spin-related phenomena and devices, there is now renewed interest in the science and engineering of narrow gap semiconductors. Narrow gap semiconductors (NGS) offer many unique features such as small effective masses, high intrinsic mobilities, large effective g- factors, and large spin-orbit coupling effects. This talk will discuss our recent magneto-optical studies on InSb quantum wells (QWs) and InMnAs ferromagnetic heterostructures. In InSb QWs, we observe spin-resolved cyclotron resonance (CR) caused by the non- parabolicity in conduction band and electron spin resonance in symmetric and asymmetric confinement potentials. The asymmetric wells exhibit a strong deviation in behavior from the symmetric wells at low magnetic fields with far more spin splitting than expected from the bulk g-factor of InSb. In InMnAs/GaSb we observe light and heavy hole CR peaks which demonstrate the existence of delocalized p-like carriers. In addition, In order to increase our understanding of the dynamics of carriers and spins, we performed time resolved measurements such as time- resolved CR spectroscopy on undoped InSb QWs and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect on InMnAs/GaSb. Our results are important for understanding the electronic and magnetic states in NGS. This work was performed in collaboration with M. B. Santos and R. E. Doezema at the Univ. of Oklahoma, J. Wang and J. Kono at Rice Univ., H. Munekata at Tokyo Institute of Technology, C. J. Stanton at the Univ. of Florida, and Y. H. Matsuda and N. Miura at the Univ. of Tokyo.

  9. A comprehensive study of the magnetic, structural, and transport properties of the III-V ferromagnetic semiconductor InMnP

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, M.; Hübner, R.; Baehtz, C.; Skorupa, W.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Gao, Kun; Helm, M.; Weschke, E.; Gordan, O.; Salvan, G.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2015-01-28

    The manganese induced magnetic, electrical, and structural modification in InMnP epilayers, prepared by Mn ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing, are investigated in the following work. All samples exhibit clear hysteresis loops and strong spin polarization at the Fermi level. The degree of magnetization, the Curie temperature, and the spin polarization depend on the Mn concentration. The bright-field transmission electron micrographs show that InP samples become almost amorphous after Mn implantation but recrystallize after pulsed laser annealing. We did not observe an insulator-metal transition in InMnP up to a Mn concentration of 5 at. %. Instead all InMnP samples show insulating characteristics up to the lowest measured temperature. Magnetoresistance results obtained at low temperatures support the hopping conduction mechanism in InMnP. We find that the Mn impurity band remains detached from the valence band in InMnP up to 5 at. % Mn doping. Our findings indicate that the local environment of Mn ions in InP is similar to GaMnAs, GaMnP, and InMnAs; however, the electrical properties of these Mn implanted III-V compounds are different. This is one of the consequences of the different Mn binding energy in these compounds.

  10. Optical properties of InAsBi and optimal designs of lattice-matched and strain-balanced III-V semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Shalindar, A. J.; Riordan, N. A.; Gogineni, C.; Liang, H.; Sharma, A. R.; Johnson, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    The optical properties of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (100)-oriented GaSb substrate are measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The index of refraction and absorption coefficient are measured over photon energies ranging from 44 meV to 4.4 eV and are used to identify the room temperature bandgap energy of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 as 60.6 meV. The bandgap of InAsBi is expressed as a function of Bi mole fraction using the band anticrossing model and a characteristic coupling strength of 1.529 eV between the Bi impurity state and the InAs valence band. These results are programmed into a software tool that calculates the miniband structure of semiconductor superlattices and identifies optimal designs in terms of maximizing the electron-hole wavefunction overlap as a function of transition energy. These functionalities are demonstrated by mapping the design spaces of lattice-matched GaSb/InAs0.911Sb0.089 and GaSb/InAs0.932Bi0.068 and strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb, InAs/GaInSb, and InAs/InAsBi superlattices on GaSb. The absorption properties of each of these material systems are directly compared by relating the wavefunction overlap square to the absorption coefficient of each optimized design. Optimal design criteria are provided for key detector wavelengths for each superlattice system. The optimal design mid-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattice is grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and its optical properties are evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  11. The Influence of Interstitial Ga and Interfacial Au (sub 2)P (sub 3) on the Electrical and Metallurgical Behavior of Au-Contacted III-V Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction of a very small amount of Ga into Au contact metallization on InP is shown to have a significant effect on both the metallurgical and electrical behavior of that contact system. Ga atoms in the interstices of the Au lattice are shown to be effective in preventing the solid state reactions that normally take place between Au and InP during contact sintering. In addition to suppressing the metallurgical interaction, the presence of small amounts of Ga is shown to cause an order of magnitude reduction in the specific contact resistivity. Evidence is presented that the reactions of GaP and GaAs with Au contacts are also drastically affected by the presence of Ga. The sintering behavior of the Au-GaP and the Au-GaAs systems (as contrasted with that of the Au-InP system) is explained as due to the presence of interstitial Ga in the contact metallization. Finally the large, two-to-three order of magnitude drop in the contact resistance that occurs in the Au-InP system upon sintering at 400 degrees Centigrade is shown to be a result of the formation of an Au (sub 2) P (sub 3) layer at the metal-semiconductor interface. Contact resistivities in the 10 (sup -6) ohm square centimeter range are obtained for as-deposited Au on InP when a thin (20 Angstrom) layer of Au (sub 2) P (sub 3) is introduced between the InP and the Au contacts.

  12. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching.

  13. Demonstration of heterogeneous III-V/Si integration with a compact optical vertical interconnect access.

    PubMed

    Ng, Doris Keh Ting; Wang, Qian; Pu, Jing; Lim, Kim Peng; Wei, Yongqiang; Wang, Yadong; Lai, Yicheng; Ho, Seng Tiong

    2013-12-15

    Heterogeneous III-V/Si integration with a compact optical vertical interconnect access is fabricated and the light coupling efficiency between the III-V/Si waveguide and the silicon nanophotonic waveguide is characterized. The III-V semiconductor material is directly bonded to the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate and etched to form the III-V/Si waveguide for a higher light confinement in the active region. The compact optical vertical interconnect access is formed through tapering a III-V and an SOI layer in the same direction. The measured III-V/Si waveguide has a light coupling efficiency above ~90% to the silicon photonic layer with the tapering structure. This heterogeneous and light coupling structure can provide an efficient platform for photonic systems on chip, including passive and active devices.

  14. Investigation of new semiinsulating behavior of III-V compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, Jacek

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of defect interactions and properties related to semiinsulating behavior of III-V semiconductors resulted in about twenty original publications, six doctoral thesis, one masters thesis and numerous conference presentations. The studies of new compensation mechanisms involving transition metal impurities have defined direct effects associated with deep donor/acceptor levels acting as compensating centers. Electrical and optical properties of vanadium and titanium levels were determined in GaAs, InP and also in ternary compounds InGaAs. The experimental data provided basis for the verification of chemical trends and the VRBE method. They also defined compositional range for III-V mixed crystals whereby semiinsulating behavior can be achieved using transition elements deep levels and a suitable codoping with shallow donor/acceptor impurities.

  15. Novel integration technique for silicon/III-V hybrid laser.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Hu, Ting-Chen; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Chen, Young-Kai; Xie, Chongjin; Luo, Xianshu; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kopf, Rose; Tate, Alaric

    2014-11-01

    Integrated semiconductor lasers on silicon are one of the most crucial devices to enable low-cost silicon photonic integrated circuits for high-bandwidth optic communications and interconnects. While optical amplifiers and lasers are typically realized in III-V waveguide structures, it is beneficial to have an integration approach which allows flexible and efficient coupling of light between III-V gain media and silicon waveguides. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a novel fabrication technique and associated transition structure to realize integrated lasers without the constraints of other critical processing parameters such as the starting silicon layer thicknesses. This technique employs epitaxial growth of silicon in a pre-defined trench with taper structures. We fabricate and demonstrate a long-cavity hybrid laser with a narrow linewidth of 130 kHz and an output power of 1.5 mW using the proposed technique. PMID:25401832

  16. III-V/Si on silicon-on-insulator platform for hybrid nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prucnal, Slawomir Zhou, Shengqiang; Ou, Xin; Facsko, Stefan; Oskar Liedke, Maciej; Bregolin, Felipe; Liedke, Bartosz; Grebing, Jochen; Fritzsche, Monika; Hübner, Rene; Mücklich, Arndt; Rebohle, Lars; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Helm, Manfred; Turek, Marcin; Drozdziel, Andrzej

    2014-02-21

    The unique properties of SOI wafers enable the integration of heterogeneous materials with distinct functionalities in different layers. In particular, III-V compound semiconductors are very attractive for low-noise and high-speed electronic and photonic components integrated on a single chip. We have developed a CMOS compatible and fully integrated solution for the integration of III-V compound semiconductors with silicon technology for optoelectronic applications. InAs compound semiconductor nanostructures are synthesized in SOI wafers using the combined ion beam implantation and millisecond liquid-phase epitaxial growth. Optoelectronic and microstructural investigations carried out on implanted, annealed, and selectively etched samples confirm the formation of high-quality III-V compound semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  18. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  19. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, Sanghyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-02-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates.

  20. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates. PMID:26864968

  1. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-02-11

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called "Si photonics"). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates.

  2. Precise measurement of charged defects in III-V compounds (supplement 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soest, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental methods and related theory which will permit the measurement of low concentrations of vacancies and other defects in III-V compound semiconductors are discussed. Once the nature of these defects has been determined, this information can be incorporated into a transport theory for devices constructed from these materials, and experiments conducted to test the theory. The vacancies and other defects in the III-V compounds are detected by measurement of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) line width. Most of the III-V compounds have at least one isotope with a nuclear quadrupole moment. In a crystal with a cubic crystal field (characteristic of most III-V compounds) there is no quadrupole splitting of the Zeeman resonance line. However, a defect removes the cubic symmetry locally and causes splitting which result in a change of the NMR width. This change can be used to detect the presence of vacancies.

  3. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  4. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  5. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-V Semiconductors in BCl(3)-Based Chemistries: Part II: InP, InGaAs, InGaAsP, InAs and AllnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Han, J.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Lee, J.W.; Maeda, T.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J

    1998-12-02

    A parametric study of etch rates and surface morphologies of In-containing compound semiconductors (InP, InGaAs, InGaAsP, InAs and AlInAs) obtained by BClj-based Inductively Coupled Plasmas is reported. Etch rates in the range 1,500-3,000 &min. are obtained for all the materials at moderate source powers (500 W), with the rates being a strong function of discharge composition, rf chuck power and pressure. Typical root-mean-square surface roughness of-5 nm were obtained for InP, which is worse than the values obtained for Ga-based materials under the same conditions (-1 run). The near surface of etched samples is typically slightly deficient in the group V element, but the depth of this deficiency is small (a few tens of angstroms).

  7. Combinatorial approaches to understanding polytypism in III-V nanowires.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonas; Bolinsson, Jessica; Ek, Martin; Caroff, Philippe; Dick, Kimberly A

    2012-07-24

    Polytypism in III-V semiconductor nanowires is a topic that has received considerable attention in recent years. Achieving a pure nanowire crystal phase requires well-controlled and advanced parameter tuning for most III-V materials. Additionally, the new and unusual phases sometimes observed may present unique material properties if they can be controllably fabricated. With the prospect of using nanowires in applications within several different fields (including electronics, photonics, and life science), theoretical models are necessary to explain experimental trends and to attain a high level of crystal phase control. At present, there is no theoretical model (or combination of models) that fully explains how and why nanowire crystal structures commonly include several different polytypes. Here we use combinatorics and interlayer interactions to include higher order polytypes (4H and 6H) with the aim to explain nanowire crystal structure beyond the well-investigated zinc blende-wurtzite polytypism. Predictions from our theoretical models compare well with experimental results. PMID:22681568

  8. Monolithic III-V on Silicon Plasmonic Nanolaser Structure for Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Liu, Ke; Sorger, Volker J.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V semiconductor lasers with Si circuits can reduce cost and enhance performance for optical interconnects dramatically. We propose and investigate plasmonic III-V nanolasers as monolithically integrated light source on Si chips due to many advantages. First, these III-V plasmonic light sources can be directly grown on Si substrates free of crystallographic defects due to the submicron cavity footprint (250 nm × 250 nm) being smaller than the average defect free region size of the heteroepitaxial III-V material on Si. Secondly, the small lateral and vertical dimensions facilitate process co-integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) in the front end of the line. Thirdly, combining with monolithically integrated CMOS circuits with low device capacitance and parasitic capacitance, the nano-cavity optoelectronic devices consume orders of magnitude less power than the conventional lasers and reduce the energy consumption. Fourthly, the modulation bandwidth of the plasmonic light-sources is enhanced to significantly higher than conventional lasers due to enhanced photon state density and transition rate. In addition, we show that these device performance are very robust after taking into account the surface recombination and variations in device fabrication processes.

  9. FOREWORD: The physics of III-V nitrides The physics of III-V nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    The evolution of semiconductor physics is driven by the increasing sophistication of the art of crystal growing and fabrication techniques. From Ge at the birth of the transistor, possibly the purest material ever grown, through Si, the work-horse of the crystal revolution, to the III-Vs, whose optical properties opened up a second front, namely, optoelectronics. Crystal growth with monolayer control gave us quantum wells, superlattices, quantum wires and quantum dots, along with the quantum Hall effect and quantized resistance. The potential for high-power devices triggered interest in the III-V nitrides with their large bandgaps. The nitrides mostly crystallize in the hexagonal form, and this has introduced the phenomenon of spontaneous polarization into mainstream semiconductor physics. Its effect manifests itself in huge electric fields in heterostructures like AlGaN/GaN which, in turn, causes the induction of substantial electron populations in the channel of a HFET without the need for doping. High-power microwave transistors have been successfully fabricated, even though there are features associated with spontaneous polarization that still needs clarifying. Another strange effect is the large electron population on the surface of InN. The lack of a suitable substrate for growing GaN has meant that the dislocation density is higher than we would wish, but that situation is expected to steadily improve. Given the current interest in the physics of nitrides, it is natural to come across a special issue devoted to this topic. The difficulty presented by the surface layer in InN in the attempt to measure transport properties is discussed in the paper by King et al. A property that can affect transport is the lifetime of optical phonons and its dependence on electron density. Measurements of phonon lifetime in InN are reported by Tsen and Ferry, and in GaN channels, via the measure of hot-electron fluctuations, by Matulionis. The dependence on electron density is

  10. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohummed Noori, Farah T.

    2013-12-01

    Indium- Arsenide (InAs) nanowires were grown in a high vacuum chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) unit on InAs(111) wafers substrates at 425-454°C. Two types of nanogold were used as orientation catalyst, 40nm and 80nm. The measurements were performed using scanning electron microscopy showed that uniform nanowires. The nanowires orient vertically in the InAs nanowire scanning electron microscopy of an array 80nm diameter InAs nanowire with length is in the range 0.5-1 μm and of an array 40nm diameter with length is in the range 0.3-0.7μm. The nanowire length with growth time shows that the linear increase of nanowires start to grow as soon as TMIn is available. The growth rate with temperature was studied.

  11. Novel compound semiconductor devices based on III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Ren, F.

    1995-10-01

    New developments in dry and wet etching, ohmic contacts and epitaxial growth of Ill-V nitrides are reported. These make possible devices such as microdisk laser structures and GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors with improved InN ohmic contacts.

  12. Surface Localization of Buried III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; González, L; Fuster, D; Martín-Sánchez, J; González, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the top surface localization of InAs quantum dots once capped by a GaAs layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At the used growth conditions, the underneath nanostructures are revealed at the top surface as mounding features that match their density with independence of the cap layer thickness explored (from 25 to 100 nm). The correspondence between these mounds and the buried nanostructures is confirmed by posterior selective strain-driven formation of new nanostructures on top of them, when the distance between the buried and the superficial nanostructures is short enough (d = 25 nm).

  13. III-V semiconductor quantum well and superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Fuchs, Frank; Schneider, Harald; Fleissner, Joachim; Schmitz, J.; Pletschen, Wilfried; Braunstein, Juergen; Ziegler, Johann; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Koidl, Peter; Weimann, Guenter

    1998-10-01

    The paper reviews the development of IR detectors for the 8 - 12 micrometer wavelength range based on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well structures and InAs/(GaIn)Sb short-period superlattices (SPSLs) at the Fraunhofer-Institute IAF. Photoconductive GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) are used for the fabrication of starring IR cameras for thermal imaging in the third atmospheric window. The long wavelength infrared (LWIR) camera, devleoped in cooperation with AEG Infrarot-Module (AIM), consists of a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) with 256 X 256 detector elements, flip- chip bonded to a read-out integrated circuit (ROIC). The technology for the fabrication of FPAs, electrical and optical properties of single detector elements in the two-dimensional arrangement and the properties of the LWIR camera system are reported. A noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) below 10 mK has been measured at an operation temperature of T equals 65 K with an integration time of 20 ms. More than 99.8% of all pixels are working and no cluster defects are observed. InAs/(GaIn)Sb SPSLs with a broken gap type-II band alignment are well suited for the fabrication of IR detectors covering the 3 - 12 micrometer spectral range. Due to the lattice mismatch of the InAs/(GaIn)Sb SPSL with respect to GaSb, tight control of thickness and composition of the layers and a controlled formation of the chemical bonds across the interface in the SPSLs are used for strain compensation. Photodiodes with a cut-off wavelength (lambda) c equals 8 micrometer and a current responsivity R(lambda ) equals 2 A/W exhibit a dynamic impedance of R0A equals 1k(Omega) cm2 at T equals 77 K. This leads to a Johnson- noise limited detectivity in excess of D* equals 1 X 1012 cm(Hz)1/2/W for these type of detectors.

  14. Power-efficient III-V/silicon external cavity DBR lasers.

    PubMed

    Zilkie, A J; Seddighian, P; Bijlani, B J; Qian, W; Lee, D C; Fathololoumi, S; Fong, J; Shafiiha, R; Feng, D; Luff, B J; Zheng, X; Cunningham, J E; Krishnamoorthy, A V; Asghari, M

    2012-10-01

    We report the design and characterization of external-cavity DBR lasers built with a III-V-semiconductor reflective-SOA with spot-size converter edge-coupled to SOI waveguides containing Bragg grating mirrors. The un-cooled lasers have wall-plug-efficiencies of up to 9.5% at powers of 6 mW. The lasers are suitable for making power efficient, hybrid WDM transmitters in a CMOS-compatible SOI optical platform.

  15. Dopant Profiling of III-V Nanostructures for Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alexandra Caroline

    2011-12-01

    High electron mobility III-V compound semiconductors such as indium arsenide (InAs) are promising candidates for future active channel materials of electron devices to further enhance device performance. In particular, compound semiconductors heterogeneously integrated on Si substrates have been studied, combining the high mobility of III-V semiconductors and the well-established, low cost processing of Si technology. However, one of the primary challenges of III-V device fabrication is controllable, post-growth dopant profiling. Here InAs nanowires and ultrathin layers (nanoribbons) on SiO2/Si are investigated as the channel material for high performance field-effect transistors (FETs) and post-growth, patterned doping techniques are demonstrated. First, the synthesis of crystalline InAs nanowires with high yield and tunable diameters by using Ni nanoparticles as the catalyst material on SiO 2/Si substrates is demonstrated. The back-gated InAs nanowire FETs have electron field-effect mobilities of ˜4,000 cm2/Vs and ION/IOFF ˜104. The uniformity of the InAs nanowires is demonstrated by large-scale assembly of parallel arrays of nanowires (˜400 nanowires) on SiO2/Si substrates by a contact printing process. This enables high performance, "printable" transistors with 5--10 mA ON currents. Second, an epitaxial transfer method for the integration of ultrathin layers of single-crystalline InAs on SiO2/Si substrates is demonstrated. As a parallel to silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology, the abbreviation "XOI" is used to represent this compound semiconductor-on-insulator platform. A high quality InAs/dielectric interface is obtained by the use of a thermally grown interfacial InAsOx layer (˜1 nm thick). Top-gated FETs exhibit a peak transconductance of ˜1.6 mS/microm at V DS=0.5V with ION/I OFF >104 and subthreshold swings of 107--150 mV/decade for a channel length of ˜0.5 microm. Next, temperature-dependent I-V and C-V studies of single InAs nanowire FETs are

  16. Heterogeneous integration of SiGe/Ge and III-V for Si photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Mitsuru; Kim, Younghyun; Han, Jaehoon; Kang, Jian; Ikku, Yuki; Cheng, Yongpeng; Park, Jinkwon; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    The heterogeneous integration of SiGe/Ge and III-V semiconductors gives us an opportunity to enhance functionalities of Si photonics platform through their superior material properties which lack in Si. In this paper we discuss what SiGe/Ge and III-V can bring to Si photonics. We have predicted that the light effective hole mass in strained SiGe results in the enhanced the free-carrier effects such as the plasma dispersion effect and free-carrier absorption. We observed significantly larger free-carrier absorption in the SiGe optical modulator than in the control Si device. By fabricating asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) SiGe optical modulators, the enhancement of the plasma dispersion effect in strained SiGe has been successfully demonstrated. Mid-infrared integrated photonics based on Ge waveguides on Si have also been investigated. Since Ge is transparent to the entire mid-infrared range, Ge photonic integrated circuits on the Ge-on-Insulator (GeOI) wafer are quite attractive. We have successfully fabricated the GeOI wafer with 2-μm-thick buried oxide (BOX) layer by wafer bonding. The passive waveguide components based on Ge strip waveguides have been demonstrated on the GeOI. We have also demonstrated carrier-injection Ge variable optical attenuators. We have proposed and investigate the III-V CMOS photonics platform by using the III-V on Insulator (IIIV- OI) on a Si wafer. The strong optical confinement in the III-V-OI enables us to achieve high-performance photonic devices. We have successfully demonstrated InGaAsP MZI optical switch with the low on-state crosstalk on the III-V-OI. Ultra-low dark current waveguide InGaAs PDs integrated with an InP grating coupler are also achieved.

  17. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  18. Surface Leakage Mechanisms in III-V Infrared Barrier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidor, D. E.; Savich, G. R.; Wicks, G. W.

    2016-09-01

    Infrared detector epitaxial structures employing unipolar barriers exhibit greatly reduced dark currents compared to simple pn-based structures. When correctly positioned within the structure, unipolar barriers are highly effective at blocking bulk dark current mechanisms. Unipolar barriers are also effective at suppressing surface leakage current in infrared detector structures employing absorbing layers that possess the same conductivity type in their bulk and at their surface. When an absorbing layer possesses opposite conductivity types in its bulk and at its surface, unipolar barriers are not solutions to surface leakage. This work reviews empirically determined surface band alignments of III-V semiconductor compounds and modeled surface band alignments of both gallium-free and gallium-containing type-II strained layer superlattice material systems. Surface band alignments are used to predict surface conductivity types in several detector structures, and the relationship between surface and bulk conductivity types in the absorbing layers of these structures is used as the basis for explaining observed surface leakage characteristics.

  19. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  20. Structural and thermochemical Aspects of (III-V)IV3 Material Assembly from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmeshya, Andrew; Kouvetakis, John

    2014-03-01

    Alloys with (III-V)-(IV) compositions, including Si3(AlP), Si5-2y(AlP)y, Si3Al(As1-xNx), Si5-2yAl(P1-xNx)y and Ge5-2y(InP)y and have recently been synthesized as mono-crystalline films on Si substrates, using a synthesis route specifically designed to avoid phase separation between the III-V and IV constituents. Molecular ``building blocks'' containing group-V-centered III-V-IV3 cores, formed via interactions of group-III atoms and reactive silyly/germyl hydride precursors of desired composition (e.g, P(SiH3)3 , P(GeH3)3 , etc), assemble to form stable, covalent, diamond-like materials with the inherent tetrahedral symmetry and composition of the III-V-IV3 units. The resulting systems may provide access to a broad range of new semiconductor systems with extended optoelectronic properties, provided that the required molecular sources are available, the thermodynamic processes are viable, and the resulting alloy composition can be tuned to lattice-match the growth substrate. Molecular/solid-state simulations are used to identify promising synthetic pathways and guide the epitaxial creation of new (III-V)-(IV) materials. The thermodynamics of gas phase synthesis reactions, energetic stability of the alloys, and their epitaxial/chemical compatibility with the substrate are combined to form a global figure of merit. The latter corroborates the synthesis of known systems and predicts that formation of GaPSi3/Si(100), GaAsSi3/SiGe(100), AlPGe3/Ge(100) and InAsSi3/Ge(100) may also be favorable. Supported by NSF-DMR under SusChEM award #1309090.

  1. Novel adiabatic tapered couplers for active III-V/SOI devices fabricated through transfer printing.

    PubMed

    Dhoore, Sören; Uvin, Sarah; Van Thourhout, Dries; Morthier, Geert; Roelkens, Gunther

    2016-06-13

    We present the design of two novel adiabatic tapered coupling structures that allow efficient and alignment tolerant mode conversion between a III-V membrane waveguide and a single-mode SOI waveguide in active heterogeneously integrated devices. Both proposed couplers employ a broad intermediate waveguide to facilitate highly alignment tolerant coupling. This robustness is needed to comply with the current misalignment tolerance requirements for high-throughput transfer printing. The proposed coupling structures are expected to pave the way for transfer-printing-based heterogeneous integration of active III-V devices such as semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs), photodetectors, electro-absorption modulators (EAMs) and single wavelength lasers on silicon photonic integrated circuits. PMID:27410317

  2. Interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Sun, Zhaoqi

    2013-03-01

    Recently, III-V materials have been extensively studied as potential candidates for post-Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) channel materials. The main obstacle to implement III-V compound semiconductors for CMOS applications is the lack of high quality and thermodynamically stable insulators with low interface trap densities. Due to their excellent thermal stability and relatively high dielectric constants, Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics have been recently highlighted as the most promising high-k dielectrics for III-V-based devices. This paper provides an overview of interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates. We begin with a survey of methods developed for generating Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics. To address the impact of these hafnium based materials, their interfaces with GaAs as well as a variety of semiconductors are discussed. After that, the integration issues are highlighted, including the development of high-k deposition without Fermi level pinning, surface passivation and interface state, and integration of novel device structure with Si technology. Finally, we conclude this review with the perspectives and outlook on the future developments in this area. This review explores the possible influences of research breakthroughs of Hf-based gate dielectrics on the current and future applications for nano-MOSFET devices.

  3. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  4. Hot carrier relaxation in highly excited III V compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, H.; Kuett, W.; Seibert, K.; Strahnen, M.

    1988-04-01

    The transition from nonthermal to thermalized carrier distributions and their subsequent cooling via phonon emission is investigated in III-V compounds by time resolved optical measurements with femtosecond laser pulses.

  5. Nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipert, Kamil; Kretzschmar, Florian; Ritschel, Manfred; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Büchner, Bernd

    2009-03-01

    We have synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single-, double-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes without magnetic impurities. In particular, we have applied a rhenium-based CVD technique yielding nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes with diamagnetic Re particles. In addition, carbon nanotubes prepared with iron as catalyst particles are annealed at very high temperatures in which the catalyst material is completely vaporized, while the carbon nanotubes are structurally preserved. Detailed magnetic studies show for both approaches a clear diamagnetic behavior typical for pure carbon nanotubes but no indication of ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material.

  6. Progress Towards III-V Photovoltaics on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; Clark, Eric B.; Sayir, Ali; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Maurer, William F.; Fritzemeier, Les

    2008-01-01

    Presented here is the recent progress of the NASA Glenn Research Center OMVPE group's efforts in the development of high efficiency thin-film polycrystalline III-V photovoltaics on optimum substrates. By using bulk polycrystalline germanium (Ge) films, devices of high efficiency and low mass will be developed and incorporated onto low-cost flexible substrates. Our progress towards the integration of high efficiency polycrystalline III-V devices and recrystallized Ge films on thin metal foils is discussed.

  7. III-V nitrides and performance of graphene on copper plasmonic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Goutam; Sahoo, Bijaya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the influence of iii-v nitrides as well as Ge and Si on the sensitivity and performance of a graphene protected copper plasmonic biosensor has been investigated. These semiconductors have been used between copper (Cu) and graphene layers on a SF 10 glass prism. The sensitivity and performance of the biosensor has been computed for with and without semiconductors. III-V nitrides demonstrated high sensitivity and high figure of merit (FOM) in comparison to Si and Ge due to their superior electronic and optical properties. The enhancement of evanescent electric field due to Si, Ge, AlN, GaN and InN have been computed and found highest enhancement for InN. This happens due to high refractive index of InN than other semiconductors. Analysis shows that for a high sensitive imaging biosensor the required optimal thickness of copper, InN and graphene are respectively 32 nm, 13 nm and 0.34 nm for light of wavelength λ = 633 nm (red Hesbnd Ne laser). This study suggests that InN would be a better choice for fabrication of new imaging plasmonic biosensors for chemical and biological sensing.

  8. Theoretical consideration of III-V nanowire/Si triple-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Long; Li, Xinhua; Zhao, Zhifei; Bu, Shaojiang; Zeng, XueSong; Huang, Jin-hua; Wang, Yuqi

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we report theoretical consideration and simulation of a proposed III-V nanowire (NW)/Si triple-junction solar cell. The cell consists of two axially connected III-V NW subcells that are grown and electrically integrated on an active Si substrate. The optical properties of the cell are thoroughly analyzed by using the finite-difference time-domain method. It is found that NW subcells with optimized geometry have high absorption throughout their absorption region. Meanwhile, beyond the absorption edge of the top and middle NW subcells, the NWs act as an efficient antireflection coating for the bottom Si subcell due to the formation of an optical cavity within the NW layer. The physics responsible for the enhanced light harvesting process is qualitatively explained through modal analysis. In addition, we have shown that the condition of current matching in a III-V NW/Si multi-junction can be fulfilled by adjusting the diameter of the NWs. In order to study the current-voltage characteristics of the proposed cell, the optical generation profiles under AM1.5G illumination are incorporated into an electrical modeling. Our optoelectrical simulations indicate that, with an excellent current matching between subcells, the performance of the proposed structure is comparable with state-of-the-art multi-junction cells. The results presented here indicate that semiconductor NWs may provide a promising route toward high efficiency multi-junction solar cells.

  9. Device physics studies of III-V and silicon MOSFETs for digital logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Himadri Sekhar

    III-V's are currently gaining a lot of attraction as possible MOSFET channel materials due to their high intrinsic mobility. Several challenges, however, need to be overcome before III-V's can replace silicon (Si) in extremely scaled devices. The effect of low density-of-states of III-V materials is investigated by analyzing the semiconductor capacitance for different device structures and scaling. Solid solubility limit of dopants in the III-V materials are also significantly lower than that in Si, causing high series resistance, and transconductance degradation due to source exhaustion. The metallic source/drain Schottky barrier MOSFET is explored as an alternative to effectively eliminate these issues. The performance of a Si channel SOI MOSFET fabricated at IBM is analyzed and interpreted using ballistic transport. The ballistic ratio and extracted mean free paths demonstrate that scattering effects cannot be ignored in modern Si channel devices. Scattering has been implemented within the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework to investigate effects of phonon and surface roughness scattering on device performance. The computational complexity is greatly reduced by analytically integrating over the transverse (width) dimension, making it possible to include scattering in planar FETs. The model has been carefully benchmarked with analytical formulas and Boltzmann transport calculations (2-D Monte Carlo results) for simple potential profiles. The scattering model is used to study the role of phonon scattering on the on-state characteristics of Si channel devices. Finally, the role of surface roughness scattering and its implementation issues within NEGF is discussed.

  10. All-optical NRZ wavelength conversion based on a single hybrid III-V/Si SOA and optical filtering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchen; Huang, Qiangsheng; Keyvaninia, Shahram; Katumba, Andrew; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Weiqiang; Morthier, Geert; He, Jian-Jun; Roelkens, Gunther

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signal based on cross-gain modulation in a single heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-silicon semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with an optical bandpass filter. The SOA is 500 μm long and consumes less than 250 mW electrical power. We experimentally demonstrate 12.5 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s AOWC for both wavelength up and down conversion. PMID:27607638

  11. Ab initio study on microscopic properties of III-V/water interfaces for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brandon; Choi, Woon Ih; Schwegler, Eric; Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2013-03-01

    Photoelectrodes made of III-V semiconductors are known to exhibit very high solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (from solar energy to chemical energy as H2 bond); however, photocorrosion of the electrode in electrolyte solution remains an issue. Based on ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations, we study the structure, stability, and chemical activity of GaP/InP(001) semiconductor electrodes in contact with water. We will show how surface oxygen and hydroxyl change the electronic and chemical properties of water at the interface, leading to the formation of a strong hydrogen-bond network where fast surface hydrogen transport seems to be realized. Implications from our findings will be discussed in detail at the presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344.

  12. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  13. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  14. Surface diffusion during shadow-mask-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy of III-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Schallenberg, T.; Brunner, K.; Borzenko, T.; Molenkamp, L.W.; Karczewski, G.

    2005-07-01

    We present a comprehensive discussion of molecular-beam epitaxy of III-V compound semiconductors through shadow masks. Based on model calculations and growth experiments, we examine how the surface diffusion and the incorporation of group-III adatoms depend on the growth configuration, group-III and group-V fluxes, and the crystal orientation. According to a macroscopic diffusion model, gradients of the group-V flux drive the unidirectional migration of group-III adatoms. Although this effect is generally observed in the experiments, the different growth profiles obtained for [110]- and [110]-oriented samples reflect the different roles of A-type and B-type steps in the incorporation of group-III adatoms. We also demonstrate that during the heteroepitaxial growth of InAs, the dissociation of the GaAs substrate is locally enhanced by the incidence of the In beam. This effect can be exploited for shadow-mask-assisted etching on selected areas. In addition, we show how the positions and sizes of III-V nanostructures can be controlled with high precision on a planar substrate by the usage of shadow masks with multiple nanoscale apertures.

  15. Improved adhesion of photoresist to III-V substrates using PECVD carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, David P.; Smith, Steven M.; Hooper, Andrew F.; Talin, A.; Chang, Daniel; Resnick, Douglas J.; Voight, Steven A.

    2002-07-01

    Amorphous PECVD carbon films have been investigated as a means to prepare III-V compound semiconductor substrates for improved photoresist adhesion. Results show that significant improvements in adhesive durability of patterned photoresist occurred for carbon primed GaAs and InGaAs wafers used in conjunction with both i-line and DUV lithography processes. These carbon layers, were 50-100 Angstrom in thickness, and varied in composition and morphology from a nitrogen-doped, diamond-like material (DLC), to a more hydrogen rich, polymer-like material (PLC). Adhesion durability tests performed in baths of ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) in general showed superior performance compared to non-primed substrates. The sole exception was a failure of PLC priming on GaAs wafers used with a DUV anti-reflective coating. This same system, however, was shown to work extremely well when a DLC coating was substituted. Characterization of PLC and DLC films included use of AES, XPS, FTIR, AFM, and contact angle analysis. Results indicate that carbon films passivate III-V oxides, creating a stable, hydrophobic surface. This factor is proposed as a key reason for the improved resistance to aggressive aqueous environments. AFM results show that carbon films are extremely smooth and actually decrease surface roughness, indicating that mechanical adhesion is unlikely.

  16. Large area III-V infrared focal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.; Soibel, A.; Rafol, S. B.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Lee, M. C.; Liu, J. K.; Yang, B.; Liao, A.

    2011-05-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively developing the III-V based infrared detector and focal plane arrays (FPAs) for remote sensing and imaging applications. Currently, we are working on Superlattice detectors, multi-band quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), and quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIPs) technologies suitable for high pixel-pixel uniformity and high pixel operability large area imaging arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the demonstration of long-wavelength 1 K × 1 K QDIP FPA, 1 K × 1K QWIP FPA, the first demonstration of the megapixel-simultaneously-readable and pixel-co-registered dual-band QWIP FPA, and demonstration of the first mid-wave and long-wave 1K × 1K superlattice FPA. In addition, we will discuss the advantages of III-V material system in the context of large format infrared FPAs.

  17. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  18. Physics, fabrication and characterization of III-V multi-gate FETs for low power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thathachary, Arun V.

    With transistor technology close to its limits for power constrained scaling and the simultaneous emergence of mobile devices as the dominant driver for new scaling, a pathway to significant reduction in transistor operating voltage to 0.5V or lower is urgently sought. This however implies a fundamental paradigm shift away from mature Silicon technology. III-V compound semiconductors hold great promise in this regard due to their vastly superior electron transport properties making them prime candidates to replace Silicon in the n-channel transistor. Among the plethora of binary and ternary compounds available in the III-V space, InxGa1-xAs alloys have attracted significant interest due to their excellent electron mobility, ideally placed bandgap and mature growth technology. Simultaneously, electrostatic control mandates multigate transistor designs such as the FinFET at extremely scaled nodes. This dissertation describes the experimental realization of III-V FinFETs incorporating InXGa1-XAs heterostructure channels for high performance, low power logic applications. The chapters that follow present experimental demonstrations, simulations and analysis on the following aspects (a) motivation and key figures of merit driving material selection and design; (b) dielectric integration schemes for high-k metal-gate stack (HKMG) realization on InXGa 1-XAs, including surface clean and passivation techniques developed for high quality interfaces; (c) novel techniques for transport (mobility) characterization in nanoscale multi-gate FET architectures with experimental demonstration on In0.7Ga0.3As nanowires; (d) Indium composition and quantum confined channel design for InXGa 1-XAs FinFETs and (e) InAs heterostructure designs for high performance FinFETs. Each chapter also contains detailed benchmarking of results against state of the art demonstrations in Silicon and III-V material systems. The dissertation concludes by assessing the feasibility of InXGa 1-XAs Fin

  19. Efficient, tunable flip-chip-integrated III-V/Si hybrid external-cavity laser array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiyun; Zheng, Xuezhe; Yao, Jin; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Cunningham, John E; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Bovington, Jock; Lee, Daniel Y; Thacker, Hiren D; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2016-09-19

    We demonstrate a surface-normal coupled tunable hybrid silicon laser array for the first time using passively-aligned, high-accuracy flip chip bonding. A 2x6 III-V reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) array with integrated total internal reflection mirrors is bonded to a CMOS SOI chip with grating couplers and silicon ring reflectors to form a tunable hybrid external-cavity laser array. Waveguide-coupled wall plug efficiency (wcWPE) of 2% and output power of 3 mW has been achieved for all 12 lasers. We further improved the performance by reducing the thickness of metal/dielectric stacks and achieved 10mW output power and 5% wcWPE with the same integration techniques. This non-invasive, one-step back end of the line (BEOL) integration approach provides a promising solution to high density laser sources for future large-scale photonic integrated circuits. PMID:27661885

  20. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; Patkar, M.P.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes to examine new solar cell desip approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program consists of two elements. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for M-III semiconductors. Substantial efficiency gains may be possible by employing light trapping techniques to confine the incident photons, as well as the photons emitted by radiative recombination. The thin-film approach is a promising route for achieving substantial performance improvements in the already high-efficiency, single-junction, III-V cell. The second element of the research involves exploring desip approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high-quality material. This work has applications to multiple-junction cells, for which the selection of a component cell often involves a compromise between optimum band pp and optimum material quality. It could also be a benefit manufacturing environment by making the cell's efficiency less dependent on materialquality.

  1. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; O'Bradovich, G.J.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year project. The objective of the research is to examine new design approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program is divided into two areas. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for III-V semiconductors. The second area centers on exploring design approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high quality material. Research activities consisted of an experimental study of minority carrier recombination in n-type, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-deposited GaAs, an assessment of the minority carrier lifetimes in n-GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and developing a high-efficiency cell fabrication process.

  2. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  3. Efficient, tunable flip-chip-integrated III-V/Si hybrid external-cavity laser array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiyun; Zheng, Xuezhe; Yao, Jin; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Cunningham, John E; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Bovington, Jock; Lee, Daniel Y; Thacker, Hiren D; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2016-09-19

    We demonstrate a surface-normal coupled tunable hybrid silicon laser array for the first time using passively-aligned, high-accuracy flip chip bonding. A 2x6 III-V reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) array with integrated total internal reflection mirrors is bonded to a CMOS SOI chip with grating couplers and silicon ring reflectors to form a tunable hybrid external-cavity laser array. Waveguide-coupled wall plug efficiency (wcWPE) of 2% and output power of 3 mW has been achieved for all 12 lasers. We further improved the performance by reducing the thickness of metal/dielectric stacks and achieved 10mW output power and 5% wcWPE with the same integration techniques. This non-invasive, one-step back end of the line (BEOL) integration approach provides a promising solution to high density laser sources for future large-scale photonic integrated circuits.

  4. Design High-Efficiency III-V Nanowire/Si Two-Junction Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, D; He, S; Li, X

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report the electrical simulation results of a proposed GaInP nanowire (NW)/Si two-junction solar cell. The NW physical dimensions are determined for optimized solar energy absorption and current matching between each subcell. Two key factors (minority carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity) affecting power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the solar cell are highlighted, and a practical guideline to design high-efficiency two-junction solar cell is thus provided. Considering the practical surface and bulk defects in GaInP semiconductor, a promising PCE of 27.5 % can be obtained. The results depict the usefulness of integrating NWs to construct high-efficiency multi-junction III-V solar cells.

  5. III-V alloy heterostructure high speed avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, H. D.; Nakano, K.; Tomasetta, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Heterostructure avalanche photodiodes have been successfully fabricated in several III-V alloy systems: GaAlAs/GaAs, GaAlSb/GaAlSb, and InGaAsP/InP. These diodes cover optical wavelengths from 0.4 to 1.8 micron. Early stages of development show very encouraging results. High speed response of less than 35 ps and high quantum efficiency more than 95 percent have been obtained. The dark currents and the excess avalanche noise are also dicussed. A direct comparison of GaAlSb, GaAlAsSb, and In GaAsP avalanche photodiodes is given.

  6. III-V Infrared Research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Soibel, A.; Liu, John; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Nguyen, J.; Bandara, S. V.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively developing the III-V based infrared detector and focal plane arrays (FPAs) for NASA, DoD, and commercial applications. Currently, we are working on multi-band Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs), Superlattice detectors, and Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIPs) technologies suitable for high pixel-pixel uniformity and high pixel operability large area imaging arrays. In this paper we report the first demonstration of the megapixel-simultaneously-readable and pixel-co-registered dual-band QWIP focal plane array (FPA). In addition, we will present the latest advances in QDIPs and Superlattice infrared detectors at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Prospects of III-V Tunnel FETs for Logic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Suman

    2015-03-01

    In order to continue and maintain the pace of energy efficient transistor scaling, it is imperative to scale the supply voltage of operation concurrently. In this invited paper, we discuss a promising III-V device architecture such as III-V Heterojunction Tunnel FETs that may break the seemingly inflexible energy vs. performance limit of silicon CMOS transistors and provide high performance, low leakage and low operating voltage for future logic transistor technology. Unlike conventional MOSFETs, the Tunnel FET (TFET) architecture employs a gate modulated Zener tunnel junction at the source which controls the transistor ON and OFF states. This scheme fundamentally eliminates the high-energy tail present in the Fermi-Dirac distribution of the valence band electrons in the p + source region and allows sub-kT/q steep slope device operation near the OFF state. This allows Tunnel FETs to achieve a much higher ION -IOFF ratio over a small gate voltage swing. A major challenge in the demonstration of high performance Tunnel FET is the limited rate of tunneling across the Zener junction which results in low drive current. Our results show, for the first time, that the on-current bottleneck in Tunnel FETs can be overcome by careful bandgap engineering. This work is supported by Intel, NRI/SRC and NSF through ASSIST NERC.

  8. III-V GaAs based plasmonic lasers (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafone, Lucas; Nguyen, Ngoc; Clarke, Ed; Fry, Paul; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is a potential route to new and improved optical devices. Many predict that sub wavelength optical systems will be essential in the development of future integrated circuits, offering the only viable way of simultaneously increasing speed and reducing power consumption. Realising this potential will be contingent on the ability to exploit plasmonic effects within the framework of the established semiconductor industry and to this end we present III-V (GaAs) based surface plasmon laser platform capable of effective laser light generation in highly focussed regions of space. Our design utilises a suspended slab of GaAs with a metallic slot printed on top. Here, hybridisation between the plasmonic mode of the slot and the photonic mode of the slab leads to the formation of a mode with confinement and loss that can be adjusted through variation of the slot width alone. As in previous designs the use of a hybrid mode provides strong confinement with relatively low losses, however the ability to print the metal slot removes the randomness associated with device fabrication and the requirement for etching that can deteriorate the semiconductor's properties. The deterministic fabrication process and the use of bulk GaAs for gain make the device prime for practical implementation.

  9. Calculations of the specific resistance of contacts to III-V nitride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.A.; Zhang, X.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Drummond, T.J.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Crawford, M.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    The authors present calculations of the specific contact resistance for metals to GaN. The calculations include a correct determination of the Fermi level taking into account the effect of the degenerate doping levels, required in creating tunneling ohmic contacts. Using a recently reported improved WKB approximation suitable in representing the depletion width at the metal-semiconductor interface, and a two band k{center_dot}p model for the effective masses, specific contact resistance was determined as a function of doping concentration. The specific contact resistance was calculated using the best data available for barrier heights, effective masses and dielectric coefficients for GaN. Because the barrier height at the metal-semiconductor interface has a very large effect on the contact resistance and the available data is sketchy or uncertain, the effect of varying the barrier height on the calculated specific contact resistance was investigated. Further, since the III-V nitrides are being considered for high temperature device applications, the specific contact resistance was also determined as a function of temperature.

  10. Toward a III-V Multijunction Space Cell Technology on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringel, S. A.; Lueck, M. R.; Andre, C. L.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Wilt, D. M.; Scheiman, D.

    2007-01-01

    High efficiency compound semiconductor solar cells grown on Si substrates are of growing interest in the photovoltaics community for both terrestrial and space applications. As a potential substrate for III-V compound photovoltaics, Si has many advantages over traditional Ge and GaAs substrates that include higher thermal conductivity, lower weight, lower material costs, and the potential to leverage the extensive manufacturing base of the Si industry. Such a technology that would retain high solar conversion efficiency at reduced weight and cost would result in space solar cells that simultaneously possess high specific power (W/kg) and high power density (W/m2). For terrestrial solar cells this would result in high efficiency III-V concentrators with improved thermal conductivity, reduced cost, and via the use of SiGe graded interlayers as active component layers the possibility of integrating low bandgap sub-cells that could provide for extremely high conversion efficiency.1 In addition to photovoltaics, there has been an historical interest in III-V/Si integration to provide optical interconnects in Si electronics, which has become of even greater relevance recently due to impending bottlenecks in CMOS based circuitry. As a result, numerous strategies to integrate GaAs with Si have been explored with the primary issue being the approx.4% lattice mismatch between GaAs and Si. Among these efforts, relaxed, compositionally-graded SiGe buffer layers where the substrate lattice constant is effectively tuned from Si to that of Ge so that a close lattice match to subsequent GaAs overlayers have shown great promise. With this approach, threading dislocation densities (TDDs) of approx.1 x 10(exp 6)/sq cm have been uniformly achieved in relaxed Ge layers on Si,5 leading to GaAs on Si with minority carrier lifetimes greater than 10 ns,6 GaAs single junction solar cells on Si with efficiencies greater than 18%,7 InGaAs CW laser diodes on Si,8 and room temperature GaInP red

  11. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  12. MBE Growth of Ferromagnetic Metal/Compound Semiconductor Heterostructures for Spintronics

    ScienceCinema

    Palmstrom, Chris [University of California, Santa Barbara, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    Electrical transport and spin-dependent transport across ferromagnet/semiconductor contacts is crucial in the realization of spintronic devices. Interfacial reactions, the formation of non-magnetic interlayers, and conductivity mismatch have been attributed to low spin injection efficiency. MBE has been used to grow epitaxial ferromagnetic metal/GA(1-x)AL(x)As heterostructures with the aim of controlling the interfacial structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. In situ, STM, XPS, RHEED and LEED, and ex situ XRD, RBS, TEM, magnetotransport, and magnetic characterization have been used to develop ferromagnetic elemental and metallic compound/compound semiconductor tunneling contacts for spin injection. The efficiency of the spin polarized current injected from the ferromagnetic contact has been determined by measuring the electroluminescence polarization of the light emitted from/GA(1-x)AL(x)As light-emitting diodes as a function of applied magnetic field and temperature. Interfacial reactions during MBE growth and post-growth anneal, as well as the semiconductor device band structure, were found to have a dramatic influence on the measured spin injection, including sign reversal. Lateral spin-transport devices with epitaxial ferromagnetic metal source and drain tunnel barrier contacts have been fabricated with the demonstration of electrical detection and the bias dependence of spin-polarized electron injection and accumulation at the contacts. This talk emphasizes the progress and achievements in the epitaxial growth of a number of ferromagnetic compounds/III-V semiconductor heterostructures and the progress towards spintronic devices.

  13. III-V Compound Detectors for CO2 DIAL Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Profiling of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is important for understanding the natural carbon cycle on Earth and its influence on global warming and climate change. Differential absorption lidar is a powerful remote sensing technique used for profiling and monitoring atmospheric constituents. Recently there has been an interest to apply this technique, at the 2 m wavelength, for investigating atmospheric CO2. This drives the need for high quality detectors at this wavelength. Although 2 m detectors are commercially available, the quest for a better detector is still on. The detector performance, regarding quantum efficiency, gain and associated noise, affects the DIAL signal-to-noise ratio and background signal, thereby influencing the instrument sensitivity and dynamic range. Detectors based on the III-V based compound materials shows a strong potential for such application. In this paper the detector requirements for a long range CO2 DIAL profiles will be discussed. These requirements were compared to newly developed III-V compound infrared detectors. The performance of ternary InGaSb pn junction devices will be presented using different substrates, as well as quaternary InGaAsSb npn structure. The performance study was based on experimental characterization of the devices dark current, spectral response, gain and noise. The final results are compared to the current state-of-the-art InGaAs technology. Npn phototransistor structure showed the best performance, regarding the internal gain and therefore the device signal-to-noise ratio. 2-micrometers detectivity as high as 3.9 x 10(exp 11) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W was obtained at a temperature of -20 C and 4 V bias voltage. This corresponds to a responsivity of 2650 A/W with about 60% quantum efficiency.

  14. Effect of III-V on insulator structure on quantum well intermixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Seiya; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    To achieve the monolithic active/passive integration on the III-V CMOS photonics platform, quantum well intermixing (QWI) on III-V on insulator (III-V-OI) is studied for fabricating multi-bandgap III-V-OI wafers. By optimizing the QWI condition for a 250-nm-thick III-V layer, which contains a five-layer InGaAsP-based multi-quantum well (MQW) with 80-nm-thick indium phosphide (InP) cladding layers, we have successfully achieved a photoluminescence (PL) peak shift of over 100 nm on the III-V-OI wafer. We have also found that the progress of QWI on the III-V-OI wafer is slower than that on the InP bulk wafer regardless of the buried oxide (BOX) thickness, bonding interface materials, and handle wafers. We have also found that the progress of QWI on the III-V-OI wafer is slower than that on the InP bulk wafer regardless of the buried oxide (BOX) thickness, bonding interface materials, and bulk support wafers on which the III-V-OI structure is formed (handle wafers). By comparing between the measured PL shift and simulated diffusions of phosphorus vacancies and interstitials during QWI, we have found that the slow QWI progress in the III-V-OI wafer is probably attributed to the enhanced recombination of vacancies and interstitials by the diffusion blocking of vacancies and interstitials at the BOX interface.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Properties of the state of the art of bulk III-V nitride substrates and homoepitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jaime A., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    The technological importance of III-V nitride semiconductors relies on their variety of applications, which cover optical, optoelectronic and electronic devices capable of operating under extreme values of current, voltage and temperature. The major roadblock for full realization of the potential of nitride semiconductors is still the availability of affordable large-area and high-quality native substrates with controlled electrical properties. Despite the impressive accomplishments recently achieved by techniques such as hydride vapour phase epitaxy and ammonothermal for GaN and sublimation for AlN, much more must be attained before establishing a bulk growth technique of choice to grow these materials. A brief review of the structural, optical and electronic properties of the state of the art of bulk and thick-film (quasi-bulk) nitride substrates and homoepitaxial films is presented, and a few device applications are also highlighted.

  16. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  17. Stable Self-Catalyzed Growth of III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tersoff, J

    2015-10-14

    Nanowire growth has generally relied on an initial particle of a catalyst such as Au to define the wire diameter and stabilize the growth. Self-catalyzed growth of III-V nanowires avoids the need for a foreign element, with the nanowire growing from the vapor via a droplet of the native group-III liquid. However, as suggested by Gibbs' phase rule, the absence of third element has a destabilizing effect. Here we analyze this system theoretically, finding that growth can be dynamically stable at pressures far above the equilibrium vapor pressure. Steady-state growth occurs via kinetic self-regulation of the droplet volume and wire diameter. In particular, for a given temperature and source-gas pressures there is a unique stable wire diameter and droplet volume, both of which decrease with increasing V/III ratio. We also examine the evolution of the droplet size and wire diameter toward the steady state as the wire grows and discuss implications for structural control. PMID:26389697

  18. Electrical characterization of surface passivation in III-V nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Gregory; Lapierre, Ray; Baugh, Jonathan

    III-V nanowires are promising for implementing many useful technologies including optical sensing and quantum information processing. However, most native nanowires have a significant density of surface states, which cause electron accumulation at the surface and make the optoelectronic characteristics very sensitive to surface conditions and variable from device to device. To achieve optimum device performance it is imperative to decrease the density of these defects, since they are responsible for charge noise (e.g. random telegraph noise) and decreased carrier mobility. Here we report on experimental results from low temperature transport studies of a series of InAs nanowire field effect transistors, each fabricated with a different surface passivation technique. The different surface treatments include combinations of chemical passivation, growth of a thermal oxide, and deposition of a high-k dielectric to determine the optimum process for passivating the surface states. To better quantify the density of surface states, we also study the axial field magnetoconductance of short-channel nanowire transistors, and show how the results can be used to estimate the degree of surface band-bending.

  19. Micro-Hall magnetic sensors with high magnetic sensitivity based on III-V heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Medico, S.; Benyattou, Taha; Guillot, Gerard; Venet, T.; Gendry, Michel; Tardy, Jacques; Chovet, Alain

    1996-04-01

    In this work, we propose solutions based on engineering of III-V heterostructures to develop new types of semiconductor magnetic sensors. These micro-Hall sensors use the properties of a 2D electron gas and the benefit of pseudomorphic material, in which both the alloy composition and the built-in strain offer additional degrees of freedom for band structure tailoring, to exhibit high magnetic sensitivity, good linearity, low temperature coefficient and high resolution. With the growth optimization which is described, two pseudomorphic In0.75Ga0.25As/In0.52Al0.48As heterostructures were grown on a semi- insulating InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand better the influence of the heterostructure design on its electronic properties, a model involving the self-consistent solution of the Poisson and Schrodinger equations using the Fermi-Dirac statistics has been developed. These results have been used to optimize the structure design. A magnetic sensitivity of 346 V/AT with a temperature coefficient of -230 ppm/ degree(s)C between -80 degree(s)C and 85 degree(s)C has been obtained. The device show good linearity against magnetic field and also against the supply current. High signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to minimal magnetic field of 350 nT/Hz1/2 at 100 Hz and 120 nT/Hz1/2 at 1 kHz have been measured.

  20. Status of ion implantation doping and isolation of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    Ion implantation doping and isolation has played a critical role in the realization of high performance photonic and electronic devices in all mature semiconductor material systems. This is also expected to be the case for the binary III-V nitrides (InN, GaN, and AlN) and their alloys as the epitaxial material quality improves and more advanced device structures are fabricated. With this in mind, we review the status of implant doping and isolation of GaN and the ternary alloys AlGaN, InGaN, and InAlN. In particular, we reported on the successful n- and p-type doping of GaN by ion implantation of Mg+P and Si, respectively, and subsequent high temperature rapid thermal anneals in excess of 1000{degrees}C. In the area of implant isolation, N-implantation has been shown to compensate both n- and p-type GaN, N and O-implantation effectively compensates InAlN, and InGaN shows limited compensation with either N or F implantation.

  1. Raising the Efficiency Ceiling with Multijunction III-V Concentrator Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    King, R. R.; Boca, A.; Edmondson, K. M.; Romero, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Law, D. C.; Fetzer, C. M.; Haddad, M.; Zakaria, A.; Hong, W.; Mesropian, S.; Krut, D. D.; Kinsey, G. S.; Pien, R.; Sherif, R. A.; Karam, N. H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we look at the question 'how high can solar cell efficiency go?' from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. First-principle efficiency limits are analyzed for some of the main candidates for high-efficiency multijunction terrestrial concentrator cells. Many of these cell designs use lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic semiconductor materials in order to tune subcell band gaps to the solar spectrum. Minority-carrier recombination at dislocations is characterized in GaInAs inverted metamorphic solar cells, with band gap ranging from 1.4 to 0.84 eV, by light I-V, electron-beam-induced current (EBIC), and cathodoluminescence (CL). Metamorphic solar cells with a 3-junction GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge structure were the first cells to reach over 40% efficiency, with an independently confirmed efficiency of 40.7% (AM1.5D, low-AOD, 240 suns, 25 C). The high efficiency of present III-V multijunction cells now in high-volume production, and still higher efficiencies of next-generation cells, is strongly leveraging for low-cost terrestrial concentrator PV systems.

  2. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. W.; Höhn, O.; Micha, D. N.; Wagner, L.; Helmers, H.; Bett, A. W.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-03-01

    Single junction photovoltaic devices composed of direct bandgap III-V semiconductors such as GaAs can exploit the effects of photon recycling to achieve record-high open circuit voltages. Modeling such devices yields insight into the design and material criteria required to achieve high efficiencies. For a GaAs cell to reach 28 % efficiency without a substrate, the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of the electrons and holes must be longer than 3 μs and 100 ns respectively in a 2 μm thin active region coupled to a very high reflective (>99%) rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's non-radiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14 % to 33 % experimentally, whereas the model requires an increasing SRH lifetime for both electrons and holes to explain these experimental results. However, intermediate absorbing GaAs layers between the two sub-cells may also increasingly contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  3. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V.; Sardela, Mauro; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  4. Semiconductor ohmic contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, Frank Zygmunt (Inventor); Kressel, Henry (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor device has one surface of P type conductivity material having a wide energy bandgap and a large crystal lattice parameter. Applied to the P type surface of the semiconductor device is a degenerate region of semiconductor material, preferably a group III-V semiconductor material, having a narrower energy bandgap. The degenerate region is doped with tin to increase the crystal lattice of the region to more closely approximate the crystal lattice of the one surface of the semiconductor device. The degenerate region is compensatingly doped with a P type conductivity modifier. An electrical contact is applied to one surface of the degenerate region forming an ohmic contact with the semiconductor device.

  5. Fully subthreshold current-based characterization of interface traps and surface potential in III-V-on-insulator MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Kwang; Lee, Jungmin; Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Choi, Won Jun; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Sanghyeon; Kim, Dong Myong

    2016-08-01

    We report characterization of the interface trap distribution (Dit(E)) over the bandgap in III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) on insulator. Based only on the experimental subthreshold current data and differential coupling factor, we simultaneously obtained Dit(E) and a nonlinear mapping of the gate bias (VGS) to the trap level (Et) via the effective surface potential (ψS,eff). The proposed technique allows direct extraction of the interface traps at the In0.53Ga0.47As-on insulator (-OI) MOSFETs only from the experimental subthreshold current data. Applying the technique to the In0.53Ga0.47As channel III-V-OI MOSFETs with the gate width/length W/L = 100/50, 100/25, and 100/10 μm/μm, we obtained Dit(E) ≅ 1011-1012 eV-1 cm-2 over the bandgap without the dimension dependence.

  6. Monte Carlo model for the analysis and development of III-V Tunnel-FETs and Impact Ionization-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbo, V.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Lechaux, Y.; Wichmann, N.; Bollaert, S.; Vasallo, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    Impact-ionization metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs (I-MOSFETs) are in competition with tunnel FETs (TFETs) in order to achieve the best behaviour for low power logic circuits. Concretely, III-V I-MOSFETs are being explored as promising devices due to the proper reliability, since the impact ionization events happen away from the gate oxide, and the high cutoff frequency, due to high electron mobility. To facilitate the design process from the physical point of view, a Monte Carlo (MC) model which includes both impact ionization and band-to-band tunnel is presented. Two ungated InGaAs and InAlAs/InGaAs 100 nm PIN diodes have been simulated. In both devices, the tunnel processes are more frequent than impact ionizations, so that they are found to be appropriate for TFET structures and not for I- MOSFETs. According to our simulations, other narrow bandgap candidates for the III-V heterostructure, such as InAs or GaSb, and/or PININ structures must be considered for a correct I-MOSFET design.

  7. Vertical III-V nanowire device integration on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Borg, Mattias; Schmid, Heinz; Moselund, Kirsten E; Signorello, Giorgio; Gignac, Lynne; Bruley, John; Breslin, Chris; Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Werner, Peter; Riel, Heike

    2014-01-01

    We report complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible integration of compound semiconductors on Si substrates. InAs and GaAs nanowires are selectively grown in vertical SiO2 nanotube templates fabricated on Si substrates of varying crystallographic orientations, including nanocrystalline Si. The nanowires investigated are epitaxially grown, single-crystalline, free from threading dislocations, and with an orientation and dimension directly given by the shape of the template. GaAs nanowires exhibit stable photoluminescence at room temperature, with a higher measured intensity when still surrounded by the template. Si-InAs heterojunction nanowire tunnel diodes were fabricated on Si(100) and are electrically characterized. The results indicate a high uniformity and scalability in the fabrication process.

  8. Genetic Algorithm for Innovative Device Designs in High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di; Schubert, Martin F.; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E. Fred; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Shim, Hyunwook; Sone, Cheolsoo

    2012-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes are becoming the next-generation light source because of their prominent benefits in energy efficiency, versatility, and benign environmental impact. However, because of the unique polarization effects in III-V nitrides and the high complexity of light-emitting diodes, further breakthroughs towards truly optimized devices are required. Here we introduce the concept of artificial evolution into the device optimization process. Reproduction and selection are accomplished by means of an advanced genetic algorithm and device simulator, respectively. We demonstrate that this approach can lead to new device structures that go beyond conventional approaches. The innovative designs originating from the genetic algorithm and the demonstration of the predicted results by implementing structures suggested by the algorithm establish a new avenue for complex semiconductor device design and optimization.

  9. Resonantly Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation Using III-V Semiconductor All-Dielectric Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Sinclair, Michael B; Saravi, Sina; Keeler, Gordon A; Yang, Yuanmu; Reno, John; Peake, Gregory M; Setzpfandt, Frank; Staude, Isabelle; Pertsch, Thomas; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-14

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in nanostructured materials have been challenging our perceptions of nonlinear optical processes that have been explored since the invention of lasers. For example, the ability to control optical field confinement, enhancement, and scattering almost independently allows nonlinear frequency conversion efficiencies to be enhanced by many orders of magnitude compared to bulk materials. Also, the subwavelength length scale renders phase matching issues irrelevant. Compared with plasmonic nanostructures, dielectric resonator metamaterials show great promise for enhanced nonlinear optical processes due to their larger mode volumes. Here, we present, for the first time, resonantly enhanced second-harmonic generation (SHG) using gallium arsenide (GaAs) based dielectric metasurfaces. Using arrays of cylindrical resonators we observe SHG enhancement factors as large as 10(4) relative to unpatterned GaAs. At the magnetic dipole resonance, we measure an absolute nonlinear conversion efficiency of ∼2 × 10(-5) with ∼3.4 GW/cm(2) pump intensity. The polarization properties of the SHG reveal that both bulk and surface nonlinearities play important roles in the observed nonlinear process.

  10. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.

  11. Diffusion length measurement in bulk and epitaxially grown III-V semiconductors using charge collection microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities were measured in GaAs diodes and InP finished solar cells. The basic technique used was charge collection microscopy, also known as electron beam induced current (EBIC). The normalized currents and distances from the pn junction were read directly from the calibrated curves obtained while using the line-scan mode in an SEM. These values were then equated to integral and infinite series expressions resulting from the solution of the diffusion equation with both extended-generation and point-generation functions. This expands previous work by examining both thin and thick samples. The surface recombination velocity was either treated as an unknown in a system of two equations or measured directly using low e(-) beam accelerating voltages. These techniques give accurate results by accounting for the effects of surface recombination and the finite size of the generation volume.

  12. Resonantly Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation Using III-V Semiconductor All-Dielectric Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Sinclair, Michael B; Saravi, Sina; Keeler, Gordon A; Yang, Yuanmu; Reno, John; Peake, Gregory M; Setzpfandt, Frank; Staude, Isabelle; Pertsch, Thomas; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-14

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in nanostructured materials have been challenging our perceptions of nonlinear optical processes that have been explored since the invention of lasers. For example, the ability to control optical field confinement, enhancement, and scattering almost independently allows nonlinear frequency conversion efficiencies to be enhanced by many orders of magnitude compared to bulk materials. Also, the subwavelength length scale renders phase matching issues irrelevant. Compared with plasmonic nanostructures, dielectric resonator metamaterials show great promise for enhanced nonlinear optical processes due to their larger mode volumes. Here, we present, for the first time, resonantly enhanced second-harmonic generation (SHG) using gallium arsenide (GaAs) based dielectric metasurfaces. Using arrays of cylindrical resonators we observe SHG enhancement factors as large as 10(4) relative to unpatterned GaAs. At the magnetic dipole resonance, we measure an absolute nonlinear conversion efficiency of ∼2 × 10(-5) with ∼3.4 GW/cm(2) pump intensity. The polarization properties of the SHG reveal that both bulk and surface nonlinearities play important roles in the observed nonlinear process. PMID:27501472

  13. Interfacial oxide re-growth in thin film metal oxide III-V semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, S.; Dong, H.; Hawkins, J. M.; Brennan, B.; Milojevic, M.; Aguirre-Tostado, F. S.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Hinkle, C. L.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M.

    2012-04-02

    The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs and HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interfaces after atomic layer deposition are studied using in situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Samples are deliberately exposed to atmospheric conditions and interfacial oxide re-growth is observed. The extent of this re-growth is found to depend on the dielectric material and the exposure temperature. Comparisons with previous studies show that ex situ characterization can result in misleading conclusions about the interface reactions occurring during the metal oxide deposition process.

  14. Investigation of proton damage in III-V semiconductors by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaccuzzi, E.; Khachadorian, S.; Suárez, S.; Reinoso, M.; Goñi, A. R.; Strittmatter, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Giudici, P.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the damage produced by 2 MeV proton radiation on epitaxially grown InGaP/GaAs structure by means of spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed parallel to the sample surface in order to determine the proton penetration range in both compounds. An increase in the intensity of longitudinal optical phonons and a decrease in the luminescence were observed. We associate these changes with the creation of defects in the damaged region, also responsible for the observed change of the carrier concentration in the GaAs layer, determined by the shift of the phonon-plasmon coupled mode frequency. From the spatially resolved profile of the PL and phonon intensities, we obtained the proton range in both materials and we compared them with stopping and range of ions in matter simulations. The comparison between the experimentally obtained proton range and simulations shows a very good agreement for GaAs but a discrepancy of 20% for InGaP. This discrepancy can be explained in terms of limitations of the model to simulate the electronic orbitals and bonding structure of the simulated compound. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose an increase in 40% in the electronic stopping power for InGaP.

  15. Ellipsometric study of metal-organic chemically vapor deposited III-V semiconductor structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Sekula-Moise, Patricia A.; Sieg, Robert M.; Drotos, Mark N.; Bogner, Nancy A.

    1992-01-01

    An ellipsometric study of MOCVD-grown layers of AlGaAs and InGaAs in thick films and strained layer complex structures is presented. It is concluded that the ternary composition of thick nonstrained layers can be accurately determined to within experimental errors using numerical algorithms. In the case of complex structures, thickness of all layers and the alloy composition of nonstrained layers can be determined simultaneously, provided that the correlations between parameters is no higher than 0.9.

  16. Calculation of strain compensation thickness for III-V semiconductor quantum dot superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polly, S. J.; Bailey, C. G.; Grede, A. J.; Forbes, D. V.; Hubbard, S. M.

    2016-11-01

    Models based on continuum elasticity theory are discussed to calculate the necessary thickness of a strain compensation (SC) layer for a superlattice (SL) of strained quantum wells (QW) or quantum dots (QD). These models are then expanded to cover material systems (substrates, QW or QD, and SC) composed of AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, or InSb, as well as the ternary, quaternary, and higher order material alloys possible in the Al/Ga/In/P/As/Sb systems. SC thickness calculation methods were compared against dynamical scattering simulations and experimental X-ray diffraction measurements of the InAs/GaP/GaAs QD/SC/Substrate superlattices of varying SC thickness. Based on the reduced (but not eliminated) strain present, a further modified strain compensation thickness is calculated to maximize the number of SL repeat units before the onset of misfit dislocations is also calculated. These models have been assembled into a free application on nanoHUB for use by the community.

  17. Stable vapor transportation of solid sources in MOVPE of III V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenai-Khatkhate, Deodatta V.; DiCarlo, Ronald L.; Marsman, Charles J.; Polcari, Robert F.; Ware, Robert A.; Woelk, Egbert

    2007-01-01

    Trimethylindium (TMI), in spite of being a solid, has remained the precursor of choice for the deposition of indium containing layers by MOVPE. However, maintaining stable TMI flows and constant concentrations in gas phase during the growth still continue to be a major concern in MOVPE. This issue is further compounded by lower TMI consumptions achieved as the MOVPE growth conditions become increasingly more aggressive to meet the industry demand of higher throughputs, e.g. at higher flow rates, or at reduced pressures or when TMI source is maintained at higher temperatures. In this paper, we report our new findings of improved TMI delivery (>90, and in some cases >95%) with excellent stability of TMI concentration throughout the cylinder lifetime. These results are achieved using standard fill capacity and under intentionally set aggressive conditions of pressure, temperature and flow. We report a novel delivery technology (Uni-Flo™ II cylinder) that is customer proven and comprises innovative improvements to our dip-tube-less cylinder design, Uni-Flo™ cylinder, and advancements in TMI packaging. In this report, TMI depletion rates are examined over an extensive range of operating parameters currently employed in MOVPE, viz. flow rates ranging from 100 to 1000 sccm, source temperatures between 17 and 30 °C, and reactor pressures in the range 300-1000 mbar. We report, significant improvements in TMI delivery (>95% depletion) at higher molar flux of TMI (>3 g/h) and an excellent reproducible dosimetry of TMI with no batch-to-batch variation, by using Uni-Flo™ II cylinder as the enabling solution to TMI delivery problems.

  18. Time Resolved Studies of Carrier Dynamics in III -v Heterojunction Semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westland, Duncan James

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Picosecond time-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study transient processes in Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As/InP multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and in bulk Ga_{.47}In _{.53}As and GaSb. To facilitate the experimental studies, apparatus was constructed to allow the detection of transient luminescence with 3ps time resolution. A frequency upconversion technique was employed. Relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As by optic phonons has been investigated, and, at carrier densities ~3 times 10^{18}cm ^{-3} is found to be a considerably slower process than simple theory predicts. The discrepancy is resolved by the inclusion of a non-equilibrium population of longitudinal optic phonons in the theoretical description. Slow energy loss is also observed in a 154A MQW under similar conditions, but carriers are found to relax more quickly in a 14A MQW with a comparable repeat period. The theory of non-equilibrium mode occupation is modified to describe the case of a MQW and is found to agree with experiment. Carrier relaxation in GaSb is studied and the importance of occupation of the L _6 conduction band valley in this material is demonstrated. The ambipolar diffusion of a photoexcited carrier plasma through an InP capping layer was investigated using an optical time-of-flight technique. This experiment also enables the efficiency of carrier capture by a Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As quantum well to be determined. A capture time of 4ps was found.

  19. Transforming common III-V/II-VI insulating building blocks into topological heterostructure via the intrinsic electric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex; Zhang, Xiuwen; Abdalla, Leonardo; Liu, Qihang

    Currently known topological insulators (TIs) are limited to narrow gap compounds incorporating heavy elements, thus severely limiting the material pool available for such applications. We show how a heterovalent superlattice made of common semiconductor building blocks can transform its non-TI components into a topological heterostructure. The heterovalent nature of such interfaces sets up, in the absence of interfacial atomic exchange, a natural internal electric field that along with the quantum confinement leads to band inversion, transforming these semiconductors into a topological phase while also forming a giant Rashba spin splitting. We demonstrate this paradigm of designing TIs from ordinary semiconductors via first-principle calculations on III-V/II-VI superlattice InSb/CdTe. We illustrate the relationship between the interfacial stability and the topological transition, finding a ``window of opportunity'' where both conditions can be optimized. This work illustrates the general principles of co-evaluation of TI functionality with thermodynamic stability as a route of identifying realistic combination of common insulators that could produce topological heterostructures. This work was supported by Basic Energy Science, MSE division (Grant DE-FG02-13ER46959).

  20. Effects of Humidity on Non-Hermetically Packaged III-V Structures and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Martin, S.; Lee, T.; Okuno, J.; Ruiz, R.; Gauldin, R.; Gaidis, M.; Smith, R.

    1999-01-01

    High humidity and temperature test (known as 85/85 tests) were performed on various III-V devices and structures to determine environmental effects in non-hermetically packaged GaAs membrane mixer diodes.

  1. Epitaxial growth of III-V compounds for electroluminescent light sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Smeltzer, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    The epitaxial growth techniques used in the fabrication of III-V compound electroluminescent devices are reviewed. Both vapor and liquid phase epitaxial techniques are discussed, including the applications of these techniques to well established materials as well as newer materials. The state of the art of light-emitting devices fabricated from members of the III-V compounds and their solid solutions is also reviewed.

  2. III-V/Ge channel MOS device technologies in nano CMOS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shinichi; Zhang, Rui; Suh, Junkyo; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nishi, Koichi; Takenaka, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    CMOS utilizing high-mobility III-V/Ge channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high-performance and low power advanced LSIs in the future, because of its enhanced carrier transport properties. However, there are many critical issues and difficult challenges for realizing III-V/Ge-based CMOS on the Si platform such as (1) the formation of high-crystal-quality Ge/III-V films on Si substrates, (2) gate stack technologies to realize superior MOS/MIS interface quality, (3) the formation of a source/drain (S/D) with low resistivity and low leakage current, (4) process integration to realize ultrashort channel devices, and (5) total CMOS integration including Si CMOS. In this paper, we review the recent progress in III-V/Ge MOS devices and process technologies as viable approaches to solve the above critical problems on the basis of our recent research activities. The technologies include MOS gate stack formation, high-quality channel formation, low-resistance S/D formation, and CMOS integration. For the Ge device technologies, we focus on the gate stack technology and Ge channel formation on Si. Also, for the III-V MOS device technologies, we mainly address the gate stack technology, III-V channel formation on Si, the metal S/D technology, and implementation of these technologies into short-channel III-V-OI MOSFETs on Si substrates. On the basis of the present status of the achievements, we finally discuss the possibility of various CMOS structures using III-V/Ge channels.

  3. Low temperature plasma enhanced CVD epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs: a new paradigm for III-V/Si integration

    PubMed Central

    Cariou, Romain; Chen, Wanghua; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Yu, Jingwen; Patriarche, Gilles; Mauguin, Olivia; Largeau, Ludovic; Decobert, Jean; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-01-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductors with silicon is a key issue for photonics, microelectronics and photovoltaics. With the standard approach, namely the epitaxial growth of III-V on silicon, thick and complex buffer layers are required to limit the crystalline defects caused by the interface polarity issues, the thermal expansion, and lattice mismatches. To overcome these problems, we have developed a reverse and innovative approach to combine III-V and silicon: the straightforward epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs at low temperature by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD). Indeed we show that both GaAs surface cleaning by SiF4 plasma and subsequent epitaxial growth from SiH4/H2 precursors can be achieved at 175 °C. The GaAs native oxide etching is monitored with in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman spectroscopy is used to assess the epitaxial silicon quality. We found that SiH4 dilution in hydrogen during deposition controls the layer structure: the epitaxial growth happens for deposition conditions at the transition between the microcrystalline and amorphous growth regimes. SIMS and STEM-HAADF bring evidences for the interface chemical sharpness. Together, TEM and XRD analysis demonstrate that PECVD enables the growth of high quality relaxed single crystal silicon on GaAs. PMID:27166163

  4. Low temperature plasma enhanced CVD epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs: a new paradigm for III-V/Si integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariou, Romain; Chen, Wanghua; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Yu, Jingwen; Patriarche, Gilles; Mauguin, Olivia; Largeau, Ludovic; Decobert, Jean; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-05-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductors with silicon is a key issue for photonics, microelectronics and photovoltaics. With the standard approach, namely the epitaxial growth of III-V on silicon, thick and complex buffer layers are required to limit the crystalline defects caused by the interface polarity issues, the thermal expansion, and lattice mismatches. To overcome these problems, we have developed a reverse and innovative approach to combine III-V and silicon: the straightforward epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs at low temperature by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD). Indeed we show that both GaAs surface cleaning by SiF4 plasma and subsequent epitaxial growth from SiH4/H2 precursors can be achieved at 175 °C. The GaAs native oxide etching is monitored with in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman spectroscopy is used to assess the epitaxial silicon quality. We found that SiH4 dilution in hydrogen during deposition controls the layer structure: the epitaxial growth happens for deposition conditions at the transition between the microcrystalline and amorphous growth regimes. SIMS and STEM-HAADF bring evidences for the interface chemical sharpness. Together, TEM and XRD analysis demonstrate that PECVD enables the growth of high quality relaxed single crystal silicon on GaAs.

  5. Low temperature plasma enhanced CVD epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs: a new paradigm for III-V/Si integration.

    PubMed

    Cariou, Romain; Chen, Wanghua; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Yu, Jingwen; Patriarche, Gilles; Mauguin, Olivia; Largeau, Ludovic; Decobert, Jean; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-01-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductors with silicon is a key issue for photonics, microelectronics and photovoltaics. With the standard approach, namely the epitaxial growth of III-V on silicon, thick and complex buffer layers are required to limit the crystalline defects caused by the interface polarity issues, the thermal expansion, and lattice mismatches. To overcome these problems, we have developed a reverse and innovative approach to combine III-V and silicon: the straightforward epitaxial growth of silicon on GaAs at low temperature by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD). Indeed we show that both GaAs surface cleaning by SiF4 plasma and subsequent epitaxial growth from SiH4/H2 precursors can be achieved at 175 °C. The GaAs native oxide etching is monitored with in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman spectroscopy is used to assess the epitaxial silicon quality. We found that SiH4 dilution in hydrogen during deposition controls the layer structure: the epitaxial growth happens for deposition conditions at the transition between the microcrystalline and amorphous growth regimes. SIMS and STEM-HAADF bring evidences for the interface chemical sharpness. Together, TEM and XRD analysis demonstrate that PECVD enables the growth of high quality relaxed single crystal silicon on GaAs. PMID:27166163

  6. GaN as an interfacial passivation layer: tuning band offset and removing fermi level pinning for III-V MOS devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaofu; Cao, Ruyue; Wang, Changhong; Li, Hao-Bo; Dong, Hong; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Cheng, Yahui; Xie, Xinjian; Liu, Hui; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert; Wang, Weichao

    2015-03-11

    The use of an interfacial passivation layer is one important strategy for achieving a high quality interface between high-k and III-V materials integrated into high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Here, we propose gallium nitride (GaN) as the interfacial layer between III-V materials and hafnium oxide (HfO2). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we explore the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/HfO2 interface with respect to the interfacial oxygen contents. In the O-rich condition, an O8 interface (eight oxygen atoms at the interface, corresponding to 100% oxygen concentration) displays the most stability. By reducing the interfacial O concentration from 100 to 25%, we find that the interface formation energy increases; when sublayer oxygen vacancies exist, the interface becomes even less stable compared with O8. The band offset is also observed to be highly dependent on the interfacial oxygen concentration. Further analysis of the electronic structure shows that no interface states are present at the O8 interface. These findings indicate that the O8 interface serves as a promising candidate for high quality III-V MOS devices. Moreover, interfacial states are present when such interfacial oxygen is partially removed. The interface states, leading to Fermi level pinning, originate from unsaturated interfacial Ga atoms. PMID:25639492

  7. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  8. III-V/Ge MOS device technologies for low power integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Noguchi, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-H.; Chang, C.-Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Nishi, K.; Zhang, R.; Ke, M.; Takenaka, M.

    2016-11-01

    CMOS utilizing high mobility III-V/Ge channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high performance and low power integrated systems in the future technology nodes, because of the enhanced carrier transport properties. In addition, Tunneling-FETs (TFETs) using Ge/III-V materials are regarded as one of the most important steep slope devices for the ultra-low power applications. In this paper, we address the device and process technologies of Ge/III-V MOSFETs and TFETs on the Si CMOS platform. The channel formation, source/drain (S/D) formation and gate stack engineering are introduced for satisfying the device requirements. The plasma post oxidation to form GeOx interfacial layers is a key gate stack technology for Ge CMOS. Also, direct wafer bonding of ultrathin body quantum well III-V-OI channels, combined with Tri-gate structures, realizes high performance III-V n-MOSFETs on Si. We also demonstrate planar-type InGaAs and Ge/strained SOI TFETs. The defect-less p+-n source junction formation with steep impurity profiles is a key for high performance TFET operation.

  9. III-V/Si wafer bonding using transparent, conductive oxide interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamboli, Adele C.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Steiner, Myles A.; Essig, Stephanie; Perl, Emmett E.; Norman, Andrew G.; Bosco, Nick; Stradins, Paul

    2015-06-01

    We present a method for low temperature plasma-activated direct wafer bonding of III-V materials to Si using a transparent, conductive indium zinc oxide interlayer. The transparent, conductive oxide (TCO) layer provides excellent optical transmission as well as electrical conduction, suggesting suitability for Si/III-V hybrid devices including Si-based tandem solar cells. For bonding temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 350 °C, Ohmic behavior is observed in the sample stacks, with specific contact resistivity below 1 Ω cm2 for samples bonded at 200 °C. Optical absorption measurements show minimal parasitic light absorption, which is limited by the III-V interlayers necessary for Ohmic contact formation to TCOs. These results are promising for Ga0.5In0.5P/Si tandem solar cells operating at 1 sun or low concentration conditions.

  10. III-V/Si wafer bonding using transparent, conductive oxide interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tamboli, Adele C. Hest, Maikel F. A. M. van; Steiner, Myles A.; Essig, Stephanie; Norman, Andrew G.; Bosco, Nick; Stradins, Paul; Perl, Emmett E.

    2015-06-29

    We present a method for low temperature plasma-activated direct wafer bonding of III-V materials to Si using a transparent, conductive indium zinc oxide interlayer. The transparent, conductive oxide (TCO) layer provides excellent optical transmission as well as electrical conduction, suggesting suitability for Si/III-V hybrid devices including Si-based tandem solar cells. For bonding temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 350 °C, Ohmic behavior is observed in the sample stacks, with specific contact resistivity below 1 Ω cm{sup 2} for samples bonded at 200 °C. Optical absorption measurements show minimal parasitic light absorption, which is limited by the III-V interlayers necessary for Ohmic contact formation to TCOs. These results are promising for Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/Si tandem solar cells operating at 1 sun or low concentration conditions.

  11. The Unexpected Influence of Precursor Conversion Rate in the Synthesis of III-V Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Franke, Daniel; Harris, Daniel K; Xie, Lisi; Jensen, Klavs F; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2015-11-23

    Control of quantum dot (QD) precursor chemistry has been expected to help improve the size control and uniformity of III-V QDs such as indium phosphide and indium arsenide. Indeed, experimental results for other QD systems are consistent with the theoretical prediction that the rate of precursor conversion is an important factor controlling QD size and size distribution. We synthesized and characterized the reactivity of a variety of group-V precursors in order to determine if precursor chemistry could be used to improve the quality of III-V QDs. Despite slowing down precursor conversion rate by multiple orders of magnitude, the less reactive precursors do not yield the expected increase in size and improvement in size distribution. This result disproves the widely accepted explanation for the shortcoming of current III-V QD syntheses and points to the need for a new generalizable theoretical picture for the mechanism of QD formation and growth.

  12. Indium Zinc Oxide Mediated Wafer Bonding for III-V/Si Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamboli, Adele C.; Essig, Stephanie; Horowitz, Kelsey A. W.; Woodhouse, Michael; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Norman, Andrew G.; Steiner, Myles A.; Stradins, Paul

    2015-06-14

    Silicon-based tandem solar cells are desirable as a high efficiency, economically viable approach to one sun or low concentration photovoltaics. We present an approach to wafer bonded III-V/Si solar cells using amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) as an interlayer. We investigate the impact of a heavily doped III-V contact layer on the electrical and optical properties of bonded test samples, including the predicted impact on tandem cell performance. We present economic modeling which indicates that the path to commercial viability for bonded cells includes developing low-cost III-V growth and reducing constraints on material smoothness. If these challenges can be surmounted, bonded tandems on Si can be cost-competitive with incumbent PV technologies, especially in low concentration, single axis tracking systems.

  13. First principles calculation of material properties of group IV elements and III-V compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Brad Dean

    This thesis presents first principles calculations on the properties of group IV elements and group III-V compounds. It includes investigations into what structure a material is likely to form in, and given that structure, what are its electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties as well as what are the properties of defects that might be introduced into the sample. The thesis is divided as follows: • Chapter 1 contains some of the conceptual foundations used in the present work. These involve the major approximations which allow us to approach the problem of systems with huge numbers of interacting electrons and atomic cores. • Then, in Chapter 2, we discuss one of the major limitations to the DFT formalism introduced in Chapter 1, namely its inability to predict the quasiparticle spectra of materials and in particular the band gap of a semiconductor. We introduce a Green's function approach to the electron self-energy Sigma known as the GW approximation and use it to compute the quasiparticle band structures of a number of group IV and III-V semiconductors. • In Chapter 3 we present a first-principles study of a number of high-pressure metastable phases of Si with tetrahedral bonding. The phases studied include all experimentally determined phases that result from decompression from the metallic beta-Sn phase, specifically the BC8 (Si-III), hexagonal diamond (Si-IV), and R8 (Si-XII). In addition to these, we also study the hypothetical ST12 structure found upon decompression from beta-Sn in germanium. • Our attention is then turned to the first principles calculations of optical properties in Chapter 4. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is then solved to obtain the optical spectrum of this material including electron-hole interactions. The calculated optical spectrum is compared with experimental data for other forms of silicon commonly used in photovoltaic devices, namely the cubic, polycrystalline, and amorphous forms. • In Chapter 5 we present

  14. Silicon, germanium, and III-V-based tunneling devices for low-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua T.

    While the scaling of transistor dimensions has kept pace with Moore's Law, the voltages applied to these devices have not scaled in tandem, giving rise to ever-increasing power/heating challenges in state-of-the-art integrated circuits. A primary reason for this scaling mismatch is due to the thermal limit---the 60 mV minimum required at room temperature to change the current through the device by one order of magnitude. This voltage scaling limitation is inherent in devices that rely on the mechanism of thermal emission of charge carriers over a gate-controlled barrier to transition between the ON- and OFF-states, such as in the case of conventional CMOS-based technologies. To overcome this voltage scaling barrier, several steep-slope device concepts have been pursued that have experimentally demonstrated sub-60-mV/decade operation since 2004, including the tunneling-field effect transistor (TFET), impact ionization metal-oxide-semiconductor (IMOS), suspended-gate FET (SG-FET), and ferroelectric FET (Fe-FET). These reports have excited strong efforts within the semiconductor research community toward the realization of a low-power device that will support continued scaling efforts, while alleviating the heating issues prevalent in modern computer chips. Literature is replete with claims of sub-60-mV/decade operation, but often with neglect to other voltage scaling factors that offset this result. Ideally, a low-power device should be able to attain sub-60-mV/decade inverse subthreshold slopes (S) employing low supply and gate voltages with a foreseeable path toward integration. This dissertation describes the experimental development and realization of CMOS-compatible processes to enhance tunneling efficiency in Si and Si/Ge nanowire (NW) TFETs for improved average S (S avg) and ON-currents (ION), and a novel, III-V-based tunneling device alternative is also proposed. After reviewing reported efforts on the TFET, IMOS, and SG-FET, the TFET is highlighted as the

  15. Low-index nanopatterned barrier for hybrid oxide-free III-V silicon conductive bonding.

    PubMed

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Talneau, Anne; Benisty, Henri

    2014-09-22

    Oxide-free bonding of a III-V active stack emitting at 1300-1600 nm to a silicon-on-insulator wafer offers the capability to electrically inject lasers from the silicon side. However, a typical 500-nm-thick silicon layer notably attracts the fundamental guided mode of the silicon + III-V stack, a detrimental feature compared to established III-V Separate-Confinement Heterostructure (SCH) stacks. We experimentally probe with photoluminescence as an internal light source the guiding behavior for oxide-free bonding to a nanopatterned silicon wafer that acts as a low-index barrier. We use a sub-wavelength square array of small holes as an effective "low-index silicon" medium. It is weakly modulated along one dimension (superperiodic array) to outcouple the resulting guided modes to free space, where we use an angle-resolved spectroscopy study. Analysis of experimental branches confirms the capability to operate with a fundamental mode well localized in the III-V heterostructures.

  16. Mexican Americans. An Appendix to "A Curriculum Guide in Spanish (Levels III-V)".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Dora F.

    This teaching and resource unit on Mexican Americans is specifically designed for advanced Spanish students. Though it is presented mostly in English, it is to be implemented for the most part in Spanish, according to the methodology set forth in "A Curriculum Guide in Spanish (Levels III-V)." The main purpose of the unit is to increase student…

  17. Heterogeneous integration of a III-V VCSEL light source for optical fiber sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiang; Ma, Xiangdong; Yuan, Danyang; Zhang, Zanyun; Li, Enbang; Tang, Chunxiao

    2016-09-15

    We propose a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation system utilizing a III-V vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) as the on-chip light source. Binary blazed grating (BBG) for coupling between III-V VCSEL and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides is demonstrated for interrogation of the FBG sensor. The footprint size of the BBG is only 5.62  μm×5.3  μm, and each BBG coupler period has two subperiods. The diameter of the VCSEL's emitting window is 5 μm, which is slightly smaller than that of the BBG coupler, to be well-matched with the proposed structure. Results show that the coupling efficiency from vertical cavities of the III-V VCSEL to the in-plane waveguides reached as high as 32.6% when coupling the 1550.65 nm light. The heterogeneous integration of the III-V VCSEL and SOI waveguides by BBG plays a fundamental role in inducing a great breakthrough to the miniaturization of an on-chip light source for optical fiber sensing. PMID:27628346

  18. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main ‘symmetry-breaking’ interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin–orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule–solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted ‘electronic’ conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted ‘nuclear’, the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and ‘continui’ of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule–solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures. PMID:27703681

  19. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  20. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling on III-V single and dual junction photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alexandre W.; Höhn, Oliver; Micha, Daniel N.; Wagner, Lukas; Helmers, Henning; Bett, Andreas W.; Dimroth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Modeling single junction solar cells composed of III-V semiconductors such as GaAs with the effects of photon recycling yields insight into design and material criteria required for high efficiencies. For a thin-film single junction GaAs cell to reach 28.5% efficiency, simulation results using a recently developed model which accounts for photon recycling indicate that Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of electrons and holes must be longer than 3 and 1 μs, respectively, in a 2-μm thin active region, and that the native substrate must be removed such that the cell is coupled to a highly reflective rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's nonradiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14% to 33% experimentally, whereas the model requires increasing electron and hole SRH lifetimes to explain these results. This could be an indication of the saturating defects which mediate the SRH process. However, intermediate GaAs layers between the two subcells may also contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  1. III-V on silicon: Observation of gallium phosphide anti-phase disorder by low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döscher, Henning; Borkenhagen, Benjamin; Lilienkamp, Gerhard; Daum, Winfried; Hannappel, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    The formation of anti-phase disorder is a major obstacle in the heteroepitaxy of III-V semiconductors on silicon. For an investigation of the anti-phase domain (APD) structure of GaP/Si(100) samples on mesoscopic length scales, we applied dark-field imaging in a low-energy electron microscope (LEEM) to thin GaP films grown on Si(100) substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). A contamination-free transfer of the samples from the MOVPE ambient to the ultra-high vacuum chamber of the microscope ensured that the atomically well-ordered, P-rich (2 × 2)/c(4 × 2) reconstruction of the surface was preserved. Mutually perpendicular oriented domains of the characteristic GaP(100) reconstruction identify the APDs in the GaP film at the surface and enabled us to achieve high contrast LEEM images. Striped patterns of APDs reflect the regular terrasse structure of the two-domain Si(100)(2 × 1) substrate far away from defects. APDs in the proximity of the defects have larger lateral extensions and are arranged in target pattern-like structures around the defects. In contrast to transmission electron microscopy, which was also applied in a specific dark-field mode for comparison, the characterization of anti-phase disorder by LEEM is non-destructive, does not require elaborate sample preparation, and addresses extended length scales.

  2. EUVE Observations of Nonmagnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W

    2001-09-05

    The authors summarize EUVE's contribution to the study of the boundary layer emission of high accretion-rate nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, especially the dwarf novae SS Cyg, U Gem, VW Hyi, and OY Car in outburst. They discuss the optical and EUV light curves of dwarf nova outbursts, the quasi-coherent oscillations of the EUV flux of SS Cyg, the EUV spectra of dwarf novae, and the future of EUV observations of cataclysmic variables.

  3. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure. PMID:26726356

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of III-V Tunnel Field-Effect Transistors for Low Voltage Logic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczyk, Brian R.

    With voltage scaling to reduce power consumption in scaled transistors the subthreshold swing is becoming a critical factor influencing the minimum voltage margin between the transistor on and off-states. Conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are fundamentally limited to a 60 mV/dec swing due to the thermionic emission current transport mechanism at room temperature. Tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) utilize band-to-band tunneling as the current transport mechanism resulting in the potential for sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swings and have been identified as a possible replacement to the MOSFET for low-voltage logic applications. The TFET operates as a gated p-i-n diode under reverse bias where the gate electrode is placed over the intrinsic channel allowing for modulation of the tunnel barrier thickness. When the barrier is sufficiently thin the tunneling probability increases enough to allow for significant number of electrons to tunnel from the source into the channel. To date, experimental TFET reports using III-V semiconductors have failed to produce devices that combine a steep subthreshold swing with a large enough drive current to compete with scaled CMOS. This study developed the foundations for TFET fabrication by improving an established Esaki tunnel diode process flow and extending it to include the addition of a gate electrode to form a TFET. The gating process was developed using an In0.53Ga 0.57As TFET which demonstrated a minimum subthreshold slope of 100 mV/dec. To address the issue of TFET drive current an InAs/GaSb heterojunction TFET structure was investigated taking advantage of the smaller tunnel barrier height.

  5. Beyond CMOS: heterogeneous integration of III-V devices, RF MEMS and other dissimilar materials/devices with Si CMOS to create intelligent microsystems.

    PubMed

    Kazior, Thomas E

    2014-03-28

    Advances in silicon technology continue to revolutionize micro-/nano-electronics. However, Si cannot do everything, and devices/components based on other materials systems are required. What is the best way to integrate these dissimilar materials and to enhance the capabilities of Si, thereby continuing the micro-/nano-electronics revolution? In this paper, I review different approaches to heterogeneously integrate dissimilar materials with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In particular, I summarize results on the successful integration of III-V electronic devices (InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs)) with Si CMOS on a common silicon-based wafer using an integration/fabrication process similar to a SiGe BiCMOS process (BiCMOS integrates bipolar junction and CMOS transistors). Our III-V BiCMOS process has been scaled to 200 mm diameter wafers for integration with scaled CMOS and used to fabricate radio-frequency (RF) and mixed signals circuits with on-chip digital control/calibration. I also show that RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can be integrated onto this platform to create tunable or reconfigurable circuits. Thus, heterogeneous integration of III-V devices, MEMS and other dissimilar materials with Si CMOS enables a new class of high-performance integrated circuits that enhance the capabilities of existing systems, enable new circuit architectures and facilitate the continued proliferation of low-cost micro-/nano-electronics for a wide range of applications. PMID:24567473

  6. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  7. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2010-12-14

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  8. A study on room-temperature photoluminescence and crystallinity of RF-sputtered GaN for a cost-effective III-V-on-Si platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Hong-Seok; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Seongjae

    2015-11-01

    Recently, Si technology has been searching for ways to develop Si-driven future electronics by overcoming the limitations in its electrical and optical properties through more Moore (MM), morethan- Moore (MtM), and beyond complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) approaches. Among the suggested strategies, III-V-on-Si heterogeneous integration can be a solution that allows the merger of III-V-based devices and Si CMOS logic blocks on Si monolithically and costeffectively. GaN has wide applicability owing to its high electron mobility and large energy bandgap for high-speed low-power transistors and visible light sources. In this work, the room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) characteristics and the crystallinity of GaN-on-Si were empirically studied. GaN was deposited by using RF sputtering on p-type Si substrates. The results show that the peak location near 520 nm does not vary with the wavelength of the excitation laser, which is strongly supported by the fact that the signals are not from higher-order harmonics but are genuinely from the prepared GaN. Further, a sharp peak is observed in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis cooperatively performed with PL experiments. Consequently, partially-crystallized GaN has been obtained on Si by using conventional CMOS processing with a low thermal budget and high cost-effectiveness.

  9. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group III and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation of low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention: (1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; (2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 monolayers at a time); (3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and (4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1) through (3).

  10. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group II and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation to low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention 1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; 2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 mono-layers at a time); 3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and 4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1)-14 (3).

  11. The Physics of III-V Heterojunction Devices in Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karl

    2003-03-01

    III-V heterojunction devices have become pervasive in wireless communication appliances. In particular, the low voltage, high efficiency power amplifier transmitters in cellular phones are dominated by heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT), psuedomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMT) and heterojunction field effect transistors (HFET). Further, these III-V heterojunction devices are also appearing in infrastructure applications such as cellular base stations, wireless local area network (WLAN) and cable television (CATV) line amplifiers. The design of these devices requires unique band gap engineering in order to meet the cost, performance and ruggedness in the linear and saturated power modes required by today's cellular modulation protocols. This presentation will address the physics behind the design, development and operation of these technologies leading to their optimization for the wireless market place.

  12. To the understanding of the formation of the droplet-epitaxial III-V based nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nemcsics, Ákos

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we discuss the evolution of the self-assembling III-V based nanostructures. These nano-structures were prepared by droplet epitaxial technique. The different nanostructures such as quantum dot, quantum ring, double quantum ring, or nanohole form similarly from an initial Ga droplet but under different substrate temperature and various arsenic pressures. Started from few atomic courses, we give here a qualitative description of the key processes for all of the aforementioned nanostructures.

  13. Studies of the III-V compounds in the megabar regime. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoff, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    In this project we develop techniques for making high pressure measurements (x-ray diffraction and optical measurements) on samples in the multimegabar regime and we make systematic studies of the crystal structure of III-V compounds and other materials as a function of pressure with the broad objective of providing experimental data over a broad range of coordination number and interatomic spacing which can play a leading role in the testing and development of theoretical models of binding.

  14. Improved Precursor Chemistry for the Synthesis of III-V Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Daniel K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of III-V Quantum Dots has been long known to be more challenging than the synthesis of other types of inorganic quantum dots. This is attributed to highly reactive group-V precursors. We synthesized molecules that are suitable for use as group-V precursors and characterized their reactivity using multiple complementary techniques. We show that the size distribution of indium arsenide quantum dots indeed improves with decreased precursor reactivity. PMID:23228014

  15. III/V nano ridge structures for optical applications on patterned 300 mm silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, B.; Guo, W.; Mols, Y.; Tian, B.; Wang, Z.; Shi, Y.; Van Thourhout, D.; Pantouvaki, M.; Van Campenhout, J.; Langer, R.; Barla, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on an integration approach of III/V nano ridges on patterned silicon (Si) wafers by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Trenches of different widths (≤500 nm) were processed in a silicon oxide (SiO2) layer on top of a 300 mm (001) Si substrate. The MOVPE growth conditions were chosen in a way to guarantee an efficient defect trapping within narrow trenches and to form a box shaped ridge with increased III/V volume when growing out of the trench. Compressively strained InGaAs/GaAs multi-quantum wells with 19% indium were deposited on top of the fully relaxed GaAs ridges as an active material for optical applications. Transmission electron microcopy investigation shows that very flat quantum well (QW) interfaces were realized. A clear defect trapping inside the trenches is observed whereas the ridge material is free of threading dislocations with only a very low density of planar defects. Pronounced QW photoluminescence (PL) is detected from different ridge sizes at room temperature. The potential of these III/V nano ridges for laser integration on Si substrates is emphasized by the achieved ridge volume which could enable wave guidance and by the high crystal quality in line with the distinct PL.

  16. High mobility CMOS technologies using III-V/Ge channels on Si platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhang, R.; Taoka, N.; Urabe, Y.; Yasuda, T.; Yamada, H.; Ichikawa, O.; Fukuhara, N.; Hata, M.; Takenaka, M.

    2013-10-01

    MOSFETs using channel materials with high mobility and low effective mass have been regarded as strongly important for obtaining high current drive and low supply voltage CMOS under sub 10 nm regime. From this viewpoint, attentions have recently been paid to Ge and III-V channels. In this paper, possible solutions for realizing III-V/Ge MOSFETs on the Si platform are presented. The high quality III-V channel formation on Si substrates can be realized through direct wafer bonding. The gate stack formation is constructed on a basis of atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 gate insulators for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. As the source/drain (S/D) formation, Ni-based metal S/D is implemented for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. By combining these technologies, we demonstrate successful integration of InGaAs-OI nMOSFETs and Ge p-MOSFETs on a same wafer and their superior device performance.

  17. Semimetal/Semiconductor Nanocomposites for Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hong; Burke, Peter G.; Gossard, Arthur C.; Zeng, Gehong; Ramu, Ashok T.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-04-15

    In this work, we present research on semimetal-semiconductor nanocomposites grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for thermoelectric applications. We study several different III-V semiconductors embedded with semimetallic rare earth-group V (RE-V) compounds, but focus is given here to ErSb:InxGa1-xSb as a promising p-type thermoelectric material. Nano­structures of RE-V compounds are formed and embedded within the III-V semiconductor matrix. By codoping the nanocomposites with the appropriate dopants, both n-type and p-type materials have been made for thermoelectric applications. The thermoelectric properties have been engineered for enhanced thermoelectric device performance. Segmented thermoelectric power generator modules using 50 μm thick Er-containing nanocomposites have been fabricated and measured. Research on different rare earth elements for thermoelectrics is discussed.

  18. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1990--31 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; O`Bradovich, G.J.; Young, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year project. The objective of the research is to examine new design approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program is divided into two areas. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for III-V semiconductors. The second area centers on exploring design approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high quality material. Research activities consisted of an experimental study of minority carrier recombination in n-type, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-deposited GaAs, an assessment of the minority carrier lifetimes in n-GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and developing a high-efficiency cell fabrication process.

  19. Fast and slow transient charging in various III-V field-effect transistors with atomic-layer-deposited-Al2O3 gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Michael E.; Akyol, Tarik; Shahrjerdi, Davood; Young, Chadwin D.; Cheng, Julian; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    We report measurement of fast transient charging effects (FTCE) in enhancement-mode n-channel GaAs, InP, and In0.53Ga0.47As field-effect transistors (FETs) using Al2O3 as the gate dielectric. The FTCE data reveal superior drive current and enhanced threshold voltage stability for In0.53Ga0.47As FETs. We further report charge pumping measurements for In0.53Ga0.47As transistors, revealing that the majority of interface traps are donor traps, as well as an increased trap density within the Al2O3 bulk. Such data, together with FTCE data, reveal that drain current degradation observed during pulsed I-V measurements is predominantly due to slow oxide traps, underscoring their significance within III-V/high-κ metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs.

  20. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; Patkar, M.P.; Young, M.P.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes to examine new solar cell desip approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program consists of two elements. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for M-III semiconductors. Substantial efficiency gains may be possible by employing light trapping techniques to confine the incident photons, as well as the photons emitted by radiative recombination. The thin-film approach is a promising route for achieving substantial performance improvements in the already high-efficiency, single-junction, III-V cell. The second element of the research involves exploring desip approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high-quality material. This work has applications to multiple-junction cells, for which the selection of a component cell often involves a compromise between optimum band pp and optimum material quality. It could also be a benefit manufacturing environment by making the cell`s efficiency less dependent on materialquality.

  1. Bonding III-V material to SOI with transparent and conductive ZnO film at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinnan; Gao, Yonghao; Xu, Xingsheng

    2014-06-16

    A procedure of bonding III-V material to SOI at low temperature using conductive and transparent adhesive ZnO as intermediate layer is demonstrated. Bonding layer thickness of less than 100 nm was achieved in our experiment that guaranteed good light coupling efficiency between III-V and silicon. This bonding method showed good bonding strength with shear stress of 80 N/cm(2). The lowest resistance of the bonded samples was 48.9 Ω and the transmittance of the spin-coated ZnO layer was above 99%. This procedure is applicable for fabricating hybrid III-V/Si lasers. PMID:24977526

  2. Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    2001-01-01

    A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

  3. Equilibrium Phase Diagrams for Stranski-Krastanov Structure Mode of III V Ternary Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo

    1999-04-01

    The strain, surface and interfacial energies of III V ternary systems were calculated for three kinds of structure modes: the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) mode, the Stranski-Krastanov (SK) mode and the Volmer-Weber (VW) mode. The free energy for each mode was estimated as functions of the thickness and composition or lattice misfit. Through comparison of the free energy of each mode, it was found that the thickness-composition phase diagrams of III V ternary systems can be determined only by considering the balance of the free energy and three kinds of structure modes appear in the phase diagrams. The SK mode appears only when the lattice misfit is large and/or the lattice layer is thick. The VW mode appears when the lattice misfit is large and the lattice layer is thin and only in the InPSb/InP and GaPSb/GaP systems which have the largest lattice misfit of III V ternary systems. The stable region of the SK mode in the GaPSb/GaP and InPSb/InP phase diagrams is largest of all because the composition dependence of the strain energy of these systems is stronger than that of the other systems. The critical number of lattice layers below which two-dimensional (2D) layers precede the three-dimensional (3D) nucleation in the SK mode at x=1.0 depends on the lattice misfit. In the InPSb/InP system, the smallest number of 2D layers precede the 3D nucleation in the SK mode.

  4. Fabrication of III-V compound nanowires via hot embossing nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, An-Chieh; He, Shi-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Kwei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique used to fabricate III-V compound nanowires was investigated. A silicon mold and thermoplastic polymer mr-I 7010R were used for hot embossing nanoimprint lithography. The mold was patterned by e-beam lithography with two masks exposed with different dosages to reduce the proximity effect. The filling capability and residual layer thickness of the thermoplastic polymer were optimized at the embossing temperature of 125 °C. A 73 nm GaAs nanowire was obtained by the mold coated with an antisticking layer.

  5. Solid-state lighting : the III-V Epi Killer App.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2010-06-01

    Throughout its history, lighting technology has made tremendous progress: the efficiency with which power is converted into usable light has increased 2.8 orders of magnitude over three centuries. This progress has, in turn, fueled large increases in the consumption of light and productivity of human society. In this talk, we review an emerging new technology, solid-state lighting: its frontier performance potential; the underlying advances in physics and materials that might enable this performance potential; the resulting energy consumption and human productivity benefits; and the impact on worldwide III-V epi manufacture.

  6. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Narrow Gap Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stradling, R. A.; Mullin, J. B.

    1992-07-01

    This proceedings includes papers in the following areas: novel growth and structures; dilute magnetic semiconductors; II-VI electronics, optics, and growth; III-V devices; magnetism and magneto-optics; dots and novel confinement; linear and nonlinear optics; and material properties of IV-VI semiconductors.

  7. Ab initio study of magnetism in nonmagnetic metal substituted monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ai-Ming; Wang, Ling-ling; Meng, Bo; Xiao, Wen-Zhi

    2015-10-01

    Based on density functional theory, the electronic structures and magnetic properties have been studied in MoS2 monolayer via substitutional doping of nonmagnetic elements (IA, IIA, and IIIA elements). The magnetic moment of those doped systems origins form the interplay between the crystal-field of MoS2 matrix and localized Mo 4d states. On the whole, these doped MoS2 monolayers exhibit a half-metal→spin gapless (or narrow gap) semiconductor→ferromagnetic semiconductor transition as the dopants change from IA to IIIA groups. Electron and hole doping by a potential gate can realize a transition from ferromagnetic semiconductor to half metal. In important, the spin-polarization direction is switchable depending on the doped carrier's type.

  8. Anomalous first-order Raman scattering in III-V quantum dots: Optical deformation potential interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolo, Anabela G.; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail I.; Hamma, Mimoun; Trallero-Giner, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to the most commonly studied nanocrystals of II-VI materials, resonant Raman spectra of colloidal III-V quantum dots (QDs) show two almost equally intense peaks centered approximately at the longitudinal and transverse optical (TO) bulk phonon frequencies. The “anomalous” spectra of III-V QDs are explained in the framework of a microscopic theory for the first-order resonant Raman scattering, which takes into account the optical deformation potential (ODP) and Fröhlich exciton-phonon interactions—valid for spherical nanoparticles. It is obtained that: (i) the “anomalous” TO peak is mostly due to confined phonon modes with the angular momentum lp=3 ; (ii) Raman intensity depends on the QD radius (R) as R-3 for the ODP mechanism, while for the Fröhlich one it is proportional to R-1 ; and (iii) the relative intensity ITO/ILO ratio value is higher in backscattering configuration for cross polarization than for parallel one. Raman spectra calculated within the Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian for the electronic states and a phenomenological theory of optical vibrations including rigorously both the mechanical and electrostatic matching boundary conditions explain the experimental data for InP QDs using bulk phonon parameters and ODP constant.

  9. III-V nanowire growth mechanism: V/III ratio and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the dependence of Au-assisted InAs nanowire (NW) growth on InAs(111)B substrates as a function of substrate temperature and input V/III precursor ratio using organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Temperature-dependent growth was observed within certain temperature windows that are highly dependent on input V/III ratios. This dependence was found to be a direct consequence of the drop in NW nucleation and growth rate with increasing V/III ratio at a constant growth temperature due to depletion of indium at the NW growth sites. The growth rate was found to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature, and substrate decomposition. These studies advance understanding of the key processes involved in III-V NW growth, support the general validity of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for III-V NWs, and improve rational control over their growth morphology. PMID:17608541

  10. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Prete, P.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-01

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  11. [Structure and electronic properties of defects at nonlattice matched III-V semiconductor interfaces]. Progress report, 1989--90

    SciTech Connect

    Ast, D.G.

    1990-12-31

    Research focused on control of misfit dislocations in strained epitaxial layers of GaAs through prepatterning of the substrate. Patterning and etching trenches into GaAs substrates before epitaxial growth results in nonplanar wafer surface, which makes device fabrication more difficult. Selective ion damaging the substrate prior to growth was investigated. The question of whether the overlayer must or must not be discontinuous was addressed. The third research direction was to extend results from molecular beam epitaxially grown material to organometallic chemical vapor deposition. Effort was increased to study the patterning processes and the damage it introduces into the substrate. The research program was initiated after the discovery that 500-eV dry etching in GaAs damages the substrate much deeper than the ion range.

  12. Nucleation, propagation, electronic levels and elimination of misfit dislocations in III-V semiconductor interfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, G.P.; Matragrano, M.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: strained layer defects; the structural and electronic characteristics of misfit dislocations; requirements for the growth of high quality, low defect density InGaAs strained epitaxial layers; the isolation and nucleation of misfit dislocations in strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned, ion-damaged GaAs; the effect of pattern substrate trench depth on misfit dislocation density; the thermal stability of lattice mismatched InGaAs grown on patterned GaAs; misfit dislocations in ZnSe strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned GaAs; and the measurement of deep level states caused by misfit dislocations in InGaAs/GaAs grown on patterned GaAs substrates.

  13. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-27

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  14. Effect of low temperature anneals and nonthermal treatments on the properties of gap fill oxides used in SiGe and III-V devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E. Todd; Morin, Pierre; Madan, Anita; Mehta, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Silicon dioxide is used to electrically isolate CMOS devices such as fin field effect transistors by filling gaps between the devices (also known as shallow trench isolation). The gap fill oxide typically requires a high temperature anneal in excess of 1000 °C to achieve adequate electrical properties and oxide densification to make the oxide compatible with subsequent fabrication steps such as fin reveal etch. However, the transition from Si-based devices to high mobility channel materials such as SiGe and III-V semiconductors imposes more severe thermal limitations on the processes used for device fabrication, including gap fill oxide annealing. This study provides a framework to quantify and model the effect of anneal temperature and time on the densification of a flowable silicon dioxide as measured by wet etch rate. The experimental wet etch rates allowed the determination of the activation energy and anneal time dependence for oxide densification. Dopant and self-diffusion can degrade the channel material above a critical temperature. We present a model of self-diffusion of Ge and Si in SiGe materials. Together these data allowed us to map the thermal process space for acceptable oxide wet etch rate and self-diffusion. The methodology is also applicable to III-V devices, which require even lower thermal budget. The results highlight the need for nonthermal oxide densification methods such as ultraviolet (UV) and plasma treatments. We demonstrate that several plasma treatments, in place of high temperature annealing, improved the properties of flowable oxide. In addition, UV curing prior to thermal annealing enables acceptable densification with dramatically reduced anneal temperature.

  15. Method for preparing homogeneous single crystal ternary III-V alloys

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1991-01-01

    A method for producing homogeneous, single-crystal III-V ternary alloys of high crystal perfection using a floating crucible system in which the outer crucible holds a ternary alloy of the composition desired to be produced in the crystal and an inner floating crucible having a narrow, melt-passing channel in its bottom wall holds a small quantity of melt of a pseudo-binary liquidus composition that would freeze into the desired crystal composition. The alloy of the floating crucilbe is maintained at a predetermined lower temperature than the alloy of the outer crucible, and a single crystal of the desired homogeneous alloy is pulled out of the floating crucible melt, as melt from the outer crucible flows into a bottom channel of the floating crucible at a rate that corresponds to the rate of growth of the crystal.

  16. Radiative dark current in optically thin III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welser, Roger E.; Sood, Ashok K.; Tatavarti, Sudersena Rao; Wibowo, Andree; Wilt, David M.; Howard, Alex

    2015-03-01

    High-voltage InGaAs quantum well solar cells have been demonstrated in a thin-film format, utilizing structures that employ advanced band gap engineering to suppress non-radiative recombination and expose the limiting radiative component of the diode current. In particular, multiple InGaAs quantum well structures fabricated via epitaxial lift-off exhibit one-sun open circuit voltages as high as 1.05 V. The dark diode characteristics of these high-voltage III-V photovoltaic devices are compared to the radiative current calculated from the measured external quantum efficiency using a generalized detailed balance model specifically adapted for optically-thin absorber structures. The fitted n=1 component of the diode current is found to match the calculated radiative dark current when assuming negligible photon recycling, suggesting this thin-film multiple quantum well structure is operating close to the radiative limit.

  17. Recent pollution prevention research in III-V device manufacturing at Hewlett-Packard

    SciTech Connect

    Shire, D.B.

    1994-12-31

    Several coordinated hazardous waste minimization projects have been undertaken at the facilities involved in III-V device manufacturing. These include modifications to existing processes to reduce or eliminate emissions of CFCs, 1,1,1-TCA, xylenes, ethylene glycol ethers, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (in photoresist stripper), and other compounds. These issues are addressed in turn, noting the unique aspects of GaAs and GaP device manufacture that need to be taken into account. Goals achieved have been complete cessation of CFC and 1,1,1-TCA use and 33% reductions in xylene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene usage since 1990, despite significant increases in total production volume during the same time period. Specific strategies are also described for tracking chemical use and sharing best practices for hazardous waste reduction across functional groups.

  18. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  19. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  20. Advances in Single and Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics on Silicon for Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Ringel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative research effort at MIT, Ohio State University and NASA has resulted in the demonstration of record quality gallium arsenide (GaAs) based single junction photovoltaic devices on silicon (Si) substrates. The ability to integrate highly efficient, radiation hard III-V based devices on silicon offers the potential for dramatic reductions in cell mass (approx.2x) and increases in cell area. Both of these improvements offer the potential for dramatic reductions in the cost of on-orbit electrical power. Recently, lattice matched InGaP/GaAs and metamorphic InGaP/InGaAs dual junction solar cells were demonstrated by MBE and OMVPE, respectively. Single junction GaAs on Si devices have been integrated into a space flight experiment (MISSES), scheduled to be launched to the International Space Station in March of 2005. I-V performance data from the GaAs/Si will be collected on-orbit and telemetered to ground stations daily. Microcracks in the GaAs epitaxial material, generated because of differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between GaAs and Si, are of concern in the widely varying thermal environment encountered in low Earth orbit. Ground based thermal life cycling (-80 C to + 80 C) equivalent to 1 year in LEO has been conducted on GaAs/Si devices with no discernable degradation in device performance, suggesting that microcracks may not limit the ability to field GaAs/Si in harsh thermal environments. Recent advances in the development and testing of III-V photovoltaic devices on Si will be presented.

  1. Realization of back-side heterogeneous hybrid III-V/Si DBR lasers for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durel, Jocelyn; Ferrotti, Thomas; Chantre, Alain; Cremer, Sébastien; Harduin, Julie; Bernabé, Stéphane; Kopp, Christophe; Boeuf, Frédéric; Ben Bakir, Badhise; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the simulation, design and fabrication of a back-side coupling (BSC) concept for silicon photonics, which targets heterogeneous hybrid III-V/Si laser integration is presented. Though various demonstrations of a complete SOI integration of passive and active photonic devices have been made, they all feature multi-level planar metal interconnects, and a lack of integrated light sources. This is mainly due to the conflict between the need of planar surfaces for III-V/Si bonding and multiple levels of metallization. The proposed BSC solution to this topographical problem consists in fabricating lasers on the back-side of the Si waveguides using a new process sequence. The devices are based on a hybrid structure composed of an InGaAsP MQW active area and a Si-based DBR cavity. The emitted light wavelength is accordable within a range of 20 nm around 1.31μm thanks to thermal heaters and the laser output is fiber coupled through a Grating Coupler (GC). From a manufacturing point of view, the BSC approach provides not only the advantages of allowing the use of a thin-BOX SOI instead of a thick one; but it also shifts the laser processing steps and their materials unfriendly to CMOS process to the far back-end areas of fabrication lines. Moreover, aside from solving technological integration issues, the BSC concept offers several new design opportunities for active and passive devices (heat sink, Bragg gratings, grating couplers enhanced with integrated metallic mirrors, tapers…). These building boxes are explored here theoretically and experimentally.

  2. Epitaxial growth of III-V nitrides and phase separation and ordering in indium gallium nitride alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppalapudi, Dharanipal

    The family of III-V nitrides are wide band-gap semiconductors with a broad range of opto-electronic applications in LEDs, laser diodes, UV detectors as well as high temperature/high frequency devices. Due to the lack of good quality native substrates, GaN is grown on foreign substrates that have a lattice and thermal mismatch with GaN. This results in a material with a high density of defects, which in turn adversely affects the opto-electronic properties of the epilayer. In this study, GaN films were epitaxially grown on various substrates (C-plane sapphire, A-plane sapphire, SiC and ZnO) by molecular beam epitaxy. Additionally, GaN homoepitaxy onto laterally overgrown thick GaN substrates was investigated. It was demonstrated that the polarity of the GaN film plays a major role in determining the properties of the films. The growth parameters were optimized to eliminate inversion domain boundaries, which result in domains of opposite polarity in the GaN lattice. For growth on A-plane sapphire, it was found that substrate nitridation and low temperature buffer deposition are critical in order to obtain good epitaxial growth, in spite of the relatively small mismatch between the film and substrate. A crystallographic model was developed to explain this observation. By optimizing growth parameters, GaN films with excellent structural, transport, optical and device properties were grown. The second part of this research involves growth of ternary alloys and superlattice structures, which are essential in the fabrication of many devices. It was found that the InN-GaN pseudo-binary system is not homogeneous over the entire composition range. Due to the mismatch between the tetrahedral radii of GaN and InN, InGaN alloys exhibited phase separation and long-range atomic ordering. Investigations of InxGa1-xN films grown over a wide range of compositions by XRD and TEM showed that the predominant strain relieving mechanism was phase separation in films with x > 0.2, and

  3. Vapor phase growth technique of III-V compounds utilizing a preheating step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Gregory Hammond (Inventor); Zamerowski, Thomas Joseph (Inventor); Buiocchi, Charles Joseph (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    In the vapor phase epitaxy fabrication of semiconductor devices and in particular semiconductor lasers, the deposition body on which a particular layer of the laser is to be grown is preheated to a temperature about 40.degree. to 60.degree. C. lower than the temperature at which deposition occurs. It has been discovered that by preheating at this lower temperature there is reduced thermal decomposition at the deposition surface, especially for semiconductor materials such as indium gallium phosphide and gallium arsenide phosphide. A reduction in thermal decomposition reduces imperfections in the deposition body in the vicinity of the deposition surface, thereby providing a device with higher efficiency and longer lifetime.

  4. Weak ferromagnetism in `non-magnetic' austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crangle, John; Fogarty, A.; Taylor, M. J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetization and susceptability of the non-magnetic stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 316 have been measured at low temperatures using a SQUID magnetometer. A small but stable ferromagnetic component is always present. Field cooling shows the effects of exchange anisotropy. Another stainless steel AISI 321 is non-magnetic at room temperature but it transforms irreversibly to a partially ferromagnetic state when it is cooled below 280 K.

  5. Methods of producing free-standing semiconductors using sacrificial buffer layers and recyclable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ptak, Aaron Joseph; Lin, Yong; Norman, Andrew; Alberi, Kirstin

    2015-05-26

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a spinel substrate using a sacrificial buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The sacrificial buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using lattice-matching epitaxy or coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The sacrificial buffer layer may be dissolved using an epitaxial liftoff technique in order to separate the semiconductor device from the spinel substrate, and the spinel substrate may be reused in the subsequent fabrication of other semiconductor devices. The low-defect density semiconductor materials produced using this method result in the enhanced performance of the semiconductor devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials.

  6. High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrator Application

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Seth

    2012-09-12

    The High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrators project seeks to provide new photovoltaic cells for Concentrator Photovoltaics (CPV) Systems with higher cell efficiency, more favorable temperature coefficients and less sensitivity to changes in spectral distribution. The main objective of this project is to provide high efficiency III-V solar cells that will reduce the overall cost per Watt for power generation using CPV systems.This work is focused both on a potential near term application, namely the use of indium arsenide (InAs) QDs to spectrally "tune" the middle (GaAs) cell of a SOA triple junction device to a more favorable effective bandgap, as well as the long term goal of demonstrating intermediate band solar cell effects. The QDs are confined within a high electric field i-region of a standard GaAs solar cell. The extended absorption spectrum (and thus enhanced short circuit current) of the QD solar cell results from the increase in the sub GaAs bandgap spectral response that is achievable as quantum dot layers are introduced into the i-region. We have grown InAs quantum dots by OMVPE technique and optimized the QD growth conditions. Arrays of up to 40 layers of strain balanced quantum dots have been experimentally demonstrated with good material quality, low residual stain and high PL intensity. Quantum dot enhanced solar cells were grown and tested under simulated one sun AM1.5 conditions. Concentrator solar cells have been grown and fabricated with 5-40 layers of QDs. Testing of these devices show the QD cells have improved efficiency compared to baseline devices without QDs. Device modeling and measurement of thermal properties were performed using Crosslight APSYS. Improvements in a triple junction solar cell with the insertion of QDs into the middle current limiting junction was shown to be as high as 29% under one sun illumination for a 10 layer stack QD enhanced triple junction solar cell. QD devices have strong

  7. Growth of III-V nitrides and buffer layer investigation by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzu-Fang

    1999-11-01

    III-V nitrides have been investigated intensively due to the enormous interest in optoelectronic device applications in the green, blue, violet, and near-ultraviolet regions. Advances in III-V nitride materials for short wavelength light sources will lead to both a revolution in optical disk storage, as higher densities can be achieved with short wavelengths, and a major impact on imaging and graphic technology as high quality red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LED) and lasers become available. High quality GaN films have mostly been prepared by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and vapor phase epitaxy (VPE). Compared to these techniques, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a relatively new growth technique used widely for the growth of oxide thin films. However, several advantages of PLD make it worthy of study as a method of growing nitrides. The congruent ablation achieved with short UV-laser pulses allows deposition of a multicomponent material by employing a single target and the ability for depositing a wide variety of materials. This advantage makes PLD very suitable for growing multilayer structures sequentially in the same chamber and investigating the effect of buffer layers. Moreover, the strong nonequilibrium growth conditions of PLD may lead to different nucleation and growth processes. In this work, GaN and (Al,Ga)N films have been epitaxially grown on (0001) sapphire substrate by PLD, which has been successfully applied to controlling the lattice constant and band gap of (Al,Ga)N. Room-temperature photoluminescence of PLD-GaN exhibits a strong band edge emission at 3.4eV. The threading dislocations of GaN are predominantly screw dislocations with Burgers vector of <0001> while edge dislocations with Burgers vector of 1/3<11-20> are the dominant ones in GaN grown by MBE, MOCVD and VPE. This variation observed in defect characteristics may come from the difference in nucleation and growth kinetics between PLD

  8. Size-dependent properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyun Wook

    Doping is crucial to many potential applications of nanometer-sized semiconductors. Since their properties are strongly affected by both doping and quantum size effect, it is important to understand how dopants will influence its media under strong quantum confinement. In this dissertation, we will discuss the role of quantum confinement in the properties of nanometer-sized semiconductors doped with impurities. It is well-known that electronic and optical properties of nanometer-sized semiconductors can vary with size. We present size-dependent properties of lithium doped silicon and zinc oxide nanocrystals as examples. With the help of first-principles methods based on real space approach, we find that not only the size itself but also the chemical nature of the impurity is important to determine the properties of nanometer-sized semiconductors. We will also discuss size-induced magnetism in semiconductor nanostructures doped with non-magnetic impurities. From recent studies, it has been proposed that magnetic semiconductors can be designed by using non-magnetic defects, e.g., through the introduction of an extrinsic impurity atom that does not exhibit magnetism by itself. We examine this idea with silicon and zinc oxide nanostructures doped with impurities. We find that quantum size effect may induce magnetism in doped nanostructures. The evidence of the size-dependent magnetic properties offers a new perspective for the design of semiconductor-based spintronic materials.

  9. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  10. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  11. Robust Large Gap Two-Dimensional Topological Insulators in Hydrogenated III-V Buckled Honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Crisostomo, Christian P; Yao, Liang-Zi; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Albao, Marvin A; Bansil, Arun

    2015-10-14

    A large gap two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator (TI), also known as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator, is highly desirable for low-power-consuming electronic devices owing to its spin-polarized backscattering-free edge conducting channels. Although many freestanding films have been predicted to harbor the QSH phase, band topology of a film can be modified substantially when it is placed or grown on a substrate, making the materials realization of a 2D TI challenging. Here we report a first-principles study of possible QSH phases in 75 binary combinations of group III (B, Al, Ga, In, and Tl) and group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements in the 2D buckled honeycomb structure, including hydrogenation on one or both sides of the films to simulate substrate effects. A total of six compounds (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, TlAs, TlSb, and TlN) are identified to be nontrivial in unhydrogenated case; whereas for hydrogenated case, only four (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, and TlSb) remains nontrivial. The band gap is found to be as large as 855 meV for the hydrogenated TlBi film, making this class of III-V materials suitable for room temperature applications. TlBi remains topologically nontrivial with a large band gap at various hydrogen coverages, indicating the robustness of its band topology against bonding effects of substrates.

  12. Analysis of III-V Superlattice nB n Device Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhiger, David R.; Smith, Edward P.; Kolasa, Borys P.; Kim, Jin K.; Klem, John F.; Hawkins, Samuel D.

    2016-09-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared nB n detectors built with III-V superlattice materials have been tested by means of both capacitance and direct-current methods. By combining the results, it is possible to achieve clear separation of the two components of dark current, namely the generation-recombination (GR) current due to the Shockley-Read-Hall mechanism in the depletion region, and the diffusion current from the neutral region. The GR current component is unambiguously identified by two characteristics: (a) it is a linear function of the depletion width, and (b) its activation energy is approximately one-half the bandgap. The remaining current is shown to be due to diffusion because of its activation energy equaling the full bandgap. In addition, the activation energy of the total measured dark current in each local region of the temperature-bias parameter space is evaluated. We show the benefits of capacitance analysis applied to the nB n device and review some of the requirements for correct measurements. The carrier concentration of the unintentionally doped absorber region is found to be 1.2 × 1014 cm-3 n-type. It is shown that the depletion region resides almost entirely within the absorber. Also, the doping in the nB n barrier is found to be 4 × 1015 cm-3 p-type. Minority-carrier lifetimes estimated from the dark current components are on the order of 10 μs.

  13. Electrically pumped continuous-wave III-V quantum dot lasers on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siming; Li, Wei; Wu, Jiang; Jiang, Qi; Tang, Mingchu; Shutts, Samuel; Elliott, Stella N.; Sobiesierski, Angela; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Ross, Ian; Smowton, Peter M.; Liu, Huiyun

    2016-05-01

    Reliable, efficient electrically pumped silicon-based lasers would enable full integration of photonic and electronic circuits, but have previously only been realized by wafer bonding. Here, we demonstrate continuous-wave InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers directly grown on silicon substrates with a low threshold current density of 62.5 A cm-2, a room-temperature output power exceeding 105 mW and operation up to 120 °C. Over 3,100 h of continuous-wave operating data have been collected, giving an extrapolated mean time to failure of over 100,158 h. The realization of high-performance quantum dot lasers on silicon is due to the achievement of a low density of threading dislocations on the order of 105 cm-2 in the III-V epilayers by combining a nucleation layer and dislocation filter layers with in situ thermal annealing. These results are a major advance towards reliable and cost-effective silicon-based photonic-electronic integration.

  14. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hash, G. L.; Schwank, J. R.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Sandoval, C. E.; Connors, M. P.; Sheridan, T. J.; Sexton, F. W.; Slayton, E. M.; Heise, J. A.; Foster, C.

    1994-01-01

    A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10(exp 10) to 2 x 10(exp 14) protons/sq cm. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 x 10(exp -5) errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10(exp -5) errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-(mu)m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10(exp 14) protons/sq cm (equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)).

  15. Damage in III-V compounds during focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Rubanov, S; Munroe, P R

    2005-10-01

    The damage layers generated in III-V compounds exposed to energetic gallium ions in a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The damage on the side walls of the milled trenches is in the form of amorphous layers associated with direct amorphization from the gallium beam, rather than from redeposition of milled material. However, the damage on the bottom of the milled trenches is more complex. For InP and InAs the damage layers include the presence of crystalline phases resulting from recrystallization associated heating from the incident beam and gallium implantation. In contrast, such crystalline phases are not present in GaAs. The thicknesses of the damage layers are greater than those calculated from theoretical models of ion implantation. These differences arise because the dynamic nature of FIB milling means that the energetic ion beams pass through already damaged layers. In InP recoil phosphorus atoms also cause significant damage.

  16. Theoretical performance of multi-junction solar cells combining III-V and Si materials.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Ian; O'Mahony, Donagh; Corbett, Brian; Morrison, Alan P

    2012-09-10

    A route to improving the overall efficiency of multi-junction solar cells employing conventional III-V and Si photovoltaic junctions is presented here. A simulation model was developed to consider the performance of several multi-junction solar cell structures in various multi-terminal configurations. For series connected, 2-terminal triple-junction solar cells, incorporating an AlGaAs top junction, a GaAs middle junction and either a Si or InGaAs bottom junction, it was found that the configuration with a Si bottom junction yielded a marginally higher one sun efficiency of 41.5% versus 41.3% for an InGaAs bottom junction. A significant efficiency gain of 1.8% over the two-terminal device can be achieved by providing an additional terminal to the Si bottom junction in a 3-junction mechanically stacked configuration. It is shown that the optimum performance can be achieved by employing a four-junction series-connected mechanically stacked device incorporating a Si subcell between top AlGaAs/GaAs and bottom In0.53Ga0.47As cells.

  17. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, G.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sandoval, C.E.; Connors, M.P.; Sheridan, T.J.; Sexton, F.W.; Slayton, E.M.; Heise, J.A.; Foster, C.

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].

  18. Monolithic integration of III-V nanowire with photonic crystal microcavity for vertical light emission.

    PubMed

    Larrue, Alexandre; Wilhelm, Christophe; Vest, Gwenaelle; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo; Soci, Cesare

    2012-03-26

    A novel photonic structure formed by the monolithic integration of a vertical III-V nanowire on top of a L3 two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is proposed to enhance light emission from the nanowire. The impact on the nanowire spontaneous emission rate is evaluated by calculating the spontaneous emission factor β, and the material gain at threshold is used as a figure of merit of this vertical emitting nanolaser. An optimal design is identified for a GaAs nanowire geometry with r = 155 nm and L~1.1 μm, where minimum gain at threshold (gth~13×10³ cm⁻¹) and large spontaneous emission factor (β~0.3) are simultaneously achieved. Modification of the directivity of the L3 photonic crystal cavity via the band-folding principle is employed to further optimize the far-field radiation pattern and to increase the directivity of the device. These results lay the foundation for a new approach toward large-scale integration of vertical emitting nanolasers and may enable applications such as intra-chip optical interconnects.

  19. Monolithic integration of III-V nanowire with photonic crystal microcavity for vertical light emission.

    PubMed

    Larrue, Alexandre; Wilhelm, Christophe; Vest, Gwenaelle; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo; Soci, Cesare

    2012-03-26

    A novel photonic structure formed by the monolithic integration of a vertical III-V nanowire on top of a L3 two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is proposed to enhance light emission from the nanowire. The impact on the nanowire spontaneous emission rate is evaluated by calculating the spontaneous emission factor β, and the material gain at threshold is used as a figure of merit of this vertical emitting nanolaser. An optimal design is identified for a GaAs nanowire geometry with r = 155 nm and L~1.1 μm, where minimum gain at threshold (gth~13×10³ cm⁻¹) and large spontaneous emission factor (β~0.3) are simultaneously achieved. Modification of the directivity of the L3 photonic crystal cavity via the band-folding principle is employed to further optimize the far-field radiation pattern and to increase the directivity of the device. These results lay the foundation for a new approach toward large-scale integration of vertical emitting nanolasers and may enable applications such as intra-chip optical interconnects. PMID:22453454

  20. Laser field induced optical gain in a group III-V quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, Subramanian; Peter, Amalorpavam John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-08-01

    Effect of intense high frequency laser field on the electronic and optical properties of heavy hole exciton in an InAsP/InP quantum well wire is investigated taking into consideration of the spatial confinement. Laser field induced exciton binding energies, optical band gap, oscillator strength and the optical gain in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum well wire are studied. The variational formulism is applied to find the respective energies. The laser field induced optical properties are studied. The optical gain as a function of photon energy, in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum wire, is obtained in the presence of intense laser field. The compact density matrix method is employed to obtain the optical gain. The results show that the 1.55 μm wavelength for the fibre optic telecommunication applications is achieved for 45 Å wire radius in the absence of laser field intensity whereas the 1.55 μm wavelength is obtained for 40 Å if the amplitude of the laser field amplitude parameter is 50 Å. The characterizing wavelength for telecommunication network is optimized when the intense laser field is applied for the system. It is hoped that the obtained optical gain in the group III-V narrow quantum wire can be applied for fabricating laser sources for achieving the preferred telecommunication wavelength.

  1. Fabrication of HfO2 patterns by laser interference nanolithography and selective dry etching for III-V CMOS application

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructuring of ultrathin HfO2 films deposited on GaAs (001) substrates by high-resolution Lloyd's mirror laser interference nanolithography is described. Pattern transfer to the HfO2 film was carried out by reactive ion beam etching using CF4 and O2 plasmas. A combination of atomic force microscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis was used to characterise the various etching steps of the process and the resulting HfO2/GaAs pattern morphology, structure, and chemical composition. We show that the patterning process can be applied to fabricate uniform arrays of HfO2 mesa stripes with tapered sidewalls and linewidths of 100 nm. The exposed GaAs trenches were found to be residue-free and atomically smooth with a root-mean-square line roughness of 0.18 nm after plasma etching. PACS: Dielectric oxides 77.84.Bw, Nanoscale pattern formation 81.16.Rf, Plasma etching 52.77.Bn, Fabrication of III-V semiconductors 81.05.Ea PMID:21711946

  2. Semiconductor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, Harold J. (Inventor); Woodall, Jerry M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A technique for fabricating a semiconductor heterostructure by growth of a ternary semiconductor on a binary semiconductor substrate from a melt of the ternary semiconductor containing less than saturation of at least one common ingredient of both the binary and ternary semiconductors wherein in a single temperature step the binary semiconductor substrate is etched, a p-n junction with specific device characteristics is produced in the binary semiconductor substrate by diffusion of a dopant from the melt and a region of the ternary semiconductor of precise conductivity type and thickness is grown by virtue of a change in the melt characteristics when the etched binary semiconductor enters the melt.

  3. A novel surface preparation methodology for epi-ready antimonide based III-V substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, P. S.; Rajagopalan, G.; Kim, H. J.; Kumar, A.

    2005-05-01

    Surfaces of GaSb substrates currently available from various commercial vendors are nowhere close to device grade GaAs, Si or InP wafer surfaces. Hence epitaxial growth and device fabrication on as-received commercial substrates poses significant difficulties amongst antimonide based researchers. Antimonide based materials are known to have poor surface oxide quality and not so well understood chemical reactions with various chemicals used to remove the oxides prior to growth. There are no existing reports on the detailed recipe for the preparation of "atomically flat and clean" surfaces that works on wafers obtained from various commercial vendors. This paper presents a detailed recipe for obtaining atomically flat and clean GaSb surfaces, irrespective of the initial polishing source. The same recipe (with slight modification) has been found to be successful with other III-V and II-VI compounds. The novel surface preparation process developed in our laboratory includes, chemical-mechanical polishing using an agglomerate-free sub-micron alumina slurry on a soft pad such as velvet, surface cleaning using dilute ammonium or potassium hydroxide-H2O solution and surfactant or glycerol, surface degreasing using organic solvents, oxide desorption using HCl-H2O and HF-H2O mixtures, mild chemical etching using ammonium sulfide and a final rinse in high purity deionized (DI) water and methanol. Using this recipe, we have been able to achieve surfaces with atomic flatness (RMS surface roughness close to 0.5 nm over a 10 x 10 mm2) and extremely clean surfaces, irrespective of the initial contamination or the sources of the wafers. Results of wafer surfaces before and after polishing using our recipe will be presented.

  4. Integrating III-V, Si, and polymer waveguides for optical interconnects: RAPIDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Offrein, Bert-Jan; Caër, Charles; Neumeyr, Christian; Malacarne, Antonio; Guina, Mircea; Sheehan, Robert N.; Peters, Frank H.; Melanen, Petri

    2016-03-01

    We present a vision for the hybrid integration of advanced transceivers at 1.3 μm wavelength, and the progress done towards this vision in the EU-funded RAPIDO project. The final goal of the project is to make five demonstrators that show the feasibility of the proposed concepts to make optical interconnects and packet-switched optical networks that are scalable to Pb/s systems in data centers and high performance computing. Simplest transceivers are to be made by combining directly modulated InP VCSELs with 12 μm SOI multiplexers to launch, for example, 200 Gbps data into a single polymer waveguide with 4 channels to connect processors on a single line card. For more advanced transceivers we develop novel dilute nitride amplifiers and modulators that are expected to be more power-efficient and temperatureinsensitive than InP devices. These edge-emitting III-V chips are flip-chip bonded on 3 μm SOI chips that also have polarization and temperature independent multiplexers and low-loss coupling to the 12 μm SOI interposers, enabling to launch up to 640 Gbps data into a standard single mode (SM) fiber. In this paper we present a number of experimental results, including low-loss multiplexers on SOI, zero-birefringence Si waveguides, micron-scale mirrors and bends with 0.1 dB loss, direct modulation of VCSELs up to 40 Gbps, +/-0.25μm length control for dilute nitride SOA, strong band edge shifts in dilute nitride EAMs and SM polymer waveguides with 0.4 dB/cm loss.

  5. Low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators using MBE-grown III-V structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maserjian, Joseph L.; Larsson, Anders G.

    1991-12-01

    Device approaches are investigated for O-SLMs based on MBE engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photo-optic effects can be achieved in periodically (delta) -doped multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. The doping-defined barriers serve to separate and delay recombination of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. One can use this photo-effect to change the internal field across the MQWs giving rise to quantum-confined Stark shift. Alternately, the photo-generated electrons can be used to occupy the quantum wells, which in turn causes exciton quenching and a shift of the absorption edge. Recent work has shown that both of these predicted photo-optic effects can indeed be achieved in such MBE engineered structures. However, these enhanced effects are still insufficient for high contrast modulation with only single or double pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. We use the asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach which permits extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. Modulation of the absorption in the active cavity layers unbalances the cavity and 'turns on' the reflected output signal, thereby allowing large contrast ratios. This approach is realized with an all-MBE- grown structure consisting of a GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror (approximately equals 0.98) and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror (approximately equals 0.3). We use for our active cavities InGaAs/GaAs MQWs separated by npn (delta) -doped GaAs barriers to achieve sensitive photo-optic effect due to exciton quenching. High contrast modulation (> 60:1) is achieved with the Fabry-Perot structures using low power (< 100 mW/cm2) InGaAs/GaAS quantum well lasers for a write signal.

  6. Recent advances on antimony(III/V) compounds with potential activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hadjikakou, S K; Ozturk, I I; Banti, C N; Kourkoumelis, N; Hadjiliadis, N

    2015-12-01

    Antimony one of the heavier pnictogens, has been in medical use against microbes and parasites as well. Antimony-based drugs have been prescribed against leishmaniasis since the parasitic transmission of the tropical disease was understood in the beginning of the 20th century. The activity of arsenic against visceral leishmaniasis led to the synthesis of an array of arsenic-containing parasitic agents, among them the less toxic pentavalent antimonials: Stibosan, Neostibosan, and Ureastibamine. Other antimony drugs followed: sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) and melglumine antimoniate (Glucantim or Glucantime); both continue to be in use today despite their toxic side effects and increasing loss in potency due to the growing resistance of the parasite against antimony. Antimony compounds and their therapeutic potentials are under consideration from many research groups, while a number of early reviews recording advances of antimony biomedical applications are also available. However, there are only few reports on the screening for antitumor potential of antimony compounds. This review focuses upon results obtained on the anti-proliferative activity of antimony compounds in the past years. This survey shows that antimony(III/V) complexes containing various types of ligands such as thiones, thiosemicarbazones, dithiocarbamates, carboxylic acids, or ketones, nitrogen donor ligands, exhibit selectivity against a variety of cancer cells. The role of the ligand type of the complex is elucidated within this review. The complexes and their biological activity are already reported elsewhere. However quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling studies have been carried out and they are reported for the first time here. PMID:26092367

  7. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-28

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  8. Low-Cost Growth of III-V Layers on Si Using Close-Spaced Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Davis, Allison L.; Bachman, Benjamin F.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2015-06-14

    Close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) uses solid precursors to deposit material at high rates and with high precursor utilization. The use of solid precursors could significantly reduce the costs associated with III-V photovoltaics, particularly if growth on Si substrates can be demonstrated. We present preliminary results of the growth of GaAs1-xPx with x ≈ 0.3 and 0.6, showing that CSVT can be used to produce III-V-V’ alloys with band gaps suitable for tandem devices. Additionally, we have grown GaAs on Si by first thermally depositing films of Ge and subsequently depositing GaAs by CSVT. Patterning the Ge into islands prevents cracking due to thermal mismatch and is useful for potential tandem structures.

  9. Magnetic assembly of nonmagnetic particles into photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Hu, Yongxing; Kim, Hyoki; Ge, Jianping; Kwon, Sunghoon; Yin, Yadong

    2010-11-10

    We report the rapid formation of photonic crystal structures by assembly of uniform nonmagnetic colloidal particles in ferrofluids using external magnetic fields. Magnetic manipulation of nonmagnetic particles with size down to a few hundred nanometers, suitable building blocks for producing photonic crystals with band gaps located in the visible regime, has been difficult due to their weak magnetic dipole moment. Increasing the dipole moment of magnetic holes has been limited by the instability of ferrofluids toward aggregation at high concentration or under strong magnetic field. By taking advantage of the superior stability of highly surface-charged magnetite nanocrystal-based ferrofluids, in this paper we have been able to successfully assemble 185 nm nonmagnetic polymer beads into photonic crystal structures, from 1D chains to 3D assemblies as determined by the interplay of magnetic dipole force and packing force. In a strong magnetic field with large field gradient, 3D photonic crystals with high reflectance (83%) in the visible range can be rapidly produced within several minutes, making this general strategy promising for fast creation of large-area photonic crystals using nonmagnetic particles as building blocks.

  10. Modeling Quantum and Coulomb Effects in Nanoscale Enhancement-Mode Tri-Gate III-V MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sibiani, Sameer; Khair, Khadija; Ahmed, Shaikh

    2014-03-01

    Because of limited benefits of strain engineering in extremely scaled silicon devices and lack of demonstration of a performance gain at the product level with nanowires, nanotubes, graphene, and other exotic channel materials, there is a strong motivation to continue device scaling using high-transport III-V (such as InGaAs and InAsSb) channel materials beyond the year 2020. However, there are several challenges with III-V MOSFETs prohibiting their use in high-performance and low-power logic applications. In this work, we investigate the performance of the tri-gate III-V FETs as compared to the planar counterpart, and show how quantum size quantization and random dopant fluctuations (RDF) affect the tri-gate FET characteristics and how to curb these issues. A 3-D fully atomistic quantum-corrected Monte Carlo device simulator has been used in this work. Space-quantization effects have been accounted for via a parameter-free effective potential scheme (and benchmarked against the NEGF approach in the ballistic limit). To treat full Coulomb (electron-ion and electron-electron) interactions, the simulator implements a real-space corrected Coulomb electron dynamics (ED) scheme. Also, the essential bandstructure parameters (bandgap, effective masses, and the density-of-states) have been computed using a 20-band nearest-neighbour sp3d5s* tight-binding scheme.

  11. X-ray studies of III-V native oxide/gallium arsenide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Seong-Kyun

    Three x-ray techniques have been employed to study wet-thermal native oxides of AlGaAs on GaAs. For these materials, a knowledge of the role of As at the interface is important for understanding Fermi-level pinning and is a central issue in efforts to develop high performance III-V MOSFET devices. This study is focused on how the As is incorporated at the interface, the interfacial strain, and related local structural parameters. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to determine the site of residual As in wet-oxidized Al0.96Ga0.04As. In a ˜0.5 mum oxide film removed from its GaAs substrate, the remaining As atoms were found to be coordinated with oxygen in the form of amorphous As oxides, with a mixture of ˜80% As3+ and ˜20% As 5+ sites. These two sites are locally similar to As2O 3 and As2O5. Through this measurement, no evidence of interstitial or substitutional As, As precipitates, or GaAs was seen, implying that less than 10% of the As atoms are in these forms. To characterize the oxide structure in both the oxide film and the interfacial region, x-ray reflectivity and reflection-mode XAFS experiments were performed for a thin (300 A) oxidized AlxGa1-xAs (x = 0.96) film grown on GaAs. X-ray reflectivity studies showed that the composition of the surface oxidized film is not homogeneous as a function of depth. Reflection-mode XAFS, which uses the total external reflection of x-rays to confine an x-ray beam to the interfacial region, provided details of the local environment of As atoms at the interface of the oxide/GaAs. Analysis through this technique revealed that As atoms are in the form of mixed As oxides, with the local environment appearing to resemble As2O3 and As 2O5 in the interfacial region, which is consistent with the above observation from the isolated oxide film.

  12. Developing high-performance III-V superlattice IRFPAs for defense: challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lucy; Tidrow, Meimei; Aitcheson, Leslie; O'Connor, Jerry; Brown, Steven

    2010-04-01

    The antimonide superlattice infrared detector technology program was established to explore new infrared detector materials and technology. The ultimate goal is to enhance the infrared sensor system capability and meet challenging requirements for many applications. Certain applications require large-format focal plane arrays (FPAs) for a wide field of view. These FPAs must be able to detect infrared signatures at long wavelengths, at low infrared background radiation, and with minimal spatial cross talk. Other applications require medium-format pixel, co-registered, dual-band capability with minimal spectral cross talk. Under the technology program, three leading research groups have focused on device architecture design, high-quality material growth and characterization, detector and detector array processing, hybridization, testing, and modeling. Tremendous progress has been made in the past few years. This is reflected in orders-of-magnitude reduction in detector dark-current density and substantial increase in quantum efficiency, as well as the demonstration of good-quality long-wavelength infrared FPAs. Many technical challenges must be overcome to realize the theoretical promise of superlattice infrared materials. These include further reduction in dark current density, growth of optically thick materials for high quantum efficiency, and elimination of FPA processing-related performance degradation. In addition, challenges in long-term research and development cost, superlattice material availability, FPA chip assembly availability, and industry sustainability are also to be met. A new program was established in 2009 with a scope that is different from the existing technology program. Called Fabrication of Superlattice Infrared FPA (FastFPA), this 4-year program sets its goal to establish U.S. industry capability of producing high-quality superlattice wafers and fabricating advanced FPAs. It uses horizontal integration strategy by leveraging existing III-V

  13. Electron-hole correlations in semiconductor quantum dots with tight-binding wave fuctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seungwon, L.; Jonsson, L.; Wilkins, J.; Bryant, G.; Klimeck, G.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-hole states of semiconductor quantum dots are investigated within the framework of empirical tight-binding descriptions for Si, as an example of an indirect-gap material, and InAs and CdSe as examples of typical III-V and II-VI direct-gap materials.

  14. III-V photocathode with nitrogen doping for increased quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, L. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An increase in the quantum efficiency of a 3-5 photocathode is achieved by doping its semiconductor material with an acceptor and nitrogen, a column-5 isoelectronic element, that introduces a spatially localized energy level just below the conduction band similar to a donor level to which optical transitions can occur. This increases the absorption coefficient, alpha without compensation of the acceptor dopant. A layer of a suitable 1-5, 1-6 or 1-7 compound is included as an activation layer on the electron emission side to lower the work function of the photocathode.

  15. Evidence of space charge regions within semiconductor nanowires from Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Angela C; Chiaramonte, Thalita; Vicaro, Klaus O; Clerici, João H; Cotta, Mônica A

    2009-11-18

    We have studied the equilibrium electrostatic profile of III-V semiconductor nanowires using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Qualitative agreement of the measured surface potential levels and expected Fermi level variation for pure InP and InAs nanowires is obtained from electrical images with spatial resolution as low as 10 nm. Surface potential mapping for pure and heterostructured nanowires suggests the existence of charge transfer mechanisms and the formation of a metal-semiconductor electrical contact at the nanowire apex.

  16. Threading dislocation reduction in III-V films: Theoretical modeling and experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Sheila Kathleen

    Heteroepitaxy remains the most efficient and successful way to integrate materials with the same crystal structure but different lattice constants and optoelectronic properties. The purpose of this work is to understand the processes of strain relaxation and subsequent threading dislocation (TD) reduction through modeling and experiment. The interpretation of these data is made according to a previously published model that is based on dislocation reactions. 1,2 These reactions are the sole mechanism for threading dislocation reduction in III--V epitaxial films.3 Gallium nitride, with no available substrate even close to the lattice-matched condition, has a unique microstructure that develops as a result of initial island growth. Dislocation densities on the order of 109--10 10/cm2 are routinely measured in GaN grown on sapphire. Dislocation reduction in these hexagonal films is extremely slow, and it is shown in Chapter II that film thicknesses on the order of a substrate thickness are required to reduce threading dislocation densities to a low (10 6/cm2) level. A model is developed to treat the reduction of TDs in (0001)-oriented films that explains the non-saturating TD density in GaN. Screw dislocation behavior is shown to strongly affect the dislocation density falloff with thickness. Threading dislocation reduction in low-temperature-grown GaAs (250--350°C) and InGaAs was known to be more efficient than in high-temperature-grown GaAs (580°C). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the microstructure of GaAs grown on InP substrates at temperatures between 250 and 580°C to determine the mechanism by which TD reduction was enhanced. While a high level of arsenic antisite defects [ASGa] may affect the TD density at temperatures below 300°C, they do not account for the improved dislocation reduction. When dislocations are generated at high temperature, the TD density on the (111)A and (111)B planes is asymmetric

  17. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  18. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  19. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  20. Nonmagnetic impurity in the spin-gap state

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaosa, N.; Ng, T.

    1995-06-01

    The effects of nonmagnetic strong scatterers (unitary limit) on magnetic and transport properties are studied for resonating-valence-bond states in both the slave-boson and slave-fermion mean-field theories with the gap for the triplet excitations. In the {ital d}-wave pairing state of the slave-boson mean-field theory in two dimensions, there is no true gap for spinons, but the Anderson localization occurs, which leads to the local moment when the repulsive interaction is taken into account. In the slave-fermion mean-field theory, local moments are found bound to nonmagnetic impurities as a result of (staggered) gauge interaction. However, in both theories, localization of spinon does not appear in the resistivity, which shows the classical value for the holon.

  1. Mechanisms of current flow in metal-semiconductor ohmic contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, T. V. Gol'dberg, Yu. A.

    2007-11-15

    Published data on the properties of metal-semiconductor ohmic contacts and mechanisms of current flow in these contacts (thermionic emission, field emission, thermal-field emission, and also current flow through metal shunts) are reviewed. Theoretical dependences of the resistance of an ohmic contact on temperature and the charge-carrier concentration in a semiconductor were compared with experimental data on ohmic contacts to II-VI semiconductors (ZnSe, ZnO), III-V semiconductors (GaN, AlN, InN, GaAs, GaP, InP), Group IV semiconductors (SiC, diamond), and alloys of these semiconductors. In ohmic contacts based on lightly doped semiconductors, the main mechanism of current flow is thermionic emission with the metal-semiconductor potential barrier height equal to 0.1-0.2 eV. In ohmic contacts based on heavily doped semiconductors, the current flow is effected owing to the field emission, while the metal-semiconductor potential barrier height is equal to 0.3-0.5 eV. In alloyed In contacts to GaP and GaN, a mechanism of current flow that is not characteristic of Schottky diodes (current flow through metal shunts formed by deposition of metal atoms onto dislocations or other imperfections in semiconductors) is observed.

  2. Damage to III-V Devices During Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Johnson, D.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, K.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-10-14

    GaAs-based metal semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFETS), heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been exposed to ECR SiJ&/NH3 discharges for deposition of SiNX passivating layers. The effect of source power, rf chuck power, pressure and plasma composition have been investigated. Effects due to both ion damage and hydrogenation of dopants are observed. For both HEMTs and MESFETS there are no conditions where substantial increases in channel sheet resistivity are not observed, due primarily to (Si-H)O complex formation. In HBTs the carbon-doped base layer is the most susceptible layer to hydrogenation. Ion damage in all three devices is minimized at low rf chuck power, moderate ECR source power and high deposition rates.

  3. Calculations of Land'e g-factors in III-V nanowhisker quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, A.; Pryor, C. E.

    2006-03-01

    We present detailed numerical calculations of Land'e g-factors in semiconductor nanowire based quantum dots. We consider 111 oriented InAs nanowires with InP double barriers forming the dot, for which transport properties have recently been investigated[1]. We find that compared to recent calculations of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots[2], typical nanowire dots have larger, and negative, g-factors. We attribute this to the nanowire dots being larger than self-assembled dots, resulting in less angular momentum quenching. For nanowire sizes typical of those that have been fabricated to date, we find g -3.1. M. T. Björk et al., Nano Letters, 4, 1621 (2004).2. C. E. Pryor, M. E. Flatte, Phys. Rev. Lett., in press, www.arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0410678

  4. The Potts model on a Bethe lattice with nonmagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Semkin, S. V. Smagin, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    We have obtained a solution for the Potts model on a Bethe lattice with mobile nonmagnetic impurities. A method is proposed for constructing a “pseudochaotic” impurity distribution by a vanishing correlation in the arrangement of impurity atoms for the nearest sites. For a pseudochaotic impurity distribution, we obtained the phase-transition temperature, magnetization, and spontaneous magnetization jumps at the phase-transition temperature.

  5. Optimized III-V Multijunction Concentrator Solar Cells on Patterned Si and Ge Substrates: Final Technical Report, 15 September 2004--30 September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ringel, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    Goal is to demo realistic path to III-V multijunction concentrator efficiencies > 40% by substrate-engineering combining compositional grading with patterned epitaxy for small-area cells for high concentration.

  6. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reverse airstream shall be approved by MSHA under the appliable requirements of 30 CFR part 18; (2) Drive... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V... Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Main fans shall be— (1) Installed on...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reverse airstream shall be approved by MSHA under the appliable requirements of 30 CFR part 18; (2) Drive... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V... Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Main fans shall be— (1) Installed on...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reverse airstream shall be approved by MSHA under the appliable requirements of 30 CFR part 18; (2) Drive... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V... Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Main fans shall be— (1) Installed on...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reverse airstream shall be approved by MSHA under the appliable requirements of 30 CFR part 18; (2) Drive... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V... Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Main fans shall be— (1) Installed on...

  10. Multilayers of zinc-blende half-metals with semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavropoulos, Ph; Galanakis, I.; Dederichs, P. H.

    2004-06-01

    We report on first-principles calculations for multilayers of zinc-blende half-metallic ferromagnets CrAs and CrSb with III-V and II-VI semiconductors, in the [001] orientation. We examine the ideal and tetragonalized structures, as well as the case of an intermixed interface. We find that, as a rule, half-metallicity can be conserved throughout the heterostructures, provided that the character of the local coordination and bonding is not disturbed. We describe a mechanism operative at the interfaces with semiconductors that can also give a non-integer spin moment per interface transition atom, and derive a simple rule for evaluating it.

  11. Spectral filtering using active metasurfaces compatible with narrow bandgap III-V infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Kim, Jin; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-19

    Narrow-bandgap semiconductors such as alloys of InAsAlSb and their heterostructures are considered promising candidates for next generation infrared photodetectors and devices. The prospect of actively tuning the spectral responsivity of these detectors at the pixel level is very appealing. In principle, this could be achieved with a tunable metasurface fabricated monolithically on the detector pixel. Here, we present first steps towards that goal using a complementary metasurface strongly coupled to an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode operating in the long-wave region of the infrared spectrum. We fabricate such a coupled system using the same epitaxial layers used for infrared pixels in a focal plane array and demonstrate the existence of ENZ modes in high mobility layers of InAsSb. We confirm that the coupling strength between the ENZ mode and the metasurface depends on the ENZ layer thickness and demonstrate a transmission modulation on the order of 25%. We further show numerically the expected tunable spectral behavior of such coupled system under reverse and forward bias, which could be used in future electrically tunable detectors. PMID:27661890

  12. Carrier transport in III-V quantum-dot structures for solar cells or photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Lu; Jiang, Yang; Ma, Ziguang; Sun, Ling; Liu, Jie; Sun, Qingling; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Wenxin; Liu, Wuming; Jia, Haiqiang; Chen, Hong

    2016-09-01

    According to the well-established light-to-electricity conversion theory, resonant excited carriers in the quantum dots will relax to the ground states and cannot escape from the quantum dots to form photocurrent, which have been observed in quantum dots without a p-n junction at an external bias. Here, we experimentally observed more than 88% of the resonantly excited photo carriers escaping from InAs quantum dots embedded in a short-circuited p-n junction to form photocurrent. The phenomenon cannot be explained by thermionic emission, tunneling process, and intermediate-band theories. A new mechanism is suggested that the photo carriers escape directly from the quantum dots to form photocurrent rather than relax to the ground state of quantum dots induced by a p-n junction. The finding is important for understanding the low-dimensional semiconductor physics and applications in solar cells and photodiode detectors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574362, 61210014, 11374340, and 11474205) and the Innovative Clean-Energy Research and Application Program of Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. Z151100003515001).

  13. Spectral filtering using active metasurfaces compatible with narrow bandgap III-V infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Kim, Jin; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-19

    Narrow-bandgap semiconductors such as alloys of InAsAlSb and their heterostructures are considered promising candidates for next generation infrared photodetectors and devices. The prospect of actively tuning the spectral responsivity of these detectors at the pixel level is very appealing. In principle, this could be achieved with a tunable metasurface fabricated monolithically on the detector pixel. Here, we present first steps towards that goal using a complementary metasurface strongly coupled to an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode operating in the long-wave region of the infrared spectrum. We fabricate such a coupled system using the same epitaxial layers used for infrared pixels in a focal plane array and demonstrate the existence of ENZ modes in high mobility layers of InAsSb. We confirm that the coupling strength between the ENZ mode and the metasurface depends on the ENZ layer thickness and demonstrate a transmission modulation on the order of 25%. We further show numerically the expected tunable spectral behavior of such coupled system under reverse and forward bias, which could be used in future electrically tunable detectors.

  14. Wavelength-tunable entangled photons from silicon-integrated III-V quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zopf, Michael; Jung, Kyubong; Zhang, Yang; Keil, Robert; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the quantum information applications rely on indistinguishable sources of polarization-entangled photons. Semiconductor quantum dots are among the leading candidates for a deterministic entangled photon source; however, due to their random growth nature, it is impossible to find different quantum dots emitting entangled photons with identical wavelengths. The wavelength tunability has therefore become a fundamental requirement for a number of envisioned applications, for example, nesting different dots via the entanglement swapping and interfacing dots with cavities/atoms. Here we report the generation of wavelength-tunable entangled photons from on-chip integrated InAs/GaAs quantum dots. With a novel anisotropic strain engineering technique based on PMN-PT/silicon micro-electromechanical system, we can recover the quantum dot electronic symmetry at different exciton emission wavelengths. Together with a footprint of several hundred microns, our device facilitates the scalable integration of indistinguishable entangled photon sources on-chip, and therefore removes a major stumbling block to the quantum-dot-based solid-state quantum information platforms.

  15. Multichamber reactive ion etching processing for III-V optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Mark A.; Thompson, John A.; Armiento, Craig A.

    1991-03-01

    A multistep reactive ion etching (RIE) process sequence has been developed for fabrication of optoelectronic devices in 111-V semiconductor materials. This process was developed in a multichamber RIlE system that has been adapted to use a different etch chemistry in each of the four chambers as well as robotic handling of small pieces of ITT-V materials. This system has been used to fabricate ridge waveguide lasers based on the TnPJTnGaAsP material system. The etch sequence consists of the following steps: SiNX patterning in an SF6 plasma photoresist removal in an plasma ridge formation in the InP and InGaAsP epitaxial layers using a CH4/H2/Ar plasma and polymer removal using an 0 2 plasma. Laser interferometry and emission spectroscopy techniques were used to establish endpoints for many of these process steps. Laser arrays with threshold currents as low as 22 mA have been routinely fabricated using this process.

  16. III-V nanowire synthesis by use of electrodeposited gold particles.

    PubMed

    Jafari Jam, Reza; Heurlin, Magnus; Jain, Vishal; Kvennefors, Anders; Graczyk, Mariusz; Maximov, Ivan; Borgström, Magnus T; Pettersson, Håkan; Samuelson, Lars

    2015-01-14

    Semiconductor nanowires are great candidates for building novel electronic devices. Considering the cost of fabricating such devices, substrate reuse and gold consumption are the main concerns. Here we report on implementation of high throughput gold electrodeposition for selective deposition of metal seed particles in arrays defined by lithography for nanowire synthesis. By use of this method, a reduction in gold consumption by a factor of at least 300 was achieved, as compared to conventional thermal evaporation for the same pattern. Because this method also facilitates substrate reuse, a significantly reduced cost of the final device is expected. We investigate the morphology, crystallography, and optical properties of InP and GaAs nanowires grown from electrodeposited gold seed particles and compare them with the properties of nanowires grown from seed particles defined by thermal evaporation of gold. We find that nanowire synthesis, as well as the material properties of the grown nanowires are comparable and quite independent of the gold deposition technique. On the basis of these results, electrodeposition is proposed as a key technology for large-scale fabrication of nanowire-based devices.

  17. InAsSbBi, a direct band-gap, III-V, LWIR material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringfellow, G. B.; Jones, Colin E.; Frodsham, John

    1990-01-01

    In the last several years Dr. Stringfellow's group at the University of Utah has reported success in incorporating over 3 percent Bi in InAs and 1.5 percent in InAsSb using Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) growth techniques. For InAs the lattice constant increase is linear with a=6.058+0.966x (InAs(1-x)Bi(x)), and a decrease in band gap energy of dEg / dx = -55meV / at a percentage Bi. Extrapolating this to the ternary minimum band gap at InAs(0.35)Sb(0.65), an addition of 1 to 2 percent Bi should drop the band gap to the 0.1 to 0.05eV range (10 to 20 microns). These alloys are direct band gap semiconductors making them candidates for far IR detectors. The current status of the InAsSbBi alloys is that good crystal morphology and x ray diffraction data has been obtained for up to 3.4 percent Bi. The Bi is metastable at these concentrations but the OMVPE grown material has been able to withstand the 400 C growth temperature for several hours without phase separation.

  18. Wavelength-tunable entangled photons from silicon-integrated III-V quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zopf, Michael; Jung, Kyubong; Zhang, Yang; Keil, Robert; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    Many of the quantum information applications rely on indistinguishable sources of polarization-entangled photons. Semiconductor quantum dots are among the leading candidates for a deterministic entangled photon source; however, due to their random growth nature, it is impossible to find different quantum dots emitting entangled photons with identical wavelengths. The wavelength tunability has therefore become a fundamental requirement for a number of envisioned applications, for example, nesting different dots via the entanglement swapping and interfacing dots with cavities/atoms. Here we report the generation of wavelength-tunable entangled photons from on-chip integrated InAs/GaAs quantum dots. With a novel anisotropic strain engineering technique based on PMN-PT/silicon micro-electromechanical system, we can recover the quantum dot electronic symmetry at different exciton emission wavelengths. Together with a footprint of several hundred microns, our device facilitates the scalable integration of indistinguishable entangled photon sources on-chip, and therefore removes a major stumbling block to the quantum-dot-based solid-state quantum information platforms. PMID:26813326

  19. Preservation of water samples for arsenic(III/V) determinations: An evaluation of the literature and new analytical results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Maest, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Published literature on preservation procedures for stabilizing aqueous inorganic As(III/V) redox species contains discrepancies. This study critically evaluates published reports on As redox preservation and explains discrepancies in the literature. Synthetic laboratory preservation experiments and time stability experiments were conducted for natural water samples from several field sites. Any field collection procedure that filters out microorganisms, adds a reagent that prevents dissolved Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation, and isolates the sample from solar radiation will preserve the As(III/V) ratio. Reagents that prevent Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation include HCl, H 2SO4, and EDTA, although extremely high concentrations of EDTA are necessary for some water samples high in Fe. Photo-catalyzed Fe(III) reduction causes As(III) oxidation; however, storing the sample in the dark prevents photochemical reactions. Furthermore, the presence of Fe(II) or SO 4 inhibits the oxidation of As(III) by Fe(III) because of complexation reactions and competing reactions with free radicals. Consequently, fast abiotic As(III) oxidation reactions observed in the laboratory are not observed in natural water samples for one or more of the following reasons: (1) the As redox species have already stabilized, (2) most natural waters contain very low dissolved Fe(III) concentrations, (3) the As(III) oxidation caused by Fe(III) photoreduction is inhibited by Fe(II) or SO4.

  20. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Daix, N. Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  1. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  2. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  3. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  4. Large low-field positive magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Liu, Enke; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-11-01

    High-quality nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystals were synthesized by a Bi self-flux method. This compound was revealed to be a hole-dominated semimetal with a large low-field magnetoresistance up to 240% at 2 K in a magnetic field of 1 T. Magneto-transport measurements demonstrated that the large low-field magnetoresistance effect resulted from the coexistence of field-induced metal-semiconductor transition and weak-antilocalization effect. Moreover, Hall measurements indicated that ScPtBi single crystal showed a high mobility over a wide temperature region even up to room temperature (4050 cm2V-1s-1 at 2 K-2016 cm2V-1s-1 at 300 K). These findings not only suggest the nonmagnetic ScPtBi semimetal a potential material candidate for applications in high-sensitivity magnetic sensors but also are of great significance to comprehensively understand the rare-earth based half-Heusler compounds.

  5. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field Hsat for arbitrary spin S . We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field Hsat≤H ≤HsatI. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H =Hsat, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ ∝1 /√{H -Hsat }. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit.

  6. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field H_{sat} for arbitrary spin S. We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field H_{sat}≤H≤H_{sat}^{I}. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H=H_{sat}, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ∝1/sqrt[H-H_{sat}]. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit. PMID:27203342

  7. Magnetoresistance in magnetic and nonmagnetic rare earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, E.; Maikis, M.; Bauer, E.; Nowotny, H.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance Δρ/ ρ of selected magnetic and nonmagnetic RE compounds in fields up to 10 T has been measured. The discussion of the positive magnetoresistance is based on Kohler's rule. It was found that deviations from Kohler's rule at low temperatures depend on the magnitude of the individual residual resistivity. Ferromagnetic compounds exhibit negative values and a minimum in the vicinity of the Curie temperature in accordance to a model calculation of Yamada and Takada. The positive Δρ/ ρ contribution in the low temperature region, observed in all magnetic compounds, is due to the dominating classical magnetoresistance in this temperature range.

  8. EUV and x-ray emission of nonmagnetic catacysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1997-09-01

    Recent results are presented and discussed regarding the EUV and X-ray emission of nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables. Emphasis is given to high accretion rate systems (novalike variables and dwarf novae in outburst), and to a number of apparent discrepancies between observations and the theory of the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf. Discussed are EUV and X-ray light curves, dwarf nova oscillations, and spectra, with new and previously unpublished results on SS Cyg and OY Car.

  9. Optical and electronic properties of some semiconductors from energy gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil K.; Pattanaik, Anup

    2016-03-01

    II-VI and III-V tetrahedral semiconductors have significant potential for novel optoelectronic applications. In the present work, some of the optical and electronic properties of these groups of semiconductors have been studied using a recently proposed empirical relationship for refractive index from energy gap. The calculated values of these properties are also compared with those calculated from some well known relationships. From an analysis of the calculated electronic polarisability of these tetrahedral binary semiconductors from different formulations, we have proposed an empirical relation for its calculation. The predicted values of electronic polarisability of these semiconductors agree fairly well with the known values over a wide range of energy gap. The proposed empirical relation has also been used to calculate the electronic polarisability of some ternary compounds.

  10. Room temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Larumbe, S.; Pastor, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles is analyzed in the present work. Undoped and N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained employing sol-gel procedure using urea as the nitrogen source. The obtained gels were first dried at 70 °C and afterwards calcined in air at 300 °C. A residual carbon concentration was retained in the samples as a consequence of the organic decomposition process. Post-annealing treatments at 300 °C under air and vacuum conditions were also performed. The crystallographic structure of nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, obtaining a single anatase crystalline phase after the calcinations (mean nanoparticle diameters around 5-8 nm). SQUID magnetometry was employed to analyze the magnetic response of the samples. Whereas for the undoped samples synthesized with hydrolysis rate h = 6, paramagnetic like behavior is observed at room temperature, the N-doped nanoparticles (h = 3) show a weak ferromagnetic response (saturation magnetization ≈10-3 emu/g). Moreover, a clear reinforcement of the room-temperature ferromagnetism response is found with the post-annealing treatments, in particular that performed in vacuum. Thus, the results indicate the dominant role of the oxygen stoichiometry and the oxygen vacancies in the room temperature ferromagnetic response of these TiO2 nanoparticles.

  11. Heterogeneously integrated III-V/Si single mode lasers based on a MMI-ring configuration and triplet-ring reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvaninia, S.; Verstuyft, S.; Lelarge, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Messaoudene, S.; Fédéli, J. M.; Geluk, E. J.; De Vries, T.; Smalbrugge, B.; Bolk, J.; Smit, M.; Van Thourhout, D.; Roelkens, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we show that using a DVS-BCB adhesive bonding process compact heterogeneously integrated III-V/silicon single mode lasers can be realized. Two new designs were implemented: in a first design a multimode interferometer coupler (MMI) - ring resonator combination is used to provide a comb-like reflection spectrum, while in a second design a triplet-ring reflector design is used to obtain the same. A broadband silicon Bragg grating reflector is implemented on the other side of the cavity. The III-V optical amplifier is heterogeneously integrated on the 400nm thick silicon waveguide layer, which is compatible with high-performance modulator designs and allows for efficient coupling to a standard 220nm high index contrast silicon waveguide layer. In order to make the optical coupling efficient, both the III-V waveguide and the silicon waveguide are tapered, with a tip width of the III-V waveguide of around 500nm. The III-V thin film optical amplifier is implemented as a 3μm wide mesa etched through to the n-type InP contact layer. In this particular device implementation the amplifier section was 500μm long. mW-level waveguide coupled output power at 20°C and a side mode suppression ratio of more than 40dB is obtained.

  12. Study on the impact of device parameter variations on performance of III-V homojunction and heterojunction tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmat, Maedeh; Kamal, Mehdi; Afzali-Kusha, Ali; Pedram, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the impact of physical parameter variations on the electrical characteristics of III-V TFETs is investigated. The study is performed on the operations of two optimized ultra-thin 20 nm double-gate transistors. The two device structures are InAs homojunction TFET and InAs-GaAs0.1Sb0.9 heterojunction TFET. The operation parameters are the ON-current, OFF-current, and threshold voltage. The investigation is performed at the device level, using a device simulator and the Monte-Carlo simulation approach is exploited to extract the distribution of electrical parameters in the presence of the process variation. The results reveal that the operation of the transistor is more sensitive to the doping of the source and gate work function compared to other physical parameters. Furthermore, the heterojunction TFETs show less sensitivity to physical parameter variations compared to the homojunction ones.

  13. Transfer-printing-based integration of single-mode waveguide-coupled III-V-on-silicon broadband light emitters.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Andreas; Cardile, Paolo; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Fecioru, Alin M; Bower, Christopher; Delbeke, Danae; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Günther

    2016-06-27

    We present the first III-V opto-electronic components transfer printed on and coupled to a silicon photonic integrated circuit. Thin InP-based membranes are transferred to an SOI waveguide circuit, after which a single-spatial-mode broadband light source is fabricated. The process flow to create transfer print-ready coupons is discussed. Aqueous FeCl3 at 5°C was found to be the best release agent in combination with the photoresist anchoring structures that were used. A thin DVS-BCB layer provides a strong bond, accommodating the post-processing of the membranes. The resulting optically pumped LED has a 3 dB bandwidth of 130 nm, comparable to devices realized using a traditional die-to-wafer bonding method. PMID:27410539

  14. Effects of proton irradiation on luminescence and carrier dynamics of self-assembled III-V quatum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Marcinkevicius, S.; Siegert, J.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Lobo, C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of proton irradiation (1.5 MeV) on photoluminescence intensities and carrier dynamics were compared between III-V quantum dots and similar quantum well structures. A significant enhancement in radiation tolerance is seen with three-dimensional quantum confinement. Measurements were carried out in different quantum dot (QD) structures, varying in material (InGaAs/GaAs and InAlAs/AlGaAs), QD surface density (4x10^8 to 3x10'^10 cm^-2), and substrate orientation [(100) and (311) B]. Similar trends were observed for all QD samples. A slight increase in PL emission after low to intermediate proton doses, are also observed in InGaAs/GaAs (100) QD structures. The latter is explained in terms of more efficient carrier transfer from the wetting layer via radiation-induced defects.

  15. Removal of Arsenic (III, V) from aqueous solution by nanoscale zero-valent iron stabilized with starch and carboxymethyl cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, synthetic nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) stabilized with two polymers, Starch and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were examined and compared for their ability in removing As (III) and As (V) from aqueous solutions as the most promising iron nanoparticles form for arsenic removal. Batch operations were conducted with different process parameters such as contact time, nanoparticles concentration, initial arsenic concentration and pH. Results revealed that starch stabilized particles (S-nZVI) presented an outstanding ability to remove both arsenate and arsenite and displayed ~ 36.5% greater removal for As (V) and 30% for As (III) in comparison with CMC-stabilized nanoparticles (C-nZVI). However, from the particle stabilization viewpoint, there is a clear trade off to choosing the best stabilized nanoparticles form. Removal efficiency was enhanced with increasing the contact time and iron loading but reduced with increasing initial As (III, V) concentrations and pH. Almost complete removal of arsenic (up to 500 μg/L) was achieved in just 5 min when the S-nZVI mass concentration was 0.3 g/L and initial solution pH of 7 ± 0.1. The maximum removal efficiency of both arsenic species was obtained at pH = 5 ± 0.1 and starched nanoparticles was effective in slightly acidic and natural pH values. The adsorption kinetics fitted well with pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 14 mg/g for arsenic (V), and 12.2 mg/g for arsenic (III). It could be concluded that starch stabilized Fe0 nanoparticles showed remarkable potential for As (III, V) removal from aqueous solution e.g. contaminated water. PMID:24860660

  16. Implicit versus explicit momentum relaxation time solution for semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E. G. Ruiz, F. G. Godoy, A. Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-07-14

    We discuss the necessity of the exact implicit Momentum Relaxation Time (MRT) solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in order to achieve reliable carrier mobility results in semiconductor nanowires. Firstly, the implicit solution for a 1D electron gas with a isotropic bandstructure is presented resulting in the formulation of a simple matrix system. Using this solution as a reference, the explicit approach is demonstrated to be inaccurate for the calculation of inelastic anisotropic mechanisms such as polar optical phonons, characteristic of III-V materials. Its validity for elastic and isotropic mechanisms is also evaluated. Finally, the implications of the MRT explicit approach inaccuracies on the total mobility of Si and III-V NWs are studied.

  17. Evolution of damping in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic thin film bilayers as a function of nonmagnetic layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzawi, S.; Ganguly, A.; Tokaç, M.; Rowan-Robinson, R. M.; Sinha, J.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Barman, A.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of damping in Co/Pt, Co/Au, and Ni81Fe19 /Pt bilayers was studied with increasing nonmagnetic (NM) heavy-metal layer thicknesses in the range 0.2 nm ≤tNM≤10 nm , where tNM is the NM layer thickness. Magnetization precession was measured in the time domain using time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry. Fitting of the data with a damped sinusoidal function was undertaken in order to extract the phenomenological Gilbert damping coefficient α . For Pt-capped Co and Ni81Fe19 layers a large and complex dependence of α on the Pt layer thickness was observed, while for Au capping no significant dependence was observed. It is suggested that this difference is related to the different localized spin-orbit interaction related to intermixing and to d -d hybridization of Pt and Au at the interface with Co or Ni81Fe19 . Also it was shown that damping is affected by the crystal structure differences in FM thin films and at the interface, which can modify the spin-diffusion length and the effective spin-mixing conductance. In addition to the intrinsic damping an extrinsic contribution plays an important role in the enhancement of damping when the Pt capping layer is discontinuous. The dependence of damping on the nonmagnetic layer thickness is complex but shows qualitative agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  18. Size dependence of non-magnetic thickness in YIG nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyaifar, M.; Mohammadpour, H.; Dorafshani, M.; Hasanpour, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study is focused on particle size dependence of structural and magnetic properties in yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12) nanoparticles. A series of YIG samples with different particle size were produced by varying the annealing temperatures. The X-ray analysis revealed an inverse correlation between lattice parameter and the crystallite size. The normal distribution is used for fitting the particles size distribution which is extracted from scanning electron micrographs. Also, by using the results of vibrating sample magnetometer, the magnetic diameter was calculated based on Langevin model in order to investigate the variation of dead layer thickness. Furthermore, the observed line broadening in Mössbauer spectra confirmed the increase of non-magnetic thickness due to the reduction of particle size.

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  20. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  1. Donor level of interstitial hydrogen in semiconductors: Deep level transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Dobaczewski, L.; Nielsen, K. Bonde; Kolkovsky, V.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted; Weber, J.

    2009-12-01

    The behaviour of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors has attracted considerable interest during several decades. Due to its high diffusion rate and ability to react with a wide variety of lattice imperfections such as intrinsic point defects, impurities, interfaces and surfaces, hydrogen is an impurity of fundamental importance in semiconductor materials. It has been already evidenced in previous investigations that the most fundamental hydrogen-related defects in-group IV semiconductors are interstitial hydrogen atoms occupying the bond-centre site ( BC) or the interstitial tetrahedral site ( T). Using first-principles calculations Van de Walle predicted similar properties of isolated hydrogen in other II-VI and III-V semiconductors. Another interesting prediction shown in that work was the existence of a universal alignment for the hydrogen electronic (-/+) level. Until now there is no direct experimental information regarding the individual isolated hydrogen states in compound semiconductors and most reported properties have been inferred indirectly. In the present work in-situ conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high-resolution Laplace DLTS techniques are used to analyse hydrogen-related levels after low-temperature proton implantation in different II-VI and III-V semiconductors including GaAs, ZnO and CdTe. From these experimental observations the donor level of isolated hydrogen is found to keep almost a constant value in the absolute energy scale taking into account different band-offsets calculated for the whole group of semiconductors.

  2. Characteristics of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Source for the Production of Active Nitrogen Species in III-V Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A simple analysis is provided to determine the characteristics of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for the generation of active nitrogen species in the molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nitrides. The effects of reactor geometry, pressure, power, and flow rate on the dissociation efficiency and ion flux are presented. Pulsing the input power is proposed to reduce the ion flux.

  3. Semiconductor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C. (Inventor); Lagowski, Jacek (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor sensor adapted to detect with a high degree of sensitivity small magnitudes of a mechanical force, presence of traces of a gas or light. The sensor includes a high energy gap (i.e., .about. 1.0 electron volts) semiconductor wafer. Mechanical force is measured by employing a non-centrosymmetric material for the semiconductor. Distortion of the semiconductor by the force creates a contact potential difference (cpd) at the semiconductor surface, and this cpd is determined to give a measure of the force. When such a semiconductor is subjected to illumination with an energy less than the energy gap of the semiconductors, such illumination also creates a cpd at the surface. Detection of this cpd is employed to sense the illumination itself or, in a variation of the system, to detect a gas. When either a gas or light is to be detected and a crystal of a non-centrosymmetric material is employed, the presence of gas or light, in appropriate circumstances, results in a strain within the crystal which distorts the same and the distortion provides a mechanism for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the gas or the light, as the case may be.

  4. Non-magnetic compensation in ferromagnetic Ga1-xMnxAs and Ga1-xMnxP synthesized by ion implantation and pulsed-laser melting

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpulla, M.A.; Stone, P.R.; Sharp, I.D.; Haller, E.E.; Dubon, O.D.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.

    2008-02-05

    The electronic and magnetic effects of intentional compensation with non-magnetic donors are investigated in the ferromagnetic semiconductors Ga1-xMnxAs and Ga1-xMnxP synthesized using ion implantation and pulsed-laser melting (II-PLM). It is demonstrated that compensation with non-magnetic donors and MnI have similarqualitative effects on materials properties. With compensation TC decreases, resistivity increases, and stronger magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect attributed to skew scattering are observed. Ga1-xMnxAs can be controllably compensated with Te through a metal-insulator transition through which the magnetic and electrical properties vary continuously. The resistivity of insulating Ga1-xMnxAs:Te can be described by thermal activation to the mobility edge and simply-activated hopping transport. Ga1-xMnxP doped with S is insulating at all compositions but shows decreasing TC with compensation. The existence of a ferromagnetic insulating state in Ga1-xMnxAs:Te and Ga1-xMnxP:S having TCs of the same order as the uncompensated materials demonstrates that localized holes are effective at mediating ferromagnetism in ferromagnetic semiconductors through the percolation of ferromagnetic 'puddles' which at low temperatures.

  5. Band to band tunneling in III-V semiconductors: Implications of complex band structure, strain, orientation, and off-zone center contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Kausik

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we use a tight binding Hamiltonian with spin orbit coupling to study the real and complex band structures of relaxed and strained GaAs. A simple d orbital on-site energy shift coupled with appropriate scaling of the off-diagonal terms is found to correctly reproduce the band-edge shifts with strain. Four different 〈100〉 strain combinations, namely, uniaxial compressive, uniaxial tensile, biaxial compressive, and biaxial tensile strain are studied, revealing rich valence band structure and strong relative orientation dependent tunneling. It is found that complex bands are unable to provide unambiguous tunneling paths away from the Brillouin zone center. Tunneling current density distribution over the Brillouin zone is computed using non-equilibrium Green's function approach elucidating a physical picture of band to band tunneling.

  6. Effect of quantum dot size and size distribution on the intersublevel transitions and absorption coefficients of III-V semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kabi, Sanjib; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2015-03-28

    The intersublevel absorption peak energy and absorption coefficient of non-uniform quantum dot (QD) ensembles are calculated analytically. The effect of size variations and size distribution of QDs on their energy states is analyzed. The dots are considered as a quantum box with finite potential at the barriers and the size distribution described by a Gaussian function. The influence of the aspect ratio (base to height ratio) of the QDs on the optical transitions is studied. Our model predicts the dot size (height and base) accurately to determine the absorption peaks and corresponding absorption coefficient. We also compute the absorption coefficient of the QD with different size distributions to verify the results calculated using this model with the reported experimental and other theoretical results.

  7. Wet chemical functionalization of III-V semiconductor surfaces: alkylation of gallium arsenide and gallium nitride by a Grignard reaction sequence.

    PubMed

    Peczonczyk, Sabrina L; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Carim, Azhar I; Maldonado, Stephen

    2012-03-13

    Crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) (111)A and gallium nitride (GaN) (0001) surfaces have been functionalized with alkyl groups via a sequential wet chemical chlorine activation, Grignard reaction process. For GaAs(111)A, etching in HCl in diethyl ether effected both oxide removal and surface-bound Cl. X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectra demonstrated selective surface chlorination after exposure to 2 M HCl in diethyl ether for freshly etched GaAs(111)A but not GaAs(111)B surfaces. GaN(0001) surfaces exposed to PCl(5) in chlorobenzene showed reproducible XP spectroscopic evidence for Cl-termination. The Cl-activated GaAs(111)A and GaN(0001) surfaces were both reactive toward alkyl Grignard reagents, with pronounced decreases in detectable Cl signal as measured by XP spectroscopy. Sessile contact angle measurements between water and GaAs(111)A interfaces after various levels of treatment showed that GaAs(111)A surfaces became significantly more hydrophobic following reaction with C(n)H(2n-1)MgCl (n = 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 18). High-resolution As 3d XP spectra taken at various times during prolonged direct exposure to ambient lab air indicated that the resistance of GaAs(111)A to surface oxidation was greatly enhanced after reaction with Grignard reagents. GaAs(111)A surfaces terminated with C(18)H(37) groups were also used in Schottky heterojunctions with Hg. These heterojunctions exhibited better stability over repeated cycling than heterojunctions based on GaAs(111)A modified with C(18)H(37)S groups. Raman spectra were separately collected that suggested electronic passivation by surficial Ga-C bonds at GaAs(111)A. Specifically, GaAs(111)A surfaces reacted with alkyl Grignard reagents exhibited Raman signatures comparable to those of samples treated with 10% Na(2)S in tert-butanol. For GaN(0001), high-resolution C 1s spectra exhibited the characteristic low binding energy shoulder demonstrative of surface Ga-C bonds following reaction with CH(3)MgCl. In addition, 4-fluorophenyl groups were attached and detected after reaction with C(6)H(4)FMgBr, further confirming the susceptibility of Cl-terminated GaN(0001) to surface alkylation. However, the measured hydrophobicities of alkyl-terminated GaAs(111)A and GaN(0001) were markedly distinct, indicating differences in the resultant surface layers. The results presented here, in conjunction with previous studies on GaP, show that atop Ga atoms at these crystallographically related surfaces can be deliberately functionalized and protected through Ga-C surface bonds that do not involve thiol/sulfide chemistry or gas-phase pretreatments.

  8. Nucleation, propagation, electronic levels and elimination of misfit dislocations in III-V semiconductor interfaces. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ast, D.G.; Watson, G.P.; Matragrano, M.

    1995-03-01

    Misfit dislocations in gallium arsenides, indium arsenides, and zinc selenides are discussed. The growth of strained epitaxial layers, isolation and nucleation, thermal stability, and electronic and structural characteristics of misfit dislocations are described.

  9. Three-Phonon Phase Space as an Indicator of the Lattice Thermal Conductivity in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    The room temperature lattice thermal conductivity of many semiconductors is limited primarily by three-phonon scattering processes arising from the anharmonicity of the interatomic potential. We employ an adiabatic bond charge model [1,2] for the phonon dispersions to calculate the phase space for three-phonon scattering events of several group IV and III-V semiconductors. We find that the amount of phase space available for this scattering in materials varies inversely with their measured thermal conductivities. Anomalous behavior occurs in III-V materials having large mass differences between cation and anion, which we explain in terms of the severely restricted three-phonon phase space arising from the large gap between acoustic and optic phonon branches. [1] W. Weber, Physical Review B 15, 4789 (1977). [2] K. C. Rustagi and W. Weber, Solid State Communications 18, 673 (1976).

  10. III-V tri-gate quantum well MOSFET: Quantum ballistic simulation study for 10 nm technology and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kanak; Khosru, Quazi D. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, quantum ballistic simulation study of a III-V tri-gate MOSFET has been presented. At the same time, effects of device parameter variation on ballistic, subthreshold and short channel performance is observed and presented. The ballistic simulation result has also been used to observe the electrostatic performance and Capacitance-Voltage characteristics of the device. With constant urge to keep in pace with Moore's law as well as aggressive scaling and device operation reaching near ballistic limit, a full quantum transport study at 10 nm gate length is necessary. Our simulation reveals an increase in device drain current with increasing channel cross-section. However short channel performance and subthreshold performance get degraded with channel cross-section increment. Increasing device cross-section lowers threshold voltage of the device. The effect of gate oxide thickness on ballistic device performance is also observed. Increase in top gate oxide thickness affects device performance only upto a certain value. The thickness of the top gate oxide however shows no apparent effect on device threshold voltage. The ballistic simulation study has been further used to extract ballistic injection velocity of the carrier and ballistic carrier mobility in the channel. The effect of device dimension and gate oxide thickness on ballistic velocity and effective carrier mobility is also presented.

  11. Rapid 2D incoherent mirror fabrication by laser interference lithography and wet etching for III-V MQW solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Freundlich, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Optimization of non-planar antireflective coating and back- (or front-) surface texturing are widely studied as advanced light management approach to further reduce the reflection losses and increase the sunlight absorption path in solar cells. Rear reflectors have been developed from coherent mirrors to incoherent mirrors in order to further increase light path, which can significantly improve the efficiency and allow for much thinner devices. A Lambertian surface, which has the most random texture, can theoretically raise the light path to 4n2 times that of a smooth surface. It's a challenge however to fabricate ideal Lambertian texture, especially in a fast and low cost way. In this work, a method is developed to overcome this challenge that combines the use of laser interference lithography (LIL) and selective wet etching. This approach allows for a rapid (10 min) wafer scale (3 inch wafer) texture processing with sub-wavelength (nano)-scale control of the pattern and the pitch. The technique appears as being particularly attractive for the development of ultrathin III-V devices, or in overcoming the weak sub-bandgap absorption in devices incorporating quantum dots or quantum wells. The structure of the device is demonstrated, without affecting active layers.

  12. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell D. Dupuis

    2004-09-30

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers the first year of the three-year program ''Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications''. The first year activities were focused on the installation, set-up, and use of advanced equipment for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of III-nitride films and the characterization of these materials (Task 1) and the design, fabrication, testing of nitride LEDs (Task 4). As a progress highlight, we obtained improved quality of {approx} 2 {micro}m-thick GaN layers (as measured by the full width at half maximum of the asymmetric (102) X-ray diffraction peak of less than 350 arc-s) and higher p-GaN:Mg doping level (free hole carrier higher than 1E18 cm{sup -3}). Also in this year, we have developed the growth of InGaN/GaN active layers for long-wavelength green light emitting diodes, specifically, for emission at {lambda} {approx} 540nm. The effect of the Column III precursor (for Ga) and the post-growth thermal annealing effect were also studied. Our LED device fabrication process was developed and initially optimized, especially for low-resistance ohmic contacts for p-GaN:Mg layers, and blue-green light emitting diode structures were processed and characterized.

  13. Optimising the defect filter layer design for III/V QDs on Si for integrated laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Jonathan R.; Wu, Jiang; Chen, Siming; Jiang, Qi; Ward, Thomas; Beanland, Richard; Lui, Huiyun; Mowbray, David

    2015-02-01

    We introduce the concept of using strained superlattice structures as defect filters, with their purpose to reduce the upwards propagation of dislocations that result from the lattice mismatch which occurs when III-V materials are grown on silicon substrates. Three samples with defect filter layers are grown on Si with and without in situ annealing and are compared to a similar structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Transmission electron microscopy is used to verify the effectiveness of the different designs grown on Si, with the twice-annealed sample reducing the number of defects present in the active region by 99.9%. Optical studies carried out exhibit brighter room temperature emission and reduced photoluminescence quenching with temperature in samples where annealing is performed. Photoluminescence excitation measurements reveal a ~20 meV redshift in the position of the GaAs exciton for the samples grown on Si compared to that of GaAs, indicating a residual inplane tensile strain ~0.35% in the GaAs of the active region for the samples grown on Si.

  14. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  15. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One andmore » two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.« less

  16. Understanding 'clean-up' of III-V native oxides during atomic layer deposition using bulk first principles models.

    PubMed

    Klejna, Sylwia; Elliott, Simon D

    2011-09-01

    The use of III-V materials as the channel in future transistor devices is dependent on removing the deleterious native oxides from their surface before deposition of a gate dielectric. Trimethylaluminium has been found to achieve in situ 'clean-up' of the oxides of GaAs and InGaAs before atomic layer deposition (ALD) of alumina. Here we propose six reaction mechanisms for 'clean-up,' featuring exchange of ligands between surface atoms, reduction of arsenic oxide by methyl groups and desorption of various products. We use first principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) to determine which mechanistic path is thermodynamically favoured based on models of the bulk oxides and gas-phase products. We therefore predict that 'clean-up' of arsenic oxides mostly produces As4 gas. Most C is predicted to form C2H6 but with some C2H4, CH4 and H2O. An alternative pathway is non-redox ligand exchange, which allows non-reducible oxides to be cleaned-up.

  17. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates. PMID:26537227

  18. Evolving Biomolecular Control and Assembly of Semiconductor and Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Angela

    2003-03-01

    We are investigating the principles of natural biological molecular recognition in materials and developing new methods to pattern useful non-biological electronic and magnetic materials on new length scales. A peptide combinatorial approach has been employed to identify proteins that select for and specifically bind to inorganic structures such as semiconductor wafers and semiconductor and magnetic nanoparticles. This approach utilizes the inherent self-organizing, highly selective properties of biologically derived molecules. We are currently investigating peptide recognition and interaction with III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials and magnetic materials. These peptides are being used to grow nanoparticles and nanowires of specific crystallographic structure and orientation. Using these molecular interactions and specific nanoparticles, we are organizing organic/inorganic hybrid materials into supramolecular architectures.

  19. Silicon superlattices: Theory and application to semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon superlattices and their applicability to improved semiconductor devices were studied. The device application potential of the atomic like dimension of III-V semiconductor superlattices fabricated in the form of ultrathin periodically layered heterostructures was examined. Whether this leads to quantum size effects and creates the possibility to alter familiar transport and optical properties over broad physical ranges was studied. Applications to improved semiconductor lasers and electrondevices were achieved. Possible application of silicon sperlattices to faster high speed computing devices was examined. It was found that the silicon lattices show features of smaller fundamental energyband gaps and reduced effective masses. The effects correlate strongly with both the chemical and geometrical nature of the superlattice.

  20. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore » can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  1. Dilute ferromagnetic semiconductors prepared by the combination of ion implantation with pulse laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2015-07-01

    Combining semiconducting and ferromagnetic properties, dilute ferromagnetic semiconductors (DFS) have been under intensive investigation for more than two decades. Mn doped III-V compound semiconductors have been regarded as the prototype of DFS from both experimental and theoretic investigations. The magnetic properties of III-V:Mn can be controlled by manipulating free carriers via electrical gating, as for controlling the electrical properties in conventional semiconductors. However, the preparation of DFS presents a big challenge due to the low solubility of Mn in semiconductors. Ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (II-PLM) provides an alternative to the widely used low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (LT-MBE) approach. Both ion implantation and pulsed-laser melting occur far enough from thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Ion implantation introduces enough dopants and the subsequent laser pulse deposit energy in the near-surface region to drive a rapid liquid-phase epitaxial growth. Here, we review the experimental study on preparation of III-V:Mn using II-PLM. We start with a brief description about the development of DFS and the physics behind II-PLM. Then we show that ferromagnetic GaMnAs and InMnAs films can be prepared by II-PLM and they show the same characteristics of LT-MBE grown samples. Going beyond LT-MBE, II-PLM is successful to bring two new members, GaMnP and InMnP, into the family of III-V:Mn DFS. Both GaMnP and InMnP films show the signature of DFS and an insulating behavior. At the end, we summarize the work done for Ge:Mn and Si:Mn using II-PLM and present suggestions for future investigations. The remarkable advantage of II-PLM approach is its versatility. In general, II-PLM can be utilized to prepare supersaturated alloys with mismatched components.

  2. Analysis on electromagnetic characteristics and military application of non-magnetized discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiachun; Miao, Lei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-11-01

    Firstly, the dispersion equation of a plane electromagnetic wave in homogeneous and non-magnetized discharge plasma was established. According to the different frequency of electromagnetic wave and plasma parameters, the characteristics were discussed when the plasma interacted with electromagnetic waves. Then the gas discharge approach was put forward according to characteristics of plasma generated by different methods and their advantages and disadvantages. The possibility of using non-magnetized discharge plasma for the military purpose was analyzed. In the end, the principle and characteristics of the application of the non-magnetized discharge plasma were studied in the fields of stealth and protection against strong electromagnetic pulse.

  3. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  4. Colloidal self assembly of non-magnetic particles in magnetic nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jadav, Mudra; Patel, Rajesh E-mail: rpat7@yahoo.co

    2015-06-24

    Here we present a technique using magnetic nanofluid to induce bidispersed suspension of nonmagnetic particles to assemble into colloidal chain, triangle, rectangle, ring-flower configurations. By changing the amplitude and direction of the magnetic field, we could tune the structure of nonmagnetic particles in magnetic nanofluid. The structures are assembled using magneto static interactions between effectively nonmagnetic particles dispersed in magnetizable magnetic nanofluid. The assembly of complex structures out of simple colloidal building blocks is of practical interest in photonic crystals and DNA biosensors.

  5. Vacancy formation and extraction energies in semiconductor compounds and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-01-01

    A model for calculating the extraction energies and vacancy-formation energies in diamond-cubic and zinc-blende semiconductors is developed on the basis of Harrison's (1980, 1983) tight-binding theory. The extraction energies provide a reference from which other final states of the removed atoms can be calculated. The results of calculations show that, in a given compound, the calculated extraction energies are larger for the anion than for the cation, with the difference between the cation and the anion being larger in the II-VI than in the III-V compounds. This is in agreement with experimental results.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy of 3 to 5 semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and theory were combined to create novel depressive quantum dots at room temperature on the (110) surfaces of InSb dots which merit further exploration as potential nanopixels for tiny-device lithography; develop a strained-layer superlattice model of high-temperature superconductivity; image, understand, and make models of single-atom-high steps on III-V surfaces; invent and exploit a new kind of spectroscopy of surface states of semiconductors, called tipology; and develop phenomenological models of a variety of surface phenomena.

  7. EDITORIAL: The 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    This Topical Issue contains works presented at the 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting (21NSM) held at Sundvolden, Norway, 18-19 August 2005. The institutions supporting 21NSM were: University of Oslo, SINTEF, the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment and Vestfold University College. The Nordic Semiconductor Meeting has become an international forum that has been held every other year in a relay fashion in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of the meeting has been on original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems. Reports on industrial activity have usually been featured at the meetings. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. For the last five meetings the proceedings have been printed in a dedicated volume of Physica Scripta in the Topical Issue series. The papers in this Topical Issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the expected high standards of the series. The range of topics covered by this volume is broad, reflecting the call for papers; most of the papers have an element of materials science and the largest portion of these deal with other semiconductor materials other than silicon. The 21NSM was supported by the following sponsors: Renewable Energy Corporation (REC), EMF III-V Innovations (EMF), and the Nordic Research Board (NordForsk). Terje G Finstad Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Norway Andrej Y Kuznetsov and Bengt G Svensson Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, Norway

  8. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell D. Dupuis

    2006-01-01

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers the second year of the three-year program ''Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications''. The second year activities were focused on the development of p-type layer that has less/no detrimental thermal annealing effect on green LED active region as well as excellent structural and electrical properties and the development of green LED active region that has superior luminescence quality for {lambda} {approx}540nm green LEDs. We have also studied the thermal annealing effect on blue and green LED active region during the p-type layer growth. As a progress highlight, we obtained green-LED-active-region-friendly In{sub 0.04}Ga{sub 0.96}N:Mg exhibiting low resistivity with higher hole concentration (p=2.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a low resistivity of 0.5 {Omega}-cm) and improved optical quality green LED active region emitting at {lambda} {approx}540nm by electroluminescence. The active region of the green LEDs was found to be much more sensitive to the thermal annealing effect during the p-type layer growth than that of the blue LEDs. We have designed grown, fabricated green LED structures for both 520 nm and 540 nm for the evaluation of second year green LED development.

  9. Progress in the Development of Metamorphic Multi-Junction III-V Space-Solar Cells at Essential Research Incorporated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinharoy, Samar; Patton, Martin O.; Valko, Thomas M., Sr.; Weizer, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have shown that highest efficiency III-V multi-junction solar cells require alloy structures that cannot be grown on a lattice-matched substrate. Ever since the first demonstration of high efficiency metamorphic single junction 1.1 eV and 1.2 eV InGaAs solar cells by Essential Research Incorporated (ERI), interest has grown in the development of multi-junction cells of this type using graded buffer layer technology. ERI is currently developing a dual-junction 1.6 eV InGaP/1.1 eV InGaAs tandem cell (projected practical air-mass zero (AM0), one-sun efficiency of 28%, and 100-sun efficiency of 37.5%) under a Ballistic Missile Defense Command (BMDO) SBIR Phase II program. A second ongoing research effort at ERI involves the development of a 2.1 eV AlGaInP/1.6 eV InGaAsP/1.2 eV InGaAs triple-junction concentrator tandem cell (projected practical AM0 efficiency of 36.5% under 100 suns) under a SBIR Phase II program funded by the Air Force. We are in the process of optimizing the dual-junction cell performance. In case of the triple-junction cell, we have developed the bottom and the middle cell, and are in the process of developing the layer structures needed for the top cell. A progress report is presented in this paper.

  10. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  11. Approaches toward a blue semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1989-01-01

    Possible approaches for obtaining semiconductor diode laser action in the blue region of the spectrum are surveyed. A discussion of diode lasers is included along with a review of the current status of visible emitters, presently limited to 670 nm. Methods are discussed for shifting laser emission toward shorter wavelengths, including the use of II-IV materials, the increase in the bandgap of III-V materials by addition of nitrogen, and changing the bandstructure from indirect to direct by incorporating interstitial atoms or by constructing superlattices. Non-pn-junction injection methods are surveyed, including avalanche breakdown, Langmuir-Blodgett diodes, heterostructures, carrier accumulation, and Berglund diodes. Prospects of inventing new multinary semiconducting materials are discussed, and a number of novel materials described in the literature are tabulated. New approaches available through the development of quantum wells and superlattices are described, including resonant tunneling and the synthesis of arbitrary bandgap materials through multiple quantum wells.

  12. Influence of the group V element on the chemical potential and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2014-02-03

    We present a kinetic growth model having a particular emphasis on the influence of the group V element on the preferred crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. The model circumvents the uncertainty in the group V contribution into the overall liquid chemical potential. We show why the nanowire elongation rate is limited by the group III transport, while the crystal structure depends on the effective group V to III imbalance. Within the model, we are able to explain some important structural trends in Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. In particular, we show that high group V flux always favors wurtzite structure in molecular-beam epitaxy. This tendency could be inverted in vapor deposition techniques due to suppression of the group III diffusion at high group V flux.

  13. Design considerations for semiconductor nanowire-plasmonic nanoparticle coupled systems for high quantum efficiency nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mokkapati, Sudha; Saxena, Dhruv; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-01

    The optimal geometries for reducing the radiative recombination lifetime and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency of III-V semiconductor nanowires by coupling them to plasmonic nanoparticles are established. The quantum efficiency enhancement factor due to coupling to plasmonic nanoparticles reduces as the initial quality of the nanowire increases. Significant quantum efficiency enhancement is observed for semiconductors only within about 15 nm from the nanoparticle. It is also identified that the modes responsible for resonant enhancement in the quantum efficiency of an emitter in the nanowire are geometric resonances of surface plasmon polariton modes supported at the nanowire/nanoparticle interface.

  14. [Experiences with Extraction of 232 intraocular and 30 intraorbital non-magnetic foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Bankow, P

    1982-09-01

    The characteristics, localisation and extraction of 262 non-magnetic intraocular and intraorbital foreign bodies in 148 consecutive patients are described. The postoperative visual acuity results show no change in 45%, an improvement in 35% and a worsening in 20% of the eyes. The precise dynamic localisation before and during surgery, and particularly the intraoperative visualisation of the non-magnetic foreign bodies are to be considered as the most important points in surgical treatment of these cases.

  15. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  16. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  17. 30 CFR 57.22222 - Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III....22222 Ventilation materials (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines). Brattice cloth and ventilation tubing shall be approved by MSHA in accordance with 30 CFR part 7, or shall bear a BC or...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22234 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-A, I-B, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-A, I-B, III, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22234 Section 57.22234 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety...

  19. Comparison for the carrier mobility between the III-V nitrides and AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongbiao, Luan; Zhaojun, Lin; Yuanjie, Lü; Zhihong, Feng; Jingtao, Zhao; Yang, Zhou; Ming, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Using the measured capacitance-voltage curves of Ni/Au Schottky contacts with different areas and the current-voltage characteristics for the AlGaAs/GaAs, AlGaN/AlN/GaN and In0.18 Al0.82N/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) at low drain-source voltage, the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) electron mobility for the prepared HFETs was calculated and analyzed. It was found that there is an obvious difference for the variation trend of the mobility curves between the III-V nitride HFETs and the AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs. In the III-V nitride HFETs, the variation trend for the curves of the 2DEG electron mobility with the gate bias is closely related to the ratio of the gate length to the drain-to-source distance. While the ratio of the gate length to the drain-to-source distance has no effect on the variation trend for the curves of the 2DEG electron mobility with the gate bias in the AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs. The reason is attributed to the polarization Coulomb field scattering in the III-V nitride HFETs.

  20. Increased bismuth concentration in MBE GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} films by oscillating III/V flux ratio during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Adam W. Babcock, Susan E.; Li, Jincheng; Brown, April S.

    2015-05-15

    The authors have examined bismuth concentration profiles in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy using high angle annular dark field imaging (Z-contrast imaging) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in conjunction with x-ray diffraction. Samples were grown with a gradient in each of the component fluxes, and therefore, the III/V ratio across the substrate. Rotating the sample during growth exposed the growth surface to an oscillating III/V flux ratio. Sinusoidal [Bi] profiles resulted in the growth direction, the wavelength and number of which were consistent with the growth rate and the rate of substrate rotation. However, the magnitude of [Bi] in the observed fluctuations was greater than the maximum [Bi] achieved using the same Bi flux and Ga/As flux ratios in steady-state conditions on a stationary substrate, suggesting that varying the III/V flux ratio during growth promotes the incorporation of Bi in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} films. A proposed qualitative model for how this enhancement might occur hypothesizes a critical role for alternating growth and shrinkage of Ga-Bi predroplet clusters on the surface as the growing material is rotated through Ga-rich and As-rich flux compositions.

  1. Electron beam pumped III-V nitride vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Hock Min

    The design and fabrication by molecular beam epitaxy of a prototype vertical cavity laser based on the III-V nitrides were investigated in this work. The bottom mirror of the laser consists of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) based on quarterwave AlN (or AlxGa1-xN) and GaN layers. Such DBRs were designed for maximum reflectivity in the spectral region from 390--600 nm. The epitaxial growth of these two binaries on each other revealed that while AlN grows on GaN in a two-dimensional mode (Frank-van der Merwe mode), GaN grows on AlN in a three-dimensional mode (Stranski-Krastanov mode). In spite of that, DBRs with peak reflectance up to 99% and bandwidths of 45nm were fabricated. The measured reflectance spectra were compared with simulations using the transmission matrix method. The mechanical stability of these DBR structures due to non-uniform distribution of strain arising from lattice or thermal mismatch of the various components were also addressed. The active region of the laser consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The existence of up to the third order diffraction peaks in the x-ray diffraction spectra suggests that the interfaces between InGaN and GaN are sharp with little interdiffusion at the growth temperature. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra were analyzed to determine the optical quality of the MQWs. The best MQWs were shown to have a single emission peak at 397nm with full width half maximum (FWHM) of 11nm. Cathodoluminescence studies showed that there are spatially localized areas of intense light emission. The complete device was formed on (0001) sapphire substrates using the previously described DBRs as bottom mirrors and the MQWs as the active region. The top mirror of the device consists of metallic silver. The device was pumped by an electron beam from the top mirror side and the light output was collected from the sapphire side. Measurements at 100K showed narrowing of the linewidth with increasing pump

  2. EDITORIAL The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsson, Sveinn; Sveinbjörnsson, Einar

    2010-12-01

    A Nordic Semiconductor Meeting is held every other year with the venue rotating amongst the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of these meetings remains 'original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems'. Reports on industrial activity have usually featured. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. Proceedings from these events are regularly published as a topical issue of Physica Scripta. All of the papers in this topical issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the high scientific standards and quality of the series. This meeting of the 23rd Nordic Semiconductor community, NSM 2009, was held at Háskólatorg at the campus of the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, 14-17 June 2009. Support was provided by the University of Iceland. Almost 50 participants presented a broad range of topics covering semiconductor materials and devices as well as related material science interests. The conference provided a forum for Nordic and international scientists to present and discuss new results and ideas concerning the fundamentals and applications of semiconductor materials. The meeting aim was to advance the progress of Nordic science and thus aid in future worldwide technological advances concerning technology, education, energy and the environment. Topics Theory and fundamental physics of semiconductors Emerging semiconductor technologies (for example III-V integration on Si, novel Si devices, graphene) Energy and semiconductors Optical phenomena and optical devices MEMS and sensors Program 14 June Registration 13:00-17:00 15 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session I 16 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session II 17 June Excursion and dinner

  3. Facet-embedded thin-film III-V edge-emitting lasers integrated with SU-8 waveguides on silicon.

    PubMed

    Palit, Sabarni; Kirch, Jeremy; Huang, Mengyuan; Mawst, Luke; Jokerst, Nan Marie

    2010-10-15

    A thin-film InGaAs/GaAs edge-emitting single-quantum-well laser has been integrated with a tapered multimode SU-8 waveguide onto an Si substrate. The SU-8 waveguide is passively aligned to the laser using mask-based photolithography, mimicking electrical interconnection in Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor, and overlaps one facet of the thin-film laser for coupling power from the laser to the waveguide. Injected threshold current densities of 260A/cm(2) are measured with the reduced reflectivity of the embedded laser facet while improving single mode coupling efficiency, which is theoretically simulated to be 77%.

  4. Lighting market alchemy: Will we find a pot of gold at the end of the III-V rainbow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Kathryn M.

    2004-12-01

    With a focus on visible spectrum light emitting diodes (LEDs), three questions frame this update. First, what are the market and financial outlooks for light-producing compound semiconductor materials and devices? Second, which applications offer the greatest growth potential for the next five to ten years and with which technologies will they likely compete for market share? Third, how can photonics experts contribute to accelerated successes for LEDs and other solid-state lighting technologies such as quantum dots? Using the rainbow as a metaphor for the market, the author examines developments in single color, multiple color and "white light" products.

  5. High-performance GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors enabled by self-assembled nanodielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. C.; Ye, P. D.; Xuan, Y.; Lu, G.; Facchetti, A.; Marks, T. J.

    2006-10-01

    High-performance GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MISFETs) fabricated with very thin self-assembled organic nanodielectrics (SANDs), deposited from solution at room temperature, are demonstrated. A submicron gate-length depletion-mode n-channel GaAs MISFET with SAND thicknesses ranging from 5.5to16.5nm exhibit a gate leakage current density <10-5A/cm2 at a gate bias smaller than 3V, a maximum drain current of 370mA/mm at a forward gate bias of 2V, and a maximum intrinsic transconductance of 170mS/mm. The importance of appropriate GaAs surface chemistry treatments on SAND/GaAs interface properties is also presented. Application of SANDs to III-V compound semiconductors affords more opportunities to manipulate the complex III-V surface chemistry with broad materials options.

  6. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.; Miller, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi were studied theoretically. Bond energies, bond lengths, and strain coefficients were calculated for pure AlBi, GaBi, and InBi compounds and their alloys, and predictions were made for the mixing enthalpies, miscibility gaps, and critical metastable-to-stable material transition temperatures. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and the InPBi will be the the most difficult to mix. However, calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe.

  7. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-07-03

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm(2) cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional 'Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  8. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-07-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional `Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ~1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  9. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional ‘Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities. PMID:26139568

  10. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm(2) cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional 'Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities. PMID:26139568

  11. Comparison of non-magnetic and magnetic beads in bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hansenová Maňásková, Silvie; van Belkum, Alex; Endtz, Hubert P; Bikker, Floris J; Veerman, Enno C I; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2016-09-01

    Multiplex bead-based flow cytometry is an attractive way for simultaneous, rapid and cost-effective analysis of multiple analytes in a single sample. Previously, we developed various bead-based assays using non-magnetic beads coated with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens for the detection of antibodies. Here, we compared the performance of the assay using non-magnetic beads with one based on the newly developed magnetic beads. We optimized the magnetic beads' coupling procedure and antibody detection assays for S. aureus and S. pneumoniae antigens and we measured IgG in human pooled serum against a series of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae-derived antigens in a singleplex and in a multiplex assay, respectively. For the multiplex assay, the comparison between magnetic and non-magnetic beads showed: i) in the majority of the cases (13 of the 17 tested S. pneumoniae antigens) significantly higher Median Fluorescence Intensity (MFI) values, ii) lower detection limits, iii) lower coefficient of variation (CV: 12% vs. 7% for non-magnetic vs. magnetic beads), so lower inter-assay variation and hence higher reproducibility. Magnetic bead coupling is cost effective, as we used 25% of the normal amount of antigen and only 50% of the beads in comparison to the non-magnetic beads. This optimized magnetic-based assay, which combines ease of use with an improved assay performance, allows detection of antibodies with a low titer that are potentially missed with the non-magnetic-based assay. PMID:27296810

  12. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  13. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology. PMID:26824274

  14. Highly tunable heterogeneously integrated III-V on silicon sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers operating in the O-band.

    PubMed

    Duprez, Helene; Jany, Christophe; Seassal, Christian; Ben Bakir, Badhise

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and performance of the first hetero-integrated III-V on silicon sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers (SGDBR) operating in the O-band and based on direct bonding and adiabatic coupling. Two devices with different geometric parameters are presented both showing an output power in the Si waveguide as high as 7.5 mW and a continuous tuning range of 27 and 35 nm respectively with a side mode suppression ration higher than 35 dB. PMID:27607693

  15. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  16. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore » on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  17. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  18. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  19. Magnetic Hardening from the Suppression of Domain Walls by Nonmagnetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-03-07

    Magnetic domain switching and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with and without nonmagnetic particles were simulated based on the magnetization dynamics of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. It is found that the 360o Bloch domain wall is the easiest nucleation site for an anti-direction domain. The nucleation occurs by splitting the 360o Bloch domain wall into two 180o domain walls. However, the existence of nonmagnetic particles destroys the 180o domain walls and prevents the formation of 360o Bloch domain walls. Simulation results demonstrate that the impact of nonmagnetic particle on the formation of the 360o Bloch domain wall is a magnetic hardening mechanism.

  20. Chromospheric Heating in Late-Type Stars: Evidence for Magnetic and Nonmagnetic Surface Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate recent observational and theoretical results concerning the physics of chromospheric heating as inferred from IUE, HST-GHRS and ROSAT data. These results are discussed in conjunction with theoretical model calculations based on acoustic and magnetic heating to infer some conclusions about the magnetic and non-magnetic surface structure of cool luminous stars. I find that most types of stars may exhibit both magnetic and nonmagnetic structures. Candidates for pure nonmagnetic surface structure include M-type giants and super-giants. M-type supergiants are also ideal candidates for identifying direct links between the appearance of hot spots on the stellar surface (perhaps caused by large convective bubbles) and temporarily increased chromospheric heating and emission.

  1. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis.

  2. Utilization of novel atom sources in studies of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolan, John Thaddeus

    Nanometer-scale characterization of semiconductor surfaces is very important for precise control of the ultrafine structures necessary for the realization of devices using quantum confinement. The performance of these heterojunction devices is strongly dependent on interface quality. In the case of III-V semiconductors, the major problem is the presence of the native oxide layer and surface carbon contamination. This carbon is strongly bonded to the III-V surface even after ion-etching and high temperature annealing and induces a free-carrier depletion region at the substrate-epilayer interface. Furthermore, native oxides on GaAs and InP surfaces are detrimental to the formation of stable interfaces and can result in defective epitaxial growth, inducing undesirable electrical characteristics to the device so they must be removed without damaging the near-surface region. A surface characterization study using ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been performed on GaAs(001) and InP(111) substrates before and after cleaning by ion sputtering/annealing cycles and room temperature exposure to the flux produced by a novel atomic hydrogen source based on electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) to determine any treatment-induced alterations. In order to realize high performance III-V circuits, the preparation of a good quality passivating oxide interface is necessary. Device quality oxide-(III-V) interface fabrication will certainly depend on the composition of the oxide interface and any possible damage induced by the oxidation process. In the case of GaAs, thermal oxides and formation of thick oxides (which actually is diffusion-controlled and possibly close to thermal equilibrium) usually results in non-stoichiometric films of Gasb2Osb3 and Assb2Osb3 as well as a pile-up of elemental As at the GaAs-oxide interface. This structure is predicted by the Ga-O-As phase diagram, but it provides poor electrical isolation and surface

  3. The space density of magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables, and implications for CV evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretorius, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present estimates of the space densities of both non-magnetic and magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), based on X-ray flux-limited samples. The measurements can be used to address several questions relevant to the evolution of CVs and to the makeup of Galactic X-ray source populations. I will discuss the implications of these results for the high predicted space density of non-magnetic CVs, the evolutionary relationship between intermediate polars and polars, the fraction of CVs with strongly magnetic white dwarfs, and for the contribution of magnetic CVs to Galactic populations of hard X-ray sources.

  4. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  5. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  6. Device Concepts Based on Spin-dependent Transmission in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. - Y.; Cartoixa, X.

    2004-01-01

    We examine zero-magnetic-field spin-dependent transmission in nonmagnetic semiconductor heterostructures with structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) and bulk inversion asymmetry (BIA), and report spin devices concepts that exploit their properties. Our modeling results show that several design strategies could be used to achieve high spin filtering efficiencies. The current spin polarization of these devices is electrically controllable, and potentially amenable to highspeed spin modulation, and could be integrated in optoelectronic devices for added functionality.

  7. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  8. Nurse outcomes in Magnet® and non-magnet hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lesly A; McHugh, Matthew D; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-10-01

    The important goals of Magnet hospitals are to create supportive professional nursing care environments. A recently published paper found little difference in work environments between Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine whether work environments, staffing, and nurse outcomes differ between Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. A secondary analysis of data from a 4-state survey of 26,276 nurses in 567 acute care hospitals to evaluate differences in work environments and nurse outcomes in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals was conducted. Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments (t = -5.29, P < .001) and more highly educated nurses (t = -2.27, P < .001). Magnet hospital nurses were 18% less likely to be dissatisfied with their job (P < .05) and 13% less likely to report high burnout (P < .05). Magnet hospitals have significantly better work environments than non-Magnet hospitals. The better work environments of Magnet hospitals are associated with lower levels of nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout.

  9. Magnetic field aligned assembly of nonmagnetic composite dumbbells in nanoparticle-based aqueous ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hayato; Nagao, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kanako; Ishii, Haruyuki; Konno, Mikio

    2015-05-26

    Monodisperse, nonmagnetic, asymmetrical composite dumbbells in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (ferrofluid) were aligned by application of an external magnetic field to the ferrofluid. The asymmetrical composite dumbbells were prepared by two-step soap-free emulsion polymerization consisting of the first polymerization to coat spherical silica cores with cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell and the second polymerization to protrude a polystyrene (PSt) lobe from the core-shell particles. A chain structure of nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the applied magnetic field was observed at nanoparticle content of 2.0 vol % and field strengths higher than 1.0 mT. A similar chain structure of the dumbbells was observed under application of alternating electric field at strengths higher than 50 V/mm. Parallel and orthogonally combined applications of the electric and magnetic fields were also conducted to examine independence of the electric and magnetic applications as operational factors in the dumbbell assembling. Dumbbell chains stiffer than those in a single application of external field were formed in the parallel combined application of electric and magnetic fields. The orthogonal combination of the different applied fields could form a magnetically aligned chain structure of the nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the electric field. The present work experimentally indicated that the employment of inverse magnetorheological effect for nonmagnetic, anisotropic particles can be a useful method for the simultaneous controls over the orientation and the positon of anisotropic particles in their assembling. PMID:25927488

  10. Development of a computational model for predicting solar wind flows past nonmagnetic terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A computational model for the determination of the detailed plasma and magnetic field properties of the global interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic terrestrial planetary obstacles is described. The theoretical method is based on an established single fluid, steady, dissipationless, magnetohydrodynamic continuum model, and is appropriate for the calculation of supersonic, super-Alfvenic solar wind flow past terrestrial ionospheres.

  11. X-ray and EUV observations of the boundary layer emission of nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1996-03-09

    EUVE, ROSAT, and ASCA observations of the boundary layer emission of nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) are reviewed. EUVE spectra reveal that the effective temperature of the soft component of high-M nonmagnetic CVs is kT {approx}10-20 eV and that its luminosity is {approx} 0.1-0.5 times the accretion disk luminosity. Although the EUV spectra are very complex and belie simple interpretation, the physical conditions of the boundary layer gas are constrained by emission lines of highly ionized Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe. ROSAT and ASCA spectra of the hard component of nonmagnetic CVs are satisfactorily but only phenomenologically described by multi-temperature thermal plasmas, and the constraints imposed on the physical conditions of this gas are limited by the relatively weak and blended fines. It is argued that significant progress in our understanding of the X-ray spectra of nonmagnetic CVs will come with future observations with XMM, AXAF, and Astro-E.

  12. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  13. Hybrid em wave - polar semiconductor interaction: A polaronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, Ayushi Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    Present paper considers incidence of a most realistic hybrid pump wave on a weakly polar semiconductor having a very small coupling constant. Possibility of optical parametric interaction has been explored in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. The effect of doping concentrations and transverse magnetostatic field on threshold characteristics of optical parametric interaction in polar semiconductor plasma has been studied, using hydrodynamic model of semiconductors, in the far infrared regime. Numerical estimations have been carried out by using data of weakly polar III-V GaAs semiconductor and influence of control parameters on electron-LO phonon interaction has been analyzed. A particular range of physical parameters is found to be suitable for minimum threshold. The choice of nonlinear medium and favorable range of operating parameters are crucial aspects in design and fabrication of parametric amplifiers and oscillators. The hybrid mode of the pump is found to be favorable for the onset of the said process and realization of a low cost amplifier.

  14. Application of the Pseudopotential Method to the Theory of Semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The Empirical Pseudopotential Method (EPM) has been used in this thesis to investigate four areas of interest in semiconductor research, namely, strain-induced valence subband splittings, simple analytical k.p expressions for conduction and valence band dispersions, 'universal' behaviour of conduction band non-parabolicity, and Gamma -L mixing in (111) grown superlattices. In the first of these the EPM was used to calculate directly the valence band structure of strained materials. From this the strain-induced matrix element, C_4, which is proportional both to the axial strain, varepsilon_{ax}, and the in-plane wave-vector, k_|, was deduced for all common III-V materials and selected II-VI's. The effect of C_4 on properties of quantum wells is discussed with particular emphasis on layers under biaxial tension. The EPM was then used to test analytical k.p expressions that attempt to describe the conduction band anisotropy and valence bands along the (001) direction around the zone centre Gamma point. A number of expressions have been derived which span a wide range of band gap and spin-orbit splitting energies. The EPM has allowed the range of applicability of these expressions to be determined. The conduction band dispersion around the Gamma point generated by the EPM was also used to verify the 'universal' behaviour of common semiconductor materials when energy and wavevector are scaled in an appropriate manner. Surprisingly we find the universality of this type is still present even when non-parabolicity effects are expected to be important. This analysis was initially done on the direct gap III-V semiconductors but was then extended to the indirect gap III-V and group IV materials, as well as the direct gap II-VI's. A modified 2-band k.p model was devised which reproduced the universal behaviour and allowed interpretation of the results using Harrison's model-solid theory. Finally superlattice (SL

  15. Synthesis and characterization of II-IV-V(2) semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chung

    1998-11-01

    The II-IV-V2 chalcopyrite semiconductors are isostructural and isoelectronic analogues of the III-V semiconductors. Like the III-V materials the compounds have potential applications in nonlinear optics, optoelectronics and solar energy conversion. The naturally abundant elements and high absorption coefficients in many of the II-IV-V2's make these materials more attractive for large scale applications. Our study focused on the investigation of the basic electrical and optical properties of a number of II-IV- V2 materials by photoelectrochemical methods and photoluminescence. A variety of single crystals in II-IV- V2 family such as ZnSiAs2, CdSiAs2, CdSiP2, ZnSiP2, CdGeP2, ZnGeP2, and ZnSnP2 have been synthesized by chemical vapor transport (CVT) and Bridgman growth techniques. Intentional doping with S, Se, Al, Ga and In of the crystals resulted in complex behavior. In some systems compensation with intrinsic acceptors was observed and in other systems the change of doping type and controllable doping levels were observed. The bandgap, doping level, band position, quantum yield and current voltage behavior in various electrolytes for many of the II-IV-V2 semiconductors have been determined using photoelectrochemical methods. Hall effect measurements of doping density have been used to compare with values obtained from Mott-Schottky analysis. Frequency and pH dependence of the Mott-Schottky plots were observed. The minority diffusion length of II-IV-V2 calculated from quantum yield and absorption coefficient data at the onset of photocurrent matches well to the prediction from the Gartner Model. Polarization dependent photoluminescence has been used for the study of interband transitions and optical anisotropy in CdSiAs2 and CdSiP2 crystals. The electrode surfaces of CdSiAs2 crystals treated by wet chemical etchants were investigated and characterized by XPS. 31P solid state MAS NMR studies of the II-IV- P2 compounds gave very sharp 31P resonances and revealed

  16. The recombination velocity at III-V compound heterojunctions with applications to Al (x) Ga(1-x)As-GaAs(1-y)Sb(y)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Interface recombination velocity in AlxGa1-xAs-GaAs and A10.85 Ga0.15As-GaAs1-ySby heterojunction systems was studied as a function of lattice mismatch. The results are applied to the design of highly efficient III-V heterojunction solar cells. A horizontal liquid-phase epitaxial growth system was used to prepare p-p-p and p-p-n double heterojunction test samples with specified values of x and y. Samples were grown at each composition, with different GaAs and GaAsSb layer thicknesses. A method was developed to obtain the lattice mismatch and lattice constants in mixed single crystals grown on (100) and (111)B oriented GaAs substrates.

  17. Estimation of Bi induced changes in the direct E0 band gap of III-V-Bi alloys and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samajdar, D. P.; Dhar, S.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum dielectric Theory (QDT) is used to explain the band gap bowing effect observed in III-V-Bismides such as InSb1-xBix, InAs1-xBix, InP1-xBix, GaSb1-xBix, GaAs1-xBix and GaP1-xBix. The dependence of the direct E0 band gap for these alloys on Bi mole fraction is calculated using QDT which requires the evaluation of the bowing parameter c. The bowing parameter gives the deviation of the direct E0 band gap from the linear relationship of E0 with Bi mole fraction. The band gap reduction values obtained using QDT are compared with those calculated using Virtual Crystal approximation (VCA) and Valence Band Anticrossing (VBAC) model as well as with the reported experimental data and the results of the comparison shows excellent agreement.

  18. Progress and Continuing Challenges in GaSb-based III-V Alloys and Heterostructures Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-05-06

    This paper discusses progress in the preparation of mid-IR GaSb-based III-V materials grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The growth of these materials is complex, and fundamental and practical issues associated with their growth are outlined. Approaches that have been explored to further improve the properties and performance are briefly reviewed. Recent materials and device results on GaInAsSb bulk layers and GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb heterostructures, grown lattice matched to GaSb, are presented. State-of-the-art GaInAsSb materials and thermophotovoltaic devices have been achieved. This progress establishes the high potential of OMVPE for mid-IR GaSb-based devices.

  19. A review of thermal processing in the subsecond range: semiconductors and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Thermal processing in the subsecond range comprises modern, non-equilibrium annealing techniques which allow various material modifications at the surface without affecting the bulk. Flash lamp annealing (FLA) is one of the most diverse methods for short-time annealing with applications ranging from the classical field of semiconductor doping to the treatment of polymers and flexible substrates. It still continues to extend its use to other material classes and applications, and is becoming of interest for an increasing number of users. In this review we present a short, but comprehensive and consistent picture of the current state-of-the-art of FLA, sometimes also called pulsed light sintering. In the first part we take a closer look at the physical and technological background, namely the electrical and optical specifications of flash lamps, the resulting temperature profiles, and the corresponding implications for process-relevant parameters such as reproducibility and homogeneity. The second part briefly considers the various applications of FLA, starting with the classical task of defect minimization and ultra-shallow junction formation in Si, followed by further applications in Si technology, namely in the fields of hyperdoping, crystallization of thin amorphous films, and photovoltaics. Subsequent chapters cover the topics of doping and crystallization in Ge and silicon carbide, doping of III-V semiconductors, diluted magnetic semiconductors, III-V nanocluster synthesis in Si, annealing of transparent conductive oxides and high-k materials, nanoclusters in dielectric matrices, and the use of FLA for flexible substrates.

  20. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  1. Thermal spin current and spin accumulation at ferromagnetic insulator/nonmagnetic metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. H.; Wang, X. S.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-07-01

    Spin current injection and spin accumulation near a ferromagnetic insulator (FI)/nonmagnetic metal (NM) bilayer film under a thermal gradient is investigated theoretically. By using the Fermi golden rule and the Boltzmann equations, we find that FI and NM can exchange spins via interfacial electron-magnon scattering because of the imbalance between magnon emission and absorption caused by either the deviation of the magnon number from the equilibrium Bose-Einstein distribution or the difference in magnon temperature and electron temperature. A temperature gradient in FI and/or a temperature difference across the FI/NM interface generates a spin current which carries angular momenta parallel to the magnetization of FI from the hotter side to the colder one. Interestingly, the spin current induced by a temperature gradient in NM is negligibly small due to the nonmagnetic nature of the nonequilibrium electron distributions. The results agree well with all existing experiments.

  2. Radiation-suppressed plasmonic open resonators designed by nonmagnetic transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyi; Wang, Xingjue; Yu, Tianyuan; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01

    How to confine light energy associated with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a physical space with minimal radiation loss whereas creating maximum interacting section with surrounding environment is of particular interest in plasmonic optics. By virtue of transformation optics, we propose a design method of forming a polygonal surface-plasmonic resonator in fully open structures by applying the nonmagnetic affine transformation optics strategy. The radiation loss can be suppressed because SPPs that propagate in the designed open structures will be deceived as if they were propagating on a flat metal/dielectric interface without radiation. Because of the nonmagnetic nature of the transformation strategy, this design can be implemented with dielectric materials available in nature. An experimentally verifiable model is subsequently proposed for future experimental demonstration. Our design may find potential applications in omnidirectional sensing, light harvesting, energy storage and plasmonic lasing.

  3. Radiation-Suppressed plasmonic open resonators designed by nonmagnetic transformation optics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongyi; Wang, Xingjue; Yu, Tianyuan; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01

    How to confine light energy associated with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a physical space with minimal radiation loss whereas creating maximum interacting section with surrounding environment is of particular interest in plasmonic optics. By virtue of transformation optics, we propose a design method of forming a polygonal surface-plasmonic resonator in fully open structures by applying the nonmagnetic affine transformation optics strategy. The radiation loss can be suppressed because SPPs that propagate in the designed open structures will be deceived as if they were propagating on a flat metal/dielectric interface without radiation. Because of the nonmagnetic nature of the transformation strategy, this design can be implemented with dielectric materials available in nature. An experimentally verifiable model is subsequently proposed for future experimental demonstration. Our design may find potential applications in omnidirectional sensing, light harvesting, energy storage and plasmonic lasing. PMID:23136641

  4. Enhanced spin-torque in double tunnel junctions using a nonmagnetic-metal spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Cheng, Y. H.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-10-12

    This study proposes an enhancement in the spin-transfer torque of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) designed with double-barrier layer structure using a nonmagnetic metal spacer, as a replacement for the ferromagnetic material, which is traditionally used in these double-barrier stacks. Our calculation results show that the spin-transfer torque and charge current density of the proposed double-barrier MTJ can be as much as two orders of magnitude larger than the traditional double-barrier one. In other words, the proposed double-barrier MTJ has a spin-transfer torque that is three orders larger than that of the single-barrier stack. This improvement may be attributed to the quantum-well states that are formed in the nonmagnetic metal spacer and the resonant tunneling mechanism that exists throughout the system.

  5. Magnetic-field-modulated resonant tunneling in ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic junctions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Dery, Hanan

    2014-07-25

    We present a theory for resonance-tunneling magnetoresistance (MR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic junctions. The theory sheds light on many of the recent electrical spin injection experiments, suggesting that this MR effect rather than spin accumulation in the nonmagnetic channel corresponds to the electrically detected signal. We quantify the dependence of the tunnel current on the magnetic field by quantum rate equations derived from the Anderson impurity model, with the important addition of impurity spin interactions. Considering the on-site Coulomb correlation, the MR effect is caused by competition between the field, spin interactions, and coupling to the magnetic lead. By extending the theory, we present a basis for operation of novel nanometer-size memories. PMID:25105652

  6. Tunable catalytic alloying eliminates stacking faults in compound semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Heo, Hoseok; Kang, Kibum; Lee, Donghun; Jin, Li-Hua; Back, Hyeon-Jun; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Miseong; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Planar defects in compound (III-V and II-VI) semiconductor nanowires (NWs), such as twin and stacking faults, are universally formed during the catalytic NW growth, and they detrimentally act as static disorders against coherent electron transport and light emissions. Here we report a simple synthetic route for planar-defect free II-VI NWs by tunable alloying, i.e. Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te NWs (0 ≤ x ≤ 1). It is discovered that the eutectic alloying of Cd and Zn in Au catalysts immediately alleviates interfacial instability during the catalytic growth by the surface energy minimization and forms homogeneous zinc blende crystals as opposed to unwanted zinc blende/wurtzite mixtures. As a direct consequence of the tunable alloying, we demonstrated that intrinsic energy band gap modulation in Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te NWs can exploit the tunable spectral and temporal responses in light detection and emission in the full visible range.

  7. High efficiency semimetal/semiconductor nanocomposite thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zide, J. M. O.; Bahk, J.-H.; Zeng, G.; Bowers, J. E.; Singh, R.; Zebarjadi, M.; Bian, Z. X.; Shakouri, A.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Feser, J. P.; Xu, D.; Singer, S. L.; Majumdar, A.

    2010-12-15

    Rare-earth impurities in III-V semiconductors are known to self-assemble into semimetallic nanoparticles which have been shown to reduce lattice thermal conductivity without harming electronic properties. Here, we show that adjusting the band alignment between ErAs and In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47-X}Al{sub X}As allows energy-dependent scattering of carriers that can be used to increase thermoelectric power factor. Films of various Al concentrations were grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and thermoelectric properties were characterized. We observe concurrent increases in electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient with increasing temperatures, demonstrating energy-dependent scattering. We report the first simultaneous power factor enhancement and thermal conductivity reduction in a nanoparticle-based system, resulting in a high figure of merit, ZT=1.33 at 800 K.

  8. Maps showing mineralogical data for nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates in the Talkeetna Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripp, R.B.; Karlson, R.C.; Curtin, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Reconnaissance geochemical and mineralogical sampling was done in the Talkeetna Quadrangle during 1975 and 1976 as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). These maps show the distribution of gold, scheelite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, galena, fluorite, cinnabar, and malachite in the nonmagnetic fraction of heavy-mineral concentrates. Heavy-mineral concentrate samples were collected at 812 sites from active stream channels. The heavy-mineral concentrates were obtained by panning stream sediment in the field to remove most of the light minerals. The panned samples were then sieved through a 20-mesh (0.8 mm) sieve in the laboratory, and the minus-20-mesh fraction was further separated with bromoform (specific gravity, 2.86) to remove any remaining light-mineral grains. Magnetite and other strongly magnetic heavy minerals were removed from the heavy-mineral fraction by use of a hand magnet. The remaining sample was passed through a Frantz Isodynamic Separator and a nonmagnetic fraction was examined for its mineralogical content with the aid of a binocular microscope and an x-ray diffractometer. The nonmagnetic concentrates primarily contain phyllite fragments, muscovite, sphene, zircon, apatite, tourmaline, rutile, and anatase. Most ore and ore-related minerals also occur in this fraction.

  9. Thermoelectric properties of two-dimensional topological insulators doped with nonmagnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-01

    We present a theoretical study on the thermoelectric properties of two-dimensional topological insulators (2DTIs) doped with nonmagnetic impurities. We develop a tractable model to calculate the electronic band structure without additional input parameters and to evaluate the thermoelectric properties of 2DTIs based on CdTe/HgTe quantum wells. We find that with increasing the doping concentration of nonmagnetic impurity, the edge states dominate the thermoelectric transport and the bulk-state conduction is largely suppressed. For typical sample parameters, the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT (a quantity used to characterize the conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric device between the heat and electricity) can be much larger than 1, which is a great advance over conventional thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we show that with decreasing the 2DTI ribbon width or the Hall-bar width, ZT can be considerably further improved. These results indicate that the CdTe/HgTe 2DTIs doped with nonmagnetic impurities can be potentially applied as high-efficiency thermoelectric materials and devices.

  10. Effect of nonmagnetic impurities on s± superconductivity in the presence of incipient bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Mishra, V.; Maiti, S.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2016-08-01

    Several Fe chalcogenide superconductors without hole pockets at the Fermi level display high temperature superconductivity, in apparent contradiction to naive spin fluctuation pairing arguments. Recently, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments studied the influence of impurities on some of these materials and claimed that nonmagnetic impurities do not create in-gap states, leading to the conclusion that the gap must be s++, i.e., conventional s wave with no gap sign change. Here we critique this argument, and give various ways sign-changing gaps can be consistent with the absence of such bound states. In particular, we calculate the bound states for an s± system with a hole pocket below the Fermi level, and show that the nonmagnetic impurity bound state energy generically tracks the gap edge Em i n in the system, thereby rendering it unobservable. A failure to observe a bound state in the case of a nonmagnetic impurity therefore cannot be used as an argument to exclude sign-changing pairing states.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of two-dimensional topological insulators doped with nonmagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-07

    We present a theoretical study on the thermoelectric properties of two-dimensional topological insulators (2DTIs) doped with nonmagnetic impurities. We develop a tractable model to calculate the electronic band structure without additional input parameters and to evaluate the thermoelectric properties of 2DTIs based on CdTe/HgTe quantum wells. We find that with increasing the doping concentration of nonmagnetic impurity, the edge states dominate the thermoelectric transport and the bulk-state conduction is largely suppressed. For typical sample parameters, the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT (a quantity used to characterize the conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric device between the heat and electricity) can be much larger than 1, which is a great advance over conventional thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we show that with decreasing the 2DTI ribbon width or the Hall-bar width, ZT can be considerably further improved. These results indicate that the CdTe/HgTe 2DTIs doped with nonmagnetic impurities can be potentially applied as high-efficiency thermoelectric materials and devices.

  12. Resistance transition assisted geometry enhanced magnetoresistance in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Magnetoresistance (MR) reported in some non-magnetic semiconductors (particularly silicon) has triggered considerable interest owing to the large magnitude of the effect. Here, we showed that MR in lightly doped n-Si can be significantly enhanced by introducing two diodes and proper design of the carrier path [Wan, Nature 477, 304 (2011)]. We designed a geometrical enhanced magnetoresistance (GEMR) device whose room-temperature MR ratio reaching 30% at 0.065 T and 20 000% at 1.2 T, respectively, approaching the performance of commercial MR devices. The mechanism of this GEMR is: the diodes help to define a high resistive state (HRS) and a low resistive state (LRS) in device by their openness and closeness, respectively. The ratio of apparent resistance between HRS and LRS is determined by geometry of silicon wafer and electrodes. Magnetic field could induce a transition from LRS to HRS by reshaping potential and current distribution among silicon wafer, resulting in a giant enhancement of intrinsic MR. We expect that this GEMR could be also realized in other semiconductors. The combination of high sensitivity to low magnetic fields and large high-field response should make this device concept attractive to the magnetic field sensing industry. Moreover, because this MR device is based on a conventional silicon/semiconductor platform, it should be possible to integrate this MR device with existing silicon/semiconductor devices and so aid the development of silicon/semiconductor-based magnetoelectronics. Also combining MR devices and semiconducting devices in a single Si/semiconductor chip may lead to some novel devices with hybrid function, such as electric-magnetic-photonic properties. Our work demonstrates that the charge property of semiconductor can be used in the magnetic sensing industry, where the spin properties of magnetic materials play a role traditionally.

  13. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III-V, and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III-V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III-V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in binary

  14. Non-magnetic and magnetic impurity effects on superconductivity in the ternary iron-silicide Lu2FeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tadataka; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Takase, Kouichi; Takano, Yoshiki

    2010-12-01

    We studied effect of non-magnetic and magnetic impurities on superconductivity in LuFeSi by investigating superconducting properties of (LuFeSi (R=Sc,Y, and Dy). The rapid depression of Tc by non-magnetic impurities reveals strong pair breaking by disorder, providing compelling evidence for the sign reversal of the superconducting order parameter in LuFeSi.

  15. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys are addressed. Because the Bi compounds are not known to form zincblende structures, only the anion-substituted alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi are considered candidates as narrow-gap semiconductors. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and InPBi, with the large lattice mismatch of the constituents, will be the most difficult to mix. Calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys, and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe. Thus, although InSbBi may be an easier material to prepare, InPBi promises to be a harder material. Growth of the Bi compounds will require high effective growth temperatures, probably attainable only through the use of nonequilibrium energy-assisted epitaxial growth techniques.

  16. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1998-01-01

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  17. Ferromagnets based on diamond-like semiconductors GaSb, InSb, Ge, and Si supersaturated with manganese or iron impurities during laser-plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, E. S. Podol'skii, V. V.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Sapozhnikov, M. V.; Druzhnov, D. M.; Gusev, S. N.; Gribkov, B. A.; Filatov, D. O.; Stepanova, Yu. S.; Levchuk, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Properties of thin (30-100 nm) layers of diluted magnetic semiconductors based on diamond-like compounds III-V (InSb and GaSb) and elemental semiconductors Ge and Si doped with 3d impurities of manganese and iron up to 15% were measured and discussed. The layers were grown by laser-plasma deposition onto heated single-crystal gallium arsenide or sapphire substrates. The ferromagnetism of layers with the Curie temperature up to 500 K appeared in observations of the ferromagnetic resonance, anomalous Hall effect, and magneto-optic Kerr effect. The carrier mobility of diluted magnetic semiconductors is a hundred times larger than that of the previously known highest temperature magnetic semiconductors, i.e., copper and chromium chalcogenides. The difference between changes in the magnetization with temperature in diluted semiconductors based on III-V, Ge, and Si was discussed. A complex structure of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in Si:Mn/GaAs was observed. The results of magnetic-force microscopy showed a weak correlation between the surface relief and magnetic inhomogeneity, which suggests that the ferromagnetism is caused by the 3d-impurity solid solution, rather than ferromagnetic phase inclusions.

  18. PREFACE: Theory, Modelling and Computational methods for Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorato, Max; Probert, Matt

    2010-04-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 2nd International Conference on: Theory, Modelling and Computational methods for Semiconductors. The conference was held at the St Williams College, York, UK on 13th-15th Jan 2010. The previous conference in this series took place in 2008 at the University of Manchester, UK. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in Semiconductor science and technology, where there is a substantial potential for time saving in R&D. The development of high speed computer architectures is finally allowing the routine use of accurate methods for calculating the structural, thermodynamic, vibrational and electronic properties of semiconductors and their heterostructures. This workshop ran for three days, with the objective of bringing together UK and international leading experts in the field of theory of group IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors together with postdocs and students in the early stages of their careers. The first day focused on providing an introduction and overview of this vast field, aimed particularly at students at this influential point in their careers. We would like to thank all participants for their contribution to the conference programme and these proceedings. We would also like to acknowledge the financial support from the Institute of Physics (Computational Physics group and Semiconductor Physics group), the UK Car-Parrinello Consortium, Accelrys (distributors of Materials Studio) and Quantumwise (distributors of Atomistix). The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Dr Matt Probert (University of York) and Dr Max Migliorato (University of Manchester) Programme Committee: Dr Marco Califano (University of Leeds), Dr Jacob Gavartin (Accelrys Ltd, Cambridge), Dr Stanko Tomic (STFC Daresbury Laboratory), Dr Gabi Slavcheva (Imperial College London) Proceedings edited and compiled by Dr

  19. Electrochemically synthesized broadband antireflective and hydrophobic GaOOH nanopillars for III-V InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jung Woo; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jun, Dong-Hwan; Heo, Jonggon; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Jin-Hong; Yu, Jae Su

    2014-03-10

    We report the efficiency enhancement of III-V InGaP/GaAs/ Ge triple-junction (TJ) solar cells using a novel structure, i.e., vertically-oriented gallium oxide hydroxide (GaOOH) nanopillars (NPs), as an antireflection coating. The optical reflectance properties of rhombus-shaped GaOOH NPs, which were synthesized by a simple, low-cost, and large-scalable electrochemical deposition method, were investigated, together with a theoretical analysis using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method. For the GaOOH NPs, the solar weighted reflectance of ~8.5% was obtained over a wide wavelength range of 300-1800 nm and their surfaces exhibited a high water contact angle of ~130° (i.e., hydrophobicity). To simply demonstrate the feasibility of device applications, the GaOOH NPs were incorporated into a test-grown InGaP/GaAs/Ge TJ solar cell structure. For the InGaP/GaAs/Ge TJ solar cell with broadband antireflective GaOOH NPs, the conversion efficiency (η) of ~16.47% was obtained, indicating an increased efficiency by 3.47% compared to the bare solar cell (i.e., η~13%).

  20. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  1. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  2. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  3. Synthesis of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, Focusing on Nontoxic and Earth-Abundant Materials.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Peter; Carrière, Marie; Lincheneau, Christophe; Vaure, Louis; Tamang, Sudarsan

    2016-09-28

    We review the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals/colloidal quantum dots in organic solvents with special emphasis on earth-abundant and toxic heavy metal free compounds. Following the Introduction, section 2 defines the terms related to the toxicity of nanocrystals and gives a comprehensive overview on toxicity studies concerning all types of quantum dots. Section 3 aims at providing the reader with the basic concepts of nanocrystal synthesis. It starts with the concepts currently used to describe the nucleation and growth of monodisperse particles and next takes a closer look at the chemistry of the inorganic core and its interactions with surface ligands. Section 4 reviews in more detail the synthesis of different families of semiconductor nanocrystals, namely elemental group IV compounds (carbon nanodots, Si, Ge), III-V compounds (e.g., InP, InAs), and binary and multinary metal chalcogenides. Finally, the authors' view on the perspectives in this field is given. PMID:27391095

  4. Synthesis of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, Focusing on Nontoxic and Earth-Abundant Materials.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Peter; Carrière, Marie; Lincheneau, Christophe; Vaure, Louis; Tamang, Sudarsan

    2016-09-28

    We review the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals/colloidal quantum dots in organic solvents with special emphasis on earth-abundant and toxic heavy metal free compounds. Following the Introduction, section 2 defines the terms related to the toxicity of nanocrystals and gives a comprehensive overview on toxicity studies concerning all types of quantum dots. Section 3 aims at providing the reader with the basic concepts of nanocrystal synthesis. It starts with the concepts currently used to describe the nucleation and growth of monodisperse particles and next takes a closer look at the chemistry of the inorganic core and its interactions with surface ligands. Section 4 reviews in more detail the synthesis of different families of semiconductor nanocrystals, namely elemental group IV compounds (carbon nanodots, Si, Ge), III-V compounds (e.g., InP, InAs), and binary and multinary metal chalcogenides. Finally, the authors' view on the perspectives in this field is given.

  5. Magnetostatic Surface Waves in Ferrite-Nonlinear Nonmagnetic Negative Permittivity Material Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ass'ad, A. I.; Ashour, H. S.; Shabat, M. M.

    Magnetostatic surface waves have been investigated in a layered system of a nonlinear nonmagnetic negative permittivity material (NPM) and Ferrite (YIG). We derived the dispersion relation before numerically solving the dispersion relation of the TE nonlinear magnetostatic surface waves (NMSSW) in the proposed structure and the power flow. We found out that the wave effective nonlinear refractive index is much smaller in the forward direction than in the backward direction and consequently, the power flow is lower for the forward direction than the backward direction.

  6. Few-layer graphene shells and nonmagnetic encapsulates: a versatile and nontoxic carbon nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Mendes, Rafael G; Hirsch, Cordula; Jähne, Carsten; Lohe, Martin R; Grothe, Julia; Kaskel, Stefan; Fu, Lei; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Eckert, Jürgen; Wick, Peter; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2013-12-23

    In this work a simple and scalable approach to coat nonmagnetic nanoparticles with few-layer graphene is presented. In addition, the easy processing of such nanoparticles to remove their core, leaving only the 3D graphene nanoshell, is demonstrated. The samples are comprehensively characterized, as are their versatility in terms of functionalization and as a material for electrochemical storage. Indeed, these 3D graphene nanostructures are easily functionalized much as is found with carbon nanotubes and planar graphene. Electrochemical investigations indicate these nanostructures are promising for stable long-life battery applications. Finally, initial toxicological investigations suggest no acute health risk from these 3D graphene nanostructures.

  7. Electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid (ec-LLS) crystal growth: a low-temperature strategy for covalent semiconductor crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, Eli; Maldonado, Stephen

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes a new electrochemical synthetic strategy for direct growth of crystalline covalent group IV and III-V semiconductor materials at or near ambient temperature conditions. This strategy, which we call "electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid" (ec-LLS) crystal growth, marries the semiconductor solvation properties of liquid metal melts with the utility and simplicity of conventional electrodeposition. A low-temperature liquid metal (i.e., Hg, Ga, or alloy thereof) acts simultaneously as the source of electrons for the heterogeneous reduction of oxidized semiconductor precursors dissolved in an electrolyte as well as the solvent for dissolution of the zero-valent semiconductor. Supersaturation of the semiconductor in the liquid metal triggers eventual crystal nucleation and growth. In this way, the liquid electrolyte-liquid metal-solid crystal phase boundary strongly influences crystal growth. As a synthetic strategy, ec-LLS has several intrinsic features that are attractive for preparing covalent semiconductor crystals. First, ec-LLS does not require high temperatures, toxic precursors, or high-energy-density semiconductor reagents. This largely simplifies equipment complexity and expense. In practice, ec-LLS can be performed with only a beaker filled with electrolyte and an electrical circuit capable of supplying a defined current (e.g., a battery in series with a resistor). By this same token, ec-LLS is compatible with thermally and chemically sensitive substrates (e.g., plastics) that cannot be used as deposition substrates in conventional syntheses of covalent semiconductors. Second, ec-LLS affords control over a host of crystal shapes and sizes through simple changes in common experimental parameters. As described in detail herein, large and small semiconductor crystals can be grown both homogeneously within a liquid metal electrode and heterogeneously at the interface of a liquid metal electrode and a seed substrate, depending on the particular

  8. Electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid (ec-LLS) crystal growth: a low-temperature strategy for covalent semiconductor crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, Eli; Maldonado, Stephen

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes a new electrochemical synthetic strategy for direct growth of crystalline covalent group IV and III-V semiconductor materials at or near ambient temperature conditions. This strategy, which we call "electrochemical liquid-liquid-solid" (ec-LLS) crystal growth, marries the semiconductor solvation properties of liquid metal melts with the utility and simplicity of conventional electrodeposition. A low-temperature liquid metal (i.e., Hg, Ga, or alloy thereof) acts simultaneously as the source of electrons for the heterogeneous reduction of oxidized semiconductor precursors dissolved in an electrolyte as well as the solvent for dissolution of the zero-valent semiconductor. Supersaturation of the semiconductor in the liquid metal triggers eventual crystal nucleation and growth. In this way, the liquid electrolyte-liquid metal-solid crystal phase boundary strongly influences crystal growth. As a synthetic strategy, ec-LLS has several intrinsic features that are attractive for preparing covalent semiconductor crystals. First, ec-LLS does not require high temperatures, toxic precursors, or high-energy-density semiconductor reagents. This largely simplifies equipment complexity and expense. In practice, ec-LLS can be performed with only a beaker filled with electrolyte and an electrical circuit capable of supplying a defined current (e.g., a battery in series with a resistor). By this same token, ec-LLS is compatible with thermally and chemically sensitive substrates (e.g., plastics) that cannot be used as deposition substrates in conventional syntheses of covalent semiconductors. Second, ec-LLS affords control over a host of crystal shapes and sizes through simple changes in common experimental parameters. As described in detail herein, large and small semiconductor crystals can be grown both homogeneously within a liquid metal electrode and heterogeneously at the interface of a liquid metal electrode and a seed substrate, depending on the particular

  9. Revetements antireflet-passivation a base de nitrure de silicium PECVD pour cellules solaires triple-jonction III-V/ Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homier, Ram

    Dans le contexte environnemental actuel, le photovoltaïque bénéficie de l'augmentation des efforts de recherche dans le domaine des énergies renouvelables. Pour réduire le coût de la production d'électricité par conversion directe de l'énergie lumineuse en électricité, le photovoltaïque concentré est intéressant. Le principe est de concentrer une grande quantité d'énergie lumineuse sur des petites surfaces de cellules solaires multi-jonction à haute efficacité. Lors de la fabrication d'une cellule solaire, il est essentiel d'inclure une méthode pour réduire la réflexion de la lumière à la surface du dispositif. Le design d'un revêtement antireflet (ARC) pour cellules solaires multi-jonction présente des défis à cause de la large bande d'absorption et du besoin d'égaliser le courant produit par chaque sous-cellule. Le nitrure de silicium déposé par PECVD en utilisant des conditions standards est largement utilisé dans l'industrie des cellules solaires à base de silicium. Cependant, ce diélectrique présente de l'absorption dans la plage des courtes longueurs d'onde. Nous proposons l'utilisation du nitrure de silicium déposé par PECVD basse fréquence (LFSiN) optimisé pour avoir un haut indice de réfraction et une faible absorption optique pour l'ARC pour cellules solaires triple-jonction III-V/Ge. Ce matériau peut aussi servir de couche de passivation/encapsulation. Les simulations montrent que l'ARC double couche SiO2/LFSiN peut être très efficace pour réduire les pertes par réflexion dans la plage de longueurs d'onde de la sous-cellule limitante autant pour des cellules solaires triple-jonction limitées par la sous-cellule du haut que pour celles limitées par la sous-cellule du milieu. Nous démontrons aussi que la performance de la structure est robuste par rapport aux fluctuations des paramètres des couches PECVD (épaisseurs, indice de réfraction). Mots-clés : Photovoltaïque concentré (CPV), cellules

  10. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-10

    The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

  11. Dynamics of electronic transitions and frequency dependence of negative capacitance in semiconductor diodes under high forward bias

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Kanika; Datta, Shouvik; Henini, Mohamed; Alshammari, Marzook S.

    2014-09-22

    We observed qualitatively dissimilar frequency dependence of negative capacitance under high charge injection in two sets of functionally different junction diodes: III-V based light emitting and Si-based non-light emitting diodes. Using an advanced approach based on bias activated differential capacitance, we developed a generalized understanding of negative capacitance phenomenon which can be extended to any diode based device structure. We explained the observations as the mutual competition of fast and slow electronic transition rates which are different in different devices. This study can be useful in understanding the interfacial effects in semiconductor heterostructures and may lead to superior device functionality.

  12. Non-magnetic impurity effects in LiFeAs studied by STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaguri, T.; Khim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Bumsung; Kim, Kee Hoon; Kitagawa, K.; Matsubayashi, K.; Mazaki, Y.; Uwatoko, Y.; Takigawa, M.; Takagi, H.

    2012-02-01

    Detecting the possible sign reversal of the superconducting gap in iron-based superconductors is highly non-trivial. Here we use non-magnetic impurity as a sign indicator. If the sign of the superconducting gap is positive everywhere in momentum space, in-gap bound state should not be observed near the impurity site unless it is magnetic. On the other hand, if there is a sign-reversal in the gap, even non-magnetic impurity may create in-gap bound state [1]. We performed STM/STS experiments on self-flux and Sn-flux grown LiFeAs crystals and examined the effects of Sn impurity. In STM images of Sn-flux grown samples, we found a ring-like object which may represent Sn. Tunneling spectrum taken at this defect site exhibits in-gap bound state. Together with flat-bottom superconducting gap observed far from the defects, sign-reversing s-wave gap is the most plausible gap structure in LiFeAs. [1] T. Kariyado and M. Ogata, JPSJ 79, 083704 (2010).

  13. Kramers non-magnetic superconductivity in LnNiAsO superconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuke; Luo, Yongkang; Li, Lin; Chen, Bin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Dai, Jianhui; Yang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Li; Cao, Guanghan; Xu, Zhu-an

    2014-10-22

    We investigated a series of nickel-based oxyarsenides LnNiAsO (Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) compounds. CeNiAsO undergoes two successive anti-ferromagnetic transitions at TN1=9.3 K and TN2=7.3 K; SmNiAsO becomes an anti-ferromagnet below TN≃3.5 K; NdNiAsO keeps paramagnetic down to 2 K but orders anti-ferromagnetically below TN≃1.3 K. Superconductivity was observed only in Kramers non-magnetic LaNiAsO and PrNiAsO with Tc=2.7 K and 0.93 K, respectively. The superconductivity of PrNiAsO is further studied by upper critical field and specific heat measurements, which reveal that PrNiAsO is a weakly coupled Kramers non-magnetic superconductor. Our work confirms that the nickel-based oxyarsenide superconductors are substantially different in mechanism to iron-based ones, and are likely to be described by the conventional superconductivity theory. PMID:25248377

  14. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Grubelich, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  15. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  16. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  17. Low frequency noise sources and mechanisms in semiconductor nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delker, Collin James

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive candidates for use in future high-speed electronics, transparent/flexible devices, and chemical sensors. Among other materials, III-V semiconductors have gained considerable interest for their high bulk mobility and low band gap, making them promising for high-speed nanoscale devices. However, nanowire devices also exhibit high levels of low-frequency noise due to their low band gap and high surface-to-volume ratio. The sources and mechanisms of this noise must be understood and controlled in order to realize practical applications of nanowire electronics. This work seeks to understand the underlying noise mechanisms of nanowire transistors in order discover ways to reduce noise levels. It also demonstrates how noise can provide a spectroscopy for analyzing device quality. Most traditional noise studies tend to apply standard MOSFET models to nanowire noise and transport, which lump together all possible independent noise sources in a nanowire, ignoring effects of the contacts or multiple gates, and could lead to misestimation of the noise figures for a device. This work demonstrates how noise in a nanowire transistor can stem from the channel, ungated access regions, metal- semiconductor contacts, and tunnel barriers, all independently adding to the total noise. Each source of noise can contribute and may dominate the overall noise behavior under certain bias regimes and temperatures, as demonstrated in this work through various device structures and measurements. For example, the contacts can influence noise even below the threshold voltage under certain conditions, emphasizing the need for high-quality metal-semiconductor interface technology.

  18. Semiconductor/dielectric interface engineering and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Antonio T.

    The focus of this dissertation is the application and characterization of several, novel interface passivation techniques for III-V semiconductors, and the development of an in-situ electrical characterization. Two different interface passivation techniques were evaluated. The first is interface nitridation using a nitrogen radical plasma source. The nitrogen radical plasma generator is a unique system which is capable of producing a large flux of N-radicals free of energetic ions. This was applied to Si and the surface was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Ultra-thin nitride layers could be formed from 200-400° C. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated using this passivation technique. Interface nitridation was able to reduce leakage current and improve the equivalent oxide thickness of the devices. The second passivation technique studied is the atomic layer deposition (ALD) diethylzinc (DEZ)/water treatment of sulfur treated InGaAs and GaSb. On InGaAs this passivation technique is able to chemically reduce higher oxidation states on the surface, and the process results in the deposition of a ZnS/ZnO interface passivation layer, as determined by XPS. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of MOSCAPs made on p-InGaAs reveal a large reduction in accumulation dispersion and a reduction in the density of interfacial traps. The same technique was applied to GaSb and the process was studied in an in-situ half-cycle XPS experiment. DEZ/H2O is able to remove all Sb-S from the surface, forming a stable ZnS passivation layer. This passivation layer is resistant to further reoxidation during dielectric deposition. The final part of this dissertation is the design and construction of an ultra-high vacuum cluster tool for in-situ electrical characterization. The system consists of three deposition chambers coupled to an electrical probe station. With this setup, devices can be processed and subsequently electrically characterized

  19. Photoemission spectroscopy of magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities on the surface of the Bi2Se3 topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Valla, T; Pan, Z-H; Gardner, D; Lee, Y S; Chu, S

    2012-03-16

    Dirac-like surface states on surfaces of topological insulators have a chiral spin structure that suppresses backscattering and protects the coherence of these states in the presence of nonmagnetic scatterers. In contrast, magnetic scatterers should open the backscattering channel via the spin-flip processes and degrade the state's coherence. We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the scattering rates upon the adsorption of various magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities on the surface of Bi2Se3, a model topological insulator. We reveal a remarkable insensitivity of the topological surface state to both nonmagnetic and magnetic impurities in the low impurity concentration regime. Scattering channels open up with the emergence of hexagonal warping in the high-doping regime, irrespective of the impurity's magnetic moment.

  20. Band structure of core-shell semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistol, Mats-Erik; Pryor, Craig

    2009-03-01

    We present band structures of strained core-shell nanowires composed of zincblende III-V (binary) semiconductors. We consider all combinations of AlN, GaN, InN, and all combinations of AlP, GaP, AlAs, GaAs, InP, InAs, AlSb, GaSb, and InSb. We compute the γ- and X-conduction band minima as well as the valence band maximum, all as functions of the core and shell radii. The calculations were performed using continuum elasticity theory for the strain, eight-band strain-dependent k.p theory for the γ-point energies, and single band approximation for the X-point conduction minima. We identify structures with type-I, type-II and type-III band alignment, as well as systems in which one material becomes metallic due to a negative band-gap. We identify structures that may support exciton crystals with and without photoexcitation. We have also computed the effective masses, from which the confinement energy may be estimated. All the results [Pistol and Pryor, Phys. Rev. B 78, 115319] are available in graphical and tabular form at www.semiconductor.physics.uiowa.edu

  1. Lattice thermal expansion for normal tetrahedral compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M.S. . E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    The cubic root of the deviation of the lattice thermal expansion from that of the expected value of diamond for group IV semiconductors, binary compounds of III-V and II-VI, as well as several ternary compounds from groups I-III-VI{sub 2}, II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-IV{sub 2}V{sub 3} semiconductors versus their bonding length are given straight lines. Their slopes were found to be 0.0256, 0.0210, 0.0170, 0.0259, 0.0196, and 0.02840 for the groups above, respectively. Depending on the valence electrons of the elements forming these groups, a formula was found to correlate all the values of the slopes mentioned above to that of group IV. This new formula which depends on the melting point and the bonding length as well as the number of valence electrons for the elements forming the compounds, will gives best calculated values for lattice thermal expansion for all compounds forming the groups mentioned above. An empirical relation is also found between the mean ionicity of the compounds forming the groups and their slopes mentioned above and that gave the mean ionicity for the compound CuGe{sub 2}P{sub 3} in the range of 0.442.

  2. Property prediction of new semiconductors by computer modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Lin, Guo Q.; Zeng, Yingzhi

    2002-11-01

    A new methodology of systematic design of new materials for various applications is presented in this paper. In particular, a large number of candidate compounds that are formed by all possible combinations of the targeted elements in the periodic table are first screened and shortlisted by artificial neural network techniques. Then the quantum mechanics computation is employed to evaluate the promising candidates selected from the first step. Finally experiments are performed to further examine the computation results. In the present work, we apply this methodology to the study of semiconductors of binary (III-V and II-VI) and ternary (I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2) compounds. Firstly, we systematically study all possible binary and ternary compounds by using pattern recognition and perform prediction of two important properties, namely band gap energy and lattice constant, with the artificial neural network model. Candidate semiconductors are then selected. On the basis of the above study, we perform first principles quantum mechanics computation for some promising II-VI binary candidates. The first principles study of the ternary candidates will be conducted in the near future, and the experiment study of the binary compounds is ongoing. The model predicted new compounds as well as the developed design methodology may be of interest to general materials scientists including these of smart materials research.

  3. Diluted magnetic semiconductor superlattices and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Furdyna, J. K.; Gunshor, R. L.

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) are mixed semiconducting crystals whose lattice is made up in part of substitutional magnetic ions. Cd 1-xMn xTe and Hg 1-xMn xTe are examples of such materials. Their structural and band parameters can be "tuned" by composition over a wide range. They can thus be exploited in situations completely similar to those involving Ga 1-xAl xAs. Using molecular beam epitaxy, we have grown Cd 1-xMn xTe superlattices with alternating Mn content, having up to 150 layers, with layer thickness ranging from 50 to 100 Å. The superlattice structure is clearly revealed by transmission electron microscopy and by zone-folding of the phonon spectrum observed in Raman scattering. Photoluminescence observed on Cd 1-xMn xTe superlattices is several orders of magnitude greater than that from a Cd 1-xMn xTe film with uniform Mn content, or from bulk Cd 1-xMn xTe specimens. The presence of localized magnetic moments in DMS results in a strong exchange interaction between these moments and band electrons. This in turn leads to gigantic Zeeman splittings of impurity states, exciton levels, Landau levels, and the bands themselves. Zeeman splittings as large as 20 meV (which in non-magnetic semiconductors would require unrealistic megagauss fields) are easily achieved in DMS in fields of several kilogauss. Since the magnitude of this exchange-induced splitting in DMS can be comparable to the binding energies and to the minigaps encountered in multiple quantum wells, DMS superlattices hold promise of a host of novel effects of both fundamental and applied interest.

  4. The influence of large non-magnetic gaps on the transversal end-effect in the linear induction pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfgat, Yu.; Mikelsons, A.; Krumins, J.; Pedchenko, A.

    2007-03-01

    It is usually accepted that in linear induction pumps and chute systems the transversal end-effect manifests itself as a deformation of the current induced in the working medium that results in decreasing the electromagnetic force, affecting the working medium. This is true at small non-magnetic gaps. With large gaps, dissipation fields should be accounted for. This phenomenon is very conspicuous in devices with a single-sided inductor. The paper reports the theoretical and experimental results on the definition of electromagnetic forces, affecting electrically conducting bodies subjected to the field induced by a one-sided inductor with different non-magnetic gaps. Figs 7, Refs 3.

  5. Antiferromagnetic phase of the gapless semiconductor V3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamer, M. E.; Assaf, B. A.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Arena, D.; Lewis, L. H.; Saúl, A. A.; Radtke, G.; Heiman, D.

    2015-03-01

    Discovering new antiferromagnetic (AF) compounds is at the forefront of developing future spintronic devices without fringing magnetic fields. The AF gapless semiconducting D 03 phase of V3Al was successfully synthesized via arc-melting and annealing. The AF properties were established through synchrotron measurements of the atom-specific magnetic moments, where the magnetic dichroism reveals large and oppositely oriented moments on individual V atoms. Density functional theory calculations confirmed the stability of a type G antiferromagnetism involving only two-thirds of the V atoms, while the remaining V atoms are nonmagnetic. Magnetization, x-ray diffraction, and transport measurements also support the antiferromagnetism. This archetypal gapless semiconductor may be considered as a cornerstone for future spintronic devices containing AF elements.

  6. Synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianfeng; Dobson, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe typical methods and provide detailed experimental protocols for synthesizing and processing various semiconductor nanoparticles which have potential application in biology and medicine. These include synthesis of binary semiconductor nanoparticles; core@shell nanoparticles and alloyed nanoparticles; size-selective precipitation to obtain monodisperse nanoparticles; and strategies for phase transfer of nanoparticles from organic solution to aqueous media. PMID:22791427

  7. Rashba semiconductor as spin Hall material: Experimental demonstration of spin pumping in wurtzite n -GaN:Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Matzer, M.; Martín-Luengo, A. Tarazaga; Scharber, M. C.; Bonanni, A.

    2016-08-01

    Pure spin currents in semiconductors are essential for implementation in the next generation of spintronic elements. Heterostructures of III-nitride semiconductors are currently employed as central building blocks for lighting and high-power devices. Moreover, the long relaxation times and the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in these materials indicate them as privileged hosts for spin currents and related phenomena. Spin pumping is an efficient mechanism for the inception of spin current and its conversion into charge current in nonmagnetic metals and semiconductors with Rashba SOC. We report on the generation at room temperature (RT) of pure spin current in nonmagnetic degenerate n -GaN:Si from a magnetic permalloy layer driven to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) conditions. The FMR signal and the generated Hall voltages due to spin Hall effect, inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE), and spurious mechanisms are detected simultaneously. No spin-pumping-induced voltage could be measured below RT, despite the persistence of FMR signal. After eliminating the spurious (not due to ISHE) components contributing to the generated voltage, we find for n -GaN:Si a spin Hall angle θSH=3.03 ×10-3 , exceeding by one order of magnitude those reported for other semiconductors, pointing at III-nitrides as particularly efficient spin current generators.

  8. Exchange coupling in hard/soft-magnetic multilayer films with non-magnetic spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, W. B.; Liu, W.; Gong, W. J.; Liu, X. H.; Guo, S.; Yang, F.; Wang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange coupling in textured HM/NM/α-Fe/NM/HM multilayer films (HM = NdFeB or PrFeB hard magnetic layers; NM = nonmagnetic Mo, Cu, and Cr layer) is shown to be indirect and long-range. The influences of thickness of NM spacer layer and HM layer, the material of HM phase and NM spacer layers, and the texture of HM layer, on the effective critical correlation length (Lexeff) and exchange-coupling between soft-magnetic (SM) and HM layers are investigated. A non-linear dependence of Lexeff on the thickness of NM spacer layer is observed. Magnetostatic interaction may lead to the observed non-linear dependence.

  9. Improving the Description of Nonmagnetic and Magnetic Molecular Crystals via the van der Waals Density Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Masao; Nakamura, Makoto; Hamada, Ikutaro; Oda, Tatsuki

    2015-02-01

    We have derived and implemented a stress tensor formulation for the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) with spin-polarization-dependent gradient correction (GC) recently proposed by the authors [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 82, 093701 (2013)] and applied it to nonmagnetic and magnetic molecular crystals under ambient condition. We found that the cell parameters of the molecular crystals obtained with vdW-DF show an overall improvement compared with those obtained using local density and generalized gradient approximations. In particular, the original vdW-DF with GC gives the equilibrium structural parameters of solid oxygen in the α-phase, which are in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Spin-Selective Electron Quantum Transport in Nonmagnetic MgZnO/ZnO Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Maryenko, D; Falson, J; Bahramy, M S; Dmitriev, I A; Kozuka, Y; Tsukazaki, A; Kawasaki, M

    2015-11-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements on a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system at the nonmagnetic MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface showing distinct behavior for electrons with spin-up and spin-down orientations. The low-field Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations manifest alternating resistance peak heights which can be attributed to distinct scattering rates for different spin orientations. The tilt-field measurements at a half-integer filling factor reveal that the majority spins show usual diffusive behavior, i.e., peaks with the magnitude proportional to the index of the Landau level at the Fermi energy. By contrast, the minority spins develop "plateaus" with the magnitude of dissipative resistivity that is fairly independent of the Landau level index and is of the order of the zero-field resistivity. PMID:26588414

  11. Spin-filter device based on the Rashba effect using a nonmagnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Koga, Takaaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Takayanagi, Hideaki; Datta, Supriyo

    2002-03-25

    We propose an electronic spin-filter device that uses a nonmagnetic triple barrier resonant tunneling diode (TB-RTD). This device combines the spin-split resonant tunneling levels induced by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction and the spin blockade phenomena between two regions separated by the middle barrier in the TB-RTD. Detailed calculations using the InAlAs/InGaAs material system reveal that a splitting of a peak should be observed in the I-V curve of this device as a result of the spin-filtering effect. The filtering efficiency exceeds 99.9% at the peak positions in the I-V curve. PMID:11909487

  12. Increasing energy relaxation time of superconducting qubits with nonmagnetic infrared filter and shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhao, Liu; Mengmeng, Li; Dong, Lan; Guangming, Xue; Xinsheng, Tan; Haifeng, Yu; Yang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    One of the primary origins of the energy relaxation in superconducting qubits is the quasiparticle loss. The quasiparticles can be excited remarkably by infrared radiation. In order to minimize the density of quasiparticle and increase the qubit relaxation time, we design and fabricate the infrared filter and shield for superconducting qubits. In comparison with previous filters and shields, a nonmagnetic dielectric is used as the infrared absorbing material, greatly suppressing the background magnetic fluctuations. The filters can be made to impedance-match with other microwave devices. Using the as-fabricated infrared filter and shield, we increased the relaxation time of a transmon qubit from 519 ns to 1125 ns. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91321310, 11274156, 11474152, 11474153, 61521001, and 11504165) and the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922104 and 2011CBA00205).

  13. Nonmagnetic impurity effects of the spin disordered state in NiGa2S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Yusuke; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2006-03-01

    Nonmagnetic impurity effects of the spin disordered state in the triangular antiferromagnet NiGa2S4[1] was studied through magnetic and thermal measurements for Zn substituted insulating materials Ni1-xZnxGa2S4 (0.0 <= x <= 0.3)[2]. Only 1 % Zn substitution is enough to strongly suppress the coherence observed in the spin disordered state. However, suppression is not complete and the robust feature of the quadratic temperature dependent specific heat and its scaling behavior with the Weiss temperature indicate the existence of a coherent Nambu-Goldstone mode. Absence of either conventional magnetic long-range order or bulk spin freezing suggests a novel symmetry breaking of the ground state. [1] Satoru Nakatsuji, Yusuke Nambu, Hiroshi Tonomura, Osamu Sakai, Seth Jonas, Collin Broholm, Hirokazu Tsunetsugu, Yiming Qiu and Yoshiteru Maeno, Science 309, 1697 (2005). [2] Yusuke Nambu, Satoru Nakatsuji and Yoshiteru Maeno, preprint.

  14. Theoretical study of optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Muhammad Aziz; Siregar, Syahril; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms. First, by introducing an alternating potential in a pure graphene, we demonstrate a gap formation in the density of states and the corresponding optical conductivity. We highlight the distinction between such a gap formation and the so-called Pauli blocking effect. Next, we apply this idea to graphene with adatoms by introducing magnetic interactions between the carrier spins and the spins of the adatoms. Exploring various possible ground-state spin configurations of the adatoms, we find that the antiferromagnetic configuration yields the lowest total electronic energy and is the only configuration that forms a gap. Furthermore, we analyze four different circumstances leading to similar gaplike structures and propose a means to interpret the magneticity and the possible orderings of the adatoms on graphene solely from the optical conductivity data. We apply this analysis to the recently reported experimental data of oxygenated graphene.

  15. Two-step fabrication of self-catalyzed Ga-based semiconductor nanowires on Si by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuezhe; Li, Lixia; Wang, Hailong; Xiao, Jiaxing; Shen, Chao; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua

    2016-05-01

    For the epitaxial growth of Ga-based III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) on Si, Ga droplets could provide a clean and compatible solution in contrast to the common Au catalyst. However, the use of Ga droplets is rather limited except for that in Ga-catalyzed GaAs NW studies in a relatively narrow growth temperature (Ts) window around 620 °C on Si. In this paper, we have investigated the two-step growth of Ga-catalyzed III-V NWs on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. First, by optimizing the surface oxide, vertically aligned GaAs NWs with a high yield are obtained at Ts = 620 °C. Then a two-temperature procedure is adopted to preserve Ga droplets at lower Ts, which leads to an extension of Ts down to 500 °C for GaAs NWs. Based on this procedure, systematic morphological and structural studies for Ga-catalyzed GaAs NWs in the largest Ts range could be presented. Then within the same growth scheme, for the first time, we demonstrate Ga-catalyzed GaAs/GaSb heterostructure NWs. These GaSb NWs are axially grown on the GaAs NW sections and are pure zinc-blende single crystals. Compositional measurements confirm that the catalyst particles indeed mainly consist of Ga and GaSb sections are of high purity but with a minor composition of As. In the end, we present GaAsSb NW growth with a tunable Sb composition. Our results provide useful information for the controllable synthesis of multi-compositional Ga-catalyzed III-V semiconductor NWs on Si for heterogeneous integration.For the epitaxial growth of Ga-based III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) on Si, Ga droplets could provide a clean and compatible solution in contrast to the common Au catalyst. However, the use of Ga droplets is rather limited except for that in Ga-catalyzed GaAs NW studies in a relatively narrow growth temperature (Ts) window around 620 °C on Si. In this paper, we have investigated the two-step growth of Ga-catalyzed III-V NWs on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. First, by

  16. Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For a period covering October 1, 1995 through August 12, 1996, the research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on "Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures. " The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the applicability of electrochemical techniques for characterization of complex device structures based on InP and GaAs, Ge, InGaAs, InSb, InAs and InSb, including: (1) accurate EC-V net majority carrier concentration depth profiling, and (2) surface and bulk structural and electrical type defect densities. Our motivation for this R&D effort was as follows: "Advanced space solar cells and ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells are fabricated using a large variety of III-V materials based on InP and GaAs for solar cells and low bandgap materials such as Ge, InGaAs, InAs and InSb for TPV applications. At the present time for complex device structures using these materials, however, there is no simple way to assess the quality of these structures prior to device fabrication. Therefore, process optimization is a very time consuming and a costly endeavor". Completion of this R&D effort would have had unquestionable benefits for space solar cell and TPV cells, since electrochemical characterization of the above cell structures, if properly designed can provide many useful structural and electrical material information virtually at any depth inside various layers and at the interfaces. This, could have been applied for step-by-step process optimization, which could have been used for fabrication of new generation high efficiency, low cost space PV and TPV cells.

  17. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-V Semiconductors in BCl(3)-Based Chemistries: Part 1: GaAs, GaN, GaP, GaSb and AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R,; Han, J.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Lee, J.W.; Maeda, T.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-12-04

    BC13, with addition of Nz, Ar or Hz, is found to provide smooth anisotropic pattern transfer in GaAs, GaN, GaP, GaSb and AIGriAs under Inductively Coupled Plasma conditions, Maxima in the etch rates for these materials are observed at 33% N2 or 87$'40 Hz (by flow) addition to BC13, whereas Ar addition does not show this behavior. Maximum etch rates are typically much higher for GaAs, Gap, GaSb and AIGaAs (-1,2 @rein) than for GaN (-0.3 ymu'min) due to the higher bond energies of the iatter. The rates decrease at higher pressure, saturate with source power (ion flux) and tend to show maxima with chuck power (ion energy). The etched surfaces remain stoichiometric over abroad range of plasma conditions.

  18. Semiconductor active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendach, Stefan; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Plasmonics is a research area in nanophotonics attracting increasing interest due to the potential applications in sensing and detecting, sub-wavelength confinement of light, integrated circuits, and many others. In particular, when plasmonic structures such as metal nanostructures or highly doped semiconductor particles are combined with active semiconductor materials and nanostructures, novel exciting physics and applications arise. This special section on semiconductor active plasmonics covers several of the most important and complementary directions in the field. First is the modification of the optical properties of a semiconductor nanostructure due to the close proximity of a metallic film or nanostructure. These arise from the formation hybrid plasmon/exciton states and may lead to enhanced spontaneous emission rates, directional far field emission patterns, strong coupling phenomena, and many more. Second is the realization of sub-wavelength scale nanolasers by coupling a semiconductor gain medium with a plasmonic metallic cavity. Particular emphasis is given on the major technical challenges in the fabrication of these nanolasers, such as device patterning, surface passivation, and metal deposition. While the above topics address mainly active structures and devices operating in the visible or near-infrared wavelength region, in the third, the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of semiconductor particles is discussed. This is based on the build-up of surface plasmon resonances in the doped semiconductor particles which can be resonantly coupled and widely tuned by the carrier density in the semiconductor. We believe these highly diverse aspects give insight into the wide variety of new physics and applications that semiconductor active plasmonics is offering. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank the contributors for their efforts and participation

  19. Two-step fabrication of self-catalyzed Ga-based semiconductor nanowires on Si by molecular-beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuezhe; Li, Lixia; Wang, Hailong; Xiao, Jiaxing; Shen, Chao; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua

    2016-05-19

    For the epitaxial growth of Ga-based III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) on Si, Ga droplets could provide a clean and compatible solution in contrast to the common Au catalyst. However, the use of Ga droplets is rather limited except for that in Ga-catalyzed GaAs NW studies in a relatively narrow growth temperature (Ts) window around 620 °C on Si. In this paper, we have investigated the two-step growth of Ga-catalyzed III-V NWs on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. First, by optimizing the surface oxide, vertically aligned GaAs NWs with a high yield are obtained at Ts = 620 °C. Then a two-temperature procedure is adopted to preserve Ga droplets at lower Ts, which leads to an extension of Ts down to 500 °C for GaAs NWs. Based on this procedure, systematic morphological and structural studies for Ga-catalyzed GaAs NWs in the largest Ts range could be presented. Then within the same growth scheme, for the first time, we demonstrate Ga-catalyzed GaAs/GaSb heterostructure NWs. These GaSb NWs are axially grown on the GaAs NW sections and are pure zinc-blende single crystals. Compositional measurements confirm that the catalyst particles indeed mainly consist of Ga and GaSb sections are of high purity but with a minor composition of As. In the end, we present GaAsSb NW growth with a tunable Sb composition. Our results provide useful information for the controllable synthesis of multi-compositional Ga-catalyzed III-V semiconductor NWs on Si for heterogeneous integration.

  20. Unraveling the nature of carrier-mediated ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzerar, Georges; Bouzerar, Richard

    2015-10-01

    After more than a decade of intensive research in the field of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), the nature and origin of ferromagnetism, especially in III-V compounds, is still controversial. Many questions and open issues are under intensive debates. Why after so many years of investigations, Mn-doped GaAs remains the candidate with the highest Curie temperature among the broad family of III-V materials doped with transition metal (TM) impurities? How can one understand that these temperatures are almost two orders of magnitude larger than that of hole-doped (Zn,Mn)Te or (Cd,Mn)Se? Is there any intrinsic limitation or is there any hope to reach room-temperature ferromagnetism in the dilute regime? How can one explain the proximity of (Ga,Mn)As to the metal-insulator transition and the change from Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) couplings in II-VI compounds to double-exchange type in (Ga,Mn)N? In spite of the great success of density functional theory-based studies to provide accurately the critical temperatures in various compounds, till very lately a theory that provides a coherent picture and understanding of the underlying physics was still missing. Recently, within a minimal model, it has been possible to show that among the physical parameters, the key one is the position of the TM acceptor level. By tuning the value of that parameter, one is able to explain quantitatively both magnetic and transport properties in a broad family of DMS. We will see that this minimal model explains in particular the RKKY nature of the exchange in (Zn,Mn)Te/(Cd,Mn)Te and the double exchange type in (Ga,Mn)N and simultaneously the reason why (Ga,Mn)As exhibits the highest critical temperature among both II-VI and III-V DMS's. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  2. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  3. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  4. SLM based semiconductor maskwriter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Steffen; Jehle, Achim

    2015-09-01

    The high-end semiconductor mask fabrication is dominated by e-beam technology. But still more than 50% of all semiconductor masks are produced by laser writers. The current laser writers are based on the same technology that was used 25 years ago. They are reliable and fast but not very economical. Heidelberg Instruments has developed a new economical and fast laser writer based on the latest technologies.

  5. Strained-bond semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-05-01

    Theories of strained-bond semiconductors and superconductors have been developed that promise to have significant impact on future electronic devices of interest to the Air Force. These include: (1) development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity based on the idea of strained-layer superlattices, (2) elucidation of the physics of doping in Type-2 semiconductor superlattices, which is now central to the development of high-speed field-effect transistors, (3) a theory of dimerization and reconstruction on (001) semiconductor surfaces, (4) theory of Mobius transforms as applied to physics and remote sensing, (5) new understanding of how defects affect the vibrational properties of semiconductors, (6) new methods of efficiently computing the trajectories of atoms in semiconductors by a priori molecular dynamics, (7) elucidation of the criteria affecting quantum-well luminescence from Si, (8) models of the effects of vacancies in large-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys, (9) physics of rare-earth-doped silicon, (10) models of Co adsorption to silicon surfaces, (11) theories of how defects affect the properties of large band-gap superlattices, and (12) models of the effects of electronic structure on the properties of semiconductors.

  6. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  7. Defect-Rich Dopant-Free ZrO2 Nanostructures with Superior Dilute Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Anisur; Rout, S; Thomas, Joseph P; McGillivray, Donald; Leung, Kam Tong

    2016-09-14

    Control of the spin degree of freedom of an electron has brought about a new era in spin-based applications, particularly spin-based electronics, with the potential to outperform the traditional charge-based semiconductor technology for data storage and information processing. However, the realization of functional spin-based devices for information processing remains elusive due to several fundamental challenges such as the low Curie temperature of group III-V and II-VI semiconductors (<200 K), and the low spin-injection efficiencies of existing III-V, II-VI, and transparent conductive oxide semiconductors in a multilayer device structure, which are caused by precipitation and migration of dopants from the host layer to the adjacent layers. Here, we use catalyst-assisted pulsed laser deposition to grow, for the first time, oxygen vacancy defect-rich, dopant-free ZrO2 nanostructures with high TC (700 K) and high magnetization (5.9 emu/g). The observed magnetization is significantly greater than both doped and defect-rich transparent conductive oxide nanomaterials reported to date. We also provide the first experimental evidence that it is the amounts and types of oxygen vacancy defects in, and not the phase of ZrO2 that control the ferromagnetic order in undoped ZrO2 nanostructures. To explain the origin of ferromagnetism in these ZrO2 nanostructures, we hypothesize a new defect-induced bound polaron model, which is generally applicable to other defect-rich, dopant-free transparent conductive oxide nanostructures. These results provide new insights into magnetic ordering in undoped dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor oxides and contribute to the design of exotic magnetic and novel multifunctional materials. PMID:27533277

  8. Defect-Rich Dopant-Free ZrO2 Nanostructures with Superior Dilute Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Anisur; Rout, S; Thomas, Joseph P; McGillivray, Donald; Leung, Kam Tong

    2016-09-14

    Control of the spin degree of freedom of an electron has brought about a new era in spin-based applications, particularly spin-based electronics, with the potential to outperform the traditional charge-based semiconductor technology for data storage and information processing. However, the realization of functional spin-based devices for information processing remains elusive due to several fundamental challenges such as the low Curie temperature of group III-V and II-VI semiconductors (<200 K), and the low spin-injection efficiencies of existing III-V, II-VI, and transparent conductive oxide semiconductors in a multilayer device structure, which are caused by precipitation and migration of dopants from the host layer to the adjacent layers. Here, we use catalyst-assisted pulsed laser deposition to grow, for the first time, oxygen vacancy defect-rich, dopant-free ZrO2 nanostructures with high TC (700 K) and high magnetization (5.9 emu/g). The observed magnetization is significantly greater than both doped and defect-rich transparent conductive oxide nanomaterials reported to date. We also provide the first experimental evidence that it is the amounts and types of oxygen vacancy defects in, and not the phase of ZrO2 that control the ferromagnetic order in undoped ZrO2 nanostructures. To explain the origin of ferromagnetism in these ZrO2 nanostructures, we hypothesize a new defect-induced bound polaron model, which is generally applicable to other defect-rich, dopant-free transparent conductive oxide nanostructures. These results provide new insights into magnetic ordering in undoped dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor oxides and contribute to the design of exotic magnetic and novel multifunctional materials.

  9. Impact of carbon and nitrogen on gate dielectrics in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minseok; Lyons, John; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Al2O3 and HfO2 are used as alternative gate oxides in CMOS technology. Promising results have been achieved with Al2O3/III-V and HfO2/Si MOS structures, which exhibit relatively low densities of interface states. However, the presence of charge traps and fixed-charge centers near the oxide/semiconductor interface still poses serious limitations in device performance. Native point defects are usually proposed as an explanation; unintentional incorporation of impurities in the gate dielectric during the deposition process has so far received less attention. Using first-principles calculations based on hybrid functionals we investigate the effects of carbon and nitrogen impurities in Al2O3 and HfO2. By analyzing the position of the impurity levels with respect to the III-V and Si band edges, we determine if these impurities can act as charge traps or sources of fixed charge. Our results show that carbon can act as a charge trap and lead to leakage current through the gate dielectric. Nitrogen can act as a source of negative fixed charge, but may be effective in alleviating the problem of charge traps and fixed charges associated with Al, Hf, and O vacancies. This work was supported by the ONR DEFINE MURI program.

  10. Two new young, wide, magnetic + non-magnetic double-degenerate binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, P. D.; Baxter, R.; Külebi, B.; Parker, Q. A.; Koester, D.; Jordan, S.; Lodieu, N.; Euchner, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of two, new, rare, wide, double-degenerate binaries that each contain a magnetic and a non-magnetic star. The components of SDSS J092646.88+132134.5 + J092647.00+132138.4 and of SDSS J150746.48+521002.1 + J150746.80+520958.0 have angular separations of only 4.6 arcsec (a˜ 650 au) and 5.1 arcsec (a˜ 750 au), respectively. They also appear to share common proper motions. Follow-up optical spectroscopy has revealed each system to consist of a DA and a H-rich high-field magnetic white dwarf (HFMWD). Our measurements of the effective temperatures and the surface gravities of the DA components reveal both to have larger masses than is typical of field white dwarfs. By assuming that these degenerates have evolved essentially as single stars, owing to their wide orbital separations, we can use them to place limits on the total ages of the stellar systems. These suggest that in each case the HFMWD is probably associated with an early-type progenitor (Minit > 2 M⊙). We find that the cooling time of SDSS J150746.80+520958.0 (DAH) is lower than might be expected had it followed the evolutionary path of a typical single star. This mild discord is in the same sense as that observed for two of the small number of other HFMWDs for which progenitor mass estimates have been made, RE J0317-853 and EG 59. The mass of the other DAH, SDSS J092646.88+132134.5, appears to be smaller than expected on the basis of single-star evolution. If this object was/is a member of a hierarchical triple system it may have experienced greater mass loss during an earlier phase of its life as a result of its having a close companion. The large uncertainties on our estimates of the parameters of the HFMWDs suggest that a larger sample of these objects is required to firmly identify any trends in their inferred cooling times and progenitor masses. This should shed further light on their formation and on the impact magnetic fields have on the late stages of stellar evolution. To

  11. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  12. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by Kθ) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies

  13. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  14. Direct X-Ray Imaging of Transient Spin Accumulation near a Ferromagnet/Nonmagnet Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Bonetti, Stefano; Backes, Dirk; Kent, Andrew; Katine, Jordan; Durr, Hermann; Ohldag, Hendrik; Stohr, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    The physics of spin transport across a ferromagnet/nonmagnet interface is not well understood, even though such interfaces are common in spintronic devices. We use time-resolved x-ray spectro-microscopy to directly image transient spin accumulation in a Cu film caused by an injected spin current from an adjacent Co film. The measurement uses element-specific, circularly polarized x-rays detected via a scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) in conjunction with 1.28MHz temporal modulation for remarkably increased x-ray sensitivity to spin signals. The transient moments per atom within the spin diffusion length from the interface were measured to be 8 x 10-5μB per Cu atom and 1.5 x 10-4μB per Co atom. The transient spin signal in Cu is found to be confined to states at the Fermi level, as expected, but we also observe a second peak of the same spin polarization in the spin accumulation signal that is 0.7eV higher than Fermi. The transient moments in the 28nm thick Cu layer exhibit the same spin sign as both the hybridization-induced static spins in Cu at the Cu/Co interface and the spins in the Co film. In contrast, the transient moments in the Co layer have the opposite sign, consistent with magnetization depleting from the Co polarizing layer.

  15. A modified Katsumata probe--Ion sensitive probe for measurement in non-magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Čada, M; Hubička, Z; Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Kment, Š; Adámek, J; Stöckel, J

    2015-07-01

    A modified Katsumata probe has been developed for measurement of ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in technological non-magnetized plasmas. A simple construction of the modified Katsumata probe consists of adding a pair of permanent Sm-Co magnets in front of Katsumata probe. A comparative study regarding IVDF measurement in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system operating in pure argon atmosphere by means of developed modified Katsumata probe and commercially available gridded retarding field analyzer (RFA) has been carried out. A time-resolved measurement of IVDF for two different pressures whilst other plasma conditions have been kept unchanged has revealed that the main advantage of the modified Katsumata probe compared to the RFA consists in significantly smaller angular aperture of entrance orifice of modified Katsumata probe being approximately 15° in comparison with a commercial RFA having angular aperture more than 160°. It leads in much better velocity resolution in measured IVDF since the transversal part of velocity vector is much more suppressed compared to RFA. Furthermore, the modified Katsumata probe less suffers from collisions of ions in the space charge sheath in front or inside of the probe compared to the RFA.

  16. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices.

  17. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed. PMID:26878770

  18. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-08-14

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  19. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-16

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  20. Controlling magnetism on metal surfaces with non-magnetic means: electric fields and surface charging.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Oleg O; Ruiz-Díaz, Pedro; Dasa, Tamene R; Stepanyuk, Valeri S

    2014-03-01

    We review the state of the art of surface magnetic property control with non-magnetic means, concentrating on metallic surfaces and techniques such as charge-doping or external electric field (EEF) application. Magneto-electric coupling via EEF-based charge manipulation is discussed as a way to tailor single adatom spins, exchange interaction between adsorbates or anisotropies of layered systems. The mechanisms of paramagnetic and spin-dependent electric field screening and the effect thereof on surface magnetism are discussed in the framework of theoretical and experimental studies. The possibility to enhance the effect of EEF by immersing the target system into an electrolyte or ionic liquid is discussed by the example of substitutional impurities and metallic alloy multilayers. A similar physics is pointed out for the case of charge traps, metallic systems decoupled from a bulk electron bath. In that case the charging provides the charge carrier density changes necessary to affect the magnetic moments and anisotropies in the system. Finally, the option of using quasi-free electrons rather than localized atomic spins for surface magnetism control is discussed with the example of Shockley-type metallic surface states confined to magnetic nanoislands. PMID:24523356