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Sample records for nonpalpable breast lesions

  1. Dual modality surgical guidance of non-palpable breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Patricia Goodale

    Although breast conserving therapy has some advantages over the traditional mastectomy procedure, the biggest disadvantage is the chance of local re-occurrence in which a second surgery is often required. Adequate surgical removal of breast tumors requires accurate tumor localization in order to ensure a balance between optimal cosmetic results and minimization of the risk for local re-occurrence. These challenges have motivated the search for alternative, more accurate methods for intraoperative localization of non-palpable breast lesions. The overall goal of this project was to develop an innovative technique for radioguided localization of non-palpable breast lesions that is more accurate, easier for the breast surgeon, and more comfortable for the patient than the current practice of wire localization. The technique uses a dual modality breast imaging system to place a marker composed of radiolabeled albumin (99mTc-MAA or 111ln-MAA) into the lesion. Preliminary studies were made to evaluate the localization accuracy of the system, which showed that the dual modality breast scanner is capable of accurate 3-dimensional localization using either X-ray or gamma ray imaging. A 3-axis needle positioning system was built and integrated into the dual modality breast scanner and its accuracy tested. A pilot clinical trial to evaluate the dual-modality surgical guidance technique was designed and preliminary clinical data collected. Detailed results were presented on the first three subjects; although a total of seven subjects have been recruited to the study to date. So far, it has been demonstrated that the radioguided surgery technique can be performed with approximately 10 times less radiomarker activity than is currently being used by other researchers employing 99mTc-MAA as a radiomarker, while maintaining comparable localization accuracy. Although the DMSG technique has not been tested in a large cohort of subjects, the preliminary data on the first few are

  2. Diagnostic Value of Hook Wire Localization Technique for Non-Palpable Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Demiral, Gokhan; Senol, Metin; Bayraktar, Baris; Ozturk, Hasan; Celik, Yahya; Boluk, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of hook wire localization biopsy for non-palpable breast lesions which were detected by ultrasonography (USG) or mammography (MMG). Methods In this retrospective study, USG or MMG-guided hook wire localization technique was performed on 83 patients who had non-palpable breast lesions. Then histopathological examination was performed on surgically removed specimens. All patients’ mammograms or ultrasonograms were categorized using Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. Results Radiologically, 27 (32.53%) patients were classified as BI-RADS 3, 49 (59.04%) BI-RADS 4, one (1.2%) BIRADS 5 and six (7.23%) BI-RADS 0. Histopathological results were benign in 68 (81.9%) and malignant in 15 (18.1%) patients. Twenty-seven patients were classified as BI-RADS 3 and definitive diagnoses for all were benign. Besides, 49 patients were classified as BI-RADS 4 and histopathologically 14 of them were reported as malignant, and 35 as benign. Sensitivity of MMG was 93% and specificity was 55%. For USG, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 73%. Conclusion In early diagnosis of breast cancer, the validity of the imaging-guided hook wire localization biopsy of non-palpable breast lesions has been proved. The cooperation of surgeon, radiologist and pathologist increases the successfull results of hook wire localization technique. PMID:27081425

  3. Excision of Nonpalpable Breast Cancer with Indocyanine Green Fluorescence-Guided Occult Lesion Localization (IFOLL).

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Fatih; Ozben, Volkan; Aytac, Erman; Yilmaz, Halit; Cercel, Ali; Celik, Varol

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently employed techniques for the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions suffer from various limitations. In this paper, we report on 2 patients in order to introduce an alternative technique, indocyanine green fluorescence-guided occult lesion localization (IFOLL), and determine its applicability for the surgical removal of this type of breast lesions. CASE REPORTS: Preoperatively, one of the patients had a needle biopsy-proven diagnosis of breast cancer, and the other one had suspicious findings for malignancy. Lesion localization was performed within 1 h before surgery under ultrasonography control by injecting 2 ml and 0.2 ml of indocyanine green into the lesion and its subcutaneous tissue projection, respectively. During surgery, the site of skin incision and the resection margins were identified by observing the area of indocyanine-derived fluorescence under the guidance of a near-infrared-sensitive camera. In both cases, the breast lesion was correctly localized, and the area of fluorescence corresponded well to the site of the lesions. Subsequent surgical excision was successful with no complications. On histopathologic examination, the surgical margins were found to be clear. CONCLUSION: IFOLL seems to be a technically applicable and clinically acceptable procedure for the removal of nonpalpable breast cancer.

  4. Breast MRI in nonpalpable breast lesions: a randomized trial with diagnostic and therapeutic outcome – MONET – study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nicky HGM; Borel Rinkes, Inne HM; Mali, Willem PTM; van den Bosch, Maurice AAJ; Storm, Remmert K; Plaisier, Peter W; de Boer, Erwin; van Overbeeke, Adriaan J; Peeters, Petra HM

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increasing interest in MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic modality for the work-up of suspicious breast lesions. The additional value of Breast MRI lies mainly in its capacity to detect multicentric and multifocal disease, to detect invasive components in ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and to depict the tumor in a 3-dimensional image. Breast MRI therefore has the potential to improve the diagnosis and provide better preoperative staging and possibly surgical care in patients with breast cancer. The aim of our study is to assess whether performing contrast enhanced Breast MRI can reduce the number of surgical procedures due to better preoperative staging and whether a subgroup of women with suspicious nonpalpable breast lesions can be identified in which the combination of mammography, ultrasound and state-of-the-art contrast-enhanced Breast MRI can provide a definite diagnosis. Methods/Design The MONET – study (MR mammography Of Nonpalpable BrEast Tumors) is a randomized controlled trial with diagnostic and therapeutic endpoints. We aim to include 500 patients with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions who are referred for biopsy. With this number of patients, the expected 12% reduction in surgical procedures due to more accurate preoperative staging with Breast MRI can be detected with a high power (90%). The secondary outcome is the positive and negative predictive value of contrast enhanced Breast MRI. If the predictive values are deemed sufficiently close to those for large core biopsy then the latter, invasive, procedure could possibly be avoided in some women. The rationale, study design and the baseline characteristics of the first 100 included patients are described. Trial registration Study protocol number NCT00302120 PMID:18045470

  5. (99)mTc-3PRGD2 scintimammography in palpable and nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Song, Yan; Gao, Shi; Ji, Tiefeng; Zhang, Haishan; Ji, Bin; Chen, Ben; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Xu, Zheli; Ma, Qingjie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic performance of 99mTc-3(poly-(ethylene glycol),PEG)4-RGD2 (99mTc-3PRGD2) scintimammography (SMM) in patients with either palpable or nonpalpable breast lesions and compare SMM to mammography to assess the possible incremental value of SMM in breast cancer detection. We also investigated the αvβ3 expression in malignant and benign breast lesions. Ninety-four patients with 110 lesions were included in this study. Mammograms were evaluated according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) by a specialized imaging radiologist. Prone SMM was performed 1 hour after injection of 99mTc-3PRGD2. Scintigraphic images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians using a three-point system, and the kappa value was calculated to determine the interreader agreement. The McNemar test was used to compare SMM and mammography with respect to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Diagnostic values for breast cancer detection were evaluated for each lesion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate integrin αvβ3 expression. Histopathology revealed 46 malignant lesions and 64 benign lesions. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of SMM were 83%, 73%, 77%, 69%, and 85%, respectively. The kappa value between the two reviewers was 0.63. The diagnostic values of SMM were higher than those of mammography in evaluating overall breast lesions. A sensitivity of 91% was achieved when SMM and mammography results were combined with 60% of all false-negative mammography findings classified as true-positive results by SMM. Integrin αvβ3 expression was positively identified using SMM imaging. SMM is a promising tool to avoid unnecessary biopsies when used in addition to mammography and can be used to image αvβ3 expression in breast cancer with good image quality.

  6. The Added Diagnostic Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI at 3.0 T in Nonpalpable Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Merckel, Laura G.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Peters, Nicky H. G. M.; Mann, Ritse M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Storm, Remmert K.; Weits, Teun; Duvivier, Katya M.; van Dalen, Thijs; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the added diagnostic value of 3.0 Tesla breast MRI over conventional breast imaging in the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer and to explore the role of routine versus expert reading. Materials and Methods We evaluated MRI scans of patients with nonpalpable BI-RADS 3–5 lesions who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced 3.0 Tesla breast MRI. Initially, MRI scans were read by radiologists in a routine clinical setting. All histologically confirmed index lesions were re-evaluated by two dedicated breast radiologists. Sensitivity and specificity for the three MRI readings were determined, and the diagnostic value of breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging was assessed. Interobserver reliability between the three readings was evaluated. Results MRI examinations of 207 patients were analyzed. Seventy-eight of 207 (37.7%) patients had a malignant lesion, of which 33 (42.3%) patients had pure DCIS and 45 (57.7%) invasive breast cancer. Sensitivity of breast MRI was 66.7% during routine, and 89.3% and 94.7% during expert reading. Specificity was 77.5% in the routine setting, and 61.0% and 33.3% during expert reading. In the routine setting, MRI provided additional diagnostic information over clinical information and conventional imaging, as the Area Under the ROC Curve increased from 0.76 to 0.81. Expert MRI reading was associated with a stronger improvement of the AUC to 0.87. Interobserver reliability between the three MRI readings was fair and moderate. Conclusions 3.0 T breast MRI of nonpalpable breast lesions is of added diagnostic value for the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer. PMID:24713637

  7. [Fine-needle biopsy under echographic control in nonpalpable breast lesions. Technical aspects].

    PubMed

    Klijanienko, J; Vielh, P

    1998-01-01

    Fine-needle biopsy under ultrasound guidance is widely used in the diagnosis of subclinical breast lesions seen on mammograms. This minimally invasive procedure requires little time and is reliable for the diagnosis of lesions in a central or peripheral (axillary extension, upper part of the superomedial quadrant, mammary fold) location, or in small-sized breasts. The procedure is done in real time, allowing reliable verification of the specimen. The cytologic results are available almost immediately. Close collaboration between the radiologist and pathologist is essential.

  8. Vacuum-assisted breast biopsy on digital stereotaxic table of nonpalpable lesions non-recognisable by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Apesteguía, L; Mellado, M; Sáenz, J; Cordero, J L; Repáraz, B; De Miguel, C

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy of 11 G vacuum-assisted percutaneous biopsy (VAPB) carried out on digital stereotaxic table, on breast non-palpable lesions (NPLs), non-visible by US. Prospective study on 132 consecutive NPLs (126 patients) not reliably found by US; 82% showed microcalcifications. Surgical confirmation was obtained in all malignant cases and when VAPB reported atypical lesion (ductal or lobular), radial scar or atypical papillary lesion. All patients with benign results were included in a mammographic follow-up programme. Two cases could not be dealt with due to technical difficulties. One to 26 cylinders were obtained from the remaining 130 NPLs. Sixty-four lesions were surgically confirmed. Forty-six of the 47 malignancies were correctly diagnosed. In one case of a malignant tumour, an atypical lesion was classified with VAPB. All cases of histologically verified lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical ductal or lobular hyperplasia, radial scar or atypical papillary lesion were correctly diagnosed preoperatively. The remaining lesions were benign in VAPB, and after 1 year of follow-up, no false negative has been found. Based on this short-term follow-up, absolute sensitivity was 97.9%, absolute specificity 84.3% and accuracy was 99.2%. For predicting invasion, accuracy was 89.1%. Vacuum-assisted percutaneous biopsy is a very accurate technique for NPLs which are not detectable by US. It can replace approximately 90% of DSB with no important complications, avoiding scars and providing a higher level of comfort.

  9. Pathologic findings in nonpalpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McKinney, C D; Frierson, H F; Fechner, R E; Wilhelm, M C; Edge, S B

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with nonpalpable invasive breast cancer have a favorable prognosis. These studies, however, have not analyzed pathologic features of mammographically detected tumors according to tumor size. We describe the histopathologic features of 77 nonpalpable invasive breast cancers, comparing neoplasms less than or equal to 1 cm with larger clinically occult tumors. Forty-seven lesions (61%) were less than or equal to 1 cm (group A) and 30 (39%) were greater than 1 cm (group B). In group A, there were 30 infiltrating ductal carcinomas (IDC); seven infiltrating lobular carcinomas (ILC); and two cases each of mixed ILC and IDC, mixed tubular carcinoma and ILC, and infiltrating cribriform carcinoma. There was one case each of mucinous carcinoma, apocrine carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, and mixed mucinous and IDC. In group B, there were 23 (77%) IDC, five (17%) ILC, and two mixed IDC and ILC. Tumors in group B were more frequently grade 3 (22% versus 7%), but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). There were no important differences in the frequency, subtypes and location of carcinoma in situ, or other histopathologic parameters evaluated in the biopsy specimens. Mastectomy specimens with axillary lymph node dissections were available for review in 64 cases (83%). Group B patients had a higher rate of residual invasive carcinoma (31% versus 13%) and lymph node metastases (31% versus 16%), but these differences were not statistically significant. Residual carcinoma in situ was more frequent in group B (54%) compared with group A (26%) (p = .036). Of seven group B cases with negative biopsy margins, residual invasive carcinoma was present in five (71%). We conclude that small nonpalpable invasive breast cancers differ from larger nonpalpable tumors primarily in size. The finding of negative biopsy margins should not be construed as conclusive evidence for the absence of residual infiltrating disease.

  10. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Image-Guided Excisional Biopsy in High-Risk Non-Palpable Breast Lesions: Predictive Factors for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    İflazoğlu, Nidal; Üreyen, Orhan; Atahan, Murat Kemal; Meral, Ulvi Mehmet; Sezgin, Gülten; Tarcan, Ercüment

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of mammography (MM) in breast cancer screening programs has been increasing in recent years. Thus, increasing the number of detected nonpalpable breast cancer patients, through early diagnosis and treatment also increased survival rates. In our study, we wanted to share the factors about imaging-guided exicional biopsies for non-palpable breast lesions in postoperative proven breast carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods The surgical data were reviewed for 83 patients with non-palpabl high-risk breast lesions undergoing imaging-guided surgery in our department between January, 2006 and May, 2011. Histopathologic results and age, ultrasound(US) results, MM image results, BI-RADS categorization, localization of lesion(quadrant) were assessed and factors for predicting malignity were detected. Results Median age was 52 (age range 32–80 years). 29 (34,9%) of patients were malign in histopathologic results. In four patient, re-excision performed because of positive surgical margins. Axillary examination results were normal in 24 (82,7%) of malignant patients. In MM examination; microcalcifications and nodular opasity were diagnosed in 74,6% of patients before surgery. There were no differance about malignity in these groups after surgery (p:0,428). 59% and 32,7% of patients were BI-RADS 4 and 3, respectively. Postoperative diagnosed malignancies in BI-RADS 4 group were significantly higher than BI-RADS 3 group (p:<0,001). Conclusion In our study; we concluded that, preoperative BI-RADS categorization (US and MM) is correlated with histopathologic findings after surgery and imaging-guided breast surgery is effective for diagnosis of early-stage breast carcinoma.

  11. Efficacy of 'radioguided occult lesion localisation' (ROLL) versus 'wire-guided localisation' (WGL) in breast conserving surgery for non-palpable breast cancer: a randomised controlled multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Postma, E L; Verkooijen, H M; van Esser, S; Hobbelink, M G; van der Schelling, G P; Koelemij, R; Witkamp, A J; Contant, C; van Diest, P J; Willems, S M; Borel Rinkes, I H M; van den Bosch, M A A J; Mali, W P; van Hillegersberg, R

    2012-11-01

    For the management of non-palpable breast cancer, accurate pre-operative localisation is essential to achieve complete resection with optimal cosmetic results. Radioguided occult lesions localisation (ROLL) uses the radiotracer, injected intra-tumourally for sentinel lymph node identification to guide surgical excision of the primary tumour. In a multicentre randomised controlled trial, we determined if ROLL is superior to the standard of care (i.e. wire-guided localisation, WGL) for preoperative tumour localisation. Women (>18 years.) with histologically proven non-palpable breast cancer and eligible for breast conserving treatment with sentinel node procedure were randomised to ROLL or WGL. Patients allocated to ROLL received an intra-tumoural dose of 120 Mbq technetium-99 m nanocolloid. The tumour was surgically removed, guided by gamma probe detection. In the WGL group, ultrasound- or mammography-guided insertion of a hooked wire provided surgical guidance for excision of the primary tumour. Primary outcome measures were the proportion of complete tumour excisions (i.e. with negative margins), the proportion of patients requiring re-excision and the volume of tissue removed. Data were analysed according to intention-to-treat principle. This study is registered at ClinincalTrials.gov, number NCT00539474. In total, 314 patients with 316 invasive breast cancers were enrolled. Complete tumour removal with negative margins was achieved in 140/162 (86 %) patients in the ROLL group versus 134/152 (88 %) patients in the WGL group (P = 0.644). Re-excision was required in 19/162 (12 %) patients in the ROLL group versus 15/152 (10 %) (P = 0.587) in the WGL group. Specimen volumes in the ROLL arm were significantly larger than those in the WGL arm (71 vs. 64 cm(3), P = 0.017). No significant differences were seen in the duration and difficulty of the radiological and surgical procedures, the success rate of the sentinel node procedure, and cosmetic outcomes. In this first

  12. Radioactive seed localization with 125I for nonpalpable lesions prior to breast lumpectomy and/or excisional biopsy: methodology, safety, and experience of initial year.

    PubMed

    Dauer, Lawrence T; Thornton, Cynthia; Miodownik, Daniel; Boylan, Daniel; Holahan, Brian; King, Valencia; Brogi, Edi; Morrow, Monica; Morris, Elizabeth A; St Germain, Jean

    2013-10-01

    The use of radioactive seed localization (RSL) as an alternative to wire localizations (WL) for nonpalpable breast lesions is rapidly gaining acceptance because of its advantages for both the patient and the surgical staff. This paper examines the initial experience with over 1,200 patients seen at a comprehensive cancer center. Radiation safety procedures for radiology, surgery, and pathology were implemented, and radioactive material inventory control was maintained using an intranet-based program. Surgical probes allowed for discrimination between 125I seed photon energies from 99mTc administered for sentinel node testing. A total of 1,127 patients (median age of 57.2 y) underwent RSL procedures with 1,223 seeds implanted. Implanted seed depth ranged from 10.3-107.8 mm. The median length of time from RSL implant to surgical excision was 2 d. The median 125I activity at time of implant was 3.1 MBq (1.9 to 4.6). The median dose rate from patients with a single seed was 9.5 µSv h-1 and 0.5 µSv h-1 at contact and 1 m, respectively. The maximum contact dose rate was 187 µSv h-1 from a superficially placed seed. RSL performed greater than 1 d before surgery is a viable alternative to WL, allowing flexibility in scheduling, minimizing day of surgery procedures, and improving workflow in breast imaging and surgery. RSL has been shown to be a safe and effective procedure for preoperative localization under mammographic and ultrasound guidance, which can be managed with the use of customized radiation protection controls.

  13. Nonpalpable Breast Carcinomas: Long-Term Evaluation of 1,258 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Luini, Alberto; Botteri, Edoardo; Zurrida, Stefano; Monti, Simonetta; Galimberti, Viviana; Cassano, Enrico; Latronico, Antuono; Pizzamiglio, Maria; Viale, Giuseppe; Vezzoli, Dario; Rotmensz, Nicole; Musmeci, Simona; Bassi, Fabio; Burgoa, Loredana; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Paganelli, Giovanni; Veronesi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. In recent decades, a steady improvement in imaging diagnostics has been observed together with a rising adherence to regular clinical breast examinations. As a result, the detection of small clinically occult (nonpalpable) lesions has progressively increased. At present in our institution some 20% of the cases are treated when nonpalpable. The aim of the present study is to analyze the characteristics and prognosis of such tumors treated in a single institution. Methods. The analysis focused on 1,258 women who presented at the European Institute of Oncology with a primary clinically occult carcinoma between 2000 and 2006. All patients underwent radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL), axillary dissection when appropriate, whole breast radiotherapy, or partial breast intraoperative irradiation and received tailored adjuvant systemic treatment. Results. Median age was 56 years. Imaging showed a breast nodule in half of the cases and a breast nodule accompanied by microcalcifications in 9%. Microcalcifications alone were present in 17.1% of the cases, whereas suspicious opacity, distortion, or thickening represented the remaining 24.6%. Most tumors were characterized by low proliferative rates (68.9%), positive estrogen receptors (92.3%), and non-overexpressed Her2/neu (91.3%). After a median follow-up of 60 months, we observed 19 local events (1.5%), 12 regional events (1%), and 20 distant metastases (1.6%). Five-year overall survival was 98.6%. Conclusions. Clinically occult (nonpalpable) carcinomas show very favorable prognostic features and high survival rates, showing the important role of modern imaging techniques. PMID:21147866

  14. Effect on biopsy technique of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) for nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Butchart, Michael; MacFarlane, John K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine if the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) defines a group of patients with mammographic abnormalities in whom stereotactic core needle biopsy (SCNB) is appropriate. Design A blinded retrospective validation sample. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Patients One hundred and nine consecutive patients who underwent fine-wire localization breast biopsy (FWLB) between Jan. 1, 1994, and June 1, 1999, with a known final pathological diagnosis. Intervention Blinded mammographic review and classification using the BI-RADS; review of corresponding pathological findings from FWLBs. Outcome measures Correlation of pathological findings with each BI-RADS category and analysis of the predictive value of clinical and radiologic features. Results BI-RADS findings were as follows: 0 malignant lesions in 10 category 3 cases, 18 malignant lesions (3 in situ, 15 invasive) in 68 category 4 cases and 24 malignant lesions (8 in situ and 16 invasive) in 31 category 5 cases. There was 1 malignant lesion in 22 category 4 cases in women younger than 50 years. Conclusions SCNB should be applied to BI-RADS categories 3 and 4 (< 50 yr of age). FWLB should be reserved for category 4 (> 50 yr of age) and category 5 cases. This algorithm will reduce the morbidity and cost of breast biopsies in patients with nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities. PMID:12174979

  15. Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery with carbon nanoparticles: implication in tumor location and lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Chongping; Jin, Na; Zhang, Zaizhong; Ke, Jun; Yu, Yinghao; Zhu, Jianping; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    To examine the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles to track nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery. During breast-conserving surgery, it is often very challenging to determine the boundary of tumor and identify involved lymph nodes. Currently used methods are useful in identifying tumor location, but do not provide direct visual guidance for resection margin during surgery. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Fuzhou General Hospital (Fuzhou, China). The current retrospective analysis included 16 patients with nonpalpable breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of preoperative marking using a carbon nanoparticle, as well as 3 patients receiving carbon nanoparticle marking followed by neoadjuvant treatment and then breast-conserving surgery. The Tumor Node Metastasis stage in the 16 cases included: T1N0M0 in 7, T1N1M0 in 2, T2N0M0 in 4, and T2N1M0 in the remaining 3 cases. The nanoparticle was injected at 12 sites at 0.5 cm away from the apparent edge under colored ultrasonography along 6 tracks separated by 60 degrees (2 sites every track). Lymph node status was also examined. The resection edge was free from cancer cells in all 16 cases (and the 3 cases with neoadjuvant treatment). Cancer cells were identified in majority of stained lymph nodes, but not in any of the unstained lymph nodes. No recurrence or metastasis was noticed after the surgery (2 to 22-month follow-up; median: 6 months). Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer with carbon nanoparticle could guide breast-conserving surgery.

  16. Radio-guided surgery improves outcome of therapeutic excision in non-palpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernandez, J F; Tanis, P J; Deurloo, E E; Nieweg, O E; Th Rutgers, E J; Kroon, B B R; Valdés Olmos, R A

    2004-03-01

    Intratumoral injection of a radiocolloid for lymphatic mapping enables the therapeutic excision of clinically occult breast cancer with the aid of a gamma-ray detection probe. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of radio-guided tumour excision in addition to a guide wire and to identify factors predicting clear margins. Sixty-five consecutive patients underwent radio-guided tumour excision after intratumoral injection of 99mTc-nanocolloid guided by ultrasound or stereotaxis. A localization wire was inserted after scintigraphy had been performed (group 1). The results were compared with retrospective data from 67 consecutive patients who underwent therapeutic wire-directed excision alone (group 2). Factors predicting clear margins (> or = 1 mm) were determined in a logistic regression model. Adequate margins were obtained in 83% of group 1 and in 64% of group 2 (P = 0.014). The invasive component was incompletely excised in two patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Further surgery was performed in four patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Factors predictive of clear margins were decreasing pathological tumour diameter (P = 0.035), increasing weight of the specimen (P = 0.046), absence of microcalcifications (P = 0.004) and absence of carcinoma in situ component (P = 0.024). Radio-guided excision was an independent predictor of complete excision of the invasive component (P = 0.012). The application of radio-guided surgery combined with wire localization seems to improve the outcome of therapeutic excision of non-palpable invasive breast cancer compared with wire-directed excision alone.

  17. Radio-guided localization of clinically occult breast lesions: current modalities and future directions.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Fatih; Velidedeoglu, Mehmet; Kilic, Fahrettin; Yilmaz, Halit

    2014-01-01

    The extensive availability of breast cancer screening programs and improvement in diagnostic imaging have led to more frequent detection of suspicious and clinically occult breast lesions. Early detection of tumor is important for breast-conserving treatment. Incomplete excision is a major risk factor for local recurrence. Following precise localization and removing the entire lesion while achieving adequate clear margins is the key factor for successful management of non-palpable breast lesions. For this purpose, several techniques such as wire-guided localization, intra-operative ultrasound guided resection, radio-guided occult lesion localization and radioactive seed localization have been described and applied. In this article, we overview the two commonly used localization techniques, radio-guided occult lesion localization and wire-guided localization, particularly describing their advantages and drawbacks.

  18. Innovation in early breast cancer surgery: radio-guided occult lesion localization and sentinel node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, G; Veronesi, U

    2002-07-01

    The surgical management of non-palpable breast lesions remains controversial. At the European Institute of Oncology we have introduced a new technique, radio-guided occult lesion localization (ROLL) to replace standard methods and overcome their disadvantages. Regarding axillary dissection, probe-guided biopsy of the sentinel node (SN) is easy to apply, and the whole procedure is associated to a low risk of false negatives. We suggest that the SN technique should be widely adopted to stage the axilla in patients with breast cancer with clinically negative lymph nodes. Large-scale implementation of the sentinel node technique will reduce the cost of treatment as a result of shorter hospitalization times.

  19. Clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions: detection and classification with high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Niehoff, A; Obrist, P; DeKoekkoek-Doll, P; Dünser, M

    2000-08-01

    With recent significant advances in ultrasound technology, the potential of high-resolution sonography to improve the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis in women with dense breasts has become a matter of interest for breast imagers. To determine how often physician-performed high-resolution sonography can detect nonpalpable breast cancers that are not revealed by mammography, 8,970 women with breast density grades 2 through 4 underwent high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography. All sonographically detected, clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions that were not simple cysts were prospectively classified into benign, indeterminate, or malignant categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, core-needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy. In 8,103 women with normal findings at mammography and physical examination, 32 cancers and 330 benign lesions were detected in 273 patients with sonography only. Eight additional cancers were found in 867 patients with a malignant (n = 5) or a benign (n = 3) palpable or mammographically detected index lesion. The overall prevalence of cancers detected with screening sonography was 0.41%, and the proportion of sonographically detected cancers to the total number of nonpalpable cancers was 22%. The mean size of invasive cancers detected only by sonography was 9.1 mm, and was not statistically different from the mean size of invasive cancers detected by mammography. The sensitivity of prospective sonographic classification for malignancy was 100%, and the specificity was 31%. In conclusion, the use of high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography in women with dense breasts may lead to detection of a significant number of otherwise occult cancers that are no different in size from nonpalpable mammographically detected cancers. Prospective classification of these lesions based on sonographic characteristics resulted in an acceptable benign-to-malignant biopsy rate of 6.3:1.

  20. A Nonpalpable Nodule in Ectopic Axillary Breast Tissue: Consider Phyllodes Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio; Espejo-Fonseca, Ruby; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Benign and malignant pathology can develop in ectopic axillary breast tissue, such as fibroadenomas, phyllodes tumors, and breast cancer. We present a rare case of an asymptomatic 43-year-old woman with an axillary nodule which was identified during screening mammography within ectopic axillary breast tissue, initially considered as a suspicious lymph node. Radiologic studies were considered as Breast Imaging-Reporting Data System (BI-RADS) 4. A hyperdense, lobular, and well-circumscribed nodule was identified in mammogram while the nodule by ultrasound (US) was hypoechoic with indistinct microlobular margins, without vascularity by Doppler, and measuring 1.26 × 1 cm. Core-needle biopsy reported a fibroepithelial neoplasm. The patient was submitted to local wide-needle excision located in intraoperative radiography of the surgical specimen and margin evaluation. Final histopathological study reported a 1.8 × 1.2 cm benign phyllodes tumor, with irregular, pushing, and clear wide margins within normal ectopic breast tissue. The patient without surgical complications continued annual screening without recurrence during a follow-up that took place 24 months later. PMID:28105378

  1. Radioguided localization of clinically occult breast lesions (ROLL): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Abarca-Pérez, Leonardo; Ulloa-Gómez, José L; Romero, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    Management of nonpalpable breast lesions requiring pathologic diagnosis has been with wire localization during the last few decades. Recently, radioguided localization (ROLL) became an alternative for this type of lesions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of this technique in a tertiary referral center in Mexico City. Consecutive patients requiring pathologic diagnosis from a nonpalpable breast lesion were included in the present study. On the same day of operation, all patients were injected with particles of human serum albumin. Localization of the lesion was performed in the operation theater with the aid of a hand-held gamma-probe. All lesions were identified in a control x-ray of the surgical specimen. Demographic, clinical, surgical and pathologic data were recorded. Forty patients with a mean age of 56.8 +/- 7.8 years were included. In 39 of the 40 patients (97.5%) the "hot spot" was identified easily. In all patients, the area of maximum radioactivity corresponded to the site of the lesion. Imaging confirmation of the lesion in the surgical specimen was done during the first excision in 37 patients (92.5%). In the remaining cases (7.5%), a wider excision was performed during the same procedure, finding the suspected lesion in all cases. Diagnosis of cancer was made in seven patients, (17.5%). There were no significant surgical complications. Our data suggest that ROLL offer a simple and reliable method to localize occult breast lesions, allowing complete removal of the lesion in 100% of the patients. Because of the small quantity of radioactivity, the procedure is safe for both patients and the medical staff, producing less discomfort in patients than wire localization.

  2. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  3. Optimised nuclear medicine method for tumour marking and sentinel node detection in occult primary breast lesions.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, C; Trifirò, G; Intra, M; Marotta, G; Ciprian, A; Frasson, A; Prisco, G; Luini, A; Viale, G; Paganelli, G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sentinel node (SN) biopsy in occult breast lesions with different radiopharmaceuticals and to establish the optimal lymphoscintigraphic method to detect both occult lesions and SNs (SNOLL: sentinel node and occult lesion localisation). Two hundred and twenty-seven consecutive patients suspected to have clinically occult breast carcinoma were enrolled in the study. In addition to the radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) procedure, using macroaggregates of technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin (MAA) injected directly into the lesion, lymphoscintigraphy was performed with nanocolloids (NC) injected in a peritumoral (group I) or a subdermal site (group II). In group III, a sole injection of NC was done into the lesion in order to perform both ROLL and SNOLL. Overall, axillary SNs were identified in 205 of the 227 patients (90.3%). In 12/62 (19.4%) patients of group I and 9/79 (11.4%) patients of group III, radioactive nodes were not visualised, whereas SNs were successfully localised in 85 of 86 patients of group II ( P<0.001). Pathological findings revealed breast carcinoma in 148/227 patients (65.2%) and benign lesions in 79 (34.8%). A total of 131 axillary SNs were removed in 118 patients with breast carcinoma; intraoperative examination of the SNs revealed metastatic involvement in 16 out of 96 cases of invasive carcinoma (16.7%). It is concluded that the combination of the ROLL procedure with direct injection of MAA into the lesion and lymphoscintigraphy performed with subdermal injection of radiocolloids represents the method of choice for accurate localisation of both non-palpable lesions and SNs.

  4. A low cost training phantom model for radio-guided localization techniques in occult breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Fatih; Mallory, Melissa Anne; Tukenmez, Mustafa; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ozturk, Erkan; Ince, Yavuz; Celik, Varol; Akca, Tamer; Golshan, Mehra

    2015-09-01

    Radio-guided localization (RGL) for identifying occult breast lesions has been widely accepted as an alternative technique to other localization methods, including those using wire guidance. An appropriate phantom model would be an invaluable tool for practitioners interested in learning the technique of RGL prior to clinical application. The aim of this study was to devise an inexpensive and reproducible training phantom model for RGL. We developed a simple RGL phantom model imitating an occult breast lesion from inexpensive supplies including a pimento olive, a green pea and a turkey breast. The phantom was constructed for a total cost of less than $20 and prepared in approximately 10 min. After the first model's construction, we constructed approximately 25 additional models and demonstrated that the model design was easily reproducible. The RGL phantom is a time- and cost-effective model that accurately simulates the RGL technique for non-palpable breast lesions. Future studies are warranted to further validate this model as an effective teaching tool.

  5. Sentinel node detection and radioguided occult lesion localization in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Trifirò, Guiseppe; Lavinia Travaini, Laura; De Cicco, Concetta; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy might replace complete axillary dissection for staging of the axilla in clinically N0 breast cancer patients and represent a significant advantage as a minimally invasive procedure, considering that about 70% of patients are found to be free from metastatic disease, yet axillary node dissection can lead to significant morbidity. In our Institute, Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization is the standard method to locate non-palpable breast lesions and the gamma probes is very effective in assisting intra-operative localization and removal, as in sentinel node biopsy. The rapid spread of sentinel lymph node biopsy has led to its use in clinical settings previously considered contraindications to sentinel lymph node biopsy. In this contest, we evaluated in a large group of patients possible factors affecting sentinel node detection and the reliability of sentinel lymph node biopsy carried out after large excisional breast biopsy. Our data confirm that a previous breast surgery does not prohibit efficient sentinel lymph node localization and sentinel lymph node biopsy can correctly stage the axialla in these patients.

  6. Optical mammography: a new technique for visualizing breast lesions in women presenting non palpable BIRADS 4-5 imaging findings: preliminary results with radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Alexandra; Vanel, Daniel; Fournier, Laure; Balleyguier, Corinne

    2007-02-28

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of near-infrared breast optical absorption imaging in patients with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) 4-5 non-palpable lesions scheduled for biopsy, using pathology after core or excisional biopsy as a reference. The patient's breast was positioned onto a panel of red light-emitting diodes (640 nm). A soft membrane was inflated to exert a uniform pressure on the breast. Transmitted light was detected using a CCD camera. The entire acquisition sequence took 1 minute. Image processing generated dynamic images displayed in colour scale, to reveal time-dependent changes in the transmitted light intensity caused by the pressure change. Dynamic curves were classified in two categories: consistently decreasing intensity suspicious for malignancy, and sinusoidal increasing intensity considered as benign. Seventy-eight women consulting for non-palpable breast lesions were initially included in the study. An imaging-histology correlation was obtained for seventy-two patients, the remaining six patients were excluded for technical optical scan reasons. We experienced an overall sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 38%, the false negative results being mainly small size (<10 mm) infiltrating malignant lesions and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). False positive results were seen in benign proliferative lesions. Dynamic optical breast imaging is a novel, low-cost, non-invasive technique yielding a new type of information about the physiology of breast lesions. Absorption is due to haemoglobin and its products, therefore reflecting the angiogenic status of breast tumours.

  7. Clinicopathological characteristics and long-term prognosis of screening detected non-palpable breast cancer by ultrasound in hospital-based Chinese population (2001-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Jun; You, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Qian-Qian; Cai, Feng; Shi, Jie; Zhou, Yi-Dong; Mao, Feng; Lin, Yan; Guan, Jing-Hong; Shen, Song-Jie; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Sun, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The mainstay modality of breast cancer screening in China is the hospital-based opportunistic screening among asymptomatic self-referred women. There is little data about the ultrasound (US) detected non-palpable breast cancer (NPBC) in Chinese population. Methods We analyzed 699 consecutive NPBC from 1.8-2.3 million asymptomatic women from 2001 to 2014, including 572 US-detected NPBC from 3,786 US-positive women and 127 mammography (MG) detected NPBC from 788 MG-positive women. The clinicopathological features, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between the US- and MG-detected NPBC. Prognostic factors of NPBC were identified. Results Compared to MG, US could detect more invasive NPBC (83.6% vs 54.3%, p<0.001), lymph node positive NPBC (19.1% vs 10.2%, p=0.018), lower grade (24.8% vs 16.5%, p<0.001), multifocal (19.2% vs 6.3%, p<0.001), PR positive (71.4% vs 66.9%, p=0.041), Her2 negative (74.3% vs 54.3%, p<0.001), Ki67 high (defined as >14%, 46.3% vs 37.0%, p=0.031) cancers and more NPBC who received chemotherapy (40.7% vs 21.3%, p<0.001). There was no significant difference in 10-year DFS and OS between US-detected vs MG-detected NPBC, DCIS and invasive NPBC. For all NPBC and the US-detected NPBC, the common DFS-predictors included pT, pN, p53 and bilateral cancers. Conclusion US could detect more invasive, node-positive, multifocal NPBC in hospital-based asymptomatic Chinese female, who could achieve comparable 10-year DFS and OS as MG-detected NPBC. US would not delay early detection of NPBC with improved cost-effectiveness, thus could serve as the feasible initial imaging modality in hospital-based opportunistic screening among Chinese women. PMID:27689334

  8. Precursor lesions of invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreer, Ingrid; Lüttges, Jutta

    2005-04-01

    The increasing application of mammography, mainly in screening programs for the early detection of breast cancer, and the high technical standard of imaging has resulted in the detection of clinically occult breast tumors. Considering that only diagnosis at an early stage will be able to change the prognosis of breast cancer, this diagnostic challenge appears to be the most exciting field in both breast imaging and breast pathology. Especially the precursor lesions need to be diagnosed and defined precisely to understand their prognostic significance. In imaging, the morphologic appearance of precursor lesions is usually neither typical nor pathognomonic. They have to be assessed histologically using percutaneous interventions. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated various genetic alterations in the ductal epithelium, with the earliest onset in atypical ductal hyperplasia. The recent WHO classification, which is based on molecular data and histopathological features, attempts to define in particular the precursor lesions and low grade intraductal carcinomas. The clinical importance of the various grades has to be assessed. Intimate cooperation between diagnostic radiologist and pathologist is essential.

  9. Clinicopathologic correlations and significance of clinically occult mammary lesions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G F; Feig, S A; Patchefsky, A S

    1978-03-01

    Experience with 189 clinically occult, i.e., nonpalpable breast lesions is presented. The described technique of localization and excision all but guarantees removal of even the smallest radiographically suspicious findings with an inconspicuous incision and minimal breast deformity. The incidence of carcinoma encountered in these 189 biopsies is 27.5%. Axillary node metastases were present in less than 25% of the invasive nonpalpable cancers, approximately half of what might have been expected if the lesions had been discovered in the usual manner. There were no patients with axillary node metastases among those with in situ ductal or microinvasive ductal carcinomas. This implies a better prognosis and lower death rate from breast cancer in these patients. Screening programs employing mammography, designed to detect breast cancers in this pre-palpable stage, are encountered as a means of uncovering a higher proportion of such cancers at an earlier stage in their natural histories.

  10. Computerized Analysis of MR and Ultrasound Images of Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Yearbook of Radiology) 3. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Huo Z, Vyborny CJ; Computer-aided diagnosis of breast lesions on ultrasound. Proceedings...International Workshop on Digital Mammography. Toronto, Canada, June, 2000. 4. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Vyborny CJ: Automatic segmentation of breast...lesions on ultrasound. Medical Physics (in press). 5. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Vyborny CJ: Computerized diagnosis of breast lesions on ultrasound

  11. Benign breast disease: when to treat, when to reassure, when to refer.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Lakshmi; Barnard, Karen; Elnicki, D Michael

    2002-05-01

    Many women have breast symptoms-swelling and tenderness, nodularity, pain, palpable lumps, nipple discharge, or breast infections and inflammation. Fortunately, relatively few have breast cancer. Physicians must distinguish benign breast conditions from malignant ones, and know when to refer the patient to a specialist. We have included some of the newer diagnostic techniques and the approach to patients with nonpalpable lesions detected on a screening mammogram.

  12. Cytomorphology of male breast lesions: diagnostic pitfalls and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marilin; Masood, Shahla

    2012-02-01

    Because lesions of the male breast have been exceeded in number by those of the female breast, marginal attention was given to these lesions in the past. Fortunately, this has changed over the years leading to an increased awareness about male breast cancer. Although male breast cancer constitutes only about 1% of all diagnosed breast cancer cases, an increased mortality is seen in this patient population. This is probably caused by late diagnosis as a consequence of low level of concern about breast cancer among male patients. However, the vast majority of lesions of the male breast are benign, gynecomastia being the number one cause of unilateral or bilateral breast mass. Since it is important to avoid unnecessary surgical treatment without missing malignancy, accurate diagnostic tools are necessary in order to triage these patients. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy has demonstrated excellent accuracy in the diagnosis and management of breast lesions in female patients. In addition, several authors have proven the value of this technique in the evaluation of lesions of the male breast. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy permits accurate diagnosis in many lesions arising in the male breast. It also allows gathering cytological material that can be used for ancillary studies which enhances the diagnostic value of this technique.

  13. Breast papillary lesions: an analysis of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Boin, Dahiana Pulgar; Baez, Jaime Jans; Guajardo, Militza Petric; Benavides, David Oddo; Ortega, Maria Elena Navarro; Valdés, Dravna Razmilic; Apphun, Mauricio Camus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Papillary breast lesions are rare and constitute less than 10% of benign breast lesions and less than 1% of breast carcinomas. Objective To analyse the clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, and surgical and anatomopathological characteristics of the patients operated on for papillary breast lesions. Material and Methods Retrospective descriptive and analytical study. We analysed the database of patients with definitive histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions operated on at our institution from January 2004 to May 2013. Results During the period described, 70 patients with histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions were operated upon. The median age was 50 years (19–86 years). Thirty-seven patients (52.8%) were symptomatic at diagnosis. Preoperative ultrasound was reported to be altered in all patients. A mammography showed pathologic findings in only 50% of cases. All patients underwent partial mastectomy, after needle localisation under ultrasound, if the lesion was not palpable on physical examination. The final pathological diagnosis was: benign papillary lesion in 55 patients (78.6%) and malignant in 15 patients (21.4%). Adjuvant treatment was performed in all malignant cases. Median follow-up was 46 months (3–115 months). Conclusions Patients with papillary breast lesions presented with symptoms in half of all cases. There was a high frequency of malignancy (21.4%), therefore surgical resection was recommended for papillary breast lesions. PMID:25228917

  14. Incidental Breast Lesions Detected on Computed Thorax Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Necdet; Emlik, Ganime Dilek; Keskin, Suat; Kalkan, Havva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mammography is the primary imaging method of the breast, incidental benign and malignant breast lesions are increasingly being detected on computed tomographies (CTs) performed to detect different pathologies. Therefore, the detection and accurate identification of these lesions is important. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency, morphological features, and results of incidental breast lesions on CTs performed for the detection of extramammarian pathologies. Materials and Methods Incidental breast lesions on CTs performed in our department between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated. Patients who had previously diagnosed breast lesions were excluded from the study. The inclusion criteria were histopathologic diagnose and being followed-up for at least 2 years. Results The study population consisted of 33 women whose mean age was 55±1.38 (37–78) years. Of the 33 women, 12 (36%) had malignant and 21 (64%) had benign or normal findings. The most common malignant lesion was invasive ductal carcinoma, and the most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma. Ill-defined contour and lymphadenopathy in malignant lesions and well-defined contour in benign lesions were the most important CT findings. Conclusion Breast must be carefully evaluated if it is included in the scans. An accurate report of breast lesions gives an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Preliminary experience in sentinel node and occult lesion localization (SNOLL) technique—One center study

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Beata; Dawid, Murawa; Karol, Połom; Arkadiusz, Spychała; Piotr, Nowaczyk; Paweł, Murawa

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to present one center experience in applying the SNOLL technique to patients with suspected occult breast lesions. Background In the last years, the widespread use of mammographic screening programs resulted in an increasing number of women with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions requiring further examination. The new method called sentinel node and occult lesion localization (SNOLL) enables the intraoperative detection of nonpalpable breast tumors and sentinel node biopsy in one surgical procedure. Materials and methods 46 patients with suspected malignant lesions or diagnosed non-palpable breast cancer were subjected to a pre-operative SNOLL procedure. The day before the surgery, they were administered two radiotracers: one to localize the tumor and the other to localize the sentinel node. During the surgery, the breast tumor and the sentinel node, which in most cases had been examined intraoperatively, were detected with a handheld gamma probe and resected under its control. Results All 46 (100%) patients had their occult breast lesions resected. Histopathologic examination revealed cancer in 40 patients: in situ in 2 cases, invasive in 38 cases. All these patients had their sentinel nodes examined. In one case only, the sentinel node could not be located with a gamma probe. Intraoperative tests showed the sentinel node to be metastatic in 5 patients, who were then given a simultaneous axillary lymphadenectomy. In addition, the final histopathologic examination revealed metastasis to the sentinel node in one patient, who had to be reoperated. Conclusion SNOLL is a modern technique that enables a precise intraoperative localization of non-palpable suspected malignant breast lesions in combination with a sentinel node biopsy. Extended application of intraoperative management leads to significant decrease in the number of reoperations performed in patients with early bread cancer. PMID:24376984

  16. Laparoscopy for the nonpalpable testis.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, G W; Brock, J W; Neblett, W W; Pietsch, J B; Morgan, W M

    1994-02-01

    Between 1988 and 1992, 287 infants and children have been evaluated for an undescended testis. In 35, the testis was not palpable. These 35 patients ranged in age between 10 months and 14 years, with a mean of 44 months and a median of 15 months. Thirteen patients had a nonpalpable right testis, 18 had a nonpalpable left testis, and four had bilateral nonpalpable testes. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in these 35 boys with a nonpalpable testis to allow a planned approach to management of this condition. In 11 children, a testis was visualized. The testis was in an inguinal hernia sac in seven, and single stage conventional orchiopexy was performed. In four children an intra-abdominal testis was seen, and three infants underwent laparoscopic clip ligation of the testicular vessels. One teenager underwent orchiectomy. In 21 of the remaining 24 boys, small, attenuated testicular vessels were noted to pass into the inguinal canal and inguinal exploration was required. A small testicular remnant was excised in 15 patients, but orchiopexy was possible in six boys. Diagnostic laparoscopy takes 7 to 10 minutes and enables the surgeon to develop a planned approach to this condition. With the information gathered at laparoscopy, the surgeon is best able to decide if an inguinal exploration is necessary or if a single-stage orchiopexy is possible. If a two-stage orchiopexy is required for an intra-abdominal testis, then clip ligation of the testicular vessels can be performed laparoscopically as the first stage, followed by Fowler-Stephens orchiopexy 6 to 9 months later.

  17. Ultrasound-guided vacuum assisted breast biopsy in the assessment of C3 breast lesions by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology: results and costs in comparison with surgery.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Francesca; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Latronico, Antuono; Trentin, Chiara; Penco, Silvia; Menna, Simona; Viale, Giuseppe; Cassano, Enrico; Bellomi, Massimo

    2009-04-01

    Breast lesions defined C3 at ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) are probably benign, but exhibit atypias. We evaluate the results of US-guided vacuum assisted breast biopsy (VABB) of these lesions. Patients diagnosed C3 by US-FNAC, submitted to US-VABB and with a minimum follow-up of 36 months or surgery were enrolled. Cost outcome of this diagnostic protocol was evaluated. We evaluated 138 patients with non-palpable C3 lesions. In 2/138 (1.4%) cases VABB results were inadequate. VABB diagnosed: 17/138 (12.3%) malignant and 119/138 (86.2%) benign lesions. In 28/138 cases (20.3%) surgery retrieved 18/28 (64.3%) malignant lesions. One false negative result of VABB was observed. Sensitivity and specificity of VABB resulted 94.4% and 100%. Our diagnostic algorithm estimated a 45% mean decrease of costs using VABB when compared with surgical biopsy of all C3 lesions.

  18. Optimized lesion detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2009-02-01

    While diagnostic improvement via breast tomosynthesis has been notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This is because of the complex task of optimizing multiple parameters that constitute image acquisition and thus affect tomosynthesis performance. Those parameters include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, we investigated the effects of acquisition parameters, independent of each other, on the overall diagnostic image quality of tomosynthesis. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view mammographic dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 non-overlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm at 224 different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which one of the many possible combinations maximized performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. Results showed that performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. At a constant dose level and angular span, the performance rolled-off beyond a certain number of projections, indicating that simply increasing the number of projections in tomosynthesis may not necessarily improve its performance. The best performance was obtained with 15-17 projections spanning an angular arc of ~45° - the maximum tested in our study, and for an acquisition dose equal to single-view mammography. The optimization framework developed in this framework is applicable to other reconstruction techniques and other multi-projection systems.

  19. Imaging features of complex sclerosing lesions of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of complex sclerosing lesions of the breast and to assess the rate of upgrade to breast cancer. Methods: From March 2008 to May 2012, seven lesions were confirmed as complex sclerosing lesions by ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy. Final results by either surgical excision or follow-up imaging studies were reviewed to assess the rate of upgrade to breast cancer. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed the imaging findings according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System classification. Results: Five lesions underwent subsequent surgical excision and two of them revealed ductal carcinoma in situ (n=1) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n=1). Our study showed a breast cancer upgrade rate of 28.6% (2 of 7 lesions). Two lesions were stable on imaging follow-up beyond 1 year. The mammographic features included masses (n=4, 57.1%), architectural distortion (n=2, 28.6%), and focal asymmetry (n=1, 14.3%). Common B-mode ultrasonographic features were irregular shape (n=6, 85.7%), spiculated margin (n=5, 71.4 %), and hypoechogenicity (n=7, 100%). The final assessment categories were category 4 (n=6, 85.7%) and category 5 (n=1, 14.3%). Conclusion: The complex sclerosing lesions were commonly mass-like on mammography and showed the suspicious ultrasonographic features of category 4. Due to a high underestimation rate, all complex sclerosing lesions by core needle biopsy should be excised. PMID:24936496

  20. Shearwave Elastography Increases Diagnostic Accuracy in Characterization of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wei Lin; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Mohd-Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of shearwave elastography (SWE) in differentiating between benign and malignant breast lesions. One hundred and fifty-nine lesions were assessed using B-mode ultrasound (US) and SWE parameters were recorded (Emax, Emean, Emin, Eratio, SD). SWE measurements were then correlated with histopathological diagnosis. The final sample contained 85 benign and 74 malignant lesions. The maximum stiffness (Emax) with a cutoff point of ≥ 56.0 kPa (based on ROC curves) provided sensitivity of 100.0%, specificity of 97.6%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 97.4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in detecting malignant lesions. A cutoff of ≥80 kPa managed to downgrade 95.5% of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4a lesions to BI-RADS 3, negating the need for biopsy. Using a combination of BI-RADS and SWE, the authors managed to improve the PPV from 2.3% to 50% in BI-RADS 4a lesions. SWE of the breast provides highly specific and sensitive quantitative values that are beneficial in the characterization of breast lesions. Our results showed that Emax is the most accurate value for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. PMID:27015196

  1. Automated segmentation of breast lesions in ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Huo, Zhimin; Zhang, Jiwu

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women. As a convenient and safe diagnosis method, ultrasound is most commonly used second to mammography for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Here we proposed an automatic method to segment lesions in ultrasound images. The images are first filtered with anisotropic diffusion algorithm to remove speckle noise. The edge is enhanced to emphasize the lesion regions. Normalized cut is a graph theoretic that admits combination of different features for image segmentation, and has been successfully used in object parsing and grouping. In this paper we combine normalized cut with region merging method for the segmentation. The merging criteria are derived from the empirical rules used by radiologists when they interpret breast images. In the performance evaluation, we compared the computer-detected lesion boundaries with manually delineated borders. The experimental results show that the algorithm has efficient and robust performance for different kinds of lesions.

  2. Optical discrimination between malignant and benign breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Ieva, Francesca; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Taroni, Paola

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 82 subjects with breast lesions (45 malignant and 38 benign lesions). A perturbative approach based on the high-order calculation of the pathlength of photons inside the lesion was applied to estimate differences between lesion and average healthy tissue of the same breast in terms of: i) absorption properties, and ii) concentration of the major tissue constituents (oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen). The absorption difference Δμa between lesion and healthy tissue is significantly different for malignant vs. benign lesions at all wavelengths. Logistic regression fitted to the absorption data identifies 975 nm as the key wavelength to discriminate malignant from benign lesions. When the difference in tissue composition between lesion and healthy tissue is considered, malignant lesions are characterized by significantly higher collagen content than benign lesions. Also the best model for the discrimination of malignant lesions obtained applying regression logistic to tissue composition is based only on collagen. Including demographic information into the model improves its specificity.

  3. Evaluating lesion segmentation on breast sonography as related to lesion type.

    PubMed

    Pons, Gerard; Martí, Joan; Martí, Robert; Ganau, Sergi; Vilanova, Joan Carles; Noble, J Alison

    2013-09-01

    Breast sonography currently provides a complementary diagnosis when other modalities are not conclusive. However, lesion segmentation on sonography is still a challenging problem due to the presence of artifacts. To solve these problems, Markov random fields and maximum a posteriori-based methods are used to estimate a distortion field while identifying regions of similar intensity inhomogeneity. In this study, different initialization approaches were exhaustively evaluated using a database of 212 B-mode breast sonograms and considering the lesion types. Finally, conclusions about the relationship between the segmentation results and lesions types are described.

  4. Measuring shape complexity of breast lesions on ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Su; Chen, Yazhu; Li, Wenying; Chen, Yaqing

    2008-03-01

    The shapes of malignant breast tumors are more complex than the benign lesions due to their nature of infiltration into surrounding tissues. We investigated the efficacy of shape features and presented a method using polygon shape complexity to improve the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions on ultrasound. First, 63 lesions (32 benign and 31 malignant) were segmented by K-way normalized cut with the priori rules on the ultrasound images. Then, the shape measures were computed from the automatically extracted lesion contours. A polygon shape complexity measure (SCM) was introduced to characterize the complexity of breast lesion contour, which was calculated from the polygonal model of lesion contour. Three new statistical parameters were derived from the local integral invariant signatures to quantify the local property of the lesion contour. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was carried on to evaluate the performance of each individual shape feature. SCM outperformed the other shape measures, the area under ROC curve (AUC) of SCM was 0.91, and the sensitivity of SCM could reach 0.97 with the specificity 0.66. The measures of shape feature and margin feature were combined in a linear discriminant classifier. The resubstitution and leave-one-out AUC of the linear discriminant classifier were 0.94 and 0.92, respectively. The distinguishing ability of SCM showed that it could be a useful index for the clinical diagnosis and computer-aided diagnosis to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  5. Effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Huang, Minming; Zhu, Quing

    2009-01-01

    The chest wall underneath the breast tissue affects near-infrared (NIR) diffusive waves measured with reflection geometry. With the assistance of a co-registered ultrasound, the depth and the tilting angle of the chest wall can be determined and are used to model the breast as a two-layer medium. Finite element method (FEM) is suitable for modeling complex boundary conditions and is adapted to model the breast tissue and chest wall. Four parameters of bulk absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of these two layers are estimated and used for imaging reconstruction. Using a two-layer model, we have systematically investigated the effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction. Results have shown that chest-wall depth, titling angle, and difference between optical properties of two layers of lesion and reference sites affect the lesion reconstruction differently. Our analysis will be valuable and informative to researchers who are using reflectance geometry for breast imaging. The analysis can also provide guidelines for imaging operators to minimize image artifacts and to produce the best reconstruction results. PMID:19725717

  6. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal.

  7. Data-driven breast decompression and lesion mapping from digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wels, Michael; Kelm, B M; Hammon, M; Jerebko, Anna; Sühling, M; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) emerges as a new 3D modality for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Like in conventional 2D mammography the breast is scanned in a compressed state. For orientation during surgical planning, e.g., during presurgical ultrasound-guided anchor-wire marking, as well as for improving communication between radiologists and surgeons it is desirable to estimate an uncompressed model of the acquired breast along with a spatial mapping that allows localizing lesions marked in DBT in the uncompressed model. We therefore propose a method for 3D breast decompression and associated lesion mapping from 3D DBT data. The method is entirely data-driven and employs machine learning methods to predict the shape of the uncompressed breast from a DBT input volume. For this purpose a shape space has been constructed from manually annotated uncompressed breast surfaces and shape parameters are predicted by multiple multi-variate Random Forest regression. By exploiting point correspondences between the compressed and uncompressed breasts, lesions identified in DBT can be mapped to approximately corresponding locations in the uncompressed breast model. To this end, a thin-plate spline mapping is employed. Our method features a novel completely data-driven approach to breast shape prediction that does not necessitate prior knowledge about biomechanical properties and parameters of the breast tissue. Instead, a particular deformation behavior (decompression) is learned from annotated shape pairs, compressed and uncompressed, which are obtained from DBT and magnetic resonance image volumes, respectively. On average, shape prediction takes 26s and achieves a surface distance of 15.80 +/- 4.70 mm. The mean localization error for lesion mapping is 22.48 +/- 8.67 mm.

  8. [The attitude before subclinical breast lesions on mammography].

    PubMed

    Blidaru, A; Sebeni, M; Bordea, C; Viişoreanu, C; Bălănescu, I

    2000-01-01

    Mammographic screening and improvement of mammography resolution have resulted in the increasingly frequent identification of small-size mammary lesions that have no clinical expression. If in Western countries, approximately one quarter of breast cancers are discovered when clinically occult, in Romania such cases are rare and, most of the times, discovered merely by chance. Infraclinical mammary lesions identified by mammography pose problems concerning the appropriate response. The paper assesses the various diagnosis and therapy choices as well as the localization techniques to be employed in order to establish the best approach. We describe twelve cases of infraclinical mammary lesions identified by mammography. In two of this cases fine needle aspiration biopsy with cytological examination was used, and in one case we performed core biopsy and histological examination. In those cases, lesion localization has been performed using stereotactic X-ray devices. In nine cases, we performed excisional biopsy with histologic assessment. In four of those cases, the lesions proved to be malignant. Preoperative localization was performed with hookwires placed in the proximity of the lesion under mammographic control. In five of those cases, lesion coordinates have been determined by stereotaxy. Using this technique, we removed, in all cases, the clinical lesions identified by mammography. We believe surgical excision to be the best approach in such lesions. Total removal of the lesion enables a thorough histopathological examination resulting in more accurate diagnosis. Curative surgery is also possible within the same surgical procedure. Unless preoperative localization is performed the surgeon is in the position to excise an image that has no clinical expression. Under this circumstances surgical removal is performed blind, as the lesion is hard to be found even intraoperatory. Preoperative localization provides guidance to the surgeon, ensures removal of the lesion

  9. Accuracy of lesion boundary tracking in navigated breast tumor excision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Emily; Ungi, Tamas; Vaughan, Thomas; Pezeshki, Padina; Lasso, Andras; Gauvin, Gabrielle; Rudan, John; Engel, C. Jay; Morin, Evelyn; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: An electromagnetic navigation system for tumor excision in breast conserving surgery has recently been developed. Preoperatively, a hooked needle is positioned in the tumor and the tumor boundaries are defined in the needle coordinate system. The needle is tracked electromagnetically throughout the procedure to localize the tumor. However, the needle may move and the tissue may deform, leading to errors in maintaining a correct excision boundary. It is imperative to quantify these errors so the surgeon can choose an appropriate resection margin. METHODS: A commercial breast biopsy phantom with several inclusions was used. Location and shape of a lesion before and after mechanical deformation were determined using 3D ultrasound volumes. Tumor location and shape were estimated from initial contours and tracking data. The difference in estimated and actual location and shape of the lesion after deformation was quantified using the Hausdorff distance. Data collection and analysis were done using our 3D Slicer software application and PLUS toolkit. RESULTS: The deformation of the breast resulted in 3.72 mm (STD 0.67 mm) average boundary displacement for an isoelastic lesion and 3.88 mm (STD 0.43 mm) for a hyperelastic lesion. The difference between the actual and estimated tracked tumor boundary was 0.88 mm (STD 0.20 mm) for the isoelastic and 1.78 mm (STD 0.18 mm) for the hyperelastic lesion. CONCLUSION: The average lesion boundary tracking error was below 2mm, which is clinically acceptable. We suspect that stiffness of the phantom tissue affected the error measurements. Results will be validated in patient studies.

  10. [Follow-up of surgical biopsies in microcalcifications of the breast. Comparative analysis of patients submitted to mammography and digitalization of mammographic images].

    PubMed

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Vento, A R; Naninato, P; Zanetti, A; Carli, L

    1997-01-01

    Improvements in the techniques of preoperative needle localization of nonpalpable breast lesions that have been detected at mammography, coupled with surgical biopsy of smaller volumes of breast tissue and the use of local anesthesia have produced a more aggressive attitude toward early biopsy of lesions that are suspected of malignancy. The authors report the follow-up in 92 cases, who underwent breast biopsy for microcalcifications with no palpable lesions. In 46 women the presence of microcalcifications was evaluated through a computerized instrument which allows digitalization of the image.

  11. Migration of Guidewire After Surgical Breast Biopsy: An Unusual Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Seifi, Ali; Axelrod, Howard; Nascimento, Tome; Salam, Zia; Karimi, Sasan; Avestimehr, Sahar; Ohebsion, Jonathan

    2009-09-15

    Needle localization of breast lesions is commonly performed for surgical guidance when excising nonpalpable lesions. A few reports have specifically addressed complications associated with needle-localized surgical breast biopsy. We present the first reported case of delayed cardiac injury resulting from migration of a guidewire from a needle-localized breast biopsy that occurred 2 years after the procedure. The patient presented with chest pain and cardiac tamponade. It was found that a hook-wire had penetrated the pericardium and left ventricular myocardium through the aortic valve into the ascending aorta. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and computed axial tomography scan and subsequent surgical removal was undertaken successfully.

  12. A rare cause of breast mass that mimics carcinoma: Foreign body reaction to amorphous surgical material.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Burhan; Sever, Ali Riza; Mills, Philippa; Fish, David; Jones, Susan; Jones, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A breast mass caused by foreign body type granulomatous reaction to surgical material is a very rare lesion and may mimic carcinoma. Reported foreign materials have included suture materials, silicone, paraffin, gunpowder and carbon particles used for localization of a nonpalpable breast lesions. To our knowledge, a foreign body reaction to gauze sponge has not been reported previously. A 58-year-old woman who had an enlarging mass that mimicked breast carcinoma, due to foreign body reaction to gauze sponge is presented here, and relevant literature is reviewed.

  13. An infrared image based methodology for breast lesions screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, K. C. C.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Reisemberger, G. G.; Freitas, F. N. P.; Oliari, S. H.; Brioschi, M. L.; Louveira, M. H.; Spautz, C.; Dias, F. G.; Gasperin, P.; Budel, V. M.; Cordeiro, R. A. G.; Schittini, A. P. P.; Neto, C. D.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of utilizing a structured methodology for breast lesions screening, based on infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges, and of breast cancer patients, previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. An analysis of the systematic error of the infrared camera skin temperature measurements was conducted in several different regions of the body, by direct comparison to high precision thermistor temperature measurements, showing that infrared camera temperatures are consistently around 2 °C above the thermistor temperatures. Therefore, a method of conjugated gradients is proposed to eliminate the infrared camera direct temperature measurement imprecision, by calculating the temperature difference between two points to cancel out the error. The method takes into account the human body approximate bilateral symmetry, and compares measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ bar) between two symmetric regions of the patient's breast, that takes into account the breast region, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures, and doing so, the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and non subjective. The range of normal whole breast average dimensionless temperature differences for 101 healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the breasts temperatures exhibit a unimodal normal distribution, the healthy normal range for each region was considered to be the dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements, Δ θ bar ‾ + 2σ Δ θ bar ‾ , in order to represent 95% of the population. Forty-seven patients with previously diagnosed breast cancer through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting breast abnormalities in 45 cases (96%). Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective

  14. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 3 Lesions Detected on Whole-Breast Screening Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sang Yu; Ko, Eun Young; Han, Boo-Kyung; Shin, Jung Hee; Hahn, Soo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the incidence and cancer rate of probably benign lesions detected on bilateral whole-breast screening ultrasound (US), which corresponded to US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, and evaluated the proper management of those lesions. Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board in our institution, which waived informed patient consent. We retrospectively reviewed US images of 1,666 patients who underwent bilateral whole-breast screening US as a supplemental screening test to negative screening mammography or screening US only. The incidence, clinical course, and cancer rate of screening US-detected probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were investigated, and the size and multiplicity of screening US-detected category 3 lesions were evaluated. Results Probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were detected in 689 of 1,666 patients (41.4%) who underwent screening US. Among them, 653 had follow-up US images for at least 24 months, and among these 653, 190 (29.1%) had multiple bilateral category 3 lesions. Moreover, 539 of 1,666 patients (32.4%) had lesions ≤1 cm in size and 114 of 1,666 (6.8%) had lesions >1 cm (median, 0.82 cm; range, 0.3–4.2 cm). Four of the 653 patients (0.6%) showed suspicious interval changes and were categorized into BI-RADS category 4. Biopsy analysis confirmed only one lesion as invasive ductal carcinoma at the 6-month follow-up; another lesion was an intraductal papilloma and the remaining two were fibroadenomas. Overall cancer rate of the screening US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions was 0.2%. Conclusion The incidence of category 3 lesions detected on screening US only was very high, but the cancer rate was very low. Therefore, in an average-risk population, routine screening US is preferable over short-term follow-up for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected on whole-breast screening US. PMID:27721880

  15. High prevalence of preinvasive lesions adjacent to BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Arun, Banu; Vogel, Kristen J; Lopez, Adriana; Hernandez, Mike; Atchley, Deann; Broglio, Kristine R; Amos, Christopher I; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kuerer, Henry; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Albarracin, Constance T

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase a woman's lifetime risk of developing breast cancer by 43% to 84%. It was originally postulated that BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers develop more rapidly than sporadic cancers and may lack preinvasive lesions. More recent studies have found preinvasive lesions in prophylactic mastectomy specimens from mutation carriers; however, there is little information on the presence of preinvasive lesions in tissue adjacent to breast cancers. Our aim is to investigate the role of preinvasive lesions in BRCA-associated breast carcinogenesis. We retrospectively compared BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers and sporadic breast cancers for the prevalence of preinvasive lesions [ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), lobular carcinoma in situ, and atypical lobular hyperplasia] in tissue adjacent to invasive breast cancers. Pathology was reviewed for 73 BRCA1/2-associated tumors from patients with breast cancer. We selected 146 patients with mutation-negative breast cancer as age-matched controls. Among the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers, 59% had at least one associated preinvasive lesion compared with 75% of controls. Preinvasive lesions were more prevalent in BRCA2 mutation carriers than in BRCA1 mutation carriers (70% versus 52%, respectively). The most common preinvasive lesion in both groups was DCIS; 56% of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers and 71% of the sporadic breast cancers had adjacent intraductal disease, respectively. Preinvasive lesions, most notably DCIS, are common in BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers. These findings suggest that BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers progress through the same intermediate steps as sporadic breast cancers, and that DCIS should be considered as a part of the BRCA1/2 tumor spectrum.

  16. High Prevalence of Pre-invasive Lesions Adjacent to BRCA1/2-Associated Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Banu; Vogel, Kristen J.; Lopez, Adriana; Hernandez, Mike; Atchley, Deann; Broglio, Kristine R.; Amos, Christopher I.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kuerer, Henry; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Albarracin, Constance T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase a woman's lifetime risk of developing breast cancer to 43%-84%. It was originally postulated that BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers develop more rapidly than sporadic cancers and may lack pre-invasive lesions. More recent studies have found pre-invasive lesions in prophylactic mastectomy specimens from mutation carriers; however, there is little information on the presence of pre-invasive lesions in tissue adjacent to breast cancers. Our aim is to investigate the role of pre-invasive lesions in BRCA-associated breast carcinogenesis. Methods We retrospectively compared BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers and sporadic breast cancers for the prevalence of pre-invasive lesions (ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS], lobular carcinoma in situ [LCIS], and atypical lobular hyperplasia [ALH]) in tissue adjacent to invasive breast cancers. Results Pathology was reviewed for 73 BRCA1/2-associated tumors from breast cancer patients. We selected 146 mutation-negative breast cancer patients as age-matched controls. Of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers, 59% had at least one associated pre-invasive lesion compared with 75% of controls. Pre-invasive lesions were more prevalent in BRCA2 mutation carriers than in BRCA1 mutation carriers (70% vs. 52%, respectively). The most common pre-invasive lesion in both groups was DCIS; 56% of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers and 71% of the sporadic breast cancers had adjacent intraductal disease, respectively. Conclusions Pre-invasive lesions, most notably DCIS, are common in BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers. These findings suggest that BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers progress through the same intermediate steps as sporadic breast cancers, and that DCIS should be considered as a part of the BRCA1/2 tumor spectrum. PMID:19174581

  17. The impact of breast structure on lesion detection in breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Loren W.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials (VCT) can be carefully designed to inform, orient, or potentially replace clinical trials. The focus of this study was to demonstrate the capability of the sophisticated tools that can be used in the design, implementation, and performance analysis of VCTs, through characterization of the effect of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of irregular masses in digital breast tomosynthesis. Twenty breast phantoms from the extended cardiactorso (XCAT) family, generated based on dedicated breast computed tomography of human subjects, were used to extract a total of 2173 volumes of interest (VOI) from simulated tomosynthesis images. Five different lesions, modeled after human subject tomosynthesis images, were embedded in the breasts, for a total of 6×2173 VOIs with and without lesions. Effects of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of the lesions were studied by implementing a doubly composite hypothesis signal detection theory paradigm with location known exactly, lesion known exactly, and background known statistically. The results indicated that the detection performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) deteriorated as density was increased, yielding findings consistent with clinical studies. The detection performance varied substantially across the twenty breasts. Furthermore, the log-likelihood ratio under H0 and H1 seemed to be affected by background tissue density and heterogeneity differently. Considering background tissue variability can change the outcomes of a VCT and is hence of crucial importance. The XCAT breast phantoms can address this concern by offering realistic modeling of background tissue variability based on a wide range of human subjects.

  18. 3-Dimensional shear wave elastography of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-ling; Chang, Cai; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fen; Chen, Jia-jian; Qu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Color patterns of 3-dimensional (3D) shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising method in differentiating tumoral nodules recently. This study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of color patterns of 3D SWE in breast lesions, with special emphasis on coronal planes. A total of 198 consecutive women with 198 breast lesions (125 malignant and 73 benign) were included, who underwent conventional ultrasound (US), 3D B-mode, and 3D SWE before surgical excision. SWE color patterns of Views A (transverse), T (sagittal), and C (coronal) were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Distribution of SWE color patterns was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.001). In malignant lesions, “Stiff Rim” was significantly more frequent in View C (crater sign, 60.8%) than in View A (51.2%, P = 0.013) and View T (54.1%, P = 0.035). AUC for combination of “Crater Sign” and conventional US was significantly higher than View A (0.929 vs 0.902, P = 0.004) and View T (0.929 vs 0.907, P = 0.009), and specificity significantly increased (90.4% vs 78.1%, P = 0.013) without significant change in sensitivity (85.6% vs 88.0%, P = 0.664) as compared with conventional US. In conclusion, combination of conventional US with 3D SWE color patterns significantly increased diagnostic accuracy, with “Crater Sign” in coronal plane of the highest value. PMID:27684820

  19. Low-contrast lesion detection in tomosynthetic breast imaging using a realistic breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lili; Oldan, Jorge; Fisher, Paul; Gindi, Gene

    2006-03-01

    Tomosynthesis mammography is a potentially valuable technique for detection of breast cancer. In this simulation study, we investigate the efficacy of three different tomographic reconstruction methods, EM, SART and Backprojection, in the context of an especially difficult mammographic detection task. The task is the detection of a very low-contrast mass embedded in very dense fibro-glandular tissue - a clinically useful task for which tomosynthesis may be well suited. The project uses an anatomically realistic 3D digital breast phantom whose normal anatomic variability limits lesion conspicuity. In order to capture anatomical object variability, we generate an ensemble of phantoms, each of which comprises random instances of various breast structures. We construct medium-sized 3D breast phantoms which model random instances of ductal structures, fibrous connective tissue, Cooper's ligaments and power law structural noise for small scale object variability. Random instances of 7-8 mm irregular masses are generated by a 3D random walk algorithm and placed in very dense fibro-glandular tissue. Several other components of the breast phantom are held fixed, i.e. not randomly generated. These include the fixed breast shape and size, nipple structure, fixed lesion location, and a pectoralis muscle. We collect low-dose data using an isocentric tomosynthetic geometry at 11 angles over 50 degrees and add Poisson noise. The data is reconstructed using the three algorithms. Reconstructed slices through the center of the lesion are presented to human observers in a 2AFC (two-alternative-forced-choice) test that measures detectability by computing AUC (area under the ROC curve). The data collected in each simulation includes two sources of variability, that due to the anatomical variability of the phantom and that due to the Poisson data noise. We found that for this difficult task that the AUC value for EM (0.89) was greater than that for SART (0.83) and Backprojection (0.66).

  20. Clinical significance of interval changes in breast lesions initially categorized as probably benign on breast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Yoon; Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Jin Hwan; Jang, Mijung; La Yun, Bo; Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Bohyoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to determine the malignancy rate of probably benign lesions that show an interval change on follow-up ultrasound and to evaluate the differences seen on imaging between benign and malignant lesions initially categorized as probably benign but with interval change on follow-up breast ultrasound. We retrospectively reviewed 11,323 lesions from ultrasound-guided core-biopsies performed between June 2004 and December 2014 and identified 289 lesions (266 patients) with an interval change from probably benign (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] category 3) in the previous 2 years. Malignancy rates were compared according to the ultrasound findings and the characteristics of the interval changes, including changes in morphology and/or diameter. The malignancy rate for probably benign lesions that showed an interval change on follow-up ultrasound was 6.9% (20/289). The malignancy rate was higher for clustered cysts (33.3%) and irregular or noncircumscribed masses (12.7%) than for circumscribed oval masses (5%) or complicated cysts (5%) seen on initial ultrasound (P = 0.043). Fifty-five percent of the malignancies were found to be ductal carcinoma in situ and there was 1 case of lymph node metastasis among the patients with invasive disease in whom biopsy was delayed by 6 to 15 months. The extent of invasiveness was greater in missed cases. There was a significant difference in the maximal diameter change between the 20 malignant lesions and the 269 benign lesions (4.0 mm vs 2.7 mm, P = 0.002). The cutoff value for maximal diameter change per initial diameter was 39.0% for predicting malignancy (sensitivity 95%, specificity 53.5%). The malignancy rate for morphologically changed lesions was significantly higher than for morphologically stable lesions (13.6% vs 4.9%; P = 0.024) Our 6.9% of probably benign lesions that showed an interval change finally turned out to be malignancy was mostly DCIS. The

  1. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis versus Supplemental Diagnostic Mammographic Views for Evaluation of Noncalcified Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bandos, Andriy I.; Ganott, Marie A.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Catullo, Victor J.; Rathfon, Grace Y.; Lu, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of breast tomosynthesis versus supplemental mammography views in classification of masses, distortions, and asymmetries. Materials and Methods: Eight radiologists who specialized in breast imaging retrospectively reviewed 217 consecutively accrued lesions by using protocols that were HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved in 182 patients aged 31–60 years (mean, 50 years) who underwent diagnostic mammography and tomosynthesis. The lesions in the cohort included 33% (72 of 217) cancers and 67% (145 of 217) benign lesions. Eighty-four percent (182 of 217) of the lesions were masses, 11% (25 of 217) were asymmetries, and 5% (10 of 217) were distortions that were initially detected at clinical examination in 8% (17 of 217), at mammography in 80% (173 of 217), at ultrasonography (US) in 11% (25 of 217), or at magnetic resonance imaging in 1% (2 of 217). Histopathologic examination established truth in 191 lesions, US revealed a cyst in 12 lesions, and 14 lesions had a normal follow-up. Each lesion was interpreted once with tomosynthesis and once with supplemental mammographic views; both modes included the mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views in a fully crossed and balanced design by using a five-category Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and a probability-of-malignancy score. Differences between modes were analyzed with a generalized linear mixed model for BI-RADS–based sensitivity and specificity and with modified Obuchowski-Rockette approach for probability-of-malignancy–based area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Average probability-of-malignancy–based area under the ROC curve was 0.87 for tomosynthesis versus 0.83 for supplemental views (P < .001). With tomosynthesis, the false-positive rate decreased from 85% (989 of 1160) to 74% (864 of 1160) (P < .01) for cases that were rated BI-RADS category 3 or higher and from 57% (663 of

  2. Incidentally detected breast lesions on chest CT with US correlation: a pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Hee; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Song, Jong Woon; Baek, Hye Jin; Doo, Kyung Won; Kim, Woogyeong; Kim, Yeon Mee; Kim, Woon Won; Lee, Jung Sun; Cho, Een Young

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing use of computed tomography (CT), incidental breast lesions are detected more frequently. When interpreting chest CT findings, it is important for radiologists to carefully review the breast to recognize any abnormal findings that could affect patient management. The purpose of this study is to discuss incidental breast lesions on chest CT with ultrasonography correlation that may be encountered in routine clinical practice. PMID:27707680

  3. Male breast cancer precursor lesions: analysis of the EORTC 10085/TBCRC/BIG/NABCG International Male Breast Cancer Program.

    PubMed

    Doebar, Shusma C; Slaets, Leen; Cardoso, Fatima; Giordano, Sharon H; Bartlett, John Ms; Tryfonidis, Konstantinos; Dijkstra, Nizet H; Schröder, Caroline P; van Asperen, Christi J; Linderholm, Barbro; Benstead, Kim; Dinjens, Winan Nm; van Marion, Ronald; van Diest, Paul J; Martens, John Wm; van Deurzen, Carolien Hm

    2017-04-01

    In men, data regarding breast cancer carcinogenesis are limited. The aim of our study was to describe the presence of precursor lesions adjacent to invasive male breast cancer, in order to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis in these patients. Central pathology review was performed for 1328 male breast cancer patients, registered in the retrospective joint analysis of the International Male Breast Cancer Program, which included the presence and type of breast cancer precursor lesions. In a subset, invasive breast cancer was compared with the adjacent precursor lesion by immunohistochemistry (n=83) or targeted next generation sequencing (n=7). Additionally, we correlated the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ with outcome. A substantial proportion (46.2%) of patients with invasive breast cancer also had an adjacent precursor lesion, mainly ductal carcinoma in situ (97.9%). The presence of lobular carcinoma in situ and columnar cell-like lesions were very low (<1%). In the subset of invasive breast cancer cases with adjacent ductal carcinoma in situ (n=83), a complete concordance was observed between the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status of both components. Next generation sequencing on a subset of cases with invasive breast cancer and adjacent ductal carcinoma in situ (n=4) showed identical genomic aberrations, including PIK3CA, GATA3, TP53, and MAP2K4 mutations. Next generation sequencing on a subset of cases with invasive breast cancer and an adjacent columnar cell-like lesion showed genomic concordance in two out of three patients. A multivariate Cox model for survival showed a trend that the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ was associated with a better overall survival, in particular in the Luminal B HER2+ subgroup. In conclusion, ductal carcinoma in situ is the most commonly observed precursor lesion in male breast cancer and its presence seems to be associated with a better outcome, in particular in Luminal B HER2+ cases

  4. Value of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Differentiating Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt Bostan, Tuğba; Koç, Gonca; Sezgin, Gülten; Altay, Canan; Fazıl Gelal, M.; Oyar, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a diagnostic and problem solving method for the breast examinations in addition to conventional breast examination methods. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) adds valuable information to conventional MRI. Aims: Our aim was to show the impact of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values acquired with DWI to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: Forty-six women with 58 breast masses (35 malignant, 23 benign) were examined on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. The morphologic characteristics of the lesions on conventional MRI sequences and contrast uptake pattern were assessed. ADC values of both lesions and normal breast parenchyma were measured. The ADC values obtained were statistically compared with the histopathologic results using Paired Samples t-Test. Results: Multiple lesions were detected in 12 (26%) of the patients, while only one lesion was detected in 34 (74%). Overall, 35 lesions out of 58 were histopathologically proven to be malignant. In the dynamic contrast-enhanced series, 5 of the malignant lesions were type 1, while 8 benign lesions revealed either type 2 or 3 time signal intensity curves (85% sensitivity, 56% spesifity). Mean ADC values were significantly different in malignant vs. benign lesions. (1.04±0.29×10−3 cm2/sec vs. 1.61±0.50×10−3 cm2/sec for the malignant and benign lesions, respectively, p=0.03). A cut-off value of 1.30×10−3 mm2/sec for ADC detected with receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded 89.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusion: ADC values improve the diagnostic accuracy of solid breast lesions when evaluated with the conventional MRI sequences. Therefore, DWI should be incorporated to routine breast MRI protocol. PMID:27308073

  5. Incidentally detection of non-palpable testicular nodules at scrotal ultrasound: what is new?

    PubMed

    Valentino, Massimo; Bertolotto, Michele; Martino, Pasquale; Barozzi, Libero; Pavlica, Pietro

    2014-12-30

    The increased use of ultrasound in patients with urological and andrological symptoms has given an higher detection of intra-testicular nodules. Most of these lesions are hypoechoic and their interpretation is often equivocal. Recently, new ultrasound techniques have been developed alongside of B-mode and color-Doppler ultrasound. Although not completely standardized, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and tissue elastography (TE), added to traditional ultrasonography, can provide useful information about the correct interpretation of incidentally detected non-palpable testicular nodules. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate these new techniques in the patient management.

  6. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  7. Analysis of 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast Masses for Lesion Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0630 TITLE: Analysis of 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast... Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast Masses for Lesion Differentiation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0630 5c...videos were obtained as part of a larger NIH funded clinical trial. The research 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer, Ultrasound Imaging, Ultrasound

  8. Advanced MRI Techniques in the Evaluation of Complex Cystic Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popli, Manju Bala; Gupta, Pranav; Arse, Devraj; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research work was to evaluate complex cystic breast lesions by advanced MRI techniques and correlating imaging with histologic findings. METHODS AND MATERIALS In a cross-sectional design from September 2013 to August 2015, 50 patients having sonographically detected complex cystic lesions of the breast were included in the study. Morphological characteristics were assessed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy were used to further classify lesions into benign and malignant categories. All the findings were correlated with histopathology. RESULTS Of the 50 complex cystic lesions, 32 proved to be benign and 18 were malignant on histopathology. MRI features of heterogeneous enhancement on CE-MRI (13/18), Type III kinetic curve (13/18), reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (18/18), and tall choline peak (17/18) were strong predictors of malignancy. Thirteen of the 18 lesions showed a combination of Type III curve, reduced apparent diffusion coefficient value, and tall choline peak. CONCLUSIONS Advanced MRI techniques like dynamic imaging, diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR spectroscopy provide a high level of diagnostic confidence in the characterization of complex cystic breast lesion, thus allowing early diagnosis and significantly reducing patient morbidity and mortality. From our study, lesions showing heterogeneous contrast enhancement, Type III kinetic curve, diffusion restriction, and tall choline peak were significantly associated with malignant complex cystic lesions of the breast. PMID:27330299

  9. Estimate of tissue composition in malignant and benign breast lesions by time-domain optical mammography

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Giovanna; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Taroni, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The optical characterization of malignant and benign breast lesions is presented. Time-resolved transmittance measurements were performed in the 630-1060 nm range by means of a 7-wavelength optical mammograph, providing both imaging and spectroscopy information. A total of 62 lesions were analyzed, including 33 malignant and 29 benign lesions. The characterization of breast lesions was performed applying a perturbation model based on the high-order calculation of the pathlength of photons inside the lesion, which led to the assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, lipids, water and collagen concentrations. Significant variations between tumor and healthy tissue were observed in terms of both absorption properties and constituents concentration. In particular, benign lesions and tumors show a statistically significant discrimination in terms of absorption at several wavelengths and also in terms of oxy-hemoglobin and collagen content. PMID:25360382

  10. Diagnostic features of quantitative comb-push shear elastography for breast lesion differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Max; Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kumar, Viksit; Meixner, Duane; Fazzio, Robert T.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Background Lesion stiffness measured by shear wave elastography has shown to effectively separate benign from malignant breast masses. The aim of this study was to evaluate different aspects of Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) performance in differentiating breast masses. Methods With written signed informed consent, this HIPAA- compliant, IRB approved prospective study included patients from April 2014 through August 2016 with breast masses identified on conventional imaging. Data from 223 patients (19–85 years, mean 59.93±14.96 years) with 227 suspicious breast masses identifiable by ultrasound (mean size 1.83±2.45cm) were analyzed. CUSE was performed on all patients. Three regions of interest (ROI), 3 mm in diameter each, were selected inside the lesion on the B-mode ultrasound which also appeared in the corresponding shear wave map. Lesion elasticity values were measured in terms of the Young’s modulus. In correlation to pathology results, statistical analyses were performed. Results Pathology revealed 108 lesions as malignant and 115 lesions as benign. Additionally, 4 lesions (BI-RADS 2 and 3) were considered benign and were not biopsied. Average lesion stiffness measured by CUSE resulted in 84.26% sensitivity (91 of 108), 89.92% specificity (107 of 119), 85.6% positive predictive value, 89% negative predictive value and 0.91 area under the curve (P<0.0001). Stiffness maps showed spatial continuity such that maximum and average elasticity did not have significantly different results (P > 0.21). Conclusion CUSE was able to distinguish between benign and malignant breast masses with high sensitivity and specificity. Continuity of stiffness maps allowed for choosing multiple quantification ROIs which covered large areas of lesions and resulted in similar diagnostic performance based on average and maximum elasticity. The overall results of this study, highlights the clinical value of CUSE in differentiation of breast masses based on their

  11. Breast ultrasound lesions classification: a performance evaluation between manual delineation and computer segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Yap, Chuin Hong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a threat to women worldwide. Manual delineation on breast ultrasound lesions is time-consuming and operator dependent. Computer segmentation of ultrasound breast lesions can be a challenging task due to the ill-defined lesions boundaries and issues related to the speckle noise in ultrasound images. The main contribution of this paper is to compare the performance of the computer classifier on the manual delineation and computer segmentation in malignant and benign lesions classification. This paper we implement computer segmentation using multifractal approach on a database consists of 120 images (50 malignant lesions and 70 benign lesions). The computer segmentation result is compared with the manual delineation using Jaccard Similarity Index (JSI). The result shows that the average JSI of 0.5010 (+/-0.2088) for malignant lesions and the average JSI of 0.6787 (+/-0.1290) for benign lesions. These results indicate lower agreement in malignant lesions due to the irregular shape while the higher agreement in benign lesions with regular shape. Further, we extract the shape descriptors for the lesions. By using logistic regression with 10 fold cross validation, the classification rates of manual delineation and computer segmentation are computed. The computer segmentation produced results with sensitivity 0.780 and specificity 0.871. However, the manual delineation produced sensitivity of 0.520 and specificity of 0.800. The results show that there are no clear differences between the delineation in MD and CS in benign lesions but the computer segmentation on malignant lesions shows better accuracy for computer classifier.

  12. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Promise of new technologies in understanding pre-invasive breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2003-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization, RNA expression profiling, and proteomic analyses are new molecular technologies used to study breast cancer. Invasive breast cancers were originally evaluated because they provided ample quantities of DNA, RNA, and protein. The application of these technologies to pre-invasive breast lesions is discussed, including methods that facilitate their implementation. Data indicate that atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are precursor lesions molecularly similar to adjacent invasive breast cancer. It is expected that molecular technologies will identify breast tissue at risk for the development of unfavorable subtypes of invasive breast cancer and reveal strategies for targeted chemoprevention or eradication. PMID:14580250

  13. Volumetric texture analysis of breast lesions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijie; Giger, Maryellen L; Li, Hui; Bick, Ulrich; Newstead, Gillian M

    2007-09-01

    Automated image analysis aims to extract relevant information from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (CE-MRI) of the breast and improve the accuracy and consistency of image interpretation. In this work, we extend the traditional 2D gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method to investigate a volumetric texture analysis approach and apply it for the characterization of breast MR lesions. Our database of breast MR images was obtained using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence and consists of 121 biopsy-proven lesions (77 malignant and 44 benign). A fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) based method is employed to automatically segment 3D breast lesions on CE-MR images. For each 3D lesion, a nondirectional GLCM is then computed on the first postcontrast frame by summing 13 directional GLCMs. Texture features are extracted from the nondirectional GLCMs and the performance of each texture feature in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign breast lesions is assessed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Our results show that the classification performance of volumetric texture features is significantly better than that based on 2D analysis. Our investigations of the effects of various of parameters on the diagnostic accuracy provided means for the optimal use of the approach.

  14. Improved characterization of molecular phenotypes in breast lesions using 18F-FDG PET image homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kunlin; Bhagalia, Roshni; Sood, Anup; Brogi, Edi; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using uorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is commonly used in the assessment of breast lesions by computing voxel-wise standardized uptake value (SUV) maps. Simple metrics derived from ensemble properties of SUVs within each identified breast lesion are routinely used for disease diagnosis. The maximum SUV within the lesion (SUVmax) is the most popular of these metrics. However these simple metrics are known to be error-prone and are susceptible to image noise. Finding reliable SUV map-based features that correlate to established molecular phenotypes of breast cancer (viz. estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression) will enable non-invasive disease management. This study investigated 36 SUV features based on first and second order statistics, local histograms and texture of segmented lesions to predict ER and PR expression in 51 breast cancer patients. True ER and PR expression was obtained via immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tissue samples from each lesion. A supervised learning, adaptive boosting-support vector machine (AdaBoost-SVM), framework was used to select a subset of features to classify breast lesions into distinct phenotypes. Performance of the trained multi-feature classifier was compared against the baseline single-feature SUVmax classifier using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results show that texture features encoding local lesion homogeneity extracted from gray-level co-occurrence matrices are the strongest discriminator of lesion ER expression. In particular, classifiers including these features increased prediction accuracy from 0.75 (baseline) to 0.82 and the area under the ROC curve from 0.64 (baseline) to 0.75.

  15. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  16. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  17. Dedicated Three-dimensional Breast Computed Tomography: Lesion Characteristic Perception by Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmiak, Cherie Marie; Cole, Elodia B; Zeng, Donglin; Tuttle, Laura A; Steed, Doreen; Pisano, Etta D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess radiologist confidence in the characterization of suspicious breast lesions with a dedicated three-dimensional breast computed tomography (DBCT) system in comparison to diagnostic two-dimensional digital mammography (dxDM). Materials and Methods: Twenty women were recruited who were to undergo a breast biopsy for a Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 or 5 lesion evaluated with dxDM in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. The enrolled subjects underwent imaging of the breast(s) of concern using DBCT. Seven radiologists reviewed the cases. Each reader compared DBCT to the dxDM and was asked to specify the lesion type and BI-RADS score for each lesion and modality. They also compared lesion characteristics: Shape for masses or morphology for calcifications; and margins for masses or distribution for calcifications between the modalities using confidence scores (0–100). Results: Twenty-four biopsied lesions were included in this study: 17 (70.8%) masses and 7 (29.2%) calcifications. Eight (33.3%) lesions were malignant, and 16 (66.7%) were benign. Across all lesions, there was no significant difference in the margin/distribution (Δ = −0.99, P = 0.84) and shape/morphology (Δ = −0.10, P = 0.98) visualization confidence scores of DBCT in relation to dxDM. However, analysis by lesion type showed a statistically significant increase in reader shape (Δ =11.34, P = 0.013) and margin (Δ =9.93, P = 0.023) visualization confidence with DBCT versus dxDM for masses and significant decrease in reader morphology (Δ = −29.95, P = 0.001) and distribution (Δ = −28.62, P = 0.002) visualization confidence for calcifications. Conclusion: Reader confidence in the characterization of suspicious masses is significantly improved with DBCT, but reduced for calcifications. Further study is needed to determine whether this technology can be used for breast cancer screening. PMID:27195180

  18. Light shadowing effect of large breast lesions imaged by optical tomography in reflection geometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    When a large, highly absorbing breast lesion is imaged by optical tomography in reflection geometry, most of the photons are absorbed by the top portion of the lesion. As a result, the lower portion of the lesion is not quantified correctly. This posterior light shadowing effect is similar to the sound shadowing effect frequently seen in pulse-echo ultrasound images. The presence of significant posterior shadowing of a lesion in ultrasound images suggests malignance. The light shadowing effect due to optical contrast is characterized using a simple measure and validated by the Monte Carlo photon-tracking method and phantom experiments. Clinical examples of large malignant and benign lesions are presented to demonstrate the shadowing effect and the utility of the measure. Understanding and quantifying the shadowing effect due to optical contrast is important for characterizing larger malignant cancers from benign lesions.

  19. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  20. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Aman Mann CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute La Jolla, CA 92037-1005 REPORT DATE: April...2015 – 31 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0032 Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast...identified a peptide CISQ that targets to the stroma in premalignant lesions and binds to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in MMTV-PyMT mice

  1. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  2. Assessment of texture analysis on DCE-MRI data for the differentiation of breast tumor lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, Jennifer; Harz, Markus T.; Laue, Hendrik; Twellmann, Thorsten; Bick, Ulrich; Rominger, Marga; Hahn, Horst K.; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer diagnosis based on magnetic resonance images (breast MRI) is increasingly being accepted as an additional diagnostic tool to mammography and ultrasound, with distinct clinical indications.1 Its capability to detect and differentiate lesion types with high sensitivity and specificity is countered by the fact that visual human assessment of breast MRI requires long experience. Moreover, the lack of evaluation standards causes diagnostic results to vary even among experts. The most important MR acquisition technique is dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR imaging since different lesion types accumulate contrast material (CM) differently. The wash-in and wash-out characteristic as well as the morphologic characteristic recorded and assessed from MR images therefore allows to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. In this work, we propose to calculate second order statistical features (Haralick textures) for given lesions based on subtraction and 4D images and on parametermaps. The lesions are classified with a linear classification scheme into probably malignant or probably benign. The method and model was developed on 104 histologically graded lesions (69 malignant and 35 benign). The area under the ROC curve obtained is 0.91 and is already comparable to the performance of a trained radiologist.

  3. Effect of Breast Compression on Lesion Characteristic Visibility with Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Faulconer, L.; Parham, C; Connor, D; Kuzmiak, C; Koomen, M; Lee, Y; Cho, K; Rafoth, J; Livasy, C; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional mammography can not distinguish between transmitted, scattered, or refracted x-rays, thus requiring breast compression to decrease tissue depth and separate overlapping structures. Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays and perfect crystal diffraction to generate images with contrast based on absorption, refraction, or scatter. Because DEI possesses inherently superior contrast mechanisms, the current study assesses the effect of breast compression on lesion characteristic visibility with DEI imaging of breast specimens. Eleven breast tissue specimens, containing a total of 21 regions of interest, were imaged by DEI uncompressed, half-compressed, or fully compressed. A fully compressed DEI image was displayed on a soft-copy mammography review workstation, next to a DEI image acquired with reduced compression, maintaining all other imaging parameters. Five breast imaging radiologists scored image quality metrics considering known lesion pathology, ranking their findings on a 7-point Likert scale. When fully compressed DEI images were compared to those acquired with approximately a 25% difference in tissue thickness, there was no difference in scoring of lesion feature visibility. For fully compressed DEI images compared to those acquired with approximately a 50% difference in tissue thickness, across the five readers, there was a difference in scoring of lesion feature visibility. The scores for this difference in tissue thickness were significantly different at one rocking curve position and for benign lesion characterizations. These results should be verified in a larger study because when evaluating the radiologist scores overall, we detected a significant difference between the scores reported by the five radiologists. Reducing the need for breast compression might increase patient comfort during mammography. Our results suggest that DEI may allow a reduction in compression without substantially compromising clinical image

  4. Spontaneous feline mammary intraepithelial lesions as a model for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Intraepithelial lesions (IELs), such as usual ductal hyperplasia (UH), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are risk factors that predict a woman's chance of developing invasive breast cancer. Therefore, a comparative study that establishes an animal model of pre-invasive lesions is needed for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for both mammary IELs and tumors. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic and molecular features of feline mammary IELs and compare them with those in women. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens (n = 205) from 203 female cats with clinical mammary disease were retrieved from the archives of the Purdue University Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Veterinary Teaching Hospital (West Lafayette, IN), and the Department of Pathology and Veterinary Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine (Sassari, Italy). Histologic sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), were evaluated for the presence of IELs in tissue adjacent to excised mammary tumors. Lesions were compared to those of humans. Immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor (ER-alpha), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) and Ki-67 was performed in IELs and adjacent tumor tissues. Results Intraepithelial lesions were found in 57 of 203 (28%) feline mammary specimens and were categorized as UH (27%), ADH (29%), and DCIS (44%). Most IELs with atypia (ADH and DCIS) were associated with mammary cancer (91%), whereas UH was associated with benign lesions in 53% of cases. Feline IELs were remarkably similar to human IELs. No ER or PR immunoreactivity was detected in intermediate-grade or high-grade DCIS or their associated malignant tumors. HER-2 protein overexpression was found in 27% of IELs. Conclusion The remarkable similarity of feline mammary IELs to those of humans

  5. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  6. Metastatic chordoma of the breast: an extremely rare lesion mimicking mucinous cancer.

    PubMed

    Tot, Tibor

    2006-10-01

    Metastases in the breast are rare, with metastatic chordoma being one of the rarest. To our knowledge, only one such case has previously been published in the literature. We report a case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with a palpable lump in her right breast. The lump was mammographically suggestive of mucinous breast cancer because it was a solitary, small, circular, and moderately dense lesion yielding abundant mucoid aspirate. The tumor resembled mucinous carcinoma upon histologic and immunohistochemical examination: it had a mucinous stroma, and the tumor cells strongly expressed epithelial markers. However, the patient had previously undergone surgery for a recurrent sacral chordoma. In addition to the clinical history, the presence of typical physaliferous cells expressing neither estrogen receptors nor cytokeratin 7, but staining positively for S-100 protein, allowed the proper diagnosis. Although extremely rare, metastatic chordoma may represent a challenge in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions. Discriminating metastases of mucin-producing tumors in the breast from primary mucinous carcinomas is important with regard to the striking difference in prognosis of these lesions.

  7. Ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Pagani, C; Coscia, D R; Dellabianca, C; Bonardi, M; Alessi, S; Calliada, F

    2011-12-01

    Breast biopsy consists in the collection of cells or tissue fragments from a breast lesion and their analysis by a pathologist. There are several types of breast biopsy defined on the basis of the type of needle used: fine-needle aspiration and biopsy performed with a spring-based needle. This article focuses on fine-needle aspiration performed under sonographic guidance.It is used mainly to assess cysts that appear to contain vegetations or blood or that are associated with symptoms; lesions and solid nodules that are not unequivocally benign; and axillary lymph nodes that appear suspicious on physical examination and/or sonography.In addition to distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions, ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration also plays an important role in tumor grading and in immunocytochemical identifying specific tumor markers. This article describes the technique used and the possible causes of false negative and false positive findings. Despite its limitations, fine-needle aspiration has become a fundamental tool for the identification and preoperative management of malignant breast lesions.

  8. Noninvasive evaluation of nuclear morphometry in breast lesions using multispectral diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Al-Quran, Samer Z; Jiang, Huabei

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the main cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. There are limitations associated with the existing clinical tools for breast cancer detection and alternative modalities for early detection and classification of breast cancer are urgently needed. Here we describe an optical imaging technique, called multispectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and demonstrate its ability of non-invasively evaluating nuclear morphometry for differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Photon densities along the surface of the breast were measured to allow for the extraction of three statistical parameters including the size, elongation and density of nuclei inside the breast tissue. The results from 14 patients (4 malignant and 10 benign lesions) show that there exist significant contrasts between the diseased and surrounding normal nuclei and that the recovered nuclear morphological parameters agree well the pathological findings. We found that the nuclei of cancer cells were less-spherical compared with those of surrounding normal cells, while the nuclear density or volume fraction provided the highest contrast among the three statistical parameters recovered. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of multispectral DOT as a cellular imaging method for accurate determination of breast cancer.

  9. Automatic ultrasound image enhancement for 2D semi-automatic breast-lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Hall, Christopher S.

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the fastest growing cancer, accounting for 29%, of new cases in 2012, and second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States and worldwide. Ultrasound (US) has been used as an indispensable tool for breast cancer detection/diagnosis and treatment. In computer-aided assistance, lesion segmentation is a preliminary but vital step, but the task is quite challenging in US images, due to imaging artifacts that complicate detection and measurement of the suspect lesions. The lesions usually present with poor boundary features and vary significantly in size, shape, and intensity distribution between cases. Automatic methods are highly application dependent while manual tracing methods are extremely time consuming and have a great deal of intra- and inter- observer variability. Semi-automatic approaches are designed to counterbalance the advantage and drawbacks of the automatic and manual methods. However, considerable user interaction might be necessary to ensure reasonable segmentation for a wide range of lesions. This work proposes an automatic enhancement approach to improve the boundary searching ability of the live wire method to reduce necessary user interaction while keeping the segmentation performance. Based on the results of segmentation of 50 2D breast lesions in US images, less user interaction is required to achieve desired accuracy, i.e. < 80%, when auto-enhancement is applied for live-wire segmentation.

  10. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Boone, J M; Abbey, C K; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, K K; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast.The percent correct of the human observer's responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist's performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends

  11. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Boone, J. M.; Abbey, C. K.; Hargreaves, J.; Bateni, C.; Lindfors, K. K.; Yang, K.; Nosratieh, A.; Hernandez, A.; Gazi, P.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist

  12. Diagnostic Pitfalls in Papillary Lesions of the Breast: Experience from a Single Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Basavaiah, Sridevi Hanaganahalli; Sreeram, Saraswathy; Suresh, Pooja Kundapur; Kini, Hema; Adiga, Deepa; Sahu, Kausalya Kumari; Pai, Radha R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Papillary neoplasms are a group of lesions that are characterized by presence of papillae supported by fibrovascular cores lined by epithelial cells with or without myoepithelial cell layer. These neoplasms may be benign, atypical or malignant. Aims This study was conducted to analyse the clinicopathological characteristics of papillary lesions of the breast. Materials and Methods A retrospective and prospective analysis of 34 cases of papillary lesions received over a period of 7 years from 2009 to 2015 was done. The patient’s clinical details were collected from medical archives and the histopathological findings were reviewed. The lesions were classified into benign, atypical and malignant categories. Results During the study period, there were 34 cases of papillary lesions of breast. The mean age was 58 years. The central quadrant was the most common location (66.6%). The most common presenting complaint was lump (76.5% cases). Papillary lesions presented more commonly as solitary lump (82.4%) rather than multifocal disease. Benign papillary lesions were more common than the atypical and malignant lesions. The most common papillary lesion accounting for 43% of the cases was intraductal papilloma. Malignant lesions accounted for 41.2% cases with intraductal papillary carcinoma and invasive papillary carcinoma constituting 14.7% cases each. Conclusion Diagnosis of papillary carcinoma is challenging and its classification includes different entities that have specific diagnostic criteria. Due to their heterozygosity in morphology with benign, atypical and malignant subtypes, morphological features such as type of fibrovascular core and continuity of myoepithelial layer along with immunohistochemical stains for myoepithelial cells should be considered for proper and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27656446

  13. Mesenchymal tumors and tumor-like lesions of the breast: a contemporary approach review.

    PubMed

    Stolnicu, Simona; Moldovan, Cosmin; Podoleanu, Cristian; Georgescu, Rares

    2015-01-01

    The classification of the breast tumors has been revised and recently published in 2012 in the WHO blue book. Contrary to the epithelial tumors in the breast, mesenchymal tumors are rare and the classification for benign and malignant tumors is based on the same criteria in both categories, since no other specific diagnostic criteria, which would have an impact on prognosis, exist to date. The present review deals with minor changes mirroring the recent developments in the benign mesenchymal tumors (new additions are nodular fasciitis and atypical vascular lesions, while the haemangiopericytoma is removed) focusing especially on criteria to diagnose sarcomas, which represent a wide spectrum including very difficult lesions. The majority of sarcomas of the breast arise as a component of a malignant phyllodes tumor, while the pure forms are very rare. When a pure primary sarcoma of the breast is diagnosed, pathologists are encouraged to categorize the lesion according to the type of differentiation and to provide to the clinicians all the important prognostic parameters for the best treatment choice.

  14. Molecular classification of non-invasive breast lesions for personalised therapy and chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    McArt, Darragh; Irwin, Gareth; Harkin, D. Paul; Lioe, Tong; McQuaid, Stephen; James, Jacqueline A.; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter; Mullan, Paul B.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer screening has led to a dramatic increase in the detection of pre-invasive breast lesions. While mastectomy is almost guaranteed to treat the disease, more conservative approaches could be as effective if patients can be stratified based on risk of co-existing or recurrent invasive disease. Here we use a range of biomarkers to interrogate and classify purely non-invasive lesions (PNL) and those with co-existing invasive breast cancer (CEIN). Apart from Ductal Carcinoma in situ (DCIS), relative homogeneity is observed. DCIS contained a greater spread of molecular subtypes. Interestingly, high expression of p-mTOR was observed in all PNL with lower expression in DCIS and invasive carcinoma while the opposite expression pattern was observed for TOP2A. Comparing PNL with CEIN, we have identified p53 and Ki67 as predictors of CEIN with a combined PPV and NPV of 90.48% and 43.3% respectively. Furthermore, HER2 expression showed the best concordance between DCIS and its invasive counterpart. We propose that these biomarkers can be used to improve the management of patients with pre-invasive breast lesions following further validation and clinical trials. p53 and Ki67 could be used to stratify patients into low and high-risk groups for co-existing disease. Knowledge of expression of more actionable targets such as HER2 or TOP2A can be used to design chemoprevention or neo-adjuvant strategies. Increased knowledge of the molecular profile of pre-invasive lesions can only serve to enhance our understanding of the disease and, in the era of personalised medicine, bring us closer to improving breast cancer care. PMID:26657114

  15. Artificial neural network in breast lesions from fine-needle aspiration cytology smear.

    PubMed

    Subbaiah, R M; Dey, Pranab; Nijhawan, Raje

    2014-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are applied in engineering and certain medical fields. ANN has immense potential and is rarely been used in breast lesions. In this present study, we attempted to build up a complete robust back propagation ANN model based on cytomorphological data, morphometric data, nuclear densitometric data, and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) of ductal carcinoma and fibroadenomas of breast cases diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). We selected 52 cases of fibroadenomas and 60 cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of breast diagnosed on FNAC by two cytologists. Essential cytological data was quantitated by two independent cytologists (SRM, PD). With the help of Image J software, nuclear morphomeric, densitometric, and GLCM features were measured in all the cases on hematoxylin and eosin-stained smears. With the available data, an ANN model was built up with the help of Neurointelligence software. The network was designed as 41-20-1 (41 input nodes, 20 hidden nodes, 1 output node). The network was trained by the online back propagation algorithm and 500 iterations were done. Learning was adjusted after every iteration. ANN model correctly identified all cases of fibroadenomas and infiltrating carcinomas in the test set. This is one of the first successful composite ANN models of breast carcinomas. This basic model can be used to diagnose the gray zone area of the breast lesions on FNAC. We assume that this model may have far-reaching implications in future.

  16. Imaging breast lesions using the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope: ongoing clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Xia, W.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2012-02-01

    Current imaging modalities are often not able to detect early stages of breast cancer with high imaging contrast. Visualizing malignancy-associated increased hemoglobin concentrations might improve breast cancer diagnosis. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize hemoglobin in tissue with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, which makes it potentially ideal for breast imaging. The Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM) has been designed specifically for this purpose. Based on a successful pilot study in 2007, a large clinical study using PAM has been started in December 2010. PAM uses a pulsed Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm to illuminate a region of interest on the breast. Photoacoustic signals are detected with a 1MHz, unfocused ultrasound detector array. Three dimensional data are reconstructed using an acoustic backprojection algorithm. Those reconstructed images are compared with conventional imaging and histopathology. In the first phase of the study, the goal was to optimize the visualization of malignancies. We performed sixteen technically acceptable measurements on confined breast malignancies. In the reconstructed volumes of all malignancies, a confined high contrast region could be identified at the expected lesion depth. After ten successful measurements, the illumination area was increased and the fluence was substantially decreased. This caused a further significant increase in PAM lesion contrast.

  17. Nonlinear analysis using Lyapunov exponents in breast thermograms to identify abnormal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EtehadTavakol, M.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Lucas, C.; Sadri, S.; Ataei, M.

    2012-07-01

    Breast diseases are one of the major issues in women's health today. Early detection of breast cancer plays a significant role in reducing the mortality rate. Breast thermography is a potential early detection method which is non-invasive, non-radiating, passive, fast, painless, low cost, risk free with no contact with the body. By identifying and removing malignant tumors in early stages before they metastasize and spread to neighboring regions, cancer threats can be minimized. Cancer is often characterized as a chaotic, poorly regulated growth. Cancerous cells, tumors, and vasculature defy have irregular shapes which have potential to be described by a nonlinear dynamical system. Chaotic time series can provide the tools necessary to generate the procedures to evaluate the nonlinear system. Computing Lyapunov exponents is thus a powerful means of quantifying the degree of the chaos. In this paper, we present a novel approach using nonlinear chaotic dynamical system theory for estimating Lyapunov exponents in establishing possible difference between malignant and benign patterns. In order to develop the algorithm, the first hottest regions of breast thermal images are identified first, and then one dimensional scalar time series is obtained in terms of the distance between each subsequent boundary contour points and the center of the mass of the first hottest region. In the next step, the embedding dimension is estimated, and by time delay embedding method, the phase space is reconstructed. In the last step, the Lyapunov exponents are computed to analyze normality or abnormality of the lesions. Positive Lyapunov exponents indicates abnormality while negative Lyapunov exponents represent normality. The normalized errors show the algorithm is satisfactorily, and provide a measure of chaos. It is shown that nonlinear analysis of breast thermograms using Lyapunov exponents may potentially capable of improving reliability of thermography in breast tumor detection as

  18. Lesion classification on breast MRI through topological characterization of morphology over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Huber, Markus B.; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Ray, Lawrence A.; Krol, Andrzej; Wismüller, Axel

    2011-03-01

    Morphological characterization of lesions on dynamic breast MRI exams through texture analysis has typically involved the computation of gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), which serve as the basis for second order statistical texture features. This study aims to characterize lesion morphology through the underlying topology and geometry with Minkowski Functionals (MF) and investigate the impact of using such texture features extracted dynamically over a time series in classifying benign and malignant lesions. 60 lesions (28 malignant & 32 benign) were identified and annotated by experienced radiologists on 54 breast MRI exams of female patients where histopathological reports were available prior to this investigation. 13 GLCM-derived texture features and 3 MF features were then extracted from lesion ROIs on all five post-contrast images. These texture features were combined into high dimensional texture feature vectors and used in a lesion classification task. A fuzzy k-nearest neighbor classifier was optimized using random sub-sampling cross-validation for each texture feature and the classification performance was calculated on an independent test set using the area under the ROC curve (AUC); AUC distributions of different features were compared using a Mann- Whitney U-test. The MF feature 'Area' exhibited significantly improvements in classification performance (p<0.05) when compared to all GLCM-derived features while the MF feature 'Perimeter' significantly outperformed 12 out of 13 GLCM features (p<0.05) in the lesion classification task. These results show that dynamic texture tracking of morphological characterization that relies on topological texture features can contribute to better lesion character classification.

  19. Diagnostic laparoscopy for contralateral patent processus vaginalis and nonpalpable testes.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, G W

    1998-11-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy can be a valuable adjunct for the surgical approach to surgical conditions in children. Two frequently employed indications for diagnostic laparoscopy in children include (1) the search for a contralateral patent processus vaginalis in a child with a known inguinal hernia and (2) localization and management in boys with a nonpalpable testis. Laparoscopy to investigate a possible contralateral patent processus vaginalis is easily performed using a 3-mm, 70 degrees telescope through the known inguinal hernia sac and requires only 5 minutes for completion. Diagnostic laparoscopy in boys with a nonpalpable testis is performed through a 5-mm cannula placed in the umbilicus and takes less than 10 minutes to accomplish. Depending on the laparoscopic findings, ligation of the testicular vessels is possible at laparoscopy in boys with an abdominal testis who appear best managed by a two-staged Fowler-Stephens operation. In addition, laparoscopic orchiectomy may be performed in teenage boys who have an atrophic testis.

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improved performance of breast imaging reporting and data system evaluation of critical breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can improve the precision of breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) categorization. METHODS: A total of 230 patients with 235 solid breast lesions classified as BI-RADS 4 on conventional ultrasound were evaluated. CEUS was performed within one week before core needle biopsy or surgical resection and a revised BI-RADS classification was assigned based on 10 CEUS imaging characteristics. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was then conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of CEUS-based BI-RADS assignment with pathological examination as reference criteria. RESULTS: The CEUS-based BI-RADS evaluation classified 116/235 (49.36%) lesions into category 3, 20 (8.51%), 13 (5.53%) and 12 (5.11%) lesions into categories 4A, 4B and 4C, respectively, and 74 (31.49%) into category 5. Selecting CEUS-based BI-RADS category 4A as an appropriate cut-off gave sensitivity and specificity values of 85.4% and 87.8%, respectively, for the diagnosis of malignant disease. The cancer-to-biopsy yield was 73.11% with CEUS-based BI-RADS 4A selected as the biopsy threshold compared with 40.85% otherwise, while the biopsy rate was only 42.13% compared with 100% otherwise. Overall, only 4.68% of invasive cancers were misdiagnosed. CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that evaluation of BI-RADS 4 breast lesions with CEUS results in reduced biopsy rates and increased cancer-to-biopsy yields. PMID:27358689

  1. Thoracoscopic localization of nonpalpable rib tumors for excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J M; Freeman, R K

    2000-07-01

    Nonpalpable tumors of the rib can be difficult to localize accurately at the time of excisional biopsy. Furthermore, the ability of current imaging techniques to assess pleural or pulmonary involvement is not reliable. An intraoperative localization method using single port thoracoscopy is discussed which allows optimal placement of a biopsy incision and provides an accurate assessment of any tumor invasion into the adjacent pleura or lung.

  2. Groin Exploration for the Nonpalpable Testes: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sowande, Oludayo A; Talabi, Ademola O; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu C; Adejuyigbe, Olusanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of non-palpable testes in Nigeria can be difficult due to late presentation and poor resources. Surgical exploration is often required for diagnosis and treatment. Aim: This study reviews the management outcome of clinically non-palpable testeis in a tertiary center in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Ten years retrospective review of all clinically non-palpable testes in children aged 2–15years managed at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex Ile-Ife Nigeria. Results: Thirty two children with 44 testicular units were managed. The right side was involved in 12 (37.5%); left in 8 (25.0%) and bilateral in 12 (37.5%) patients. Pre-operative ultrasound was done in 12 patients with localization in just 4 patients (33.3% success rate). At groin exploration, 34 (77.32%) testicular units were located in the inguinal canal. Eight patients with 10 The remaining 10 (22.7%) testicular units required additional mini-laparotomy for which six (13.6%) and 4 (9.1%) testicular units respectively were either in the retroperitoneum or not found. Of the testes in the groin, twenty two (64.7%) testicular units were normal while 12 (35.3%) were atrophic. Four of the retroperitoneal testes were normal while 2 were atrophic. Eight (22.5%) testicular units among the inguinal group had multi-staged orchidopexy; while 2 each of the retroperitoneal group had orchidectomy, one stage orchidopexy, two staged Fowler Stephens (F-S) procedure or lost to follow up after first stage of F-S procedure. Mean follow up period was 2 months. 2 testicular units each had retracted or vanished respectively during follow up. Conclusion: Groin exploration still offers a viable approach Surgical exploration is still useful in to the management of non-palpable testes in low resource environment despite the lack of laparoscopy. PMID:25838769

  3. Non-mass-like lesions on breast ultrasonography: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Takayoshi

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews various non-mass-like ultrasonography (US) findings of the breast and the sonographic-pathologic correlation with Doppler techniques, elastography, and MRI. High-resolution US allows for identification of small, clinically occult non-mass-like US findings. Ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma usually manifest as a non-mass-like lesion on US. It is useful to classify non-mass-like lesions on US in a similar manner to the classification of non-mass-like enhancement on MRI.

  4. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation

    PubMed Central

    Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction. PMID:28194351

  5. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation.

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Laurenz; Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction.

  6. Benign and malignant papillary lesions of the breast. A cytomorphologic study.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, P B; Ljung, B M

    1994-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology of benign and malignant papillary lesions of the breast has been infrequently described. To define the cytologic features of benign and malignant papillary breast lesions better, the authors retrospectively reviewed the fine-needle aspiration cytology of five cases of histologically proven intracystic papillary carcinoma (IPC) and six cases of histologically proven papilloma. Clinical information was obtained from the medical records in each case. Intracystic papillary carcinoma tended to present as a larger tumor (average, 5 cm) in older women (average, 65.4 years). Papilloma, however, tended to present as a smaller tumor (average, 1.5 cm) in younger women (average, 43 years). Eighty percent of the IPC cases (4/5) and 50% of the papilloma cases (3/6) yielded highly cellular aspirates with complex vascular papillae and single columnar cells. Macrophages were a constant feature of IPC and were present in all but one case of papilloma. Although cellular atypia was not a prominent feature in either IPC or papilloma, moderate atypia was noted in one case of IPC and two cases of papilloma. Severe atypia was noted in a single case of IPC. Although IPC tended to yield a harvest with higher cellularity and single intact cells, no single feature or constellation of findings was consistently reliable in distinguishing IPC from papilloma. The authors found that papillary lesions of the breast demonstrate a distinct cytomorphology characterized by complex vascular papillae, columnar cells, and macrophages. They concluded, however, that, in the absence of overt cytologic malignancy, distinguishing between benign and malignant papillary breast lesions is difficult, if not impossible.

  7. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features ([Formula: see text]).

  8. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features (p<0.001). PMID:26158036

  9. Image-detected 'probably benign' breast lesions: a significant reason for referral from primary care.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M E; Houssami, N

    2006-10-01

    In Australia, and many health care provider systems, primary care physicians are the first to see women with breast symptoms and are responsible for making decisions on whether to investigate and when to refer to specialist teams. We present an audit of new patient referrals from primary care triaged to a 'low-risk' (low likelihood of cancer) clinic on the basis of benign findings. The most common reason for referral was 'breast lump' (38%) followed by 'image-detected' abnormality (26%.) We have identified that (outside of population screening services) many women are being referred from primary care to specialist clinics for management of screen-detected lesions considered benign on imaging. Further research is needed to identify the reasons for such referrals and to develop appropriate educational strategies and clinical policy, both for the primary care and the specialist breast practitioner.

  10. Research on the lesion segmentation of breast tumor MR images based on FCM-DS theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangbin; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xing; Li, Yuehua; Zhu, Yuemin; Chen, Li; Zhang, Su

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the treatment of breast tumor by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The doctors evaluate the scale, distribution and the statement of benign or malignancy of breast tumor by analyzing variety modalities of MRI, such as the T2, DWI and DCE images for making accurate preoperative treatment plan and evaluating the effect of the operation. This paper presents a method of lesion segmentation of breast tumor based on FCM-DS theory. Fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) algorithm combined with Dempster-Shafer (DS) theory is used to process the uncertainty of information, segmenting the lesion areas on DWI and DCE modalities of MRI and reducing the scale of the uncertain parts. Experiment results show that FCM-DS can fuse the DWI and DCE images to achieve accurate segmentation and display the statement of benign or malignancy of lesion area by Time-Intensity Curve (TIC), which could be beneficial in making preoperative treatment plan and evaluating the effect of the therapy.

  11. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  12. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  13. Automatic ultrasonic breast lesions detection using support vector machine based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Miao, Shan-Jung; Fan, Wei-Che; Chen, Yung-Sheng

    2007-03-01

    It is difficult to automatically detect tumors and extract lesion boundaries in ultrasound images due to the variance in shape, the interference from speckle noise, and the low contrast between objects and background. The enhancement of ultrasonic image becomes a significant task before performing lesion classification, which was usually done with manual delineation of the tumor boundaries in the previous works. In this study, a linear support vector machine (SVM) based algorithm is proposed for ultrasound breast image training and classification. Then a disk expansion algorithm is applied for automatically detecting lesions boundary. A set of sub-images including smooth and irregular boundaries in tumor objects and those in speckle-noised background are trained by the SVM algorithm to produce an optimal classification function. Based on this classification model, each pixel within an ultrasound image is classified into either object or background oriented pixel. This enhanced binary image can highlight the object and suppress the speckle noise; and it can be regarded as degraded paint character (DPC) image containing closure noise, which is well known in perceptual organization of psychology. An effective scheme of removing closure noise using iterative disk expansion method has been successfully demonstrated in our previous works. The boundary detection of ultrasonic breast lesions can be further equivalent to the removal of speckle noise. By applying the disk expansion method to the binary image, we can obtain a significant radius-based image where the radius for each pixel represents the corresponding disk covering the specific object information. Finally, a signal transmission process is used for searching the complete breast lesion region and thus the desired lesion boundary can be effectively and automatically determined. Our algorithm can be performed iteratively until all desired objects are detected. Simulations and clinical images were introduced to

  14. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Fox, Stephen B; Dabbs, David J; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew H S; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are classified traditionally into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey zone between benign and malignant, as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorization of such lesions is challenging, and for some entities is recognized to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over- or undertreatment. The rarity of these lesions makes the acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision-making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification and behaviour, and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential, such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions of uncertain malignant nature remain, such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of (1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and (2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed.

  15. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: Proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Rakha, Emad A.; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Fox, Stephen B.; Dabbs, David J.; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew HS.; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C.; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M.; Ellis, Ian O.

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are traditionally classified into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey-zone between benign and malignant as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorisation of such lesions is challenging and for some entities is recognised to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over-treatment or under-treatment. The rarity of these lesions makes acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification, behaviour and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions remain of uncertain malignant nature such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of 1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and 2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential, are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  16. Classification of small lesions in dynamic breast MRI: Eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation through spatio-temporal analysis of contrast enhancement over time.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Huber, Markus B; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Leinsinger, Gerda; Krol, Andrzej; Wismüller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the dignity of breast lesions as benign or malignant is specifically difficult for small lesions; they don't exhibit typical characteristics of malignancy and are harder to segment since margins are harder to visualize. Previous attempts at using dynamic or morphologic criteria to classify small lesions (mean lesion diameter of about 1 cm) have not yielded satisfactory results. The goal of this work was to improve the classification performance in such small diagnostically challenging lesions while concurrently eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation. To this end, we introduce a method for topological characterization of lesion enhancement patterns over time. Three Minkowski Functionals were extracted from all five post-contrast images of sixty annotated lesions on dynamic breast MRI exams. For each Minkowski Functional, topological features extracted from each post-contrast image of the lesions were combined into a high-dimensional texture feature vector. These feature vectors were classified in a machine learning task with support vector regression. For comparison, conventional Haralick texture features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were also used. A new method for extracting thresholded GLCM features was also introduced and investigated here. The best classification performance was observed with Minkowski Functionals area and perimeter, thresholded GLCM features f8 and f9, and conventional GLCM features f4 and f6. However, both Minkowski Functionals and thresholded GLCM achieved such results without lesion segmentation while the performance of GLCM features significantly deteriorated when lesions were not segmented (p < 0.05). This suggests that such advanced spatio-temporal characterization can improve the classification performance achieved in such small lesions, while simultaneously eliminating the need for precise segmentation.

  17. Evaluation of solid breast lesions with power Doppler: value of penetrating vessels as a predictor of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Rositaa; Rahmat, Kartini; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Alli, Kasumawati; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Moosa, Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to evaluate the vascular pattern of solid breast lesions using power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) and assess whether the presence of intratumoural penetrating vessels can predict breast cancer malignancy. METHODS Greyscale ultrasonography (US) and PDUS were prospectively performed on 91 women in Malaysia with histopathologically proven breast lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of greyscale US, PDUS, and both greyscale US and PDUS was calculated and compared. RESULTS The 91 women had 102 breast lesions (55 benign, 47 malignant). Of the 47 malignant lesions, 36 demonstrated intratumoural penetrating vessels. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of greyscale US findings in diagnosing malignancy were 100.0%, 71.4%, 74.1% and 100.0%, respectively. The presence of calcification in the breast lesion and the margin, shape and posterior acoustic features of the lesion were significant parameters in predicting malignancy (p < 0.01). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the presence of intratumoural penetrating vessels in predicting malignancy were 76.5%, 80.0%, 76.5% and 80.0%, respectively. When both greyscale US and PDUS were used, there was a significant correlation in predicting malignancy (p < 0.05). The specificity and PPV values of the combined greyscale US and PDUS method (89.0% and 85.7%, respectively) were higher than those of greyscale US or PDUS alone. CONCLUSION Flow patterns revealed by PDUS can be useful for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions. The visualisation of penetrating vessels in solid breast lesions can be used to complement greyscale US findings in predicting malignancy. PMID:27872938

  18. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  19. Monomorphic Epithelial Proliferations of the Breast: A Possible Precursor Lesion Associated With Ipsilateral Breast Failure After Breast Conserving Therapy in Patients With Negative Lumpectomy Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-03-01

    Background: It is generally believed that ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) develop from incompletely eradicated carcinoma. We previously suggested that monomorphic epithelial proliferations (MEPs) in the breast may be a pool of partially transformed clones from which breast carcinomas can arise and that radiation therapy (RT) may also reduce the risk of IBF by eradicating MEPs. We examined salvage mastectomy specimens in patients experiencing an IBF to define the relationship between MEPs and IBFs and an additional potential mechanism for IBF risk reduction by RT. Methods and Materials: The location, number, and distribution of radiation changes and MEPs relative to 51 IBFs were mapped in salvage mastectomy specimens from BCT patients with adequately excised, initial carcinomas (negative lumpectomy margins). Results: All 51 salvage mastectomies had diffuse, late radiation changes. None had active fibrocystic lesions. MEPs were predominantly located in the immediate vicinity of the IBFs. A mean of 39% of MEP cases were located within the IBF, 46% were located within 2 cm of the IBF, and 14% were 2-3 cm from the IBF. Conclusions: MEPs appear to be a pool of partially transformed precursor lesions that can give rise to ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinomas (CAs). Many IBFs may arise from MEPs that reemerge after RT. Radiation may also reduce IBF risk after BCT (including in patients with negative margins) by primarily eradicating MEPs.

  20. Regulation of breast cancer-induced bone lesions by β-catenin protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Shi, Heidi Y; Stock, Stuart R; Stern, Paula H; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-09

    Breast cancer patients have an extremely high rate of bone metastases. Morphological analyses of the bones in most of the patients have revealed the mixed bone lesions, comprising both osteolytic and osteoblastic elements. β-Catenin plays a key role in both embryonic skeletogenesis and postnatal bone regeneration. Although this pathway is also involved in many bone malignancy, such as osteosarcoma and prostate cancer-induced bone metastases, its regulation of breast cancer bone metastases remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the β-catenin signaling pathway has a significant impact on the bone lesion phenotype. In this study, we established a novel mouse model of mixed bone lesions using intratibial injection of TM40D-MB cells, a breast cancer cell line that is highly metastatic to bone. We found that both upstream and downstream molecules of the β-catenin pathway are up-regulated in TM40D-MB cells compared with non-bone metastatic TM40D cells. TM40D-MB cells also have a higher T cell factor (TCF) reporter activity than TM40D cells. Inactivation of β-catenin in TM40D-MB cells through expression of a dominant negative TCF4 not only increases osteoclast differentiation in a tumor-bone co-culture system and enhances osteolytic bone destruction in mice, but also inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Surprisingly, although tumor cells overexpressing β-catenin did induce a slight increase of osteoblast differentiation in vitro, these cells display a minimal effect on osteoblastic bone formation in mice. These data collectively demonstrate that β-catenin acts as an important determinant in mixed bone lesions, especially in controlling osteoblastic effect within tumor-harboring bone environment.

  1. In Vivo Quantification of the Nonlinear Shear Modulus in Breast Lesions: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Miguel; Chamming's, Foucauld; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer detection in the early stages is of great importance since the prognosis, and the treatment depends more on this. Multiple techniques relying on the mechanical properties of soft tissues have been developed to help in early detection. In this study, we implemented a technique that measures the nonlinear shear modulus (NLSM) (μ(NL)) in vivo and showed its utility to detect breast lesions from healthy tissue. The technique relies on the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible media. In order to recover μ(NL), static elastography and supersonic shear imaging are combined to subsequently register strain maps and shear modulus maps while the medium is compressed. Then, μ(NL) can be recovered from the relationship between the stress, deduced from strain maps, and the shear modulus. For this study, a series of five nonlinear phantoms were built using biological tissue (pork liver) inclusions immersed in an agar-gelatin gel. Furthermore, 11 in vivo acquisitions were performed to characterize the NLSM of breast tissue. The phantom results showed a very good differentiation of the liver inclusions when measuring μ(NL) with a mean value of -114.1 kPa compared to -34.7 kPa for the gelatin. Meanwhile, values for the shear modulus for the liver and the gelatin were very similar, 3.7 and 3.4 kPa, respectively. In vivo NLSM mean value for the healthy breast tissue was of -95 kPa, while mean values of the benign and the malignant lesions were -619 and -806 kPa with a strong v ariability, respectively. This study shows the potential of the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible medium to bring a new parameter for breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. Polyarteritis Nodosa Presenting as Digital Gangrene and Breast Lesion following Exposure to Silicone Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Homsi, Yamen; Carlson, John Andrew; Homsi, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium sized arteries. We report a case of a 49-year old woman who presented with PAN following exposure to silicone breast implants. Although the relationship between silicone implants and connective tissue diseases has been investigated in the literature, no prior reports were found documenting PAN after silicone mammoplasty. While the pathogenesis of idiopathic PAN is not known yet, responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy may suggest an immunologic mechanism. More robust research is needed to understand the connection between silicone breast implants and autoimmunity. PMID:26844000

  3. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhao, Zuowei; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  4. Papillary lesions of the breast: outcomes of 156 patients managed without excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Paloma; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Rössle, Matthias; Rageth, Christoph J

    2014-01-01

    Papillomas of the breast are benign epithelial neoplasms. Because of the low, but continued potential for malignancy, the treatment options after initial diagnosis remain controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical course of patients with papilloma who were managed by active surveillance following initial diagnosis by core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy. This retrospective study analyzed 174 patients with 180 papillomas that were diagnosed by core needle biopsy (113 cases) or vacuum-assisted biopsy (67 cases) at the Breast Center Seefeld Zurich between February 2002 and May 2011. We excluded 24 cases that underwent excisional biopsy for removal of the lesion. Over a mean follow-up of 3.5 years, 13 further events occurred in 156 cases (8%). These events included two cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (one after 4 and one after 6 years), one case of atypical ductal hyperplasia, one radial scar, eight cases of papilloma, and one case of flat epithelial atypia. No invasive carcinomas occurred during the follow-up period. Conservative management of 156 papillary lesions with removal by vacuum-assisted biopsy and surveillance was not associated with invasive cancer over a median follow-up of 3.5 years. Therefore, this approach seems to be a safe option for the clinical management of papillary lesions.

  5. Borderline breast lesions diagnosed at core needle biopsy: can magnetic resonance mammography rule out associated malignancy? Preliminary results based on 79 surgically excised lesions.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Zuiani, Chiara; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Furlan, Alessandro; Londero, Viviana

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) can exclude associated malignancy in case of diagnosis of borderline breast lesions (B3) at core needle biopsy (CNB). Retrospective analysis of MRM findings of 79 borderline breast lesions (26 benign papillomas, 29 radial sclerosing lesions, 6 atypical ductal hyperplasias, 18 lobular neoplasias) diagnosed at CNB was performed. Lesions were classified as "non-suspicious" or "suspicious" according to Fischer score. These findings were compared to the results of histological analysis of the excisional specimens. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of MRM in predicting the presence of malignancy were calculated. Out of 24 (30.4%) lesions classified as "suspicious", 8 (33.3%) proved to be malignant and 16 (66.7%) benign. Among the 55 (69.6%) "non-suspicious" lesions, only 1 (1.8%) was malignant (low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ), while the remaining 54 (98.2%) proved to be benign. MRM sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 88.9%, 77.1%, 33.3%, and 98.2%, respectively. When a borderline lesion is diagnosed on CNB, in case of mild or no enhancement at MRM, follow-up rather than excisional biopsy might be prompted.

  6. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p < 0.001 in all cases. The value of β was also found to be associated with patient age and

  7. Determining whether excision of all fibroepithelial lesions of the breast is needed to exclude phyllodes tumor: upgrade rate of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast to phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Van Osdol, Andrew D; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Ellis, Richard L; Gensch, Erin M; Johnson, Jeanne M; De Maiffe, Brooke; Marcou, Kristen A; Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Vang, Choua A

    2014-10-01

    Fibroepithelial lesions (FELs) are a common histologic finding on core needle biopsy (CNB) of the breast. Fibroepithelial lesions include fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor, which can be difficult to distinguish with an initial CNB. An institutional experience was reviewed from February 12, 2001, to January 4, 2007, to determine the safety of selective rather than routine excision of FELs and to determine the factors associated with upgrading diagnosis of FELs to phyllodes tumors without definitive phyllodes tumor diagnosis by CNB. Of 313 patients, 261 (83%) with FELs diagnosed by CNB received observation with long-term follow-up (mean, 8 years). Of the observed patients, 3 (1%) were diagnosed with phyllodes tumor on follow-up. Eighteen of 52 patients (35%) who received excision had an upgrade of diagnosis to phyllodes tumor. Sensitivity and specificity of the pathologist's comment of concern for phyllodes tumor on a CNB demonstrating FELs without definitive phyllodes tumor diagnosis were 82% and 93%, respectively. Our policy of selective excision of FELs without definitive phyllodes tumor diagnosis resulted in safe avoidance of many surgical procedures.

  8. Staging and treatment of clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G F; Feig, S A; Rosenberg, A L; Patchefsky, A S; Schwartz, A B

    1984-03-15

    Five hundred fifty-seven biopsies were performed for clinically occult mammary lesions, detected by mammography as clustered calcifications or nonpalpable masses within the breast. One hundred seventy-five cancers were demonstrated within this group, including 106 invasive carcinomas, 10 microinvasive carcinomas, 45 in situ ductal carcinomas, and 14 lobular carcinomas in situ (lobular neoplasia). No patient with in situ or microinvasive carcinoma had evidence of axillary node metastases in 33 specimens studied. However, a disturbingly high proportion of those patients with invasive carcinomas, approximately 35%, had histologically confirmed axillary node metastases, despite the small size of the primary tumors. These observations suggest that the use of the term "minimal" cancer is misleading when applied to invasive carcinoma. Staging systems for breast cancer have been imprecise when referring to nonpalpable lesions. Cancers detected as clustered calcifications only or as areas of parenchymal distortion without an accompanying mass are properly considered as T-0 cancers, with a suggested T-0(m) to indicate that the lesion was detected by mammography. However, when the mammogram indicates the presence of a mass that proves to be malignant, although the clinical examination may have been negative, the cancer should be staged according to the size of the mass on the mammogram, with the notation that it was detected by mammography, e.g., T-1(m), T-2(m), etc. The incidence of axillary node metastases even in these so-called occult cancers is significant, so that recommendations for treatment for any invasive cancer, regardless of its size, must take these observations into account. Similarly, the incidence of multifocal sites of cancer within the breast, even in the noninvasive cancers encountered, must be remembered when treatment is suggested.

  9. Quantitative nucleic features are effective for discrimination of intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Saito, Akira; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Cosatto, Eric; Kurata, Atsushi; Nagao, Toshitaka; Tateishi, Ayako; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraductal proliferative lesions (IDPLs) of the breast are recognized as a risk factor for subsequent invasive carcinoma development. Although opportunities for IDPL diagnosis have increased, these lesions are difficult to diagnose correctly, especially atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (LG-DCIS). In order to define the difference between these lesions, many molecular pathological approaches have been performed. However, still we do not have a molecular marker and objective histological index about IDPLs of the breast. Methods: We generated full digital pathology archives from 175 female IDPL patients, including usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH), ADH, LG-DCIS, intermediate-grade (IM)-DCIS, and high-grade (HG)-DCIS. After total 2,035,807 nucleic segmentations were extracted, we evaluated nuclear features using step-wise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a support vector machine. Results: High diagnostic accuracy (81.8–99.3%) was achieved between pathologists’ diagnoses and two-group LDA predictions from nucleic features for IDPL discrimination. Grouping of nuclear features as size and shape-related or intranuclear texture-related revealed that the latter group was more important when distinguishing between normal duct, UDH, ADH, and LG-DCIS. However, these two groups were equally important when discriminating between LG-DCIS and HG-DCIS. The Mahalanobis distances between each group showed that the smallest distance values occurred between LG-DCIS and IM-DCIS and between ADH and Normal. On the other hand, the distance value between ADH and LG-DCIS was larger than this distance. Conclusions: In this study, we have presented a practical and useful digital pathological method that incorporates nuclear morphological and textural features for IDPL prediction. We expect that this novel algorithm is used for the automated diagnosis assisting system for breast cancer. PMID:26955499

  10. Diagnostic power of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted detection of breast lesions with microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Soares, Jaqueline S; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Volynskaya, Zoya; Liu, Wendy; Klein, Nina; Plecha, Donna; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-01-08

    Microcalcifications geographically target the location of abnormalities within the breast and are of critical importance in breast cancer diagnosis. However, despite stereotactic guidance, core needle biopsy fails to retrieve microcalcifications in up to 15% of patients. Here, we introduce an approach based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for detection of microcalcifications that focuses on variations in optical absorption stemming from the calcified clusters and the associated cross-linking molecules. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra are acquired ex vivo from 203 sites in fresh biopsy tissue cores from 23 patients undergoing stereotactic breast needle biopsies. By correlating the spectra with the corresponding radiographic and histologic assessment, we have developed a support vector machine-derived decision algorithm, which shows high diagnostic power (positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 97% and 88%, respectively) for diagnosis of lesions with microcalcifications. We further show that these results are robust and not due to any spurious correlations. We attribute our findings to the presence of proteins (such as elastin), and desmosine and isodesmosine cross-linkers in the microcalcifications. It is important to note that the performance of the diffuse reflectance decision algorithm is comparable to one derived from the corresponding Raman spectra, and the considerably higher intensity of the reflectance signal enables the detection of the targeted lesions in a fraction of the spectral acquisition time. Our findings create a unique landscape for spectroscopic validation of breast core needle biopsy for detection of microcalcifications that can substantially improve the likelihood of an adequate, diagnostic biopsy in the first attempt.

  11. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  12. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Gillian E.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Banducci, Sarah E.; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Sutton, Brad P.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment. PMID:26915025

  13. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Gillian E; Wetter, Nathan C; Banducci, Sarah E; Mackenzie, Michael J; Zuniga, Krystle E; Awick, Elizabeth A; Roberts, Sarah A; Sutton, Brad P; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment.

  14. Breast ductoscopy with a 0.55-mm mini-endoscope for direct visualization of intraductal lesions.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Kiechle, Marion; Plattner, Birgit; Fischer, Thorsten; Paepke, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Standard radiologic examinations of breast duct lesions can give only indirect information. Mini-endoscopy with a breast ductoscope of only 0.55 mm offers direct visualization of the lesion and helps in the decision to perform or avoid exploratory breast tissue resection. We used a LaDuScope (PolyDiagnost, Pfaffenhofen, Germany) with a 0.55- or 0.95-mm outer diameter and a 75-mm working length from October 2003 through July 2004 on 11 women (average age of 48.3 years [range 36-69 years]) with suspicious nipple discharge. The optics have zero-degree direct view, 70-degree field vision, and 3000 or 6000 pixel resolution. Breast ducts and walls could be easily inspected; and irrigation of breast ducts, aspiration, and use of cytology brush were possible under visual control. We had no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The new procedure of mini-ductoscopy is feasible, safe, and helpful as an additional ambulatory diagnostic method for visual inspection of breast ducts. This instrument demonstrates the latest advances of technology and a trend toward less-invasive diagnostics for breast duct lesions.

  15. Predictive Factors for Upgrading Patients with Benign Breast Papillary Lesions Using a Core Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Ran; Song, Byung Joo; Jung, Sang Seol; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intraductal papilloma (IDP) is a benign breast disease with malignant potential, for which complete surgical excision is usually recommended. The aim of the present study was to investigate predictive factors for upgrading patients with a benign papillary lesion (BPL). Methods This study was an observational study using a prospectively collected cohort. In total, 13,049 patients who underwent a core needle biopsy (CNB) for a breast lesion between January 2009 and May 2015 were enrolled. We reviewed all patients with pathologically confirmed BPL from a CNB. Results Surgical treatment was performed for 363 out of a total of 592 lesions. According to the pathological differences, the lowest upgrade rate was shown in IDP without atypia (without atypia, 6.0%; with atypia, 26.8%; papillary neoplasm, 31.5%; p<0.001). The univariate analysis showed that, in IDP without atypia, the age at diagnosis, size of BPL on ultrasonography, and density on mammography were associated with upgrading. The multivariate analysis revealed that age >54 years and lesion size >1 cm were significantly associated with upgrade to malignancy (odds ratio [OR]=4.351, p=0.005 and OR=4.236, p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion The indications for surgical treatment can be defined as age >54 years and mass size >1 cm, even in IDP without atypia in the CNB results; this also includes cases of IDP with atypia or papillary neoplasm. Therefore, we suggest that close observation without surgery is sufficient for younger women with a small IDP without atypia. PMID:28053629

  16. Population Based Assessment of MHC Class I Antigens Down Regulation as Markers of Increased Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer from Benign Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Manuscript attached: Appendix A- 2 C: EXPRESSION OF MHC CLASS I AND II EXPRESSION SIGNIFICANTLY DISCRIMINATES AMONG BENIGN, CARCINOMA IN SITU, AND...Tumor aggressiveness and MHC class I and II antigens in laryngeal and breast cancer. Semin Cancer Biol. 2 :47-54; 1991. 5. Sawtell, NM., DiPersio, L... 2 , 3). In breast lesions examined for expression of MHC class I, approximately half (51%) of carcinomas had an abnormally low content of HLA-A, -B

  17. The use of colour-coded and spectral Doppler ultrasound in the differentiation of benign and malignant breast lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Peters-Engl, C.; Medl, M.; Leodolter, S.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of colour-coded and spectral Doppler sonography to predict the benign or malignant nature of breast lesions. A total of 112 women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were investigated prior to surgery. Thirty-nine breast carcinomas and 73 benign lesions were evaluated for the resistance index, pulsatility index and the flow velocity. A resistance index of > or = 0.70 was characteristic of malignant tumours with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 81%. The positive predictive value was 70% and the negative predictive value 89%. Doppler sonography offers one possible method for further investigation of patients with mammographic abnormalities. PMID:7819029

  18. Proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Delmonico, Lucas; Bravo, Maryah; Silvestre, Rafaele Tavares; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; De Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the proteomic profile of saliva and plasma from women with impalpable breast lesions using nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight (nLC-Q-TOF) technology. Plasma and saliva from patients with fibroadenoma (n=10), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (n=10) and healthy control groups (n=8) were assessed by combinations of inter/intra-group analyses, revealing significant quantitative and qualitative differences. The major differentially-expressed proteins in the saliva of patients compared with the controls were α2-macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, but the proteins that met the minimum fold-change and P-value cut-offs were leukocyte elastase inhibitor and α-enolase, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Concerning plasma, α-2-macroglobulin and ceruplasmin were upregulated, while other proteins such as haptoglobin, hemopexin and vitamin D-binding protein were downregulated compared with the control. The changes in immune, molecular transport and signaling pathways were the most representative in the proteomic profile of the saliva and plasma. This is the first study to describe the proteome of saliva and plasma from the same women with impalpable breast lesions. PMID:27602154

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  20. Quantitative analysis of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-03-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions.

  1. New diagnostic approach to intracystic lesions of the breast by fiberoptic ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D; Ueda, S; Senzaki, H; Shoji, T; Haijima, H; Gondo, H; Tanaka, K

    2001-01-01

    Intracystic tumors of the breast are uncommon and, at the time of ultrasonography and aspiration cytology, it is difficult to distinguish cancer from a benign tumor. The Fiberoptic Ductoscopy System (FDS) is an emerging technique allowing direct visual access to the ductal system of the breast. FDS was inserted through the cannulae into the cavity and we observed the intracystic tumors (3 intracystic papillomas and 2 intracytsic papillary carcinomas). The appearance of the malignant tumors was irregular, rough-shaped and they tended to bleed. On the contrary, benign tumors had smooth surfaces without bleeding. Cytological findings showed malignant cells in one out of two breast cancer patients. In addition, in the immunohistochemical study of resected tumor tissues from 5 patients, we observed positive reactions with anti-ErbB-2 antibody in 2 intracystic papillary carcinomas. In contrast, none of the histologically confirmed benign lesions (3 intracystic papillomas) gave positive results. In conclusion, the use of FDS as a non-invasive technique may provide valuable information.

  2. Fine-needle aspiration of gray zone lesions of the breast: fibroadenoma versus ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Normolle, Daniel; Michael, Claire W

    2013-09-01

    While breast lesions have characteristic cytological features, some lesions, particularly adenocarcinoma and fibroadenoma, may present with overlapping features causing erroneous diagnoses. The current study aimed to define significant cytomorphologic features predictive of fibroadenoma and adenocarcinoma, respectively. Further, we intended to evaluate the predictive characteristics for differentiation between gray zone lesions and to identify root causes contributing to misdiagnoses. First, direct smears prepared from 14 histology-confirmed fibroadenomas and 14 adenocarcinomas were reviewed and characteristics of commonly encountered morphologic features were assessed. We then retrospectively and blindly reviewed nine cytohistologic discrepant cases using the significant characteristic as a guideline, in order to assess whether these discrepant cases could be correctly categorized. Morphologic characteristics predictive of fibroadenoma included moderate cellularity, large, folded cellular sheets/aggregates, staghorn projections, smooth and round borders, monolayers, honeycomb arrangement, smaller nuclear size, and background bipolar cells. Predictive characteristics of adenocarcinoma included high cellularity, loose cohesive sheets/aggregates, pointed projections, irregular borders, larger nuclear size, irregular nuclear membrane, prominent nucleoli, and single atypical epithelial cells. Retrospective, blind review correctly re-classified seven out of nine cytohistologic discrepant cases, including five false negative cases and two false positive cases. Root causes contributing to the misdiagnoses were large branching sheets of carcinoma mimicking folded sheets of fibroadenoma; fibroblasts mimicking myoepithelial cells; apocrine cells mimicking carcinoma cells; and not recognizing the loose myxoid matrix presenting as soap bubbles in fibroadenoma. In conclusion, this study identified significant characteristics that can assist in achieving accurate diagnosis in a

  3. Study of nuclear morphometry on cytology specimens of benign and malignant breast lesions: A study of 122 cases

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Anamika; Jain, Manjula; Shukla, Shailaja; Andley, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer has emerged as a leading site of cancer among women in India. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) has been routinely applied in assessment of breast lesions. Cytological evaluation in breast lesions is subjective with a “gray zone” of 6.9–20%. Quantitative evaluation of nuclear size, shape, texture, and density parameters by morphometry can be of diagnostic help in breast tumor. Aims: To apply nuclear morphometry on cytological breast aspirates and assess its role in differentiating between benign and malignant breast lesions with derivation of suitable cut-off values between the two groups. Settings and Designs: The present study was a descriptive cross-sectional hospital-based study of nuclear morphometric parameters of benign and malignant cases. Materials and Methods: The study included 50 benign breast disease (BBD), 8 atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and 64 carcinoma cases. Image analysis was performed on Papanicolaou-stained FNAC slides by Nikon Imaging Software (NIS)–Elements Advanced Research software (Version 4.00). Nuclear morphometric parameters analyzed included 5 nuclear size, 2 shape, 4 texture, and 2 density parameters. Results: Nuclear morphometry could differentiate between benign and malignant aspirates with a gradually increasing nuclear size parameters from BBD to ADH to carcinoma. Cut-off values of 31.93 μm2, 6.325 μm, 5.865 μm, 7.855 μm, and 21.55 μm for mean nuclear area, equivalent diameter, minimum feret, maximum ferret, and perimeter, respectively, were derived between benign and malignant cases, which could correctly classify 7 out of 8 ADH cases. Conclusion: Nuclear morphometry is a highly objective tool that could be used to supplement FNAC in differentiating benign from malignant lesions, with an important role in cases with diagnostic dilemma. PMID:28182052

  4. Predictive model for contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the breast: Is it feasible in malignant risk assessment of breast imaging reporting and data system 4 lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To build and evaluate predictive models for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of the breast to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. METHODS: A total of 235 breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) 4 solid breast lesions were imaged via CEUS before core needle biopsy or surgical resection. CEUS results were analyzed on 10 enhancing patterns to evaluate diagnostic performance of three benign and three malignant CEUS models, with pathological results used as the gold standard. A logistic regression model was developed basing on the CEUS results, and then evaluated with receiver operating curve (ROC). RESULTS: Except in cases of enhanced homogeneity, the rest of the 9 enhancement appearances were statistically significant (P < 0.05). These 9 enhancement patterns were selected in the final step of the logistic regression analysis, with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 84.4% and 82.7%, respectively, and the area under the ROC curve of 0.911. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the malignant vs benign CEUS models were 84.38%, 87.77%, 86.38% and 86.46%, 81.29% and 83.40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The breast CEUS models can predict risk of malignant breast lesions more accurately, decrease false-positive biopsy, and provide accurate BI-RADS classification. PMID:27358688

  5. Comparing contrast-enhanced color flow imaging and pathological measures of breast lesion vascularity.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Flemming; Kuruvilla, Babita; Pascua, Mark B; Chaudhari, Manisha H; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Goldberg, Barry B

    2008-09-01

    This study was conducted to compare quantifiable measures of vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced color flow images of breast lesions to pathologic vascularity measurements. Nineteen patients with solid breast masses received Levovist Injection (10 mL at 300 mg/mL; Berlex Laboratories, Montville, NJ, USA). Color flow images of the mass pre and post contrast were obtained using an HDI 3000 scanner (Philips Medical Systems, Bothell, WA, USA) optimized for clinical scanning on an individual basis. After surgical removal, specimens were sectioned in the same planes as the ultrasound images and stained with an endothelial cell marker (CD31). Microvessel area (MVA) and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) were determined for vessels 10-19 microm, 20-29 microm, 30-39 microm, 40-49 microm and > or =50 microm in diameter using a microscope and image processing software. From the ultrasound images, the number of color pixels before and after contrast administration relative to the total area of the breast mass was calculated as a first-order measure of fractional tumor vascularity. Vascularity measures were compared using reverse stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. In total, 58 pathology slides (with 8,106 frames) and 185 ultrasound images were analyzed. There was a significant increase in flow visualization pre to post Levovist injection (p = 0.001), but no differences were found between the 11 benign and the eight malignant lesions (p > 0.35). Ultrasound vascularity measurements post contrast correlated significantly with pathology (0.15 < or = r2 < or = 0.46; p < 0.03). The 30-39 microm vessel range contributed most significantly to the MVD relationship (p < 0.001), whereas the MVA was mainly influenced by vessels 20-29 microm (p < 0.004). Precontrast ultrasound only correlated with pathology for relative MVA (r2 = 0.16; p = 0.01). In conclusion, contrast-enhanced color flow imaging provides a noninvasive measure of breast tumor neovascularity

  6. Vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in lesions radiologically suspicious of breast fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Połom, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Adamczyk, Beata; Giles, Elizabeth; Fertsch, Sonia; Michalak, Michal; Murawa, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of breast fibroadenoma remains a subject of clinical discussion. Recommended methods include clinical observation or surgical excision of the lesion. The procedure involves hospitalisation and anaesthesia, leaving a scar on the breast. Aim The aim of this study was to present the Centre's experience in removing lesions radiologically suspicious of fibroadenoma by means of an ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as an alternative to a classical surgery. Materials and methods Between March 2007 and April 2010, 196 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies were performed in the Mammotome Biopsy Laboratory of the 1st Surgical Oncology and General Surgery Department at the Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznań. The procedure was delivered to female patients aged 17–91 years (mean 40.8, median 39). Qualified for removal were ultrasound identified lesions described as fibroadenomas. Results The average size of excised lesions according to pre-biopsy ultrasound image was 13.53 ± 8.92 mm (median 11 mm, range 4–60 mm). In 184 cases (93.9%), benign lesions were found in the final histopathologic examination. Pre-cancer lesions were found in 10 cases, and invasive lesions in two cases. Overall, after follow-up ultrasound examination, four patients were qualified for subsequent surgical resection of lesions that had been left behind. Conclusion Vacuum core-needle biopsy is an effective tool enabling removal of breast fibroadenomas. It combines features of a lesion resection and histopathologic material collection providing an access with minimum invasiveness. PMID:24376952

  7. Second harmonic generation microscopy is a novel technique for differential diagnosis of breast fibroepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wai Jin; Yan, Jie; Xu, Shuoyu; Thike, Aye Aye; Bay, Boon Huat; Yu, Hanry; Tan, Min-Han; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours, are commonly encountered in clinical practice. As histological differences between these two related entities may be subtle, resulting in a challenging differential diagnosis, pathological techniques to assist the differential diagnosis of these two entities are of high interest. An accurate diagnosis at biopsy is important given corresponding implications for clinical decision-making including surgical extent and monitoring. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a recently developed optical imaging technique capable of robust, powerful and unbiased label-free direct detection of collagen fibril structure in tissue without the use of antibodies. We constructed tissue microarrays emulating limited materials on biopsy to investigate quantitative collagen signal in fibroepithelial lesions using SHG microscopy. Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded materials of 47 fibroepithelial lesions (14 fibroadenomas and 33 phyllodes tumours) were evaluated. Higher collagen signal on SHG microscopy was observed in fibroadenomas than phyllodes tumours on SHG imaging (p<0.001, area under the curve 0.859). At an automated threshold (2.5 million positive pixels), the sensitivity and specificity of the SHG microscopy for fibroadenoma classification was 71.4% and 84.4%, respectively. To corroborate these findings, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue array sections using collagen I and III primary antibodies. Both collagen I and III immunohistochemical expressions were also significantly higher in fibroadenomas than in phyllodes tumours (p<0.001). In conclusion, label-free collagen quantitation on SHG microscopy is a novel imaging approach that can aid the differential diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions.

  8. Image manifold revealing for breast lesion segmentation in DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Cheng, Zhaoning; Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is widely used for breast lesion differentiation. Manual segmentation in DCE-MRI is difficult and open to viewer interpretation. In this paper, an automatic segmentation method based on image manifold revealing was introduced to overcome the problems of the currently used method. First, high dimensional datasets were constructed from a dynamic image series. Next, an embedded image manifold was revealed in the feature image by nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique. In the last stage, k-means clustering was performed to obtain final segmentation results. The proposed method was applied in actual clinical cases and compared with the gold standard. Statistical analysis showed that the proposed method achieved an acceptable accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity rates.

  9. Differential marking of excision planes in screened breast lesions by organically coloured gelatins.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J S; Weinzwieg, I P; Davies, J D

    1990-01-01

    Traditionally India ink has been used to mark surgical resection margins, more recently with acetone to aid drying. Alternative methods have been suggested in recent months, including solutions of alcian blue, and Tippex. These methods use one colour only and Tippex is radiodense. Artists' pigments have been used, but their radiodensity makes them unsuitable for the detailed mammograms of the sliced screened specimens. An alternative method was specifically designed for impalpable breast lesions. It is based on coloured gelatins that are painted on to the biopsy specimen before dissection. The markers are radiolucent, quick to set, and do not penetrate the connective tissue. They can be applied to both fresh and fixed tissues, and the cost is about 0.05 pounds a specimen. The system is also suitable for marking other large specimens. Images PMID:2380408

  10. Skin Involvement and Breast Cancer: Are T4B Lesions of All Sizes Created Equal?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Diana; Ruth, Karen; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Egleston, Brian L.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Wong, Yu-Ning; Boraas, Marcia; Bleicher, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmetastatic non-inflammatory invasive breast cancers having skin involvement (SI) are classified as T4b, regardless of size. This study evaluated disease specific survival (DSS) to determine whether size should be considered for these lesions, rather than grouping them all into Stage III. Study Design Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data linked to Medicare claims were reviewed. SI and nonSI tumors were reclassified using AJCC 7th Edition groupings using tumor size and nodal involvement alone without considering SI (neostage). DSS was adjusted for demographics, histology and treatment using competing risk methods with propensity score-based weighting and bootstrap standard errors. Results Among 924 SI patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2005, tumors were 0.1–2.0, 2.1–5.0, and >5.0 cm in 11.6%, 51.1%, and 37.3% of cases, respectively. There were no nodal metastases in 22.3%, 1–3 positive nodes in 31.7%, 4–9 positive in 28.6% and ≥10 positive in 17.4% of cases. For SI patients, adjusted 5-year DSS was 95.8% [95%CI: 95.6–96.0] for neostage I, declining progressively to 36.4% [95%CI: 33.8–39.2] for neostage IIIC patients. Adjusted 5-year DSS for SI and nonSI tumors (n=66,185) was similar for neostage I, IIA, and IIB, and markedly lower for IIIA and IIIC. Adjusted DSS for SI IIIA was similar to nonSI IIIC. Conclusions Noninflammatory SI breast cancers have widely varied DSS that differs by tumor size and nodal involvement, and therefore should not all be stage III. SI should be subordinate to T and N groupings to classify SI with nonSI lesions having similar prognoses. PMID:25026875

  11. Exclusion of the retinoblastoma gene and chromosome 13q as the site of a primary lesion for human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Hall, J M; Hebert, J M; King, M C

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome 13q has been suggested as the site of a gene predisposing to human breast cancer, because loss of heterozygosity of alleles on this chromosome has been observed in some ductal breast tumors and because two breast cancer lines are altered at the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) at 13q14. To test this possibility, linkage of breast cancer susceptibility to 14 loci on chromosome 13q loci was assessed in extended families in which breast cancer is apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. RB1 was excluded as the site of a breast cancer gene by a lod score of Z = -7.60 at close linkage for 13 families. Multipoint analysis yielded negative lod scores throughout the region between 13q12 and 13q34; over most of this distance, Z less than -2.0. Therefore, chromosome 13q appears to be excluded as the site of primary lesion for breast cancer in these families. In addition, comparison of tumor versus normal tissues of nonfamilial breast cancer patients revealed an alteration at the 5' end of RB1 in a mucoid carcinoma but no alterations of RB1 in five informative ductal adenocarcinomas. Linkage data and comparisons of tumor and normal tissues suggest that changes in the RBI locus either are secondary alterations associated with progression of some tumors or occur by chance. Images Figure 2 PMID:2294744

  12. A prospective pilot clinical trial evaluating the utility of a dynamic near-infrared imaging device for characterizing suspicious breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ronald X; Young, Donn C; Mao, Jimmy J; Povoski, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Characterizing and differentiating between malignant tumors, benign tumors, and normal breast tissue is increasingly important in the patient presenting with breast problems. Near-infrared diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy is capable of measuring multiple physiologic parameters of biological tissue systems and may have clinical applications for assessing the development and progression of neoplastic processes, including breast cancer. The currently available application of near-infrared imaging technology for the breast, however, is compromised by low spatial resolution, tissue heterogeneity, and interpatient variation. Materials and methods We tested a dynamic near-infrared imaging schema for the characterization of suspicious breast lesions identified on diagnostic clinical ultrasound. A portable handheld near-infrared tissue imaging device (P-Scan; ViOptix Inc., Fremont, CA, USA) was utilized. An external mechanical compression force was applied to breast tissue. The tissue oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration were recorded simultaneously by the handheld near-infrared imaging device. Twelve categories of dynamic tissue parameters were derived based on real-time measurements of the tissue hemoglobin concentration and the oxygen saturation. Results Fifty suspicious breast lesions were evaluated in 48 patients. Statistical analyses were carried out on 36 out of 50 datasets that satisfied our inclusion criteria. Suspicious breast lesions identified on diagnostic clinical ultrasound had lower oxygenation and higher hemoglobin concentration than the surrounding normal breast tissue. Furthermore, histopathologic-proven malignant breast tumors had a lower differential hemoglobin contrast (that is, the difference of hemoglobin concentration variability between the suspicious breast lesion and the normal breast parenchyma located remotely elsewhere within the ipsilateral breast) as compared with histopathologic-proven benign breast lesions

  13. Can Doppler or contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis add diagnostically important information about the nature of breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Stanzani, Daniela; Chala, Luciano F.; de Barros, Nestor; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite evidence suggesting that Doppler ultrasonography can help to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether certain vascular features of breast masses observed by duplex Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography (before and/or after microbubble contrast injection) add information to the gray-scale analysis and support the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. METHODS: Seventy solid lesions were prospectively evaluated with gray-scale ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. The morphological analysis and lesion vascularity were correlated with the histological results. RESULTS: Percutaneous core biopsies revealed that 25/70 (17.5%) lesions were malignant, while 45 were benign. Hypervascular lesions with tortuous and central vessels, a resistive index (RI)≥0.73 before contrast injection, and an RI≥0.75 after contrast injection were significantly predictive of malignancy (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The combination of gray-scale ultrasonography data with unenhanced or enhanced duplex Doppler and color Doppler US data can provide diagnostically useful information. These techniques can be easily implemented because Doppler devices are already present in most health centers. PMID:24519198

  14. Touch Imprint Cytology and Stereotactically-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Suspicious Breast Lesions: 15-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Fasching, P. A.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Jud, S.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C.; Wachter, D. L.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Loehberg, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stereotactically-guided core needle biopsies (CNB) of breast tumours allow histological examination of the tumour without surgery. Touch imprint cytology (TIC) of CNB promises to be useful in providing same-day diagnosis for counselling purposes and for planning future surgery. Having addressed the issue of accuracy of immediate microscopic evaluation of TIC, we wanted to re-examine the usefulness of this procedure in light of the present health care climate of cost containment by incorporating the surgical 15-year follow-up data and outcome. Patients and Methods: From January until December 1996 we performed TIC in core needle biopsies of 173 breast tumours in 169 patients, consisting of 122 malignant and 51 benign tumours. Histology of core needle biopsies was proven by surgical histology in all malignant and in 5 benign tumours. Surgical breast biopsy was not performed in 46 patients with 46 benign lesions, as the histological result from the core needle biopsy and the result of the TIC were in agreement with the suspected diagnosis from the complementary breast diagnostics. A 15-year follow-up of these patients followed in 2013 and follow-up data was collected from 40 women. Results: In the 15-year follow-up of the 40 benign lesions primarily confirmed using CNB and TIC, a diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and accuracy of 100 % was found. Conclusion: TIC and stereotactically guided CNB showed excellent long-term follow-up in patients with benign breast lesions. The use of TIC to complement CNB can therefore provide immediate cytological diagnosis of breast lesions. PMID:26855442

  15. 78 FR 66932 - Scientific Information Request on Core Needle and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ...? Question 2 In women with a palpable or nonpalpable breast abnormality, what are the harms associated with... associated with the patient and her breast abnormality influence the harms of core-needle breast biopsy when... associated with the procedure itself influence the harms of core-needle breast biopsy when ] compared...

  16. A robust region-based active contour model with point classification for ultrasound breast lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Lidan; Ren, Haibing; Kim, Ji-Yeun

    2013-02-01

    Lesion segmentation is one of the key technologies for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. In this paper, we propose a robust region-based active contour model (ACM) with point classification to segment high-variant breast lesion in ultrasound images. First, a local signed pressure force (LSPF) function is proposed to classify the contour points into two classes: local low contrast class and local high contrast class. Secondly, we build a sub-model for each class. For low contrast class, the sub-model is built by combining global energy with local energy model to find a global optimal solution. For high contrast class, the sub-model is just the local energy model for its good level set initialization. Our final energy model is built by adding the two sub-models. Finally, the model is minimized and evolves the level set contour to get the segmentation result. We compare our method with other state-of-art methods on a very large ultrasound database and the result shows that our method can achieve better performance.

  17. Early Breast Cancer Precursor Lesions: Lessons Learned from Molecular and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Hans-Peter; Elsawaf, Zeinab; Helmchen, Birgit; Aulmann, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular neoplasia (LN) form a group of early precursor lesions that are part of the low-grade pathway in breast cancer development. This concept implies that the neoplastic disease process begins at a stage much earlier than in situ carcinoma. We have performed a review of the published literature for the upgrade risk to ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma in open biopsy after a diagnosis of ADH, FEA, or LN in core needle biopsy. This has revealed the highest upgrade risk for ADH (28.2% after open biopsy), followed by LN (14.9%), and FEA (10.2%). With LN, the pleomorphic subtype is believed to confer a higher risk than classical LN. With all types of precursor lesions, careful attention must be paid to the clinicopathological correlation for the guidance of the clinical management. Follow-up biopsies are generally indicated in ADH, and if there is any radiological-pathological discrepancy, also in LN or FEA. PMID:22590441

  18. ROC study of the effect of stereoscopic imaging on assessment of breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Helvie, Mark A; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Lydick, Justin T; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Bailey, Janet E; Nees, Alexis; Blane, Caroline E; Sahiner, Berkman

    2005-04-01

    An observer performance study was conducted to evaluate the usefulness of assessing breast lesion characteristics with stereomammography. Stereoscopic image pairs of 158 breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired with a GE Senographe 2000D full field digital mammography system using a 1.8x magnification geometry. A phantom-shift method equivalent to a stereo shift angle of +/- 3 degrees relative to a central axis perpendicular to the detector was used. For each specimen, two pairs of stereo images were taken at approximately orthogonal orientations. The specimens contained either a mass, microcalcifications, both, or normal tissue. Based on pathological analysis, 39.9% of the specimens were found to contain malignancy. The digital specimen radiographs were displayed on a high resolution MegaScan CRT monitor driven by a DOME stereo display board using in-house developed software. Five MQSA radiologists participated as observers. Each observer read the 316 specimen stereo image pairs in a randomized order. For each case, the observer first read the monoscopic image and entered his/her confidence ratings on the presence of microcalcifications and/or masses, margin status, BI-RADS assessment, and the likelihood of malignancy. The corresponding stereoscopic images were then displayed on the same monitor and were viewed through stereoscopic LCD glasses. The observer was free to change the ratings in every category after stereoscopic reading. The ratings of the observers were analyzed by ROC methodology. For the 5 MQSA radiologists, the average Az value for estimation of the likelihood of malignancy of the lesions improved from 0.70 for monoscopic reading to 0.72 (p=0.04) after stereoscopic reading, and the average Az value for the presence of microcalcifications improved from 0.95 to 0.96 (p=0.02). The Az value for the presence of masses improved from 0.80 to 0.82 after stereoscopic reading, but the difference fell short of statistical significance (p=0.08). The visual

  19. TU-CD-207-02: Quantification of Breast Lesion Compositions Using Low-Dose Spectral Mammography: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Sennung, D; Kumar, N; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of measuring breast lesion composition with spectral mammography using physical phantoms and bovine tissue. Methods: Phantom images were acquired with a spectral mammography system with a silicon-strip based photon-counting detector. Plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms were used to calibrate the system for dual-energy material decomposition. The calibration phantom was constructed in range of 2–8 cm thickness and water densities in the range of 0% to 100%. A non-linear rational fitting function was used to calibrate the imaging system. The phantom studies were performed with uniform background phantom and non-uniform background phantom. The breast lesion phantoms (2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm in thickness) were made with water densities ranging from 0 to 100%. The lesion phantoms were placed in different positions and depths on the phantoms to investigate the accuracy of the measurement under various conditions. The plastic water content of the lesion was measured by subtracting the total decomposed plastic water signal from a surrounding 2.5 mm thick border outside the lesion. In addition, bovine tissue samples composed of 80 % lean were imaged as background for the simulated lesion phantoms. Results: The thickness of measured and known water contents was compared. The rootmean-square (RMS) errors in water thickness measurements were 0.01 cm for the uniform background phantom, 0.04 cm for non-uniform background phantom, and 0.03 cm for 80% lean bovine tissue background. Conclusion: The results indicate that the proposed technique using spectral mammography can be used to accurately characterize breast lesion compositions.

  20. Exploring type II microcalcifications in benign and premalignant breast lesions by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lijia; Zheng, Chao; Zhang, Haipeng; Xu, Shuping; Zhang, Zhe; Hu, Chengxu; Bi, Lirong; Fan, Zhimin; Han, Bing; Xu, Weiqing

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of type II microcalcifications in fibroadenoma (FB), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast tissues has been analyzed by the fingerprint features of Raman spectroscopy. Fresh breast tissues were first handled to frozen sections and then they were measured by normal Raman spectroscopy. Due to inherently low sensitivity of Raman scattering, Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) technique was utilized. A total number of 71 Raman spectra and 70 SHINERS spectra were obtained from the microcalcifications in benign and premalignant breast tissues. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to distinguish the type II microcalcifications between these tissues. This is the first time to detect type II microcalcifications in premalignant (ADH and DCIS) breast tissue frozen sections, and also the first time SHINERS has been utilized for breast cancer detection. Conclusions demonstrated in this paper confirm that SHINERS has great potentials to be applied to the identification of breast lesions as an auxiliary method to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  1. Non-invasive optical estimate of tissue composition to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Ieva, Francesca; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Several techniques are being investigated as a complement to screening mammography, to reduce its false-positive rate, but results are still insufficient to draw conclusions. This initial study explores time domain diffuse optical imaging as an adjunct method to classify non-invasively malignant vs benign breast lesions. We estimated differences in tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, lipid, water, collagen) and absorption properties between lesion and average healthy tissue in the same breast applying a perturbative approach to optical images collected at 7 red-near infrared wavelengths (635–1060 nm) from subjects bearing breast lesions. The Discrete AdaBoost procedure, a machine-learning algorithm, was then exploited to classify lesions based on optically derived information (either tissue composition or absorption) and risk factors obtained from patient’s anamnesis (age, body mass index, familiarity, parity, use of oral contraceptives, and use of Tamoxifen). Collagen content, in particular, turned out to be the most important parameter for discrimination. Based on the initial results of this study the proposed method deserves further investigation.

  2. Non-invasive optical estimate of tissue composition to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Taroni, Paola; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Ieva, Francesca; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Several techniques are being investigated as a complement to screening mammography, to reduce its false-positive rate, but results are still insufficient to draw conclusions. This initial study explores time domain diffuse optical imaging as an adjunct method to classify non-invasively malignant vs benign breast lesions. We estimated differences in tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, lipid, water, collagen) and absorption properties between lesion and average healthy tissue in the same breast applying a perturbative approach to optical images collected at 7 red-near infrared wavelengths (635–1060 nm) from subjects bearing breast lesions. The Discrete AdaBoost procedure, a machine-learning algorithm, was then exploited to classify lesions based on optically derived information (either tissue composition or absorption) and risk factors obtained from patient’s anamnesis (age, body mass index, familiarity, parity, use of oral contraceptives, and use of Tamoxifen). Collagen content, in particular, turned out to be the most important parameter for discrimination. Based on the initial results of this study the proposed method deserves further investigation. PMID:28091596

  3. Non-invasive optical estimate of tissue composition to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Taroni, Paola; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Ieva, Francesca; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2017-01-16

    Several techniques are being investigated as a complement to screening mammography, to reduce its false-positive rate, but results are still insufficient to draw conclusions. This initial study explores time domain diffuse optical imaging as an adjunct method to classify non-invasively malignant vs benign breast lesions. We estimated differences in tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, lipid, water, collagen) and absorption properties between lesion and average healthy tissue in the same breast applying a perturbative approach to optical images collected at 7 red-near infrared wavelengths (635-1060 nm) from subjects bearing breast lesions. The Discrete AdaBoost procedure, a machine-learning algorithm, was then exploited to classify lesions based on optically derived information (either tissue composition or absorption) and risk factors obtained from patient's anamnesis (age, body mass index, familiarity, parity, use of oral contraceptives, and use of Tamoxifen). Collagen content, in particular, turned out to be the most important parameter for discrimination. Based on the initial results of this study the proposed method deserves further investigation.

  4. [Identification of the primary lesion in a patient with concomitant breast and kidney cancer following fracture of the femur].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasufumi; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Ishida, Tomo; Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Kusama, Hiroki; Matsusita, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Tadayoshi; Kimura, Kei; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Nitta, Kanae; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Takeno, Atsushi; Sakisaka, Hideki; Nakahira, Shin; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Egawa, Chiyomi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Oku, Kazuko; Goto, Takayoshi; Nagano, Teruaki; Nakatsuka, Shinichi

    2014-11-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with breast cancer [T3N3cM0: Stage IIIC, estrogen receptor [ER] (+), progesterone receptor [PgR] (+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2[HER2] (-)]at the time of initial presentation. Following diagnosis, combined modality therapy including hormone therapy and chemotherapy were initiated, but hemorrhage from the primary lesion and bone metastases were observed. Priority was given to treatment of the breast cancer, and chemotherapy was administered, after which, right mastectomy and axillary lymph node sampling were performed to assess local disease control. In addition, concurrent right kidney enucleation was performed for a renal lesion. The renal neoplasm was diagnosed as T1aN0M0, Stage I. After this intervention, treatment of the breast cancer was continued, but pain of the right femoral region developed, and bone metastasis was diagnosed on close inspection. The bone metastasis was considered to derive from the breast cancer. During hospitalization, the patient fell and broke her right femur. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed immediately, and bone metastasis of kidney cancer was diagnosed via perioperative cytodiagnosis. Pulmonary metastasis, local recurrence, and metastasis to the shoulder blade have been detected. The metastases are considered to derive from the breast cancer, for which treatment has been continued. In the case of concomitant cancers, biopsy for metastatic foci can be considered essential, whenever it can be performed safely.

  5. The Spatial Relationship of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions with Respect to the Fat-Gland Interface on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Hwa; Li, MuLan; Han, Wonshik; Ryu, Han Suk; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The fat-gland interface in the breast is noteworthy in that major vessels and lymphatic channels supplying the breast are located there; however, the relationship between breast lesion formation and the fat-gland interface is poorly understood. Here we evaluate the location of malignant and benign breast lesions with respect to the fat-gland interface in 881 women 50 years of age and younger, utilizing MR imaging. We find that most breast lesions are located in or near the interface in qualitative (89.7%) and quantitative (90.0%, 1 cm within the interface) analyses. This propensity for the fat-gland interface is not accounted for by breast anatomy, whereby 12.3% and 55.7% of breast volume is within 2 mm and 1 cm of the interface, respectively. Malignant lesions were located in or near the interface in significantly higher proportions than benign lesions in qualitative (94.3% vs. 67.3%, P < 0.001) and quantitative (49.7% vs. 34.5%, P < 0.001, 2 mm within the interface) analyses. This phenomenon may reflect a biological importance of the fat-gland interface in breast cancer development and progression. PMID:27966625

  6. The Spatial Relationship of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions with Respect to the Fat-Gland Interface on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Li, MuLan; Han, Wonshik; Ryu, Han Suk; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-12-14

    The fat-gland interface in the breast is noteworthy in that major vessels and lymphatic channels supplying the breast are located there; however, the relationship between breast lesion formation and the fat-gland interface is poorly understood. Here we evaluate the location of malignant and benign breast lesions with respect to the fat-gland interface in 881 women 50 years of age and younger, utilizing MR imaging. We find that most breast lesions are located in or near the interface in qualitative (89.7%) and quantitative (90.0%, 1 cm within the interface) analyses. This propensity for the fat-gland interface is not accounted for by breast anatomy, whereby 12.3% and 55.7% of breast volume is within 2 mm and 1 cm of the interface, respectively. Malignant lesions were located in or near the interface in significantly higher proportions than benign lesions in qualitative (94.3% vs. 67.3%, P < 0.001) and quantitative (49.7% vs. 34.5%, P < 0.001, 2 mm within the interface) analyses. This phenomenon may reflect a biological importance of the fat-gland interface in breast cancer development and progression.

  7. Current management of non-palpable testes: a literature review and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common pathology that occurs in 3% in full term newborns, and it decreases to 0.8–1.2% at 1 year of age. Nearly a 20% of undescended testes are non-palpable. Various surgical treatments have been described, but its management is still controversial. A literature review was made of non-palpable testes, analysing diagnostic tools, treatment and its results. Additionally we reviewed non-palpable testes cases treated in our centre in the last 20 years. Different techniques are described for the management of non-palpable testes; with or without section of the spermatic vessels and/or in 1 or 2 stages. Nowadays, literature supports the laparoscopic management in two stages. In our experience, we have better results in two-stage Fowler-Stephens than one-stage, with lower rates of testicular atrophy. Non-palpable testes are a common pathology in paediatric urology. Analysing the literature and our experience we recommend a two-stage surgery for intra-abdominal testes, which has demonstrated good results and lower percentage of atrophic testis. PMID:27867845

  8. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  9. Ultrasonographic differentiation of malignant from benign breast lesions: a meta-analytic comparison of elasticity and BIRADS scoring.

    PubMed

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Neal, Colleen H; Dwamena, Ben A

    2012-05-01

    There has been controversy regarding the accuracy of breast ultrasound elastography (USE) compared to conventional B-mode Ultrasound (USB). The purpose of this study was to conduct a direct comparative effectiveness analysis of USB versus USE or their combination in differentiating breast lesions through systematically reviewing recent literature. An extensive literature search of PubMed and other medical and general purpose databases from inception through August 2011 was conducted. Published studies that reported a direct comparison of the diagnostic performance of USE, using elasticity score versus USB, using breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) for characterization of focal breast lesions were included. Summary diagnostic performance measures were assessed for each of the tests and their combination using bivariate generalized linear mixed modeling. The two tests were combined as: (1) conjunctive, where the outcome of the combination of tests is positive only if both test results are positive; (2) disjunctive, where the outcome of a combination of tests is negative only if both tests are negative. Twenty nine studies provided relevant information on 5,511 breast masses (2,065 cancers, 3,446 benign lesions). Sensitivity of USB, USE, and their conjunctive and disjunctive combinations were 96% (95% credible interval (CrI), 93-98%), 79% (95% CrI, 74-83%), 73% (95% CrI, 67-78%), and 99% (95% CrI, 98-99%), respectively. Specificity of USB, USE, and their conjunctive and disjunctive combinations were 70% (95% CrI, 55-83%), 88% (95% CrI, 82-92%), 97% (95% CrI, 95-99%), and 56% (95% CrI, 43-69%), respectively. The application of USE as a single test is not superior to USB alone. However, in low risk patients it is recommended to perform an USE following a positive USB result to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies.

  10. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis with a novel shear wave speed imaging for differential diagnosis of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Le-Hang; He, Ya-Ping; Wang, Dan; Liu, Bo-Ji; Zhao, Chong-Ke; Chen, Bao-Ding; Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new two-dimensional shear wave speed (SWS) imaging (i.e. Toshiba shear wave elastography, T-SWE) in differential diagnosis of breast lesions. 225 pathologically confirmed breast lesions in 218 patients were subject to conventional ultrasound and T-SWE examinations. The mean, standard deviation and ratio of SWS values (m/s) and elastic modulus (KPa) on T-SWE were computed. Besides, the 2D elastic images were classified into four color patterns. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of T-SWE in differentiation of breast lesions. Compared with other quantitative T-SWE parameters, mean value expressed in KPa had the highest AUROC value (AUROC = 0.943), with corresponding cut-off value of 36.1 KPa, sensitivity of 85.1%, specificity of 96.6%, accuracy of 94.2%, PPV of 87.0%, and NPV of 96.1%. The AUROC of qualitative color patterns in this study obtained the best performance (AUROC = 0.957), while the differences were not significant except for that of Eratio expressed in m/s (AUROC = 0.863) (P = 0.03). In summary, qualitative color patterns of T-SWE obtained the best performance in all parameters, while mean stiffness (36.05 KPa) provided the best diagnostic performance in the quantitative parameters. PMID:28102328

  12. Is there any Correlation between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Breast Lesions of BIRADS Category 4 with Histopathologic Results?

    PubMed Central

    Farghadani, Maryam; Soofi, Ghazale Jamalipoor; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast lesions of Breast Imaging Reporting and Database System (BI-RADS) category 4 with histopathologic results. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study between December 2013 and April 2015, patients with suspicious mammographic and/or ultrasound findings referred for Breast MRI were evaluated. Patients with lesions of BI-RADS category 4 were enrolled with a written informed consent. In each patient, mass lesion (ML) or nonmass lesion (NML) was determined, and different characteristics of the lesions were recorded. A follow-up program was taken with mean 3–12 months. Patients who underwent core needle biopsy or open biopsy were summoned. Results: Seventy-eight females aged 24–67 years (mean 43.1 ± 8.8) met the inclusion criteria and had adequate samples for histopathologic study. Twenty-nine (37.2%) patients had ML and 49 (62.8%) patients had NML. Tissue sampling in 63 (80.7%) patients was through core needle biopsy and in 15 (19.2%) patients through surgery. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant pathologic diagnoses was seen. In statistical analysis, none of the MRI features has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis (P = 0.185). However, the relation between the MRI category (ML or NML) and pathology results was significant at level of 0.1 (P = 0.06). Conclusion: This study showed that a wide spectrum of histopathologic results is seen in BI-RADS category 4. However, in this sample volume, none of the MRI features in this BI-RADS category has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:28217652

  13. [Effort, accuracy and histology of MR-guided vacuum biopsy of suspicious breast lesions--retrospective evaluation after 389 interventions].

    PubMed

    Fischer, U; Schwethelm, L; Baum, F T; Luftner-Nagel, S; Teubner, J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effort, accuracy, histological diagnoses and value of MR-guided vacuum biopsy (10-gauge, 9-gauge) as the diagnostic procedure for suspicious breast lesions visible on MRI alone. 389 MR-guided vacuum biopsies of suspicious MRM findings were performed in 365 patients either with a Vacora system (10G, Bard Company) or an ATEC system (9G, Suros Company). The retrospective study included the number of specimens, the table time, the complication rate, and the histopathological results for open biopsy and the findings after follow-up. The study included 341 unilateral unilocular, 12 unilateral bilocular and 12 bilateral unilocular MR-guided vacuum biopsies. In 27 patients (3.9%) the planned intervention was canceled because the lesion could not be reproduced. The average number of specimens was 15.1 (range 4 - 75) with the 10G technique and 14.6 (range 4 - 38) with the 9G technique. The table time was 43.2 min (range 17 - 95 min). Histology revealed concordant benign lesions in 231 cases (59.4%), borderline lesions in 50 cases (12.8%), malignant tumors in 106 cases (DCIS 30 [7.7%], invasive carcinoma 76 [19.5%]), and discordant findings in 2 cases (0.5%). The complication rate was less than 1%. MR-guided vacuum biopsy of the breast is an effective method for the minimally invasive percutaneous evaluation of suspicious breast lesions seen on MRI alone. As a consequence, primary open biopsy can be avoided and the rate of unnecessary surgical interventions reduced. There were no major differences between 10G and 9G vacuum biopsy systems.

  14. Diminished number or complete loss of myoepithelial cells associated with metaplastic and neoplastic apocrine lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Trine; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2011-02-01

    The presence of myoepithelial (ME) cells is considered an important feature in the vast majority of benign breast lesions. Recently, a case showing the absence of myoepithelium in a mammary duct with apocrine metaplasia was reported. To investigate the status of ME cells associated with apocrine metaplasia, the distribution of ME cells in 59 metaplastic and intraductal proliferative apocrine lesions was evaluated using immunohistochemical expression of p63 and Calponin. p63 showed a diminished number of ME cells and increased intermyoepithelial nuclear distance in ducts with all variants of apocrine metaplasia and proliferation compared with normal glands. In the majority of cases, Calponin showed a continuous ME layer. In 6 cases, including an apocrine papilloma, there were definitive ME gaps confirmed by both markers, in the absence of atypia and with preservation of the basement membrane. In all cases, there was frequent heterogeneity in the distribution of ME cells in ducts harboring apocrine cells and even in various papillae within papillary lesions. In summary, benign and noninvasive apocrine lesions can show reduction and occasional complete loss of ME cells. This observation is particularly important when evaluating apocrine papillary proliferations, in which the absence of ME cells may lead to overdiagnosis of atypia and/or malignancy. The observation suggests that at least 2 ME markers should be used when evaluating apocrine lesions, and that a malignant diagnosis should be based on features of the proliferating cells until more data become available on the significance, if any, of the absence of ME cells in apocrine lesions.

  15. Is there an Upgrading to Malignancy at Surgery of Mucocele-Like Lesions Diagnosed on Percutaneous Breast Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Provencher, Louise; Morin, Josée; Desbiens, Christine; Poirier, Brigitte; Poirier, Éric; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Jacob, Simon; Côté, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Management of pure mucocele-like lesion (MLL) diagnosed on percutaneous breast biopsy (PBB) is controversial. To assess surgical upgrade rate and clinical outcome of pure MLL obtained as sole diagnosis on PBB. Patients diagnosed with a MLL as the most advanced lesion on PBB from April 1997 to December 2010 were reviewed for radiologic presentation, biopsy technique, and pathologic and clinical outcomes. Of the 21,340 image-guided PBB performed during the study period, 50 women with 51 MLL (0.24%) were identified. Mean age was 53.1 ± 7.7 years. Radiologic findings were mostly microcalcifications (n = 47, 92.2%). Stereotactic PBB was performed for 49 lesions (96.1%). Surgery was performed shortly after biopsy in 35 women, with benign final pathology in 33, and upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in two patients (2/35, 5.7%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.5 years (3.7 ± 2.1 years for surgical patients; 5.9 ± 2.9 years for follow-up only patients); three women were lost to follow-up (3/50). Three invasive cancers (3/47, 6.4%) were diagnosed 1.2, 1.2, and 2.8 years after biopsy: two in surgical patients, and one in a follow-up only patient. No cancer occurred at the same site as the original MLL. Pure MLL lesion of the breast is a rare entity and is mostly associated with a benign outcome. We observed an upgrade to DCIS slightly superior to 5%, but no invasive cancer. It is therefore unclear if these lesions should be excised or clinically and radiologically followed up when such lesions are found at PBB.

  16. Clinical Data as an Adjunct to Ultrasound Reduces the False-Negative Malignancy Rate in BI-RADS 3 Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, S.; Schoenenberger, C.-A.; Zanetti-Dällenbach, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound (US) is a well-established diagnostic procedure for breast examination. We investigated the malignancy rate in solid breast lesions according to their BI-RADS classification with a particular focus on false-negative BI-RADS 3 lesions. We examined whether patient history and clinical findings could provide additional information that would help determine further diagnostic steps in breast lesions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study by exploring US BI-RADS in 1469 breast lesions of 1201 patients who underwent minimally invasive breast biopsy (MIBB) from January 2002 to December 2011. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity of BI-RADS classification was 97.4% and 66.4%, respectively, with a positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 65% and 98%, respectively. In 506 BI-RADS 3 lesions, histology revealed 15 malignancies (2.4% malignancy rate), which corresponds to a false-negative rate (FNR) of 2.6%. Clinical evaluation and patient requests critically influenced the further diagnostic procedure, thereby prevailing over the recommendation given by the BI-RADS 3 classification. Conclusion: Clinical criteria including age, family and personal history, clinical examination, mammography and patient choice ensure adequate diagnostic procedures such as short-term follow-up or MIBB in patients with lesions classified as US-BI-RADS 3. PMID:27689181

  17. Analysis of 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast Masses for Lesion Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    kinetics based on temporal data for 4D subharmonic breast ultrasound exams.  Applied these algorithms to an existing data set of contrast enhanced...Mattrey, H. Ojeda- Fournier, K. Wallace, C.L. Chalek, K.E. Thomenius, F. Forsberg. Initial 10 experiences with 4D subharmonic breast Imaging. Ultrasound ...to improve visualization of vascularity using 4D subharmonic breast imaging. Ultrasound Med Biol 2013; 39(5): S27. Scientific presentations: 1

  18. Aluminum concentrations in central and peripheral areas of malignant breast lesions do not differ from those in normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. Methods A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. Results The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Conclusions Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next

  19. CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and ATM promoter methylation in patients with impalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Lucas; Moreira, Aline dos Santos; Franco, Marco Felipe; Esteves, Eliane Barbosa; Scherrer, Luciano; Gallo, Claúdia Vitória de Moura; do Nascimento, Cristina Moreira; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; de Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2015-10-01

    Early detection of breast cancer increases the chances of cure, but the reliable identification of impalpable lesions is still a challenge. In spite of the advances in breast cancer detection, the molecular basis of impalpable lesions and the corresponding circulating biomarkers are not well understood. Impalpable lesions, classified by radiologists according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System in the categories 3 and 4, can be either benign or malignant (slow growing or aggressive). In this article, we report the DNA methylation pattern in CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and in ATM gene promoters from 62 impalpable lesions, 39 peripheral blood samples, and 39 saliva samples, assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction method. ATM showed the greatest percentage of methylation in DNA from lesions (benign and malignant), blood (even with p16(INK4a)), and saliva, followed by p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Among the malignant cases, ATM promoter was the most hypermethylated in lesion DNA and in blood and saliva DNAs, and p14(ARF), the least. The highest percentage of p16(INK4a) methylation was found in the blood. Finally, our data are relevant because they were obtained using impalpable breast lesions from patients who were carefully recruited in 2 public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro.

  20. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    to the diagnosis of breast cancer. Breast cancer is rich in blood vessels. The feeding arteries flow directly into the tumor and are characterized by tortuosity and flexion. Since the intraductal spread of breast cancer can easily be evaluated, ultrasound has come to play an important role in breast conserving treatment. Breast cancer with intraductal spreading causes dilation of the mammary ducts, and the resolution of ultrasound at present has been improved to the degree that this dilation is shown as a tubular hypoechoic area. With the progress made in imaging diagnosis, nonpalpable breast cancer has increased and ultrasonically-guided aspiration cytology and biopsy techniques have been developed to obtain definite diagnoses of these lesions. In cases of micro-calcification detected by mammography, ultrasonically guided biopsy is recommended when identification by ultrasound is possible. Since this is a simple technique, it should be mastered.

  1. Differentiation of malignant and benign breast lesions: Added value of the qualitative analysis of breast lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging at 3.0 T

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the added value of qualitative analysis as an adjunct to quantitative analysis for the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in patients with breast cancer using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI). Methods A total of 99 patients with 144 lesions were reviewed from our prospectively collected database. DWI data were obtained using rs-EPI acquired at 3.0 T. The diagnostic performances of DWI in the qualitative, quantitative, and combination analyses were compared with that of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Additionally, the effect of lesion size on the diagnostic performance of the DWI combination analysis was evaluated. Results The strongest indicators of malignancy on DWI were a heterogeneous pattern (P = 0.005) and an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value <1.0 × 10–3 mm2/sec (P = 0.002). The area under the curve (AUC) values for the qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and combination analysis on DWI were 0.732 (95% CI, 0.651–0.803), 0.780 (95% CI, 0.703–0.846), and 0.826 (95% CI, 0.754–0.885), respectively (P<0.0001). The AUC for the combination analysis on DWI was superior to that for DCE-MRI alone (0.651, P = 0.003) but inferior to that for DCE-MRI plus the ADC value (0.883, P = 0.03). For the DWI combination analysis, the sensitivity was significantly lower in the size ≤1 cm group than in the size >1 cm group (80% vs. 95.6%, P = 0.034). Conclusions Qualitative analysis of tumor morphology was diagnostically applicable on DWI using rs-EPI. This qualitative analysis adds value to quantitative analyses for lesion characterization in patients with breast cancer. PMID:28358833

  2. EDITORIAL: Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light (OPTIMAMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    The Commission of the European Union (EU) conceived its Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) to identify the priorities for the European Union's research, technological development and demonstration activities for the period 1998-2002. By encouraging collaborative research between groups in different member countries, FP5 was intended to help solve problems the EU is facing and respond to major socio-economic challenges. The programme focused on a number of objectives and areas combining technological, industrial, economic, social and cultural aspects. A specific call was made, under its `Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources' section, for proposals which aim to explore improvements in non-invasive methods of imaging for early diagnosis and clinical evaluation of disease. Among the projects successfully funded under the FP5 programme was one entitled `Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light', known by its acronym OPTIMAMM. The project involved a consortium of nine partners, comprising ten applied science and clinical research groups based in six EU countries, with overall administration and management provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany. The broad aim of the OPTIMAMM project was to combine multi-disciplinary basic (physics, engineering, mathematics, computer science) and clinical (oncology, histology) research to assess the diagnostic potential of time-domain optical and photoacoustic mammography as novel, non-invasive imaging modalities for the detection and clinical evaluation of breast lesions. Funding for the project, at a total cost of about 1.67 MEuro, began in December 2000 for a period of three years, although a zero-cost extension was granted to enable the ongoing project activities to continue until the end of May 2004. The importance of developing new tools for the detection and diagnosis of breast disease is evident from the very high incidence and

  3. Endomedullary radiofrequency ablation of metastatic lesion of the right femur 5 years after primary breast carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Majerović, Mate; Augustin, Goran; Jelincić, Zeljko; Buković, Damir; Burcar, Ivan; Smud, Dubravko; Kekez, Tihomir; Kinda, Emil; Matosević, Petar; Turcić, Josip

    2008-12-01

    Metastatic tumors of the long bones usually present with severe pain refractory to analgesic therapy. Pathologic fractures of the bone may lead to the significant decrease of patient's quality of life and necessitate further surgical therapy. We present 66 year old female with metastatic left breast carcinoma (T2N0M0) diagnosed 5 years before presentation of the metastatic lesion of the right femur causing severe pain in the middle of the right upper leg. Pain persisted after palliative irradiation therapy. We performed radiofrequency ablation of the metastatic lesion of the right femur using R.I.TA. Medical System Generator. This resulted in total necrosis of the tumor mass that caused osteolysis of the internal part of the femoral cortex. First three months after RFA procedure, the pain and tenderness were absent and normal daily activities were performed without restrictions.

  4. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Segmentation of breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first step in lesion diagnosis in a computer-aided diagnosis framework. Because manual segmentation of such lesions is both time consuming and highly susceptible to human error and issues of reproducibility, an automated lesion segmentation method is highly desirable. Traditional automated image segmentation methods such as boundary-based active contour (AC) models require a strong gradient at the lesion boundary. Even when region-based terms are introduced to an AC model, grayscale image intensities often do not allow for clear definition of foreground and background region statistics. Thus, there is a need to find alternative image representations that might provide (1) strong gradients at the margin of the object of interest (OOI); and (2) larger separation between intensity distributions and region statistics for the foreground and background, which are necessary to halt evolution of the AC model upon reaching the border of the OOI. Methods: In this paper, the authors introduce a spectral embedding (SE) based AC (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast DCE-MRI. SE, a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme, is applied to the DCE time series in a voxelwise fashion to reduce several time point images to a single parametric image where every voxel is characterized by the three dominant eigenvectors. This parametric eigenvector image (PrEIm) representation allows for better capture of image region statistics and stronger gradients for use with a hybrid AC model, which is driven by both boundary and region information. They compare SEAC to ACs that employ fuzzy c-means (FCM) and principal component analysis (PCA) as alternative image representations. Segmentation performance was evaluated by boundary and region metrics as well as comparing lesion classification using morphological features from SEAC, PCA+AC, and FCM+AC. Results: On a cohort of 50

  5. Computerized detection of breast lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument DCE-MR data using 3D principal component maps and template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertas, Gokhan; Doran, Simon; Leach, Martin O.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we introduce a novel, robust and accurate computerized algorithm based on volumetric principal component maps and template matching that facilitates lesion detection on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR. The study dataset comprises 24 204 contrast-enhanced breast MR images corresponding to 4034 axial slices from 47 women in the UK multi-centre study of MRI screening for breast cancer and categorized as high risk. The scans analysed here were performed on six different models of scanner from three commercial vendors, sited in 13 clinics around the UK. 1952 slices from this dataset, containing 15 benign and 13 malignant lesions, were used for training. The remaining 2082 slices, with 14 benign and 12 malignant lesions, were used for test purposes. To prevent false positives being detected from other tissues and regions of the body, breast volumes are segmented from pre-contrast images using a fast semi-automated algorithm. Principal component analysis is applied to the centred intensity vectors formed from the dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images of the segmented breasts, followed by automatic thresholding to eliminate fatty tissues and slowly enhancing normal parenchyma and a convolution and filtering process to minimize artefacts from moderately enhanced normal parenchyma and blood vessels. Finally, suspicious lesions are identified through a volumetric sixfold neighbourhood connectivity search and calculation of two morphological features: volume and volumetric eccentricity, to exclude highly enhanced blood vessels, nipples and normal parenchyma and to localize lesions. This provides satisfactory lesion localization. For a detection sensitivity of 100%, the overall false-positive detection rate of the system is 1.02/lesion, 1.17/case and 0.08/slice, comparing favourably with previous studies. This approach may facilitate detection of lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MR data.

  6. Vacuum-assisted stereotactic breast biopsy in the diagnosis and management of suspicious microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Gül; Tutar, Burçin; Uras, Cihan; Calay, Zerrin; İnce, Ümit; Tutar, Onur

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to present our biopsy method and retrospectively evaluate the results, upgrade rate, and follow-up findings of stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) procedures performed in our clinic. METHODS Two hundred thirty-four patients with mammographically detected nonpalpable breast lesions underwent VABB using a 9 gauge biopsy probe and prone biopsy table. A total of 195 patients (median age 53 years, range 32–80 years) with 198 microcalcification-only lesions with a follow-up of at least one year were included in the study. The location of the lesion relative to the needle was determined from the postfire images, and unlike the conventional technique, tissue retrieval was predominantly performed from that location, followed by a complete 360° rotation, if needed. RESULTS The median core number was 8.5. Biopsy results revealed 135 benign, 24 atypical, and 39 malignant lesions. The total upgrade rate at surgery was 7.7% (6.1% for ductal carcinomas in situ and 10.5% for atypical lesions). Patients with benign lesions were followed up for a median period of 27.5 months, with no interval change. At the follow-up, scar formation was seen in 23 patients (17%); three of the scars were remarkable for resembling a malignancy. CONCLUSION Our biposy method is fast and practical, and it is easily tolerated by patients without compromising accuracy. Patients with a diagnosis of atypia still need to undergo a diagnostic surgical procedure and those with a malignancy need to undergo curative surgery, even if the lesion is totally excised at biopsy. VABB may leave a scar in the breast tissue, which may resemble a malignancy, albeit rarely. PMID:27306660

  7. The management of screen-detected breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneer; Douek, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of mammography and introduction of breast screening programmes have resulted in a rise in clinically-occult breast cancer, with one-third of all breast carcinomata diagnosed being non-palpable. These types of cancer have a unique natural history and biology compared to symptomatic breast cancer and this needs to be taken into account when considering surgery and adjuvant treatment. The majority of studies demonstrating efficacy of adjuvant treatments are largely based on patients with symptomatic breast cancer. The current evidence for the role of surgery and adjuvant therapy for screen-detected breast cancer was reviewed in light of their improved prognosis, compared to symptomatic breast cancer.

  8. A Novel Method Based on Learning Automata for Automatic Lesion Detection in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Leila; Azmi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. In this way, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful tool for the detection of breast cancer. Breast MRI presently has two major challenges. First, its specificity is relatively poor, and it detects many false positives (FPs). Second, the method involves acquiring several high-resolution image volumes before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. The large volume of data makes the task of interpretation by the radiologist both complex and time-consuming. These challenges have led to the development of the computer-aided detection systems to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the interpretation process. Detection of suspicious regions of interests (ROIs) is a critical preprocessing step in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data evaluation. In this regard, this paper introduces a new automatic method to detect the suspicious ROIs for breast DCE-MRI based on region growing. The results indicate that the proposed method is thoroughly able to identify suspicious regions (accuracy of 75.39 ± 3.37 on PIDER breast MRI dataset). Furthermore, the FP per image in this method is averagely 7.92, which shows considerable improvement comparing to other methods like ROI hunter. PMID:25298929

  9. Can galactography-guided stereotactic, 11-gauge, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of intraductal lesions serve as an alternative to surgical biopsy?

    PubMed

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Helbich, Thomas H; Rudas, Margaretha; Ponhold, Lothar; Riedl, Christopher C; Kropf, Nina; Fuchsjäger, Michael H

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of galactography-guided, stereotactic, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) for the assessment of intraductal breast lesions and its potential as a therapeutic tool that could eliminate the need for surgical excision. Eighteen patients (median age 64 years, range 37-80) with nipple discharge and galactography-verified intraductal lesions underwent galactography-guided, stereotactic, 11-gauge VABB followed by surgery. Histopathology findings from VABB and subsequent surgery were compared. Underestimation and false-negative rates were assessed. After VABB, histopathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in three (17%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in six (33%), high-risk lesions in six (33%) and benign lesions in three (17%) cases. After surgical biopsy, histopathology confirmed the previously established diagnosis in 11 lesions (61%). The underestimation rate for high-risk lesions and DCIS was 50% (6/12). The false-negative rate was 7% (1/14). Histopathology examination after surgery showed that not a single lesion had been completely removed at VABB. Galactography-guided VABB is a feasible diagnostic tool. However, its value as a therapeutic procedure is limited because of the high number of underestimated and missed lesions and because of the histopathological detection of lesions' remnants in every case. Surgical excision should be the therapeutic gold standard in cases of pathological nipple discharge and galactography abnormalities.

  10. 1H-MRS evaluation of breast lesions by using total choline signal-to-noise ratio as an indicator of malignancy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiang Jiang; Song, Hui Sheng; Chen, Long Hua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the use of total choline signal-to-noise ratio (tCho SNR) criteria in MRS studies for benign/malignant discrimination of focal breast lesions. We conducted (1) a meta-analysis based on 10 studies including 480 malignant breast lesions and 312 benign breast lesions and (2) a subgroup meta-analysis of tCho SNR ≥ 2 as cutoff for malignancy based on 7 studies including 371 malignant breast lesions and 239 benign breast lesions. (1) The pooled sensitivity and specificity of proton MRS with tCho SNR were 0.74 (95 % CI 0.69-0.77) and 0.76 (95 % CI 0.71-0.81), respectively. The PLR and NLR were 3.67 (95 % CI 2.30-5.83) and 0.25 (95 % CI 0.14-0.42), respectively. From the fitted SROC, the AUC and Q* index were 0.89 and 0.82. Publication bias was present (t = 2.46, P = 0.039). (2) Meta-regression analysis suggested that neither threshold effect nor evaluated covariates including strength of field, pulse sequence, TR and TE were sources of heterogeneity (all P value >0.05). (3) Subgroup meta-analysis: The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 and 0.72, respectively. The PLR and NLR were 3.49 and 0.20, respectively. The AUC and Q* index were 0.92 and 0.85. The use of tCho SNR criteria in MRS studies was helpful for differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions. However, pooled diagnostic measures might be overestimated due to publication bias. A tCho SNR ≥ 2 as cutoff for malignancy resulted in higher diagnostic accuracy.

  11. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  12. BRCA1-IRIS overexpression promotes and maintains the tumor initiating phenotype: implications for triple negative breast cancer early lesions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Abhilasha; Paul, Bibbin T; Sullivan, Lisa M; Sims, Hillary; El Bastawisy, Ahmed; Yousef, Hend F; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; ElShamy, Wael M

    2017-02-07

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are cancer cells endowed with self-renewal, multi-lineage differentiation, increased chemo-resistance, and in breast cancers the CD44+/CD24-/ALDH1+ phenotype. Triple negative breast cancers show lack of BRCA1 expression in addition to enhanced basal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and TIC phenotypes. BRCA1-IRIS (hereafter IRIS) is an oncogene produced by the alternative usage of the BRCA1 locus. IRIS is involved in induction of replication, transcription of selected oncogenes, and promoting breast cancer cells aggressiveness. Here, we demonstrate that IRIS overexpression (IRISOE) promotes TNBCs through suppressing BRCA1 expression, enhancing basal-biomarkers, EMT-inducers, and stemness-enforcers expression. IRISOE also activates the TIC phenotype in TNBC cells through elevating CD44 and ALDH1 expression/activity and preventing CD24 surface presentation by activating the internalization pathway EGFR→c-Src→cortactin. We show that the intrinsic sensitivity to an anti-CD24 cross-linking antibody-induced cell death in membranous CD24 expressing/luminal A cells could be acquired in cytoplasmic CD24 expressing IRISOE TNBC/TIC cells through IRIS silencing or inactivation. We show that fewer IRISOE TNBC/TICs cells form large tumors composed of TICs, resembling TNBCs early lesions in patients that contain metastatic precursors capable of disseminating and metastasizing at an early stage of the disease. IRIS-inhibitory peptide killed these IRISOE TNBC/TICs, in vivo and prevented their dissemination and metastasis. We propose IRIS inactivation could be pursued to prevent dissemination and metastasis from early TNBC tumor lesions in patients.

  13. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Solid Breast Lesions Using an Ultrasonic Multi-Feature Analysis Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    areas. We quantified morphometric features by geometric and fractal analysis of traced lesion boundaries. Although no single parameter can reliably...These include acoustic descriptors (“echogenicity,” “heterogeneity,” “shadowing”) and morphometric descriptors (“area,” “aspect ratio,” “border...quantitative descriptors; some morphometric features (such as border irregularity) also were particularly effective in lesion classification. Our

  14. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. Results The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86–0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93–0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38–795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Conclusions Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection. PMID:27459193

  15. Regularized Reconstruction of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images for Evaluation of Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    V. Knopp, E. Weiss, H. P. Sinn, J. Mattern, H. Junkermann, J. Radeleff, A. Magener, G. Brix , S. Delorme, I. Zuna, and G. . Kaick, “Pathophysiologic...basis of contrast enhancement in breast tumors,” J. Mag. Res. Im., vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 260–6, Sept. 1999. [11] P. S. Tofts, G. Brix , D. L. Buckley, J. L

  16. Analysis of breast lesions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images using high-dimensional texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Huber, Markus B.; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Leinsinger, Gerda; Wismueller, Axel

    2010-03-01

    Haralick texture features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were used to classify the character of suspicious breast lesions as benign or malignant on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI studies. Lesions were identified and annotated by an experienced radiologist on 54 MRI exams of female patients where histopathological reports were available prior to this investigation. GLCMs were then extracted from these 2D regions of interest (ROI) for four principal directions (0°, 45°, 90° & 135°) and used to compute Haralick texture features. A fuzzy k-nearest neighbor (k- NN) classifier was optimized in ten-fold cross-validation for each texture feature and the classification performance was calculated on an independent test set as a function of area under the ROC curve. The lesion ROIs were characterized by texture feature vectors containing the Haralick feature values computed from each directional-GLCM; and the classifier results obtained were compared to a previously used approach where the directional-GLCMs were summed to a nondirectional GLCM which could further yield a set of texture feature values. The impact of varying the inter-pixel distance while generating the GLCMs on the classifier's performance was also investigated. Classifier's AUC was found to significantly increase when the high-dimensional texture feature vector approach was pursued, and when features derived from GLCMs generated using different inter-pixel distances were incorporated into the classification task. These results indicate that lesion character classification accuracy could be improved by retaining the texture features derived from the different directional GLCMs rather than combining these to yield a set of scalar feature values instead.

  17. Effect of 18F-FDG uptake time on lesion detectability in PET imaging of early stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Kurland, Brenda F.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Prior reports have suggested that delayed FDG-PET oncology imaging can improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for known lesions. Our goal was to estimate realistic bounds for lesion detectability for static measurements with one to four hours between FDG injection and image acquisition. Tumor and normal tissue kinetic model parameters were estimated from dynamic PET studies of patients with early stage breast cancer. These were used to generate time-activity curves (TACs) out to four hours, for which we assumed both nonreversible and reversible models with different rates of FDG dephosphorylation (k4). For each pair of tumor and normal tissue TACs, 600 PET sinogram realizations were generated, and images were reconstructed using OSEM. Test statistics for each tumor and normal tissue region of interest were output from the computer model observers and evaluated using an ROC analysis with the calculated AUC providing a measure of lesion detectability. For the nonreversible model (k4 = 0), the AUC increased in 11/23 (48%) of patients for one to two hours after the current standard post-radiotracer injection imaging window of one hour. This improvement was driven by increased tumor/normal tissue contrast before the impact of increased noise due to radiotracer decay began to dominate the imaging signal. As k4 was increased from 0 to 0.01 min−1, the time of maximum detectability shifted earlier, as the decreasing FDG concentration in the tumor lowered the CNR. These results imply that delayed PET imaging may reveal low-conspicuity lesions that would have otherwise gone undetected. PMID:26807443

  18. Fine-needle aspiration and core biopsy in the diagnosis of breast lesions: A comparison and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, the diagnosis of breast lesions has mostly become dependent on core needle biopsies (CNBs) with a gradual reduction in the rate of performing fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Both the procedures have their pros and cons and outsmart each other taking into account different parameters. Both the methods are found to be fraught with loopholes, taking into account different performance indices, diagnostic accuracy and concordance, patient benefit, and cost-effectiveness. Unlike the popular belief of an absolute superiority of CNB over FNAC, the literature review does not reveal a very distinct demarcation in many aspects. We recommend judicious use of these diagnostic modalities in resource-limited settings and screening programs taking into account parameters such as palpability and availability of an experienced cytopathologist. PMID:27651820

  19. Residual analysis of the water resonance signal in breast lesions imaged with high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, William A. Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: High spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HiSS MRI) yields information on the local environment of suspicious lesions. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of HiSS (complete fat-suppression, improved image contrast, no required contrast agent, etc.), leading to initial investigations of water resonance lineshape for the purpose of breast lesion classification. The purpose of this study is to investigate a quantitative imaging biomarker, which characterizes non-Lorentzian components of the water resonance in HiSS MRI datasets, for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Methods: The inhomogeneous broadening and non-Lorentzian or “off-peak” components seen in the water resonance of proton spectra of breast HiSS images are analyzed by subtracting a Lorentzian fit from the water peak spectra and evaluating the difference spectrum or “residual.” The maxima of these residuals (referred to hereafter as “off-peak components”) tend to be larger in magnitude in malignant lesions, indicating increased broadening in malignant lesions. The authors considered only those voxels with the highest magnitude off-peak components in each lesion, with the number of selected voxels dependent on lesion size. Our voxel-based method compared the magnitudes and frequencies of off-peak components of all voxels from all lesions in a database that included 15 malignant and 8 benign lesions (yielding ∼3900 voxels) based on the lesions’ biopsy-confirmed diagnosis. Lesion classification was accomplished by comparing the average off-peak component magnitudes and frequencies in malignant and benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for both the voxel-based and lesion-based methods. Results: In the voxel-based task of distinguishing voxels from malignant and benign lesions, off-peak magnitude yielded an AUC of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [0.84, 0.91]). In the lesion-based task of distinguishing malignant and

  20. Method and device for intraoperative imaging of lumpectomy specimens to provide feedback to breast surgeon for prompt re-excision during the same procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Hemingway, Susan; Kort, Kara; de la Rosa, Gustavo; Adhikary, Ravi; Masrani, Deepa; Feiglin, David; O'Connell, Avice; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Yang, Chien-Chun; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer is now widely accepted due to improved cosmetic outcome and improved patients' quality of life. One of the critical issues in performing breast-conserving surgery is trying to achieve microscopically clear surgical margins while maintaining excellent cosmesis. Unfortunately, unacceptably close or positive surgical margins occur in at least 20-25% of all patients undergoing BCT requiring repeat surgical excision days or weeks later, as permanent histopathology routinely takes days to complete. Our aim is to develop a better method for intraoperative imaging of non-palpable breast malignancies excised by wire or needle localization. Providing non-deformed three dimensional imaging of the excised breast tissue should allow more accurate assessment of tumor margins and consequently allow further excision at the time of initial surgery thus limiting the enormous financial and emotional burden of additional surgery. We have designed and constructed a device that allows preservation of the excised breast tissue in its natural anatomic position relative to the breast as it is imaged to assess adequate excision. We performed initial tests with needle-guided lumpectomy specimens using micro-CT and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Our device consists of a plastic sphere inside a cylindrical holder. The surgeon inserts a freshly excised piece of breast tissue into the sphere and matches its anatomic orientation with the fiducial markers on the sphere. A custom-shaped foam is placed inside the sphere to prevent specimen deformation due to gravity. DBT followed by micro-CT images of the specimen were obtained. We confirmed that our device preserved spatial orientation of the excised breast tissue and that the location error was lower than 10mm and 10 degrees. The initial obtained results indicate that breast lesions containing microcalcifications allow a good 3D imaging of margins providing immediate intraoperative feedback for

  1. Occult Breast Cancer: Scintimammography with High-Resolution Breast-specific Gamma Camera in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Jocelyn A. Rapelyea; , Gilat Zisman; Kevin Mohtashemi; Joyce Raub; Christine B. Teal; Stan Majewski; Benjamin L. Welch

    2005-08-01

    (12%) patients, invasive carcinoma was diagnosed at US-guided biopsy (9 mm each at pathologic examination). CONCLUSION: High-resolution breast-specific scintimammography can depict small (<1-cm), mammographically occult, nonpalpable lesions in women at increased risk for breast cancer not otherwise identified at mammography or physical examination.

  2. Lesions with unclear malignant potential (B3) after minimally invasive breast biopsy: evaluation of vacuum biopsies performed in Switzerland and recommended further management

    PubMed Central

    Haueisen, Harald; Kampmann, Gert; Oehlschlegel, Christian; Seifert, B; Rageth, Luzi; Rageth, Christoph; Stadlmann, S; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Histopathological B3 lesions after minimal invasive breast biopsy (VABB) are a particular challenge for the clinician, as there are currently no binding recommendations regarding the subsequent procedure. Purpose To analyze all B3 lesions, diagnosed at VABB and captured in the national central Swiss MIBB database and to provide a data basis for further management in this subgroup of patients. Material and Methods All 9,153 stereotactically, sonographically, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies, performed in Switzerland between 2009 and 2011, captured in a central database, were evaluated. The rate of B3 lesions and the definitive pathological findings in patients who underwent surgical resection were analyzed. Results The B3 rate was 17.0% (1532 of 9000 biopsies with B classification). Among the 521 lesions with a definitive postoperative diagnosis, the malignancy rate (invasive carcinoma or DCIS) was 21.5%. In patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia, papillary lesions, flat epithelial atypia, lobular neoplasia, and radial scar diagnosed by VABB, the malignancy rates were 25.9%, 3.1%, 18.3%, 26.4%, and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion B3 lesions, comprising 17%, of all analyzed biopsies, were common and the proportion of malignancies in those lesions undergoing subsequent surgical excision was high (21.5%). PMID:26552694

  3. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-01

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid ``omics''-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.Although tissue staining

  4. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-28

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid "omics"-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.

  5. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: Added Value of Quantitative Enhancement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Pang; Hsu, Hsian-He; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chang, Tsun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the association between breast lesion morphology and malignancy and to determine the optimal value of lesion enhancement (HU, Hounsfield units) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer in patients with incidental breast lesions (IBLs). A total of 97 patients with 102 IBLs detected from July 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the presence of malignancy based on the morphology of the lesions alone and in combination with an enhancement value (HU) analysis. There were 36 malignant and 66 benign IBLs. When the morphology and enhancement values were combined, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for reader 1 and 89%, 94%, and 92%, respectively, for reader 2. The addition of HU values led to correct changes in the diagnosis; specifically, the accuracy of the diagnosis of reader 1 and reader 2 improved by 6.9% and 11.8%, respectively. The addition of the enhancement value (HU) to the CT morphology improved the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of malignant from benign IBLs by using the region of interest (ROI) to measure the HU within the most suspicious part of the lesion. PMID:27128524

  6. Channeling Nanoparticles for Detection and Targeted Treatment of Breast Cancerous Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    have also confirmed that non-neoplastic breast epithelial MCF10A cells display basal polarity on filters. This represents a simplified system to study ...is to provide a model to study the use of fluorescent magnetic nano or submicron particles for future detection and treatment applications. In the...PEGylation was successful as indicated by an observed size increase for the PEGylated SMPs relative to the size of the stock SMPs. Zeta potential

  7. Segmentation of Breast Lesions in Ultrasound Images through Multiresolution Analysis Using Undecimated Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    PubMed

    Prabusankarlal, K M; Thirumoorthy, P; Manavalan, R

    2016-11-01

    Earliest detection and diagnosis of breast cancer reduces mortality rate of patients by increasing the treatment options. A novel method for the segmentation of breast ultrasound images is proposed in this work. The proposed method utilizes undecimated discrete wavelet transform to perform multiresolution analysis of the input ultrasound image. As the resolution level increases, although the effect of noise reduces, the details of the image also dilute. The appropriate resolution level, which contains essential details of the tumor, is automatically selected through mean structural similarity. The feature vector for each pixel is constructed by sampling intra-resolution and inter-resolution data of the image. The dimensionality of feature vectors is reduced by using principal components analysis. The reduced set of feature vectors is segmented into two disjoint clusters using spatial regularized fuzzy c-means algorithm. The proposed algorithm is evaluated by using four validation metrics on a breast ultrasound database of 150 images including 90 benign and 60 malignant cases. The algorithm produced significantly better segmentation results (Dice coef = 0.8595, boundary displacement error = 9.796, dvi = 1.744, and global consistency error = 0.1835) than the other three state of the art methods.

  8. Effects of grayscale window/level parameters on breast lesion detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Nafziger, John S.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Lubin, Jeffrey; Roehrig, Hans

    2003-05-01

    The detectability of low-contrast lesions in medical images can be affected significantly by the choice of grayscale window width and level (W/L) for electronic display. Our objective was to measure the effects of various W/L conditions on lesion detectability in simulated and real mammographic images, and then correlate observer performance with predictions of detection thresholds derived from a visual discrimination model (VDM). In the first experiment, detection thresholds were measured in 2AFC trials for five W/L conditions applied to simulated mammographic backgrounds and lesions (i.e., Gaussian "masses" and blurred-disk "microcalcification clusters") using nonmedical observers. In the second experiment, the detectability of real microcalcification clusters in digitized mammograms was evaluated for three W/L conditions in an ROC observer study with mammographers. For the simulated images, there was generally good agreement between model and experimental thresholds and their variations across W/L conditions. Both experimental and model results showed significant reductions in thresholds when W/L processing was applied locally near the lesion. ROC results with digitized mammograms read by radiologists, however, failed to show enhanced detection of microcalcifications using a localized W/L frame, probably due to the nonuniform appearance of parenchymal tissue across the image.

  9. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    characterized by distinct phenotypic changes that occur in the mammary gland . We proposed to utilize this animal model to probe early stage...of the matrix in the mammary glands containing the early cancer lesions. On further analysis, we determined that CSG peptide co-localizes with

  10. Stereotactic breast biopsy with an 8-gauge, directional, vacuum-assisted probe: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lifrange, Eric; Dondelinger, Robert F; Quatresooz, Pascale; Vandevorst, Geraldine; Colin, Claude

    2002-09-01

    This study was prospectively conducted to assess the feasibility, safety and accuracy of an 8-G directional vacuum-assisted biopsy (DVAB) probe in the diagnostic management of nonpalpable breast lesions (NPBL). Of 170 planned procedures which were indicated for investigation of BI-RADS category-3 to category-5 lesions, 153 were performed in 138 consecutive patients. The probe was targeted by the stereotactic unit of a prone table (United States Surgical Corporation, Norwalk, Conn.; and Lorad, Danbury, Conn.). Four to 18 (mean 8) core specimens were obtained for each lesion. In case of complete removal of the lesion, a localizing clip was deployed at the biopsy site. Adequate material for histopathologic examination was obtained in all cases (100%). Four of 138 (3%) patients experienced mild hematomas. We observed 15 of 39 failures (38%) to place the localizing clips. Thirteen of 153 (8%) procedures were inconclusive and required reintervention. Following DVAB, 42 of 138 (30%) patients underwent surgery. Subject to incomplete follow-up of the entire cohort, we observed no false-positive and one false-negative diagnosis. These preliminary results suggest that DVAB using an 8-G probe are feasible, safe and accurate. In our experience, clip placement was problematic. It is probable that increasing the dimensions of DVAB will only be relevant in a limited number of clinical situations, primarily the desire to obtain complete radiologic resections of the target abnormality.

  11. Should the hyperechogenic halo around malignant breast lesions be included in the measurement of tumor size?

    PubMed

    Joekel, Judith; Eggemann, Holm; Costa, Serban Dan; Ignatov, Atanas

    2016-04-01

    The estimation of tumor size is important for treatment strategies of breast cancer. The hyperechogenic zone around breast cancer is a recognized criterion for malignancy, but its impact on preoperative tumor size estimations has been poorly investigated. Data of prospectively maintained database of 513 patients with primary breast tumors were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 196 patients with complete datasets including preoperative ultrasound (US) were eligible for analysis. The median age of the patients was 58.5 years (range 33-87). With all of the 196 patients, US has been performed. In 170 of 196 (86.7 %) cases, an echogenic halo was detected. We use two ways to measure tumor size with US: without (US-0) and with (US-1) echogenic halo. Mammography (MG) was used as standard. Tumor size measured by US and MG was compared with the actual histopathological (HP) tumor size. Mean differences between the sizing obtained by US-0, US-1, and MG and the HP sizing were -6.5, -1.5, and -1.8 mm, respectively. All three methods tend to underestimate the tumor size. The US-1 measurement was the closest to the HP size in comparison to the MG and US-0 measurements and the match was higher in tumors <2 cm. The estimated Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were 0.72, 0.68, and 0.61 for US-1, US-0, and MG, respectively. Moreover, the predictive value of US-1 regarding tumor size was not influenced by histological type and grade of the tumor, receptor status, and presence of intraductal component. Estimation of tumor size by US should include the hyperechogenic zone around the tumor.

  12. Design, Implementation, and Characterization of a Dedicated Breast Computed Mammo Tomography System for Enhanced Lesion Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    with development of a phantom for this purpose (Figure.7). 9 Figure.7 Schematic of cross phantom with 5mm acrylic spheres arranged in a cross...total of 9 spheres are placed on the sheet (graphic is courtesy of Priti Madhav). Cross phantom studies showed that lesion information may be...measurements of similar Varian devices. A phantom was developed specifically for the measurement of 3D MTF, NPS, and resulting DQE (Figure.9

  13. Analysis of 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast Masses for Lesion Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    ductal carcinomas (23/35) made up the majority of the malignant cases, while fibroadenoma (30/99) was the most prevalent classification of the benign...heterogeneity plot of a benign case (a fibroadenoma ) across the peripheral and central sections. The presence of vascularity in the central sections is...heterogeneity plots of (a) benign ( fibroadenoma ) and (b) malignant (invasive ductal carcinoma) across the peripheral and central sections of the lesion

  14. Diagnostic Value of Diffusion-weighted Imaging and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in the Differentiation of Breast Lesions, Histpathologic Subgroups and Correlatıon with Prognostıc Factors using 3.0 Tesla MR

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Yasin; Uğurlu, M. Ümit; Kaya, Handan; Arıbal, Erkin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and diffusion-weighted imaging in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions, histopathologic subtypes of breast tumors, and to find a correlation with prognostic factors using 3T MR. Materials and Methods A total of 165 patients aged between 16 and 78 years with 181 histopathologically-verifed breast lesions were enrolled in this study. A 3T MR system and bilateral phased array breast coil was used. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with spin echo “echo planar” with “b” values: 50, 400, and 800 seconds/mm2. ADC values were calculated for normal fibroglandular tissue and breast lesions. ADC values of independent groups were compared using Student’s t-test. ROC analysis was used to find a threshold ADC value in the differentiation of lesions. Results The mean ADC values were 1.35±0.16 × 10−3 mm2/s for normal fibroglandular tissue, 1.41±0.24 × 10−3 mm2/s for benign breast lesions and 0.83±0.19 × 10−3 mm2/s for malignant breast lesions. The AUC with ROC analysis was 0.945 and the threshold for ADC was 1.08 × 10−3 mm2/s with a sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 92%, respectively. The threshold value for ADC ratio was 0.9 with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. The mean ADC of malignant breast lesions was statistically lower for benign lesions (p<0.01). We found no correlation between the mean ADC values and ER-PR receptor, Her2, and Ki-67 values. Conclusion Diffusion-weighted imaging has high diagnostic value with high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating malignant and benign breast lesions.

  15. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis in breast cancer cells by 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses tumorigenicity in vitro and metastatic lesions of bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hiroshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Wasa, Junji; Arai, Eisuke; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kozawa, Eiji; Futamura, Naohisa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-01-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to play crucial roles in the tumorigenicity of malignant tumors. Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of HA suppressed the tumorigenicity of various malignant tumors including breast cancer. 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) has been reported to inhibit HA synthesis in several cell types. However, few studies have focused on the effects of HA inhibition in breast cancer cells by MU, nor the effects on bone metastasis. We hypothesized that MU would suppress the progression of bone metastasis via inhibition of HA synthesis. Here, we investigated the effects of MU on HA expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in addition to their tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. HAS2 mRNA expression was downregulated after 6 and 24 hr treatment with MU. Quantitative analysis of HA revealed that MU significantly inhibited the intracellular and cell surface HA. MU significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as determined by cell proliferation and TUNEL assays, respectively. Phosphorylation of Akt was suppressed after 12 and 24 hr treatment with MU. MU treatment also inhibited cell motility as well as cell invasiveness. MU also inhibited cell growth and motility in murine fibroblast cell line NIH3T3. In vivo, administration of MU inhibited the expansion of osteolytic lesions on soft X-rays in mouse breast cancer xenograft models. HA accumulation in bone metastatic lesions was perturbed peripherally. These data suggest that MU might be a therapeutic candidate for bone metastasis of breast cancer via suppression of HA synthesis and accumulation.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis of mass-like lesion in breast MRI: differential analysis of the 3-D morphology between benign and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Hao; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wu, Tsung-Ju; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the value of using 3-D breast MRI morphologic features to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions. The 3-D morphological features extracted from breast MRI were used to analyze the malignant likelihood of tumor from ninety-five solid breast masses (44 benign and 51 malignant) of 82 patients. Each mass-like lesion was examined with regards to three categories of morphologic features, including texture-based gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) feature, shape, and ellipsoid fitting features. For obtaining a robust combination of features from different categories, the biserial correlation coefficient (|r(pb)|)≧0.4 was used as the feature selection criterion. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate performance and Student's t-test to verify the classification accuracy. The combination of the selected 3-D morphological features, including conventional compactness, radius, spiculation, surface ratio, volume covering ratio, number of inside angular regions, sum of number of inside and outside angular regions, showed an accuracy of 88.42% (84/95), sensitivity of 88.24% (45/51), and specificity of 88.64% (39/44), respectively. The AZ value was 0.8926 for these seven combined morphological features. In conclusion, 3-D MR morphological features specified by GLCM, tumor shape and ellipsoid fitting were useful for differentiating benign and malignant breast masses.

  17. Characteristics, Malignancy Rate, and Follow-up of BI-RADS Category 3 Lesions Identified at Breast MR Imaging: Implications for MR Image Interpretation and Management.

    PubMed

    Chikarmane, Sona A; Birdwell, Robyn L; Poole, Patricia S; Sippo, Dorothy A; Giess, Catherine S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To (a) evaluate the frequency of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3 assessment in screening and diagnostic breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (b) review findings considered indicative of BI-RADS category 3, and (c) determine outcomes of BI-RADS category 3 lesions, including upgrades, downgrades, and malignancy rates. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors retrospectively reviewed the breast MR imaging database (2009-2011) to identify breast MR images classified as showing BI-RADS category 3 lesions. There were 9216 BI-RADS assessments in 5778 examinations (3360 women). Of the 9216 assessments, 567 (6%) in 483 women (average age, 47.2 years; median age, 47.0 years) were assigned BI-RADS category 3. In women with more than one BI-RADS category 3 lesion, the first lesion reported in the impression was used for data analysis. Outcomes data were available for 435 of the 483 women (90.1%). These women comprised the study cohort. Medical records from January 1, 2009, to May 31, 2015, were reviewed to obtain demographic characteristics and outcomes. χ(2) statistics and 95% exact confidence intervals (CIs) were constructed. Results MR imaging was performed for high-risk screening in 240 of the 435 patients (55.2%) and for diagnostic purposes in 195 (44.8%). Findings included mass (n = 125, 28.7%), focus (n = 111, 25.5%), nonmass enhancement (n = 80, 18.3%), moderate or marked background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) (n = 91, 20.9%), posttreatment changes (n = 16, 3.8%), and other findings (n = 12, 2.8%). Outcomes were as follows: 339 of the 435 patients (78%) did not have evidence of malignancy at more than 24 months, 28 (6.4%) underwent mastectomy (all benign), and 68 (15.6%) had lesion upgrades, with 11 cancers (2.5%). All 11 cancers were diagnosed in women with a genetic mutation or a personal history of breast cancer. No cancer was

  18. Multimodality imaging and state-of-art GPU technology in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions on real time decision support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, S.; Sidiropoulos, K.; Glotsos, D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Asvestas, P.; Cavouras, D.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to design a pattern recognition system for assisting the diagnosis of breast lesions, using image information from Ultrasound (US) and Digital Mammography (DM) imaging modalities. State-of-art computer technology was employed based on commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards and parallel programming. An experienced radiologist outlined breast lesions on both US and DM images from 59 patients employing a custom designed computer software application. Textural features were extracted from each lesion and were used to design the pattern recognition system. Several classifiers were tested for highest performance in discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Classifiers were also combined into ensemble schemes for further improvement of the system's classification accuracy. Following the pattern recognition system optimization, the final system was designed employing the Probabilistic Neural Network classifier (PNN) on the GPU card (GeForce 580GTX) using CUDA programming framework and C++ programming language. The use of such state-of-art technology renders the system capable of redesigning itself on site once additional verified US and DM data are collected. Mixture of US and DM features optimized performance with over 90% accuracy in correctly classifying the lesions.

  19. Probably Benign Lesions at Screening Breast US in a Population with Elevated Risk: Prevalence and Rate of Malignancy in the ACRIN 6666 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Cormack, Jean B.; Mendelson, Ellen B.; Berg, Wendie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively validate predefined breast ultrasonographic (US) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3 criteria in a multicenter setting in an elevated-risk population. Materials and Methods The American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6666 database was reviewed for prospectively defined BI-RADS category 3 lesions. Patient characteristics, lesion US features at initial detection, and work-up recommendations were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Exact 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were given, where appropriate. Lesion reference standard was biopsy or a minimum of 1-year follow-up. In addition, malignancy rate for lesions that had at least 2 years of follow-up data or that had biopsy data was calculated. Results Of 2662 participants, 519 (19.5%) had 745 BI-RADS category 3 lesions (25.5% of 2916 US lesions other than simple cysts), with a median size of 7 mm (range, 2–135 mm). The number of new BI-RADS category 3 lesions decreased with year 2–3 screening, but the percentage of new BI-RADS category 3 lesions was stable at 26.4% (506 of 1920 lesions), 23.6% (142 of 601 lesions), and 24.6% (97 of 395 lesions), respectively. Of 745 BI-RADS category 3 lesions, 124 (16.6%) were ultimately sampled for biopsy. Six malignancies (0.8% of BI-RADS category 3 lesions; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3%, 1.7%) occurred in five (1.0%) of 519 participants: Five malignancies were invasive (median size, 10 mm; size range, 2–18 mm), and one was node positive. When the analysis is limited to lesions with at least 2-year follow-up or biopsy, the malignancy rate among BI-RADS category 3 lesions is 0.9% (95% CI: 0.3%, 2.0%). Three malignant BI-RADS category 3 lesions were sampled for biopsy because of a suspicious change at follow-up (two N0 lesions, one each at 6- and 12-month follow-up; one N1 lesion at 24-month follow-up), one was sampled for biopsy because of an upgrade after additional mammography (NX), one was found at mastectomy for

  20. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, Joanne; Kulawansa, Sagarika; McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell; Phillips, Michael; Tinning, Jill; Taylor, Donna

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  1. A rare cause of acute abdomen: tumor rupture of nonpalpable testis

    PubMed Central

    Yıldız, Turan; İlçe, Zekeriya; Gündüz, Yasemin; Çakırsoy, Gözde Çakar

    2016-01-01

    Undescended testicle is the most common congenital anomaly among males. Testicular tumor develops in 3–5% of the boys with a complaint of undescended testicle. The clinical presentation of malignant intra-abdominal testicular tumors ranges from asymptomatic cases to acute abdomen. In this study, we present a child with testicular tumor rupture which is observed very rarely. A 16-year-old boy presented 24 hours after the sudden onset of right lower quadrant pain, nausea, vomiting and fever. On physical examination, extensive tenderness in the abdomen and abdominal guarding were found. The right testicle was not palpable. The serum white blood cell count was elevated. Ultrasonography and abdominal computerized tomography scan demonstrated a perforated, hyperdense mass with free fluid in the abdomen. The preoperative alpha fetoprotein level was found to be increased. We performed surgery with laparoscopy and a perforated right intraabdominal testicle was found in the right iliac fossa. The mass was excised. Histopathological examination revealed a yolk sac tumor. Ruptured nonpalpable testicular tumors are very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first adolescent case reported so far. Testicular tumor rupture should be considered in patients with nonpalpable testicle and acute abdomen. Laparoscopy may be performed in differential diagnosis and treatment of these patients. PMID:27738401

  2. Precursor lesions of mucinous carcinoma of the breast: analysis of 130 cases.

    PubMed

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Yoon, Jiyoon; Arias-Stella, Javier; Meier, Frederick A; Lee, Min W

    2013-07-01

    Mucinous mammary carcinoma (MC) is a tumor type with relatively favorable prognosis. Unlike the circumstances surrounding conventional invasive duct carcinoma, data are limited regarding precursor lesions for MC. This study characterizes patterns of mucinous ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as a precursor lesion for MC. All slides from 130 cases of MC encountered between 2000 and 2011 at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI were reviewed to subclassify MC, identify DCIS, and explore transition patterns from DCIS to MC. Calponin, p63, chromogranin, synaptophysin, CD56, and MIB-1 immunostaining analyses were performed in 65 cases. Among 106 cases of pure (71 type A, 35 type B) and 24 cases of mixed MC, DCIS appeared in 88 (68%) specimens, with all but 4 showing luminal mucin accumulation. Dominant patterns of mucinous DCIS were cribriform/solid (66), cribriform and papillary (7), papillary (5), micropapillary (3), and flat (3). Fifty-seven (68%) cases of mucinous DCIS demonstrated transitions from DCIS to MC. Luminal mucinous distention, focal flattening and attenuation of the epithelium, and disruption of the duct wall resulting in a mucocele-like extravasation of malignant epithelia with escaping mucin was a transition pattern seen with all architectures of DCIS and in all types of MC. This was the only pattern of transition to type A MC. The epithelial outpouching, formation of a cleft with accumulation of mucin around the epithelium, and transition into mucin pools with floating tumor cell clusters was the second transition pattern that went from cribriform/solid DCIS to type B and mixed MC. DCIS preceding aggressive phenotypes of MC (type B and mixed) more often had a cribriform/solid architecture, higher nuclear grade, and higher Ki-67-labeling index (all P<0.05). In summary, mucinous DCIS is a precursor to MC with distinctive features that link patterns of DCIS with aggressive MC phenotypes. The 2 observed transitions between mucinous DCIS and MC suggest that

  3. Effects of visual fixation cues on the detectability of simulated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, John S.; Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    A discrepancy exists between two studies that investigated psychophysical detection of simulated lesions (e.g. gaussians or designer nodules) embedded in filtered noise images (Johnson et al, 2002; Burgess et al, 2003). Johnson et al, 2002 identified a significant difference in the slope of the contrast detail plots (CD plots) as the presentation methodology in a 2AFC task was changed from the unlike background (unpaired) to identical backgrounds (paired). In comparable experiments, Burgess et al, 2003 challenged the results by finding no difference between the slopes (both positive) of the CD plots when using paired backgrounds or unpaired backgrounds. We found that a significant difference between the two studies, namely the presence of a circular fixation cue was responsible for the discrepancy. The detection noise due to positional uncertainty was sufficient to reduce subject's threshold for small target diameters. This effect was amplified in the paired background, switching the CD plot from a negative slope (without fixation) to a positive slope (with fixation). The effect was less dramatic with the unpaired backgrounds, however intra-observer variability seemed to be reduced with fixation cues. These results significantly reduce the discrepancies in C-D characteristics between the two studies.

  4. Computerized Segmentation and Characterization of Breast Lesions in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images Using Fuzzy c-Means Clustering and Snake Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yachun; Li, Li; Hu, Wenyong; Peng, Yanxia; Liu, Lizhi; Shao, Yuanzhi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel two-step approach that incorporates fuzzy c-means (FCMs) clustering and gradient vector flow (GVF) snake algorithm for lesions contour segmentation on breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI). Manual delineation of the lesions by expert MR radiologists was taken as a reference standard in evaluating the computerized segmentation approach. The proposed algorithm was also compared with the FCMs clustering based method. With a database of 60 mass-like lesions (22 benign and 38 malignant cases), the proposed method demonstrated sufficiently good segmentation performance. The morphological and texture features were extracted and used to classify the benign and malignant lesions based on the proposed computerized segmentation contour and radiologists' delineation, respectively. Features extracted by the computerized characterization method were employed to differentiate the lesions with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.968, in comparison with an AUC of 0.914 based on the features extracted from radiologists' delineation. The proposed method in current study can assist radiologists to delineate and characterize BMRI lesion, such as quantifying morphological and texture features and improving the objectivity and efficiency of BMRI interpretation with a certain clinical value. PMID:22952558

  5. Comedo-DCIS is a precursor lesion for basal-like breast carcinoma: identification of a novel p63/Her2/neu expressing subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Malathy P.V.; Kato, Ikuko; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Tait, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Basal breast cancer comprises ~15% of invasive ductal breast cancers, and presents as high-grade lesions with aggressive clinical behavior. Basal breast carcinomas express p63 and cytokeratin 5 (CK5) antigens characteristic of the myoepithelial lineage, and typically lack Her2/neu and hormone receptor expression. However, there is limited data about the precursor lesions from which they emerge. Here we wished to determine whether comedo-ductal carcinoma in situ (comedo-DCIS), a high-risk in situ breast lesion, serve as precursors for basal-like breast cancer. To determine this link, p63, CK5, Her2/neu, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 17 clinical comedo- and 12 noncomedo-DCIS cases, and in tumors derived from unfractionated and CK5-overexpressing subpopulation (MCF10DCIS.com-CK5high) of MCF10DCIS.com cells, a model representative of clinical comedo-DCIS. p63 and Her2/neu coexpression was analyzed by immunofluorescence double labeling. A novel p63/CK5/Her2/neu expressing subpopulation of cells that are ER−/PgR−/EGFR− were identified in the myoepithelial and luminal areas of clinical comedo-DCIS and tumors derived from unfractionated MCF10DCIS.com and MCF10DCIS.com-CK5high cells. These data suggest that p63 and Her2/neu expressors may share a common precursor intermediate. P63, but not Her2/neu, expression was significantly associated (P = 0.038) with microinvasion/recurrence of clinical comedo-DCIS, and simultaneous expression of p63 and Her2/neu was marginally associated (P = 0.067) with comedo-DCIS. These data suggest that p63/Her2/neu expressing precursor intermediate in comedo-DCIS may provide a cellular basis for emergence of p63+/Her2/neu- or p63+/Her2/neu+ basal-like breast cancer, and that p63/Her2/neu coexpression may serve as biomarkers for identification of this subgroup of basal-like breast cancers. PMID:23548208

  6. Synergy in combining findings from mammography and ultrasonography in detecting malignancy in women with higher density breasts and lesions over 2 cm in Albania

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Albana

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study To provide evidence of the synergy of combining findings from mammography (MM) and ultrasonography (US) in detecting malignancy in women with high-density breasts. Material and methods A total of 245 women were screened for breast cancer using both mammography and ultrasonography at the American Hospital in Tirana during 2013–2014. The data was used to identify possible benefits in detecting malignancy, by combining the findings of MM and US and confirming them with those of the biopsy. Data on age, breast density, BI-RADS classification, and biopsy confirmations were collected and analysed. Results Out of the 245 women, 36 biopsies were taken (17 for women classified BI-RADS 4 and 5; 19 for women with BI-RADS 3 that had grown in size from the previous examination). The accuracy in detecting malignancy for low-density-breast women was 90% for MM, 70% for US, and 90% for combined. For high-density breasts, the accuracy was 65% for MM, 79% for US, and 82% for combined findings. Multivariate analysis indicates that high-density-breast women who have a malignant finding in at least one of the examinations (MM or US) are 24 times more likely (p = 0.039) to have a positive finding in biopsy for malignancy. The odds increased 32 times for lesions over 2 cm (p = 0.056). Conclusions Our study results indicate additional benefits of combining findings from MM and US for high-density-breast women. Further study is warranted in a larger population and for different kinds of cancer. PMID:28239286

  7. Analysis of breast CT lesions using computer-aided diagnosis: an application of neural networks on extracted morphologic and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Prionas, Nicolas D.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Boone, John M.

    2012-03-01

    Dedicated cone-beam breast CT (bCT) scanners have been developed as a potential alternative imaging modality to conventional X-ray mammography in breast cancer diagnosis. As with other modalities, quantitative imaging (QI) analysis can potentially be utilized as a tool to extract useful numeric information concerning diagnosed lesions from high quality 3D tomographic data sets. In this work, preliminary QI analysis was done by designing and implementing a computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system consisting of image preprocessing, object(s) of interest (i.e. masses, microcalcifications) segmentation, structural analysis of the segmented object(s), and finally classification into benign or malignant disease. Image sets were acquired from bCT patient scans with diagnosed lesions. Iterative watershed segmentation (IWS), a hybridization of the watershed method using observer-set markers and a gradient vector flow (GVF) approach, was used as the lesion segmentation method in 3D. Eight morphologic parameters and six texture features based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) calculations were obtained per segmented lesion and combined into multi-dimensional feature input data vectors. Artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers were used by performing cross validation and network parameter optimization to maximize area under the curve (AUC) values of the resulting receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Within these ANNs, biopsy-proven diagnoses of malignant and benign lesions were recorded as target data while the feature vectors were saved as raw input data. With the image data separated into post-contrast (n = 55) and pre-contrast sets (n = 39), a maximum AUC of 0.70 +/- 0.02 and 0.80 +/- 0.02 were achieved, respectively, for each data set after ANN application.

  8. Mapping transitions between healthy and pathological lesions in human breast tissues by diffraction enhanced imaging computed tomography (DEI-CT) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Geraldelli, W.; Poletti, M. E.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we have combined the DEI-CT and SAXS technique to study the transition between healthy and pathological breast tissues, which include benign and malignant lesions. The ability of DEI-CT to enhance the contrast between soft tissues was used to localize the tumor region in the sample. Then, the tumor region and its surroundings were scanned by SAXS in order to map the changes promoted by the neoplasias at nano-level.It was clearly observed that pathological tissues present distinguishable SAXS scattering profiles from those of normal tissue. These differences are mainly related to changes in arrangement and diameter of collagen fibrils, evaluated by the higher order of reflection peaks of these fibrils. Differences related to the peak intensities and the total scattered intensity were found by comparing the healthy and pathological regions. The 2nd order of collagen reflection arises only in the healthy region neighboring the benign lesion. A broader peak at q=0.16 nm-1 seems to characterize the malignant lesions. Finally, based on this information, the transition between healthy and pathological human breast tissues was mapped which allowed to get insights into the changes promoted by tumors during growth and progression.

  9. Assessment of Functional Differences in Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions and Improvement of Diagnostic Accuracy by Using US-guided Diffuse Optical Tomography in Conjunction with Conventional US.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quing; Ricci, Andrew; Hegde, Poornima; Kane, Mark; Cronin, Edward; Merkulov, Alex; Xu, Yan; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Tannenbaum, Susan

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To investigate ultrasonography (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography to distinguish the functional differences of hemoglobin concentrations in a wide range of malignant and benign breast lesions and to improve breast cancer diagnosis in conjunction with conventional US. Materials and Methods The study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards and was HIPAA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients (288 women; mean age, 50 years; range, 17-94 years) who underwent US-guided biopsy were imaged with a handheld US and optical probe. The US-imaged lesion was used to guide reconstruction of light absorption maps at four wavelengths, and total hemoglobin (tHb), oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb), and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) were computed from the absorption maps. A threshold (80 μmol/L) was chosen on the basis of this study population. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated US images on the basis of the US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon, and a lesion was considered malignant when a score of 4C or 5 was given or a lesion had tHb greater than 80 μmol/L. A two-sample t test was used to calculate significance between groups, and Spearman ρ was computed between hemoglobin parameters and tumor pathologic grades. Results Three tumors were Tis, 37 were T1, 19 were T2-T4 carcinomas, and 233 were benign lesions. The mean maximum tHb, oxyHb, and deoxyHb of Tis-T1 and T2-T4 groups were 89.3 μmol/L ± 20.2 (standard deviation), 65.0 μmol/L ± 20.8, and 33.5 μmol/L ± 11.3, respectively, and 84.7 μmol/L ± 32.8, 57.1 μmol/L ± 19.8, and 34.7 μmol/L ± 18.9, respectively. The corresponding values of benign lesions were 54.1 μmol/L ± 23.5, 38.0 μmol/L ± 17.4, and 25.2 μmol/L ± 13.8, respectively. The mean maximum tHb, oxyHb, and deoxyHb were significantly higher in the malignant groups than the benign group (P <.001, <.001, and .041, respectively). For malignant lesions, the mean maximum t

  10. Does flat epithelial atypia have rounder nuclei than columnar cell change/hyperplasia? A morphometric approach to columnar cell lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoshiko; Ichihara, Shu; Moritani, Suzuko; Yoon, Han-Seung; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Columnar cell lesions of the breast encompass columnar cell change/hyperplasia (CCC/CCH) and flat epithelial atypia (FEA). These have attracted researchers because emerging data suggest that FEA may represent the earliest histologically detectable non-obligate precursor of breast cancer. However, it is occasionally difficult to distinguish FEA from CCC/CCH because of similar histology. Although the nuclei of FEA are frequently described as relatively round compared with those of CCC/CCH, there are few morphometric studies to support this statement. The aim of this study was to provide objective data as to the nuclear shape in columnar cell lesions. As a shape descriptor, we adopted ellipticity that is defined by the formula 2b/2a, where a is the length of the long axis of the ellipse and b is the length of the short axis. Contrary to circularity, ellipticity reflects the overall configuration of an ellipse irrespective of surface irregularity. Our image analysis included generating whole slide images, extracting glandular cell nuclei, measuring nuclear ellipticity, and superimposing graded colors based on execution of results on the captured images. A total of 7917 nuclei extracted from 22 FEA images and 5010 nuclei extracted from 13 CCC/CCH images were analyzed. There was a significant difference in nuclear roundness between FEA and CCC/CCH with mean ellipticity values of 0.723 and 0.679, respectively (p < 0.001, Welch's t test). Furthermore, FEA with malignancy had significantly rounder nuclei than FEA without malignancy (p < 0.001). Our preliminary results suggest that nuclear ellipticity is a key parameter in reproducibly classifying columnar cell lesions of the breast.

  11. Classification of breast mass lesions using model-based analysis of the characteristic kinetic curve derived from fuzzy c-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Yan-Hao; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chang, Pei-Kang; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of the representative characteristic kinetic curve of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) extracted by fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering for the discrimination of benign and malignant breast tumors using a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. About the research data set, DCE-MRIs of 132 solid breast masses with definite histopathologic diagnosis (63 benign and 69 malignant) were used in this study. At first, the tumor region was automatically segmented using the region growing method based on the integrated color map formed by the combination of kinetic and area under curve color map. Then, the FCM clustering was used to identify the time-signal curve with the larger initial enhancement inside the segmented region as the representative kinetic curve, and then the parameters of the Tofts pharmacokinetic model for the representative kinetic curve were compared with conventional curve analysis (maximal enhancement, time to peak, uptake rate and washout rate) for each mass. The results were analyzed with a receiver operating characteristic curve and Student's t test to evaluate the classification performance. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the combined model-based parameters of the extracted kinetic curve from FCM clustering were 86.36% (114/132), 85.51% (59/69), 87.30% (55/63), 88.06% (59/67) and 84.62% (55/65), better than those from a conventional curve analysis. The A(Z) value was 0.9154 for Tofts model-based parametric features, better than that for conventional curve analysis (0.8673), for discriminating malignant and benign lesions. In conclusion, model-based analysis of the characteristic kinetic curve of breast mass derived from FCM clustering provides effective lesion classification. This approach has potential in the development of a CAD system for DCE breast MRI.

  12. Outcome of initially only magnetic resonance mammography-detected findings with and without correlate at second-look sonography: distribution according to patient history of breast cancer and lesion size.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Zuiani, Chiara; Londero, Viviana; Bazzocchi, Massimo

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the outcome of initially only magnetic resonance mammography (MRM)-detected breast lesions as a function of radiologic features, history of breast cancer and lesion size. We evaluated core needle biopsy (CNB) (148) and follow-up (25) results of 173 initially only MRM-detected lesions-142 with and 31 without "second-look" correlate, as a function of (1) radiologic features (sonographic correlate, MRI BI-RADS category); (2) history of breast cancer; (3) MRM indication in case of history of breast neoplasm; (4) side and size of synchronous cancer; (5) lesion diameter. (1) Overall malignancy rate was 28.3% (49/173); significantly higher among lesions with a sonographic correlate (46/142), than among those without (3/31) (p=0.014). Frequencies of malignancy for MRI BI-RADS categories 2, 3, 4 and 5, were 0% (0/1), 5.4% (4/73), 26.1% (17/65) and 82.3% (28/34), respectively. (2) Malignancy rate was significantly higher in case of history of breast carcinoma (40/118 versus 9/55; p=0.027); in particular, of 42 MRI BI-RADS category 3 lesions in women with history of breast cancer and of 31 in patients without history, 3 (7%) and 1 (3%) proved to be malignant, respectively (non-significant). (3) Malignancy was more frequent when MRM was performed for pre-operative assessment than for follow-up (30/78 versus 10/40; non-significant). (4) Malignancy rate increased in presence of ipsilateral (19/35 versus 11/43; p=0.018), large (cut-off 6 mm: 30/75 versus 0/3, non-significant; 11 mm: 28/61 versus 2/17, p=0.011; 16 mm: 24/48 versus 6/30, p=0.015; 21 mm: 14/21 versus 16/57, p=0.004) primary tumors. (5) The frequency of malignancy was significantly higher in lesions equal to or larger than 6, 11 and 16 mm, compared with smaller lesions (6 mm: 45/136 versus 4/37, p=0.007; 11 mm: 21/51 versus 28/122, p=0.025; 16 mm: 12/24 versus 37/149, p=0.021). Radiologic features, history of breast cancer and large diameter are associated with high likelihood

  13. Multi-probe-based resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy for detection of suspicious breast lesions: improving performance using partial ROC optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Wang, Xiao Hui; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a multi-probe resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscope (REIS) system to detect breast abnormalities. Based on assessing asymmetry in REIS signals acquired between left and right breasts, we developed several machine learning classifiers to classify younger women (i.e., under 50YO) into two groups of having high and low risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we investigated a new method to optimize performance based on the area under a selected partial receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve when optimizing an artificial neural network (ANN), and tested whether it could improve classification performance. From an ongoing prospective study, we selected a dataset of 174 cases for whom we have both REIS signals and diagnostic status verification. The dataset includes 66 "positive" cases recommended for biopsy due to detection of highly suspicious breast lesions and 108 "negative" cases determined by imaging based examinations. A set of REIS-based feature differences, extracted from the two breasts using a mirror-matched approach, was computed and constituted an initial feature pool. Using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method, we applied a genetic algorithm (GA) to train the ANN with an optimal subset of features. Two optimization criteria were separately used in GA optimization, namely the area under the entire ROC curve (AUC) and the partial area under the ROC curve, up to a predetermined threshold (i.e., 90% specificity). The results showed that although the ANN optimized using the entire AUC yielded higher overall performance (AUC = 0.83 versus 0.76), the ANN optimized using the partial ROC area criterion achieved substantially higher operational performance (i.e., increasing sensitivity level from 28% to 48% at 95% specificity and/ or from 48% to 58% at 90% specificity).

  14. An MMP13-Selective Inhibitor Delays Primary Tumor Growth and the Onset of Tumor-Associated Osteolytic Lesions in Experimental Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manisha; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Connor, Andrea; Reiter, Lawrence A.; Hardink, Joel R.; Lynch, Conor C.; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13)-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy)-5-(2-methoxyethyl) pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (Cmpd-1), on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis. PMID:22253746

  15. Population Based Assessment of MHC Class 1 Antigens Down Regulation as Marker in Increased Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer From Benign Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer from Benign Breast Lesions” antigen retrieval solution in the microwave . Lastly, tissue... Microwave and citrate buffer antigen-retrieval substitutions yielded comparable results. Lab 2 demonstrated that a negative control is useful as an...the infiltrating lymphocytes in germinal centers and dendritic cells as seen in case 1. Microsatellite Analysis Labs 1, 2, and 4 performed

  16. Design of a phased array for the generation of adaptive radiation force along a path surrounding a breast lesion for dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekeom, Didace; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    This work demonstrates, with numerical simulations, the potential of an octagonal probe for the generation of radiation forces in a set of points following a path surrounding a breast lesion in the context of dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging. Because of the in-going wave adaptive focusing strategy, the proposed method is adapted to induce shear wave fronts to interact optimally with complex lesions. Transducer elements were based on 1-3 piezocomposite material. Three-dimensional simulations combining the finite element method and boundary element method with periodic boundary conditions in the elevation direction were used to predict acoustic wave radiation in a targeted region of interest. The coupling factor of the piezocomposite material and the radiated power of the transducer were optimized. The transducer's electrical impedance was targeted to 50 Ω. The probe was simulated by assembling the designed transducer elements to build an octagonal phased-array with 256 elements on each edge (for a total of 2048 elements). The central frequency is 4.54 MHz; simulated transducer elements are able to deliver enough power and can generate the radiation force with a relatively low level of voltage excitation. Using dynamic transmitter beamforming techniques, the radiation force along a path and resulting acoustic pattern in the breast were simulated assuming a linear isotropic medium. Magnitude and orientation of the acoustic intensity (radiation force) at any point of a generation path could be controlled for the case of an example representing a heterogeneous medium with an embedded soft mechanical inclusion.

  17. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and other lesions along the coding strand of the exon 5 of the tumour suppressor gene P53 in a breast cancer case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Beniamino; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Bianchi, Simonetta; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G.; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing studies of breast cancer have reported that the tumour suppressor P53 (TP53) gene is mutated in more than 40% of the tumours. We studied the levels of oxidative lesions, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), along the coding strand of the exon 5 in breast cancer patients as well as in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-attacked breast cancer cell line using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique. We detected a significant ‘in vitro’ generation of 8-oxodG between the codons 163 and 175, corresponding to a TP53 region with high mutation prevalence, after treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a ROS-generating system. Then, we evaluated the occurrence of oxidative lesions in the DNA-binding domain of the TP53 in the core needle biopsies of 113 of women undergoing breast investigation for diagnostic purpose. An increment of oxidative damage at the −G− residues into the codons 163 and 175 was found in the cancer cases as compared to the controls. We found significant associations with the pathological stage and the histological grade of tumours. As the major news of this study, this largest analysis of genomic footprinting of oxidative lesions at the TP53 sequence level to date provided a first roadmap describing the signatures of oxidative lesions in human breast cancer. Our results provide evidence that the generation of oxidative lesions at single nucleotide resolution is not an event highly stochastic, but causes a characteristic pattern of DNA lesions at the site of mutations in the TP53, suggesting causal relationship between oxidative DNA adducts and breast cancer. PMID:27260513

  18. Does adjuvant radiation therapy benefit women with small mammography-detected breast cancers?

    PubMed Central

    Jerzak, K.; Dudalski, N.; Pritchard, K.; Sun, P.; Narod, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with small nonpalpable breast tumours have an excellent prognosis. The benefit of radiotherapy in this group of low-risk women is unknown. Methods A cohort of 1595 women with stages i–iii invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery were followed for local recurrence. Using t-tests, baseline demographic data and tumour characteristics were compared for the women who had palpable (n = 1023) and mammography-detected (n = 572) breast cancers. The 15-year actuarial risk of local recurrence was estimated using a Kaplan–Meier method, stratified for adjuvant radiation therapy (yes or no), tumour palpability (palpable or not), and tumour size (≤1 cm or >1 cm). Hazard ratios (hrs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% cis) were calculated using a multivariate Cox regression model. Results were considered statistically significant if 2-tailed p values were less than 0.05. Results Among women with a nonpalpable tumour, the 15-year actuarial rates of local recurrence were, respectively, 13.9% and 18.3% for those treated and not treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (hr: 0.65; 95%ci: 0.40 to 1.06; p = 0.08). Among women with small nonpalpable breast cancers (≤1.0 cm), the rates were 14.6% and 13.4% respectively (p = 0.67). The absolute reduction in 15-year local recurrence was 11.0% for women with palpable tumours. Conclusions Our results suggest that women with small (<1 cm) screen-detected nonpalpable breast cancers likely derive little benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy; however, an adequately powered randomized trial would be required to make definitive conclusions. PMID:28270722

  19. Potential of Computer-aided Diagnosis of High Spectral and Spatial (HiSS) MRI in the Classification of Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhooshan, Neha; Giger, Maryellen; Medved, Milica; Li, Hui; Wood, Abbie; Yuan, Yading; Lan, Li; Marquez, Angelica; Karczmar, Greg; Newstead, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of CADx analysis of pre-contrast HiSS MRI to that of clinical DCE-MRI in the diagnostic classification of breast lesions. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four malignant and seven benign lesions were scanned using 2D HiSS and clinical 4D DCE-MRI protocols. Lesions were automatically segmented. Morphological features were calculated for HiSS whereas both morphological and kinetic features were calculated for DCE-MRI. After stepwise feature selection, Bayesian artificial neural networks merged selected features, and ROC analysis evaluated the performance with leave-one-lesion-out validation. Results: AUC values of 0.92 ± 0.06 and 0.90 ± 0.05 were obtained using CADx on HiSS and DCE-MRI, respectively, in the task of classifying benign and malignant lesions. While we failed to show that the higher HiSS performance was significantly better than DCE-MRI, non-inferiority testing confirmed that HiSS was not worse than DCE-MRI. Conclusion: CADx of HiSS (without contrast) performed similarly to CADx on clinical DCE-MRI; thus, computerized analysis of HiSS may provide sufficient information for diagnostic classification. The results are clinically important for patients in whom contrast agent is contra-indicated. Even in the limited acquisition mode of 2D single slice HiSS, by using quantitative image analysis to extract characteristics from the HiSS images, similar performance levels were obtained as compared to those from current clinical 4D DCE-MRI. As HiSS acquisitions become possible in 3D, CADx methods can also be applied. Since HiSS and DCE-MRI are based on different contrast mechanisms, the use of the two protocols in combination may increase diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24023011

  20. Computerized self-assessment of automated lesion segmentation in breast ultrasound: implication for CADx applied to findings in the axilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, K.; Giger, M. L.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a self-assessment method in which the CADx system provided a confidence level for its lesion segmentations. The self-assessment was performed by a fuzzy-inference system based on 4 computer-extracted features of the computer-segmented lesions in a leave-one-case-out evaluation protocol. In instances where the initial segmentation received a low assessment rating, lesions were re-segmented using the same segmentation method but based on a user-defined region-of-interest. A total of 542 cases with 1133 lesions were collected in this study, and we focused here on the 97 normal lymph nodes in this dataset since these pose challenges for automated segmentation due to their inhomogeneous appearance. The percentage of all lesions with satisfactory segmentation (i.e., normalized overlap with the radiologist-delineated lesion >=0.3) was 85%. For normal lymph nodes, however, this percentage was only 36%. Of the lymph nodes, 53 received a low confidence rating (<0.3) for their initial segmentation. When those lymph nodes were re-segmented, the percentage with a satisfactory segmentation improved to 80.0%. Computerassessed confidence levels demonstrated potential to 1) help radiologists decide whether to use or disregard CADx output, and 2) provide a guide for improvement of lesion segmentation.

  1. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:26046722

  2. Improving the performance of lesion-based computer-aided detection schemes of breast masses using a case-based adaptive cueing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Qian, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Current commercialized CAD schemes have high false-positive (FP) detection rates and also have high correlations in positive lesion detection with radiologists. Thus, we recently investigated a new approach to improve the efficacy of applying CAD to assist radiologists in reading and interpreting screening mammograms. Namely, we developed a new global feature based CAD approach/scheme that can cue the warning sign on the cases with high risk of being positive. In this study, we investigate the possibility of fusing global feature or case-based scores with the local or lesion-based CAD scores using an adaptive cueing method. We hypothesize that the information from the global feature extraction (features extracted from the whole breast regions) are different from and can provide supplementary information to the locally-extracted features (computed from the segmented lesion regions only). On a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) testing dataset with 785 cases (347 negative and 438 cancer cases with masses only), we ran our lesion-based and case-based CAD schemes "as is" on the whole dataset. To assess the supplementary information provided by the global features, we used an adaptive cueing method to adaptively adjust the original CAD-generated detection scores (Sorg) of a detected suspicious mass region based on the computed case-based score (Scase) of the case associated with this detected region. Using the adaptive cueing method, better sensitivity results were obtained at lower FP rates (<= 1 FP per image). Namely, increases of sensitivities (in the FROC curves) of up to 6.7% and 8.2% were obtained for the ROI and Case-based results, respectively.

  3. Breast self-examination and adherence to mammographic follow-up: an intriguing diptych after benign breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zografos, George C; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Zagouri, Flora; Papadimitriou, Christos A; Domeyer, Philip; Kontogianni, Panagiota N; Nonni, Afroditi; Tsigris, Christos; Patsouris, Efstratios

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of palpability upon breast self-examination (BSE) and adherence to annual mammogram after benign breast biopsy (BBB). Seven hundred and fifty-two women with palpable (WP, n = 359) or nonpalpable (WNP, n = 393) lesions were evaluated 2 years before and after BBB. BSE was considered adequate when it was performed at least once per month, and inadequate when it was performed with a frequency of less than once per month. Prebiopsy/postbiopsy adherence was characterized as inadequate when at least one session of mammographic examination was lost within the 2-prebiopsy/postbiopsy (including the last visit) years, respectively. The prebiopsy frequency of adequate BSE was higher in WP [49 (176 of 359) vs. 38.9% (153 of 393) for WNP; Pearson's chi2 (1) = 7.77, P = 0.005]. However, the opposite happened regarding the prebiopsy adherence to mammogram, as the frequency of adequate adherence was 64.1% (252 of 393) in WNP, but only 46.0% (165 of 359) in WP. After BBB, adherence to mammogram significantly increased in both groups, reaching 76.1% (299 of 393) for WNP and 65.2% (234 of 359) for WP. However, BSE increased significantly only in WNP. Regarding the WP group, the postBBB BSE did not exhibit any significant change. Noticeably, the aforementioned increase in BSE among WNP resulted in the disappearance of the initial WP-WNP discrepancy regarding BSE; the postBBB BSE did not differ between WP and WNP. However, concerning adherence to mammogram, the superiority of WNP versus WP persisted (76.1 vs. 65.2%, respectively). In conclusion WP and WNP may perceive BBB differently, as reflected upon the differentially modified patterns.

  4. Cancer stem cells biomarkers in triple negative invasive carcinoma of the breast and associated in situ lesions.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Maria; Bussolati, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) [negative for expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER, PR) and HER2÷neu protein] represent a subtype of breast cancer associated with poor prognosis and highly aggressive behavior. The characterization of stem cell in this type of carcinoma could determine the appearance of new ideas concerning origin and evolution. There is an impressive amount of data in the literature related to TNBC and a growing interest for stem cell research during the past years, but there are no data concerning the genetic characterization of stem cells in the context of cell biology of TNBC as compared with associated DCIS. We performed immunohistochemical studies for the expression and distribution of several stem cell-related antigens, focusing on the association of TNBC with DCIS and comparing the presence of stem cells in the invasive and in the in situ component. Optimization of detection, identification and characterization of tumorigenic breast cancer stem cells might permit further identification of targeted treatment.

  5. Depth-correction algorithm that improves optical quantification of large breast lesions imaged by diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2011-01-01

    Optical quantification of large lesions imaged with diffuse optical tomography in reflection geometry is depth dependence due to the exponential decay of photon density waves. We introduce a depth-correction method that incorporates the target depth information provided by coregistered ultrasound. It is based on balancing the weight matrix, using the maximum singular values of the target layers in depth without changing the forward model. The performance of the method is evaluated using phantom targets and 10 clinical cases of larger malignant and benign lesions. The results for the homogenous targets demonstrate that the location error of the reconstructed maximum absorption coefficient is reduced to the range of the reconstruction mesh size for phantom targets. Furthermore, the uniformity of absorption distribution inside the lesions improve about two times and the median of the absorption increases from 60 to 85% of its maximum compared to no depth correction. In addition, nonhomogenous phantoms are characterized more accurately. Clinical examples show a similar trend as the phantom results and demonstrate the utility of the correction method for improving lesion quantification. PMID:21639570

  6. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  7. Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma with Unusual Presentation: Review of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Pérez, M. Asunción; Viqueira Rodriguez, Isabel; Tello Royloa, Alberto; Martínez Guisasola, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Metaplastic breast carcinoma is an uncommon type of breast cancer that usually appears as a large, fast growing breast lump. Case Report We report 3 cases of metaplastic breast carcinoma presented at our clinic in 2014. The mean age at diagnosis was 67.3 years. 1 patient presented with a fast growing, large mass detected by herself. However, in the other 2 patients, the nodule was approximately 1.5 cm in size, not fast growing, and was detected on mammography. All 3 patients were treated surgically (2 lumpectomies and 1 mastectomy), with the final pathology of metaplastic carcinoma with chondroid mesenchymal differentiation in 2 cases and metaplastic carcinoma with myoepithelial differentiation in the 3rd case. The patients are still under adjuvant therapy. Conclusions Metaplastic breast carcinoma may present unusually as a non-palpable lump. This entity must be considered in any breast lump. PMID:26989360

  8. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  9. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-15

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  10. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features. PMID:27079888

  11. Microglandular adenosis associated with triple-negative breast cancer is a neoplastic lesion of triple-negative phenotype harbouring TP53 somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Geyer, Felipe C; De Filippo, Maria R; Eberle, Carey A; Akram, Muzaffar; Fusco, Nicola; Ichihara, Shu; Sakr, Rita A; Yatabe, Yasushi; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Wen, Y Hannah; Weigelt, Britta; Schnitt, Stuart J; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-04-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is a rare proliferative lesion of the breast composed of small glands lacking myoepithelial cells and lined by S100-positive, oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and HER2-negative epithelial cells. There is evidence to suggest that MGA may constitute a non-obligate precursor of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We sought to define the genomic landscape of pure MGA and of MGA, atypical MGA (AMGA) and associated TNBCs, and to determine whether synchronous MGA, AMGA, and TNBCs would be clonally related. Two pure MGAs and eight cases of MGA and/or AMGA associated with in situ or invasive TNBC were collected, microdissected, and subjected to massively parallel sequencing targeting all coding regions of 236 genes recurrently mutated in breast cancer or related to DNA repair. Pure MGAs lacked clonal non-synonymous somatic mutations and displayed limited copy number alterations (CNAs); conversely, all MGAs (n = 7) and AMGAs (n = 3) associated with TNBC harboured at least one somatic non-synonymous mutation (range 3-14 and 1-10, respectively). In all cases where TNBCs were analyzed, identical TP53 mutations and similar patterns of gene CNAs were found in the MGA and/or AMGA and in the associated TNBC. In the MGA/AMGA associated with TNBC lacking TP53 mutations, somatic mutations affecting PI3K pathway-related genes (eg PTEN, PIK3CA, and INPP4B) and tyrosine kinase receptor signalling-related genes (eg ERBB3 and FGFR2) were identified. At diagnosis, MGAs associated with TNBC were found to display subclonal populations, and clonal shifts in the progression from MGA to AMGA and/or to TNBC were observed. Our results demonstrate the heterogeneity of MGAs, and that MGAs associated with TNBC, but not necessarily pure MGAs, are genetically advanced, clonal, and neoplastic lesions harbouring recurrent mutations in TP53 and/or other cancer genes, supporting the notion that a subset of MGAs and AMGAs may constitute

  12. Radial scar lesions of the breast diagnosed by needle core biopsy: analysis of cases containing occult malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Douglas‐Jones, Anthony G; Denson, Jemimah L; Cox, Adam C; Harries, Iwan B; Stevens, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Aim To identify and review cases of false negative needle core biopsy (NCB) in the preoperative investigation of radial scar/complex sclerosing lesion (RS/CSL) lesions—that is, benign NCB from RS/CSL which contained malignancy on excision. Methods and results A total of 11 false negative NCB in RS/CSL lesions from 281 (3.9%) were identified (6 cases: B1, 2 cases: B2 and 3 cases: B3). In 6 of 11 cases a radial scar or stromal sclerosis was seen in NCB. Localisation biopsy showed duct carcinoma in situ in six cases, duct carcinoma in situ with invasive carcinoma in three and invasive carcinoma in two. In all 11 cases, needle tracks were identified as missing the malignant epithelium by a mean of 5 mm (median:4 mm; range:1–20 mm). In 9 of 11 cases, the malignancy was missed by <6 mm. Conclusions Despite evidence of accurate targeting of lesions, the use of NCB instead of fine needle aspiration cytology has not eliminated the problem of false negative biopsy in RS/CSL, and excision is recommended. PMID:16731590

  13. Immunohistochemical localisation of pS2 protein in ductal carcinoma in situ and benign lesions of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Luqmani, Y. A.; Campbell, T.; Soomro, S.; Shousha, S.; Rio, M. C.; Coombes, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of pS2 was examined histochemically in paraffin sections taken from biopsy material from patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Often intense immunoreactivity, to an anti-pS2 monoclonal antibody, was observed in comedo, solid, cribriform and micropapillary types of DCIS, with significant positivity found in 63-67% of cases. In 15 samples analysed, we found a good correlation between pS2 expression and presence of progesterone receptor positive cells, but not with estrogen receptor. There was only a limited degree of correspondence between the cells staining with these anti-sera. Some pS2 positive cells were also seen in normal acini in areas adjacent to cancer but much less frequently in sections of normal breast from reduction mammoplasty. Most normal areas were negative, as were cysts. In benign proliferative conditions (seen in sections with and without DCIS) such as adenosis, sclerosing adenosis, mild and florid ductal epithelial hyperplasia, significant pS2 positivity was seen in about 50% of cases. These results suggest that there is a progressive increase in pS2 from normal to benign to cancer cells and that this gene is expressed in both the invasive and pre-invasive forms of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385977

  14. Pregnancy-like (pseudolactational) hyperplasia: a primary diagnosis in mammographically detected lesions of the breast and its relationship to cystic hypersecretory hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Rosen, P P

    2000-12-01

    Pregnancy-like (pseudolactational) hyperplasia (PLH) has long been recognized as an incidental finding in breast biopsies performed for various clinically detected benign and malignant conditions. The histologic features of PLH have been well described, including some instances exhibiting cytologic and structural atypia. The presence of calcifications in these lesions was rarely mentioned and was considered to be of little consequence. More recently, however, calcifications in PLH have become the target of needle localization and needle core biopsies. The authors report 12 instances in which PLH was the primary diagnosis in biopsy specimens obtained for radiographic abnormalities, usually calcifications. Six of 12 procedures (50.0%) were performed for mammographically detected calcifications, four cases for a mass, one for an "abnormal mammogram," and one for galactorrhea. Calcifications were present in PLH in 10 biopsies, in benign terminal ducts in one specimen, and were not identified histologically in the remaining specimen. In most instances, calcifications associated with PLH had smooth round or lobulated contours and distinctive, internal, unevenly spaced laminations. Cystic hypersecretory hyperplasia (CHH) was present in five specimens. In four of the five specimens, CHH merged with PLH (PLH/CHH). Four of 12 specimens (33.3%) showed atypia within foci of PLH/CHH. PLH should be recognized as a primary diagnosis in breast biopsies for mammographically detected abnormalities such as calcifications. Some calcifications associated with PLH have a distinctive histologic appearance, and their recognition can aid in the diagnosis of PLH. Additional cases of PLH/CHH must be studied to ascertain the clinical significance, if any, of this previously undescribed entity. The precancerous significance of PLH/CHH and of PLH with atypia has not been determined. In most instances, surgical excision would be prudent if PLH/ CHH or PLH with atypia is present in a needle core

  15. WE-FG-207A-01: Introduction to Dedicated Breast CT - Early Studies.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, S

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  16. WE-FG-207A-04: Performance Characteristics of Photon-Counting Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kalender, W

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  17. WE-FG-207A-00: Advances in Dedicated Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Molloi, Sabee

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  18. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, A

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  19. High-Resolution Speckle-Free Ultrasound Imaging System - A Potential Solution for Detecting Missed Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    piezo-electric material from the detector array. In this area there is no energy added to the pixel cells from ultrasound detection. Figure 8 shows a... Sickles , "Mammographic features of 300 consecutive nonpalpable breast cancers," AJR, vol. 146, p. 661, 1986. 3. F. M. Hall, J. M. Storella, D. Z...353, 1988. 4. S. D. Frankel, E. A. Sickle , B. N. Curpen, R. A. Sollitto, S. H. Ominsky, and H. B. Galvin, "Initial versus subsequent screening

  20. Intraoperative Ultrasound Guidance Is Associated with Clear Lumpectomy Margins for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; Dai, Juncheng; Ling, Lijun; Chen, Lin; Zha, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiaoan; Zhou, Wenbin; Wang, Shui

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Margin status is one of the most important predictors of local recurrence after breast conserving surgery (BCS). Intraoperative ultrasound guidance (IOUS) has the potential to improve surgical accuracy for breast cancer. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of IOUS in breast cancer surgery and to compare the margin status to that of the more traditional Guide wire localization (GWL) or palpation-guidance. Methods We searched the database of PubMed for prospective and retrospective studies about the impact of IOUS on margin status of breast cancer, and a meta-analysis was conducted. Results Of the 13 studies included, 8 were eligible for the impact of IOUS on margin status of non-palpable breast cancers, 4 were eligible for palpable breast cancers, and 1 was for both non-palpable and palpable breast cancers. The rate of negative margins of breast cancers in IOUS group was significantly higher than that in control group without IOUS (risk ratio (RR)  = 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI)  = 1.18–1.59 from 7 prospective studies, odds ratio (OR)  = 2.75, 95% CI  = 1.66–4.55 from 4 retrospective studies). For non-palpable breast cancers, IOUS-guidance enabled a significantly higher rate of negative margins than that of GWL-guidance (RR  = 1.26, 95% CI  = 1.09–1.46 from 6 prospective studies; OR  = 1.45, 95% CI  = 0.86–2.43 from 2 retrospective studies). For palpable breast cancers, relative to control group without IOUS, the RR for IOUS associated negative margins was 2.36 (95% CI  = 1.26–4.43) from 2 prospective studies, the OR was 2.71 (95% CI  = 1.25–5.87) from 2 retrospective studies. Conclusion This study strongly suggests that IOUS is an accurate method for localization of non-palpable and palpable breast cancers. It is an efficient method of obtaining high proportion of negative margins and optimum resection volumes in patients undergoing BCS. PMID:24073200

  1. WE-FG-207A-05: Dedicated Breast CT as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: Physics and Clinical Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Karellas, A

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  2. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development.

    PubMed

    Boone, J

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  3. Therapeutic response to a novel enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for residual lesions in patients with stage IV primary breast cancer, following induction chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide or taxane

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yasuoka, Miki; Iwasa, Hitomi; Miyatake, Kana; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Hamada, Norihiko; Tamura, Taiji; Kobayashi, Kana; Murata, Yoriko; Yamagami, Takuji; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Linac-based radiotherapy has a negligible effect on the majority of advanced neoplasms. Therefore, a novel radiosensitization treatment Kochi Oxydol Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas II (KORTUC II), which utilizes hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate was developed. The effectiveness of KORTUC II for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant supraclavicular lymph node metastases and recurrent breast cancers has previously been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of KORTUC II in patients with stage IV primary breast cancer. Seven patients (age range, 36–65 years) were enrolled. All patients received induction chemotherapy prior to KORTUC II treatment and underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examinations prior to and 2–7 months following KORTUC II treatment, and every six months thereafter where possible. The radiotherapy regimen (x-ray irradiation) was 2.75 gray (Gy)/fraction, 5 fractions/week for 16–18 fractions with a total radiation dose of 44–49.5 Gy. Administration of the KORTUC II agent (3–6 ml: 3 ml for a lesion <3 cm in diameter and 6 ml for a lesion ≥3 cm) was initiated from the sixth radiotherapy fraction, and was conducted twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by PET-CT examinations prior to and following KORTUC II treatment. Of the seven lesions from the seven patients, five exhibited complete responses, two exhibited partial responses and none exhibited stable disease or progressive disease. The overall survival rate was determined to be 100% at 1 and 86% at 2 years post-treatment. The mean duration of follow-up by December 2014 was 51 months. The results of the PET-CT studies indicated that KORTUC II treatment demonstrated marked therapeutic effects with satisfactory treatment outcomes and acceptable adverse effects. PMID:28123524

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis of diagnostically challenging lesions in breast MRI: a comparison between a radiomics and a feature-selective approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Lobbes, Marc; Houben, Ivo; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Wengert, Georg; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Lemaitre, Guillaume; Meyer-Baese, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostically challenging lesions pose a challenge both for the radiological reading and also for current CAD systems. They are not well-defined in both morphology (geometric shape) and kinetics (temporal enhancement) and pose a problem to lesion detection and classification. Their strong phenotypic differences can be visualized by MRI. Radiomics represents a novel approach to achieve a detailed quantification of the tumour phenotypes by analyzing a large number of image descriptors. In this paper, we apply a quantitative radiomics approach based on shape, texture and kinetics tumor features and evaluate it in comparison to a reduced-order feature approach in a computer-aided diagnosis system applied to diagnostically challenging lesions.

  5. Breast cancer in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease: clinical and pathological analysis of 76 cases in 63 patients.

    PubMed

    Cutuli, B; Dhermain, F; Borel, C; de Larochefordiere, A; Graic, Y; de Lafontan, B; Dilhyudy, J M; Mignotte, H; Tessier, E; Tortochaux, J; N'Guyen, T; Bey, P; Le Mevel-Le Pourhiet, A; Velten, M; Arriagada, R

    1997-12-01

    In a retrospective multicentric analysis, 63 women treated between 1941 to 1988 for Hodgkin's disease (HD) subsequently developed 76 breast cancers (BC). The median age at diagnosis of HD was 26 years (range 7-67), and 22 women (35%) were 20 years old or less. Exclusive radiotherapy (RT) was used in 36 women (57%) and combined modalities with chemotherapy (CT) in 25 (39%). Breast cancer occurred after a median interval of 16 years (range 2-40) and the median age at diagnosis of the first BC was 42 years (range 25-73). TNM classification (UICC, 1978) showed 10 T0 (non-palpable lesions) (13%), 20 T1 (26%), 22 T2 (29%), 8 T3 (11%), 7 T4 (9%) and 9 Tx (12%), giving altogether a total of 76 tumours, including, respectively, 5 and 8 bilateral synchronous and metachronous lesions. Among the 68 tumours initially discovered, 53 ductal infiltrating, one lobular infiltrating and two medullary carcinomas were found. Moreover, two fibrosarcomas and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were also found. Among 50 axillary dissections for invasive carcinomas, histological involvement was found in 31 cases (62%). 45 tumours were treated by mastectomy, without (n = 35) or with (n = 10) RT. 27 tumours had lumpectomy, without (n = 7) or with RT (n = 20). 2 others received RT only, and one only CT. 7 patients (11%) developed isolated local recurrence. 20 patients (32%) developed metastases and all died; 38 are in complete remission, whereas 5 died of intercurrent disease. The 5-year disease-specific survival rate by the Kaplan-Meier method was 61%. The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for pN0, pN1-3 and pN > or = 3 groups were 91%, 66% and 0%, respectively (P < 0.0001) and 100%, 88%, 64% and 23% for the T0, T1, T2 and T3T4 groups, respectively. These secondary BCs seem to be of two types: a large number of aggressive tumours with a very unfavourable prognosis (especially in the case of pN > 3 and/or T3T4); and many tumours with a 'slow development' such as DCIS and microinvasive

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  7. Detectability of Hygroscopic Clips Used in Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Moshe; Olsha, Oded; Gekhtman, David; Nikitin, Irena; Cohen, Yamin; Messing, Michael; Lioubashevsky, Natali; Abu Dalo, Ribhi; Hadar, Tal; Golomb, Eliahu

    2017-02-01

    Sonographically detectable clips were introduced over the last decade. We retrospectively studied the rate and duration of sonographically detectable clip detectability in patients with breast cancer who had sonographically detectable clips inserted over a 2-year period. Nine of 26 patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with all clips remaining detectable 140 to 187 days after insertion. Six of the 9 had intraoperative sonographic localization, with 1 reoperation (17%). Eleven additional patients with nonpalpable tumors and sonographically detectable clips had intraoperative sonographic localization with 1 reoperation (9%). In 1 patient, a sonographically detectable clip enabled intraoperative identification of a suspicious lymph node. There were no complications or clip migration. Sonographically detectable clips are helpful in breast cancer surgery with and without neoadjuvant chemotherapy, remaining detectable for many months and often averting preoperative localization and scheduling difficulties.

  8. Comparison of Whole-Body 18F FDG PET/MR Imaging and Whole-Body 18F FDG PET/CT in Terms of Lesion Detection and Radiation Dose in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melsaether, Amy N.; Raad, Roy A.; Pujara, Akshat C.; Ponzo, Fabio D.; Pysarenko, Kristine M.; Jhaveri, Komal; Babb, James S.; Sigmund, Eric E.; Kim, Sungheon G.; Moy, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare fluorine 18 (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 18F FDG combined PET and computed tomography (CT) in terms of organ-specific metastatic lesion detection and radiation dose in patients with breast cancer. Materials and Methods From July 2012 to October 2013, this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant prospective study included 51 patients with breast cancer (50 women; mean age, 56 years; range, 32–76 years; one man; aged 70 years) who completed PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast material–enhanced sequences after unenhanced PET/CT. Written informed consent for study participation was obtained. Two independent readers for each modality recorded site and number of lesions. Imaging and clinical follow-up, with consensus in two cases, served as the reference standard. Results There were 242 distant metastatic lesions in 30 patients, 18 breast cancers in 17 patients, and 19 positive axillary nodes in eight patients. On a per-patient basis, PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced sequences depicted distant (30 of 30 [100%] for readers 1 and 2) and axillary (eight of eight [100%] for reader 1, seven of eight [88%] for reader 2) metastatic disease at rates similar to those of unenhanced PET/CT (distant metastatic disease: 28 of 29 [96%] for readers 3 and 4, P = .50; axillary metastatic disease: seven of eight [88%] for readers 3 and 4, P > .99) and outperformed PET/CT in the detection of breast cancer (17 of 17 [100%] for readers 1 and 2 vs 11 of 17 [65%] for reader 3 and 10 of 17 [59%] for reader 4; P < .001). PET/MR imaging showed increased sensitivity for liver (40 of 40 [100%] for reader 1 and 32 of 40 [80%] for reader 2 vs 30 of 40 [75%] for reader 3 and 28 of 40 [70%] for reader 4; P < .001) and bone (105 of 107 [98%] for reader 1 and 102 of 107 [95%] for reader 2 vs 106 of 107 [99%] for reader 3 and 93 of 107 [87

  9. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  10. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  11. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  12. [Axillary lymph node dissection in clinically occult breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Le Bouëdec, G; Pomel, C; Chamussy, E; Feillel, V; de Latour, M; Dauplat, J

    1996-07-01

    The study concerns 265 patients with axillary lymph node dissection for non-palpable breast cancer. The mammographically detected breast tumors were: 36 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), 23 microinvasive carcinomas, 206 invasive carcinomas of which 179 were invasive ductal cancers (IDC), 25 invasive lobular cancers (ILC) and 2 mucinous invasive carcinomas. The histologic size of the invasive component was < or = 5 mm in 38 cases, 6-10 mm in 84 cases, 11-15 mm in 53 cases, 16-20 mm in 16 cases, > 20 mm in 15 cases. Axillary dissection was performed immediately during the initial surgical procedure in 209 patients (79%) or secondarily in 56 (21%) according to the results of intraoperative examination of surgical specimens on frozen sections. Axillary lymph node involvement was not found in DCIS, microinvasive carcinomas or invasive carcinomas < or = 5 mm in size. Among all 206 invasive breast carcinomas, lymph node involvement was found in 7.8% (16/206) of cases. There were 9/84 (10.7%) in tumors > 10 mm, 7/122 (5.8%) in tumors < or = 10 mm. Thus, it is concluded that lymph node involvement is unlikely to be found in patients with non palpable breast cancers, specially those with carcinoma in situ, microinvasive breast tumors and invasive breast cancer with less than 5 mm maximum diameter size. Axillary dissection may be avoided in these patients. However, the use of new prognostic factors of lymph node involvement may help in the definition of patient group.

  13. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast

  14. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant

  15. Accessory Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyun Jo; Jung, Sung Hoo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Ectopic breast tissue usually develops along the mammary ridges, and the incidence has been reported to be 2–6% of the general population. Occurrence of primary carcinoma in ectopic breast tissue is rare. Case Report We report the case of 59-year-old woman with accessory breast carcinoma in her left axilla. Conclusion Because an accessory areola or nipple is often missing and awareness of physicians and patients about these unsuspicious masses is lacking, clinical diagnosis of accessory breast carcinoma is frequently delayed. Therefore, a mass along the ‘milk line’ should be examined carefully, and any suspicious lesions should be evaluated. PMID:20847887

  16. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  17. Exploring breast with therapeutic ductoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sheldon Marc

    2014-01-01

    Breast lesions are thought to arise mostly from the epithelium of ductal lining. Conventional imaging could only show indirect images of suspected lesions which are confirmed by percutaneous biopsies. However, ductoscopy provides direct images of the ductal epithelium which is the source of most malignant and papillary lesions. As an advance of current ductoscopy systems, pathologic nipple discharge (PND) could be treated ductoscopically by miniaturized endo-baskets or wires. Our goal is to discuss current intraductal technology which enables diagnostic and therapeutic advance for breast lesions that cause nipple discharge. PMID:25083507

  18. Exploring breast with therapeutic ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Balci, Fatih Levent; Feldman, Sheldon Marc

    2014-05-01

    Breast lesions are thought to arise mostly from the epithelium of ductal lining. Conventional imaging could only show indirect images of suspected lesions which are confirmed by percutaneous biopsies. However, ductoscopy provides direct images of the ductal epithelium which is the source of most malignant and papillary lesions. As an advance of current ductoscopy systems, pathologic nipple discharge (PND) could be treated ductoscopically by miniaturized endo-baskets or wires. Our goal is to discuss current intraductal technology which enables diagnostic and therapeutic advance for breast lesions that cause nipple discharge.

  19. Sampling probability distributions of lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, P.; Warren, L. M.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2015-03-01

    One approach to image perception studies in mammography using virtual clinical trials involves the insertion of simulated lesions into normal mammograms. To facilitate this, a method has been developed that allows for sampling of lesion positions across the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections in accordance with measured distributions of real lesion locations. 6825 mammograms from our mammography image database were segmented to find the breast outline. The outlines were averaged and smoothed to produce an average outline for each laterality and radiographic projection. Lesions in 3304 mammograms with malignant findings were mapped on to a standardised breast image corresponding to the average breast outline using piecewise affine transforms. A four dimensional probability distribution function was found from the lesion locations in the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections for calcification and noncalcification lesions. Lesion locations sampled from this probability distribution function were mapped on to individual mammograms using a piecewise affine transform which transforms the average outline to the outline of the breast in the mammogram. The four dimensional probability distribution function was validated by comparing it to the two dimensional distributions found by considering each radiographic projection and laterality independently. The correlation of the location of the lesions sampled from the four dimensional probability distribution function across radiographic projections was shown to match the correlation of the locations of the original mapped lesion locations. The current system has been implemented as a web-service on a server using the Python Django framework. The server performs the sampling, performs the mapping and returns the results in a javascript object notation format.

  20. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  1. Pathologic High-risk Lesions, Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melissa

    2016-12-01

    Percutaneous imaging-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) is a less invasive and less expensive alternative to surgical biopsy for the evaluation of breast lesions. After a CNB the radiologist determine if there is concordance between the pathology, imaging, and clinical findings. Patient management after CNB diagnosis of high-risk breast lesion varies. Surgical excision is warranted for lesions yielding a CNB diagnosis of ADH; however controversy exists regarding the need for surgical excision after CNB diagnosis of radial scar, papillary lesion, atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Repeat CNB or surgical excision is warranted if histologic findings and imaging findings are discordant.

  2. Detection of lesions in mammographic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper is a report on very surprising results from recent work on detection of real lesions in digitized mammograms. The experiments were done using a novel experimental procedure with hybrid images. The lesions (signals) were real tumor masses extracted from breast tissue specimen radiographs. In the detection experiments, the tumors were added to digitized normal mammographic backgrounds. The results of this new work have been both novel and very surprising. Contrast thresholds increased with increasing lesion size for lesions larger than approximately 1 mm in diameter. Earlier work with white noise, radiographic image noise, computed tomography (CT) noise and some types of patient structure have accustomed us to a particular relationship between lesion size and contrast for constant detectability. All previous contrast/detail (CD) diagrams have been similar, the contrast threshold decreases as lesion size increases and flattens at large lesion sizes. The CD diagram for lesion detection in mammographic structure is completely different. It will be shown that this is a consequence of the power-law dependence of the projected breast tissue structure spectral density on spatial frequency. Mammographic tissue structure power spectra have the form P(f) equals B/f(beta ), with an average exponent of approximately 3 (range from 2 to 4), and are approximately isotropic (small angular dependence). Results for two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) signal detection experiments using 4 tumor lesions and one mathematically generated signal will be presented. These results are for an unbiased selection of mammographic backgrounds. It is possible that an additional understanding of the effects of breast structure on lesion detectability can be obtained by investigating detectability in various classes of mammographic backgrounds. This will be the subject of future research.

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  4. Correlation of lesions from multiple images for CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hui-Hua; Giger, Maryellen L.; Horsch, Karla; Hendrick, R. Edward; Vyborny, Carl J.; Lan, Li

    2004-05-01

    The object of this research is to investigate a method for determining whether two different imaged presentations of a lesion actually represent the same abnormality. Tasks of this kind are expected to arise in numerous applications, including when interpreting multi-view mammograms or multi-modal images for breast cancer diagnosis and when comparing breast images in longitudinal studies for evaluation of disease prognosis or treatment outcome. Currently, we consider the above-stated discrimination task in two-view breast sonography. We are studying image-based feature(s) and are developing general correlation formulation that uses the identified feature(s). By using a database of 262 actual breast lesions we have obtained promising initial results that yield an Az value of 0.82 in the task of distinguishing between corresponding lesion pairs and non-corresponding lesion pairs.

  5. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  6. Juvenile papillomatosis of the breast in young male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, A; Fioriti, L; Brugia, M; Roila, F; Farabi, R; Sidoni, A; Avenia, N

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile papillomatosis of the breast ("Swiss cheese disease'') is a benign localized proliferative condition of the breast which occurs almost exclusively in young adult women. Patients with this lesion often have a family history of breast carcinoma, but rarely carcinoma may coexist with the lesion at the time of diagnosis. We present a case of a young male with juvenile papillomatosis of the breast. The pathology and clinical management of this rare lesion is discussed.

  7. Breast infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... female breast anatomy Breast infection Female breast References Hunt KK, Mittendorf EA. Diseases of the breast. In: ... Jacobson, MD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda Center for ...

  8. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a direct link between breast cancer and pesticides. Symptoms Early breast cancer often does not cause ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  9. Minimal breast cancer: a clinical appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, T G; Donegan, W L; Burg, E A

    1977-01-01

    Eighty-five patients with a diagnosis of minimal breast cancer were evaluated. The predominant lesion was intraductal carcinoma, and axillary metastases occurred in association with minimal breast cancer in seven of 96 cases. One death occurred due to minimal breast cancer. Bilateral mammary carcinoma was evident in 24% and bilateral minimal breast cancer in 13% of the patients. The component lesions of minimal breast cancer have varied biologic activity, but prognosis is good with a variety of operations. The multifocal nature of minimal breast cancer and the potential for metastases should be recognized. Therapy should include removal of the entire mammary parenchyma and low axillary nodes. The high incidence of bilateral malignancy supports elective contralateral biopsy at the time of therapy for minimal breast cancer. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:203233

  10. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  11. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  12. Cutaneous melanoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, D N; Kinne, D W; Rosen, P P; Ashikari, R; Fortner, J G

    1979-03-01

    A study of 115 cutaneous melanomas of the breast demonstrated that these neoplasms follow different metastatic patterns than do primary carcinomas of the breast and require a different therapuetic approach. Lesions located below a 3 cm from the clavicle metastasized exclusively to the axillary nodes regardless of location. None of 19 internal mammary node chains examined histologically contained tumor deposits. Microstaging of the primary lesion correlated closely with prognosis and lymph node metastasis. Treatment by mastectomy (radical, modified, extended radical) offered no advantage over local excision of the primary plus axillary dissection. The latter procedure is recommended for all cutaneous melanomas of the breast which require node dissection. Mastectomy is not indicated unless the breast is in the field of wide local excision. Internal mammary node dissections are not indicated.

  13. Computerized Interpretation of Dynamic Breast MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    inhomogenieity artifacts in breast MR images. We developed a fuzzy c- means (FCM) based method for 3D lesion segmentation, which is a key procedure in...automatic, efficient, and objective. We developed a fuzzy c- means (FCM) clustering based method for the segmentation of breast lesions in 3-D...We investigated and developed a fuzzy c- means (FCM) clustering based technique for automatically identifying characteristic kinetic curves from

  14. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-03-16

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

  15. Computerized Interpretation of Dynamic Breast MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    malignant and benign lesions. Keywords: Fuzzy c- means , breast cancer, contrast-enhanced MRI, tumor heterogeneity, computer-aided diag- nosis (CAD) 1...applications. tumor response to therapy[3]. Furthermore, breast MRI can In this paper, we present a fast fuzzy c- means (FCM) based be used for quantitative...use of a fuzzy c- means (FCM) algorithm for the assessment of 3-D tumor extent from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (CE-MRI) of the breast

  16. Fibroadenoma - breast

    MedlinePlus

    Breast lump - fibroadenoma; Breast lump - noncancerous; Breast lump - benign ... The cause of fibroadenomas is not known. There may be a connection to a problem with genes. Fibroadenoma is the most common benign ...

  17. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sonogram of the breast Images Female breast References Hacker NF, Friedland ML. Breast disease. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  18. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  19. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique.

  20. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  1. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  2. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Østvold, Anne Carine; Grundt, Kirsten; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Havaki, Sophia; Kollia, Panagoula; Kittas, Christos; Marinos, Evangelos; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki

    2009-01-01

    Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR), real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non malignant breast lesions and

  3. The relationship between the attenuation properties of breast microcalcifications and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, F.; Van Ongeval, C.; Marshall, N.; Meylaers, T.; Michielsen, K.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2010-02-01

    Screening mammography is one of the most challenging radiological techniques and this is partly due to the difficulty in detecting microcalcifications (MCs) against an anatomical background of varying mammographic tissue density. Further complicating factors in the detection of MCs include the small size and their resemblance to other bright structures in the breast. A number of different microcalcification simulating materials are available and these are often incorporated in test objects used to study some aspects of an imaging system, for example, optimal beam quality selection in digital mammography. Aluminum (Al) has similar x-ray attenuation properties to MCs and therefore Al is extensively used in test objects. However, to the best of our knowledge, the suitability of Al as a substitute material for MCs has not been studied explicitly. The aim of this study was therefore to demonstrate that spectral optimization studies for MCs can be performed with Al sheets. The approach used was twofold. First, contrasts generated by Al and MCs at several exposure settings were compared, and secondly an optimization study was performed with both Al and MCs as the contrasting target using an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based digital mammography unit. Specimens from stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsies of non-palpable lesions with mammographic evidence of MCs were obtained from clinical routine patients. Contrasts generated by these MCs and by Al sheets were measured for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations, for different polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thicknesses at the extremes of the x-ray tube voltages used clinically. A linear regression was then applied between the two measurements of contrast; the ratio of the angular coefficient q obtained from the fitted regression lines for Al and MCs ranged from 0.96 to 0.99 for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh combinations at 2 and 4 cm PMMA, respectively, and from 0.83 at 4 cm PMMA to 1.14 at 7 cm PMMA for the W/Rh combination

  4. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Breast Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, discharge or skin irritation, see your health care provider. Minor and serious breast problems have similar symptoms. Although many women fear cancer, most breast problems are not cancer. Some common ...

  6. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  7. Vitronectin: a promising breast cancer serum biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer in patients.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wende; Zhang, Xuhui; Xiu, Bingshui; Yang, Xiqin; Hu, Shuofeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Duan, Cuimi; Jin, Shujuan; Ying, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yanfeng; Han, Xiaowei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Fan, Yawen; Johnson, Heather; Meng, Di; Persson, Jenny L; Zhang, Heqiu; Feng, XiaoYan; Huang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, identification of new biomarkers for early diagnosis and detection will improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. In the present study, we determined serum levels of vitronectin (VN) in 93 breast cancer patients, 30 benign breast lesions, 9 precancerous lesions, and 30 healthy individuals by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Serum VN level was significantly higher in patients with stage 0-I primary breast cancer than in healthy individuals, patients with benign breast lesion or precancerous lesions, as well as those with breast cancer of higher stages. Serum VN level was significantly and negatively correlated with tumor size, lymph node status, and clinical stage (p < 0.05 in all cases). In addition, VN displayed higher area under curve (AUC) value (0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI) [0.62-0.84]) than carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (0.64, 95 % CI [0.52-0.77]) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) (0.69, 95 % CI [0.58-0.81]) when used to distinguish stage 0-I cancer and normal control. Importantly, the combined use of three biomarkers yielded an improvement in receiver operating characteristic curve with an AUC of 0.83, 95 % CI [0.74-0.92]. Taken together, our current study showed for the first time that serum VN is a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer when combined with CEA and CA15-3.

  8. Evolving paradigms in multifocal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Roberto; Aftimos, Philippe; Sotiriou, Christos; Desmedt, Christine

    2015-04-01

    The 7th edition of the TNM defines multifocal breast cancer as multiple simultaneous ipsilateral and synchronous breast cancer lesions, provided they are macroscopically distinct and measurable using current traditional pathological and clinical tools. According to the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the characterization of only the largest lesion is considered sufficient, unless the grade and/or histology are different between the lesions. Here, we review three potentially clinically relevant aspects of multifocal breast cancers: first, the importance of a different intrinsic breast cancer subtype of the various lesions; second, the emerging awareness of inter-lesion heterogeneity; and last but not least, the potential introduction of bias in clinical trials due to the unrecognized biological diversity of these cancers. Although the current strategy to assess the lesion with the largest diameter has clearly its advantages in terms of costs and feasibility, this recommendation may not be sustainable in time and might need to be adapted to be compliant with new evolving paradigms in breast cancer.

  9. Multiparametric Breast MRI of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Breast MRI has increased in popularity over the past two decades due to evidence for its high sensitivity for cancer detection. Current clinical MRI approaches rely on the use of a dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) acquisition that facilitates morphologic and semi-quantitative kinetic assessments of breast lesions. The use of more functional and quantitative parameters, such as pharmacokinetic features from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) on diffusion weighted MRI, and choline concentrations on MR spectroscopy, hold promise to broaden the utility of MRI and improve its specificity. However, due to wide variations in approach among centers for measuring these parameters and the considerable technical challenges, robust multicenter data supporting their routine use is not yet available, limiting current applications of many of these tools to research purposes. PMID:26613883

  10. X-ray stereotactic lesion localization in conjunction with dedicated scintimammography

    SciTech Connect

    Mitali J. More; Deepa Narayanan; Patricia J. Goodale; Stanislaw Majewski; Benjamin Welch; Randolph Wojcik; Mark Williams

    2003-10-01

    We are developing a dual modality system that combines digital X-ray mammography with gamma emission scintigraphy on an upright mammography gantry. The breast is held under mild compression by a support structure that is independent of the detectors. The X-ray source and detectors can be rotated around a fixed rotation axis permitting multiple views of the breast with fixed compression. Two such views can be combined as a stereotactic pair to obtain the three-dimensional location of breast lesions. Information about the location of the lesion within the breast permits corrections for attenuation and detector spatial resolution, resulting in more accurate estimation of the true lesion-to-background concentration ratio, based on the image lesion-to-background counts ratio. In this paper, we describe the model used to make these corrections, and present the results of the phantom experiments designed to test the accuracy of our calculations.

  11. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  12. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  13. [Dosimetric comparison of external partial breast irradiation with whole breast irradiation and partial breast brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Bodács, István; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2014-06-01

    Different techniques exist for the delivery of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. The conventional method is whole breast irradiation. However, in selected patients partial breast irradiation can be performed, either with external beams or brachytherapy. In the current study three irradiation techniques are compared regarding dosimetric aspects. Treatment plans of thirty women treated with external beam conformal partial breast irradiation (CONF) were evaluated using dose-volume histograms. For the same patients whole breast irradiation plans (WBI) were made and compared with the CONF ones. Breast and lung of both sides, and heart at left sided lesions were contoured as organs at risk. After this, dose plans of another thirty patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) were analyzed and compared with the CONF plans. According to our results the 90% isodose curve covered at least 97% of the target volume at all three techniques, and this value was 100% for CONF. The maximal dose within target volume was 106% in CONF and 115% in WBI plans. Volume of ipsilateral breast receiving the prescribed dose was 66%, 15% and 13% in the WBI, CONF and IBT plans, respectively. The dose to the contralateral breast was less for CONF compared to WBI. Volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 30% of the prescribed dose was 15%, 8% and 1%, the maximal dose was 105%, 94% and 47% in the WBI, CONF and IBT plans, respectively. In the same order the maximal dose to the heart was 82%, 49% and 25%, while the dose irradiated to 5% of the heart volume was 27%, 19% and 14% at left sided lesions. Regarding target coverage, the conformal technique was the best, and the dose was more homogeneous than at WBI. With respect to dose to organs at risk the partial breast irradiation techniques were much more favorable than WBI, and the lowest doses occurred in the IBT treatment plans.

  14. Can T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI predict clinically occult inflammatory breast cancer before pathological examination? A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Watanabe, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Occult inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is defined as an invasive cancer without any clinical inflammatory signs but with pathologically proven dermal lymphovascular invasion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of 3-T breast MRI to predict occult IBC before pathological examination and compare its effectiveness with that of mammography (MMG) and ultrasound (US). A retrospective review of clinical, radiological, and pathological records of 460 consecutive breast cancers revealed five proved occult IBCs. We analyzed the findings of 3-T MRI, MMG, and US for these five occult IBCs. Primary breast lesions were detected by 3-T MRI, MMG, and US in all five breasts with occult IBCs. 3-T MRI revealed 40% mass type lesions and 60% non-mass-like type lesions. Kinetic curve analysis of the primary breast lesions showed a rapid initial kinetic phase in 80% of lesions and a delayed washout pattern in 60% of lesions. 3-T MRI showed slight skin thickness in 60% of breasts, whereas MMG and US showed slight skin thickness in 40 and 20% of breasts, respectively. Subcutaneous and prepectoral edema, as evaluated on T2-weighted images, was present in all five breasts with occult IBCs. The presence of subcutaneous and prepectoral edema on T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI is an important finding that should suggest the diagnosis of occult IBC before pathological examination.

  15. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    PubMed Central

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient measurements, all tumors were visible and easily differentiated from artifacts and areolas in the scatterplots. The different rate of intake and wash out of the fluorescent contrast agent in the healthy versus malignant tissues was also observed in the scatterplot: this information can be used to discriminate malignant lesion from normal structures. PMID:21483622

  16. Computer detection of stellate lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The three primary signs for which radiologists search when screening mammograms for breast cancer are stellate lesions, microcalcifications, and circumscribed lesions. Stellate lesions are of particular importance, as they are almost always associated with a malignancy. Further, they are often indicated only by subtle architectural distortions and so are in general easier to miss than the other signs. We have developed a method for the automatic detection of stellate lesions in digitized mammograms, and have tested them on image data where the presence or absence of malignancies is known. We extract image features from the known images, use them to grow binary decision trees, and use those trees to label each pixel of new mammograms with its probability of being located on an abnormality. The primary feature for the detection of stellate lesions is ALOE, analysis of local oriented edges, which is derived from an analysis of the histogram of edge orientations in local windows. Other features, based on the Laws texture energy measures, have been developed to respond to normal tissue, and so improve the false alarm performance of the entire system.

  17. Breast Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast gangrene is rare in surgical practice. Gangrene of breast can be idiopathic or secondary to some causative factor. Antibiotics and debridement are used for management. Acute inflammatory infiltrate, severe necrosis of breast tissue, necrotizing arteritis, and venous thrombosis is observed on histopathology. The aim of was to study patients who had breast gangrene. Methods A prospective study of 10 patients who had breast gangrene over a period of 6 years were analyzed Results All the patients in the study group were female. Total of 10 patients were encountered who had breast gangrene. Six patients presented with breast gangrene on the right breast whereas four had on left breast. Out of 10 patients, three had breast abscess after teeth bite followed by gangrene, one had iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of erythematous area of breast under septic conditions. Four had history of application of belladonna on cutaneous breast abscess and had then gangrene. All were lactating female. Amongst the rest two were elderly, one of which was a diabetic who had gangrene of breast and had no application of belladonna. All except one had debridement under cover of broad spectrum antibiotics. Three patients had grafting to cover the raw area. Conclusion Breast gangrene occurs rarely. Etiology is variable and mutifactorial. Teeth bite while lactation and the iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of breast abscess under unsterlised conditions could be causative. Uncontrolled diabetes can be one more causative factor for the breast gangrene. Belladonna application as a topical agent could be inciting factor. Sometimes gangrene of breast can be idiopathic. Treatment is antibiotics and debridement. PMID:21854557

  18. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  19. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  20. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  1. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... Planning to have more children Talk with a plastic surgeon if you are considering cosmetic breast surgery. ... before surgery: You may need a mammogram . Your plastic surgeon will do a routine breast exam. You ...

  2. Breast Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your hormone levels fluctuate each month during your menstrual cycle, which causes changes in breast tissue. Swelling begins ... changes that occur at various points in the menstrual cycles. Finding a change or lump in your breast ...

  3. Breast Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... discuss your symptoms, their relation to your menstrual cycle and any other relevant information. To prepare for ... one or both breasts? How does your menstrual cycle affect the breast cyst or lump? When was ...

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  5. Quantification of osteolytic bone lesions in a preclinical rat trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, Andrea; Bretschi, Maren; Bäuerle, Tobias; Giske, Kristina; Hillengass, Jens; Bendl, Rolf

    2013-10-01

    In breast cancer, most of the patients who died, have developed bone metastasis as disease progression. Bone metastases in case of breast cancer are mainly bone destructive (osteolytic). To understand pathogenesis and to analyse response to different treatments, animal models, in our case rats, are examined. For assessment of treatment response to bone remodelling therapies exact segmentations of osteolytic lesions are needed. Manual segmentations are not only time-consuming but lack in reproducibility. Computerized segmentation tools are essential. In this paper we present an approach for the computerized quantification of osteolytic lesion volumes using a comparison to a healthy reference model. The presented qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed bone volumes show, that the automatically segmented lesion volumes complete missing bone in a reasonable way.

  6. Intraductal location of the sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed

    Unal, Bulent; Gur, A Serhat; Bhargava, Rohit; Edington, Howard; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Soran, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    Sclerosing adenosis is a benign breast disease with non-specific images on ultrasound or mammogram. It can mimic infiltrating carcinoma when the above mentioned imaging techniques are used. Herein we present a patient with breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and subsequently underwent mastectomy. Ductoscopy was performed to the mastectomised breast specimen as per the ductoscopy research protocol. Ductoscopy revealed several nodular lesions in the duct with no additional demonstrable intraductal pathology. The lesions were reported as sclerosing adenosis by pathologist. As to our knowledge, this is the first case in literature that demonstrates the use of ductoscopy in diagnosing the sclerosing adenosis in the breast tissue. Ductoscopy and development of ductoscopy guided biopsy techniques may be used as an early diagnostic method for the ductal breast lesions (Fig. 2, Ref. 10). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. An unexpected metastasis of breast cancer mimicking wheal rush

    PubMed Central

    DAMASKOS, C.; DIMITROULIS, D.; PERGIALIOTIS, V.; DOULA, C.; KOULERMOU, G.; ANTONIOU, E.A.; FRANGOULIS, M.; STERGIOS, K.; KONTZOGLOU, K.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and ranks second in cancer deaths worldwide. Breast cancer can metastasize to the skin but rarely, cutaneous metastases may be the first indication of the cancer. Skin metastases of breast cancer are usually found on the chest and close to the point of the mastectomy. We present the rare clinical entity of a breast cancer which was first diagnosed due to the skin metastasis away from the breast tumor. This is a rare case because the skin lesions usually appear simultaneously or secondary. Also, while the existing metastasis; the only symptom was the wheal rash. PMID:27734799

  9. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  10. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided pbreast density (, and therefore, breast cancer risk), as well as detect and help differentiate breast lesions. Finally, our sound-speed tomograms may also be a useful tool to monitor clinical response of breast cancer patients to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. A developmental hypothesis to explain the multicentricity of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, C R

    1998-01-01

    In this article the author proposes that the multicentricity of breast cancer might be explained by a developmental hypothesis. Genetic alterations ("hits") occurring in epithelial stem cells during the development of the breast may be transmitted to populations of daughter cells during growth. As a result, areas of the breast may be predisposed to malignant transformation with the occurrence of further genetic hits. Areas with the same predisposition should be anatomically connected, and earlier hits during breast development should result in larger areas of predisposition. The multicentricity of breast cancer would be explained if multiple lesions--monoclonal for the predisposing genetic hit and polyclonal for subsequent hits--developed within a predisposed area. Multiple lesions arising from the spread of disease by extension would be expected to share many genetic hits. The author discusses the implications that further evidence supporting the developmental hypothesis would have for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:9679488

  12. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  13. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  14. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  15. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  16. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  17. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  18. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  19. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  20. Expression and Activation of STAT Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-08

    several other studies suggest that estrogen given in low doses to relieve menopausal symptoms probably does not increase the incidence of breast cancer...breast cancer. ’It was recently demonstrated that, while .overall STAT DNA-bindinq activity is low in normal breast and benign lesions, it is...adjuvant anticancer treatment, particularly in chronic myelogenous leukemia, maliqnant melanoma, low · grade lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and midgut

  1. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  2. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  3. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  4. Development of array piezoelectric fingers towards in vivo breast tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Chung, Youngsoo; Brooks, Ari D.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the development of a handheld 4 × 1 piezoelectric finger (PEF) array breast tumor detector system towards in vivo patient testing, particularly, on how the duration of the DC applied voltage, the depression depth of the handheld unit, and breast density affect the PEF detection sensitivity on 40 patients. The tests were blinded and carried out in four phases: with DC voltage durations 5, 3, 2, to 0.8 s corresponding to scanning a quadrant, a half, a whole breast, and both breasts within 30 min, respectively. The results showed that PEF detection sensitivity was unaffected by shortening the applied voltage duration from 5 to 0.8 s nor was it affected by increasing the depression depth from 2 to 6 mm. Over the 40 patients, PEF detected 46 of the 48 lesions (46/48)—with the smallest lesion detected being 5 mm in size. Of 28 patients (some have more than one lesion) with mammography records, PEF detected 31/33 of all lesions (94%) and 14/15 of malignant lesions (93%), while mammography detected 30/33 of all lesions (91%) and 12/15 of malignant lesions (80%), indicating that PEF could detect malignant lesions not detectable by mammography without significantly increasing false positives. PEF's detection sensitivity is also shown to be independent of breast density, suggesting that PEF could be a potential tool for detecting breast cancer in young women and women with dense breasts.

  5. Dose Assessment and Considerations When a Radioactive Seed is Unrecoverable in a Breast Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard P

    2016-11-01

    Excision of non-palpable breast tumors in cancer patients has been routinely performed using surgical clips and wires placed under mammographic or ultrasound guidance. An alternative method exists for performing these surgeries without surgical wires and this approach has become more widely used at Oncology Centers in the United States. Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) performs many of their breast surgeries with radioactive seeds and has enjoyed favorable outcomes along with an enhanced patient experience. There are some inherent difficulties with using radioactive seeds, and seed tracking can be a problem during surgical procedures. When a seed is misplaced, an extensive search is conducted in an effort to locate the misplaced seed. Every attempt to recover these radioactive seeds should be made unless patient safety is jeopardized. If the seed is unrecoverable, then a dose assessment must be performed and corrective action determined. It is important to have adequate policies and procedures in place to prevent these rare occurrences. They should be treated as a radioactive medical event.

  6. Benign Breast Disease: Toward Molecular Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    fibroadenoma , or columnar changes were consid- ered nonproliferative unless they also contained one of the lesions denoted above. statistical analysis...Cancer 1989;64: 1977-83. 16. Dupont WD, Page DL, Parl FF, et al. Long-term risk of breast cancer in women with fibroadenoma . N Engl J Med 1994;331...PDWA), and AH. NP fibrocystic changes included cyst formation, stromal fibrosis, apocrine metaplasia, and noncomplex fibroadenoma . Proliferative

  7. Hand-held and automated breast ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Kimme-Smith, C.

    1985-01-01

    The book is a guide for physicians and technologists who use US as an adjunct to mammography; it carefully outlines the pros and cons of US of the breast and its role in the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. After an introduction that discusses the philosophy of breast US, the chapters cover the physics of US and instrumentation (both hand-held transducers as well as automated water path scanners), then proceed to a discussion of the normal breast. Sections on benign disorders, malignant lesions, and pitfalls of diagnosis are followed by quiz cases.

  8. Molecular breast tomosynthesis with scanning focus multi-pinhole cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Goorden, Marlies C.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-08-01

    Planar molecular breast imaging (MBI) is rapidly gaining in popularity in diagnostic oncology. To add 3D capabilities, we introduce a novel molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) scanner concept based on multi-pinhole collimation. In our design, the patient lies prone with the pendant breast lightly compressed between transparent plates. Integrated webcams view the breast through these plates and allow the operator to designate the scan volume (e.g. a whole breast or a suspected region). The breast is then scanned by translating focusing multi-pinhole plates and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors together in a sequence that optimizes count yield from the volume-of-interest. With simulations, we compared MBT with existing planar MBI. In a breast phantom containing different lesions, MBT improved tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over planar MBI by 12% and 111% for 4.0 and 6.0 mm lesions respectively in case of whole breast scanning. For the same lesions, much larger CNR improvements of 92% and 241% over planar MBI were found in a scan that focused on a breast region containing several lesions. MBT resolved 3.0 mm rods in a Derenzo resolution phantom in the transverse plane compared to 2.5 mm rods distinguished by planar MBI. While planar MBI cannot provide depth information, MBT offered 4.0 mm depth resolution. Our simulations indicate that besides offering 3D localization of increased tracer uptake, multi-pinhole MBT can significantly increase tumour-to-background CNR compared to planar MBI. These properties could be promising for better estimating the position, extend and shape of lesions and distinguishing between single and multiple lesions.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Adenosis in the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Gity, Masoumeh; Arabkheradmand, Ali; Shakiba, Madjid; Khademi, Yassaman; Bijan, Bijan; Sadaghiani, Mohammad Salehi; Jalali, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenosis lesions of the breast, including sclerosing adenosis and adenosis tumors, are a group of benign proliferative disorders that may mimic the features of malignancy on imaging. In this study, we aim to describe the features of breast adenosis lesions with suspicious or borderline findings on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods In our database, we identified 49 pathologically proven breast adenosis lesions for which the final assessment of the breast MRI report was classified as either category 4 (n=45) or category 5 (n=4), according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR). The lesions had a final diagnosis of either pure adenosis (n=33, 67.3%) or mixed adenosis associated with other benign pathologies (n=16, 32.7%). Results Of the 49 adenosis lesions detected on DCE-MRI, 32 (65.3%) appeared as enhancing masses, 16 (32.7%) as nonmass enhancements, and one (2.1%) as a tiny enhancing focus. Analysis of the enhancing masses based on the ACR BI-RADS lexicon revealed that among the mass descriptors, the most common features were irregular shape in 12 (37.5%), noncircumscribed margin in 20 (62.5%), heterogeneous internal pattern in 16 (50.0%), rapid initial enhancement in 32 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed en-hancement pattern in 21 (65.6%). Of the 16 nonmass enhancing lesions, the most common descriptors included focal distribution in seven (43.8%), segmental distribution in six (37.5%), clumped internal pattern in nine (56.3%), rapid initial enhancement in 16 (100.0%), and wash-out delayed enhancement pattern in eight (50.0%). Conclusion Adenosis lesions of the breast may appear suspicious on breast MRI. Awareness of these suspi-cious-appearing features would be helpful in obviating unnecessary breast biopsies. PMID:26155296

  10. Stroma in Breast Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that normal and malignant breast tissues require complex local and systemic stromal interactions for development and progression. During development, mammary cell fate specification and differentiation require highly regulated contextual signals derived from the stroma. Likewise, during breast carcinoma development, the tissue stroma can provide tumor suppressing and tumor-promoting environments that serve to regulate neoplastic growth of the epithelium. This review focuses on the role of the stroma as a mediator of normal mammary development, as well as a critical regulator of malignant conversion and progression in breast cancer. Recognition of the important role of the stroma during the progression of breast cancers leads to the possibility of new targets for treatment of the initial breast cancer lesion as well as prevention of recurrence. PMID:19857593

  11. Breast Lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015. Raftery AT, et al. Breast lumps. In: Churchill's Pocketbook of Differential Diagnosis. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingston Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed ...

  12. Intracystic papillary breast carcinoma with areas of infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Martín Gutiérrez, Silvia; Nieto Gallo, María Antonia; Noguero Meseguera, Rosario; Rodríguez Prieto, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic papillary carcinoma of the breast associated with areas of infiltration is rare in that it constitutes less than 1% of breast cancers. After initial radiological study, these tumors show lesions with little likelihood of malignancy in a high proportion of cases. Two cases of intracystic papillary carcinoma associated with infiltration were diagnosed at the Breast Unit of Hospital Infanta Cristina. In both cases, the reason for consultation arose after palpation of a nodule and the initial radiographic analyses showed lesions with little likelihood of malignancy. PMID:24893058

  13. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  14. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  15. CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, A.; Thompson, C. J.; Sarkar, S.; Raisali, G.; Pani, R.; Davilu, H.; Sardari, D.

    2005-06-01

    We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system for breast imaging with patients in the prone position. An individual pendulous breast is covered by thin plastic to provide reduced pressure fixation and surrounded by the crystals inside the CYBPET ring. Each breast is imaged separately. The rest of the body is shielded properly to minimize the contribution of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET (WB-PET) the simulations of CYBPET and a WB-PET (GE-Advance) for a 10 mm tumor inside the breast with a lesion to background (breast) activity concentration of 6 to 1 were made. The noise effective count rate (NECR) of CYBPET is about twice that of WB-PET at activity concentrations less than 3.1 μCi/cc. The spatial resolution of CYBPET is better by 25% than the WB-PET.

  16. Breast Tomosynthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... mammography, that uses a low-dose x-ray system and computer reconstructions to create three-dimensional images of the ... Breast tomosynthesis uses a low-dose x-ray system, electronics and a computer to convert x-ray images of the breast ...

  17. Breast Feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  18. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  19. Cystic fibroadenoma of the breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Durak, Merih Güray; Karaman, Ilgın; Canda, Tülay; Balci, Pınar; Harmancioğlu, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common breast tumor in adolescent and young women. Fibroadenomas that consist of sclerosing adenosis, papillary apocrine metaplasia, epithelial calcifications, and/or cysts greater than 3 mm are considered as complex fibroadenoma. The relative risk of developing breast cancer in patients with complex fibroadenoma is increased, compared to women with noncomplex fibroadenoma. Extensive cystic degeneration in a fibroadenoma, so called "cystic fibroadenoma" is very rare. Herein, we present a case of such a lesion in a 43-year-old female who has been on follow-up for fibrocystic changes of the breast, and discuss both radiological and histopathologic differential diagnosis of this lesion with other cystic lesions of the breast, including cystic papilloma. The patient is free of disease after 17 months of clinical follow-up.

  20. Intraventricular mass lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Sobel, D.F.; Kelley, W.M.; Norman, D.

    1984-11-01

    Determining the precise etiology of an intraventricular mass can be a difficult diagnostic problem. CT and angiographic findings were reviewed in a series of 73 patients who had intraventricular masses. The histologic diagnosis can be suggested preoperatively by an analysis of the frequency of lesions occurring at a given ventricular location, lesion density before and after administration of contrast material, age, and sex of the patient, morphologic appearance of the mass, and presence or absence of hydrocephalus. Angiography is useful when meningioma, choroid plexus papilloma and carcinoma, or arteriovenous malformation are considered.

  1. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  2. Factors Associated with Nipple Lesions in Puerperae

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Luana Caroline; Peixoto, Érika Freitas; Lopes, Leonardo Motta Costa; de Andrade, Luiza Barroso; Frois, Marcelo Cançado; Santiago, Michelle Amanda; Bouzada, Maria Cândida Ferrarez

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with nipple lesion development in puerperae. Analyses were performed using the Poisson regression with robust variance. The level of significance was set at 5% (p < 0.05). We evaluated 1270 puerperae, among whom 193 (15.4%) presented with nipple lesions. The condition was more prevalent among the mothers who did not receive information about breastfeeding [PR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19–2.42], those who underwent cesarean delivery (PR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.02–2.16), those who used a pacifier (prevalence ratios (PR), 2.04; 95% CI, 1.05–3.95), those who used baby formula only (PR, 1.61; 95% CI, 4.82–5.36) and those who used baby formula combined with breastfeeding (PR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.06–2.45). A lower incidence of nipple lesions was observed among those who did not receive information on hand expression of breast milk (PR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46–0.93) and those who did not breastfeed in the first hour of life (PR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38–0.97). PMID:26330461

  3. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-03-07

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses.

  4. Development and Application of a Suite of 4-D Virtual Breast Phantoms for Optimization and Evaluation of Breast Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Dobbins, James T.; Segars, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is currently the most widely utilized tool for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, in women with dense breast tissue, tissue overlap may obscure lesions. Digital breast tomosynthesis can reduce tissue overlap. Furthermore, imaging with contrast enhancement can provide additional functional information about lesions, such as morphology and kinetics, which in turn may improve lesion identification and characterization. The performance of these imaging techniques is strongly dependent on the structural composition of the breast, which varies significantly among patients. Therefore, imaging system and imaging technique optimization should take patient variability into consideration. Furthermore, optimization of imaging techniques that employ contrast agents should include the temporally varying breast composition with respect to the contrast agent uptake kinetics. To these ends, we have developed a suite of 4-D virtual breast phantoms, which are incorporated with the kinetics of contrast agent propagation in different tissues and can realistically model normal breast parenchyma as well as benign and malignant lesions. This development presents a new approach in performing simulation studies using truly anthropomorphic models. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed 4-D phantoms, we present a simplified example study to compare the performance of 14 imaging paradigms qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:24691118

  5. Tactile imaging of palpable breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanchana, Rujirutana; Wang, Yue J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Nguyen, Charles C.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a prototype Tactile Mapping Device (TMD) system comprised mainly of a tactile sensor array probe (TSAP), a 3-D camera, and a force/torque sensor, which can provide the means to produce tactile maps of the breast lumps during a breast palpation. Focusing on the key tactile topology features for breast palpation such as spatial location, size/shape of the detected lesion, and the force levels used to demonstrate the palpable abnormalities, these maps can record the results of clinical breast examination with a set of pressure distribution profiles and force sensor measurements due to detected lesion. By combining the knowledge of vision based, neural networks and tactile sensing technology; the TMD is integrated for the investigation of soft tissue interaction with tactile/force sensor, where the hard inclusion (breast cancer) can be characterized through neural network learning capability, instead of using simplified complex biomechanics model with many heuristic assumptions. These maps will serve as an objective documentation of palpable lesions for future comparative examinations. Preliminary results of simulated experiments and limited pre-clinical evaluations of the TMD prototype have tested this hypothesis and provided solid promising data showing the feasibility of the TMD in real clinical applications.

  6. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  7. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  8. From the archives of the AFIP: breast masses in children and adolescents: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Cube, Regino; Hall, Gregory J; González, Candela; Stocker, J Thomas; Glassman, Leonard M

    2009-01-01

    The spectrum of breast lesions in children and adolescents varies markedly from that for adults, with the former lesions being overwhelmingly benign. A breast mass in a young boy or girl may arise from normal and abnormal breast development. Other causes of masses include infection, trauma, and cyst formation. After onset of puberty, most cases of breast enlargement arise from benign fibroadenoma in girls and gynecomastia in boys. These conditions have specific imaging appearances, although juvenile (often giant) fibroadenoma cannot be distinguished from phyllodes tumor, which can be benign or malignant. In children, both conditions usually appear as well-circumscribed, hypoechoic masses at sonography and show diffuse enhancement except for nonenhancing septations at magnetic resonance imaging. A diagnosis of juvenile papillomatosis (a benign lesion) portends later development of breast cancer, and patients with this condition should be closely monitored. Malignant lesions of the breast in children are rare. The most common malignant lesions are metastases and are usually associated with widespread disease. The most common primary breast malignancy is malignant phyllodes tumor. Primary breast carcinoma is exceedingly rare in the pediatric age group, but its imaging appearance in children is the same as seen in adults and is different from that of almost all benign lesions. In girls, diagnostic interventions may injure the developing breast and cause subsequent disfigurement. Given this risk and the low prevalence of malignant disease in this population, a prudent course should be followed in the diagnosis of breast lesions. Imaging findings are very helpful for selecting patients for further diagnostic procedures. Although malignancy is rare, lesions with suspicious imaging findings or progressive growth should be subjected to cytologic or histologic examination.

  9. CT scanning of the breast using a conventional CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Doust, B D; Milbrath, J R; Doust, V L

    1981-09-01

    Using a conventional body CT scanner, computed tomography of the breast was performed on 32 patients known to have or suspected of having breast masses. Xeromammograms were available for comparison in all cases. All mass lesions were histologically proved. Seven patients were examined prone, 25 supine. The prone position yielded pictures that resembled craniocaudal mammograms. Breast asymmetry, skin thickening, stranding from a mass to the chest wall, calcification, and axillary lymphadenopathy could be demonstrated by means of CT. The portion of the breast adjacent to the chest wall was more readily examined by means of CT than by conventional mammography. Internal mammary nodes could not be demonstrated.

  10. Paget's Disease of Nipple in Male Breast with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uthamalingam, Murali; Periyasamy, Karthikkumaran

    2016-02-01

    Carcinoma of the male breast accounts for less than 0.5% of all cases of breast cancer. However, Paget's disease of nipple in male is extremely rare. We report on a case of Paget's disease of nipple with breast cancer in a 51-year-old gentleman. He presented with a ulcerative lesion and lump in the left breast beneath the nipple-areolar region with single mobile ipsilateral central group of axillary nodes. Modified radical mastectomy was performed. On follow up, patient was doing well with no recurrence.

  11. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the shape of your breasts. Talk with a plastic surgeon if you are considering breast augmentation. Discuss ... mammograms or breast x-rays before surgery. The plastic surgeon will do a routine breast exam. Several ...

  12. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  13. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... augmentation surgery Breast reconstruction - implants Mastectomy Patient Instructions Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask ...

  14. Possible Synchronous Lung Metastasis of Breast Mass Detected Using Breast Ultrasonography: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bekci, Tümay

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US), which is used for the diagnosis of breast cancer and the evaluation of its local metastasis, has proven its worth as a diagnostic method. In breast ultrasonographic examination peripherally localized metastatic lesions at the posterior of the screened breast tissue can also be detected. In this case report, two female patients whose breast ultrasonography showed lumps. Their peripheral lung metastases were screened ultrasonographically, and the patients were diagnosed in a timely manner. Ultrasonographic examination at a patient’s first appointment – and especially during routine check-ups after the primary treatment – can allow an early diagnosis of peripherally localized lung metastasis at the posterior of the screened breast tissue and make a vital contribution to the patient’s prognosis.

  15. Absence of human papillomavirus sequences in epithelial breast cancer in a Mexican female population.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Romano, Lisbeth; Fernández-Tamayo, Nora; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Reyes-Cardoso, Juan M; Ortiz-Gutierrez, Felipe; Ceballos, Guillermo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Piña, Patricia; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2012-09-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in breast cancer is controversial. We evaluated 118 breast carcinomas and two paraffin-embedded tissues of lesions of the nipple of Mexican patients for HPV sequences. No carcinoma sample exhibited koilocytosis, in contrast to lesions of the nipple. We subjected purified DNAs to PCR employing two HPV16/E6 or GP5/6 primer set oligonucleotides. Results showed that HPV DNA sequences were absent in the breast tissues. Absence of HPV in breast carcinoma failed to support an association between HPV infection and this carcinoma.

  16. Chronic cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis involvement of the skin is common. The skin lesions of sarcoidosis may be nonspecific, showing a nondiagnostic inflammatory reaction pattern on histologic evaluation. Nonspecific skin lesions are often associated with an acute presentation of sarcoidosis and, in general, portend a good prognosis. Specific sarcoidosis skin lesions reveal typical sarcoid granulomas on histologic examination. These lesions tend to be chronic and require therapy for resolution. This article will review the epidemiology, diagnostic evaluation, and description of the various chronic skin lesions of sarcoidosis. Various images of these skin lesions will be demonstrated.

  17. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  18. Random forest learning of ultrasonic statistical physics and object spaces for lesion detection in 2D sonomammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheet, Debdoot; Karamalis, Athanasios; Kraft, Silvan; Noël, Peter B.; Vag, Tibor; Sadhu, Anup; Katouzian, Amin; Navab, Nassir; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Early diagnosis can significantly improve lifeexpectancy and allow different treatment options. Clinicians favor 2D ultrasonography for breast tissue abnormality screening due to high sensitivity and specificity compared to competing technologies. However, inter- and intra-observer variability in visual assessment and reporting of lesions often handicaps its performance. Existing Computer Assisted Diagnosis (CAD) systems though being able to detect solid lesions are often restricted in performance. These restrictions are inability to (1) detect lesion of multiple sizes and shapes, and (2) differentiate between hypo-echoic lesions from their posterior acoustic shadowing. In this work we present a completely automatic system for detection and segmentation of breast lesions in 2D ultrasound images. We employ random forests for learning of tissue specific primal to discriminate breast lesions from surrounding normal tissues. This enables it to detect lesions of multiple shapes and sizes, as well as discriminate between hypo-echoic lesion from associated posterior acoustic shadowing. The primal comprises of (i) multiscale estimated ultrasonic statistical physics and (ii) scale-space characteristics. The random forest learns lesion vs. background primal from a database of 2D ultrasound images with labeled lesions. For segmentation, the posterior probabilities of lesion pixels estimated by the learnt random forest are hard thresholded to provide a random walks segmentation stage with starting seeds. Our method achieves detection with 99.19% accuracy and segmentation with mean contour-to-contour error < 3 pixels on a set of 40 images with 49 lesions.

  19. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    ... a woman are often caused by fibrocystic changes, fibroadenomas, and cysts. Fibrocystic changes are painful, lumpy breasts. ... period, and then improve after your period starts. Fibroadenomas are noncancerous lumps that feel rubbery. They move ...

  20. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  1. B-Spline Filtering for Automatic Detection of Calcification Lesions in Mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, G.; Ruiz, M.; Sanchez, S

    2006-10-04

    Breast cancer continues to be an important health problem between women population. Early detection is the only way to improve breast cancer prognosis and significantly reduce women mortality. It is by using CAD systems that radiologist can improve their ability to detect, and classify lesions in mammograms. In this study the usefulness of using B-spline based on a gradient scheme and compared to wavelet and adaptative filtering has been investigated for calcification lesion detection and as part of CAD systems. The technique has been applied to different density tissues. A qualitative validation shows the success of the method.

  2. B-Spline Filtering for Automatic Detection of Calcification Lesions in Mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, G.; Sánchez, S.; Ruiz, M.

    2006-10-01

    Breast cancer continues to be an important health problem between women population. Early detection is the only way to improve breast cancer prognosis and significantly reduce women mortality. It is by using CAD systems that radiologist can improve their ability to detect, and classify lesions in mammograms. In this study the usefulness of using B-spline based on a gradient scheme and compared to wavelet and adaptative filtering has been investigated for calcification lesion detection and as part of CAD systems. The technique has been applied to different density tissues. A qualitative validation shows the success of the method.

  3. Assessment of spatial information for hyperspectral imaging of lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Multiple diseases such as breast tumor poses a great threat to women's health and life, while the traditional detection method is complex, costly and unsuitable for frequently self-examination, therefore, an inexpensive, convenient and efficient method for tumor self-inspection is needed urgently, and lesion localization is an important step. This paper proposes an self-examination method for positioning of a lesion. The method adopts transillumination to acquire the hyperspectral images and to assess the spatial information of lesion. Firstly, multi-wavelength sources are modulated with frequency division, which is advantageous to separate images of different wavelength, meanwhile, the source serves as fill light to each other to improve the sensitivity in the low-lightlevel imaging. Secondly, the signal-to-noise ratio of transmitted images after demodulation are improved by frame accumulation technology. Next, gray distributions of transmitted images are analyzed. The gray-level differences is constituted by the actual transmitted images and fitting transmitted images of tissue without lesion, which is to rule out individual differences. Due to scattering effect, there will be transition zones between tissue and lesion, and the zone changes with wavelength change, which will help to identify the structure details of lesion. Finally, image segmentation is adopted to extract the lesion and the transition zones, and the spatial features of lesion are confirmed according to the transition zones and the differences of transmitted light intensity distributions. Experiment using flat-shaped tissue as an example shows that the proposed method can extract the space information of lesion.

  4. Label-Free Detection of Breast Masses Using Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Zhu, Weifeng; Qiu, Jingting; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology forms the gold standard for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been proposed to be a potentially powerful adjunct to current histopathological techniques. A label-free imaging based on two- photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation is developed for differentiating normal breast tissues, benign, as well as breast cancer tissues. Human breast biopsies (including human normal breast tissues, benign as well as breast cancer tissues ) that are first imaged (fresh, unfixed, and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine H-E histopathology. Our results suggest that the MPM images, obtained from these unprocessed biopsies, can readily distinguish between benign lesions and breast cancers. In the tissues of breast cancers, MPM showed that the tumor cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. The tumor cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, infiltrated into disrupted connective tissue, leading to the loss of second-harmonic generation signals. For breast cancer, MPM diagnosis was 100% correct because the tissues of breast cancers did not have second-harmonic generation signals in MPM imaging. On the contrary, in benign breast masses, second-harmonic generation signals could be seen easily in MPM imaging. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide label-free noninvasive diagnostic impressions that can guide surgeon in biopsy and patient management. PMID:23755295

  5. Sclerosing Lesions of the Orbit: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lokdarshi, Gautam; Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sclerosing inflammation is a distinct group of pathologies characterized by indolent growth with minimal or no signs of inflammation. However, contrary to earlier classifications, it should not be considered a chronic stage of acute inflammation. Although rare, orbital IgG4-related disease has been associated with systemic sclerosing pseudotumor-like lesions. Possible mechanisms include autoimmune and IgG4 related defective clonal proliferation. Currently, there is no specific treatment protocol for IgG4-related disease although the response to low dose steroid provides a good response as compared to non-IgG4 sclerosing pseudotumor. Specific sclerosing inflammations (e.g. Wegener's disease, sarcoidosis, Sjogren's syndrome) and neoplasms (lymphoma, metastatic breast carcinoma) should be ruled out before considering idiopathic sclerosing inflammation as a diagnosis.

  6. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  7. Impact of dose on observer performance in breast tomosynthesis using breast specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberg, Pontus; Båth, Magnus; Andersson, Ingvar; Svahn, Tony; Ruschin, Mark; Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Sören; Tingberg, Anders

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dose on lesion detection and characterization in breast tomosynthesis (BT), using human breast specimens. Images of 27 lesions in breast specimens were acquired on a BT prototype based on a Mammomat Novation (Siemens) full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system. Two detector modes - binned (2×1 in the scan direction) and full resolution - and four BT exposure levels - approximately 2×, 1.5×, 1×, and 0.5× the total mAs at the same beam quality as used in a single FFDM view with a Mammomat Novation unit under automatic exposure control (AEC) conditions - were examined. The exposure for all BT scans was equally divided among 25 projections. An enhanced filtered back projection reconstruction method was applied with a constant filter setting. A human observer performance study was conducted in which the observers were forced to select the minimum (threshold) exposure level at which each lesion could be both detected and characterized for assessment of recall or not in a screening situation. The median threshold exposure level for all observers and all lesions corresponded to approximately 1×, which is half the exposure of what we currently use for BT. A substantial variation in exposure thresholds was noticed for different lesion types. For low contrast lesions with diffuse borders, an exposure threshold of approximately 2× was required, whereas for spiculated high contrast lesions and lesions with well defined borders, the exposure threshold was lower than 0.5×. The use of binned mode had no statistically significant impact on observer performance compared to full resolution mode. There was no substantial difference between the modes for the detection and characterization of the lesion types.

  8. A numerical investigation of breast compression: a computer-aided design approach for prescribing boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, MacArthur L; Smith, Lorenzo M; Hall, Neal

    2011-10-01

    Prior to performing an MRI-guided breast biopsy, the radiologist has to locate the suspect lesion with the breast compressed between rigid plates. However, the suspect lesion is typically identified from a diagnostic MRI exam with the breast hanging freely under the force of gravity. There are several challenges associated with localizing suspect lesions including, patient positioning, the visibility of the lesion may fade after contrast injection, menstrual cycles, and lesion deformation. Researchers have developed finite element analysis (FEA) methodologies that simulate breast compression with the intent of reducing these challenges. In this paper, we constructed a patient-specific finite element (FE) breast model from diagnostic MR images. In addition, we constructed surfaces corresponding to the biopsy MR volume and used them to deform the FE breast mesh. The predicted results suggest that the FE breast model, in its uncompressed configuration, can be compressed to replicate the perimeter of the biopsy MR volume. The simulated lesion displacement was within 3  mm of its actual position.

  9. Thyroid gland metastasis arising from breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chenfang

    2013-06-01

    The thyroid gland is an uncommon site for metastasis to develop and thus metastases arising from breast cancer are rarely observed. In the present study, we describe a case of a 45-year-old female with a three-year history of breast cancer who presented with a thyroid mass that was diagnosed as metastatic breast carcinoma by histopathological analysis of the subtotal thyroidectomy specimen. To ascertain the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, we evaluated two types of markers; those that possessed a similar expression status in the original and metastatic lesions [ER, PR and CerbB-2 (HER2/neu)], and those that are capable of differentiating between metastatic lesions and the surrounding thyroid components (TG and TTF-1). The results showed that ER, PR and CerbB-2 demonstrated a similar expression pattern in primary breast carcinoma and thyroid lesions. Meanwhile, in the thyroid lesions, the malignant cells showed negative staining for TG and TTF-1, which confirmed that lesions were not thyroid in origin. This case may prompt clinicians that although thyroid gland are uncommon metastatic site, a diagnosis of metastatic disease should be considered when new aggregates are identified in the thyroid glands and histopathological analysis may aid the diagnosis.

  10. Expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Ki67 in normal breast tissue in relation to subsequent risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hannah; Eliassen, A Heather; Wang, Molin; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Beck, Andrew H; Schnitt, Stuart J; Collins, Laura C; Connolly, James L; Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Polyak, Kornelia; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and cell proliferation marker Ki67 serve as predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancers, little is known about their roles in normal breast tissue. Here in a nested case–control study within the Nurses’ Health Studies (90 cases, 297 controls), we evaluated their expression levels in normal breast epithelium in relation to subsequent breast cancer risk among women with benign breast disease. Tissue microarrays were constructed using cores obtained from benign biopsies containing normal terminal duct lobular units and immunohistochemical stained for these markers. We found PR and Ki67 expression was non-significantly but positively associated with subsequent breast cancer risk, whereas ER expression was non-significantly inversely associated. After stratifying by lesion subtype, Ki67 was significantly associated with higher risk among women with proliferative lesions with atypical hyperplasia. However, given the small sample size, further studies are required to confirm these results. PMID:28111631

  11. Upgrade Rate and Imaging Features of Atypical Apocrine Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chang Sen, Lauren Q; Berg, Wendie A; Carter, Gloria J

    2017-03-23

    The purpose of our work was to identify imaging features of atypical apocrine lesions and determine the rate of upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma at excision after such a diagnosis on percutaneous breast biopsy. From January 1, 2006, through October 8, 2013, a total of 33,157 breast core biopsies were performed at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Of those, 58 (0.2%) showed atypical apocrine lesions. For 24, atypical apocrine adenosis (AAA) or atypical apocrine metaplasia (AAM) was the only risk lesion, with no known ipsilateral malignancy, and the results of excision were available. The median patient age was 58 years (range 43-88). Among 24 atypical apocrine lesions (20 AAA and 4 AAM), four (16.7%; 95% confidence interval: 4.7, 37.4) were upgraded at excision: one invasive ductal carcinoma (grade 2, 0.2 cm, estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, HER2/Neu negative) and three DCIS (two grade 3, one grade 2). All four upgraded lesions were AAA (20%; 4/20). Twelve AAA were seen as an irregular (n = 9) or circumscribed (n = 3) mass on ultrasound; three masses had calcifications. Six of 20 (30%) AAA were seen on biopsy of calcifications only and calcifications were within two AAA lesions at histopathology. One AAA (1/20, 5%) was asymmetry only, and one (1/20, 5%) a persistently enhancing MR focus. All four malignancies were masses on ultrasound (three irregular, one circumscribed), and three malignancies had calcifications (two coarse heterogeneous, one amorphous). While concordant with an irregular or circumscribed mass on imaging, with or without amorphous or coarse heterogeneous calcifications, AAA merits excision with a 20% upgrade rate to malignancy. Further study of AAM is warranted.

  12. Advanced Methods for the Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Lesions in Digital Mammograms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    classification of mammographic mass lesions. Radiology 213: 200, 1999. " Nishikawa R, Giger ML, Yarusso L, Kupinski M, Baehr A, Venta L,: Computer-aided...detection of mass lesions in digital mammography using radial gradient index filtering. Radiology 213: 229, 1999. " Maloney M, Huo Z, Giger ML, Venta L...Nishikawa R, Huo Z, Jiang Y, Venta L, Doi K: Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in breast imaging. Radiology 213: 507, 1999. -Final Report DAMD 17-96-1-6058 19

  13. Classification of breast computed tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas R.; Cervino, Laura I.; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2008-03-15

    Differences in breast tissue composition are important determinants in assessing risk, identifying disease in images and following changes over time. This paper presents an algorithm for tissue classification that separates breast tissue into its three primary constituents of skin, fat and glandular tissue. We have designed and built a dedicated breast CT scanner. Fifty-five normal volunteers and patients with mammographically identified breast lesions were scanned. Breast CT voxel data were filtered using a 5 pt median filter and the image histogram was computed. A two compartment Gaussian fit of histogram data was used to provide an initial estimate of tissue compartments. After histogram analysis, data were input to region-growing algorithms and classified as to belonging to skin, fat or gland based on their value and architectural features. Once tissues were classified, a more detailed analysis of glandular tissue patterns and a more quantitative analysis of breast composition was made. Algorithm performance assessment demonstrated very good or excellent agreement between algorithm and radiologist observers in 97.7% of the segmented data. We observed that even in dense breasts the fraction of glandular tissue seldom exceeded 50%. For most individuals the composition is better characterized as being a 70% (fat)-30% (gland) composition than a 50% (fat)-50% (gland) composition.

  14. Klatskin-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Senthil Kumar, M. P.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5–15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature. PMID:22811587

  15. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  16. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Rumney, Robin M H; Schoof, Erwin M; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2015-06-04

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in patients with oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified lysyl oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonize and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications.

  17. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Rumney, Robin M.H.; Schoof, Erwin M.; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M.; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R.; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia1. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions2–5 and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable6. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality6,7. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in ER-negative breast cancer patients. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK Ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonise and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications. PMID:26017313

  18. Differential diagnosis of breast masses in South Korean premenopausal women using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leproux, Anaïs; Kim, You Me; Min, Jun Won; McLaren, Christine E.; Chen, Wen-Pin; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Lee, Seung-ha; Chung, Phil-Sang; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Young patients with dense breasts have a relatively low-positive biopsy rate for breast cancer (˜1 in 7). South Korean women have higher breast density than Westerners. We investigated the benefit of using a functional and metabolic imaging technique, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), to help the standard of care imaging tools to distinguish benign from malignant lesions in premenopausal Korean women. DOSI uses near-infrared light to measure breast tissue composition by quantifying tissue concentrations of water (ctH2O), bulk lipid (ctLipid), deoxygenated (ctHHb), and oxygenated (ctHbO2) hemoglobin. DOSI spectral signatures specific to abnormal tissue and absent in healthy tissue were also used to form a malignancy index. This study included 19 premenopausal subjects (average age 41±9), corresponding to 11 benign and 10 malignant lesions. Elevated lesion to normal ratio of ctH2O, ctHHb, ctHbO2, total hemoglobin (THb=ctHHb+ctHbO2), and tissue optical index (ctHHb×ctH2O/ctLipid) were observed in the malignant lesions compared to the benign lesions (p<0.02). THb and malignancy index were the two best single predictors of malignancy, with >90% sensitivity and specificity. Malignant lesions showed significantly higher metabolism and perfusion than benign lesions. DOSI spectral features showed high discriminatory power for distinguishing malignant and benign lesions in dense breasts of the Korean population.

  19. Visualization of basement membranes in normal breast and breast cancer tissues using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; CHEN, GANG; QIU, JINGTING; LU, JIANPING; ZHU, WEIFENG; CHEN, JIANXIN; ZHUO, SHUANGMU; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Since basement membranes represent a critical barrier during breast cancer progression, timely imaging of these signposts is essential for early diagnosis of breast cancer. A label-free method using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence signals and second harmonic generation signals for analyzing the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues is likely to enable a better understanding of the pathophysiology of breast cancer and facilitate improved clinical management and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPM has the potential for label-free assessment of the morphology of basement membrane in normal and cancerous breast tissues. A total of 60 tissue section samples (comprising 30 fresh breast cancer specimens and 30 normal breast tissues) were first imaged (fresh, unfixed and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Comparisons were made between MPM imaging and gold standard sections for each specimen stained with H&E. Simply by visualizing morphological features appearing on multiphoton images, cancerous lesions may be readily identified by the loss of basement membrane and tumor cells characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. These results suggest that MPM has potential as a label-free method of imaging the morphology of basement membranes and cell features to effectively distinguish between normal and cancerous breast tissues. PMID:27313695

  20. Cystic hypersecretory ductal carcinoma of the breast: a rare cause of cystic breast mass.

    PubMed

    Song, Sun Wha; Whang, In Yong; Chang, Eun Deok

    2011-11-01

    We present the case of a surgically confirmed, invasive, cystic hypersecretory ductal carcinoma (CHDC) of the breast in a 43-year-old woman. The initial sonography showed a complex cyst, which required a core biopsy; however, the diagnosis was delayed as the patient refused to undergo the biopsy and the cyst decreased in size, as seen on follow-up sonography. Excision biopsy was performed, and invasive CHDC was diagnosed after regrowth of the cystic lesion. Meticulous sonographic evaluation of a cystic breast mass is always important, and pathology confirmation must be considered if the lesion shows features suspicious for malignancy, as a CHDC could be the cause of a cystic breast mass.

  1. Breast Carcinosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakan, Savaş; Sarı, Erdem; Erkan, Nazif; Yıldırım, Mehmet; Vardar, Enver; Coşkun, Ali; Çetin, Durmuş Ali; Eliyatkın, Nükhet

    2014-01-01

    Objective Carcinosarcomas of the breast are rare and aggressive breast tumors. The optimal treatment strategies and the classification of these difficult to diagnose tumors are not clear in the literature due to their very low incidence. In this study, we aimed to evaluate patients who were operated on for breast carcinosarcoma and discuss the current literature. Materials and Methods Ten patients who were treated with a diagnosis of breast carcinosarcoma between January 2000 – March 2013 at the Izmir Bozyaka Teaching and Training Hospital General Surgery Clinics were retrospectively analyzed. Results The mean age of the patients was 59.7 (±13.4) years. Eight patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, one patient lumpectomy and one patient breast conserving surgery + sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures. The TNM stage of patients were identified as stage 1 in 2 patients, stage 2 in 6 patients, and stage 3 in 2 patients. 60-month disease-free survival rate was 52.5% (±18.6). The overall survival rate was 53.3% (±20.5). Four patients died during follow-up. Conclusion It is reported that the prognosis of carcinosarcomas are as poor as triple negative epithelial tumors. In contrast to the literature, in our study the disease-free and overall survival rates according to stage were not different from epithelial tumors. In this regard, prospective studies including more patients are required.

  2. Cytodiagnosis of papillary carcinoma of the breast: Report of a case with histological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Deepti; Soin, Navmeet; Kalita, Dipti; Pant, Leela; Kudesia, Madhur; Singh, Sompal

    2014-04-01

    Papillary lesions of the breast pose diagnostic challenges on aspiration cytology due to overlapping features of benign and malignant entities. Accurate cytologic diagnosis of papillary breast carcinoma cannot usually be made pre-operatively. We present the case of an adult female who underwent fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of a left breast lump. FNA smears were highly cellular showing cohesive clusters, complex papillary fragments and few singly dispersed intact cells. The tumor cells had hyperchromatic nuclei, prominent nucleoli and mild nuclear pleomorphism. A cytologic impression of papillary lesion, possibly malignant (in view of high cellularity, complex papillae and single intact cells) was rendered. The lesion proved to be a papillary carcinoma with microscopic foci of stromal invasion on histologic examination. Papillary carcinoma, an uncommon subtype of breast carcinoma, should be considered while evaluating a papillary lesion with complex branching papillae containing delicate fibrovascular cores and singly lying intact atypical cells.

  3. Breast Fibroadenoma With Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using Ga DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of Ga DOTATATE-avid breast lesions that could mimic malignancy in neuroendocrine tumor patients.

  4. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  5. [A case of multiple breast mucinous carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tetsuyo; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao

    2010-11-01

    A case was a 46-year-old woman who presented with the left breast lump confirmed about 30 years ago. In August 2006, the patient came to our hospital for consultation due to her breast lump was enlarged. Mammography revealed a frequent occurrence of the mass shadow of marginal irregularity and we diagnosed it with category 4. Breast echography showed a lot of irregular lesions. Even breast MRI presented a multiple mass-related lesion. The malignancy was possible, and a needle biopsy diagnosed them to be mucinous carcinoma. Pectoralis muscle preservation mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy technique were used for surgery. Histopathology also diagnosed it to be mucinous carcinoma, T2N0 M0, stage IIA, ER (+), PgR (+), HER2 score 0. It has been 4 years since the operation but no sign of recurrence/metastasis was observed at present. There have been few reports of breast cancer with multiple cases, mucinous carcinoma as a case in point. Therefore, we report the invaluable case in addition to some paper consideration with it.

  6. Oncoplastic Surgery for Upper/Upper Inner Quadrant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joseph; Chen, Dar-Ren; Wang, Yu-Fen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Tumors located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast warrant more attention. A small lesion relative to the size of breast in this location may be resolved by performing a level I oncoplastic technique. However, a wide excision may significantly reduce the overall quality of the breast shape by distorting the visible breast line. From June 2012 to April 2015, 36 patients with breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant underwent breast-conservation surgery with matrix rotation mammoplasty. According to the size and location of the tumor relative to the nipple-areola complex, 11 patients underwent matrix rotation with periareolar de-epithelialization (donut group) and the other 25 underwent matrix rotation only (non-donut group). The cosmetic results were self-assessed by questionnaires. The average weights of the excised breast lumps in the donut and non-donut groups were 104.1 and 84.5 g, respectively. During the 3-year follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in one case and was managed with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction with prosthetic implants. In total, 31 patients (88.6%) ranked their postoperative result as either acceptable or satisfactory. The treated breasts were also self-evaluated by 27 patients (77.1%) to be nearly identical to or just slightly different from the untreated side. Matrix rotation is an easy breast-preserving technique for treating breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast that requires a relatively wide excision. With this technique, a larger breast tumor could be removed without compromising the breast appearance. PMID:28030581

  7. A novel MR-guided interventional device for 3D circumferential access to breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew; Zhai, Xu; Harter, Ray; Sisney, Gale; Elezaby, Mai; Fain, Sean

    2008-01-01

    MRI is rapidly growing as a tool for image-guided procedures in the breast such as needle localizations, biopsy, and cryotherapy. The ability of MRI to resolve small (<1 cm) lesions allows earlier detection and diagnosis than with ultrasound. Most MR-guidance methods perform a two-dimensional compression of the breast that distorts tissue anatomy and limits medial access. This work presents a system for localizing breast lesions with 360° access to breast tissue. A novel system has been developed to perform breast lesion localization using MR guidance that uses a 3D radial coordinate system with four degrees of freedom. The device is combined with a novel breast RF coil for improved signal to noise and rotates 360° around the breast to allow medial, lateral, superior, and inferior access minimizing insertion depth to the target. Coil performance was evaluated using a human volunteer by comparing signal to noise from both the developed breast RF coil and a commercial seven-channel breast coil. The system was tested with a breast-shaped gel phantom containing randomly distributed MR-visible targets. MR-compatible localization needles were used to demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the concept for breast biopsy. Localization results were classified based on the relationship between the final needle tip position and the lesion. A 3D bladder concept was also tested using animal tissue to evaluate the device’s ability to immobilize deformable breast tissue during a needle insertion. The RF breast coil provided signal to noise values comparable to a seven-channel breast coil. The needle tip was in contact with the targeted lesion in 89% (25∕28) of all the trials and 100% (6∕6) of the trials with targeted lesions >6 mm. Target lesions were 3–4 mm in diameter for 47% (13∕28), 5–6 mm in diameter for 32% (9∕28), and over 6 mm in diameter for 21% (6∕28) of the trials, respectively. The 3D bladder concept was shown to immobilize a deformable animal

  8. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  9. Recent results from clinical trials using SERMs to reduce the risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Victor G

    2006-11-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are used for the treatment of invasive breast cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of specific natural or synthetic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the progression of premalignant lesions to invasive carcinoma. The finding of a decrease in contralateral breast cancer incidence following tamoxifen administration for adjuvant therapy led to its use in breast cancer prevention. Four large trials have used tamoxifen, the prototypical SERM, as a breast cancer chemopreventive agent with differing results. In the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), tamoxifen reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer by 49%. Tamoxifen also reduced the incidence of benign breast disease as well as the number of breast biopsies in the treated women. Three other randomized prevention trials comparing tamoxifen with placebo have been reported and show a reduction in breast cancer incidence of 38%. Serum levels of estrone sulfate and testosterone are significantly associated with breast cancer risk, and estradiol appears to be more strongly associated with breast cancer in high-risk women. Raloxifene is comparable to tamoxifen in its ability to reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal, high-risk women and has fewer side effects, as shown in the study of tamoxifen and raloxifene. Several ongoing and planned studies will evaluate the ability of aromatase inhibitors to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at increased risk.

  10. Breast awareness and screening.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK. Breast awareness and screening, along with better treatment, can significantly improve outcomes, and more women than ever are now surviving the disease. This article discusses breast awareness and screening, symptoms and risk factors for breast cancer, and how nurses can raise breast awareness and screening uptake.

  11. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastatic Progression in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-31

    15243 Redondo M, Villar E, Torres-Muñoz J, Tellez T, Morell M & Petito CK: Overexpression of clusterin in human breast carcinoma. Am J Pathol 2000...sites. Biochem 2002, 41:282-291. 21. de Silva HV, Stuart WD, Park YB, Mao SJ, Gil CM, Wetterau JR, Busch SJ, Harmony JA: Purification and characterization...reactant proteins in sera and breast lesions of patients with malignant and benign tumors. Electrophoresis 2004, 25:2392-2401. 33. Redondo M, Villar E

  13. Seamless lesion insertion in digital mammography: methodology and reader study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshk, Aria; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman

    2016-03-01

    Collection of large repositories of clinical images containing verified cancer locations is costly and time consuming due to difficulties associated with both the accumulation of data and establishment of the ground truth. This problem poses a significant challenge to the development of machine learning algorithms that require large amounts of data to properly train and avoid overfitting. In this paper we expand the methods in our previous publications by making several modifications that significantly increase the speed of our insertion algorithms, thereby allowing them to be used for inserting lesions that are much larger in size. These algorithms have been incorporated into an image composition tool that we have made publicly available. This tool allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a real breast mass or micro-calcification cluster extracted from a source digital mammogram into a different location on another mammogram. We demonstrate examples of the performance of this tool on clinical cases taken from the University of South Florida Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Finally, we report the results of a reader study evaluating the realism of inserted lesions compared to clinical lesions. Analysis of the radiologist scores in the study using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology indicates that inserted lesions cannot be reliably distinguished from clinical lesions.

  14. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  15. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients.

  16. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  17. Bilateral Gigantomastia, Multiple Synchronous Nodular Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia Involving Breast and Bilateral Axillary Accessory Breast Tissue, and Perianal Mammary-Type Hamartoma of Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Malcolm M; Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kreuzberg, Boris; Suvova, Bozena; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2016-05-01

    Mammary-type fibroepithelial lesions involving ectopic breast and anogenital region are rare and usually coexist with normal orthotopic breast. We present what we believe to be a unique case of synchronous bilateral gestational gigantomastia resembling fibrous mastopathy, synchronous rapidly growing pregnancy-associated nodular pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia involving right breast and bilateral axillary ectopic breast tissue, and metachronous perianal mammary-type hamartoma involving anogenital mammary-like glands occurring in a 34-year-old patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Also, we review the literature concerning these lesions.

  18. Sensitivity of imaging for multifocal-multicentric breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bozzini, Anna; Renne, Giuseppe; Meneghetti, Lorenza; Bandi, Giuseppe; Santos, Gabriela; Vento, Anna Rita; Menna, Simona; Andrighetto, Stefania; Viale, Giuseppe; Cassano, Enrico; Bellomi, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Background This retrospective study aims to determine: 1) the sensitivity of preoperative mammography (Mx) and ultrasound (US), and re-reviewed Mx to detect multifocal multicentric breast carcinoma (MMBC), defined by pathology on surgical specimens, and 2) to analyze the characteristics of both detected and undetected foci on Mx and US. Methods Three experienced breast radiologists re-reviewed, independently, digital mammography of 97 women with MMBC pathologically diagnosed on surgical specimens. The radiologists were informed of all neoplastic foci, and blinded to the original mammograms and US reports. With regards to Mx, they considered the breast density, number of foci, the Mx characteristics of the lesions and their BI-RADS classification. For US, they considered size of the lesions, BI-RADS classification and US pattern and lesion characteristics. According to the histological size, the lesions were classified as: index cancer, 2nd lesion, 3rd lesion, and 4th lesion. Any pathologically identified malignant foci not previously described in the original imaging reports, were defined as undetected or missed lesions. Sensitivity was calculated for Mx, US and re-reviewed Mx for detecting the presence of the index cancer as well as additional satellite lesions. Results Pathological examination revealed 13 multifocal and 84 multicentric cancers with a total of 303 malignant foci (282 invasive and 21 non invasive). Original Mx and US reports had an overall sensitivity of 45.5% and 52.9%, respectively. Mx detected 83/97 index cancers with a sensitivity of 85.6%. The number of lesions undetected by original Mx was 165/303. The Mx pattern of breasts with undetected lesions were: fatty in 3 (1.8%); scattered fibroglandular density in 40 (24.3%), heterogeneously dense in 91 (55.1%) and dense in 31 (18.8%) cases. In breasts with an almost entirely fatty pattern, Mx sensitivity was 100%, while in fibroglandular or dense pattern it was reduced to 45.5%. Re-reviewed Mx

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast diagnosis by vacuum-assisted core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gabriella; Zagami, Maria Giovanna; Montesano, Marilena; Primavera, Angelo; Carino, Rita; Battista, Cleonice; Rabitti, Carla; Altomare, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Squamous cell breast carcinoma is a rare occurrence. Often the tumor is metastatic from an extramammary primary tumor. In order to determine the nature of the lesion, extensive sampling is necessary. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast diagnosed by vacuum-assisted core biopsy.

  20. Performance of dedicated emission mammotomography for various breast shapes and sizes

    PubMed Central

    Brzymialkiewicz, C N; Tornai, M P; McKinley, R L; Cutler, S J; Bowsher, J E

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the effect of breast shape and size and lesion location on a dedicated emission mammotomography system developed in our lab. The hemispherical positioning gantry allows ample flexibility in sampling a pendant, uncompressed breast. Realistic anthropomorphic torso (which includes the upper portion of the arm) and breast phantoms draw attention to the necessity of using unique camera trajectories (orbits) rather than simple circular camera trajectories. We have implemented several novel three-dimensional (3D) orbits with fully contoured radius-of-rotation capability for compensating for the positioning demands that emerge from different breast shapes and sizes. While a general orbit design may remain the same between two different breasts, the absolute polar tilt range and radius-of-rotation range may vary. We have demonstrated that using 3D orbits with increased polar camera tilt, lesions near the chest wall can be visualized for both large and small sized breasts (325 ml to 1060 ml), for a range of intrinsic contrasts (three to ten times higher activity concentration in the lesion than breast background). Overall, nearly complete 3D acquisition schemes yield image data with relatively high lesion SNRs and contrasts and with minimal distortion of the uncompressed breast shape. PMID:16985287

  1. Breast Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    If you need a mastectomy, you have a choice about whether or not to have surgery to rebuild the shape of the breast. Instead of ... be done at the same time as the mastectomy, or it may be done later on. If ...

  2. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... sale in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. They vary in size, shell thickness, ... implant them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a ...

  3. Breast reduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fade. The surgeon will make every effort to place the cuts so that scars are hidden. Cuts are usually made on the underside of the breast. Most of the time, the scars should not be noticeable, even in low-cut clothing.

  4. [Breast ductoscopy].

    PubMed

    Sharon, Eran; Avin, Ilan D; Leong, Wey

    2011-02-01

    The majority of benign and malignant breast diseases originate in the ductal system. Breast ductoscopy (BD) allows direct access to this ductal system and thus holds great promise in the diagnosis and surgical management of a number of breast diseases. BD was first developed over 20 years ago to investigate nipple discharge. Indeed, till now, this remains the most common indication. However, BD technology has been further developed for a variety of new clinical applications. For example, BD-guided ductal ravage combined with molecular and genetic analysis can be a powerful screening tool for women at high-risk of breast cancer. BD can also be used during lumpectomy to identify additional radiographically occult disease. This refined intraoperative margin assessment can help surgeons to achieve clear margins at the first excision while optimizing the extent of resection. In the future, this same precise intraoperative margin assessment may facilitate a variety of local ablative techniques including laser Over time, BD is likely to evolve beyond its current technological limitations to realize its full diagnostic and therapeutic potential. The article describes the technique of BD, reviews its evolution and discusses current and future applications.

  5. The Efficiency of Diffusion Weighted MRI and MR Spectroscopy On Breast MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Canan; Balcı, Pınar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiologically routine is to establish an imaging protocol that will create high quality images with a short period of time. Fort this purpose, an imaging protocol should include a conventional breast MRI and contrast enhanced sequences. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are important MR techniques for evaluation to complicated breast lesions. In this article, we will evaluate that technical properties of the MRS and DWI as additional MR imaging.

  6. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  7. Bilateral Simultaneous Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breasts and Axillae: Imaging Findings with Pathological and Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ensani, Fereshteh; Omranipour, Ramesh; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a pathology that is usually diagnosed by accident during pathological examination of other breast lesions. PASH is an uncommon and benign tumoral lesion of the mammary stroma that can be pathologically mistaken for other tumours, such as phyllodes, fibroadenoma, and sometimes even angiosarcoma. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with complaints of huge bilateral breast enlargement. This is a rare case of PASH presenting with gigantomastia and involving bilateral breasts and axillae simultaneously. Mammography, ultrasonography, and MRI features are illustrated with histopathological correlation. PMID:27867677

  8. The Role of MR Mammography in Differentiating Benign from Malignant in Suspicious Breast Masses

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Padhmini; Murugesan, Vijaya Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) Mammography is being increasingly used now-a-days for the evaluation of breast lesions. Aim To find out the effectiveness and the exact role of MR mammography in differentiating benign lesions from malignant lesions in patients with palpable, suspicious breast masses found on routine conventional imaging techniques. Materials and Methods It was a prospective study wherein patients with suspicious breast lesions were subjected to MR mammography. The morphological feature (smooth vs irregular margin) and the enhancement patterns (Type Ia/Ib vs Type II vs Type III) of the lesions were assessed and finally the effectiveness of MR mammography in differentiating benign and malignant lesions was judged by taking the histopathological diagnosis as the gold standard. Results A total of 33 patients with 35 breast lesions were finally analysed. The sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and the Negative Predictive Value (NPV) in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion for the type of margin on MR mammography was 95.45%, 84.6%, 91.3% and 91.7%, while for the type of enhancement curve it was 76.2%, 90.9%, 94.1% and 66.7% respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value for the type of margins was statistically better when compared to the type of enhancement curve in differentiating benign from malignant lesions but the specificity and PPV though better for the type of enhancement curve was not found to be statistically significant. Conclusion MR mammography was found to be an effective tool in differentiating benign from malignant suspicious breast lesions. The type of margin and the enhancement patterns both individually and in combination provide the clinicians with ample information so as to decide on further management. PMID:27790545

  9. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  10. Breast Reduction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction ... risk of complications from breast reduction surgery. Your plastic surgeon will likely: Evaluate your medical history and ...

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hasn't spread beyond your breast tissue. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill ... option for men with advanced breast cancer. Hormone therapy Most men with male breast cancer have tumors ...

  13. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  14. Breast Lift (Mastopexy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and breast tissue is reshaped to restore firmness and raise the breasts. You might choose to ... get older, your breasts change — losing elasticity and firmness. There are many causes for these kinds of ...

  15. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  16. Clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sheray Nicole; Green, Cheryl; Strachan, Georgiana Gordon; Wharfe, Gilian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Jamaican women. This study assessed the clinicopathologic features of cases in a hospital-based specialist clinic in Kingston, Jamaica. A retrospective chart review was performed for the 2-year study period and relevant clinical and surgico-pathologic data were recorded and analyzed. Median age of the 121 breast cancer patients was 52 years (range 22-84, IQR 20) and there was 1 case of male breast cancer. Most patients (65%) were referred from the surgical service after definitive breast cancer surgery, 20% were referred for pre-operative systemic therapy, and 15% had a diagnosis of metastatic disease. The surgico-pathologic group comprised 78 women who were referred for adjuvant therapy. The majority had presented with a palpable breast lump (91%), with median tumour size 3.5cm (range 0.4-13, IQR 4). Most tumours were node positive (56%). Approximately one-third of patients had stage III disease (33%). Most women presented with large palpable tumours and had lymph node involvement confirmed on surgicopathological evaluation, indicative of limited early breast cancer detection. A national screening mammography programme is recommended for detection of earlier lesions. Pre-operative systemic therapy should be considered as an option for eligible patients.

  17. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  18. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  19. Reducing breast biopsies by ultrasonographic analysis and a modified self-organizing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Greenleaf, James F.; Gisvold, John J.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that visual evaluation of ultrasound images could decrease negative biopsies of breast cancer diagnosis. However, visual evaluation requires highly experienced breast sonographers. The objective of this study is to develop computerized radiologist assistant to reduce breast biopsies needed for evaluating suspected breast cancer. The approach of this study utilizes a neural network and tissue features extracted from digital sonographic breast images. The features include texture parameters of breast images: characteristics of echoes within and around breast lesions, and geometrical information of breast tumors. Clusters containing only benign lesions in the feature space are then identified by a modified self- organizing map. This newly developed neural network objectively segments population distributions of lesions and accurately establishes benign and equivocal regions.t eh method was applied to high quality breast sonograms of a large number of patients collected with a controlled procedure at Mayo Clinic. The study showed that the number of biopsies in this group of women could be decreased by 40 percent to 59 percent with high confidence and that no malignancies would have been included in the nonbiopsied group. The advantages of this approach are that it is robust, simple, and effective and does not require highly experienced sonographers.

  20. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = <0.001). DNA integrity index is correlated with TNM stage. Given 100 % specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved in detecting cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  1. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  2. Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast with neuroglial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Golshan, Mehra; Kuten, Adam; William, Jacquleine; Richardson, Andrea; Modarressi, Amir; Matulonis, Ursula

    2006-08-01

    We present a case of a 34-year-old female who had a rapidly enlarging right breast mass. Biopsy results were consistent with a neuroblastic neoplasm of the breast. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for a neuroblastoma was performed followed by a modified radical mastectomy was performed. Final pathology revealed small foci of poorly differentiated carcinoma randomly distributed within extensive areas of neuroglial differentiation. Such a lesion has not been described in the current literature to our knowledge, and we propose that this neoplasm is a metaplastic carcinoma with a novel heterogeneous differentiation. Subsequent therapy consisted of standard adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  3. Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tato-Varela, Sara; Albalat-Fernández, Rosa; Pabón-Fernández, Sara; Núñez-García, Diego; Calle-Marcos, Manolo La

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma is a severe but rare late complication in the breast-preserving management of breast cancer through surgery and radiotherapy [1]. Often the initial diagnosis of this entity is complex given its relatively anodyne nature and usually being present in the form of typically multifocal reddish-purple papular skin lesions [2]. Because of the low incidence of this tumour, there is a limited number of studies regarding its optimal therapeutic management [3]. The preferred treatment is aggressive surgical removal and the prognosis is poor with an overall survival rate of 12–20% at five years [4]. PMID:28101140

  4. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  5. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26229668

  6. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Sudha S.; Raju, K. V. V. N.; Nair, Haripreetha G.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion with leaf-like fibroepithelial growth pattern and typical nonuniform or diffuse stromal proliferation with periductal accentuation even in the absence of mitotic figures can help clinch the diagnosis. Benign phyllodes is known for its recurrence and requires wide excision and close follow-up. It is vital to identify these lesions even on limited biopsies as therapeutic options differ. This case is presented for its rarity and the diagnostic challenge it poses in limited biopsy. PMID:27081326

  7. [Progress of ductoscopy of the breast].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, A; Okazaki, M; Hirata, K; Tsumanuma, T

    1996-05-01

    Ductoscopy of the breast was initially performed utilizing a rigid scope. Improvements in endoscopic equipment and introduction of the silica-fiberscope have enabled observation of intraductal lesions. The silica-fiberscope can be gradually moved into peripheral sites, after which the endoscopic findings are compared with histological features and diagnostic imaging. The most common symptom dictating endoscopic examination is a discharge from the nipple in which no palpable mass is detected. The fiberscope is introduced through the duct orifice on the surface of the nipple. The characteristic feature of a cancerous lesion is a superficial spread along the surface of the ductal lumen, which differs from the typical features of intraductal papilloma. Microsampling methods such as tube curette cytology should be used to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Endoscopic examination can provide valuable information which will be helpful in the decision process such as; surgical methods, nipple-preservation, and breast conservation.

  8. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  9. Reference state estimation of breast computed tomography for registration with digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Ning, Ruola; Cha, Kenny; Helvie, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the deformation of the breast is a fundamental aspect to lesion localization in multi-view and multimodality imaging. Finite element methods (FEMs) are commonly used to model the deformation process of the breast. In FEM, ideally a reference state of the breast with no loading conditions is available as a starting point and then appropriate imaging-modality-based loading conditions for a specific application can be applied to the breast in the reference state. We propose an iterative method to estimate the reference state configuration between a gravity loaded uncompressed breast computed tomography (BCT) volume and a compressed breast using the corresponding digital mammograms (DM) as a guide. The reference state breast model is compressed between two plates similar to mammographic imaging. A DM-like image is generated by forward ray-tracing. The iterative method applies pressure in the anterior-to-posterior direction of the breast and uses information from the DM geometry and measurements to converge on a reference state of the breast. The process of reference state estimation and breast compression was studied using BCT cases from small to large breast sizes and breast densities consisting of scattered, heterogeneous and extremely dense categories. The breasts were assumed to be composed of non-linear materials based on Mooney-Rivlin models. The effects of the material properties on the estimation process were analyzed. The Fréchet distance between the edges of the DM-like image and the DM image was used as a performance measure.

  10. Varicosity of a single breast: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vinod; Misra, Samir; Jaiswal, Vaibhav; Singh, Saumya

    2014-09-19

    Varicosity of the breasts is a rare clinical entity that may lead to symptoms such as prominent vascular markings over the breasts and may be painless; in long-standing cases it can lead to recurrent bleeding episodes. Bilateral venous affection in the breasts has been described in the literature; however, unilateral affection is a rarely documented phenomenon. Since vascular affliction of a single breast is rare and there is inherent difficulty in obtaining a histopathological diagnosis against a background of suspicion of malignancy, it is always challenging to provide optimal management to the patient. We are reporting a rare case of a 42-year-old, postmenopausal Indian woman with a long-standing history of unilateral varicosity of the left breast, who was treated successfully with a simple mastectomy; postoperative histopathology was consistent with benign vascular lesion, that is, angiomatosis.

  11. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions. PMID:18383664

  12. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Konecky, Soren D; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M; Saffer, Janet R; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G

    2008-02-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Breast Augmentation Scar.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lisa R; Cresce, Nicole D; Russell, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with a persistent lesion on the inferior right breast. The lesion was located within the scar from a breast augmentation procedure 12 years ago. The lesion had been treated as several conditions with no improvement. Biopsy revealed a superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma, and the lesion was successfully removed with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a surgical scar is exceedingly rare with only 13 reported cases to date. This is the first reported case of basal cell carcinoma arising in a breast augmentation scar. We emphasize the importance of biopsy for suspicious lesions or those refractory to treatment, particularly those lesions that form within a scar. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  14. Breast ductoscopy and the evolution of the intra-ductal approach to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dooley, William C

    2009-01-01

    Interest in breast endoscopy came from Oriental investigators in the early 1990s where bloody nipple discharge is a more common presentation of breast cancer. The early techniques using a single microfiber scope without ductal distension was successful in navigating only the first 1-3 cm of the ducts and fraught with technical problems such as scope breakage and poor image quality. In spite of these barriers there has been increasing use of this technology in Japan and more widespread acceptance as the technology of scope design improved. Dooley and others tested a new method of obtaining a rich cytologic specimen from the ducts of high-risk women known as ductal lavage recently. The success of this procedure was that it detected severe cytologic and malignant atypia in clinically and radiographically normal breasts. Reproducibly, the same breast duct could be cannulated and severely atypical cytology obtained. The problem arose in identifying the lesion within the breast, which was the source for the atypia. New American multi-fiber microendoscopes were applied to solve this problem in an initial series of patients with abnormal cytology to identify the lesions. Success of that series lead to wider application of the imaging technology and eventual adoption of this imaging modality help to guide during all non-mastectomy breast surgery where fluid could be elicited from the nipple to identify the duct connecting to the lesion for which surgery was being performed. Initial reports have demonstrated the types of operative findings in certain sub-populations early in the use of this technology.

  15. Coexistence of benign phyllodes tumor and invasive ductal carcinoma in distinct breasts: case report.

    PubMed

    Neto, Guerino Barbalaco; Rossetti, Claudia; Souza, Natalia A; LA Fonseca, Fernando; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Valenti, Vitor E; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2012-04-25

    This report describes a rare case of coexistence of benign phyllodes tumor, which measured 9 cm in the right breast, and invasive ductal carcinoma of 6 cm in the left breast, synchronous and independent, in a 66-year-old patient. The patient underwent a bilateral mastectomy due to the size of both lesions. Such situations are rare and usually refer to the occurrence of ductal or lobular carcinoma in situ when associated with malignant phyllodes tumors, and more often in ipsilateral breast or intra-lesional.

  16. Coexistence of benign phyllodes tumor and invasive ductal carcinoma in distinct breasts: case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of coexistence of benign phyllodes tumor, which measured 9 cm in the right breast, and invasive ductal carcinoma of 6 cm in the left breast, synchronous and independent, in a 66-year-old patient. The patient underwent a bilateral mastectomy due to the size of both lesions. Such situations are rare and usually refer to the occurrence of ductal or lobular carcinoma in situ when associated with malignant phyllodes tumors, and more often in ipsilateral breast or intra-lesional. PMID:22534285

  17. Radiographically occult intrasinusoidal liver metastases leading to hepatic failure in a case of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulia, Seema; Khurana, Sachin; Shet, Tanuja; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-02-15

    The liver is one of the commonest sites of metastatic involvement in breast cancer, usually evident as focal lesions on imaging tests. Rarely, the pattern of metastatic spread is so diffuse that it remains radiologically occult. Such patients usually present with signs of hepatic insufficiency without any focal lesions on liver imaging. In such cases, liver biopsy is required to make a definitive diagnosis. We report a case of a 56-year-old postmenopausal woman with metastatic breast cancer who presented with subacute progressive liver failure. Repeated imaging of the liver was normal or non-descript. Liver biopsy finally established the diagnosis of intrasinusoidal metastases from breast cancer.

  18. A feasibility study of soft embalmed human breast tissue for preclinical trials of HIFU- preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Joyce; Yang, Yang; Purdie, Colin; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women in the UK, accounting for 30% of all new cancers in women, with an estimated 49,500 new cases in 20101. With the widespread negative publicity around over-diagnosis and over-treatment of low risk breast cancers, interest in the application of non-invasive treatments such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has increased. Development has begun of novel US transducers and platforms specifically designed for use with breast lesions, so as to improve the range of breast lesions that can be safely treated. However, before such transducers can be evaluated in patients in clinical trials, there is a need to establish their efficacy. A particular issue is the accuracy of temperature monitoring of FUS with MRI in the breast, since the presence of large amounts of surrounding fat can hinder temperature measurement. An appropriate anatomical model that imposes similar physical constraints to the breast and that responds to FUS in the same way would be extremely advantageous. The aim of this feasibility study is to explore the use of Thiel embalmed cadaveric tissue for these purposes. We report here the early results of laboratory-based experiments sonicating dissected breast samples from a Thiel embalmed soft human cadaver with high body mass index (BMI). A specially developed MRI compatible chamber and sample holder was developed to secure the sample and ensure reproducible sonications at the transducer focus. The efficacy of sonication was first studied with chicken breast and porcine tissue. The experiments were then repeated with the dissected fatty breast tissue samples from the soft-embalmed human cadavers. The sonicated Thiel breast tissue was examined histopathologically, which confirmed the absence of any discrete lesion. To investigate further, fresh chicken breast tissue was embalmed and the embalmed tissue was sonicated with the same parameters. The results confirmed the

  19. Breast implant foreign body reaction mimicking breast cancer recurrence on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ulaner, Gary A; D'Andrea, Gabriella; Cody, Hiram S

    2013-06-01

    A woman with bilateral breast cancer treated with bilateral mastectomies, implant reconstructions, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy underwent FDG PET/CT imaging. Imaging demonstrated sternal, nodal, and lung lesions which were stable or slowly increasing, as well as a parasternal chest wall mass which was enlarging much more rapidly and was excised. Pathology of the chest wall mass demonstrated only benign soft tissue with fat necrosis and foreign body giant cell reaction, without evidence of malignancy or implant rupture. This case demonstrates how a benign FDG-avid foreign body reaction, induced by an intact breast prosthesis, could easily be mistaken for malignancy.

  20. A Rare Breast Tumor: Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Tevhide Bilgen; Hacıhasanoğlu, Ezgi; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aksoy, Şefika; Leblebici, Cem; Talu, Canan Kelten

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a slow-growing, local aggressive fibrous tumor of the subcutaneous tissue, frequently seen in the proximal extremities and the trunk. Its occurrence in the breast is very rare. Herein, we present a female who presented with a breast mass, and aim to discuss pathological features and differential diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. A 44-year-old female presented to our clinic with a mass on her breast. Physical examination revealed a 8×5.5 cm mass with multilobular nodules on the skin in the lower inner quadrant of her right breast. Her mammography revealed a hyperdense, 7.5×6.5 cm, well-demarcated, lobulated mass in the right breast, which caused nodules on the lower para-areolar portion of the breast skin. There was no axillary lymphadenopathy on both clinical and radiologic examinations. A core needle biopsy had been performed prior to her referral to our center, which revealed a ‘spindle cell lesion’. The patient underwent simple mastectomy. On macroscopic examination; the skin over the lesion appeared ulcerated, and there was a well-defined solid mass, which was pale white-tan on the cut surface. Microscopic examination revealed monotonous spindle cell proliferation arranged in storiform pattern within the collagenous stroma with irregular extensions into deep adipose tissue. There were no necrosis or nuclear pleomorphism. The mitotic rate was 2–3/10 HPF. Immunohistochemically tumor cells showed diffuse CD34 positivity, and S100, EMA and SMA negativity. Based on histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, the lesion was diagnosed as dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Local recurrence is expected in 20–50% of these cases. Its treatment requires complete surgical excision with wide margins. Distant metastases, although rare, have been reported.

  1. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  2. Duct ectasia in an accessory breast successfully treated with a flap technique: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Wang, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of duct ectasia in an accessory breast. A 39-year-old, non-lactating Chinese female presented with a recurrent lesion in the right axillary accessory breast. Physical examination and ultrasound revealed an extensive multifocal inflammatory lesion with a size of 10 cm × 7 cm. Antibiotic therapy and a drainage procedure were unsuccessful during the past year. Because of the patient’s severe recurrent lesion, we performed an accessory breast excision and then developed an additional flap to achieve primary suture and healing. The outcome was satisfactory. To our knowledge, this is the first case of duct ectasia in an accessory breast reported in China thus far and the first time that a flap technique was used in duct ectasia for complete excision, defect covering and primary healing. PMID:28149587

  3. Concurrent fibroadenoma and intraductal papilloma - A recurring complex lesion in a premenarcheal girl.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Lara; Gobbi, Dalia; Zanon, Giovanni Franco; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Alaggio, Rita

    2013-02-15

    Breast diseases are rare in childhood and adolescence, most lesions being fibroadenomas and papillomas. We report the case of an 11-year old girl with a complex breast lesion with hybrid features of fibroadenoma and intraductal papilloma with an early recurrence. Microscopically, the lesion was composed of dilated ducts showing intraluminal papillary projections with small to broad fibrovascular stalks. The typical leaf-like appearance of fibroadenoma was determined by the presence at the periphery of ducts compressed and distorted by the prominent stromal component. Despite its florid epithelial hyperplasia and mild cytological atypia (more evident in the relapse), immunohistochemical staining for p63 and smooth muscle actin highlighted a continuum outer myoepithelial layer, confirming the non-invasive appearance of the lesion. Two pathogenetic links have been hypothesized: one is based on the morphological continuum between these two entities, which may represent different evolutive stages in the same lesion; the other is based on epithelial/mesenchymal interactions. The possible malignant transformation of such complex lesion is also discussed, along with its differential diagnoses. The relevance of this case lies in its rarity, as well as in the therapeutic strategies related to its biological potential and to the necessity of a conservative treatment, due to the young age of the patient.

  4. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  5. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  6. Benign Breast Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue.Female breasts are very complex. The female breast is filled with parts called glands (organs that produce milk in women who have ... birth), fat, and fibrous (connecting) tissue. Within each breast, there are ... of glands and fibrous tissue. Most people associate breast abnormalities ...

  7. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  8. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  9. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  10. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  11. Investigation of optimal parameters for penalized maximum-likelihood reconstruction applied to iodinated contrast-enhanced breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Andrey; Ikejimba, Lynda; Lo, Joseph Y.; Glick, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Although digital mammography has reduced breast cancer mortality by approximately 30%, sensitivity and specificity are still far from perfect. In particular, the performance of mammography is especially limited for women with dense breast tissue. Two out of every three biopsies performed in the U.S. are unnecessary, thereby resulting in increased patient anxiety, pain, and possible complications. One promising tomographic breast imaging method that has recently been approved by the FDA is dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT). However, visualizing lesions with BCT can still be challenging for women with dense breast tissue due to the minimal contrast for lesions surrounded by fibroglandular tissue. In recent years there has been renewed interest in improving lesion conspicuity in x-ray breast imaging by administration of an iodinated contrast agent. Due to the fully 3-D imaging nature of BCT, as well as sub-optimal contrast enhancement while the breast is under compression with mammography and