Science.gov

Sample records for nonrigid motion analysis

  1. Model-Based Nonrigid Motion Analysis Using Natural Feature Adaptive Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Goldgof, D.B.; Sarkar, S.; Tsap, L.V.

    2000-04-25

    The success of nonrigid motion analysis using physical finite element model is dependent on the mesh that characterizes the object's geometric structure. We suggest a deformable mesh adapted to the natural features of images. The adaptive mesh requires much fewer number of nodes than the fixed mesh which was used in our previous work. We demonstrate the higher efficiency of the adaptive mesh in the context of estimating burn scar elasticity relative to normal skin elasticity using the observed 2D image sequence. Our results show that the scar assessment method based on the physical model using natural feature adaptive mesh can be applied to images which do not have artificial markers.

  2. Iterative k-t principal component analysis with nonrigid motion correction for dynamic three-dimensional cardiac perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Wissmann, Lukas; Manka, Robert; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    In this study, an iterative k-t principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm with nonrigid frame-to-frame motion correction is proposed for dynamic contrast-enhanced three-dimensional perfusion imaging. An iterative k-t PCA algorithm was implemented with regularization using training data corrected for frame-to-frame motion in the x-pc domain. Motion information was extracted using shape-constrained nonrigid image registration of the composite of training and k-t undersampled data. The approach was tested for 10-fold k-t undersampling using computer simulations and in vivo data sets corrupted by respiratory motion artifacts owing to free-breathing or interrupted breath-holds. Results were compared to breath-held reference data. Motion-corrected k-t PCA image reconstruction resolved residual aliasing. Signal intensity curves extracted from the myocardium were close to those obtained from the breath-held reference. Upslopes were found to be more homogeneous in space when using the k-t PCA approach with motion correction. Iterative k-t PCA with nonrigid motion correction permits correction of respiratory motion artifacts in three-dimensional first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dynamic analysis of a system of hinge-connected rigid bodies with nonrigid appendages. [equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Equations of motion are derived for use in simulating a spacecraft or other complex electromechanical system amenable to idealization as a set of hinge-connected rigid bodies of tree topology, with rigid axisymmetric rotors and nonrigid appendages attached to each rigid body in the set. In conjunction with a previously published report on finite-element appendage vibration equations, this report provides a complete minimum-dimension formulation suitable for generic programming for digital computer numerical integration.

  4. A factorization-based approach for articulated nonrigid shape, motion and kinematic chain recovery from video.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jingyu; Pollefeys, Marc

    2008-05-01

    Recovering articulated shape and motion, especially human body motion, from video is a challenging problem with a wide range of applications in medical study, sport analysis and animation, etc. Previous work on articulated motion recovery generally requires prior knowledge of the kinematic chain and usually does not concern the recovery of the articulated shape. The non-rigidity of some articulated part, e.g. human body motion with nonrigid facial motion, is completely ignored. We propose a factorization-based approach to recover the shape, motion and kinematic chain of an articulated object with nonrigid parts altogether directly from video sequences under a unified framework. The proposed approach is based on our modeling of the articulated non-rigid motion as a set of intersecting motion subspaces. A motion subspace is the linear subspace of the trajectories of an object. It can model a rigid or non-rigid motion. The intersection of two motion subspaces of linked parts models the motion of an articulated joint or axis. Our approach consists of algorithms for motion segmentation, kinematic chain building, and shape recovery. It handles outliers and can be automated. We test our approach through synthetic and real experiments and demonstrate how to recover articulated structure with non-rigid parts via a single-view camera without prior knowledge of its kinematic chain.

  5. Evaluation of skin and muscular deformations in a non-rigid motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Michela; Carli, Marco; Conforto, Silvia; Bibbo, Daniele; Neri, Alessandro; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2005-04-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is indispensable to take into account this phenomenon and thus approximating body limbs to rigid structures appears as restrictive. The present work aims at evaluating skin and muscular deformation, and at modeling body segment elastic behavior by analysing video sequences that capture a sport gesture. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using the technique based on Gauss Laguerre Expansion. Promising results have been obtained by applying the proposed method to a video sequence, where an upper arm isometric contraction was present.

  6. Impact of nonrigid motion correction technique on pixel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis of free-breathing pulmonary dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Junichi; Mamata, Hatsuho; Gill, Ritu R; Hata, Nobuhiko; Kikinis, Ron; Padera, Robert F; Lenkinski, Robert E; Sugarbaker, David J; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2011-04-01

    To investigates the impact of nonrigid motion correction on pixel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis of free-breathing DCE-MRI in patients with solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Misalignment of focal lesions due to respiratory motion in free-breathing dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) precludes obtaining reliable time-intensity curves, which are crucial for pharmacokinetic analysis for tissue characterization. Single-slice 2D DCE-MRI was obtained in 15 patients. Misalignments of SPNs were corrected using nonrigid B-spline image registration. Pixel-wise pharmacokinetic parameters K(trans) , v(e) , and k(ep) were estimated from both original and motion-corrected DCE-MRI by fitting the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model to the time-intensity curve obtained in each pixel. The "goodness-of-fit" was tested with χ(2) -test in pixel-by-pixel basis to evaluate the reliability of the parameters. The percentages of reliable pixels within the SPNs were compared between the original and motion-corrected DCE-MRI. In addition, the parameters obtained from benign and malignant SPNs were compared. The percentage of reliable pixels in the motion-corrected DCE-MRI was significantly larger than the original DCE-MRI (P = 4 × 10(-7) ). Both K(trans) and k(ep) derived from the motion-corrected DCE-MRI showed significant differences between benign and malignant SPNs (P = 0.024, 0.015). The study demonstrated the impact of nonrigid motion correction technique on pixel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis of free-breathing DCE-MRI in SPNs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Kernel Non-Rigid Structure from Motion

    PubMed Central

    Gotardo, Paulo F. U.; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2013-01-01

    Non-rigid structure from motion (NRSFM) is a difficult, underconstrained problem in computer vision. The standard approach in NRSFM constrains 3D shape deformation using a linear combination of K basis shapes; the solution is then obtained as the low-rank factorization of an input observation matrix. An important but overlooked problem with this approach is that non-linear deformations are often observed; these deformations lead to a weakened low-rank constraint due to the need to use additional basis shapes to linearly model points that move along curves. Here, we demonstrate how the kernel trick can be applied in standard NRSFM. As a result, we model complex, deformable 3D shapes as the outputs of a non-linear mapping whose inputs are points within a low-dimensional shape space. This approach is flexible and can use different kernels to build different non-linear models. Using the kernel trick, our model complements the low-rank constraint by capturing non-linear relationships in the shape coefficients of the linear model. The net effect can be seen as using non-linear dimensionality reduction to further compress the (shape) space of possible solutions. PMID:24002226

  8. Estimating nonrigid motion from inconsistent intensity with robust shape features

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Ruan, Dan

    2013-12-15

    qualitatively appealing results, demonstrating good feasibility and applicability of the proposed method. Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel method to estimate the nonrigid motion of GOIs in the presence of spatial intensity and contrast variations, taking advantage of robust shape features. Quantitative analysis and qualitative evaluation demonstrated good promise of the proposed method. Further clinical assessment and validation is being performed.

  9. Discerning nonrigid 3D shapes from motion cues

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Zaidi, Qasim

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms and objects deform nonrigidly when moving, requiring perceivers to separate shape changes from object motions. Surprisingly, the abilities of observers to correctly infer nonrigid volumetric shapes from motion cues have not been measured, and structure from motion models predominantly use variants of rigidity assumptions. We show that observers are equally sensitive at discriminating cross-sections of flexing and rigid cylinders based on motion cues, when the cylinders are rotated simultaneously around the vertical and depth axes. A computational model based on motion perspective (i.e., assuming perceived depth is inversely proportional to local velocity) predicted the psychometric curves better than shape from motion factorization models using shape or trajectory basis functions. Asymmetric percepts of symmetric cylinders, arising because of asymmetric velocity profiles, provided additional evidence for the dominant role of relative velocity in shape perception. Finally, we show that inexperienced observers are generally incapable of using motion cues to detect inflation/deflation of rigid and flexing cylinders, but this handicap can be overcome with practice for both nonrigid and rigid shapes. The empirical and computational results of this study argue against the use of rigidity assumptions in extracting 3D shape from motion and for the primacy of motion deformations computed from motion shears. PMID:21205884

  10. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with layered motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Jung, Hoyup; Yun, Il Dong

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method for nonrigid registration of coronary artery models with layered motion information. 2D nonrigid registration method is proposed that brings layered motion information into correspondence with fluoroscopic angiograms. The registered model is overlaid on top of interventional angiograms to provide surgical assistance during image-guided chronic total occlusion procedures. The proposed methodology is divided into two parts: layered structures alignments and local nonrigid registration. In the first part, inpainting method is used to estimate a layered rigid transformation that aligns layered motion information. In the second part, a nonrigid registration method is implemented and used to compensate for any local shape discrepancy. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms results in a reduced target registration error, which showed the effectiveness of the proposed method over single layered approach.

  11. Motion correction via nonrigid coregistration of dynamic MR mammography series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Magri, Alphonso; Unlu, Mehmet; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Lee, Wei; Coman, Ioana; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to improve quality of subtraction MR breast images and improve accuracy of time-signal intensity curves (TSIC) related to local contrast-agent concentration in dynamic MR mammography. The patients, with up to nine fiducial skin markers (FSMs) taped to each breast, were prone with both breasts suspended into a single well that housed the receiver coil. After a preliminary scan, paramagnetic contrast agent gadopentate digmeglumine (Gd) was delivered intravenously, followed by physiological saline. The field of view was centered over the breasts. We used a gradient recalled echo (GRE) technique for pre-Gd baseline, and five more measurements at 60s intervals. Centroids were determined for corresponding FSMs visible on pre-Gd and any post-Gd images. This was followed by segmentation of breast surfaces in all dynamic-series images, and meshing of all post-Gd breast images. Tetrahedral volume and triangular surface elements were used to construct a finite element method (FEM) model. We used ANSYS TM software and an analogy between orthogonal components of the displacement field and the temperature differences in steady-state heat transfer (SSHT) in solids. The floating images were warped to a fixed image using an appropriate shape function for interpolation from mesh nodes to voxels. To reduce any residual misregistration, we performed surface matching between the previously warped floating image and the target image. Our method of motion correction via nonrigid coregistration yielded excellent differential-image series that clearly revealed lesions not visible in unregistered differential-image series. Further, it produced clinically useful maximum intensity projection (MIP) 3D images.

  12. Nonrigid retrospective respiratory motion correction in whole-heart coronary MRA.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Buehrer, Martin; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    A nonrigid retrospective respiratory motion correction scheme is presented for whole-heart coronary imaging with interleaved acquisition of motion information. The quasi-periodic nature of breathing is exploited to populate a 3D nonrigid motion model from low-resolution 2D imaging slices acquired interleaved with a segmented 3D whole-heart coronary scan without imposing scan time penalty. Reconstruction and motion correction are based on inversion of a generalized encoding equation. Therein, a forward model describes the transformation from the motion free image to the motion distorted k-space data, which includes nonrigid spatial transformations. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated on 10 healthy volunteers using free-breathing coronary whole-heart scans. Although conventional respiratory-gated acquisitions with 5-mm gating window resulted in an average gating efficiency of 51% ± 11%, nonrigid motion correction allowed for gate-free acquisitions, and hence scan time reduction by a factor of two without significant penalty in image quality. Image scores and quantitative image quality measures for the left coronary arteries showed no significant differences between 5-mm gated and gate-free acquisitions with motion correction. For the right coronary artery, slightly reduced image quality in the motion corrected gate-free scan was observed as a result of the close vicinity of anatomical structures with different motion characteristics. Magn Reson Med, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nonrigid Autofocus Motion Correction for Coronary MR Angiography with a 3D Cones Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, R. Reeve; Wu, Holden H.; Addy, Nii Okai; Cheng, Joseph Y.; Yang, Phillip C.; Hu, Bob S.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a nonrigid autofocus motion correction technique to improve respiratory motion correction of free-breathing whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA) acquisitions using an image-navigated 3D cones sequence. Methods: 2D image navigators acquired every heartbeat are used to measure superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left translation of the heart during a free-breathing CMRA scan using a 3D cones readout trajectory. Various tidal respiratory motion patterns are modeled by independently scaling the three measured displacement trajectories. These scaled motion trajectories are used for 3D translational compensation of the acquired data, and a bank of motion-compensated images is reconstructed. From this bank, a gradient entropy focusing metric is used to generate a nonrigid motion-corrected image on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The performance of the autofocus motion correction technique is compared with rigid-body translational correction and no correction in phantom, volunteer, and patient studies. Results: Nonrigid autofocus motion correction yields improved image quality compared to rigid-body-corrected images and uncorrected images. Quantitative vessel sharpness measurements indicate superiority of the proposed technique in 14 out of 15 coronary segments from three patient and two volunteer studies. Conclusion: The proposed technique corrects nonrigid motion artifacts in free-breathing 3D cones acquisitions, improving image quality compared to rigid-body motion correction. PMID:24006292

  14. Learned Non-Rigid Object Motion is a View-Invariant Cue to Recognizing Novel Objects

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Lewis L.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that observers use learned object motion to recognize objects. For instance, studies have shown that reversing the learned direction in which a rigid object rotated in depth impaired recognition accuracy. This motion reversal can be achieved by playing animation sequences of moving objects in reverse frame order. In the current study, we used this sequence-reversal manipulation to investigate whether observers encode the motion of dynamic objects in visual memory, and whether such dynamic representations are encoded in a way that is dependent on the viewing conditions. Participants first learned dynamic novel objects, presented as animation sequences. Following learning, they were then tested on their ability to recognize these learned objects when their animation sequence was shown in the same sequence order as during learning or in the reverse sequence order. In Experiment 1, we found that non-rigid motion contributed to recognition performance; that is, sequence-reversal decreased sensitivity across different tasks. In subsequent experiments, we tested the recognition of non-rigidly deforming (Experiment 2) and rigidly rotating (Experiment 3) objects across novel viewpoints. Recognition performance was affected by viewpoint changes for both experiments. Learned non-rigid motion continued to contribute to recognition performance and this benefit was the same across all viewpoint changes. By comparison, learned rigid motion did not contribute to recognition performance. These results suggest that non-rigid motion provides a source of information for recognizing dynamic objects, which is not affected by changes to viewpoint. PMID:22661939

  15. Learned Non-Rigid Object Motion is a View-Invariant Cue to Recognizing Novel Objects.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Lewis L; Vuong, Quoc C; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that observers use learned object motion to recognize objects. For instance, studies have shown that reversing the learned direction in which a rigid object rotated in depth impaired recognition accuracy. This motion reversal can be achieved by playing animation sequences of moving objects in reverse frame order. In the current study, we used this sequence-reversal manipulation to investigate whether observers encode the motion of dynamic objects in visual memory, and whether such dynamic representations are encoded in a way that is dependent on the viewing conditions. Participants first learned dynamic novel objects, presented as animation sequences. Following learning, they were then tested on their ability to recognize these learned objects when their animation sequence was shown in the same sequence order as during learning or in the reverse sequence order. In Experiment 1, we found that non-rigid motion contributed to recognition performance; that is, sequence-reversal decreased sensitivity across different tasks. In subsequent experiments, we tested the recognition of non-rigidly deforming (Experiment 2) and rigidly rotating (Experiment 3) objects across novel viewpoints. Recognition performance was affected by viewpoint changes for both experiments. Learned non-rigid motion continued to contribute to recognition performance and this benefit was the same across all viewpoint changes. By comparison, learned rigid motion did not contribute to recognition performance. These results suggest that non-rigid motion provides a source of information for recognizing dynamic objects, which is not affected by changes to viewpoint.

  16. Sequential Non-Rigid Structure from Motion Using Physical Priors.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Antonio; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Calvo, Begona; Montiel, Jose M Martinez

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new approach to simultaneously recover camera pose and 3D shape of non-rigid and potentially extensible surfaces from a monocular image sequence. For this purpose, we make use of the Extended Kalman Filter based Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (EKF-SLAM) formulation, a Bayesian optimization framework traditionally used in mobile robotics for estimating camera pose and reconstructing rigid scenarios. In order to extend the problem to a deformable domain we represent the object's surface mechanics by means of Navier's equations, which are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM). With these main ingredients, we can further model the material's stretching, allowing us to go a step further than most of current techniques, typically constrained to surfaces undergoing isometric deformations. We extensively validate our approach in both real and synthetic experiments, and demonstrate its advantages with respect to competing methods. More specifically, we show that besides simultaneously retrieving camera pose and non-rigid shape, our approach is adequate for both isometric and extensible surfaces, does not require neither batch processing all the frames nor tracking points over the whole sequence and runs at several frames per second.

  17. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Non-rigid Motion Correction in 3D Using Autofocusing with Localized Linear Translations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Alley, Marcus T.; Cunningham, Charles H.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from non-rigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well-approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric – more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multi-channel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called “Butterfly” navigators which are modifications to the spin-warp sequence that provide intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, non-rigid motion was observed. PMID:22307933

  19. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W.; Pretorius, P. H.; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  20. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W; Pretorius, P H; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A

    2014-07-21

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  1. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  2. A spatiotemporal model of cyclic kinematics and its application to analyzing nonrigid motion with MR velocity images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Pelc, N J

    1999-07-01

    We present a method (DMESH) for nonrigid cyclic motion analysis using a series of velocity images covering the cycle acquired, for example, from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The method is based on fitting a dynamic finite-element mesh model to velocity samples of an extended region, at all time frames. The model offers a flexible tradeoff between accuracy and reproducibility with controllable built-in spatiotemporal smoothing, which is determined by the fineness of the initially defined mesh and the richness of included Fourier harmonics. The method can further provide a prediction of the analysis reproducibility, along with the estimated motion and deformation quantities. Experiments have been conducted to validate the method and to verify the reproducibility prediction. Use of the method for motion analysis using displacement information (e.g., from magnetic resonance tagging) has also been explored.

  3. Correspondence estimation from non-rigid motion information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulff, Jonas; Lotz, Thomas; Stehle, Thomas; Aach, Til; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    The DIET (Digital Image Elasto Tomography) system is a novel approach to screen for breast cancer using only optical imaging information of the surface of a vibrating breast. 3D tracking of skin surface motion without the requirement of external markers is desirable. A novel approach to establish point correspondences using pure skin images is presented here. Instead of the intensity, motion is used as the primary feature, which can be extracted using optical flow algorithms. Taking sequences of multiple frames into account, this motion information alone is accurate and unambiguous enough to allow for a 3D reconstruction of the breast surface. Two approaches, direct and probabilistic, for this correspondence estimation are presented here, suitable for different levels of calibration information accuracy. Reconstructions show that the results obtained using these methods are comparable in accuracy to marker-based methods while considerably increasing resolution. The presented method has high potential in optical tissue deformation and motion sensing.

  4. Digital Correction of Motion Artifacts in Microscopy Image Sequences Collected from Living Animals Using Rigid and Non-Rigid Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail, and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artifacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and non-rigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, while the non-rigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung, and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  5. Flexible model and spectrum of non-rigid motion in LMF4 fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, L. Ya.; Boldyrev, A. I.

    A flexible model is used to simulate the spectrum of the non-rigid motion in the LiBF4 molecule. It is shown that there are many states having energies below the barrier of rearrangement which can be regarded as anharmonic bending vibrations. A one-well representation of the potential energy surface appears to be a fairly good approximation for describing this part of the spectrum. The tunnelling splittings at these levels are extremely small. At energies above the barrier the level pattern changes radically and highly excited states should be regarded as intramolecular hindered rotation. Differences between the spectra of LMH4 hydrides and LMF4 fluorides are discussed.

  6. Quantifying Rigid and Nonrigid Motion of Liver Tumors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qianyi; Hanna, George; Grimm, Jimm; Kubicek, Gregory; Pahlajani, Niraj; Asbell, Sucha; Fan, Jiajin; Chen, Yan; LaCouture, Tamara

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify rigid and nonrigid motion of liver tumors using reconstructed 3-dimensional (3D) fiducials from stereo imaging during CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three liver patients treated with 3 fractions of SBRT were used in this study. After 2 orthogonal kilovoltage images were taken during treatment, the 3D locations of the fiducials were generated by the CyberKnife system and validated using geometric derivations. A total of 4824 pairs of kilovoltage images from start to end of treatment were analyzed. For rigid motion, the rotational angles and translational shifts were reported by aligning 3D fiducial groups from different image pairs, using least-squares fitting. For nonrigid motion, we quantified interfractional tumor volume variations by using the proportional volume derived from the fiducials, which correlates to the sum of interfiducial distances. The individual fiducial displacements were also reported (1) after rigid corrections and (2) without angle corrections. Results: The proportional volume derived by the fiducials demonstrated a volume-increasing trend in the second (101.9% ± 3.6%) and third (101.0 ± 5.9%) fractions among most patients, possibly due to radiation-induced edema. For all patients, the translational shifts in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior directions were 2.1 ± 2.3 mm, 2.9 ± 2.8 mm, and 6.4 ± 5.5 mm, respectively. The greatest translational shifts occurred in the superoinferior direction, likely due to respiratory motion from the diaphragm. The rotational angles in roll, pitch, and yaw were 1.2° ± 1.8°, 1.8° ± 2.4°, and 1.7° ± 2.1°, respectively. The 3D individual fiducial displacements with rigid corrections were 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and increased to 0.5 ± 0.4 mm without rotational corrections. Conclusions: Accurate 3D locations of internal fiducials can be reconstructed from stereo imaging during treatment. As an

  7. Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Spector, David L.; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed. PMID:20840894

  8. Nonrigid PET motion compensation in the lower abdomen using simultaneous tagged-MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, B.; Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Zhu, X.; Alpert, N. M.; El Fakhri, G.; Reese, T.; Catana, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a novel approach for PET respiratory motion correction using tagged-MRI and simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions.Methods: We use a tagged-MRI acquisition followed by motion tracking in the phase domain to estimate the nonrigid deformation of biological tissues during breathing. In order to accurately estimate motion even in the presence of noise and susceptibility artifacts, we regularize the traditional HARP tracking strategy using a quadratic roughness penalty on neighboring displacement vectors (R-HARP). We then incorporate the motion fields estimated with R-HARP in the system matrix of an MLEM PET reconstruction algorithm formulated both for sinogram and list-mode data representations. This approach allows reconstruction of all detected coincidences in a single image while modeling the effect of motion both in the emission and the attenuation maps. At present, tagged-MRI does not allow estimation of motion in the lungs and our approach is therefore limited to motion correction in soft tissues. Since it is difficult to assess the accuracy of motion correction approaches in vivo, we evaluated the proposed approach in numerical simulations of simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions using the NCAT phantom. We also assessed its practical feasibility in PET-MRI acquisitions of a small deformable phantom that mimics the complex deformation pattern of a lung that we imaged on a combined PET-MRI brain scanner.Results: Simulations showed that the R-HARP tracking strategy accurately estimated realistic respiratory motion fields for different levels of noise in the tagged-MRI simulation. In simulations of tumors exhibiting increased uptake, contrast estimation was 20% more accurate with motion correction than without. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was more than 100% greater when performing motion-corrected reconstruction which included all counts, compared to when reconstructing only coincidences detected in the first of eight gated frames. These results were

  9. Non-rigid, but not rigid, motion interferes with the processing of structural face information in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Maguinness, Corrina; Newell, Fiona N

    2015-04-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that facial motion is an important cue for face recognition. However, it is poorly understood whether motion is integrated with facial form information or whether it provides an independent cue to identity. To provide further insight into this issue, we compared the effect of motion on face perception in two developmental prosopagnosics and age-matched controls. Participants first learned faces presented dynamically (video), or in a sequence of static images, in which rigid (viewpoint) or non-rigid (expression) changes occurred. Immediately following learning, participants were required to match a static face image to the learned face. Test face images varied by viewpoint (Experiment 1) or expression (Experiment 2) and were learned or novel face images. We found similar performance across prosopagnosics and controls in matching facial identity across changes in viewpoint when the learned face was shown moving in a rigid manner. However, non-rigid motion interfered with face matching across changes in expression in both individuals with prosopagnosia compared to the performance of control participants. In contrast, non-rigid motion did not differentially affect the matching of facial expressions across changes in identity for either prosopagnosics (Experiment 3). Our results suggest that whilst the processing of rigid motion information of a face may be preserved in developmental prosopagnosia, non-rigid motion can specifically interfere with the representation of structural face information. Taken together, these results suggest that both form and motion cues are important in face perception and that these cues are likely integrated in the representation of facial identity.

  10. MRI-based nonrigid motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se Young; Reese, Timothy G; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Catana, Ciprian; Zhu, Xuping; Alpert, Nathaniel M; El Fakhri, Georges

    2012-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion is the most serious limitation to whole-body PET, resulting in spatial resolution close to 1 cm. Furthermore, motion-induced inconsistencies in the attenuation measurements often lead to significant artifacts in the reconstructed images. Gating can remove motion artifacts at the cost of increased noise. This paper presents an approach to respiratory motion correction using simultaneous PET/MRI to demonstrate initial results in phantoms, rabbits, and nonhuman primates and discusses the prospects for clinical application. Studies with a deformable phantom, a free-breathing primate, and rabbits implanted with radioactive beads were performed with simultaneous PET/MRI. Motion fields were estimated from concurrently acquired tagged MR images using 2 B-spline nonrigid image registration methods and incorporated into a PET list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm. Using the measured motion fields to transform both the emission data and the attenuation data, we could use all the coincidence data to reconstruct any phase of the respiratory cycle. We compared the resulting SNR and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the motion-corrected reconstruction with the results obtained from standard gating and uncorrected studies. Motion correction virtually eliminated motion blur without reducing SNR, yielding images with SNR comparable to those obtained by gating with 5-8 times longer acquisitions in all studies. The CHO study in dynamic phantoms demonstrated a significant improvement (166%-276%) in lesion detection SNR with MRI-based motion correction as compared with gating (P < 0.001). This improvement was 43%-92% for large motion compared with lesion detection without motion correction (P < 0.001). CHO SNR in the rabbit studies confirmed these results. Tagged MRI motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI significantly improves lesion detection compared with respiratory gating and no

  11. Free-Breathing Pediatric MRI with Nonrigid Motion Correction and Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Zhang, Tao; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Alley, Marcus T.; Uecker, Martin; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess motion correction techniques for high-resolution pediatric abdominal volumetric MR images acquired free breathing with high scan efficiency. Materials and Methods First, variable-density sampling and radial-like phase-encode ordering are incorporated into the 3D Cartesian acquisition. Second, intrinsic multi-channel Butterfly navigators are used to measure respiratory motion. Lastly, these estimates are applied for both motion-weighted data-consistency in a compressed sensing and parallel imaging reconstruction, and for nonrigid motion correction using a localized autofocusing framework. With Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent/assent, studies were performed on 22 consecutive pediatric patients. Two radiologists independently scored the images for overall image quality, degree of motion artifacts, and sharpness of hepatic vessels and the diaphragm. The results are assessed using paired Wilcoxon test and weighted kappa coefficient for inter-observer agreements. Results The complete procedure yielded significantly better overall image quality (mean score of 4.7 out of 5) when compared to using no correction (mean score of 3.4, P value < 0.05) and to using motion-weighted accelerated imaging (mean score of 3.9, P value < 0.05). With an average scan time of 28 s, the proposed method resulted in comparable image quality to conventional prospective respiratory-triggered acquisitions with an average scan time of 91 s (mean score of 4.5). Conclusion With the proposed methods, diagnosable high-resolution abdominal volumetric scans can be obtained from free breathing data acquisitions. PMID:25329325

  12. Free-breathing pediatric MRI with nonrigid motion correction and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Zhang, Tao; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Alley, Marcus T; Uecker, Martin; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2015-08-01

    To develop and assess motion correction techniques for high-resolution pediatric abdominal volumetric magnetic resonance images acquired free-breathing with high scan efficiency. First, variable-density sampling and radial-like phase-encode ordering were incorporated into the 3D Cartesian acquisition. Second, intrinsic multichannel butterfly navigators were used to measure respiratory motion. Lastly, these estimates are applied for both motion-weighted data-consistency in a compressed sensing and parallel imaging reconstruction, and for nonrigid motion correction using a localized autofocusing framework. With Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent/assent, studies were performed on 22 consecutive pediatric patients. Two radiologists independently scored the images for overall image quality, degree of motion artifacts, and sharpness of hepatic vessels and the diaphragm. The results were assessed using paired Wilcoxon test and weighted kappa coefficient for interobserver agreements. The complete procedure yielded significantly better overall image quality (mean score of 4.7 out of 5) when compared to using no correction (mean score of 3.4, P < 0.05) and to using motion-weighted accelerated imaging (mean score of 3.9, P < 0.05). With an average scan time of 28 seconds, the proposed method resulted in comparable image quality to conventional prospective respiratory-triggered acquisitions with an average scan time of 91 seconds (mean score of 4.5). With the proposed methods, diagnosable high-resolution abdominal volumetric scans can be obtained from free-breathing data acquisitions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme for nonrigid bulk motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR.

    PubMed

    Kolbitsch, Christoph; Prieto, Claudia; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive medical imaging technique commonly used to detect and assess tumor lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution anatomical images with different contrasts and a range of additional information important for cancer diagnosis. Recently, simultaneous PET-MR systems have been released with the promise to provide complementary information from both modalities in a single examination. Due to long scan times, subject nonrigid bulk motion, i.e., changes of the patient's position on the scanner table leading to nonrigid changes of the patient's anatomy, during data acquisition can negatively impair image quality and tracer uptake quantification. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme is proposed to detect and correct for nonrigid bulk motion in simultaneously acquired PET-MR data. A respiratory navigated three dimensional (3D) MR-acquisition with Radial Phase Encoding (RPE) is used to obtain T1- and T2-weighted data with an isotropic resolution of 1.5 mm. Healthy volunteers are asked to move the abdomen two to three times during data acquisition resulting in overall 19 movements at arbitrary time points. The acquisition scheme is used to retrospectively reconstruct dynamic 3D MR images with different temporal resolutions. Nonrigid bulk motion is detected and corrected in this image data. A simultaneous PET acquisition is simulated and the effect of motion correction is assessed on image quality and standardized uptake values (SUV) for lesions with different diameters. Six respiratory gated 3D data sets with T1- and T2-weighted contrast have been obtained in healthy volunteers. All bulk motion shifts have successfully been detected and motion fields describing the transformation between the different motion states could be obtained with an accuracy of 1.71 ± 0.29 mm. The PET simulation showed errors of up to 67% in measured SUV due to bulk motion which could be reduced to less than 10% with the proposed

  14. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme for nonrigid bulk motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbitsch, Christoph Prieto, Claudia; Schaeffter, Tobias; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive medical imaging technique commonly used to detect and assess tumor lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution anatomical images with different contrasts and a range of additional information important for cancer diagnosis. Recently, simultaneous PET-MR systems have been released with the promise to provide complementary information from both modalities in a single examination. Due to long scan times, subject nonrigid bulk motion, i.e., changes of the patient's position on the scanner table leading to nonrigid changes of the patient's anatomy, during data acquisition can negatively impair image quality and tracer uptake quantification. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme is proposed to detect and correct for nonrigid bulk motion in simultaneously acquired PET-MR data. Methods: A respiratory navigated three dimensional (3D) MR-acquisition with Radial Phase Encoding (RPE) is used to obtain T1- and T2-weighted data with an isotropic resolution of 1.5 mm. Healthy volunteers are asked to move the abdomen two to three times during data acquisition resulting in overall 19 movements at arbitrary time points. The acquisition scheme is used to retrospectively reconstruct dynamic 3D MR images with different temporal resolutions. Nonrigid bulk motion is detected and corrected in this image data. A simultaneous PET acquisition is simulated and the effect of motion correction is assessed on image quality and standardized uptake values (SUV) for lesions with different diameters. Results: Six respiratory gated 3D data sets with T1- and T2-weighted contrast have been obtained in healthy volunteers. All bulk motion shifts have successfully been detected and motion fields describing the transformation between the different motion states could be obtained with an accuracy of 1.71 ± 0.29 mm. The PET simulation showed errors of up to 67% in measured SUV due to bulk motion which could be reduced to less than

  15. Nonrigid registration-based coronary artery motion correction for cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Pack, Jed D.; Miller, James V.; Iatrou, Maria

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the modality of choice to noninvasively monitor and diagnose heart disease with coronary artery health and stenosis detection being of particular interest. Reliable, clinically relevant coronary artery imaging mandates high spatiotemporal resolution. However, advances in intrinsic scanner spatial resolution (CT scanners are available which combine nearly 900 detector columns with focal spot oversampling) can be tempered by motion blurring, particularly in patients with unstable heartbeats. As a result, recently numerous methods have been devised to improve coronary CTA imaging. Solutions involving hardware, multisector algorithms, or {beta}-blockers are limited by cost, oversimplifying assumptions about cardiac motion, and populations showing contraindications to drugs, respectively. This work introduces an inexpensive algorithmic solution that retrospectively improves the temporal resolution of coronary CTA without significantly affecting spatial resolution. Methods: Given the goal of ruling out coronary stenosis, the method focuses on 'deblurring' the coronary arteries. The approach makes no assumptions about cardiac motion, can be used on exams acquired at high heart rates (even over 75 beats/min), and draws on a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) nonrigid bidirectional labeled point matching approach to estimate the trajectories of the coronary arteries during image acquisition. Motion compensation is achieved by employing a 3D warping of a series of partial reconstructions based on the estimated motion fields. Each of these partial reconstructions is created from data acquired over a short time interval. For brevity, the algorithm 'Subphasic Warp and Add' (SWA) reconstruction. Results: The performance of the new motion estimation-compensation approach was evaluated by a systematic observer study conducted using nine human cardiac CTA exams acquired over a range of average heart rates between 68 and

  16. Comparing nonrigid registration techniques for motion corrected MR prostate diffusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, C. Sénégas, J.; Kabus, S.; Carolus, H.; Schulz, H.; Renisch, S.; Agarwal, H.; Turkbey, B.; Choyke, P. L.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used for anatomical visualization in the pelvis area, such as the prostate, with high soft-tissue contrast. MRI can also provide functional information such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) which depicts the molecular diffusion processes in biological tissues. The combination of anatomical and functional imaging techniques is widely used in oncology, e.g., for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. However, acquisition-specific distortions as well as physiological motion lead to misalignments between T{sub 2} and DWI and consequently to a reduced diagnostic value. Image registration algorithms are commonly employed to correct for such misalignment. Methods: The authors compare the performance of five state-of-the-art nonrigid image registration techniques for accurate image fusion of DWI with T{sub 2}. Results: Image data of 20 prostate patients with cancerous lesions or cysts were acquired. All registration algorithms were validated using intensity-based as well as landmark-based techniques. Conclusions: The authors’ results show that the “fast elastic image registration” provides most accurate results with a target registration error of 1.07 ± 0.41 mm at minimum execution times of 11 ± 1 s.

  17. Motion tracking in the liver: Validation of a method based on 4D ultrasound using a nonrigid registration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, Sinara; Klein, Stefan; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Langø, Thomas; Lindseth, Frank; Ystgaard, Brynjulf

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Treatments like radiotherapy and focused ultrasound in the abdomen require accurate motion tracking, in order to optimize dosage delivery to the target and minimize damage to critical structures and healthy tissues around the target. 4D ultrasound is a promising modality for motion tracking during such treatments. In this study, the authors evaluate the accuracy of motion tracking in the liver based on deformable registration of 4D ultrasound images. Methods: The offline analysis was performed using a nonrigid registration algorithm that was specifically designed for motion estimation from dynamic imaging data. The method registers the entire 4D image data sequence in a groupwise optimization fashion, thus avoiding a bias toward a specifically chosen reference time point. Three healthy volunteers were scanned over several breathing cycles (12 s) from three different positions and angles on the abdomen; a total of nine 4D scans for the three volunteers. Well-defined anatomic landmarks were manually annotated in all 96 time frames for assessment of the automatic algorithm. The error of the automatic motion estimation method was compared with interobserver variability. The authors also performed experiments to investigate the influence of parameters defining the deformation field flexibility and evaluated how well the method performed with a lower temporal resolution in order to establish the minimum frame rate required for accurate motion estimation. Results: The registration method estimated liver motion with an error of 1 mm (75% percentile over all datasets), which was lower than the interobserver variability of 1.4 mm. The results were only slightly dependent on the degrees of freedom of the deformation model. The registration error increased to 2.8 mm with an eight times lower temporal resolution. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the methodology was able to accurately track the motion of the liver in the 4D ultrasound data. The authors believe

  18. Nonrigid motion compensation in B-mode and contrast enhanced ultrasound image sequences of the carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Diego D. B.; Akkus, Zeynettin; Bosch, Johan G.; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Klein, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate nonrigid motion compensation in simultaneously acquired (side-by-side) B-mode ultrasound (BMUS) and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequences of the carotid artery. These images are acquired to study the presence of intraplaque neovascularization (IPN), which is a marker of plaque vulnerability. IPN quantification is visualized by performing the maximum intensity projection (MIP) on the CEUS image sequence over time. As carotid images contain considerable motion, accurate global nonrigid motion compensation (GNMC) is required prior to the MIP. Moreover, we demonstrate that an improved lumen and plaque differentiation can be obtained by averaging the motion compensated BMUS images over time. We propose to use a previously published 2D+t nonrigid registration method, which is based on minimization of pixel intensity variance over time, using a spatially and temporally smooth B-spline deformation model. The validation compares displacements of plaque points with manual trackings by 3 experts in 11 carotids. The average (+/- standard deviation) root mean square error (RMSE) was 99+/-74μm for longitudinal and 47+/-18μm for radial displacements. These results were comparable with the interobserver variability, and with results of a local rigid registration technique based on speckle tracking, which estimates motion in a single point, whereas our approach applies motion compensation to the entire image. In conclusion, we evaluated that the GNMC technique produces reliable results. Since this technique tracks global deformations, it can aid in the quantification of IPN and the delineation of lumen and plaque contours.

  19. Nonrigid groupwise registration for motion estimation and compensation in compressed sensing reconstruction of breath-hold cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Royuela-del-Val, Javier; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Simmross-Wattenberg, Federico; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Compressed sensing methods with motion estimation and compensation techniques have been proposed for the reconstruction of accelerated dynamic MRI. However, artifacts that naturally arise in compressed sensing reconstruction procedures hinder the estimation of motion from reconstructed images, especially at high acceleration factors. This work introduces a robust groupwise nonrigid motion estimation technique applied to the compressed sensing reconstruction of dynamic cardiac cine MRI sequences. A spatio-temporal regularized, groupwise, nonrigid registration method based on a B-splines deformation model and a least squares metric is used to estimate and to compensate the movement of the heart in breath-hold cine acquisitions and to obtain a quasistatic sequence with highly sparse representation in temporally transformed domains. Short axis in vivo datasets are used for validation, both original multicoil as well as DICOM data. Fully sampled data were retrospectively undersampled with various acceleration factors and reconstructions were compared with the two well-known methods k-t FOCUSS and MASTeR. The proposed method achieves higher signal to error ratio and structure similarity index for medium to high acceleration factors. Reconstruction methods based on groupwise registration show higher quality reconstructions for cardiac cine images than the pairwise counterparts tested. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transition states from molecular symmetry groups: Analysis of non-rigid acetylene trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bone, Richard G. A.; Rowlands, Timothy W.; Handy, Nicholas C.; Stone, Anthony J.

    We demonstrate that Longuet-Higgins' molecular symmetry (MS) group for describing non-rigid molecules allows deduction of the transition state for an intramolecular rearrangement and that the level of symmetry of the transition state is governed by very simple rules. Key pieces of information are the order of the MS group and the number of distinctly labelled forms represented by it. We also show that the local symmetry at stationary points on the potential energy surface is important and introduce natural definitions of narcissistic reactions and pathways using the laboratory-fixed inversion operation, giving examples of each. Inspection of normal modes is used to depict motion across the potential energy surface between a minimum-energy structure and a transition state. This analysis is applied to acetylene trimer, a recently observed van der Waals cluster. We elucidate the relationships between the stationary points identified by our earlier ab initio work. There are two transition state structures that together allow full interconversion between the 16 distinctly labelled forms of the global minimum.

  1. List-mode-based reconstruction for respiratory motion correction in PET using non-rigid body transformations.

    PubMed

    Lamare, F; Ledesma Carbayo, M J; Cresson, T; Kontaxakis, G; Santos, A; Le Rest, C Cheze; Reader, A J; Visvikis, D

    2007-09-07

    Respiratory motion in emission tomography leads to reduced image quality. Developed correction methodology has been concentrating on the use of respiratory synchronized acquisitions leading to gated frames. Such frames, however, are of low signal-to-noise ratio as a result of containing reduced statistics. In this work, we describe the implementation of an elastic transformation within a list-mode-based reconstruction for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax, allowing the use of all data available throughout a respiratory motion average acquisition. The developed algorithm was evaluated using datasets of the NCAT phantom generated at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List-mode-data-based PET-simulated frames were subsequently produced by combining the NCAT datasets with Monte Carlo simulation. A non-rigid registration algorithm based on B-spline basis functions was employed to derive transformation parameters accounting for the respiratory motion using the NCAT dynamic CT images. The displacement matrices derived were subsequently applied during the image reconstruction of the original emission list mode data. Two different implementations for the incorporation of the elastic transformations within the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm were developed and evaluated. The corrected images were compared with those produced using an affine transformation of list mode data prior to reconstruction, as well as with uncorrected respiratory motion average images. Results demonstrate that although both correction techniques considered lead to significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lung fields, the elastic-transformation-based correction leads to a more uniform improvement across the lungs for different lesion sizes and locations.

  2. Experiences in determination of non-rigid body motion in industrial environment using low-cost photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupnik, Ewelina; Jansa, Josef

    2013-04-01

    Central to our investigation is determination of dynamic behaviour of a highly reflective platform floating on water, as well as derivation of parameters defining instantaneous water state. The employed imaging setup consists of three off-the-shelf dSLR cameras capable of video recording at a 30Hz frame rate. In order to observe a change, the non-rigid and non-diffuse bodies impose the adoption of artificial targetting and custom measurement algorithms. Attention will be given to an in-house software tool implemented to carry out point measurement, correspondence search, tracking and outlier detection methods in the presence of specular reflections and a multimedia scene. A methodology for retrieval of wave parameters in regular wave conditions is also automatically handled by the software and will be discussed. In the context of performed measurements and achieved results, we will point out the extent to which consumer grade camera can fulfil automation and accuracy demands of industrial applications and the pitfalls entailed. Lastly, we will elaborate on visual representation of computed motion and deformations.

  3. Automatic motion correction for in vivo human skin optical coherence tomography angiography through combined rigid and nonrigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, David Wei; Deegan, Anthony J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-06-01

    When using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), the development of artifacts due to involuntary movements can severely compromise the visualization and subsequent quantitation of tissue microvasculatures. To correct such an occurrence, we propose a motion compensation method to eliminate artifacts from human skin OCTA by means of step-by-step rigid affine registration, rigid subpixel registration, and nonrigid B-spline registration. To accommodate this remedial process, OCTA is conducted using two matching all-depth volume scans. Affine transformation is first performed on the large vessels of the deep reticular dermis, and then the resulting affine parameters are applied to all-depth vasculatures with a further subpixel registration to refine the alignment between superficial smaller vessels. Finally, the coregistration of both volumes is carried out to result in the final artifact-free composite image via an algorithm based upon cubic B-spline free-form deformation. We demonstrate that the proposed method can provide a considerable improvement to the final en face OCTA images with substantial artifact removal. In addition, the correlation coefficients and peak signal-to-noise ratios of the corrected images are evaluated and compared with those of the original images, further validating the effectiveness of the proposed method. We expect that the proposed method can be useful in improving qualitative and quantitative assessment of the OCTA images of scanned tissue beds.

  4. GGO nodule volume-preserving nonrigid lung registration using GLCM texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjin; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Jeongjin; Goo, Jin Mo; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2011-10-01

    In lung cancer screening, benign and malignant nodules can be classified through nodule growth assessment by the registration and, then, subtraction between follow-up computed tomography scans. During the registration, the volume of nodule regions in the floating image should be preserved, whereas the volume of other regions in the floating image should be aligned to that in the reference image. However, ground glass opacity (GGO) nodules are very elusive to automatically segment due to their inhomogeneous interior. In other words, it is difficult to automatically define the volume-preserving regions of GGO nodules. In this paper, we propose an accurate and fast nonrigid registration method. It applies the volume-preserving constraint to candidate regions of GGO nodules, which are automatically detected by gray-level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM) texture analysis. Considering that GGO nodules can be characterized by their inner inhomogeneity and high intensity, we identify the candidate regions of GGO nodules based on the homogeneity values calculated by the GLCM and the intensity values. Furthermore, we accelerate our nonrigid registration by using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In the nonrigid registration process, the computationally expensive procedures of the floating-image transformation and the cost-function calculation are accelerated by using CUDA. The experimental results demonstrated that our method almost perfectly preserves the volume of GGO nodules in the floating image as well as effectively aligns the lung between the reference and floating images. Regarding the computational performance, our CUDA-based method delivers about 20× faster registration than the conventional method. Our method can be successfully applied to a GGO nodule follow-up study and can be extended to the volume-preserving registration and subtraction of specific diseases in other organs (e.g., liver cancer).

  5. Theory of nonrigid rotational motion applied to NMR relaxation in RNA.

    PubMed

    Emani, Prashant S; Olsen, Gregory L; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P

    2011-11-10

    Solution NMR spectroscopy can elucidate many features of the structure and dynamics of macromolecules, yet relaxation measurements, the most common source of experimental information on dynamics, can sample only certain ranges of dynamic rates. A complete characterization of motion of a macromolecule thus requires the introduction of complementary experimental approaches. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy successfully probes the time scale of nanoseconds to microseconds, a dynamic window where solution NMR results have been deficient, and probes conditions where the averaging effects of rotational diffusion of the molecule are absent. Combining the results of the two distinct techniques within a single framework provides greater insight into dynamics, but this task requires the common interpretation of results recorded under very different experimental conditions. Herein, we provide a unified description of dynamics that is robust to the presence of large-scale conformational exchange, where the diffusion tensor of the molecule varies on a time scale comparable to rotational diffusion in solution. We apply this methodology to the HIV-1 TAR RNA molecule, where conformational rearrangements are both substantial and functionally important. The formalism described herein is of greater generality than earlier combined solid-state/solution NMR interpretations, if detailed molecular structures are available, and can offer a more complete description of RNA dynamics than either solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy alone.

  6. Non-rigid estimation of cell motion in calcium time-lapse images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachi, Siham; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Desmet, An-Sofie; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2016-03-01

    Calcium imaging is a widely used technique in neuroscience permitting the simultaneous monitoring of electro- physiological activity of hundreds of neurons at single cell resolution. Identification of neuronal activity requires rapid and reliable image analysis techniques, especially when neurons fire and move simultaneously over time. Traditionally, image segmentation is performed to extract individual neurons in the first frame of a calcium sequence. Thereafter, the mean intensity is calculated from the same region of interest in each frame to infer calcium signals. However, when cells move, deform and fire, this segmentation on its own generates artefacts and therefore biased neuronal activity. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop a more efficient cell tracking technique. We hereby present a novel vision-based cell tracking scheme using a thin-plate spline deformable model. The thin-plate spline warping is based on control points detected using the Fast from Accelerated Segment Test descriptor and tracked using the Lucas-Kanade optical flow. Our method is able to track neurons in calcium time-series, even when there are large changes in intensity, such as during a firing event. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed approach is validated on real calcium time-lapse images of a neuronal population.

  7. SU-E-J-225: Quantitative Evaluation of Rigid and Non-Rigid Motion of Liver Tumors Using Stereo Imaging During SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Hanna, G; Kubicek, G; Asbell, S; Chen, Y; LaCouture, T; Grimm, J; Pahlajani, N; Fan, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate rigid and nonrigid motion of liver tumors based on fiducial tracking in 3D by stereo imaging during CyberKnife SBRT. Methods: Twenty-five liver patients previously treated with three-fractions of SBRT were retrospectively recruited in this study. During treatment, the 3D locations of fiducials were reported by the CyberKnife system after two orthogonal kV X-ray images were taken and further validated by geometry derivations. A total of 5004 pairs of X-ray images acquired during the course of treatment for all the patients, were analyzed. For rigid motion, the rotational angles and translational shifts by aligning 3D fiducial groups in different image pairs after least-square fitting were reported. For nonrigid motion, the relative interfractional tumor shape variations were reported and correlated to the sum of inter-fiducial distances. The individual fiducial displacements were also reported after rigid corrections and without angle corrections. Results: The relative tumor volume variation indicated by the inter-fiducial distances demonstrated an increasing trend in the second (101.6±3.4%) and third fraction (101.2±5.6%) among most patients. The cause could be possibly due to radiation-induced edema. For all the patients, the translational shift was 8.1±5.7 mm, with shifts in LR, AP and SI were 2.1±2.4 mm, 2.8±2.9 mm and 6.7±5.1 mm, respectively. The greatest translation shift occurred in SI, mainly due the breathing motion of diaphragm The rotational angles were 1.1±1.7°, 1.9±2.6° and 1.6±2.2°, in roll, pitch, and yaw, respectively. The 3D fiducial displacement with rigid corrections were 0.2±0.2 mm and increased to 0.6±0.3 mm without rotational corrections. Conclusion: The fiducial locations in 3D can be precisely reconstructed from CyberKnife stereo imaging system during treatment. The fiducials provide close estimation of both rigid and nonrigid motion of .liver tumors. The reported data could be further

  8. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  9. High-throughput mouse phenotyping using non-rigid registration and robust principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongliu; Kitamoto, Asanobu; Tamura, Masaru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Gillies, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    Intensive international efforts are underway towards phenotyping the mouse genome, by knocking out each of its ≍25,000 genes one-by-one for comparative study. With vast amounts of data to analyze, the traditional method using time-consuming histological examination is clearly impractical, leading to an overwhelming demand for some high-throughput phenotyping framework, especially with the employment of biomedical image informatics to efficiently identify phenotypes concerning morphological abnormality. Existing work has either excessively relied on volumetric analytics which is insensitive to phenotypes associated with no severe volume variations, or tailored for specific defects and thus fails to serve a general phenotyping purpose. Furthermore, the prevailing requirement of an atlas for image segmentation in contrast to its limited availability further complicates the issue in practice. In this paper we propose a high-throughput general-purpose phenotyping framework that is able to efficiently perform batch-wise anomaly detection without prior knowledge of the phenotype and the need for atlas-based segmentation. Anomaly detection is centered on the combined use of group-wise non-rigid image registration and robust principal component analysis (RPCA) for feature extraction and decomposition.

  10. Motion sequence analysis in the presence of figural cues

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pawan; Vaina, Lucia M.

    2015-01-01

    The perception of 3D structure in dynamic sequences is believed to be subserved primarily through the use of motion cues. However, real-world sequences contain many figural shape cues besides the dynamic ones. We hypothesize that if figural cues are perceptually significant during sequence analysis, then inconsistencies in these cues over time would lead to percepts of non-rigidity in sequences showing physically rigid objects in motion. We develop an experimental paradigm to test this hypothesis and present results with two patients with impairments in motion perception due to focal neurological damage, as well as two control subjects. Consistent with our hypothesis, the data suggest that figural cues strongly influence the perception of structure in motion sequences, even to the extent of inducing non-rigid percepts in sequences where motion information alone would yield rigid structures. Beyond helping to probe the issue of shape perception, our experimental paradigm might also serve as a possible perceptual assessment tool in a clinical setting. PMID:26028822

  11. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  12. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T. Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  13. A three-dimension finite element analysis to evaluate the stress distribution in tooth supported 5-unit intermediate abutment prosthesis with rigid and nonrigid connector

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Ritesh; Kohli, Shivani; Rajeshwari, K.; Bhatia, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate the stress distribution in tooth supported 5-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) having tooth as pier abutment using rigid and nonrigid connectors respectively, under simultaneous and progressive loading. Material and Methods: The three-dimensional (3D) finite element program (ANSYS software) was used to construct the mathematical model. Two 5-unit FPD’S were simulated, one with rigid connector and another one with nonrigid connector. For analysis, each of these models were subjected to axial and oblique forces under progressive loading (180, 180, 120, 120, 80 N force on first and second molars, premolars and canine respectively) and simultaneous loading (100, 100, 100, 100, 100 N force on first and second molars, premolars and canine respectively). Results: The rigid and nonrigid connector design have effect on stress distribution in 5-unit FPDs with pier abutments. Conclusion: Oblique forces produce more stresses than vertical forces. Nonrigid connector resulted in decrease in stress at the level of prosthesis and increase in stress at the level of alveolar crest. PMID:26038660

  14. Conformational analysis of tripeptides: a molecular dynamics study of rigid and non-rigid tripeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, John; Mochel, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on different tripeptides classified as structurally rigid and non-rigid (1). The simulations were run using the OPLS-AA force field (2) with and without explicit solvent. Two modeling programs, Tinker (3) and Macromodel (4), were used to simulate the dynamics. The accessible conformations were analyzed using Ramachandran plots of the dihedral angles. The results of this study are compared to the rigidity classification scheme (1), and differences in the results using explicit solvent and a continuum solvent model are noted. (1) Anishetty, S., Pennathur, G., Anishetty, R. BMC Structural Biology 2:9 (2002). Available from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6807/2/9. (2) Jorgensen, W. L., Maxwell, D. S., Tirado-Rives, J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 11225 (1996). (3) Dudek, M. J., Ramnarayan, K., Ponder, J. W. J. Comput. Chem. 19, 548 (1996). Available from http://dasher.wustl.edu/tinker. (4) Mohamadi, F., Richards, N. G. J., Guida, W. C., Liskamp, R., Lipton, M., Caufield, C., Chang, G., Hendrickson, T., Still, W. C. J. Comput. Chem. 11, 440 (1990).

  15. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  16. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  17. Motion analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  18. Nonrigid registration and classification of the kidneys in 3D dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Ghafourian, Pegah; Sharma, Puneet; Salman, Khalil; Martin, Diego; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We have applied image analysis methods in the assessment of human kidney perfusion based on 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data. This approach consists of 3D non-rigid image registration of the kidneys and fuzzy C-mean classification of kidney tissues. The proposed registration method reduced motion artifacts in the dynamic images and improved the analysis of kidney compartments (cortex, medulla, and cavities). The dynamic intensity curves show the successive transition of the contrast agent through kidney compartments. The proposed method for motion correction and kidney compartment classification may be used to improve the validity and usefulness of further model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of kidney function.

  19. Human motion analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  20. The effect of rigid and non-rigid connections between implants and teeth on biological and technical complications: a systematic review and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsaousoglou, Phoebus; Michalakis, Konstantinos; Kang, Kiho; Weber, Hans-Peter; Sculean, Anton

    2017-07-01

    To assess survival, as well as technical and biological complication rates of partial fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) supported by implants and teeth. An electronic Medline search was conducted to identify articles, published in dental journals from January 1980 to August 2015, reporting on partial FDPs supported by implants and teeth. The search terms were categorized into four groups comprising the PICO question. Manual searches of published full-text articles and related reviews were also performed. The initial database search produced 3587 relevant titles. Three hundred and eighty-six articles were retrieved for abstract review, while 39 articles were selected for full-text review. A total of 10 studies were selected for inclusion. Overall survival rate for implants ranged between 90% and 100%, after follow-up periods with a mean range of 18-120 months. The survival of the abutment teeth was 94.1-100%, while the prostheses survival was 85-100% for the same time period. The most frequent complications were "periapical lesions" (11.53%). The most frequent technical complication was "porcelain occlusal fracture" (16.6%), followed by "screw loosening" (15%). According to the meta-analysis, no intrusion was noted on the rigid connection group, while five teeth (8.19%) were intruded in the non-rigid connection group [95% CI (0.013-0.151)]. The tooth-implant FDP seems to be a possible alternative to an implant-supported FDP. There is limited evidence that rigid connection between teeth and implants presents better results when compared with the non-rigid one. The major drawback of non-rigidly connected FDPs is tooth intrusion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  2. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of tooth- and implant-supported fixed dental prostheses with various nonrigid connector positions: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Burak Özcelik, Tuncer; Ersoy, Ersan; Yilmaz, Burak

    2011-01-01

    In the tooth- and implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP), rigid and nonrigid connector (NRC) designs have been preferred by clinicians for many years. The aim of this study was to analyze the stress distribution on the connecting areas of the superstructure and supporting structure of the tooth- and implant-supported FDP designs under both static vertical and oblique occlusal loads. Four 2D finite element analysis (FEA) models were prepared presuming that the first and second molars were missing, and that the implant (3.80-mm diameter × 13-mm length) was placed in the second molar NRC design and patrix-matrix position supported by teeth/implants. Nonlinear contact elements were used to simulate a realistic interface fixation within the implant system and the sliding function of the NRC. Supporting periodontal ligament and alveolar bone (cortical and trabecular) were also modeled. Linear static analysis was performed on the prepared 2D solid models with a total masticatory force of 250 N (50 N for premolar, 100 N for first molar, 100 N for second molar), 0° (at a right angle) and 30° to the long axis of the supports. The maximum equivalent Von Mises (VM(Max)) was analyzed around the supporting teeth/implant and connector areas on tooth- and implant-supported FDP. The simulated results indicated that the highest level of VM(Max) (400.377 MPa) was observed on the NRC with the matrix positioned on the implant site of tooth- and implant-supported FDP under vertical occlusal load. The highest level of VM(Max) (392.8 MPa) under oblique occlusal load was also observed on the same model; however, the lowest VM(Max) value around implants was observed with the NRC when the patrix was positioned on the implant site of the FDP. Under vertical occlusal loads, in designs where the NRC was placed on the implant site, the stress formed around the implant decreased when compared to the designs where the NRCs were positioned on the tooth site. The efficiency of the NRC

  4. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with propagated deformation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Shin, Seung Yeon; Hong, Youngtaek; Lee, Soochahn; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Yun, Il Dong

    2017-03-01

    We propose a novel method for nonrigid registration of coronary arteries within frames of a fluoroscopic X-ray angiogram sequence with propagated deformation field. The aim is to remove the motion of coronary arteries in order to simplify further registration of the 3D vessel structure obtained from computed tomography angiography, with the x-ray sequence. The Proposed methodology comprises two stages: propagated adjacent pairwise nonrigid registration, and, sequence-wise fixed frame nonrigid registration. In the first stage, a propagated nonrigid transformation reduces the disparity search range for each frame sequentially. In the second stage, nonrigid registration is applied for all frames with a fixed target frame, thus generating a motion-aligned sequence. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms resulted in reduced target registration error, compared to previous methods, showing the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  5. Non-rigid Face Tracking with Local Appearance Consistency Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Saragih, Jason

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new discriminative approach to achieve consistent and efficient tracking of non-rigid object motion, such as facial expressions. By utilizing both spatial and temporal appearance coherence at the patch level, the proposed approach can reduce ambiguity and increase accuracy. Recent research demonstrates that feature based approaches, such as constrained local models (CLMs), can achieve good performance in non-rigid object alignment/tracking using local region descriptors and a non-rigid shape prior. However, the matching performance of the learned generic patch experts is susceptible to local appearance ambiguity. Since there is no motion continuity constraint between neighboring frames of the same sequence, the resultant object alignment might not be consistent from frame to frame and the motion field is not temporally smooth. In this paper, we extend the CLM method into the spatio-temporal domain by enforcing the appearance consistency constraint of each local patch between neighboring frames. More importantly, we show that the global warp update can be optimized jointly in an efficient manner using convex quadratic fitting. Finally, we demonstrate that our approach receives improved performance for the task of non-rigid facial motion tracking on the videos of clinical patients. PMID:25242852

  6. Human motion analysis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Prussing, Keith; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and the derivation of motionbased observables, and changes in these fundamental properties arising from load variations. Analyses were conducted to characterize the motion properties of various body components such as leg swing, arm swing, head motion, and full body motion. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, extraction of motion characteristics, and analysis of these data. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and analysis results will also be presented.

  7. Non-rigid summing of gated PET via optical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    A method for summing together datasets from gated cardiac PET acquisitions is described. Optical flow techniques are used to accurately model non-rigid motion present during the cardiac cycle so that a one-to-one mapping is found between each voxel of two gated volumes. Using this mapping, image summing can take place, producing a composite dataset with improved statistics and reduced motion-induced blur. Results using a data from a gated cardiac study on a dog are presented.

  8. Shrinking of the Cocos and Nazca Plates due to Horizontal Thermal Contraction and Implications for Plate Non-rigidity and the Non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca Plate Motion Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plate rigidity is the central tenet of plate tectonics. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that significant intraplate deformation occurs in oceanic lithosphere due to horizontal thermal contraction, the rate of which decreases as ≈ 1/age [Kumar & Gordon 2009]. Support for this hypothesis comes from the azimuths of submarine transform faults, which are fit significantly better assuming shrinking plates than by assuming rigid plates [Mishra & Gordon 2015]. Previously we estimated the intraplate velocity field of the Pacific plate accounting for horizontal thermal contraction. The ≈2 mm/yr southeastward motion predicted for the northeastern part of the plate relative to the Pacific-Antarctic Rise may contribute to the non-closure of the Pacific-North America plate motion circuit. In a reference frame in which fix the oldest portion of the Pacific plate, some sites on the plate move up to ≈2 mm/yr [Kreemer & Gordon 2014]. Here we present intraplate velocity fields of the Cocos and Nazca plates and discuss their implications for the non-rigidity of plates and the non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca plate circuit, which fails closure by a stunning 14 ±5 mm/yr [DeMets et al. 2010]. If we fix the oldest part of the Cocos plate, intraplate velocities of up to ≈2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring at the northern end of the plate. If we fix the oldest part of the Nazca plate, displacement rates up to 2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring in the northeasternmost portion of the plate. In the velocity fields for both plates, the lithosphere adjacent to transform faults along the East Pacific Rise tends to move to the south, which would skew the azimuths of the transform faults clockwise of the values expected for rigid plates, which is the same as the sense of misfit between observed azimuths of transform faults and the azimuths calculated from the MORVEL global set of relative angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Direct

  9. Video Analysis of Muscle Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Boyd

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how video cameras can help students in physical education and sport science classes successfully learn and present anatomy and kinesiology content at levels. Video analysis of physical activity is an excellent way to expand student knowledge of muscle location and function, planes and axes of motion, and…

  10. Motion Analysis From Television Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, George G.; Keller, Patrick N.

    1982-02-01

    The Department of Defense ranges have relied on photographic instrumentation for gathering data of firings for all types of ordnance. A large inventory of cameras are available on the market that can be used for these tasks. A new set of optical instrumentation is beginning to appear which, in many cases, can directly replace photographic cameras for a great deal of the work being performed now. These are television cameras modified so they can stop motion, see in the dark, perform under hostile environments, and provide real time information. This paper discusses techniques for modifying television cameras so they can be used for motion analysis.

  11. Discontinuous nonrigid registration using extended free-form deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Rui; Pozo, Jose M.; Taylor, Zeike A.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method to treat discontinuities in a 3D piece-wise non-rigid registration framework, coined as EXtended Free-Form Deformation (XFFD). Existing discontinuities in the image, such as sliding motion of the lungs or the cardiac boundary adjacent to the blood pool, should be handled to obtain physically plausible deformation fields for motion analysis. However, conventional Free-form deformations (FFDs) impose continuity over the whole image, introducing inaccuracy near discontinuity boundaries. The proposed method incorporates enrichment functions into the FFD formalism, inspired by the linear interpolation method in the EXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM). Enrichment functions enable B-splines to handle discontinuities with minimal increase of computational complexity, while avoiding boundary-matching problem. It retains all properties of the framework of FFDs yet seamlessly handles general discontinuities and can also coexist with other proposed improvements of the FFD formalism. The proposed method showed high performance on synthetic and 3D lung CT images. The target registration error on the CT images is comparable to the previous methods, while being a generic method without assuming any type of motion constraint. Therefore, it does not include any penalty term. However, any of these terms could be included to achieve higher accuracy for specific applications.

  12. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  13. NoRMCorre: An online algorithm for piecewise rigid motion correction of calcium imaging data.

    PubMed

    Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A; Giovannucci, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Motion correction is a challenging pre-processing problem that arises early in the analysis pipeline of calcium imaging data sequences. The motion artifacts in two-photon microscopy recordings can be non-rigid, arising from the finite time of raster scanning and non-uniform deformations of the brain medium. We introduce an algorithm for fast Non-Rigid Motion Correction (NoRMCorre) based on template matching. NoRMCorre operates by splitting the field of view (FOV) into overlapping spatial patches along all directions. The patches are registered at a sub-pixel resolution for rigid translation against a regularly updated template. The estimated alignments are subsequently up-sampled to create a smooth motion field for each frame that can efficiently approximate non-rigid artifacts in a piecewise-rigid manner. Existing approaches either do not scale well in terms of computational performance or are targeted to non-rigid artifacts arising just from the finite speed of raster scanning, and thus cannot correct for non-rigid motion observable in datasets from a large FOV. NoRMCorre can be run in an online mode resulting in comparable to or even faster than real time motion registration of streaming data. We evaluate its performance with simple yet intuitive metrics and compare against other non-rigid registration methods on simulated data and in vivo two-photon calcium imaging datasets. Open source Matlab and Python code is also made available. The proposed method and accompanying code can be useful for solving large scale image registration problems in calcium imaging, especially in the presence of non-rigid deformations. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel non-rigid calcium phosphate scaffold seeded with umbilical cord stem cells for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Thein-Han, WahWah; Weir, Michael D.; Simon, Carl G.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    The need for bone repair has increased as the population ages. Non-rigid calcium phosphate scaffolds could provide compliance for micro-motions within the tissues and yet have load-supporting strength. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a non-rigid calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold; and (2) investigate human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) proliferation, osteodifferentiation and mineralization on non-rigid CPC for the first time. Non-rigid CPC was fabricated by adding extra tetracalcium phosphate in the traditional CPC, and by incorporating chitosan, absorbable fibers, and hydrogel microbeads. The non-rigid CPCmicrobead scaffold possessed a strain-at-failure of 10.7%, much higher than the traditional CPC’s strain of 0.05% which is typical for brittle bioceramics. Flexural strength of non-rigid CPCmicrobead was 4-fold that of rigid CPC-mircobead scaffold, while work-of-fracture (toughness) was increased by 20-fold. The strength of non-rigid CPC-microbead-fiber scaffold matched that of cancellous bone. hUCMSCs on non-rigid CPC proliferated from 100 cells/mm2 at 1 day, to 600 cells/mm2 at 8 days. Alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and collagen gene expressions of hUCMSCs were greatly increased, and the cells synthesized bone minerals. hUCMSCs on non-rigid CPC-microbead-fiber construct had higher bone markers and more mineralization than those on rigid CPC. In conclusion, this study developed the first non-rigid, in situ-setting calcium phosphate-microbead-fiber scaffold with a strain-at-failure exceeding 10%. hUCMSCs showed excellent proliferation, osteodifferentiation, and mineralization on non-rigid CPC scaffold. The novel non-rigid CPC-hUCMSC construct with good strength, high strain-at-failure and toughness, as well as superior cell proliferation, osteodifferentiation and mineralization is promising for load-bearing bone regeneration applications. PMID:22451091

  15. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1990-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body, a wide variety of technologies was developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development coupled with recent advances in video technology have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System to develop data on shirt-sleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The system is described.

  16. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  17. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body a wide variety of technologies has been developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development, coupled with recent advances in video technology, have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS) to develop data on shirtsleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on-orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. APAS is a fully integrated system of hardware and software for biomechanics and the analysis of human performance and generalized motion measurement. Major components of the complete system include the video system, the AT compatible computer, and the proprietary software.

  18. Analytical Analysis of Motion Separability

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Jazi, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Motion segmentation is an important task in computer vision and several practical approaches have already been developed. A common approach to motion segmentation is to use the optical flow and formulate the segmentation problem using a linear approximation of the brightness constancy constraints. Although there are numerous solutions to solve this problem and their accuracies and reliabilities have been studied, the exact definition of the segmentation problem, its theoretical feasibility and the conditions for successful motion segmentation are yet to be derived. This paper presents a simplified theoretical framework for the prediction of feasibility, of segmentation of a two-dimensional linear equation system. A statistical definition of a separable motion (structure) is presented and a relatively straightforward criterion for predicting the separability of two different motions in this framework is derived. The applicability of the proposed criterion for prediction of the existence of multiple motions in practice is examined using both synthetic and real image sequences. The prescribed separability criterion is useful in designing computer vision applications as it is solely based on the amount of relative motion and the scale of measurement noise. PMID:24348191

  19. Non-rigid Reconstruction of Casting Process with Temperature Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjie; Li, Xin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu

    2017-09-01

    Off-line reconstruction of rigid scene has made a great progress in the past decade. However, the on-line reconstruction of non-rigid scene is still a very challenging task. The casting process is a non-rigid reconstruction problem, it is a high-dynamic molding process lacking of geometric features. In order to reconstruct the casting process robustly, an on-line fusion strategy is proposed for dynamic reconstruction of casting process. Firstly, the geometric and flowing feature of casting are parameterized in manner of TSDF (truncated signed distance field) which is a volumetric block, parameterized casting guarantees real-time tracking and optimal deformation of casting process. Secondly, data structure of the volume grid is extended to have temperature value, the temperature interpolation function is build to generate the temperature of each voxel. This data structure allows for dynamic tracking of temperature of casting during deformation stages. Then, the sparse RGB features is extracted from casting scene to search correspondence between geometric representation and depth constraint. The extracted color data guarantees robust tracking of flowing motion of casting. Finally, the optimal deformation of the target space is transformed into a nonlinear regular variational optimization problem. This optimization step achieves smooth and optimal deformation of casting process. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct the casting process robustly and reduce drift in the process of non-rigid reconstruction of casting.

  20. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J A; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M

    2016-09-09

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  1. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  2. The eigenmode analysis of human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Juyong; Lee, Deok-Sun; González, Marta C.

    2010-11-01

    Rapid advances in modern communication technology are enabling the accumulation of large-scale, high-resolution observational data of the spatiotemporal movements of humans. Classification and prediction of human mobility based on the analysis of such data has great potential in applications such as urban planning in addition to being a subject of theoretical interest. A robust theoretical framework is therefore required to study and properly understand human motion. Here we perform the eigenmode analysis of human motion data gathered from mobile communication records, which allows us to explore the scaling properties and characteristics of human motion.

  3. Uncertainty Prediction in Passive Target Motion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-12

    300118 1 of 25 UNCERTAINTY PREDICTION IN PASSIVE TARGET MOTION ANALYSIS STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein...uncertainty. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] In the bearing only target motion analysis (TMA) problem, one must estimate the position and...very often inadequate for characterizing the accuracy of estimates when data quality is low and the estimation problem is nonlinear. In recent years

  4. Motion Analysis: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, J. K.

    The subject of motion has been the center of interdisciplinary studies since the time when Zeno posed his paradox circa 500BC. However, computer vision, the use of a camera and a computer to recognize objects, people and/or events automatically, is a relatively young field of research. Its development began in the early 1960s; however, it has matured fairly quickly. Today, it is contributing to the solutions of some of the most serious societal problems. Motion analysis of a sequence of images is an important part of computer vision. This chapter briefly presents the contributions to motion analysis from other fields followed by the computer vision-based analysis of motion from a sequence of images. Analysis and understanding of images based on both feature tracking and optical flow estimation are presented. Early works focused on the computation of structure from motion of objects from a sequence of images via point features. This was followed by the computation of optical flow to characterize motion. Applications today focus on the monitoring of traffic, providing guidance to a motorist in terms of his/her position relative to traffic lanes and traffic ahead, and inspection of complicated three-dimensional industrial parts, to mention a few. Research focus has shifted from inanimate objects to people, for example monitoring people and their activities in public places or monitoring activities from an unmanned aerial vehicle. These applications are dominating the research scene through the belief that computer vision/motion analysis can contribute to the solution of societal surveillance and biometric problems. The chapter ends with a discussion of the future directions of research in motion analysis and possible applications.

  5. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    PubMed

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments.

  6. Contour propagation in MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment of cervical cancer: the accuracy of rigid, non-rigid and semi-automatic registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Put, R. W.; Kerkhof, E. M.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2009-12-01

    External beam radiation treatment for patients with cervical cancer is hindered by the relatively large motion of the target volume. A hybrid MRI-accelerator system makes it possible to acquire online MR images during treatment in order to correct for motion and deformation. To fully benefit from such a system, online delineation of the target volumes is necessary. The aim of this study is to investigate the accuracy of rigid, non-rigid and semi-automatic registrations of MR images for interfractional contour propagation in patients with cervical cancer. Registration using mutual information was performed on both bony anatomy and soft tissue. A B-spline transform was used for the non-rigid method. Semi-automatic registration was implemented with a point set registration algorithm on a small set of manual landmarks. Online registration was simulated by application of each method to four weekly MRI scans for each of 33 cervical cancer patients. Evaluation was performed by distance analysis with respect to manual delineations. The results show that soft-tissue registration significantly (P < 0.001) improves the accuracy of contour propagation compared to registration based on bony anatomy. A combination of user-assisted and non-rigid registration provides the best results with a median error of 3.2 mm (1.4-9.9 mm) compared to 5.9 mm (1.7-19.7 mm) with bone registration (P < 0.001) and 3.4 mm (1.3-19.1 mm) with non-rigid registration (P = 0.01). In a clinical setting, the benefit may be further increased when outliers can be removed by visual inspection of the online images. We conclude that for external beam radiation treatment of cervical cancer, online MRI imaging will allow target localization based on soft tissue visualization, which provides a significantly higher accuracy than localization based on bony anatomy. The use of limited user input to guide the registration increases overall accuracy. Additional non-rigid registration further reduces the propagation

  7. Analysis as a Means of Motion Exploration and Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seveyka, Jerred; Shigeoka, Cassie A.; Bavis, Ryan W.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses procedures for investigating animal motion and makes suggestions for conducting a field or laboratory experiment using video. Recommends using nature videos to perform motion analysis. (YDS)

  8. Wavelet Analysis of Protein Motion

    PubMed Central

    BENSON, NOAH C.

    2014-01-01

    As high-throughput molecular dynamics simulations of proteins become more common and the databases housing the results become larger and more prevalent, more sophisticated methods to quickly and accurately mine large numbers of trajectories for relevant information will have to be developed. One such method, which is only recently gaining popularity in molecular biology, is the continuous wavelet transform, which is especially well-suited for time course data such as molecular dynamics simulations. We describe techniques for the calculation and analysis of wavelet transforms of molecular dynamics trajectories in detail and present examples of how these techniques can be useful in data mining. We demonstrate that wavelets are sensitive to structural rearrangements in proteins and that they can be used to quickly detect physically relevant events. Finally, as an example of the use of this approach, we show how wavelet data mining has led to a novel hypothesis related to the mechanism of the protein γδ resolvase. PMID:25484480

  9. Nonrigid correction of interleaving artefacts in pelvic MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jason; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Raffelt, David; Fripp, Jurgen; Greer, Peter B.; Patterson, Jacqueline; Denham, James; Gupta, Sanjiv; Tang, Colin; Stanwell, Peter; Ourselin, Sébastien; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a novel method to reduce the effects of interleaving motion artefacts in single-plane MR scanning of the pelvic region without the need for k-space information. Interleaved image (or multipacket) acquisition is frequently used to reduce cross-talk and scanning time during full pelvic MR scans. Patient motion during interleaved acquisition can result in non-linear "staircase" imaging artefacts which are most visible on sagittal and coronal reconstructions. These artefacts can affect the segmentation of organs, registration, and visualization. A fast method has been implemented to replace artefact affected slices in a packet with interpolated slices based on Penney et al (2004) whose method involves the registration of neighbouring slices to obtain correspondences, followed by linear interpolation of voxel intensities along the displacement fields. This interpolation method has been applied to correct motion affected MRI volumes by firstly creating a new volume where every axial slice from the artefact affected packet is removed and replaced with an interpolated slice and then secondly for each of these slices, 2D non-rigid registration is used to register each original axial slice back to its matching interpolated slice. Results show visible improvements in artefacts particularly in sagittal and coronal image reconstructions, and should result in improved intensity based non-rigid registration results between MR scans (for example for atlas based automatic segmentation). Further validation was performed on simulated interleaving artefacts which were applied to an artefact free volume. Results obtained on prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment planning contouring were inconclusive and require further investigation.

  10. Lunar motion analysis and laser data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Work completed in lunar motion analysis and laser data management during the period July 1, 1971 - September 30, 1975 was reported. In this context, analysis refers to theoretical or numerical studies involving real or potential applications of such observations to improvement of the physical model, and data management refers to the process by which observed photon events are turned into observations and are made available to potential users. The data analysis work included: (1) bringing to operational status of computer programs for the numerical integration of the lunar orbit motion and for the application of lunar laser time delays for the improvement of the parameters of the physical model, (2) program improvement and program integrity, (3) three-dimensional ephemeris, and (4) miscellaneous independent studies. The data management work included: (1) data identification, (2) observatory interfaces, and (3) data distribution.

  11. Motion Analysis System for Instruction of Nihon Buyo using Motion Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Yukitaka; Murakami, Shingo; Watanabe, Yuta; Mito, Yuki; Watanuma, Reishi; Marumo, Mieko

    The passing on and preserving of advanced technical skills has become an important issue in a variety of fields, and motion analysis using motion capture has recently become popular in the research of advanced physical skills. This research aims to construct a system having a high on-site instructional effect on dancers learning Nihon Buyo, a traditional dance in Japan, and to classify Nihon Buyo dancing according to style, school, and dancer's proficiency by motion analysis. We have been able to study motion analysis systems for teaching Nihon Buyo now that body-motion data can be digitized and stored by motion capture systems using high-performance computers. Thus, with the aim of developing a user-friendly instruction-support system, we have constructed a motion analysis system that displays a dancer's time series of body motions and center of gravity for instructional purposes. In this paper, we outline this instructional motion analysis system based on three-dimensional position data obtained by motion capture. We also describe motion analysis that we performed based on center-of-gravity data obtained by this system and motion analysis focusing on school and age group using this system.

  12. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Smith, D W; Claudet, A A; Kasper, E P; Patterson, S R

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints cause significant deformation of the part. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics in service will deviate from the reported values during inspection. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components

  13. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K; Swift, D; Claudet, A; Kasper, E; Patterson, S

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints are significant. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics will deviate from reported values. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components. The problems are compounded as the requirements come to

  14. Global Methods for Image Motion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    including the time for reviewing instructions , searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing...thanks go to Pankaj who inspired me in research , to Prasad from whom I have learned so much, and to Ronie and Laureen, the memories of whose company...of images to determine egomotion and to extract information from the scene. Research in motion analysis has been focussed on the problems of

  15. GPU accelerated non-rigid registration for the evaluation of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for the fast and efficient tracking of motion in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) cines. A GPU accelerated Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear least squares optimization procedure for finite element non-rigid registration was implemented on an NVIDIA graphics card using the OpenGL environment. Points were tracked from frame to frame using forward and backward incremental registration. The inner (endocardial) and outer (epicardial) boarders of the heart were tracked in six short axis cines with approximately 25 frames through the cardiac cycle in 36 patients with vascular disease. Contours placed by two independent expert observers using a semi-automatic ventricular analysis program (CIM version 4.6) were used as the gold standard. The method took 0.5 seconds per frame, and the maximum Hausdorff errors were less than 2 mm on average which was of the same order as the expert inter-observer error. In conclusion, GPU accelerated Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear optimization enables fast and accurate tracking of cardiac motion in CMR images.

  16. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  17. 3D motion analysis of keratin filaments in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf; Aach, Til

    2010-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for 3D motion estimation of keratin intermediate filaments in vitro. Keratin filaments are elastic cables forming a complex scaffolding within epithelial cells. To understand the mechanisms of filament formation and network organisation under physiological and pathological conditions, quantitative measurements of dynamic network alterations are essential. Therefore we acquired time-lapse series of 3D images using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Based on these image series, we show that a dense vector field can be computed such that the displacements from one frame to the next can be determined. Our method is based on a two-step registration process: First, a rigid pre-registration is applied in order to compensate for possible global cell movement. This step enables the subsequent nonrigid registration to capture only the sought local deformations of the filaments. As the transformation model of the deformable registration algorithm is based on Free Form Deformations, it is well suited for modeling filament network dynamics. The optimization is performed using efficient linear programming techniques such that the huge amount of image data of a time series can be efficiently processed. The evaluation of our results illustrates the potential of our approach.

  18. Non-rigid calcium phosphate cement containing hydrogel microbeads and absorbable fibres seeded with umbilical cord stem cells for bone engineering.

    PubMed

    TheinHan, Wahwah; Weir, Michael D; Simon, Carl G; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-10-01

    The need for bone repair has increased as the population ages. Non-rigid calcium phosphate scaffolds could provide compliance for micro-motions within the tissues and yet have load-supporting strength. The objectives of this study were to: (a) develop a non-rigid calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with microbeads and fibre reinforcement; and (b) investigate human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) proliferation, osteodifferentiation and mineralization on non-rigid CPC for the first time. Non-rigid CPC was fabricated by adding extra tetracalcium phosphate in the traditional CPC and by incorporating chitosan, absorbable fibres and hydrogel microbeads. The non-rigid CPC-microbead scaffold possessed a strain-at-failure of 10.7%, much higher than the traditional CPC's strain of 0.05% which is typical for brittle bioceramics. Flexural strength of non-rigid CPC-microbead was 4-fold that of rigid CPC-microbead scaffold, while work-of-fracture (toughness) was increased by 20-fold. The strength of non-rigid CPC-microbead-fibre scaffold matched that of cancellous bone. hUCMSCs on non-rigid CPC proliferated from 100 cells/mm(2) at 1 day to 600 cells/mm(2) at 8 days. Alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen gene expressions of hUCMSCs were greatly increased, and the cells synthesized bone minerals. hUCMSCs on non-rigid CPC-microbead-fibre constructs had higher bone markers and more mineralization than those on rigid CPC controls. In conclusion, this study developed the first non-rigid, in situ-setting calcium phosphate-microbead-fibre scaffold with a strain-at-failure exceeding 10%. hUCMSCs showed excellent proliferation, osteodifferentiation and mineralization on non-rigid CPC scaffold. The novel non-rigid CPC-hUCMSC construct with good strength, high strain-at-failure and toughness, as well as superior stem cell proliferation, osteodifferentiation and mineralization, is promising for load-bearing bone regeneration applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley

  19. Motion analysis using 3D high-resolution frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takaaki; Fujii, Kenta; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Yoshizawa, Toshio; Misawa, Tadanobu

    2013-08-01

    The spatiotemporal spectra of a video that contains a moving object form a plane in the 3D frequency domain. This plane, which is described as the theoretical motion plane, reflects the velocity of the moving objects, which is calculated from the slope. However, if the resolution of the frequency analysis method is not high enough to obtain actual spectra from the object signal, the spatiotemporal spectra disperse away from the theoretical motion plane. In this paper, we propose a high-resolution frequency analysis method, described as 3D nonharmonic analysis (NHA), which is only weakly influenced by the analysis window. In addition, we estimate the motion vectors of objects in a video using the plane-clustering method, in conjunction with the least-squares method, for 3D NHA spatiotemporal spectra. We experimentally verify the accuracy of the 3D NHA and its usefulness for a sequence containing complex motions, such as cross-over motion, through comparison with 3D fast Fourier transform. The experimental results show that increasing the frequency resolution contributes to high-accuracy estimation of a motion plane.

  20. Real-time respiratory motion analysis using manifold ray casting of volumetrically fused multi-view range imaging.

    PubMed

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    A novel real-time multi-sensor framework for range imaging (RI) based respiratory motion analysis in image guided interventions such as fractionated radiation therapy is presented. We constitute our method based upon real-time constraints in clinical practice and an analytic analysis of RI based elastic body surface deformation fields. For the latter, we show that the underlying joint rigid and non-rigid registration problem is ill-conditioned and identify insufficient body coverage as an error source. Facing these issues, we propose a novel manifold ray casting technique enabling the reconstruction of an 180 degrees coverage body surface model composed of - 3 x 10(5) points from volumetrically fused multi-view range data in - 25 ms. Exploiting the wide field of view surface model enabled by our method, we reduce the error in motion compensated patient alignment by a factor of 2.7 in the translational and 2.4 in the rotational component compared to conventional single sensor surface coverage.

  1. Analysis Of Rearfoot Motion In Running Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Les

    1986-12-01

    In order to produce better shoes that cushion athletes from the high impact forces of running and still provide stability to the foot it is essential to have a method of quickly and reliably evaluating the performance of prototype shoes. The analysis of rear-foot motion requires the use of film or video recordings of test subjects running on a treadmill. Specific points on the subject are tracked to give a measure of inversion or eversion of the heel. This paper describes the testing procedure and its application to running shoe design. A comparison of film and video systems is also discussed.

  2. Non-rigid molecular group theory and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1982-06-01

    The use of generalized wreath product groups as representations of symmetry groups of nonrigid molecules is considered. Generating function techniques are outlined for nuclear spin statistics and character tables of the symmetry groups of nonrigid molecules. Several applications of nonrigid molecular group theory to NMR spectroscopy, rovibronic splitting and nuclear spin statistics of nonrigid molecules, molecular beam deflection and electric resonance experiments of weakly bound Van der Waal complexes, isomerization processes, configuration interaction calculations and the symmetry of crystals with structural distortions are described. 81 references.

  3. Quantication and analysis of respiratory motion from 4D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizzuddin Abd Rahni, Ashrani; Lewis, Emma; Wells, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that respiratory motion affects image acquisition and also external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment planning and delivery. However often the existing approaches for respiratory motion management are based on a generic view of respiratory motion such as the general movement of organ, tissue or fiducials. This paper thus aims to present a more in depth analysis of respiratory motion based on 4D MRI for further integration into motion correction in image acquisition or image based EBRT. Internal and external motion was first analysed separately, on a per-organ basis for internal motion. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the internal and external motion vectors separately and the relationship between the two PCA spaces was analysed. The motion extracted from 4D MRI on general was found to be consistent with what has been reported in literature.

  4. Motion analysis of normal patellar tendon reflex.

    PubMed

    Tham, Lai Kuan; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Lim, Kheng Seang

    2013-11-01

    Reflex assessment, an essential element in the investigation of the motor system, is currently assessed through qualitative description, which lacks of normal values in the healthy population. This study quantified the amplitude and latency of patellar tendon reflex in normal subjects using motion analysis to determine the factors affecting the reflex amplitude. 100 healthy volunteers were recruited for patellar tendon reflex assessments which were recorded using a motion analysis system. Different levels of input strength were exerted during the experiments. A linear relationship was found between reflex input and reflex amplitude (r = 0.50, P <0.001). The left knee was found to exhibit 26.3% higher reflex amplitude than the right (P <0.001). The Jendrassik manoeuvre significantly increased reflex amplitude by 34.3% (P = 0.001); the effect was especially prominent in subjects with weak reflex response. Reflex latency normality data were established, which showed a gradual reduction with increasing input strength. The quantitative normality data and findings showed that the present method has great potential to objectively quantify deep tendon reflexes. Analyse du mouvement du réflexe rotulien normal.

  5. Biomechanics and motion analysis applied to sports.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Barrentine, S W

    2000-05-01

    The development of motion analysis and the application of biomechanical analysis techniques to sports has paralleled the exponential growth of computational and videographic technology. Technological developments have provided for advances in the investigation of the human body and the action of the human body during sports believed to be unobtainable a few years ago. Technological advancements have brought biomechanical applications into a wide range of fields from orthopedics to entertainment. An area that has made tremendous gains using biomechanics is sports science. Coaches, therapists, and physicians are using biomechanics to improve performance, rehabilitation, and the prevention of sports related injuries. Functional analyses of athletic movements that were impossible a few years ago are available and used today. With new advancements, the possibilities for investigating the way a human interacts and reacts to environmental conditions are ever expanding.

  6. Two-character motion analysis and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taesoo; Cho, Young-Sang; Park, Sang Il; Shin, Sung Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the problem of synthesizing novel motions of standing-up martial arts such as Kickboxing, Karate, and Taekwondo performed by a pair of human-like characters while reflecting their interactions. Adopting an example-based paradigm, we address three non-trivial issues embedded in this problem: motion modeling, interaction modeling, and motion synthesis. For the first issue, we present a semi-automatic motion labeling scheme based on force-based motion segmentation and learning-based action classification. We also construct a pair of motion transition graphs each of which represents an individual motion stream. For the second issue, we propose a scheme for capturing the interactions between two players. A dynamic Bayesian network is adopted to build a motion transition model on top of the coupled motion transition graph that is constructed from an example motion stream. For the last issue, we provide a scheme for synthesizing a novel sequence of coupled motions, guided by the motion transition model. Although the focus of the present work is on martial arts, we believe that the framework of the proposed approach can be conveyed to other two-player motions as well.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Proper-Motion Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. B.

    Proper motion surveys offer a great deal of data bearing on important astronomical problems such as stellar kinematics and the luminosity function in the solar neighborhood. Major obstacles to the full use of proper motions have long been posed by: (1) incompleteness of proper motion surveys, (2) proper motion bias in kinematic studies, and (3) the indirect approaches and kinematical assumptions needed in traditional luminosity studies. These obstacles can be largely overcome by a new approach (Hanson 1983) using multivariate and conditional distribution statistics (Hanson, Lutz, and Murray 1984) to model the proper motion survey data.

  8. INS integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bazakos, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The use of inertial navigation system (INS) measurements to enhance the quality and robustness of motion analysis techniques used for obstacle detection is discussed with particular reference to autonomous vehicle navigation. The approach to obstacle detection used here employs motion analysis of imagery generated by a passive sensor. Motion analysis of imagery obtained during vehicle travel is used to generate range measurements to points within the field of view of the sensor, which can then be used to provide obstacle detection. Results obtained with an INS integrated motion analysis approach are reviewed.

  9. INS integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bazakos, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The use of inertial navigation system (INS) measurements to enhance the quality and robustness of motion analysis techniques used for obstacle detection is discussed with particular reference to autonomous vehicle navigation. The approach to obstacle detection used here employs motion analysis of imagery generated by a passive sensor. Motion analysis of imagery obtained during vehicle travel is used to generate range measurements to points within the field of view of the sensor, which can then be used to provide obstacle detection. Results obtained with an INS integrated motion analysis approach are reviewed.

  10. Analysis of motion in speed skating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yuzo; Nishimura, Tetsu; Watanabe, Naoki; Okamoto, Kousuke; Wada, Yuhei

    1997-03-01

    A motion on sports has been studied by many researchers from the view of the medical, psychological and mechanical fields. Here, we try to analyze a speed skating motion dynamically for an aim of performing the best record. As an official competition of speed skating is performed on the round rink, the skating motion must be studied on the three phases, that is, starting phase, straight and curved course skating phase. It is indispensable to have a visual data of a skating motion in order to analyze kinematically. So we took a several subject's skating motion by 8 mm video cameras in order to obtain three dimensional data. As the first step, the movement of the center of gravity of skater (abbreviate to C. G.) is discussed in this paper, because a skating motion is very complicated. The movement of C. G. will give an information of the reaction force to a skate blade from the surface of ice. We discuss the discrepancy of several skating motion by studied subjects. Our final goal is to suggest the best skating form for getting the finest record.

  11. Diffeomorphic Multi-Frame Non-Rigid Registration of Cell Nuclei in 2D and 3D Live Cell Images.

    PubMed

    Tektonidis, Marco; Rohr, Karl

    2017-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of cellular and molecular processes, it is important to quantitatively analyze the motion of subcellular particles in live cell microscopy image sequences. Since, generally, the subcellular particles move and cell nuclei move as well as deform, it is important to decouple the movement of particles from that of the cell nuclei using non-rigid registration methods. We have developed a diffeomorphic multi-frame approach for non-rigid registration of cell nuclei in 2D and 3D live cell fluorescence microscopy images. Our non-rigid registration approach is based on local optic flow estimation, exploits information from multiple consecutive image frames, and determines diffeomorphic transformations in the log-domain, which allows efficient computation of the inverse transformations. To register single images of an image sequence to a reference image, we use a temporally weighted mean image, which is constructed based on inverse transformations and multiple consecutive frames. Using multiple consecutive frames improves the registration accuracy compared to pairwise registration, and using a temporally weighted mean image significantly reduces the computation time compared with previous work. In addition, we use a flow boundary preserving method for regularization of computed deformation vector fields, which prevents from over-smoothing compared to standard Gaussian filtering. Our approach has been successfully applied to 2D and 3D synthetic as well as real live cell microscopy image sequences, and an experimental comparison with non-rigid pairwise, multi-frame, and temporal groupwise registration has been carried out.

  12. Computer synthesis of human motion as a part of an adequate motion analysis experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Sholukha, Victor A.; Zinkovsky, Anatoly V.

    1999-05-01

    The role of problem of computer synthesis of a human motion for a traditional problem of control generalized and muscular forces determination is discussed. It is emphasized significance of computer model choice for adequate analysis kinematic and dynamic experimental data. On the basis of an imitation computer model influence of model's parameters values is demonstrated. With help of non-stationary constraints we can simulate human motions that satisfy to the most significant parameters of the concerned class of motion. Some results of simulation are discussed. We arrive at a conclusion that for correct interpretation of an experiment mixed problem of bodies system dynamics must be solved.

  13. Time motion analysis of international kickboxing competition.

    PubMed

    Ouergui, Ibrahim; Hssin, Nizar; Haddad, Monoem; Franchini, Emerson; Behm, David; Wong, Del P; Gmada, Nabil; Bouhlel, Ezzedine

    2014-06-17

    The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from two male World Championships were monitored using a time motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity: HIA; low-intensity activity: LIA; and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2± 1.2 s; LIA: 2.3± 0.8 s; pauses: 5.4± 4.3 s; and 3.4±1.2 s between two subsequent HIA. The fighting to non-fighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA were 27.1±7.1, 25.1±6.6 and 24.9±6.1 respectively for round1, 2 and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8±11.4, 22.3±22.6 and 24.6±23.3s respectively for round1, 2 and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.

  14. Adaptive-passive vibration isolation between nonrigid machines and nonrigid foundations using a dual-beam periodic structure with shape memory alloy transverse connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfang; Mak, Cheuk-Ming

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the problem of broadband vibration control of nonrigid systems employing periodic structures with tunable parameters. It investigates this by using a semi-two-dimensional model that applies a dual-beam periodic structure with transverse branches as a parameter-tunable isolator. Conventional study of vibration control problems, including the problem of vibration control by periodic structures, usually reduces systems to equivalent single- or multi-mount models with only a unidirectional translation at a mounting point. This assumption of decoupling leads to the erroneous prediction of vibratory power transmission when designing an isolator for a nonrigid system. Such a periodic structure involves the coupling of vibrations between different mounting points and different directions of motion and is therefore a reasonable simulation of the real-life problem. However, its application as a periodic isolator has not been proposed previously. The configuration of shape memory alloy (SMA) branches and non-SMA dual beams is proposed in order that this structure can effectively exploit the advantages of SMA materials, namely their significantly varying Young's moduli which can be tuned to adjust and widen the stop bands, and can prevent the associated limitation of hysteresis. Equations are derived governing the vibration transmitted through any number of periodic mounts between nonrigid machines and foundations. Based on the derived results, two methodologies are developed to determine the proper Young's moduli of the SMA branches and minimize the transmitted power. The numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive SMA branches at the proper temperatures are able to attenuate broadband vibration by adjusting the locations and broadening the widths of stop bands. With the application of a semi-two-dimensional periodic structure to broadband vibration isolation, this paper provides an approach and supporting methodologies for broadband vibration control

  15. A Bio-Inspired, Motion-Based Analysis of Crowd Behavior Attributes Relevance to Motion Transparency, Velocity Gradients, and Motion Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of motion crowds is concerned with the detection of potential hazards for individuals of the crowd. Existing methods analyze the statistics of pixel motion to classify non-dangerous or dangerous behavior, to detect outlier motions, or to estimate the mean throughput of people for an image region. We suggest a biologically inspired model for the analysis of motion crowds that extracts motion features indicative for potential dangers in crowd behavior. Our model consists of stages for motion detection, integration, and pattern detection that model functions of the primate primary visual cortex area (V1), the middle temporal area (MT), and the medial superior temporal area (MST), respectively. This model allows for the processing of motion transparency, the appearance of multiple motions in the same visual region, in addition to processing opaque motion. We suggest that motion transparency helps to identify “danger zones” in motion crowds. For instance, motion transparency occurs in small exit passages during evacuation. However, motion transparency occurs also for non-dangerous crowd behavior when people move in opposite directions organized into separate lanes. Our analysis suggests: The combination of motion transparency and a slow motion speed can be used for labeling of candidate regions that contain dangerous behavior. In addition, locally detected decelerations or negative speed gradients of motions are a precursor of danger in crowd behavior as are globally detected motion patterns that show a contraction toward a single point. In sum, motion transparency, image speeds, motion patterns, and speed gradients extracted from visual motion in videos are important features to describe the behavioral state of a motion crowd. PMID:23300930

  16. A bio-inspired, motion-based analysis of crowd behavior attributes relevance to motion transparency, velocity gradients, and motion patterns.

    PubMed

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of motion crowds is concerned with the detection of potential hazards for individuals of the crowd. Existing methods analyze the statistics of pixel motion to classify non-dangerous or dangerous behavior, to detect outlier motions, or to estimate the mean throughput of people for an image region. We suggest a biologically inspired model for the analysis of motion crowds that extracts motion features indicative for potential dangers in crowd behavior. Our model consists of stages for motion detection, integration, and pattern detection that model functions of the primate primary visual cortex area (V1), the middle temporal area (MT), and the medial superior temporal area (MST), respectively. This model allows for the processing of motion transparency, the appearance of multiple motions in the same visual region, in addition to processing opaque motion. We suggest that motion transparency helps to identify "danger zones" in motion crowds. For instance, motion transparency occurs in small exit passages during evacuation. However, motion transparency occurs also for non-dangerous crowd behavior when people move in opposite directions organized into separate lanes. Our analysis suggests: The combination of motion transparency and a slow motion speed can be used for labeling of candidate regions that contain dangerous behavior. In addition, locally detected decelerations or negative speed gradients of motions are a precursor of danger in crowd behavior as are globally detected motion patterns that show a contraction toward a single point. In sum, motion transparency, image speeds, motion patterns, and speed gradients extracted from visual motion in videos are important features to describe the behavioral state of a motion crowd.

  17. Kinematic analysis of human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuhei; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Tetsu; Itoh, Masaru; Watanabe, Naoki; Yanagi, Shigeru

    1997-03-01

    The knowledge of analyzing a human motion can contribute to the treatment and the prevention of sports injuries or the investigation of welfare equipment. It is important to know the human motion by not only the medical field but the mechanical knowledge. The mechanical knowledge is expected to prevent the sports injuries or to design such as an artificial equipment. Here, we suggest a basic procedure to analyze a human motion from the view of the dynamical knowledge. Although the human body is composed of a lot of element and joint, if the slight movement on the joint such as dislocation and distortion is neglected, the human body can be replaced by a mechanical links system. On this assumption, we analyze an actual simple human motion. We take a picture of a simple arm motion from video cameras. And at the same time, we directly measure the vertical acceleration of the hand by an accelerometer. From the video image, we get the vertical acceleration of the hand with assuming the arm as two-links system. On the process of resolving the vertical acceleration of the hand, we introduce the Fourier series for filtering. Finally, we confirm the propriety of our suggested procedure by comparing the calculated acceleration of hand with the directly measured acceleration.

  18. Nonrigid Image Registration in Digital Subtraction Angiography Using Multilevel B-Spline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of motion artifact reduction in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) using image registration techniques. Most of registration algorithms proposed for application in DSA, have been designed for peripheral and cerebral angiography images in which we mainly deal with global rigid motions. These algorithms did not yield good results when applied to coronary angiography images because of complex nonrigid motions that exist in this type of angiography images. Multiresolution and iterative algorithms are proposed to cope with this problem, but these algorithms are associated with high computational cost which makes them not acceptable for real-time clinical applications. In this paper we propose a nonrigid image registration algorithm for coronary angiography images that is significantly faster than multiresolution and iterative blocking methods and outperforms competing algorithms evaluated on the same data sets. This algorithm is based on a sparse set of matched feature point pairs and the elastic registration is performed by means of multilevel B-spline image warping. Experimental results with several clinical data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:23971026

  19. Analysis of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional treatments of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity have led to certain difficulties of interpretation. Certain reversals in the apparent gravitational field of an accelerated body may be avoided by simpler analysis based on the use of restricted conformal transformations. In the conformal theory the velocity of light remains constant even for experimenters in accelerated motion. The problem considered is that of rectilinear motion with a variable velocity. The motion takes place along the x or x' axis of two coordinate systems.

  20. Motion Picture and Videotape Analysis of Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Geoffrey C.; Duvall, David

    1983-01-01

    Use of motion pictures and videotape recordings to analyze animal behavior is described. Indicates that accuracy/amount of data available is greatly increased and that simultaneous behaviors of different animals can be studied or individual behavior patterns increased/decreased, providing observers with temporal perceptions similar to the animals…

  1. Is motion analysis a valid tool for assessing laparoscopic skill?

    PubMed

    Mason, John D; Ansell, James; Warren, Neil; Torkington, Jared

    2013-05-01

    The use of simulation for laparoscopic training has led to the development of objective tools for skills assessment. Motion analysis represents one area of focus. This study was designed to assess the evidence for the use of motion analysis as a valid tool for laparoscopic skills assessment. Embase, MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using the following domains: (1) motion analysis, (2) validation and (3) laparoscopy. Studies investigating motion analysis as a tool for assessment of laparoscopic skill in general surgery were included. Common endpoints in motion analysis metrics were compared between studies according to a modified form of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine levels of evidence and recommendation. Thirteen studies were included from 2,039 initial papers. Twelve (92.3 %) reported the construct validity of motion analysis across a range of laparoscopic tasks. Of these 12, 5 (41.7 %) evaluated the ProMIS Augmented Reality Simulator, 3 (25 %) the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD), 2 (16.7 %) the Hiroshima University Endoscopic Surgical Assessment Device (HUESAD), 1 (8.33 %) the Advanced Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Tester (ADEPT) and 1 (8.33 %) the Robotic and Video Motion Analysis Software (ROVIMAS). Face validity was reported by 1 (7.7 %) study each for ADEPT and ICSAD. Concurrent validity was reported by 1 (7.7 %) study each for ADEPT, ICSAD and ProMIS. There was no evidence for predictive validity. Evidence exists to validate motion analysis for use in laparoscopic skills assessment. Valid parameters are time taken, path length and number of hand movements. Future work should concentrate on the conversion of motion data into competency-based scores for trainee feedback.

  2. Single syllable tongue motion analysis using tagged cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Unay, Devrim; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Stone, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    The complicated muscle activity of the human tongue and the resultant surface shapes can give us important clues about speech motor control and pathological tongue motion. This study uses tagged magnetic resonance imaging to provide a 2D surface deformation analysis of the tongue, as well as a 4D compression-expansion analysis, during utterances of four different syllables (/ba/, /ta/, /sha/ and /ga/). All speech tasks were performed several times to confirm the repeatability of the motion analysis. The results showed that the tongue has unique motion patterns for utterances of different syllables, and these differences, which may not be observed by a simple surface analysis, can be examined thoroughly by a 4D motion model-based analysis of the tongue muscles.

  3. Inertial navigation sensor integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bhanu, Bir

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on INS integrated motion analysis is described. Results were obtained with a maximally passive system of obstacle detection (OD) for ground-based vehicles and rotorcraft. The OD approach involves motion analysis of imagery acquired by a passive sensor in the course of vehicle travel to generate range measurements to world points within the sensor FOV. INS data and scene analysis results are used to enhance interest point selection, the matching of the interest points, and the subsequent motion-based computations, tracking, and OD. The most important lesson learned from the research described here is that the incorporation of inertial data into the motion analysis program greatly improves the analysis and makes the process more robust.

  4. Inertial navigation sensor integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bhanu, Bir

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on INS integrated motion analysis is described. Results were obtained with a maximally passive system of obstacle detection (OD) for ground-based vehicles and rotorcraft. The OD approach involves motion analysis of imagery acquired by a passive sensor in the course of vehicle travel to generate range measurements to world points within the sensor FOV. INS data and scene analysis results are used to enhance interest point selection, the matching of the interest points, and the subsequent motion-based computations, tracking, and OD. The most important lesson learned from the research described here is that the incorporation of inertial data into the motion analysis program greatly improves the analysis and makes the process more robust.

  5. Mechanical testing for three-dimensional motion analysis reliability.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily; Kaufman, Kenton; Kingsbury, Trevor; Wolf, Erik; Wilken, Jason; Wyatt, Marilynn

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use simple mechanical tests to evaluate the reliability of three-dimensional motion analysis systems and biomechanical models. Three different tests were conducted at four motion analysis laboratories where clinical care and research studies are routinely performed. The laboratories had different motion capture systems, different types and number of cameras, different types and numbers of force plates and different biomechanical models. These mechanical tests evaluated the accuracy of the motion capture system, the integration of the force plate and the motion capture system, and the strength of the biomechanical model used to calculate rotational kinematics. Results of motion capture system accuracy tests showed that, for all labs, the error between the measured and calculated distances between markers was less than 2mm and 1° for marker separations which ranged from 24mm to 500mm. Results from the force plate integration tests demonstrated errors in center of pressure calculation of less than 4mm across all labs, despite varied force plate and motion system configurations. Finally, errors across labs for single joint rotations and for combined rotations at the hip and knee were less than 2° at the hip and less than 10° at the knee. These results demonstrate that system accuracy and reliability can be obtained allowing the collection of comparable data across different motion analysis laboratories with varying configurations and equipment. This testing is particularly important when multi-center studies are planned in order to assure data consistency across labs.

  6. Hierarchical Aligned Cluster Analysis for Temporal Clustering of Human Motion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; De la Torre, Fernando; Hodgins, Jessica K

    2013-03-01

    Temporal segmentation of human motion into plausible motion primitives is central to understanding and building computational models of human motion. Several issues contribute to the challenge of discovering motion primitives: the exponential nature of all possible movement combinations, the variability in the temporal scale of human actions, and the complexity of representing articulated motion. We pose the problem of learning motion primitives as one of temporal clustering, and derive an unsupervised hierarchical bottom-up framework called hierarchical aligned cluster analysis (HACA). HACA finds a partition of a given multidimensional time series into m disjoint segments such that each segment belongs to one of k clusters. HACA combines kernel k-means with the generalized dynamic time alignment kernel to cluster time series data. Moreover, it provides a natural framework to find a low-dimensional embedding for time series. HACA is efficiently optimized with a coordinate descent strategy and dynamic programming. Experimental results on motion capture and video data demonstrate the effectiveness of HACA for segmenting complex motions and as a visualization tool. We also compare the performance of HACA to state-of-the-art algorithms for temporal clustering on data of a honey bee dance. The HACA code is available online.

  7. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  8. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  9. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  10. Analysis and Modelling of Muscles Motion during Whole Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarelli, M.; Fratini, A.; Bifulco, P.; La Gatta, A.; Romano, M.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize the local muscles motion in individuals undergoing whole body mechanical stimulation. In this study we aim also to evaluate how subject positioning modifies vibration dumping, altering local mechanical stimulus. Vibrations were delivered to subjects by the use of a vibrating platform, while stimulation frequency was increased linearly from 15 to 60 Hz. Two different subject postures were here analysed. Platform and muscles motion were monitored using tiny MEMS accelerometers; a contra lateral analysis was also presented. Muscle motion analysis revealed typical displacement trajectories: motion components were found not to be purely sinusoidal neither in phase to each other. Results also revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour at some muscles, similar to a second-order system response. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject and his positioning. Proper mechanical stimulation can maximize muscle spindle solicitation, which may produce a more effective muscle activation.

  11. Effect of nonrigid registration algorithms on deformation-based morphometry: a comparative study with control and Williams syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaoying; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Dykens, Elisabeth M; Gore, John C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2012-07-01

    Deformation-based morphometry (DBM) is a widely used method for characterizing anatomical differences across groups. DBM is based on the analysis of the deformation fields generated by nonrigid registration algorithms, which warp the individual volumes to a DBM atlas. Although several studies have compared nonrigid registration algorithms for segmentation tasks, few studies have compared the effect of the registration algorithms on group differences that may be uncovered through DBM. In this study, we compared group atlas creation and DBM results obtained with five well-established nonrigid registration algorithms using 13 subjects with Williams syndrome and 13 normal control subjects. The five nonrigid registration algorithms include the following: (1) the adaptive bases algorithm, (2) the image registration toolkit, (3) The FSL nonlinear image registration tool, (4) the automatic registration tool, and (5) the normalization algorithm available in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8). Results indicate that the choice of algorithm has little effect on the creation of group atlases. However, regions of differences between groups detected with DBM vary from algorithm to algorithm both qualitatively and quantitatively. Some regions are detected by several algorithms, but their extent varies. Others are detected only by a subset of the algorithms. Based on these results, we recommend using more than one algorithm when performing DBM studies.

  12. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

  13. Non-rigid registration using higher-order mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckert, D.; Clarkson, M. J.; Hill, D. L. G.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Non-rigid registration of multi-modality images is an important tool for assessing temporal and structural changesbetween images. For rigid registration, voxel similarity measures like mutual information have been shown to alignimages from different modalities accurately and robustly. For non-rigid registration, mutual information can besensitive to local variations of intensity which in MR images may be caused by RF inhomogeneity. The reasonfor the sensitivity of mutual information towards intensity variations stems from the fact that mutual informationignores any spatial information. In this paper we propose an extension of the mutual information framework whichincorporates spatial information about higher-order image structure into the registration process and has the potentialto improve the accuracy and robustness of non-rigid registration in the presence of intensity variations. We haveapplied the non-rigid registration algorithm to a number of simulated MR brain images of a digital phantom whichhave been degraded by a simulated intensity shading and a known deformation. In addition, we have applied thealgorithm for the non-rigid registration of eight pre- and post-operative brain MR images which were acquired withan interventional MR scanner and therefore have substantial intensity shading due to RF field inhomogeneities. Inall cases the second-order estimate of mutual information leads to robust and accurate registration.

  14. Approximate analysis of balloting motion of railgun projectiles. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.H.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final of three reports dealing with the in-bore balloting motion of a projectile fired from an electromagnetic railgun. Knowledge of projectile in-bore motion is important to its design and the design of the railgun. It is a complicated problem since many parameters are involved and it is not easy to determine the interacting relationships between them. To make the problem easier to understand it was analyzed on several levels. Beginning from the basic simple model which computed only the axial motion, more complicated models were introduced in upper levels that included the more significant lateral forces and gun tube vibration effects. This report deals with the approximate analysis of balloting motion. This model considers the effects of the propulsion force, the friction force of the projectile package (projectile and armature), air resistance, gravity, the elastic forces, and the projectile/barrel clearance. To simplify the modeling, a plane motion configuration is assumed. Though the projectile is moving with a varying yaw angle, the axes of the barrel and the projectile package, and the projectile center of gravity are always considered in a plane containing the centerlines of the rails. Equations of motion are derived and solved. A sample computation is performed and the results plotted to give a clearer understanding of projectile in-bore motion.

  15. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David . E-mail: dsarrut@univ-lyon2.fr; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm{sup 3} and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  16. Experimentally confirmed mathematical model for human control of a non-rigid object.

    PubMed

    Dingwell, Jonathan B; Mah, Christopher D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2004-03-01

    Determining the principles used to plan and execute movements is a fundamental question in neuroscience research. When humans reach to a target with their hand, they exhibit stereotypical movements that closely follow an optimally smooth trajectory. Even when faced with various perceptual or mechanical perturbations, subjects readily adapt their motor output to preserve this stereotypical trajectory. When humans manipulate non-rigid objects, however, they must control the movements of the object as well as the hand. Such tasks impose a fundamentally different control problem than that of moving one's arm alone. Here, we developed a mathematical model for transporting a mass-on-a-spring to a target in an optimally smooth way. We demonstrate that the well-known "minimum-jerk" model for smooth reaching movements cannot accomplish this task. Our model extends the concept of smoothness to allow for the control of non-rigid objects. Although our model makes some predictions that are similar to minimum jerk, it predicts distinctly different optimal trajectories in several specific cases. In particular, when the relative speed of the movement becomes fast enough or when the object stiffness becomes small enough, the model predicts that subjects will transition from a uni-phasic hand motion to a bi-phasic hand motion. We directly tested these predictions in human subjects. Our subjects adopted trajectories that were well-predicted by our model, including all of the predicted transitions between uni- and bi-phasic hand motions. These findings suggest that smoothness of motion is a general principle of movement planning that extends beyond the control of hand trajectories.

  17. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noël; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sébastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm(3) and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  18. Numerical analysis of slender vortex motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.

    1996-02-01

    Several numerical methods for slender vortex motion (the local induction equation, the Klein-Majda equation, and the Klein-Knio equation) are compared on the specific example of sideband instability of Kelvin waves on a vortex. Numerical experiments on this model problem indicate that all these methods yield qualitatively similar behavior, and this behavior is different from the behavior of a non-slender vortex with variable cross-section. It is found that the boundaries between stable, recurrent, and chaotic regimes in the parameter space of the model problem depend on the method used. The boundaries of these domains in the parameter space for the Klein-Majda equation and for the Klein-Knio equation are closely related to the core size. When the core size is large enough, the Klein-Majda equation always exhibits stable solutions for our model problem. Various conclusions are drawn; in particular, the behavior of turbulent vortices cannot be captured by these local approximations, and probably cannot be captured by any slender vortex model with constant vortex cross-section. Speculations about the differences between classical and superfluid hydrodynamics are also offered.

  19. Ground Motion in Central Mexico: A Comprehensive Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Juarez, A.; Rábade, S.; Aguirre, J.; Bielak, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the ground motion in Central Mexico based on numerical simulations, as well as broadband and strong ground motion records. We describe and evaluate a velocity model for Central Mexico derived from noise and regional earthquake cross-correlations, which is used throughout this research to estimate the ground motion in the region. The 3D crustal model includes a geotechnical structure of the Valley of Mexico (VM), subduction zone geometry, and 3D velocity distributions. The latter are based on more than 200 low magnitude (Mw < 4.5) earthquakes and two years of noise recordings. We emphasize the analysis on the ground motion in the Valley of Mexico originating from intra-slab deep events and temblors located along the Pacific coast. Also, we quantify the effects Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the low-velocity deposits on the ground motion. The 3D octree-based finite element wave propagation computations, valid up to 1 Hz, reveal that the inclusion of a basin with a structure as complex as the Valley of Mexico dramatically enhances the regional effects induced by the TMVB. Moreover, the basin not only produces ground motion amplification and anomalous duration, but it also favors the energy focusing into zones of Mexico City where structures typically undergo high levels of damage.

  20. Effects of self-motion on auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirohito M; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Toshima, Iwaki; Kashino, Makio

    2012-04-24

    Auditory scene analysis requires the listener to parse the incoming flow of acoustic information into perceptual "streams," such as sentences from a single talker in the midst of background noise. Behavioral and neural data show that the formation of streams is not instantaneous; rather, streaming builds up over time and can be reset by sudden changes in the acoustics of the scene. Here, we investigated the effect of changes induced by voluntary head motion on streaming. We used a telepresence robot in a virtual reality setup to disentangle all potential consequences of head motion: changes in acoustic cues at the ears, changes in apparent source location, and changes in motor or attentional processes. The results showed that self-motion influenced streaming in at least two ways. Right after the onset of movement, self-motion always induced some resetting of perceptual organization to one stream, even when the acoustic scene itself had not changed. Then, after the motion, the prevalent organization was rapidly biased by the binaural cues discovered through motion. Auditory scene analysis thus appears to be a dynamic process that is affected by the active sensing of the environment.

  1. Nonrigid image registration with crystal dislocation energy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yishan; Chung, Albert C S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of nonrigid image registration is to find a suitable transformation such that the transformed moving image becomes similar to the reference image. The image registration problem can also be treated as an optimization problem, which tries to minimize an objective energy function that measures the differences between two involved images. In this paper, we consider image matching as the process of aligning object boundaries in two different images. The registration energy function can be defined based on the total energy associated with the object boundaries. The optimal transformation is obtained by finding the equilibrium state when the total energy is minimized, which indicates the object boundaries find their correspondences and stop deforming. We make an analogy between the above processes with the dislocation system in physics. The object boundaries are viewed as dislocations (line defects) in crystal. Then the well-developed dislocation energy is used to derive the energy assigned to object boundaries in images. The newly derived registration energy function takes the global gradient information of the entire image into consideration, and produces an orientation-dependent and long-range interaction between two images to drive the registration process. This property of interaction endows the new registration framework with both fast convergence rate and high registration accuracy. Moreover, the new energy function can be adapted to realize symmetric diffeomorphic transformation so as to ensure one-to-one matching between subjects. In this paper, the superiority of the new method is theoretically proven, experimentally tested and compared with the state-of-the-art SyN method. Experimental results with 3-D magnetic resonance brain images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the compared methods in terms of both registration accuracy and computation time.

  2. A shockwave approach for web-based clinical motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Advances in Internet connectivity and personal multimedia computing have created opportunities for integrating simple motion analysis into clinical practice. The Macromedia Shockwave environment provides tools for creating media-rich software that runs within a Web browser. For this project, clinical motion analysis software was created using Shockwave that can load digital video clips of a client's motion, step/shuttle/play through the clip, superimpose a grid over the video image, measure relative joint angles, scale to a linear factor, measure distances, and measure average velocities. After installing the Shockwave and Quicktime video plug-ins, the Motion Analysis Tools-Shockwave program runs directly from a Web page hyperlink. Program testing involved comparing angle measurements, linear distances, stride length, and walking speed among six video clips. The first three clips were of a transtibial prosthesis being carried through the field of view (640 x 480, 320 x 240, 320 x 240 enlarged to 640 x 480). The second set of three clips was of a metal square carried through the field of view. Average root mean square errors were 2.0 degrees for angle measures and 1.2 cm for length measures. Stride length standard deviation was 4.6 cm (mean length = 212.1 cm). Average walking speed standard deviation was 0.015 m/s (mean speed = 1.15 m/s). The test results were consistent with video motion analysis results and within an acceptable range for clinical design-making. This Web-based motion analysis approach provides a useful tool for ubiquitous, quantitative, clinical gait analysis.

  3. Tracking Non-rigid Structures in Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gezahegne, A; Kamath, C

    2008-01-10

    A key challenge in tracking moving objects is the correspondence problem, that is, the correct propagation of object labels from one time step to another. This is especially true when the objects are non-rigid structures, changing shape, and merging and splitting over time. In this work, we describe a general approach to tracking thousands of non-rigid structures in an image sequence. We show how we can minimize memory requirements and generate accurate results while working with only two frames of the sequence at a time. We demonstrate our results using data from computer simulations of a fluimix problem.

  4. Human Factors Vehicle Displacement Analysis: Engineering In Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Laura Ashley; Reynolds, David; Robertson, Clay

    2010-01-01

    While positioned on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center, tall stacked launch vehicles are exposed to the natural environment. Varying directional winds and vortex shedding causes the vehicle to sway in an oscillating motion. The Human Factors team recognizes that vehicle sway may hinder ground crew operation, impact the ground system designs, and ultimately affect launch availability . The objective of this study is to physically simulate predicted oscillation envelopes identified by analysis. and conduct a Human Factors Analysis to assess the ability to carry out essential Upper Stage (US) ground operator tasks based on predicted vehicle motion.

  5. Analysis of human body motion by Lattice theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uragami, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yurika

    2017-07-01

    We propose a method of applying lattice algebra to the analysis of multivariate time series data. We measured the body motion of a Shorinji-Kempo kata using acceleration sensors at five positions on the body. The proposed analysis was applied to the time series data obtained from the sensors. As a result, a correlation was observed between the skill levels and the number of elements of the lattice generated using the time series data. We observed that highly skilled subjects executed more complex motions; thus, we consider the number of lattice elements as an index of complexity of the space-time pattern.

  6. Recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis of human motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josiński, Henryk; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Szczesna, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The authors present exemplary application of recurrence plots, cross recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis for the purpose of exploration of experimental time series describing selected aspects of human motion. Time series were extracted from treadmill gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland by means of the Vicon system. Analysis was focused on the time series representing movements of hip, knee, ankle and wrist joints in the sagittal plane.

  7. Observation and analysis of high-speed human motion with frequent occlusion in a large area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Jiafeng; Liu, Guojun; Tang, Xianglong; Liu, Peng

    2009-12-01

    The use of computer vision technology in collecting and analyzing statistics during sports matches or training sessions is expected to provide valuable information for tactics improvement. However, the measurements published in the literature so far are either unreliably documented to be used in training planning due to their limitations or unsuitable for studying high-speed motion in large area with frequent occlusions. A sports annotation system is introduced in this paper for tracking high-speed non-rigid human motion over a large playing area with the aid of motion camera, taking short track speed skating competitions as an example. The proposed system is composed of two sub-systems: precise camera motion compensation and accurate motion acquisition. In the video registration step, a distinctive invariant point feature detector (probability density grads detector) and a global parallax based matching points filter are used, to provide reliable and robust matching across a large range of affine distortion and illumination change. In the motion acquisition step, a two regions' relationship constrained joint color model and Markov chain Monte Carlo based joint particle filter are emphasized, by dividing the human body into two relative key regions. Several field tests are performed to assess measurement errors, including comparison to popular algorithms. With the help of the system presented, the system obtains position data on a 30 m × 60 m large rink with root-mean-square error better than 0.3975 m, velocity and acceleration data with absolute error better than 1.2579 m s-1 and 0.1494 m s-2, respectively.

  8. Bifurcation analysis of aircraft pitching motions near the stability boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1984-01-01

    Bifuraction theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single degree of freedom pitching-motion perturbations about a large mean angle of attack. The requisite aerodynamic information in the equations of motion is represented in a form equivalent to the response to finite-amplitude pitching oscillations about the mean angle of attack. This information is deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the mean angle of attack is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite-amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable (supercritical) or unstable (subcritical). For flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either that exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

  9. AMAB: automated measurement and analysis of body motion.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Ronald; Van Der Zee, Sophie; Heylen, Dirk K J; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Technologies that measure human nonverbal behavior have existed for some time, and their use in the analysis of social behavior has become more popular following the development of sensor technologies that record full-body movement. However, a standardized methodology to efficiently represent and analyze full-body motion is absent. In this article, we present automated measurement and analysis of body motion (AMAB), a methodology for examining individual and interpersonal nonverbal behavior from the output of full-body motion tracking systems. We address the recording, screening, and normalization of the data, providing methods for standardizing the data across recording condition and across subject body sizes. We then propose a series of dependent measures to operationalize common research questions in psychological research. We present practical examples from several application areas to demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed method for full-body measurements and comparisons across time, space, body parts, and subjects.

  10. Non-actual motion: phenomenological analysis and linguistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Johan; Zlatev, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Sentences with motion verbs describing static situations have been seen as evidence that language and cognition are geared toward dynamism and change (Talmy in Toward a cognitive semantics, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2000; Langacker in Concept, image, and symbol: the cognitive basis of grammar, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin and New York, 1990). Different concepts have been used in the literature, e.g., fictive motion, subjective motion and abstract motion to denote this. Based on phenomenological analysis, we reinterpret such concepts as reflecting different motivations for the use of such constructions (Blomberg and Zlatev in Phenom Cogn Sci 13(3):395-418, 2014). To highlight the multifaceted character of the phenomenon, we propose the concept non-actual motion (NAM), which we argue is more compatible with the situated cognition approach than explanations such as "mental simulation" (e.g., Matlock in Studies in linguistic motivation, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, 2004). We investigate the expression of NAM by means of a picture-based elicitation task with speakers of Swedish, French and Thai. Pictures represented figures that either afford human motion or not (±afford); crossed with this, the figure extended either across the picture from a third-person perspective (3 pp) or from a first-person perspective (1 pp). All picture types elicited NAM-sentences with the combination [+afford, 1 pp] producing most NAM-sentences in all three languages. NAM-descriptions also conformed to language-specific patterns for the expression of actual motion. We conclude that NAM shows interaction between pre-linguistic motivations and language-specific conventions.

  11. Analysis of unbounded operators and random motion

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2009-11-15

    We study infinite weighted graphs with view to 'limits at infinity' or boundaries at infinity. Examples of such weighted graphs arise in infinite (in practice, that means 'very' large) networks of resistors or in statistical mechanics models for classical or quantum systems. However, more generally, our analysis includes reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces and associated operators on them. If X is some infinite set of vertices or nodes, in applications the essential ingredient going into the definition is a reproducing kernel Hilbert space; it measures the differences of functions on X evaluated on pairs of points in X. Moreover, the Hilbert norm-squared in H(X) will represent a suitable measure of energy. Associated unbounded operators will define a notion or dissipation, it can be a graph Laplacian or a more abstract unbounded Hermitian operator defined from the reproducing kernel Hilbert space under study. We prove that there are two closed subspaces in reproducing kernel Hilbert space H(X) that measure quantitative notions of limits at infinity in X: one generalizes finite-energy harmonic functions in H(X) and the other a deficiency index of a natural operator in H(X) associated directly with the diffusion. We establish these results in the abstract, and we offer examples and applications. Our results are related to, but different from, potential theoretic notions of 'boundaries' in more standard random walk models. Comparisons are made.

  12. Analysis of cardiac interventricular septum motion in different respiratory states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Lennart; Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Hennemuth, Anja; Axel, Leon

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the left and right heart ventricles (LV and RV) depends on load and pressure conditions that are affected by cardiac contraction and respiration cycles. A novel MRI sequence, XD-GRASP, allows the acquisition of multi-dimensional, respiration-sorted and cardiac-synchronized free-breathing image data. In these data, effects of the cardiac and respiratory cycles on the LV/RV interaction can be observed independently. To enable the analysis of such data, we developed a semi-automatic exploration workflow. After tracking a cross-sectional line positioned over the heart, over all motion states, the septum and heart wall border locations are detected by analyzing the grey-value profile under the lines. These data are used to quantify septum motion, both in absolute units and as a fraction of the heart size, to compare values for different subjects. In addition to conventional visualization techniques, we used color maps for intuitive exploration of the variable values for this multi-dimensional data set. We acquired short-axis image data of nine healthy volunteers, to analyze the position and the motion of the interventricular septum in different breathing states and different cardiac cycle phases. The results indicate a consistent range of normal septum motion values, and also suggest that respiratory phase-dependent septum motion is greatest near end-diastolic phases. These new methods are a promising tool to assess LV/RV ventricle interaction and the effects of respiration on this interaction.

  13. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis using advanced ground motion intensity measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tothong, P.; Luco, N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the objectives in performance-based earthquake engineering is to quantify the seismic reliability of a structure at a site. For that purpose, probabilistic seismic demand analysis (PSDA) is used as a tool to estimate the mean annual frequency of exceeding a specified value of a structural demand parameter (e.g. interstorey drift). This paper compares and contrasts the use, in PSDA, of certain advanced scalar versus vector and conventional scalar ground motion intensity measures (IMs). One of the benefits of using a well-chosen IM is that more accurate evaluations of seismic performance are achieved without the need to perform detailed ground motion record selection for the nonlinear dynamic structural analyses involved in PSDA (e.g. record selection with respect to seismic parameters such as earthquake magnitude, source-to-site distance, and ground motion epsilon). For structural demands that are dominated by a first mode of vibration, using inelastic spectral displacement (Sdi) can be advantageous relative to the conventionally used elastic spectral acceleration (Sa) and the vector IM consisting of Sa and epsilon (??). This paper demonstrates that this is true for ordinary and for near-source pulse-like earthquake records. The latter ground motions cannot be adequately characterized by either Sa alone or the vector of Sa and ??. For structural demands with significant higher-mode contributions (under either of the two types of ground motions), even Sdi (alone) is not sufficient, so an advanced scalar IM that additionally incorporates higher modes is used.

  14. Correction of geometric distortions in EP images using nonrigid registration to corresponding anatomic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerl, Darko; Pan, Shiyan; Li, Rui; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Parks, Mitchell H.; Martin, Peter R.; Morgan, Victoria L.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2001-07-01

    The spatial resolution of echo planar image (EPI) data acquired for functional MRI (fMRI) studies is low. To facilitate their interpretation, conventional T1-weighted anatomical images are often acquired prior to the acquisition of the EP images. T1-weighted and EP images are then registered and activation patterns computed from the EP images are superimposed on the anatomic images. Registration between the anatomic and the EP images is required to compensate for patient motion between the acquisitions and for geometric distortions affecting EP images. Recently, methods have been proposed to register EP and anatomic images using non-rigid registration techniques. In these approaches, the transformation is parameterized using splines. Here, we propose an alternative solution to this problem based on optical flow with non-stationary stiffness constraint. The approach we propose also includes several preprocessing steps such as automatic skull removal and intensity remapping. Results obtained with eight studies on normal volunteers are presented.

  15. An effective non-rigid registration approach for ultrasound image based on "demons" algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cheng, H D; Huang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yingtao; Tang, Xianglong; Tian, Jiawei

    2013-06-01

    Medical image registration is an important component of computer-aided diagnosis system in diagnostics, therapy planning, and guidance of surgery. Because of its low signal/noise ratio (SNR), ultrasound (US) image registration is a difficult task. In this paper, a fully automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm based on demons algorithm is proposed for registration of ultrasound images. In the proposed method, an "inertia force" derived from the local motion trend of pixels in a Moore neighborhood system is produced and integrated into optical flow equation to estimate the demons force, which is helpful to handle the speckle noise and preserve the geometric continuity of US images. In the experiment, a series of US images and several similarity measure metrics are utilized for evaluating the performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can register ultrasound images efficiently, robust to noise, quickly and automatically.

  16. Robust and sensitive video motion detection for sleep analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Adrienne; Geng, Di; Znamenskiy, Dmitry; Vink, Jelte Peter; de Haan, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a camera-based system combining video motion detection, motion estimation, and texture analysis with machine learning for sleep analysis. The system is robust to time-varying illumination conditions while using standard camera and infrared illumination hardware. We tested the system for periodic limb movement (PLM) detection during sleep, using EMG signals as a reference. We evaluated the motion detection performance both per frame and with respect to movement event classification relevant for PLM detection. The Matthews correlation coefficient improved by a factor of 2, compared to a state-of-the-art motion detection method, while sensitivity and specificity increased with 45% and 15%, respectively. Movement event classification improved by a factor of 6 and 3 in constant and highly varying lighting conditions, respectively. On 11 PLM patient test sequences, the proposed system achieved a 100% accurate PLM index (PLMI) score with a slight temporal misalignment of the starting time (<1 s) regarding one movement. We conclude that camera-based PLM detection during sleep is feasible and can give an indication of the PLMI score.

  17. Survey of Non-Rigid Registration Tools in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Keszei, András P; Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    We catalogue available software solutions for non-rigid image registration to support scientists in selecting suitable tools for specific medical registration purposes. Registration tools were identified using non-systematic search in Pubmed, Web of Science, IEEE Xplore® Digital Library, Google Scholar, and through references in identified sources (n = 22). Exclusions are due to unavailability or inappropriateness. The remaining (n = 18) tools were classified by (i) access and technology, (ii) interfaces and application, (iii) living community, (iv) supported file formats, and (v) types of registration methodologies emphasizing the similarity measures implemented. Out of the 18 tools, (i) 12 are open source, 8 are released under a permissive free license, which imposes the least restrictions on the use and further development of the tool, 8 provide graphical processing unit (GPU) support; (ii) 7 are built on software platforms, 5 were developed for brain image registration; (iii) 6 are under active development but only 3 have had their last update in 2015 or 2016; (iv) 16 support the Analyze format, while 7 file formats can be read with only one of the tools; and (v) 6 provide multiple registration methods and 6 provide landmark-based registration methods. Based on open source, licensing, GPU support, active community, several file formats, algorithms, and similarity measures, the tools Elastics and Plastimatch are chosen for the platform ITK and without platform requirements, respectively. Researchers in medical image analysis already have a large choice of registration tools freely available. However, the most recently published algorithms may not be included in the tools, yet.

  18. Analysis of electron diffraction data for several symmetric coordinates of large-amplitude motions in the case of the 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Kochikov, I. V.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.

    2015-06-01

    A brief description of a solution of the problem on electron diffraction analysis using the potential procedure for nonrigid molecules with large-amplitude motions along several symmetric internal coordinates was given. The efficiency of the approach was demonstrated for determination of the equilibrium geometry of the 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene molecule with three equivalent internal rotation coordinates of NO2 groups. The results of the electron diffraction experiment and quantum-chemical calculation at the MP2( full)/ cc-pVTZ level were considered along with the vibrational spectra of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene and a planar equilibrium D 3 h symmetry conformation for the molecule was found reliably for the first time. The geometrical parameters of the molecule were determined ( r e , the bond lengths are given in Å, the angles in deg): CC 1.387(2), CN 1.474(4), NO 1.220(1), CH 1.072(31), ONO 125.8(2), CC(H)C 116.6(3), HCC* 121.7(1), CC(N)C* 123.4(3), NCC* 118.3(1), and CNO* 117.1(1); the asterisk marks the dependent parameters.

  19. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  20. Analysis of unstructured video based on camera motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahian, Golnaz; Delp, Edward J.

    2007-01-01

    Although considerable work has been done in management of "structured" video such as movies, sports, and television programs that has known scene structures, "unstructured" video analysis is still a challenging problem due to its unrestricted nature. The purpose of this paper is to address issues in the analysis of unstructured video and in particular video shot by a typical unprofessional user (i.e home video). We describe how one can make use of camera motion information for unstructured video analysis. A new concept, "camera viewing direction," is introduced as the building block of home video analysis. Motion displacement vectors are employed to temporally segment the video based on this concept. We then find the correspondence between the camera behavior with respect to the subjective importance of the information in each segment and describe how different patterns in the camera motion can indicate levels of interest in a particular object or scene. By extracting these patterns, the most representative frames, keyframes, for the scenes are determined and aggregated to summarize the video sequence.

  1. Estimates of Running Ground Reaction Force Parameters from Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pavei, Gaspare; Seminati, Elena; Storniolo, Jorge L L; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A

    2017-02-01

    We compared running mechanics parameters determined from ground reaction force (GRF) measurements with estimated forces obtained from double differentiation of kinematic (K) data from motion analysis in a broad spectrum of running speeds (1.94-5.56 m⋅s(-1)). Data were collected through a force-instrumented treadmill and compared at different sampling frequencies (900 and 300 Hz for GRF, 300 and 100 Hz for K). Vertical force peak, shape, and impulse were similar between K methods and GRF. Contact time, flight time, and vertical stiffness (kvert) obtained from K showed the same trend as GRF with differences < 5%, whereas leg stiffness (kleg) was not correctly computed by kinematics. The results revealed that the main vertical GRF parameters can be computed by the double differentiation of the body center of mass properly calculated by motion analysis. The present model provides an alternative accessible method for determining temporal and kinetic parameters of running without an instrumented treadmill.

  2. Energy flow: image correspondence approximation for motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangliang; Li, Ruifeng; Fang, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    We propose a correspondence approximation approach between temporally adjacent frames for motion analysis. First, energy map is established to represent image spatial features on multiple scales using Gaussian convolution. On this basis, energy flow at each layer is estimated using Gauss-Seidel iteration according to the energy invariance constraint. More specifically, at the core of energy invariance constraint is "energy conservation law" assuming that the spatial energy distribution of an image does not change significantly with time. Finally, energy flow field at different layers is reconstructed by considering different smoothness degrees. Due to the multiresolution origin and energy-based implementation, our algorithm is able to quickly address correspondence searching issues in spite of background noise or illumination variation. We apply our correspondence approximation method to motion analysis, and experimental results demonstrate its applicability.

  3. Video motion analysis with automated tracking: an insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab Usman, Bilal; Alam, Junaid; Sabieh Anwar, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    The article describes the use of elementary techniques in computer vision and motion photography for the analysis of well known experiments in interactive instructional physics laboratories. We describe a method for the automated tracking of the kinematics of physical objects which involves the subtraction of orthogonal colors in color space. The aim is to expose undergraduate students to image processing and its applications in video motion analysis. The straightforward technique is simple, results in computational speedup compared to an existing method, removes the need for a laborious repetitive and manual tagging of frames and is generally robust against color variations. Insight is also presented into the process of thresholding and selecting the correct region out of the several choice presented in the post-threshold frames. Finally, the approach is illustrated through a selection of well known mechanics experiments.

  4. Salient motion detection using proximal robust principal component analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Chen, Qian; Qian, Weixian; Ren, Kan; Yao, Zheyi; Xu, Fuyuan

    2017-03-01

    The recently proposed robust principal component analysis (RPCA) theory and its derived methods have attracted much attention in many computer vision and machine intelligence applications. From a wide view of these methods, independent motion objects are modeled as pixel-wised sparse or structurally sparse outliers from a highly correlated background signal, and all these methods are implemented under an ℓ1 -penalized optimization. Real data experiments reveal that even if ℓ1-penalty is convex, the optimization sometimes cannot be satisfactorily solved, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is relatively high. In addition, the unexpected background motion (e.g., periodic or stochastic motion) may also be included. We propose a moving object detection method based on a proximal RPCA along with saliency detection. Convex penalties including low-rank and sparse regularizations are substituted with proximal norms to achieve robust regression. After the foreground candidates have been extracted, a motion saliency map using spatiotemporal filtering is constructed. The foreground objects are then filtered out by dynamically adjusting the penalty parameter according to the corresponding saliency values. Evaluations on challenging video clips and qualitative and quantitative comparisons with several state-of-the-art methods demonstrate that the proposed approach works efficiently and robustly.

  5. Quantitative analysis of motion control in long term microgravity.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Anolli, A; Andreoni, G; Pedotti, A

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the 179-days EUROMIR '95 space mission, two in-flight experiments have foreseen quantitative three-dimensional human movement analysis in microgravity. For this aim, a space qualified opto-electronic motion analyser based on passive markers has been installed onboard the Russian Space Station MIR and 8 in flight sessions have been performed. Techhology and method for the collection of kinematics data are described, evaluating the accuracy in three-dimensional marker localisation. Results confirm the suitability of opto-electronic technology for quantitative human motion analysis on orbital modules and raise a set of "lessons learned", leading to the improvement of motion analyser performance with a contemporary swiftness of the on-board operations. Among the experimental program of T4, results of three voluntary posture perturbation protocols are described. The analysis suggests that a short term reinterpretation of proprioceptive information and re-calibration of sensorimotor mechanisms seem to end within the first weeks of flight, while a continuous long term adaptation process allows the refinement of motor performance, in the frame of never abandoned terrestrial strategies.

  6. Non-rigid precession of magnetic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, S. K.; Jones, D. I.

    2017-06-01

    Stars are, generically, rotating and magnetized objects with a misalignment between their magnetic and rotation axes. Since a magnetic field induces a permanent distortion to its host, it provides effective rigidity even to a fluid star, leading to bulk stellar motion that resembles free precession. This bulk motion is, however, accompanied by induced interior velocity and magnetic field perturbations, which are oscillatory on the precession time-scale. Extending previous work, we show that these quantities are described by a set of second-order perturbation equations featuring cross-terms scaling with the product of the magnetic and centrifugal distortions to the star. For the case of a background toroidal field, we reduce these to a set of differential equations in radial functions, and find a method for their solution. The resulting magnetic field and velocity perturbations show complex multipolar structure and are strongest towards the centre of the star.

  7. Torsional and rotational couplings in nonrigid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiste, Juan J.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-02-01

    We analyze theoretically the interplay between the torsional and the rotational motion of an aligned biphenyl-like molecule. To do so, we consider a transition between two electronic states with different internal torsional potentials, induced by means of a resonant laser pulse. The change in the internal torsional potential provokes the motion of the torsional wave packet in the excited electronic state, modifying the structure of the molecule, and hence, its inertia tensor. We find that this process has a strong impact on the rotational wave function, displaying different behavior depending on the electronic states involved and their associated torsional potentials. We describe the dynamics of the system by considering the degree of alignment and the expectation values of the angular momentum operators for the overall rotation of the molecule.

  8. Reproduction of motion artifacts for performance analysis of prospective motion correction in MRI.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Michael; Maclaren, Julian; Lovell-Smith, Cris; Sostheim, Rebecca; Egger, Karl; Harloff, Andreas; Korvink, Jan; Hennig, Juergen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous publications describing the ability of prospective motion correction to improve image quality in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, a reliable approach to assess this improvement is still missing. A method that accurately reproduces motion artifacts correctable with prospective motion correction is developed, and enables the quantification of the improvements achieved. A software interface was developed to simulate rigid body motion by changing the scanning coordinate system relative to the object. Thus, tracking data recorded during a patient scan can be used to reproduce the prevented motion artifacts on a volunteer or a phantom. The influence of physiological motion on image quality was investigated by filtering these data. Finally, the method was used to reproduce and quantify the motion artifacts prevented in a patient scan. The accuracy of the method was tested in phantom experiments and in vivo. The calculated quality factor, as well as a visual inspection of the reproduced artifacts shows a good correspondence to the original. Precise reproduction of motion artifacts assists qualification of prospective motion correction strategies. The presented method provides an important tool to investigate the effects of rigid body motion on a wide range of sequences, and to quantify the improvement in image quality through prospective motion correction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Retrieval analysis of motion preserving spinal devices and periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla; Ianuzzi, Allyson; van Ooij, André; Punt, Ilona M.; Isaza, Jorge; Ross, E.R.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews certain practical aspects of retrieval analysis for motion preserving spinal implants and periprosthetic tissues as an essential component of the overall revision strategy for these implants. At our institution, we established an international repository for motion-preserving spine implants in 2004. Our repository is currently open to all spine surgeons, and is intended to be inclusive of all cervical and lumbar implant designs such as artificial discs and posterior dynamic stabilization devices. Although a wide range of alternative materials is being investigated for nonfusion spine implants, many of the examples in this review are drawn from our existing repository of metal-on-polyethylene, metal-on-metal lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs), and polyurethane-based dynamic motion preservation devices. These devices are already approved or nearing approval for use in the United States, and hence are the most clinically relevant at the present time. This article summarizes the current literature on the retrieval analysis of these implants and concludes with recommendations for the development of new test methods that are based on the current state of knowledge of in vivo wear and damage mechanisms. Furthermore, the relevance and need to evaluate the surrounding tissue to obtain a complete understanding of the biological reaction to implant component corrosion and wear is reviewed. PMID:25802641

  10. Relativistic Double Group Spinor Representations of Non-rigid Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2003-12-22

    The character theory of relativistic double group spinor representations is developed in order to represent the total rovibronic states of non-rigid molecules. It is shown that the double groups can be represented in terms of wreath products and powerful matrix cycle type generators that are used to construct their character tables. It is shown that these tables are of use when spin-orbit coupling is included in the hamiltonian even for molecules containing lighter atoms. Applications to non-rigid molecules such as Tl{sub 2}H{sub 4} /Tl{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} are considered. It is shown that the tunneling splittings and the nuclear spin statistical weights can be obtained for such species using the character tables thus constructed. The spinor double groups of several other molecules such as hexamethyl dilead and heavy weakly bound clusters such as (PoH{sub 2}){sub 4} are also considered.

  11. WHOLE BODY NONRIGID CT-PET REGISTRATION USING WEIGHTED DEMONS

    PubMed Central

    Suh, J.W.; Kwon, Oh -K.; Scheinost, D.; Sinusas, A.J.; Cline, Gary W.; Papademetris, X.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new registration method for whole-body rat computed tomography (CT) image and positron emission tomography (PET) images using a weighted demons algorithm. The CT and PET images are acquired in separate scanners at different times and the inherent differences in the imaging protocols produced significant nonrigid changes between the two acquisitions in addition to heterogeneous image characteristics. In this situation, we utilized both the transmission-PET and the emission-PET images in the deformable registration process emphasizing particular regions of the moving transmission-PET image using the emission-PET image. We validated our results with nine rat image sets using M-Hausdorff distance similarity measure. We demonstrate improved performance compared to standard methods such as Demons and normalized mutual information-based non-rigid FFD registration. PMID:23377533

  12. WHOLE BODY NONRIGID CT-PET REGISTRATION USING WEIGHTED DEMONS.

    PubMed

    Suh, J W; Kwon, Oh-K; Scheinost, D; Sinusas, A J; Cline, Gary W; Papademetris, X

    2011-03-30

    We present a new registration method for whole-body rat computed tomography (CT) image and positron emission tomography (PET) images using a weighted demons algorithm. The CT and PET images are acquired in separate scanners at different times and the inherent differences in the imaging protocols produced significant nonrigid changes between the two acquisitions in addition to heterogeneous image characteristics. In this situation, we utilized both the transmission-PET and the emission-PET images in the deformable registration process emphasizing particular regions of the moving transmission-PET image using the emission-PET image. We validated our results with nine rat image sets using M-Hausdorff distance similarity measure. We demonstrate improved performance compared to standard methods such as Demons and normalized mutual information-based non-rigid FFD registration.

  13. Motion Simulation Analysis of Rail Weld CNC Fine Milling Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huajie; Shu, Min; Li, Chao; Zhang, Baojun

    CNC fine milling machine is a new advanced equipment of rail weld precision machining with high precision, high efficiency, low environmental pollution and other technical advantages. The motion performance of this machine directly affects its machining accuracy and stability, which makes it an important consideration for its design. Based on the design drawings, this article completed 3D modeling of 60mm/kg rail weld CNC fine milling machine by using Solidworks. After that, the geometry was imported into Adams to finish the motion simulation analysis. The displacement, velocity, angular velocity and some other kinematical parameters curves of the main components were obtained in the post-processing and these are the scientific basis for the design and development for this machine.

  14. Time series analysis of collective motions in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakent, Burak; Doruker, Pemra; ćamurdan, Mehmet C.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat around its native state is investigated using time series analysis of the principal components of the Cα atomic displacements obtained from molecular dynamics trajectories. Collective motion along a principal component is modeled as a homogeneous nonstationary process, which is the result of the damped oscillations in local minima superimposed on a random walk. The motion in local minima is described by a stationary autoregressive moving average model, consisting of the frequency, damping factor, moving average parameters and random shock terms. Frequencies for the first 50 principal components are found to be in the 3-25 cm-1 range, which are well correlated with the principal component indices and also with atomistic normal mode analysis results. Damping factors, though their correlation is less pronounced, decrease as principal component indices increase, indicating that low frequency motions are less affected by friction. The existence of a positive moving average parameter indicates that the stochastic force term is likely to disturb the mode in opposite directions for two successive sampling times, showing the modes tendency to stay close to minimum. All these four parameters affect the mean square fluctuations of a principal mode within a single minimum. The inter-minima transitions are described by a random walk model, which is driven by a random shock term considerably smaller than that for the intra-minimum motion. The principal modes are classified into three subspaces based on their dynamics: essential, semiconstrained, and constrained, at least in partial consistency with previous studies. The Gaussian-type distributions of the intermediate modes, called "semiconstrained" modes, are explained by asserting that this random walk behavior is not completely free but between energy barriers.

  15. Correction of Motion Artifacts From Shuttle Mode Computed Tomography Acquisitions for Body Perfusion Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payel; Chandler, Adam G; Altinmakas, Emre; Rong, John; Ng, Chaan S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of shuttle-mode computed tomography (CT) technology for body perfusion applications by quantitatively assessing and correcting motion artifacts. Noncontrast shuttle-mode CT scans (10 phases, 2 nonoverlapping bed locations) were acquired from 4 patients on a GE 750HD CT scanner. Shuttling effects were quantified using Euclidean distances (between-phase and between-bed locations) of corresponding fiducial points on the shuttle and reference phase scans (prior to shuttle mode). Motion correction with nonrigid registration was evaluated using sum-of-squares differences and distances between centers of segmented volumes of interest on shuttle and references images. Fiducial point analysis showed an average shuttling motion of 0.85 ± 1.05 mm (between-bed) and 1.18 ± 1.46 mm (between-phase), respectively. The volume-of-interest analysis of the nonrigid registration results showed improved sum-of-squares differences from 2950 to 597, between-bed distance from 1.64 to 1.20 mm, and between-phase distance from 2.64 to 1.33 mm, respectively, averaged over all cases. Shuttling effects introduced during shuttle-mode CT acquisitions can be computationally corrected for body perfusion applications.

  16. Non-rigid image registration with SalphaS filters.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Chung, Albert C S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, based on the SalphaS distributions, we design SalphaS filters and use the filters as a new feature extraction method for non-rigid medical image registration. In brain MR images, the energy distributions of different frequency bands often exhibit heavy-tailed behavior. Such non-Gaussian behavior is essential for non-rigid image registration but cannot be satisfactorily modeled by the conventional Gabor filters. This leads to unsatisfactory modeling of voxels located at the salient regions of the images. To this end, we propose the SalphaS filters for modeling the heavy-tailed behavior of the energy distributions of brain MR images, and show that the Gabor filter is a special case of the SalphaS filter. The maximum response orientation selection criterion is defined for each frequency band to achieve rotation invariance. In our framework, if the brain MR images are already segmented, each voxel can be automatically assigned a weighting factor based on the Fisher's separation criterion and it is shown that the registration performance can be further improved. The proposed method has been compared with the free-form-deformation based method, Demons algorithm and a method using Gabor features by conducting non-rigid image registration experiments. It is observed that the proposed method achieves the best registration accuracy among all the compared methods in both the simulated and real datasets obtained from the BrainWeb and IBSR respectively.

  17. Nonrigid Point Registration for 2D Curves and 3D Surfaces and its Applications in Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    A nonrigid B-spline based point-matching method (BPM) is proposed to match dense surface points. The method solves both the point correspondence and nonrigid transformation without features extraction. The registration method integrates a motion model, which combines a global transformation and a B-spline based local deformation, into a robust point-matching framework. The point correspondence and deformable transformation are estimated simultaneously by fuzzy correspondence and by a deterministic annealing technique. Prior information about global translation, rotation and scaling is incorporated into the optimization. A local B-spline motion model decreases the degrees of freedom for optimization and thus enables the registration of a larger number of feature points. The performance of the BPM method has been demonstrated and validated using synthesized 2D and 3D data, mouse MRI, and micro-CT images. The proposed B-spline point-matching method can be used to register feature point sets, 2D curves, 3D surfaces, and various image data. PMID:23732538

  18. Analysis of ground-motion simulation big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, T.; Fujiwara, H.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a parallel distributed processing system which applies a big data analysis to the large-scale ground motion simulation data. The system uses ground-motion index values and earthquake scenario parameters as input. We used peak ground velocity value and velocity response spectra as the ground-motion index. The ground-motion index values are calculated from our simulation data. We used simulated long-period ground motion waveforms at about 80,000 meshes calculated by a three dimensional finite difference method based on 369 earthquake scenarios of a great earthquake in the Nankai Trough. These scenarios were constructed by considering the uncertainty of source model parameters such as source area, rupture starting point, asperity location, rupture velocity, fmax and slip function. We used these parameters as the earthquake scenario parameter. The system firstly carries out the clustering of the earthquake scenario in each mesh by the k-means method. The number of clusters is determined in advance using a hierarchical clustering by the Ward's method. The scenario clustering results are converted to the 1-D feature vector. The dimension of the feature vector is the number of scenario combination. If two scenarios belong to the same cluster the component of the feature vector is 1, and otherwise the component is 0. The feature vector shows a `response' of mesh to the assumed earthquake scenario group. Next, the system performs the clustering of the mesh by k-means method using the feature vector of each mesh previously obtained. Here the number of clusters is arbitrarily given. The clustering of scenarios and meshes are performed by parallel distributed processing with Hadoop and Spark, respectively. In this study, we divided the meshes into 20 clusters. The meshes in each cluster are geometrically concentrated. Thus this system can extract regions, in which the meshes have similar `response', as clusters. For each cluster, it is possible to determine

  19. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  20. Reproduction of Motion Artifacts for Performance Analysis of Prospective Motion Correction in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Michael; Maclaren, Julian; Lovell-Smith, Cris; Sostheim, Rebecca; Egger, Karl; Harloff, Andreas; Korvink, Jan; Hennig, Juergen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Despite numerous publications describing the ability of prospective motion correction (PMC) to improve image quality in MRI of the brain, a reliable approach to assess this improvement is still missing. This work develops a method that accurately reproduces motion artifacts correctable with PMC, and enables the quantification of the improvements achieved. Methods A software interface was developed to simulate rigid body motion by changing the scanning coordinate system relative to the object. Thus, tracking data recorded during a patient scan can be used to reproduce the prevented motion artifacts on a volunteer or a phantom. The influence of physiological motion on image quality was investigated by filtering these data. Finally, the method was used to reproduce and quantify the motion artifacts prevented in a patient scan. Results The accuracy of the method was tested in phantom experiments and in vivo. The calculated quality factor, as well as a visual inspection of the reproduced artifacts shows a good correspondence to the original. Conclusion Precise reproduction of motion artifacts assists qualification of prospective motion correction strategies. The presented method provides an important tool to investigate the effects of rigid body motion on a wide range of sequences, and to quantify the improvement in image quality through PMC. PMID:23440737

  1. Analysis of Heald Motion During of Weaving Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, M.

    The paper is concerned with description of the mathematical model meant for an analysis of the movement of healds during the weaving cycle. The referred model consists of mathematical description of shedding motion, coupled with the solution of the model of the heald of weaving loom. The effected calculations show a high value of acceleration of the heald produced after its drop upon the supporting wire. The referred model allows analysing a considerable part of designs of heald shaft that are employed in weaving looms nowadays.

  2. An automated time and hand motion analysis based on planar motion capture extended to a virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Hector A.; Ovalle, Alex M.; Vargas, Carlos A.; Cardona, María J.

    2015-03-01

    In the context of industrial engineering, the predetermined time systems (PTS) play an important role in workplaces because inefficiencies are found in assembly processes that require manual manipulations. In this study, an approach is proposed with the aim to analyze time and motions in a manual process using a capture motion system embedded to a virtual environment. Capture motion system tracks IR passive markers located on the hands to take the positions of each one. For our purpose, a real workplace is virtually represented by domains to create a virtual workplace based on basic geometries. Motion captured data are combined with the virtual workplace to simulate operations carried out on it, and a time and motion analysis is completed by means of an algorithm. To test the methodology of analysis, a case study was intentionally designed using and violating the principles of motion economy. In the results, it was possible to observe where the hands never crossed as well as where the hands passed by the same place. In addition, the activities done in each zone were observed and some known deficiencies were identified in the distribution of the workplace by computational analysis. Using a frequency analysis of hand velocities, errors in the chosen assembly method were revealed showing differences in the hand velocities. An opportunity is seen to classify some quantifiable aspects that are not identified easily in a traditional time and motion analysis. The automated analysis is considered as the main contribution in this study. In the industrial context, a great application is perceived in terms of monitoring the workplace to analyze repeatability, PTS, workplace and labor activities redistribution using the proposed methodology.

  3. Coherence Motion Perception in Developmental Dyslexia: A Meta-Analysis of Behavioral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benassi, Mariagrazia; Simonelli, Letizia; Giovagnoli, Sara; Bolzani, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of the association between developmental dyslexia (DD) and motion sensitivity is evaluated in 35 studies, which investigated coherence motion perception in DD. A first analysis is conducted on the differences between DD groups and age-matched control (C) groups. In a second analysis, the relationship between motion coherence…

  4. Validation and Comparison of Approaches to Respiratory Motion Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabus, Sven; Klinder, Tobias; Murphy, Keelin; Werner, René; Sarrut, David

    The accuracy of respiratory motion estimation has a direct impact on the success of clinical applications such as diagnosis, as well as planning, delivery, and assessment of therapy for lung or other thoracic diseases. While rigid registration is well suited to validation and has reached a mature state in clinical applications, for non-rigid registration no gold-standard exists. This chapter investigates the validation of non-rigid registration accuracy with a focus on lung motion. The central questions addressed in this chapter are (1) how to measure registration accuracy, (2) how to generate ground-truth for validation, and (3) how to interpret accuracy assessment results.

  5. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  6. Improved spectral analysis for the motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.; Klabacha, J.

    2012-10-15

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from reversed field pinch plasmas in the Madison symmetric torus (MST) have been routinely obtained from fully resolved motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum analyses. Recently, the spectrum fit procedure has been improved by initializing and constraining the fit parameters based on the MSE model in the atomic data and analysis structure. A collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n= 4 and a simple Born approximation for ion-impact cross sections is used for this analysis. Measurement uncertainty is quantified by making MSE measurements with multiple views of a single spatial location, ranging 5%-15% for typical MST operation conditions. A multi-view fit improves the goodness of fit of MSE spectral features and background.

  7. Arctic Sea Ice Motion from Wavelet Analysis of Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yunhe

    1998-01-01

    Wavelet analysis of DMSP SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) 85 GHz and 37 GHz radiance data, SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) 37 GHz, and NSCAT (NASA Scatterometer) 13.9 GHZ data can be used to obtain daily sea ice drift information for both the northern and southern polar regions. The derived maps of sea ice drift provide both improved spatial coverage over the existing array of Arctic Ocean buoys and better temporal resolution over techniques utilizing data from satellite synthetic aperture radars (SAR). Examples of derived ice-drift maps in the Arctic illustrate large-scale circulation reversals within a period of a couple weeks. Comparisons with ice displacements derived from buoys show good quantitative agreement. NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) 13.9 GHZ data have been also used for wavelet analysis to derive sea-ice drift. First, the 40' incidence-angle, sigma-zero (surface roughness) daily map of whole Arctic region with 25 km of pixel size from satellite's 600 km swath has been constructed. Then, the similar wavelet transform procedure to SSM/I data can be applied. Various scales of wavelet transform and threshold have been tested. By overlaying , neighbor filtering, and block-averaging the results of multiscale wavelet transforms, the final sea ice drift vectors are much smooth and representative to the sea ice motion. This wavelet analysis procedure is robust and can make a major contribution to the understanding of ice motion over large areas at relatively high temporal resolutions. The results of wavelet analysis of SSM/I and NSCAT images and buoy data can be merged by some data fusion techniques and will help to improve our current knowledge of sea ice drift and related processes through the data assimilation of ocean-ice numerical model.

  8. Arctic Sea Ice Motion from Wavelet Analysis of Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yunhe

    1998-01-01

    Wavelet analysis of DMSP SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) 85 GHz and 37 GHz radiance data, SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) 37 GHz, and NSCAT (NASA Scatterometer) 13.9 GHZ data can be used to obtain daily sea ice drift information for both the northern and southern polar regions. The derived maps of sea ice drift provide both improved spatial coverage over the existing array of Arctic Ocean buoys and better temporal resolution over techniques utilizing data from satellite synthetic aperture radars (SAR). Examples of derived ice-drift maps in the Arctic illustrate large-scale circulation reversals within a period of a couple weeks. Comparisons with ice displacements derived from buoys show good quantitative agreement. NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) 13.9 GHZ data have been also used for wavelet analysis to derive sea-ice drift. First, the 40' incidence-angle, sigma-zero (surface roughness) daily map of whole Arctic region with 25 km of pixel size from satellite's 600 km swath has been constructed. Then, the similar wavelet transform procedure to SSM/I data can be applied. Various scales of wavelet transform and threshold have been tested. By overlaying , neighbor filtering, and block-averaging the results of multiscale wavelet transforms, the final sea ice drift vectors are much smooth and representative to the sea ice motion. This wavelet analysis procedure is robust and can make a major contribution to the understanding of ice motion over large areas at relatively high temporal resolutions. The results of wavelet analysis of SSM/I and NSCAT images and buoy data can be merged by some data fusion techniques and will help to improve our current knowledge of sea ice drift and related processes through the data assimilation of ocean-ice numerical model.

  9. Effectiveness of an Automatic Tracking Software in Underwater Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Fabrício A.; Sawacha, Zimi; Di Michele, Rocco; Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio; Fantozzi, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Tracking of markers placed on anatomical landmarks is a common practice in sports science to perform the kinematic analysis that interests both athletes and coaches. Although different software programs have been developed to automatically track markers and/or features, none of them was specifically designed to analyze underwater motion. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a software developed for automatic tracking of underwater movements (DVP), based on the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi feature tracker. Twenty-one video recordings of different aquatic exercises (n = 2940 markers’ positions) were manually tracked to determine the markers’ center coordinates. Then, the videos were automatically tracked using DVP and a commercially available software (COM). Since tracking techniques may produce false targets, an operator was instructed to stop the automatic procedure and to correct the position of the cursor when the distance between the calculated marker’s coordinate and the reference one was higher than 4 pixels. The proportion of manual interventions required by the software was used as a measure of the degree of automation. Overall, manual interventions were 10.4% lower for DVP (7.4%) than for COM (17.8%). Moreover, when examining the different exercise modes separately, the percentage of manual interventions was 5.6% to 29.3% lower for DVP than for COM. Similar results were observed when analyzing the type of marker rather than the type of exercise, with 9.9% less manual interventions for DVP than for COM. In conclusion, based on these results, the developed automatic tracking software presented can be used as a valid and useful tool for underwater motion analysis. Key Points The availability of effective software for automatic tracking would represent a significant advance for the practical use of kinematic analysis in swimming and other aquatic sports. An important feature of automatic tracking software is to require limited human

  10. Accident investigation: Analysis of aircraft motions from ATC radar recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A technique was developed for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from air traffic control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data (from an onboard Mode-C transponder), to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, thrust-drag, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This method of analyzing aircraft motions was evaluated through flight experiments which used the CV-990 research aircraft and recordings from both the enroute and terminal ATC radar systems. The results indicate that the values derived from the ATC radar records are for the most part in good agreement with the corresponding values obtained from airborne measurements. In an actual accident, this analysis of ATC radar records can complement the flight-data recorders, now onboard airliners, and provide a source of recorded information for other types of aircraft that are equipped with Mode-C transponders but not with onboard recorders.

  11. Integration of monocular motion signals and the analysis of interocular velocity differences for the perception of motion-in-depth.

    PubMed

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Kakehi, Daisuke; Tashiro, Tomoyoshi; Yaguchi, Hirohisa

    2009-12-09

    We investigated how the mechanism for perceiving motion-in-depth based on interocular velocity differences (IOVDs) integrates signals from the motion spatial frequency (SF) channels. We focused on the question whether this integration is implemented before or after the comparison of the velocity signals from the two eyes. We measured spatial frequency selectivity of the MAE of motion in depth (3D MAE). The 3D MAE showed little spatial frequency selectivity, whereas the 2D lateral MAE showed clear spatial frequency selectivity in the same condition. This indicates that the outputs of the monocular motion SF channels are combined before analyzing the IOVD. The presumption was confirmed by the disappearance of the 3D MAE after exposure to superimposed gratings with different spatial frequencies moving in opposite directions. The direction of the 2D MAE depended on the test spatial frequency in the same condition. These results suggest that the IOVD is calculated at a relatively later stage of the motion analysis, and that some monocular information is preserved even after the integration of the motion SF channel outputs.

  12. Topology preserving non-rigid image registration using time-varying elasticity model for MRI brain volumes.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sahar; Khan, Muhammad Faisal

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new non-rigid image registration method that imposes a topology preservation constraint on the deformation. We propose to incorporate the time varying elasticity model into the deformable image matching procedure and constrain the Jacobian determinant of the transformation over the entire image domain. The motion of elastic bodies is governed by a hyperbolic partial differential equation, generally termed as elastodynamics wave equation, which we propose to use as a deformation model. We carried out clinical image registration experiments on 3D magnetic resonance brain scans from IBSR database. The results of the proposed registration approach in terms of Kappa index and relative overlap computed over the subcortical structures were compared against the existing topology preserving non-rigid image registration methods and non topology preserving variant of our proposed registration scheme. The Jacobian determinant maps obtained with our proposed registration method were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The results demonstrated that the proposed scheme provides good registration accuracy with smooth transformations, thereby guaranteeing the preservation of topology.

  13. Spatio-temporal (2D+T) non-rigid registration of real-time 3D echocardiography and cardiovascular MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Brady, J. Michael; Becher, Harald; Noble, J. Alison

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we describe a method to non-rigidly co-register a 2D slice sequence from real-time 3D echocardiography with a 2D cardiovascular MR image sequence. This is challenging because the imaging modalities have different spatial and temporal resolution. Non-rigid registration is required for accurate alignment due to imprecision of cardiac gating and natural motion variations between cardiac cycles. In our approach the deformation field between the imaging modalities is decoupled into temporal and spatial components. First, temporal alignment is performed to establish temporal correspondence between a real-time 3D echocardiography frame and a cardiovascular MR frame. Spatial alignment is then performed using an adaptive non-rigid registration algorithm based on local phase mutual information on each temporally aligned image pair. Experiments on seven volunteer datasets are reported. Evaluation of registration errors based on expert-identified landmarks shows that the spatio-temporal registration algorithm gives a mean registration error of 3.56 ± 0.49 and 3.54 ± 0.27 mm for the short and long axis sequences, respectively.

  14. Head Motion Modeling for Human Behavior Analysis in Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Baucom, Brian; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of head motion in human interaction, notably of its role in conveying interlocutors’ behavioral characteristics. Head motion is physically complex and carries rich information; current modeling approaches based on visual signals, however, are still limited in their ability to adequately capture these important properties. Guided by the methodology of kinesics, we propose a data driven approach to identify typical head motion patterns. The approach follows the steps of first segmenting motion events, then parametrically representing the motion by linear predictive features, and finally generalizing the motion types using Gaussian mixture models. The proposed approach is experimentally validated using video recordings of communication sessions from real couples involved in a couples therapy study. In particular we use the head motion model to classify binarized expert judgments of the interactants’ specific behavioral characteristics where entrainment in head motion is hypothesized to play a role: Acceptance, Blame, Positive, and Negative behavior. We achieve accuracies in the range of 60% to 70% for the various experimental settings and conditions. In addition, we describe a measure of motion similarity between the interaction partners based on the proposed model. We show that the relative change of head motion similarity during the interaction significantly correlates with the expert judgments of the interactants’ behavioral characteristics. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed head motion model, and underscore the promise of analyzing human behavioral characteristics through signal processing methods. PMID:26557047

  15. Stochastic analysis of the motion of DNA nanomechanical bipeds.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Iddo; Boushaba, Khalid; Matzavinos, Anastasios; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we formulate and analyze a Markov process modeling the motion of DNA nanomechanical walking devices.We consider a molecular biped restricted to a well-defined one-dimensional track and study its asymptotic behavior.Our analysis allows for the biped legs to be of different molecular composition, and thus to contribute differently to the dynamics. Our main result is a functional central limit theorem for the biped with an explicit formula for the effective diffusivity coefficient in terms of the parameters of the model. A law of large numbers, a recurrence/transience characterization and large deviations estimates are also obtained.Our approach is applicable to a variety of other biological motors such as myosin and motor proteins on polymer filaments.

  16. Continuous motion decoding from EMG using independent component analysis and adaptive model training.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (EMG) is popularly used to decode human motion intention for robot movement control. Traditional motion decoding method uses pattern recognition to provide binary control command which can only move the robot as predefined limited patterns. In this work, we proposed a motion decoding method which can accurately estimate 3-dimensional (3-D) continuous upper limb motion only from multi-channel EMG signals. In order to prevent the muscle activities from motion artifacts and muscle crosstalk which especially obviously exist in upper limb motion, the independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the independent source EMG signals. The motion data was also transferred from 4-manifold to 2-manifold by the principle component analysis (PCA). A hidden Markov model (HMM) was proposed to decode the motion from the EMG signals after the model trained by an adaptive model identification process. Experimental data were used to train the decoding model and validate the motion decoding performance. By comparing the decoded motion with the measured motion, it is found that the proposed motion decoding strategy was feasible to decode 3-D continuous motion from EMG signals.

  17. A review of vision-based motion analysis in sport.

    PubMed

    Barris, Sian; Button, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Efforts at player motion tracking have traditionally involved a range of data collection techniques from live observation to post-event video analysis where player movement patterns are manually recorded and categorized to determine performance effectiveness. Due to the considerable time required to manually collect and analyse such data, research has tended to focus only on small numbers of players within predefined playing areas. Whilst notational analysis is a convenient, practical and typically inexpensive technique, the validity and reliability of the process can vary depending on a number of factors, including how many observers are used, their experience, and the quality of their viewing perspective. Undoubtedly the application of automated tracking technology to team sports has been hampered because of inadequate video and computational facilities available at sports venues. However, the complex nature of movement inherent to many physical activities also represents a significant hurdle to overcome. Athletes tend to exhibit quick and agile movements, with many unpredictable changes in direction and also frequent collisions with other players. Each of these characteristics of player behaviour violate the assumptions of smooth movement on which computer tracking algorithms are typically based. Systems such as TRAKUS, SoccerMan, TRAKPERFORMANCE, Pfinder and Prozone all provide extrinsic feedback information to coaches and athletes. However, commercial tracking systems still require a fair amount of operator intervention to process the data after capture and are often limited by the restricted capture environments that can be used and the necessity for individuals to wear tracking devices. Whilst some online tracking systems alleviate the requirements of manual tracking, to our knowledge a completely automated system suitable for sports performance is not yet commercially available. Automatic motion tracking has been used successfully in other domains outside

  18. Automatic mitral annulus tracking in volumetric ultrasound using non-rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    De Veene, Henri; Bertrand, Philippe B; Popovic, Natasa; Vandervoort, Pieter M; Claus, Piet; De Beule, Matthieu; Heyde, Brecht

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mitral annular dynamics plays an important role in the diagnosis and selection of optimal valve repair strategies, but remains cumbersome and time-consuming if performed manually. In this paper we propose non-rigid image registration to automatically track the annulus in 3D ultrasound images for both normal and pathological valves, and compare the performance against manual tracing. Relevant clinical properties such as annular area, circumference and excursion could be extracted reliably by the tracking algorithm. The root-mean-square error, calculated as the difference between the manually traced landmarks (18 in total) and the automatic tracking, was 1.96 ± 0.46 mm over 10 valves (5 healthy and 5 diseased) which is within the clinically acceptable error range.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of a topology preserving non-rigid registration method.

    PubMed

    Noblet, V; Heinrich, C; Heitz, F; Armspach, J-P

    2006-06-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive evaluation of a monomodal B-spline-based non-rigid registration algorithm allowing topology preservation in 3-D. This article is to be considered as the companion of [Noblet, V., Heinrich, C., Heitz, F., Armspach, J.-P., 2005. 3-D deformable image registration: a topology preservation scheme based on hierarchical deformation models and interval analysis optimization. IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 14 (5), 553-566] where this algorithm, based on the minimization of an objective function, was introduced and detailed. Overall assessment is based on the estimation of synthetic deformation fields, on average brain construction, on atlas-based segmentation and on landmark mapping. The influence of the model parameters is characterized. Comparison between several objective functions is carried out and impact of their symmetrization is pointed out. An original intensity normalization scheme is also introduced, leading to significant improvements of the registration quality. The comparison benchmark is the popular demons algorithm [Thirion, J.-P., 1998. Image matching as a diffusion process: an analogy with Maxwell's demons. Medical Image Analysis, 2 (3), 243-260], that exhibited best results in a recent comparison between several non-rigid 3-D registration methods [Hellier, P., Barillot, C., Corouge, I., Gibaud, B., Le Goualher, G., Collins, D.L., Evans, A., Malandain, G., Ayache, N., Christensen, G.E., Johnson, H.J., 2003. Retrospective evaluation of intersubject brain registration. IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 22 (9), 1120-1130]. The topology preserving B-spline-based method proved to outperform the commonly available ITK implementation of the demons algorithms on many points. Some limits of intensity-based registration methods are also highlighted through this work.

  20. Nonrigid brain MR image registration using uniform spherical region descriptor.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Chung, Albert C S

    2012-01-01

    There are two main issues that make nonrigid image registration a challenging task. First, voxel intensity similarity may not be necessarily equivalent to anatomical similarity in the image correspondence searching process. Second, during the imaging process, some interferences such as unexpected rotations of input volumes and monotonic gray-level bias fields can adversely affect the registration quality. In this paper, a new feature-based nonrigid image registration method is proposed. The proposed method is based on a new type of image feature, namely, uniform spherical region descriptor (USRD), as signatures for each voxel. The USRD is rotation and monotonic gray-level transformation invariant and can be efficiently calculated. The registration process is therefore formulated as a feature matching problem. The USRD feature is integrated with the Markov random field labeling framework in which energy function is defined for registration. The energy function is then optimized by the α-expansion algorithm. The proposed method has been compared with five state-of-the-art registration approaches on both the simulated and real 3-D databases obtained from the BrainWeb and Internet Brain Segmentation Repository, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve high registration accuracy and reliable robustness behavior.

  1. Non-rigid registration of tomographic images with Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Ar; Isoardi, Ra; Mato, G.

    2007-11-01

    Spatial image registration of deformable body parts such as thorax and abdomen has important medical applications, but at the same time, it represents an important computational challenge. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm to perform non-rigid registration of tomographic images using a non-rigid model based on Fourier transforms. As a measure of similarity, we use the correlation coefficient, finding that the optimal order of the transformation is n = 3 (36 parameters). We apply this method to a digital phantom and to 7 pairs of patient images corresponding to clinical CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a fairly good agreement according to medical experts, with an average registration error of 2 mm for the case of clinical images. For 2D images (dimensions 512×512), the average running time for the algorithm is 15 seconds using a standard personal computer. Summarizing, we find that intra-modality registration of the abdomen can be achieved with acceptable accuracy for slight deformations and can be extended to 3D with a reasonable execution time.

  2. Accelerated Nonrigid Intensity-Based Image Registration Using Importance Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Boklye

    2015-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration methods using intensity-based similarity metrics are becoming increasingly common tools to estimate many types of deformations. Nonrigid warps can be very flexible with a large number of parameters and gradient optimization schemes are widely used to estimate them. However for large datasets, the computation of the gradient of the similarity metric with respect to these many parameters becomes very time consuming. Using a small random subset of image voxels to approximate the gradient can reduce computation time. This work focuses on the use of importance sampling to improve accuracy and reduce the variance of this gradient approximation. The proposed importance sampling framework is based on an edge-dependent adaptive sampling distribution designed for use with intensity-based registration algorithms. We compare the performance of registration based on stochastic approximations with and without importance sampling to that using deterministic gradient descent. Empirical results, on simulated MR brain data and real CT inhale-exhale lung data from 8 subjects, show that a combination of stochastic approximation methods and importance sampling improves the rate of convergence of the registration process while preserving accuracy. PMID:19211343

  3. Accelerated nonrigid intensity-based image registration using importance sampling.

    PubMed

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Kim, Boklye

    2009-08-01

    Nonrigid image registration methods using intensity-based similarity metrics are becoming increasingly common tools to estimate many types of deformations. Nonrigid warps can be very flexible with a large number of parameters and gradient optimization schemes are widely used to estimate them. However, for large datasets, the computation of the gradient of the similarity metric with respect to these many parameters becomes very time consuming. Using a small random subset of image voxels to approximate the gradient can reduce computation time. This work focuses on the use of importance sampling to reduce the variance of this gradient approximation. The proposed importance sampling framework is based on an edge-dependent adaptive sampling distribution designed for use with intensity-based registration algorithms. We compare the performance of registration based on stochastic approximations with and without importance sampling to that using deterministic gradient descent. Empirical results, on simulated magnetic resonance brain data and real computed tomography inhale-exhale lung data from eight subjects, show that a combination of stochastic approximation methods and importance sampling accelerates the registration process while preserving accuracy.

  4. Coherence analysis for movement disorder motion captured by six degree-of-freedom inertial sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teskey, Wesley J. E.; Elhabiby, Mohamed; El-Sheimy, Naser; MacIntosh, Brian

    2012-06-01

    The use of inertial sensors (accelerometer and gyroscopes) for evaluation of movement disorder motion, including essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD), is becoming prevalent. This paper uses a novel combination of six degree-of-freedom motion analysis and coherence based processing methodologies to uncover differences in the signature of motion for the ET and PD movement disorders. This is the first analysis of such motions utilizing the novel methodology outlined, and it displays a distinct motion profile differentiating between these two groups. Such an analysis can be used to assist medical professionals in diagnosing movement disorders given a currently high error rate of diagnosis. As well, the Kalman smoothing analysis performed in this paper can be quite useful for any application when tracking of human motion is required. Another contribution of the work is the use of wavelets in zero phase lag filtering, which helped in preparing the data for analysis by removing unwanted frequencies without introducing distortions into the data.

  5. Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

    2010-01-01

    Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

  6. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  7. Untypical Undergraduate Research: Player Motion Analysis in Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loerke, Dinah

    There is significant concern about the degree of attrition in STEM disciplines from the start of K-12 through to the end of higher education, and the analysis of the `leaky pipeline' from the various institutions has identified a critical decline - which may be as high as 60 percent - between the fraction of students who identify as having an interest in a science or engineering major at the start of college/university, and the fraction of students who ultimately graduate with a STEM degree. It has been shown that this decline is even more dramatic for women and underrepresented minorities (Blickenstaff 2005, Metcalf 2010). One intervention which has been proven to be effective for retention of potential STEM students is early research experience, particularly if it facilitates the students' integration into a STEM learning community (Graham et al. 2013, Toven-Lindsey et al. 2015). In other words, to retain students in STEM majors, we would like to encourage them to `think of themselves as scientists', and simultaneously promote supportive peer networks. The University of Denver (DU) already has a strong undergraduate research program. However, while the current program provides valuable training for many students, it likely comes too late to be effective for student retention in STEM, because it primarily serves older students who have already finished the basic coursework in their discipline; within physics, we know that the introductory physics courses already serve as gatekeeper courses that cause many gifted but `non-typical' students to lose interest in pursuing a STEM major (Tobias 1990). To address this issue, my lab is developing a small research spinoff program in which we apply spatiotemporal motion analysis to the motion trajectories of players in sports, using video recordings of DU Pioneer hockey games. This project aims to fulfill a dual purpose: The research is framed in a way that we think is attractive and accessible for beginning students who

  8. An analysis of human motion detection systems use during elder exercise routines.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Havens, Timothy C; Rantz, Marilyn; Keller, James; Casanova Abbott, Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Human motion analysis provides motion pattern and body pose estimations. This study integrates computer-vision techniques and explores a markerless human motion analysis system. Using human-computer interaction (HCI) methods and goals, researchers use a computer interface to provide feedback about range of motion to users. A total of 35 adults aged 65 and older perform three exercises in a public gym while human motion capture methods are used. Following exercises, participants are shown processed human motion images captured during exercises on a customized interface. Standardized questionnaires are used to elicit responses from users during interactions with the interface. A matrix of HCI goals (effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction) and emerging themes are used to describe interactions. Sixteen users state the interface would be useful, but not necessarily for safety purposes. Users want better image quality, when expectations are matched satisfaction increases, and unclear meaning of motion measures decreases satisfaction.

  9. The effect of motion correction on pharmacokinetic parameter estimation in dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Melbourne, A; Hipwell, J; Modat, M; Mertzanidou, T; Huisman, H; Ourselin, S; Hawkes, D J

    2011-12-21

    A dynamic-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) dataset consists of many imaging frames, often acquired both before and after contrast injection. Due to the length of time spent acquiring images, patient motion is likely and image re-alignment or registration is required before further analysis such as pharmacokinetic model fitting. Non-rigid image registration procedures may be used to correct motion artefacts; however, a careful choice of registration strategy is required to reduce misregistration artefacts associated with enhancing features. This work investigates the effect of registration on the results of model-fitting algorithms for 52 DCE-MR mammography cases for 14 patients. Results are divided into two sections: a comparison of registration strategies in which a DCE-MRI-specific algorithm is preferred in 50% of cases, followed by an investigation of parameter changes with known applied deformations, inspecting the effect of magnitude and timing of motion artefacts. Increased motion magnitude correlates with increased model-fit residual and is seen to have a strong influence on the visibility of strongly enhancing features. Motion artefacts in images close to the contrast agent arrival have a disproportionate effect on discrepancies in parameter estimation. The choice of algorithm, magnitude of motion and timing of the motion are each shown to influence estimated pharmacokinetic parameters even when motion magnitude is small.

  10. The effect of motion correction on pharmacokinetic parameter estimation in dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, A.; Hipwell, J.; Modat, M.; Mertzanidou, T.; Huisman, H.; Ourselin, S.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    A dynamic-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) dataset consists of many imaging frames, often acquired both before and after contrast injection. Due to the length of time spent acquiring images, patient motion is likely and image re-alignment or registration is required before further analysis such as pharmacokinetic model fitting. Non-rigid image registration procedures may be used to correct motion artefacts; however, a careful choice of registration strategy is required to reduce misregistration artefacts associated with enhancing features. This work investigates the effect of registration on the results of model-fitting algorithms for 52 DCE-MR mammography cases for 14 patients. Results are divided into two sections: a comparison of registration strategies in which a DCE-MRI-specific algorithm is preferred in 50% of cases, followed by an investigation of parameter changes with known applied deformations, inspecting the effect of magnitude and timing of motion artefacts. Increased motion magnitude correlates with increased model-fit residual and is seen to have a strong influence on the visibility of strongly enhancing features. Motion artefacts in images close to the contrast agent arrival have a disproportionate effect on discrepancies in parameter estimation. The choice of algorithm, magnitude of motion and timing of the motion are each shown to influence estimated pharmacokinetic parameters even when motion magnitude is small.

  11. Simulation calculation and characteristics analysis of coil motion noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yang; Peng, Cong; Fu, MingYe; Lu, Yiming; Yu, Zining; Zhu, Kaiguang

    2017-01-01

    Coil motion noise is one of the largest noises in airborne electromagnetic exploration, which results from the variations of magnetic flux in the Earth's magnetic accompanied by the receiver coil's movement during the flight. On the assumption of attitude measurements, coil motion noise is calculated according to roll, pitch and yaw of the receiver coils. Therefore, the characteristics of coil motion noise are analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain. And the Gaussianity of coil motion noise is also discussed using the histogram of data and its estimated Gaussian function, and another method termed normal probability paper. All of these are to lay the foundation for removal of coil motion noise in airborne electromagnetic detection.

  12. Measurement Performance of a Computer Assisted Vertebral Motion Analysis System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reginald J; Lee, David C; Wade, Chip; Cheng, Boyle

    2015-01-01

    Segmental instability of the lumbar spine is a significant cost within the US health care system; however current thresholds for indication of radiographic instability are not well defined. To determine the performance measurements of sagittal lumbar intervertebral measurements using computerassisted measurements of the lumbar spine using motion sequences from a video-fluoroscopic technique. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, prevalence, and test-retest reliability evaluation of digitized manual versus computer-assisted measurements of the lumbar spine. A total of 2239 intervertebral levels from 509 symptomatic patients, and 287 intervertebral levels from 73 asymptomatic participants were retrospectively evaluated. Specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), diagnostic accuracy, and prevalence between the two measurement techniques; Measurements of Coefficient of repeatability (CR), limits of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; type 3,1), and standard error of measurement for both measurement techniques. Asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic patients were all evaluated using both the Vertebral Motion Analysis (VMA) system and fluoroscopic flexion extension static radiographs (FE). The analysis was compared to known thresholds of 15% intervertebral translation (IVT, equivalent to 5.3mm assuming a 35mm vertebral body depth) and 25° intervertebral rotation (IVR). The VMA measurements demonstrated greater specificity, % change in sensitivity, NPV, prevalence, and reliability compared with FE for radiographic evidence of instability. Specificity was 99.4% and 99.1% in the VMA compared to 98.3% and 98.2% in the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. Sensitivity in this study was 41.2% and 44.6% greater in the VMA compared to the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. NPV was 91% and 88% in the VMA compared to 62% and 66% in the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. Prevalence was 12.3% and 11.9% for the VMA compared to 6.1% and 5

  13. Measurement Performance of a Computer Assisted Vertebral Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Reginald J.; Lee, David C.; Cheng, Boyle

    2015-01-01

    Background Segmental instability of the lumbar spine is a significant cost within the US health care system; however current thresholds for indication of radiographic instability are not well defined. Purpose To determine the performance measurements of sagittal lumbar intervertebral measurements using computerassisted measurements of the lumbar spine using motion sequences from a video-fluoroscopic technique. Study design Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, prevalence, and test-retest reliability evaluation of digitized manual versus computer-assisted measurements of the lumbar spine. Patient sample A total of 2239 intervertebral levels from 509 symptomatic patients, and 287 intervertebral levels from 73 asymptomatic participants were retrospectively evaluated. Outcome measures Specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), diagnostic accuracy, and prevalence between the two measurement techniques; Measurements of Coefficient of repeatability (CR), limits of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; type 3,1), and standard error of measurement for both measurement techniques. Methods Asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic patients were all evaluated using both the Vertebral Motion Analysis (VMA) system and fluoroscopic flexion extension static radiographs (FE). The analysis was compared to known thresholds of 15% intervertebral translation (IVT, equivalent to 5.3mm assuming a 35mm vertebral body depth) and 25° intervertebral rotation (IVR). Results The VMA measurements demonstrated greater specificity, % change in sensitivity, NPV, prevalence, and reliability compared with FE for radiographic evidence of instability. Specificity was 99.4% and 99.1% in the VMA compared to 98.3% and 98.2% in the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. Sensitivity in this study was 41.2% and 44.6% greater in the VMA compared to the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. NPV was 91% and 88% in the VMA compared to 62% and 66% in the FE for IVR and IVT

  14. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-06-15

    s, with the resulting average motion speed of 1.45 cm/s. The motion-perturbed high resolution (2 mm voxel) volumetric dose grids on the MC2 phantom were generated for each beam. From each grid, a coronal dose plane at the detector level was extracted and compared to the corresponding moving MC2 measurement, using gamma analysis with both global (G) and local (L) dose-error normalization. Results: Using the TG-119 criteria of (3%G/3 mm), per beam average gamma analysis passing rates exceeded 95% in all cases. No individual beam had a passing rate below 91%. LDVE correction eliminated systematic disagreement patterns at the beams’ aperture edges. In a representative example, application of LDVE correction improved (2%L/2 mm) gamma analysis passing rate for an IMRT beam from 74% to 98%. Conclusions: The effect of motion on the moving region-of-interest IMRT dose can be estimated with a standard, static phantom QA measurement, provided the motion characteristics are independently known from 4D CT or otherwise. The motion-perturbed absolute dose estimates were validated by the direct planar diode array measurements, and were found to reliably agree with them in a homogeneous phantom.

  15. On selection and scaling of ground motions for analysis of seismically isolated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Deepak R.; Maharjan, Manika

    2016-12-01

    A broader consensus on the number of ground motions to be used and the method of scaling to be adopted for nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) of structures is yet to be reached. Therefore, in this study, the effects of selection and scaling of ground motions on the response of seismically isolated structures, which are routinely designed using nonlinear RHA, are investigated. For this purpose, isolation systems with a range of properties subjected to bidirectional excitation are considered. Benchmark response of the isolation systems is established using large sets of unscaled ground motions systematically categorized into pulse-like, non-pulse-like, and mixed set of motions. Different subsets of seven to 14 ground motions are selected from these large sets using (a) random selection and (b) selection based on the best match of the shape of the response spectrum of ground motions to the target spectrum. Consequences of weighted scaling (also commonly referred to as amplitude scaling or linear scaling) as well as spectral matching are investigated. The ground motion selection and scaling procedures are evaluated from the viewpoint of their accuracy, efficiency, and consistency in predicting the benchmark response. It is confirmed that seven time histories are sufficient for a reliable prediction of isolation system displacement demands, for all ground motion subsets, selection and scaling procedures, and isolation systems considered. If ground motions are selected based on their best match to the shape of the target response spectrum (which should be preferred over randomly selected motions), weighted scaling should be used if pulse-like motions are considered, either of weighted scaling or spectral matching can be used if non-pulse-like motions are considered, and an average of responses from weighted-scaled and spectrum-matched ground motions should be used for a mixed set of motions. On the other hand, the importance of randomly selected motions in

  16. Articulated Non-Rigid Point Set Registration for Human Pose Estimation from 3D Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Song; Fan, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generative framework for 3D human pose estimation that is able to operate on both individual point sets and sequential depth data. We formulate human pose estimation as a point set registration problem, where we propose three new approaches to address several major technical challenges in this research. First, we integrate two registration techniques that have a complementary nature to cope with non-rigid and articulated deformations of the human body under a variety of poses. This unique combination allows us to handle point sets of complex body motion and large pose variation without any initial conditions, as required by most existing approaches. Second, we introduce an efficient pose tracking strategy to deal with sequential depth data, where the major challenge is the incomplete data due to self-occlusions and view changes. We introduce a visible point extraction method to initialize a new template for the current frame from the previous frame, which effectively reduces the ambiguity and uncertainty during registration. Third, to support robust and stable pose tracking, we develop a segment volume validation technique to detect tracking failures and to re-initialize pose registration if needed. The experimental results on both benchmark 3D laser scan and depth datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework when compared with state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26131673

  17. A study of attitude control concepts for precision-pointing non-rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Attitude control concepts for use onboard structurally nonrigid spacecraft that must be pointed with great precision are examined. The task of determining the eigenproperties of a system of linear time-invariant equations (in terms of hybrid coordinates) representing the attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft is discussed. Literal characteristics are developed for the associated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. A method is presented for determining the poles and zeros of the transfer function describing the attitude dynamics of a flexible spacecraft characterized by hybrid coordinate equations. Alterations are made to linear regulator and observer theory to accommodate modeling errors. The results show that a model error vector, which evolves from an error system, can be added to a reduced system model, estimated by an observer, and used by the control law to render the system less sensitive to uncertain magnitudes and phase relations of truncated modes and external disturbance effects. A hybrid coordinate formulation using the provided assumed mode shapes, rather than incorporating the usual finite element approach is provided.

  18. A search advantage for faces learned in motion.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Karin S; Thornton, Ian M; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2006-06-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in the role that motion might play in the perception and representation of facial identity. Most studies have considered old/new recognition as a task. However, especially for non-rigid motion, these studies have often produced contradictory results. Here, we used a delayed visual search paradigm to explore how learning is affected by non-rigid facial motion. In the current studies we trained observers on two frontal view faces, one moving non-rigidly, the other a static picture. After a delay, observers were asked to identify the targets in static search arrays containing 2, 4 or 6 faces. On a given trial target and distractor faces could be shown in one of five viewpoints, frontal, 22 degrees or 45 degrees to the left or right. We found that familiarizing observers with dynamic faces led to a constant reaction time advantage across all setsizes and viewpoints compared to static familiarization. This suggests that non-rigid motion affects identity decisions even across extended periods of time and changes in viewpoint. Furthermore, it seems as if such effects may be difficult to observe using more traditional old/new recognition tasks.

  19. Spherical navigator registration using harmonic analysis for prospective motion correction.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, C L; Ari, N; Kraft, R A

    2005-01-01

    Spherical navigators are an attractive approach to motion compensation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Because they can be acquired quickly, spherical navigators have the potential to measure and correct for rigid motion during image acquisition (prospectively as opposed to retrospectively). A limiting factor to prospective use of navigators is the time required to estimate the motion parameters. This estimation problem can be separated into a rotational and translational component. Recovery of the rotational motion can be cast as a registration of functions defined on a sphere. Previous methods for solving this registration problem are based on optimization strategies that are iterative and require k-space interpolation. Such approaches have undesirable convergence behavior for prospective use since the estimation complexity depends on both the number of samples and the amount of rotation. We propose and demonstrate an efficient algorithm for recovery of rotational motion using spherical navigators. We decompose the navigator magnitude using the spherical harmonic transform. In this framework, rigid rotations can be recovered from an over-constrained system of equations, leading to a computationally efficient algorithm for prospective motion compensation. The resulting algorithm is compared to existing approaches in simulated and actual navigator data. These results show that the spherical harmonic based estimation algorithm is significantly faster than existing methods and so is suited for prospective motion correction.

  20. Application Of Image Processing To Human Motion Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baca, Arnold

    1989-10-01

    A novel method is presented for the determination of position and orientation of interconnected human body segments relative to a spatial coordinate system. The development of this new method was prompted by the inadequacy of the techniques currently in use for recorded images. In these techniques, markers are fixed to certain points on the skin of the subject. However, due to skin movement relative to the skeleton and various other factors, the configurational coordinates derived from digitized marker positions may be grossly erroneous with disastrous consequences for the subsequent motion analysis. The new method is based on body-segment shape recognition in the video-image domain. During the recording session, the subject carries special, tight-fitting clothing which permits the unambiguous recognition of segmental shapes and boundaries from the recorded video images. The recognition is performed by means of an edge detection algorithm followed by the computation of the positions and orientations relative to the spatial axes system of all segments of the body model. The new method is implemented on an advanced, special high speed graphic system (Impuls, System 2400) based on transputer chips. The parallel processing capability of this system permits the simultaneous computation of the configurational characteristics for all segments visible in the image. After processing one complete image frame, the video digitizer is instructed to automatically proceed to the next frame, thereby enabling the user to automatically evaluate large amounts of successive frames.

  1. Characterizing Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of multifractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, V. A.; Sharma, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Hurst exponent (H) is widely used to quantify long range dependence in time series data and is estimated using several well known techniques. Recognizing its ability to remove trends the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is used extensively to estimate a Hurst exponent in non-stationary data. Multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) broadly encompasses a set of models of non-stationary data exhibiting time varying Hurst exponents, H(t) as against a constant H. Recently, there has been a growing interest in time dependence of H(t) and sliding window techniques have been used to estimate a local time average of the exponent. This brought to fore the ability of DFA to estimate scaling exponents in systems with time varying H(t) , such as mBm. This paper characterizes the performance of DFA on mBm data with linearly varying H(t) and further test the robustness of estimated time average with respect to data and technique related parameters. Our results serve as a bench-mark for using DFA as a sliding window estimator to obtain H(t) from time series data.

  2. Analysis of motion during the breast clamping phase of mammography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wang Kei; McEntee, Mark F; Mercer, Claire; Kelly, Judith; Millington, Sara; Hogg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To measure paddle motion during the clamping phase of a breast phantom for a range of machine/paddle combinations. A deformable breast phantom was used to simulate a female breast. 12 mammography machines from three manufacturers with 22 flexible and 20 fixed paddles were evaluated. Vertical motion at the paddle was measured using two calibrated linear potentiometers. For each paddle, the motion in millimetres was recorded every 0.5 s for 40 s, while the phantom was compressed with 80 N. Independent t-tests were used to determine differences in paddle motion between flexible and fixed, small and large, GE Senographe Essential (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (Hologic, Bedford, MA). Paddle tilt in the medial-lateral plane for each machine/paddle combination was calculated. All machine/paddle combinations demonstrate highest levels of motion during the first 10 s of the clamping phase. The least motion is 0.17 ± 0.05 mm/10 s (n = 20) and the most motion is 0.51 ± 0.15 mm/10 s (n = 80). There is a statistical difference in paddle motion between fixed and flexible (p < 0.001), GE Senographe Essential and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (p < 0.001). Paddle tilt in the medial-lateral plane is independent of time and varied from 0.04 ° to 0.69 °. All machine/paddle combinations exhibited motion and tilting, and the extent varied with machine and paddle sizes and types. This research suggests that image blurring will likely be clinically insignificant 4 s or more after the clamping phase commences.

  3. Analysis of motion during the breast clamping phase of mammography

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, Mark F; Mercer, Claire; Kelly, Judith; Millington, Sara; Hogg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure paddle motion during the clamping phase of a breast phantom for a range of machine/paddle combinations. Methods: A deformable breast phantom was used to simulate a female breast. 12 mammography machines from three manufacturers with 22 flexible and 20 fixed paddles were evaluated. Vertical motion at the paddle was measured using two calibrated linear potentiometers. For each paddle, the motion in millimetres was recorded every 0.5 s for 40 s, while the phantom was compressed with 80 N. Independent t-tests were used to determine differences in paddle motion between flexible and fixed, small and large, GE Senographe Essential (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (Hologic, Bedford, MA). Paddle tilt in the medial–lateral plane for each machine/paddle combination was calculated. Results: All machine/paddle combinations demonstrate highest levels of motion during the first 10 s of the clamping phase. The least motion is 0.17 ± 0.05 mm/10 s (n = 20) and the most motion is 0.51 ± 0.15 mm/10 s (n = 80). There is a statistical difference in paddle motion between fixed and flexible (p < 0.001), GE Senographe Essential and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (p < 0.001). Paddle tilt in the medial–lateral plane is independent of time and varied from 0.04 ° to 0.69 °. Conclusion: All machine/paddle combinations exhibited motion and tilting, and the extent varied with machine and paddle sizes and types. Advances in knowledge: This research suggests that image blurring will likely be clinically insignificant 4 s or more after the clamping phase commences. PMID:26739577

  4. Analysis of rotational motion measurement based on HS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Hua-Kang; Guo, Bai-Wei

    2017-01-01

    In micro aircraft design and testing, as well as motor and rotational motion monitoring, it will need to achieve a noncontact detection for rotational motion. HS (Horn and Schunck) algorithm is deduced under the premise that adjacent image intervals and the little change of image gray. HS algorithm is an optical flow calculation method that based on the image in the global smooth constraint. This paper propose an indicator that is used to characterize the optical flow field, and analyze the feasibility of the HS algorithm for the rotational motion measurement.

  5. A nonrigid kernel-based framework for 2D-3D pose estimation and 2D image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Romeil; Dambreville, Samuel; Yezzi, Anthony; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we present a nonrigid approach to jointly solving the tasks of 2D-3D pose estimation and 2D image segmentation. In general, most frameworks that couple both pose estimation and segmentation assume that one has exact knowledge of the 3D object. However, under nonideal conditions, this assumption may be violated if only a general class to which a given shape belongs is given (e.g., cars, boats, or planes). Thus, we propose to solve the 2D-3D pose estimation and 2D image segmentation via nonlinear manifold learning of 3D embedded shapes for a general class of objects or deformations for which one may not be able to associate a skeleton model. Thus, the novelty of our method is threefold: first, we present and derive a gradient flow for the task of nonrigid pose estimation and segmentation. Second, due to the possible nonlinear structures of one's training set, we evolve the pre-image obtained through kernel PCA for the task of shape analysis. Third, we show that the derivation for shape weights is general. This allows us to use various kernels, as well as other statistical learning methodologies, with only minimal changes needing to be made to the overall shape evolution scheme. In contrast with other techniques, we approach the nonrigid problem, which is an infinite-dimensional task, with a finite-dimensional optimization scheme. More importantly, we do not explicitly need to know the interaction between various shapes such as that needed for skeleton models as this is done implicitly through shape learning. We provide experimental results on several challenging pose estimation and segmentation scenarios.

  6. Statistical modeling of ground motion relations for seismic hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, Mathias

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a new approach for ground motion relations (GMR) in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), being influenced by the extreme value theory of mathematical statistics. Therein, we understand a GMR as a random function. We derive mathematically the principle of area equivalence, wherein two alternative GMRs have an equivalent influence on the hazard if these GMRs have equivalent area functions. This includes local biases. An interpretation of the difference between these GMRs (an actual and a modeled one) as a random component leads to a general overestimation of residual variance and hazard. Beside this, we discuss important aspects of classical approaches and discover discrepancies with the state of the art of stochastics and statistics (model selection and significance, test of distribution assumptions, extreme value statistics). We criticize especially the assumption of logarithmic normally distributed residuals of maxima like the peak ground acceleration (PGA). The natural distribution of its individual random component (equivalent to exp( ɛ 0) of Joyner and Boore, Bull Seism Soc Am 83(2):469-487, 1993) is the generalized extreme value. We show by numerical researches that the actual distribution can be hidden and a wrong distribution assumption can influence the PSHA negatively as the negligence of area equivalence does. Finally, we suggest an estimation concept for GMRs of PSHA with a regression-free variance estimation of the individual random component. We demonstrate the advantages of event-specific GMRs by analyzing data sets from the PEER strong motion database and estimate event-specific GMRs. Therein, the majority of the best models base on an anisotropic point source approach. The residual variance of logarithmized PGA is significantly smaller than in previous models. We validate the estimations for the event with the largest sample by empirical area functions, which indicate the appropriate modeling of the GMR by an anisotropic

  7. Compensation of intra-frame head motion in PET data with motion corrected independent component analysis (MCICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Martin J.; Gadala, Marwa; Abu-Gharbieh, Rafeef

    2005-04-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has proved a powerful exploratory analysis method for fMRI. In the ICA model, the fMRI data at a given time point are modeled as the linear superposition of spatially independent (and spatially stationary) component maps. The ICA model has been recently applied to positron emission tomography (PET) data with some success (Human Brain Mapping 18:284-295(2003), IEEE Trans. BME, Naganawa et al, in press). However, in PET imaging each frame is, in fact, activity integrated over a relatively long period of time, making the assumption that the underlying component maps are spatially stationary (and hence no head movement has taken place during the frame collection) very tenuous. Here we extend the application of the ICA model to 11C-methylphenidate PET data by assuming that each frame is actually composed of the superposition of rigidly transformed underlying spatial components. We first determine the "noisy" initial spatially independent components of a data set under the erroneous assumption of no intra or inter-frame motion. Aspects of the initial components that reliably track spatial perturbations of the data are then determined to produce the motion-compensated components. Initial components included ring-like spatial distributions, indicating that movement corrupts the statistical properties of the data. The final intra-frame motion-compensated components included more plausible symmetric and robust activity in the striatum as would be expected compared to the raw data and the initial components. We conclude that 1) intra-frame motion is a serious confound in PET imaging which affects the statistical properties of the data and 2) our proposed procedure ameliorates such motion effects.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the GNSS derived Victoria plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinário, João; Fernandes, Rui; Bos, Machiel

    2014-05-01

    estimated trend (Williams 2003, Langbein 2012). Finally, our preferable angular velocity estimation is used to evaluate the consequences on the kinematics of the Victoria block, namely the magnitude and azimuth of the relative motions with respect to the Nubia and Somalia plates and their tectonic implications. References Agnew, D. C. (2013). Realistic simulations of geodetic network data: The Fakenet package, Seismol. Res. Lett., 84 , 426-432, doi:10.1785/0220120185. Blewitt, G. & Lavallee, D., (2002). Effect of annual signals on geodetic velocity, J. geophys. Res., 107(B7), doi:10.1029/2001JB000570. Bos, M.S., R.M.S. Fernandes, S. Williams, L. Bastos (2012) Fast Error Analysis of Continuous GNSS Observations with Missing Data, Journal of Geodesy, doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0. Bos, M.S., L. Bastos, R.M.S. Fernandes, (2009). The influence of seasonal signals on the estimation of the tectonic motion in short continuous GPS time-series, J. of Geodynamics, j.jog.2009.10.005. Fernandes, R.M.S., J. M. Miranda, D. Delvaux, D. S. Stamps and E. Saria (2013). Re-evaluation of the kinematics of Victoria Block using continuous GNSS data, Geophysical Journal International, doi:10.1093/gji/ggs071. Langbein, J. (2012). Estimating rate uncertainty with maximum likelihood: differences between power-law and flicker-random-walk models, Journal of Geodesy, Volume 86, Issue 9, pp 775-783, Williams, S. D. P. (2003). Offsets in Global Positioning System time series, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 2310, doi:10.1029/2002JB002156, B6.

  9. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  10. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  11. Rolled fingerprint construction using MRF-based nonrigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dongjin; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2010-12-01

    This paper proposes a new rolled fingerprint construction approach incorporating a state-of-the-art nonrigid image registration method based upon a Markov random field (MRF) energy model. The proposed method finds dense correspondences between images from a rolled fingerprint sequence and warps the entire fingerprint area to synthesize a rolled fingerprint. This method can generate conceptually more accurate rolled fingerprints by preserving the geometric properties of the finger surface as opposed to ink-based rolled impressions and other existing rolled fingerprint construction methods. To verify the accuracy of the proposed method, various comparative experiments were designed to reveal differences among the rolled construction methods. The results show that the proposed method is significantly superior in various aspects compared to previous approaches.

  12. Supplementary active stabilization of nonrigid gravity gradient satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of active control for stability augmentation of passive gravity gradient satellites is investigated. The reaction jet method of control is the main interest. Satellite nonrigidity is emphasized. The reduction in the Hamiltonian H is used as a control criteria. The velocities, relative to local vertical, of the jets along their force axes are shown to be of fundamental significance. A basic control scheme which satisfies the H reduction criteria is developed. Each jet is fired when its velocity becomes appropriately large. The jet is de-energized when velocity reaches zero. Firing constraints to preclude orbit alteration may be needed. Control is continued until H has been minimized. This control policy is investigated using impulse and rectangular pulse models of the jet outputs.

  13. Magnetic phenomena in nonrigid metal-nitroxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharenko, V.; Fursova, E.; Fokin, S.; Romanenko, G.; Ikorskii, V.

    2004-04-01

    For NiL{2} heterospin bischelates, stereochemical nonrigidity in solution has been found, which leads to solids with varying structure and composition. While investigating the products of Cu(hfac){2} interaction with spin-labeled pyrazole 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-imidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl we have isolated a family of heterospin compounds differing in the structure and composition in the solid state. In synthetic systems, these compounds often co-crystallize and must be separated mechanically. It is also shown that minor variations in the structure of solid heterospin complexes substantially change the magnetic properties of the compounds. Key words. Nitroxides - metal complexes structure - magnetic properties.

  14. Time-motion analysis of international and national level futsal.

    PubMed

    Dogramaci, Sera N; Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J

    2011-03-01

    Futsal is the Fédération de Internationale Football Association's officially recognized five-a-side indoor soccer, which although increasing in popularity worldwide, lacks the Australian or other English language research necessary to enable the growth of the sport. The purpose of this study was to establish a comprehensive overview of the demands of futsal by a time-motion analysis on 8 Australian National Team players and 10 State League Team players over 4 futsal matches. The study analyzed 6 locomotor activity categories, focusing on total distance covered, total duration of activities, total frequency of activities, effort distance, and effort duration. The national team covered a 42% greater overall distance than the state league team. In terms of relative data normalized for match duration, only the standing duration value was significantly different between the teams. Furthermore, futsal players of elite and subelite level in Australia perform a change in activity every 8-9 seconds on the court, and the national team athletes attained a higher, yet nonsignificant, average match-play velocity. This may be because of the national futsal athletes participating in an extended game duration, potentially suggesting that higher levels of competition facilitate a higher intensity of match play and greater physiological demands on individual players. Apart from the differences in timing structure and overall metabolic work, there was no real difference between the levels of competition within the Australian futsal analysis, although at higher levels of competition, there may be a need for more recovery because of the elevated intensity of the match. When comparing the data with other countries, however, Australian futsal players produce less distance and duration than Spanish futsal players.

  15. Circular motion analysis of time-varying bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Rutkove, S B; Pintelon, R

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a step forward towards the analysis of a linear periodically time-varying (PTV) bioimpedance ZPTV(jw, t), which is an important subclass of a linear time-varying (LTV) bioimpedance. Similarly to the Fourier coefficients of a periodic signal, a PTV impedance can be decomposed into frequency dependent impedance phasors, [Formula: see text], that are rotating with an angular speed of wr = 2πr/TZ. The vector length of these impedance phasors corresponds to the amplitude of the rth-order harmonic impedance |Zr( jw)| and the initial phase is given by Φr(w, t0) = [Symbol: see text]Zr( jw) + 2πrt0/TZ, with t0∈[0, T] being a time instant within the measurement time T. The impedance period TZ stands for the cycle length of the bio-system under investigation; for example, the elapsed time between two consecutive R-waves in the electrocardiogram or the breathing periodicity in case of the heart or lungs, respectively. First, it is demonstrated that the harmonic impedance phasor [Formula: see text], at a particular measured frequency k, can be represented by a rotating phasor, leading to the so-called circular motion analysis technique. Next, the two dimensional (2D) representation of the harmonic impedance phasors is then extended to a three-dimensional (3D) coordinate system by taking into account the frequency dependence. Finally, we introduce a new visualizing tool to summarize the frequency response behavior of ZPTV( jw, t) into a single 3D plot using the local Frenet-Serret frame. This novel 3D impedance representation is then compared with the 3D Nyquist representation of a PTV impedance. The concepts are illustrated through real measurements conducted on a PTV RC-circuit.

  16. A Study of Motion Sickness: Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Warwick-Evans, L.A. and others. " Electrodermal Activity as an Index of Motion Sickness," Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 58: 417-423 (May...have recorded EEG activity which appears to specif- ically accompany motion sickness. In 1986, Hartle, McPherson, and Miller reported "distinctive...change sim- *ilar to that reported a year earlier (17:30). Gaudreault hypothesized that the low frequency brain wave activity was due to

  17. Myocardial motion analysis from B-mode echocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Sühling, Michael; Arigovindan, Muthuvel; Jansen, Christian; Hunziker, Patrick; Unser, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The quantitative assessment of cardiac motion is a fundamental concept to evaluate ventricular malfunction. We present a new optical-flow-based method for estimating heart motion from two-dimensional echocardiographic sequences. To account for typical heart motions, such as contraction/expansion and shear, we analyze the images locally by using a local-affine model for the velocity in space and a linear model in time. The regional motion parameters are estimated in the least-squares sense inside a sliding spatiotemporal B-spline window. Robustness and spatial adaptability is achieved by estimating the model parameters at multiple scales within a coarse-to-fine multiresoluion framework. We use a wavelet-like algorithm for computing B-spline-weighted inner products and moments at dyadic scales to increase computational efficiency. In order to characterize myocardial contractility and to simplify the detection of myocardial dysfunction, the radial component of the velocity with respect to a reference point is color coded and visualized inside a time-varying region of interest. The algorithm was first validated on synthetic data sets that simulate a beating heart with a speckle-like appearance of echocardiograms. The ability to estimate motion from real ultrasound sequences was demonstrated by a rotating phantom experiment. The method was also applied to a set of in vivo echocardiograms from an animal study. Motion estimation results were in good agreement with the expert echocardiographic reading.

  18. Preliminary Analysis of IGS Reprocessed Orbit and Polar Motion Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J. R.; Griffiths, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Analysis Centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) are reanalyzing the history of global network GPS data collected since 1994 in a consistent way using the latest models and methodology. This is the first reprocessing by the IGS, but it is expected to be repeated in the future as further analysis and reference frame changes occur. All eight final-product ACs are participating, together with three other related groups. First partial results consisting of IGS combined weekly SINEX TRF and EOP combinations have been submitted to the IERS for ITRF2008. A snapshot of the available AC weekly SINEX files was used covering the reprocessed years 2000 through 2007 plus the IGS regular operational solutions for 2008 (from week 1460 onward). Meanwhile, the full reprocessing campaign will continue to completion by about the end of 2009 and will cover the period 1994 to present with long-term consistent, combined SINEX, orbit, and clock products. We have examined the reprocessed AC orbit and polar motion (PM) estimates from the 1024 days (or 1025 for differences) of results till the end of 2007. These parameters are linked since PM is sensed in the GPS modeling as a global diurnal sinusoidal motion of the terrestrial frame relative to the satellite frame. Any similar type errors in the orbital frame can bias the PM and PM rate estimates. For the orbits, each daily AC satellite ephemeris for each pair of consecutive days has been fit to the extended CODE orbit model, extrapolated to the mid-point epoch between the days, and the geocentric satellite position differences computed to give time series of orbit repeatabilities. Occasional data gaps have been filled by linear interpolation, FFT power spectra computed, and the spectra stacked over the full GPS constellation and lightly smoothed. Our analysis reveals considerable diversity among AC orbits. Several show broad semi-annual (probably related mostly to eclipsing) and fortnightly spectral peaks, as well as

  19. Time-motion analysis of basketball players: a reliability assessment of Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 software.

    PubMed

    Hulka, Karel; Cuberek, Roman; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the measurement error of a monitoring system, the Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 (VMMT1.0), during time-motion analysis of basketball players. In this study, four reliability parameters were used to assess the measurement error of the system: the systematic bias, the inter-observer reliability, the intra-observer reliability and the absolute reliability. A basketball game video was used for the analysis. To assess the inter-observer reliability, two observers analysed a player's covered distance for 50 different periods of the game. To assess the relative and absolute reliability of the covered distance, the chosen players were monitored three times by 41 qualified observers. The findings did not indicate a significant systematic bias in the measurement error using the VMMT1.0 (one-way ANOVA, P > 0.05). The intra-observer reliability of the monitoring system was rated as very high (intraclass correlation, ICC = 0.999), similar to its inter-observer reliability (Pearson product-moment correlation, r = 0.994). The absolute reliability does not appear to be significant (standard error of measurement, SEM = 0.34 m). The results showed that the measurement error of the VMMT1.0 is acceptable and comparable with that of other time-motion analysis techniques.

  20. A novel CT acquisition and analysis technique for breathing motion modeling

    PubMed Central

    Low, Daniel A.; White, Benjamin M.; Lee, Percy P.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Jani, Shyam S.; Wu, Xiao; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report on a novel technique for providing artifact-free quantitative 4DCT image datasets for breathing motion modeling. Methods Commercial clinical four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) methods have trouble managing irregular breathing. The resulting images contain motion-induced artifacts that can distort structures and inaccurately characterize breathing motion. We have developed a novel scanning and analysis method for motion-correlated CT that utilizes standard repeated fast helical acquisitions, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a published breathing motion model. Results The motion model differs from the CT-measured motion by an average of 0.72 mm, indicating the precision of the motion model. The integral of the divergence of one of the motion model parameters is predicted to be a constant 1.11 and is found in this case to be 1.09, indicating the accuracy of the motion model. Conclusions The proposed technique shows promise for providing motion-artifact free images at user-selected breathing phases, accurate Hounsfield units, and noise characteristics similar to non-4D CT techniques, at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4DCT techniques. PMID:23640212

  1. A novel CT acquisition and analysis technique for breathing motion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel A.; White, Benjamin M.; Lee, Percy P.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Jani, Shyam S.; Wu, Xiao; Lamb, James M.

    2013-06-01

    To report on a novel technique for providing artifact-free quantitative four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) image datasets for breathing motion modeling. Commercial clinical 4DCT methods have difficulty managing irregular breathing. The resulting images contain motion-induced artifacts that can distort structures and inaccurately characterize breathing motion. We have developed a novel scanning and analysis method for motion-correlated CT that utilizes standard repeated fast helical acquisitions, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a published breathing motion model. The motion model differs from the CT-measured motion by an average of 0.65 mm, indicating the precision of the motion model. The integral of the divergence of one of the motion model parameters is predicted to be a constant 1.11 and is found in this case to be 1.09, indicating the accuracy of the motion model. The proposed technique shows promise for providing motion-artifact free images at user-selected breathing phases, accurate Hounsfield units, and noise characteristics similar to non-4D CT techniques, at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4DCT techniques.

  2. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, John Kyle P; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  3. Discriminative analysis of lip motion features for speaker identification and speech-reading.

    PubMed

    Cetingül, H Ertan; Yemez, Yücel; Erzin, Engin; Tekalp, A Murat

    2006-10-01

    There have been several studies that jointly use audio, lip intensity, and lip geometry information for speaker identification and speech-reading applications. This paper proposes using explicit lip motion information, instead of or in addition to lip intensity and/or geometry information, for speaker identification and speech-reading within a unified feature selection and discrimination analysis framework, and addresses two important issues: 1) Is using explicit lip motion information useful, and, 2) if so, what are the best lip motion features for these two applications? The best lip motion features for speaker identification are considered to be those that result in the highest discrimination of individual speakers in a population, whereas for speech-reading, the best features are those providing the highest phoneme/word/phrase recognition rate. Several lip motion feature candidates have been considered including dense motion features within a bounding box about the lip, lip contour motion features, and combination of these with lip shape features. Furthermore, a novel two-stage, spatial, and temporal discrimination analysis is introduced to select the best lip motion features for speaker identification and speech-reading applications. Experimental results using an hidden-Markov-model-based recognition system indicate that using explicit lip motion information provides additional performance gains in both applications, and lip motion features prove more valuable in the case of speech-reading application.

  4. A Motion Correction Framework for Time Series Sequences in Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankur N.; Short, Kurt W.; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of in vivo laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, time-series and three-dimensional volumes of living tissue and vessels at micron scales can be acquired to firmly analyze vessel architecture and blood flow. Analysis of a large number of image stacks to extract architecture and track blood flow manually is cumbersome and prone to observer bias. Thus, an automated framework to accomplish these analytical tasks is imperative. The first initiative toward such a framework is to compensate for motion artifacts manifest in these microscopy images. Motion artifacts in in vivo microscopy images are caused by respiratory motion, heart beats, and other motions from the specimen. Consequently, the amount of motion present in these images can be large and hinders further analysis of these images. In this article, an algorithmic framework for the correction of time-series images is presented. The automated algorithm is comprised of a rigid and a nonrigid registration step based on shape contexts. The framework performs considerably well on time-series image sequences of the islets of Langerhans and provides for the pivotal step of motion correction in the further automatic analysis of microscopy images. PMID:23410911

  5. Mid-Level Vision and Recognition of Non-Rigid Objects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    recover a more complete description, not just three points or pairs of parallel lines. Gestalt principles commonly used in rigid object segmentation...research, such as parallelism, can be used also for non-rigid objects. However, to be useful in non-rigid object segmentation, Gestalt principles have to...incorporating Gestalt notions such as symmetry and convexity [Ullman 1976], [Shashua and Ullman 1988], [Subirana-Vilanova 1990], [Subirana-Vilanova and

  6. Recent researches in airship construction III : a new type of nonrigid airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naatz, H

    1924-01-01

    The author describes experiments in designing nonrigid airships. A nonrigid airship of 32,000 cubic meters, the PL 27 withstood all stresses with 20 kg/m(exp 2) hull pressure during its life of two years. The moment of resistance is known, as also the stresses in the envelope for the given hull pressure. The mean internal pressure necessary to give the airship the requisite rigidity and to prevent buckling was also investigated.

  7. Tectonic Motion of Malaysia: Analysis from Years 2001 TO 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J.; Shariff, N. S.; Omar, K.; Amin, Z. M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the tectonic motion of Malaysia using the Malaysian Active GPS Station (MASS) and Malaysia Realtime Kinematic GNSS Network (MyRTKnet) data from years 2001 to 2013. GNSS data were processed using Bernese 5.0, and plotted as a time series; whereby the period before and after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega earthquake are plotted separately. From the time series, episodic events and stable inter-seismic deformation period are analysed. The results indicate that the 2001- 2004 and 2008-2011 periods were free from episodic events; hence, chosen to depict the tectonic motion of Malaysia before and after 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, respectively. The motion had a major change in direction and rate, especially for East Malaysia and South Peninsular Malaysia. This indicates there exist a long-term post-seismic deformation due to the 2004 mega earthquake. Nonetheless, the 2008-2011 inter-seismic period is stable, and suitable to represent the current long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia: Peninsular and East Malaysia moves south-east, at an average velocity of 0.89 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 1.70 ±0.02 cm/yr east, and 1.06 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 2.50 ±0.02 cm/yr east, respectively. In addition, the co-seismic motion for the 2005 Nias, 2007 Bengkulu and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake are relatively small, indicating these three earthquakes have no significant contribution to the long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia. Overall, this paper aims to provide a general insight into the tectonic motion of Malaysia which, expectedly, may benefit other scientific fields.

  8. Analysis of glacial and periglacial processes using structure from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, L.; Carturan, L.; de Blasi, F.; Tarolli, P.; Dalla Fontana, G.; Vettore, A.; Pfeifer, N.

    2015-11-01

    Close-range photo-based surface reconstruction from the ground is rapidly emerging as an alternative to lidar (light detection and ranging), which today represents the main survey technique in many fields of geoscience. The recent evolution of photogrammetry, incorporating computer vision algorithms such as Structure from Motion (SfM) and dense image matching such as Multi-View Stereo (MVS), allows the reconstruction of dense 3-D point clouds for the photographed object from a sequence of overlapping images taken with a digital consumer camera. The objective of our work was to test the accuracy of the ground-based SfM-MVS approach in calculating the geodetic mass balance of a 2.1 km2 glacier in the Ortles-Cevedale Group, Eastern Italian Alps. In addition, we investigated the feasibility of using the image-based approach for the detection of the surface displacement rate of a neighbouring active rock glacier. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data were used as benchmarks to estimate the accuracy of the photogrammetric DTMs and the reliability of the method in this specific application. The glacial and periglacial analyses were performed using both range and image-based surveying techniques, and the results were then compared. The results were encouraging because the SfM-MVS approach enables the reconstruction of high-quality DTMs which provided estimates of glacial and periglacial processes similar to those achievable by ALS. Different resolutions and accuracies were obtained for the glacier and the rock glacier, given the different survey geometries, surface characteristics and areal extents. The analysis of the SfM-MVS DTM quality allowed us to highlight the limitations of the adopted expeditious method in the studied alpine terrain and the potential of this method in the multitemporal study of glacial and periglacial areas.

  9. Time-motion analysis of elite male kickboxing competition.

    PubMed

    Ouergui, Ibrahim; Hssin, Nizar; Haddad, Monoem; Franchini, Emerson; Behm, David G; Wong, Del P; Gmada, Nabil; Bouhlel, Ezzedine

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from 2 male World Championships were monitored using a time-motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity [HIA], low-intensity activity [LIA], and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2 ± 1.2 seconds; LIA: 2.3 ± 0.8 seconds; pauses: 5.4 ± 4.3 seconds; and 3.4 ± 1.2 seconds between 2 subsequent HIA. The fighting to nonfighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA was 27.1 ± 7.1, 25.1 ± 6.6, and 24.9 ± 6.1, respectively, for rounds 1, 2, and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8 ± 11.4, 22.3 ± 22.6, and 24.6 ± 23.3 seconds, respectively, for rounds 1, 2, and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.

  10. Inertial motion capture system for biomechanical analysis in pressure suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Massimiliano

    A non-invasive system has been developed at the University of Maryland Space System Laboratory with the goal of providing a new capability for quantifying the motion of the human inside a space suit. Based on an array of six microprocessors and eighteen microelectromechanical (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs), the Body Pose Measurement System (BPMS) allows the monitoring of the kinematics of the suit occupant in an unobtrusive, self-contained, lightweight and compact fashion, without requiring any external equipment such as those necessary with modern optical motion capture systems. BPMS measures and stores the accelerations, angular rates and magnetic fields acting upon each IMU, which are mounted on the head, torso, and each segment of each limb. In order to convert the raw data into a more useful form, such as a set of body segment angles quantifying pose and motion, a series of geometrical models and a non-linear complimentary filter were implemented. The first portion of this works focuses on assessing system performance, which was measured by comparing the BPMS filtered data against rigid body angles measured through an external VICON optical motion capture system. This type of system is the industry standard, and is used here for independent measurement of body pose angles. By comparing the two sets of data, performance metrics such as BPMS system operational conditions, accuracy, and drift were evaluated and correlated against VICON data. After the system and models were verified and their capabilities and limitations assessed, a series of pressure suit evaluations were conducted. Three different pressure suits were used to identify the relationship between usable range of motion and internal suit pressure. In addition to addressing range of motion, a series of exploration tasks were also performed, recorded, and analysed in order to identify different motion patterns and trajectories as suit pressure is increased and overall suit mobility is reduced

  11. Learning intervention-induced deformations for non-rigid MR-CT registration and electrode localization in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Onofrey, John A.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning a statistical model of non-rigid deformations induced by interventional procedures. We make use of this learned model to perform constrained non-rigid registration of pre-procedural and post-procedural imaging. We demonstrate results applying this framework to non-rigidly register post-surgical computed tomography (CT) brain images to pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of epilepsy patients who had intra-cranial electroencephalography electrodes surgically implanted. Deformations caused by this surgical procedure, imaging artifacts caused by the electrodes, and the use of multi-modal imaging data make non-rigid registration challenging. Our results show that the use of our proposed framework to constrain the non-rigid registration process results in significantly improved and more robust registration performance compared to using standard rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26900569

  12. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  13. An Analysis of the Historical Development of Ideas about Motion and Its Implications for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    The persistence of students' misconceptions about motion illustrates the enormous difficulty that teachers face in their attempts to overcome these with traditional physics instruction. An understanding of students' ideas about motion and ways to incorporate them into successful instructional approaches can be obtained from an analysis of…

  14. Analysis of achievable disturbance attenuation in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander V.; Holmes, Michael L.; Behrouzjou, Roxana; Trumper, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the achievable disturbance attenuation to get an Angstrom motion control resolution and macroscopic travel in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system are presented in this paper. Noise sources in the transducers, electronics, and mechanical vibrations are used to develop the control design.

  15. Low-cost human motion capture system for postural analysis onboard ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, Erica; Ackermann, Sebastiano; Del Pizzo, Silvio; Menna, Fabio; Troisi, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    The study of human equilibrium, also known as postural stability, concerns different research sectors (medicine, kinesiology, biomechanics, robotics, sport) and is usually performed employing motion analysis techniques for recording human movements and posture. A wide range of techniques and methodologies has been developed, but the choice of instrumentations and sensors depends on the requirement of the specific application. Postural stability is a topic of great interest for the maritime community, since ship motions can make demanding and difficult the maintenance of the upright stance with hazardous consequences for the safety of people onboard. The need of capturing the motion of an individual standing on a ship during its daily service does not permit to employ optical systems commonly used for human motion analysis. These sensors are not designed for operating in disadvantageous environmental conditions (water, wetness, saltiness) and with not optimal lighting. The solution proposed in this study consists in a motion acquisition system that could be easily usable onboard ships. It makes use of two different methodologies: (I) motion capture with videogrammetry and (II) motion measurement with Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The developed image-based motion capture system, made up of three low-cost, light and compact video cameras, was validated against a commercial optical system and then used for testing the reliability of the inertial sensors. In this paper, the whole process of planning, designing, calibrating, and assessing the accuracy of the motion capture system is reported and discussed. Results from the laboratory tests and preliminary campaigns in the field are presented.

  16. Test suite for image-based motion estimation of the brain and tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Jordan; Prince, Jerry L.; Gomez, Arnold D.

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive analysis of motion has important uses as qualitative markers for organ function and to validate biomechanical computer simulations relative to experimental observations. Tagged MRI is considered the gold standard for noninvasive tissue motion estimation in the heart, and this has inspired multiple studies focusing on other organs, including the brain under mild acceleration and the tongue during speech. As with other motion estimation approaches, using tagged MRI to measure 3D motion includes several preprocessing steps that affect the quality and accuracy of estimation. Benchmarks, or test suites, are datasets of known geometries and displacements that act as tools to tune tracking parameters or to compare different motion estimation approaches. Because motion estimation was originally developed to study the heart, existing test suites focus on cardiac motion. However, many fundamental differences exist between the heart and other organs, such that parameter tuning (or other optimization) with respect to a cardiac database may not be appropriate. Therefore, the objective of this research was to design and construct motion benchmarks by adopting an "image synthesis" test suite to study brain deformation due to mild rotational accelerations, and a benchmark to model motion of the tongue during speech. To obtain a realistic representation of mechanical behavior, kinematics were obtained from finite-element (FE) models. These results were combined with an approximation of the acquisition process of tagged MRI (including tag generation, slice thickness, and inconsistent motion repetition). To demonstrate an application of the presented methodology, the effect of motion inconsistency on synthetic measurements of head- brain rotation and deformation was evaluated. The results indicated that acquisition inconsistency is roughly proportional to head rotation estimation error. Furthermore, when evaluating non-rigid deformation, the results suggest that

  17. Motion synthesis and force distribution analysis for a biped robot.

    PubMed

    Trojnacki, Maciej T; Zielińska, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the method of generating biped robot motion using recorded human gait is presented. The recorded data were modified taking into account the velocity available for robot drives. Data includes only selected joint angles, therefore the missing values were obtained considering the dynamic postural stability of the robot, which means obtaining an adequate motion trajectory of the so-called Zero Moment Point (ZMT). Also, the method of determining the ground reaction forces' distribution during the biped robot's dynamic stable walk is described. The method was developed by the authors. Following the description of equations characterizing the dynamics of robot's motion, the values of the components of ground reaction forces were symbolically determined as well as the coordinates of the points of robot's feet contact with the ground. The theoretical considerations have been supported by computer simulation and animation of the robot's motion. This was done using Matlab/Simulink package and Simulink 3D Animation Toolbox, and it has proved the proposed method.

  18. Motion Analysis of a Rocket-Propelled Truck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment to study the motion of a rocket-propelled vehicle over the entire duration of the engine burn using a video system with a frame-by-frame playback and a Sonic Ranger for ultrasonic position movements. Enables students to study the impulse-momentum principle and the effects of a time-varying force. (JRH)

  19. [Temporal Analysis of Body Sway during Reciprocator Motion Movie Viewing].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Akihiro; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Wakatabe, Shun; Matsumoto, Chika; Miyao, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of stereoscopic viewing and the degree of awareness of motion sickness on posture by measuring body sway during motion movie viewing. Nineteen students (12 men and 7 women; age range, 21-24 years) participated in this study. The movie, which showed several balls randomly positioned, was projected on a white wall 2 m in front of the subjects through a two-dimensional (2-D)/three-dimensional (3-D) convertible projector. To measure body sway during movie viewing, the subjects stood statically erect on a Wii balance board, with the toe opening at 18 degrees. The study protocol was as follows: The subjects watched (1) a nonmoving movie for 1 minute as the pretest and then (2) a round-trip sinusoidally moving-in-depth-direction movie for 3 minutes. (3) The initial static movie was shown again for 1 minute. Steps (2) and (3) were treated as one trial, after which two trials (2-D and 3-D movies) were performed in a random sequence. In this study, we found that posture changed according to the motion in the movie and that the longer the viewing time, the higher the synchronization accuracy. These tendencies depended on the level of awareness of motion sickness or the 3-D movie viewed. The mechanism of postural change in movie viewing was not vection but self-defense to resolve sensory conflict between visual information (spatial swing) and equilibrium sense (motionlessness).

  20. Motion Analysis of a Rocket-Propelled Truck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment to study the motion of a rocket-propelled vehicle over the entire duration of the engine burn using a video system with a frame-by-frame playback and a Sonic Ranger for ultrasonic position movements. Enables students to study the impulse-momentum principle and the effects of a time-varying force. (JRH)

  1. Physiological model of motion analysis for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Richard A.; Lesperance, Ronald M.

    1993-09-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal shape of `receptive fields' of simple cells in the monkey visual cortex. Receptive fields are maps of the regions in space and time that affect a cell's electrical responses. Fields with no change in shape over time responded to all directions of motion; fields with changing shape over time responded to only some directions of motion. A Gaussian Derivative (GD) model fit these fields well, in a transformed variable space that aligned the centers and principal axes of the field and model in space-time. The model accounts for fields that vary in orientation, location, spatial scale, motion properties, and number of lobes. The model requires only ten parameters (the minimum possible) to describe fields in two dimensions of space and one of time. A difference-of-offset-Gaussians (DOOG) provides a plausible physiological means to form GD model fields. Because of its simplicity, the GD model improves the efficiency of machine vision systems for analyzing motion. An implementation produced robust local estimates of the direction and speed of moving objects in real scenes.

  2. An accurate 3D shape context based non-rigid registration method for mouse whole-body skeleton registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie C.; Salvado, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Small animal image registration is challenging because of its joint structure, and posture and position difference in each acquisition without a standard scan protocol. In this paper, we face the issue of mouse whole-body skeleton registration from CT images. A novel method is developed for analyzing mouse hind-limb and fore-limb postures based on geodesic path descriptor and then registering the major skeletons and fore limb skeletons initially by thin-plate spline (TPS) transform based on the obtained geodesic paths and their enhanced correspondence fields. A target landmark correction method is proposed for improving the registration accuracy of the improved 3D shape context non-rigid registration method we previously proposed. A novel non-rigid registration framework, combining the skeleton posture analysis, geodesic path based initial alignment and 3D shape context model, is proposed for mouse whole-body skeleton registration. The performance of the proposed methods and framework was tested on 12 pairs of mouse whole-body skeletons. The experimental results demonstrated the flexibility, stability and accuracy of the proposed framework for automatic mouse whole body skeleton registration.

  3. A novel spinal kinematic analysis using X-ray imaging and vicon motion analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Nam G; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights a novel spinal kinematic analysis method and the feasibility of X-ray imaging measurements to accurately assess thoracic spine motion. The advanced X-ray Nash-Moe method and analysis were used to compute the segmental range of motion in thoracic vertebra pedicles in vivo. This Nash-Moe X-ray imaging method was compared with a standardized method using the Vicon 3-dimensional motion capture system. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent and significant correlation between the two methods (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.05), suggesting that the analysis of spinal segmental range of motion using X-ray imaging measurements was accurate and comparable to the conventional 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Clinically, this novel finding is compelling evidence demonstrating that measurements with X-ray imaging are useful to accurately decipher pathological spinal alignment and movement impairments in idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

  4. Neck range of motion measurements using a new three-dimensional motion analysis system: validity and repeatability.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Haruhi; Tojima, Michio; Mano, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Ogata, Naoshi; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Neck movement is important for many activities of daily living (ADL). Neck disorders, such as cervical spondylosis and whiplash can limit neck movement and ADL. The cervical range of motion (CROM) device has been recently used to measure neck range of motion (ROM); however, this measurement includes trunk motion, and therefore does not represent a pure neck ROM measurement. The authors aimed to develop a new method to establish pure neck ROM measurements during flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, VICON. Twelve healthy participants were recruited and neck ROMs during flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation were measured using VICON and the CROM device. Test-retest repeatability was assessed using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Validity between two measurements was evaluated using a determination coefficient and Pearson's correlation coefficient. ICCs of neck ROM measured using VICON and the CROM device were all at substantial or almost perfect levels [VICON: ICC(1,2) = 0.786-0.962, the CROM device: ICC(1,2) = 0.736-0.950]. Both SEMs and MDCs were low in all measurement directions (VICON: SEM = 1.3°-4.5°, MDC = 3.6°-12.5°; the CROM device: SEM = 2.2°-3.9°, MDC = 6.1°-10.7°). Determination coefficients (R(2)s) and Pearson's correlation coefficients (rs) between the two measurement methods were high (R(2) = 0.607-0.745, r = 0.779-0.863). VICON is a useful system to measure neck ROMs and evaluate the efficacy of interventions, such as surgery or physiotherapeutic exercise.

  5. Can one angle be simply subtracted from another to determine range of motion in three-dimensional motion analysis?

    PubMed

    Michaud, Benjamin; Jackson, Monique I; Prince, François; Begon, Mickaël S

    2014-04-01

    To determine the range of motion of a joint between an initial orientation and a final orientation, it is convenient to subtract initial joint angles from final joint angles, a method referred to as the vectorial approach. However, for three-dimensional movements, the vectorial approach is not mathematically correct. To determine the joint range of motion, the rotation matrix between the two orientations should be calculated, and angles describing the range of motion should be extracted from this matrix, a method referred to as the matrical approach. As the matrical approach is less straightforward to implement, it is of interest to identify situations in which the vectorial approach leads to insubstantial errors. In this study, the vectorial approach was compared to the matrical approach, and theoretical justification was given for situations in which the vectorial approach can reasonably be used. The main findings are that the vectorial approach can be used if (1) the motion is planar (Woltring HJ. 1994. 3-D attitude representation of human joints: a standardization proposal. J Biomech 27(12): 1399-1414), (2) the angles between the final and the initial orientation are small (Woltring HJ. 1991. Representation and calculation of 3-D joint movement. Hum Mov Sci 10(5): 603-616), (3) the angles between the initial orientation of the distal segment and the proximal segment are small and finally (4) when only one large angle occurs between the initial orientation of the distal segment and the proximal segment and the angle sequence is chosen in such a way that this large angle occurs on the first axis of rotation. These findings provide specific criteria to consider when choosing the angle sequence to use for movement analysis.

  6. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-08-03

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  7. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  8. Mechanical analysis of arterial plaques in native geometry with OCT wall motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claire; Heidari, Andrew E.; Chen, Zhongping; George, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of an atherosclerotic plaque may encode information about the type, composition, and vulnerability to rupture. Human arterial segments with varying plaque burden were analyzed ex vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to determine plaque type and to determine compliance during pulsatile inflation in their native geometry. Calcifications and lipid filled plaques showed markedly different compliance when analyzed with OCT wall motion analysis. There was also a trend towards increased circumferential variation in arterial compliance with increasing plaque burden. PMID:24388166

  9. Cardiac Motion Analysis Using High-Speed Video Images in a Rat Model for Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Idaku; Okuda, Toshikazu; Nie, Yuman; Takaki, Takeshi; Orito, Kensuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    In this study, we performed a cardiac motion analysis by using 1000-frames per second (fps) stereo images to capture the three-dimensional motion of small color markers in a rat heart. This method of recording cardiac motion could quantify the rate of change in the myocardial area, which indicated localized myocardial activity of rhythmic expansion and contraction. We analyzed the three-dimensional motion distributions in a rat model for myocardial infarction, in which the heart rate was 4 times/s or more. In the analysis, we spatiotemporally quantified the characteristic cardiac motion in ischemic heart diseases and found that infarction due to ischemia in the rat heart was spread around the left ventricle.

  10. The stability analysis of rolling motion of hypersonic vehicles and its validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, YouDa; Zhao, ZhongLiang; Tian, Hao; Zhang, XianFeng

    2014-12-01

    The stability of the rolling motion of near space hypersonic vehicles with rudder control is studied using method of qualitative analysis of nonlinear differential equations, and the stability criteria of the deflected rolling motions are improved. The outcomes can serve as the basis for further study regarding the influence of pitching and lateral motion on the stability of rolling motion. To validate the theoretical results, numerical simulations were done for the rolling motion of two hypersonic vehicles with typical configurations. Also, wind tunnel experiments for four aircraft models with typical configurations have been done. The results show that: 1) there exist two dynamic patterns of the rolling motion under statically stable condition. The first one is point attractor, for which the motion of aircraft returns to the original state. The second is periodic attractor, for which the aircraft rolls periodically. 2) Under statically unstable condition, there exist three dynamic patterns of rolling motion, namely, the point attractor, periodic attractor around deflected state of rolling motion, and double periodic attractors or chaotic attractors.

  11. Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxuan; Guo, Li; Pan, Cong; Lu, Tongtong; Hong, Tianyu; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (Angio-OCT), mainly based on the temporal dynamics of OCT scattering signals, has found a range of potential applications in clinical and scientific research. Based on the model of random phasor sums, temporal statistics of the complex-valued OCT signals are mathematically described. Statistical distributions of the amplitude differential and complex differential Angio-OCT signals are derived. The theories are validated through the flow phantom and live animal experiments. Using the model developed, the origin of the motion contrast in Angio-OCT is mathematically explained, and the implications in the improvement of motion contrast are further discussed, including threshold determination and its residual classification error, averaging method, and scanning protocol. The proposed mathematical model of Angio-OCT signals can aid in the optimal design of the system and associated algorithms.

  12. Analysis of the orbital motion of the asteroid Apophis' satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkin, V. V.; Lang, A.

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed the orbital disturbed spacecraft motion near an asteroid. The equations of the asteroidocentric spacecraft motion have been used with regard to three perturbations from celestial bodies, the asteroid's nonsphericity, and solar radiation pressure. It has been shown that the orbital parameters of the main spacecraft and a small satellite with a radio beacon can be selected such that the orbits are rather stable for a fairly long period of time, i.e., a few weeks for the main spacecraft with an orbit initial radius of 0.5 km and a few years before approaching Apophis with the Earth in 2029, for a small satellite at an orbit initial radius of 1.5 km. The initial orientation of the spacecraft orbital plane perpendicular to the sunward direction is optimal from the point of view of the stability of the spacecraft flight near an asteroid.

  13. Directivity in NGA earthquake ground motions: Analysis using isochrone theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Chiou, B.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present correction factors that may be applied to the ground motion prediction relations of Abrahamson and Silva, Boore and Atkinson, Campbell and Bozorgnia, and Chiou and Youngs (all in this volume) to model the azimuthally varying distribution of the GMRotI50 component of ground motion (commonly called 'directivity') around earthquakes. Our correction factors may be used for planar or nonplanar faults having any dip or slip rake (faulting mechanism). Our correction factors predict directivity-induced variations of spectral acceleration that are roughly half of the strike-slip variations predicted by Somerville et al. (1997), and use of our factors reduces record-to-record sigma by about 2-20% at 5 sec or greater period. ?? 2008, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  14. An Approximate Analysis of Balloting Motion of Railgun Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    projecile/ barrel clearance. To simplify the fri-oddelinci, a plane motion configuration is assumed. Though the pro- jectile ;s moving with a varying yaw...angle, the axee of the barrel and the projectile pactia~f, and the projectile center oi gravity are always considered in a plane containing the...The lateral forces and lateral projectile/ barrel impact affects muzzle jump, intermediate and terminai ballistics and, consequently, weapon system

  15. Analysis of River Ice Motion Near a Breaking Front

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    bank toward the camera at a speed of about 1 m/ s . Note the pressure ridge across the river and the ice rubble - front (white) farther upstream. The ice...volume S , scalar product of polynomial Pi with itself St hydraulic gradient of the river I global time for the ice motion in a river reach 7 local time...dynamic breakup has the front. Conversely, in what we call "strength- been noted by several authors (e.g., Beltaos and dominateddynamicbreakup

  16. GOCI Level-2 Processing Improvements and Cloud Motion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The Ocean Biology Processing Group has been working with the Korean Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) to process geosynchronous ocean color data from the GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Instrument) aboard the COMS (Communications, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite). The level-2 processing program, l2gen has GOCI processing as an option. Improvements made to that processing are discussed here as well as a discussion about cloud motion effects.

  17. Motion analysis of live objects by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Guang; Zhang, Houxiang

    2012-01-01

    Motion analysis plays an important role in studing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine, biotechnology, chemistry, physics, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, enzymology, and biological engineering. This paper briefly reviews the developments in this area mostly in the recent three years, especially for cellular analysis in fluorescence microscopy. The topic has received much attention with the increasing demands in biomedical applications. The tasks of motion analysis include detection and tracking of objects, as well as analysis of motion behavior, living activity, events, motion statistics, and so forth. In the last decades, hundreds of papers have been published in this research topic. They cover a wide area, such as investigation of cell, cancer, virus, sperm, microbe, karyogram, and so forth. These contributions are summarized in this review. Developed methods and practical examples are also introduced. The review is useful to people in the related field for easy referral of the state of the art.

  18. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  19. Analysis of unstable modes distinguishes mathematical models of flagellar motion

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, P. V.; Wilson, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella remain incompletely understood despite the fundamental importance of these organelles. The axoneme (the cytoskeletal structure of cilia and flagella) consists of microtubule doublets connected by passive and active elements. The motor protein dynein is known to drive active bending, but dynein activity must be regulated to generate oscillatory, propulsive waveforms. Mathematical models of flagellar motion generate quantitative predictions that can be analysed to test hypotheses concerning dynein regulation. One approach has been to seek periodic solutions to the linearized equations of motion. However, models may simultaneously exhibit both periodic and unstable modes. Here, we investigate the emergence and coexistence of unstable and periodic modes in three mathematical models of flagellar motion, each based on a different dynein regulation hypothesis: (i) sliding control; (ii) curvature control and (iii) control by interdoublet separation (the ‘geometric clutch’ (GC)). The unstable modes predicted by each model are used to critically evaluate the underlying hypothesis. In particular, models of flagella with ‘sliding-controlled’ dynein activity admit unstable modes with non-propulsive, retrograde (tip-to-base) propagation, sometimes at the same parameter values that lead to periodic, propulsive modes. In the presence of these retrograde unstable modes, stable or periodic modes have little influence. In contrast, unstable modes of the GC model exhibit switching at the base and propulsive base-to-tip propagation. PMID:25833248

  20. Stability analysis of motion patterns in biathlon shooting.

    PubMed

    Baca, Arnold; Kornfeind, Philipp

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the stability of the aiming process of elite biathlon athletes. Nine elite athletes performed four series of five shots onto the same target and onto targets next to each other in a shooting hall. A video-based system reconstructed the horizontal and vertical motion of the muzzle. The time period starting after repeating the rifle and ending with the shot was divided in 10 intervals of equal duration. Eight kinematic parameters describing the motion in these intervals were calculated. Based on the parameter values obtained a special variant of an artificial network of type SOM (self-organizing map) was trained. Similar neurons were combined to clusters. For each shot the 10 data sets describing the aiming process were then mapped to the corresponding neurons. The sequence of the related clusters in the respective succession was used as representation of the complex aiming motion. In a second processing step types of shots were identified applying a second net. A more stable pattern could be inferred for the members of the national squad compared to the biathletes classified in the next best performance level. Only small differences between the two shooting conditions could be observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Independent motion detection with a rival penalized adaptive particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stefan; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Aggregation of pixel based motion detection into regions of interest, which include views of single moving objects in a scene is an essential pre-processing step in many vision systems. Motion events of this type provide significant information about the object type or build the basis for action recognition. Further, motion is an essential saliency measure, which is able to effectively support high level image analysis. When applied to static cameras, background subtraction methods achieve good results. On the other hand, motion aggregation on freely moving cameras is still a widely unsolved problem. The image flow, measured on a freely moving camera is the result from two major motion types. First the ego-motion of the camera and second object motion, that is independent from the camera motion. When capturing a scene with a camera these two motion types are adverse blended together. In this paper, we propose an approach to detect multiple moving objects from a mobile monocular camera system in an outdoor environment. The overall processing pipeline consists of a fast ego-motion compensation algorithm in the preprocessing stage. Real-time performance is achieved by using a sparse optical flow algorithm as an initial processing stage and a densely applied probabilistic filter in the post-processing stage. Thereby, we follow the idea proposed by Jung and Sukhatme. Normalized intensity differences originating from a sequence of ego-motion compensated difference images represent the probability of moving objects. Noise and registration artefacts are filtered out, using a Bayesian formulation. The resulting a posteriori distribution is located on image regions, showing strong amplitudes in the difference image which are in accordance with the motion prediction. In order to effectively estimate the a posteriori distribution, a particle filter is used. In addition to the fast ego-motion compensation, the main contribution of this paper is the design of the probabilistic

  2. An Extended Production and Inspection Model with Nonrigid Demand

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Neng-Hui; Wang, Chih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends a previous production and inspection (PI) model in relation to market demand that is nonrigid to consider an imperfect process that has a general hazard rate instead of a constant failure rate. Products are produced by an imperfect process that may shift randomly from the IN state to the OUT state. When the process is in the OUT state, it has a higher probability of producing a nonconforming product than when it is in the IN state. To achieve the zero defects policy, all products before delivery to the market should be inspected and the inspection order follows their production sequence. Furthermore, the inspection information from all previous products is used to decide either that the next candidate product should be inspected or that the inspection procedure for the current production lot should be terminated. When the inspection procedure is terminated, the remaining unmet demand is regarded as a shortage. An algorithm is developed to determine an optimal PI policy that minimizes the expected total cost, which includes the cost of inspection, of shortage, and of production. PMID:24396302

  3. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions.

  4. Automatic nonrigid registration of whole body CT mice images.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Peterson, Todd E; Gore, John C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional intra- and intersubject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, computing population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. While a number of methods have been proposed to address this problem, few have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the majority of registration algorithms have been applied. This article presents a new method for the automatic registration of whole body computed tomography (CT) volumes, which consists of two main steps. Skeletons are first brought into approximate correspondence with a robust point-based method. Transformations so obtained are refined with an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm that includes spatial adaptation of the transformation's stiffness. The approach has been applied to whole body CT images of mice, to CT images of the human upper torso, and to human head and neck CT images. To validate the authors method on soft tissue structures, which are difficult to see in CT images, the authors use coregistered magnetic resonance images. They demonstrate that the approach they propose can successfully register image volumes even when these volumes are very different in size and shape or if they have been acquired with the subjects in different positions.

  5. Biological motion processing in schizophrenia - Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Okruszek, Łukasz; Pilecka, Izabela

    2017-03-09

    Patients with schizophrenia show impairments in processing of biological motion. This is especially important since deficits in domains of social cognition has been associated with functional outcome and everyday functioning in this population. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies which have used point-light displays to present whole-body motion to patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls, to evaluate the magnitude of differences between these groups in biological motion processing. Firstly, relevant publications were identified by a systematic search of Google Scholar and PubMed databases. Secondly, we excluded non-relevant studies for the meta-analysis according to our exclusion criteria. Effect sizes were expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD). 15 papers reporting results of 14 different experiments with 571 patients and 482 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The results for the general biological motion perception analysis revealed that patients with schizophrenia (compared with healthy controls) present reduced biological motion processing capacity with the effect size (SMD) of 0.66 (95% CI, -0.79 to -0.54; p<0.001). The results for the specific biological motion-based tasks were also statistically significant with SMD of 0.72 for Basic Biological Motion task (95% CI: -0.94 to -0.51; p<0.001) and SMD of 0.61 for Emotion in Biological Motion task, (95% CI: -0.79 to -0.43; p<0.001) respectively. The findings from our meta-analysis highlight abnormalities in general and specific domains of biological motion perception in schizophrenia patients as compared with healthy controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stereo saliency map considering affective factors and selective motion analysis in a dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sungmoon; Ban, Sang-Woo; Lee, Minho

    2008-12-01

    We propose new integrated saliency map and selective motion analysis models partly inspired by a biological visual attention mechanism. The proposed models consider not only binocular stereopsis to identify a final attention area so that the system focuses on the closer area as in human binocular vision, based on the single eye alignment hypothesis, but also both the static and dynamic features of an input scene. Moreover, the proposed saliency map model includes an affective computing process that skips an unwanted area and pays attention to a desired area, which reflects the human preference and refusal in subsequent visual search processes. In addition, we show the effectiveness of considering the symmetry feature determined by a neural network and an independent component analysis (ICA) filter which are helpful to construct an object preferable attention model. Also, we propose a selective motion analysis model by integrating the proposed saliency map with a neural network for motion analysis. The neural network for motion analysis responds selectively to rotation, expansion, contraction and planar motion of the optical flow in a selected area. Experiments show that the proposed model can generate plausible scan paths and selective motion analysis results for natural input scenes.

  7. Tendon strain imaging using non-rigid image registration: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno M.; Slagmolen, Pieter; Barbosa, Daniel; Scheys, Lennart; Geukens, Leonie; Fukagawa, Shingo; Peers, Koen; Bellemans, Johan; Suetens, Paul; D'Hooge, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound image has already been proved to be a useful tool for non-invasive strain quantifications in soft tissue. While clinical applications only include cardiac imaging, the development of techniques suitable for musculoskeletal system is an active area of research. On this study, a technique for speckle tracking on ultrasound images using non-rigid image registration is presented. This approach is based on a single 2D+t registration procedure, in which the temporal changes on the B-mode speckle patterns are locally assessed. This allows estimating strain from ultrasound image sequences of tissues under deformation while imposing temporal smoothness in the deformation field, originating smooth strain curves. METHODS: The tracking algorithm was systematically tested on synthetic images and gelatin phantoms, under sinusoidal deformations with amplitudes between 0.5% and 4.0%, at frequencies between 0.25Hz and 2.0Hz. Preliminary tests were also performed on Achilles tendons isolated from human cadavers. RESULTS: The strain was estimated with deviations of -0.011%+/-0.053% on the synthetic images and agreements of +/-0.28% on the phantoms. Some tests with real tendons show good tracking results. However, significant variability between the trials still exists. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed image registration methodology constitutes a robust tool for motion and deformation tracking in both simulated and real phantom data. Strain estimation in both cases reveals that the proposed method is accurate and provides good precision. Although the ex-vivo results are still preliminary, the potential of the proposed algorithm is promising. This suggests that further improvements, together with systematic testing, can lead to in-vivo and clinical applications.

  8. Categorizing identity from facial motion.

    PubMed

    Girges, Christine; Spencer, Janine; O'Brien, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Advances in marker-less motion capture technology now allow the accurate replication of facial motion and deformation in computer-generated imagery (CGI). A forced-choice discrimination paradigm using such CGI facial animations showed that human observers can categorize identity solely from facial motion cues. Animations were generated from motion captures acquired during natural speech, thus eliciting both rigid (head rotations and translations) and nonrigid (expressional changes) motion. To limit interferences from individual differences in facial form, all animations shared the same appearance. Observers were required to discriminate between different videos of facial motion and between the facial motions of different people. Performance was compared to the control condition of orientation-inverted facial motion. The results show that observers are able to make accurate discriminations of identity in the absence of all cues except facial motion. A clear inversion effect in both tasks provided consistency with previous studies, supporting the configural view of human face perception. The accuracy of this motion capture technology thus allowed stimuli to be generated that closely resembled real moving faces. Future studies may wish to implement such methodology when studying human face perception.

  9. Real-time marker-free motion capture system using blob feature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Joon; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hong-Seok; Lee, In-Ho

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a real-time marker-free motion capture system which can reconstruct 3-dimensional human motions. The virtual character of the proposed system mimics the motion of an actor in real-time. The proposed system captures human motions by using three synchronized CCD cameras and detects the root and end-effectors of an actor such as a head, hands, and feet by exploiting the blob feature analysis. And then, the 3-dimensional positions of end-effectors are restored and tracked by using Kalman filter. At last, the positions of the intermediate joint are reconstructed by using anatomically constrained inverse kinematics algorithm. The proposed system was implemented under general lighting conditions and we confirmed that the proposed system could reconstruct motions of a lot of people wearing various clothes in real-time stably.

  10. One hybrid model combining singular spectrum analysis and LS + ARMA for polar motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Guo, Jinyun; Liu, Xin; Wei, Xiaobei; Li, Wudong

    2017-01-01

    Accurate real-time polar motion parameters play an important role in satellite navigation and positioning and spacecraft tracking. To meet the needs for real-time and high-accuracy polar motion prediction, a hybrid model that integrated singular spectrum analysis (SSA), least-squares (LS) extrapolation and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model was proposed. SSA was applied to separate the trend, the annual and the Chandler components from a given polar motion time series. LS extrapolation models were constructed for the separated trend, annual and Chandler components. An ARMA model was established for a synthetic sequence that contained the remaining SSA component and the residual series of LS fitting. In applying this hybrid model, multiple sets of polar motion predictions with lead times of 360 days were made based on an IERS 08 C04 series. The results showed that the proposed method could effectively predict the polar motion parameters.

  11. A new analysis methodology for the motion of self-propelled particles and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Young-Moo; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    The self-propelled particle (SPP) on the microscale in the solution is a growing field of study, which has a potential to be used for nanomedicine and nanorobots. However, little detailed quantitative analysis on the motion of the SPP has been performed so far because its self-propelled motion is strongly coupled to Brownian motion, which makes the extraction of intrinsic propulsion mechanisms problematic, leading to inconsistent conclusions. Here, we present a novel way to decompose the motion of the SPP into self-propelled and Brownian components; accurate values for self-propulsion speed and diffusion coefficients of the SPP are obtained for the first time. Then, we apply our analysis methodology to ostensible chemotaxis of SPP, and reveal the actual (non-chemotactic) mechanism of the phenomenon, demonstrating that our analysis methodology is a powerful and reliable tool.

  12. CMA-HT: a crowd motion analysis framework based on heat-transfer analog model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Melvin, William; Sritharan, Subramania I.; Fernandes, Shane; Barker, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    Crowd motion analysis covers the detection, tracking, recognition, and behavior interpretation of target group from persistent surveillance video data. This project is dedicated to investigating a crowd motion analysis system based on a heat-transfer-analog model (denoted as CMA-HT for simplicity), and a generic modeling and simulation framework describing crowd motion behavior. CMA-HT is formulated by coupling the statistical analysis of crowd's historical behavior at a given location, geographic information system, and crowd motion dynamics. The mathematical derivation of the CMA-HT model and the innovative methods involved in the framework's implementation will be discussed in detail. Using the sample video data collected by Central Florida University as benchmark, CMA-HT is employed to measure and identify anomalous personnel or group responses in the video.

  13. Error analysis on spinal motion measurement using skin mounted sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengyi; Ma, Heather Ting; Wang, Deming; Lee, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Measurement errors of skin-mounted sensors in measuring forward bending movement of the lumbar spines are investigated. In this investigation, radiographic images capturing the entire lumbar spines' positions were acquired and used as a 'gold' standard. Seventeen young male volunteers (21 (SD 1) years old) agreed to participate in the study. Light-weight miniature sensors of the electromagnetic tracking systems-Fastrak were attached to the skin overlying the spinous processes of the lumbar spine. With the sensors attached, the subjects were requested to take lateral radiographs in two postures: neutral upright and full flexion. The ranges of motions of lumbar spine were calculated from two sets of digitized data: the bony markers of vertebral bodies and the sensors and compared. The differences between the two sets of results were then analyzed. The relative movement between sensor and vertebrae was decomposed into sensor sliding and titling, from which sliding error and titling error were introduced. Gross motion range of forward bending of lumbar spine measured from bony markers of vertebrae is 67.8 degrees (SD 10.6 degrees ) and that from sensors is 62.8 degrees (SD 12.8 degrees ). The error and absolute error for gross motion range were 5.0 degrees (SD 7.2 degrees ) and 7.7 degrees (SD 3.9 degrees ). The contributions of sensors placed on S1 and L1 to the absolute error were 3.9 degrees (SD 2.9 degrees ) and 4.4 degrees (SD 2.8 degrees ), respectively.

  14. Non-linear analysis of stick/slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, T. K.; Williams, R.

    1981-02-01

    The steady state relative motion of two masses with dry (Coulomb) friction contact is investigated. The bodies are assumed to have the same mass and stiffness and are subjected to harmonic excitation. By means of a combined analytical—numerical procedure, results are obtained for arbitrary values of Coulomb friction, excitation frequency, and natural frequencies of the bodies. For certain values of these parameters, multiple lockups per cycle are possible. In this respect, the problem investigated here is a natural extension of the one considered by Den Hartog, who in obtaining his closed form solution assumed a maximum of two lockups per cycle.

  15. Analysis of star pair latitudes. [for polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Star pair latitude observations form the basis for the pole positions reported by the International Polar Motion Service (IMPS). The IPMS processes these observations to produce a mean pole position. However, the time series of observations contains high-frequency information which is lost in the calculation of the mean pole. In this study, 2931 star pair observations are analyzed. A possible large excitation at one cycle per solar day is observed. The average power level in the frequency band of the tesseral tides is seen to be high, although the peaks cannot be conclusively identified as tidal phenomena.

  16. Strong Ground-Motion Prediction in Seismic Hazard Analysis: PEGASOS and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbaum, F.; Bommer, J. J.; Cotton, F.; Bungum, H.; Sabetta, F.

    2005-12-01

    The SSHAC Level 4 approach to probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), which could be considered to define the state-of-the-art in PSHA using multiple expert opinions, has been fully applied only twice, firstly in the multi-year Yucca Mountain study and subsequently (2002-2004) in the PEGASOS project. The authors of this paper participated as ground-motion experts in this latter project, the objective of which was comprehensive seismic hazard analysis for four nuclear power plant sites in Switzerland, considering annual exceedance frequencies down to 1/10000000. Following SSHAC procedure, particular emphasis was put on capturing both the aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. As a consequence, ground motion prediction was performed by combining several empirical ground motion models within a logic tree framework with the weights on each logic tree branch expressing the personal degree-of-belief of each ground-motion expert. In the present paper, we critically review the current state of ground motion prediction methodology in PSHA in particular for regions of low seismicity. One of the toughest lessons from PEGASOS was that in systematically and rigorously applying the laws of uncertainty propagation to all of the required conversions and adjustments of ground motion models, a huge price has to be paid in an ever-growing aleatory variability. Once this path has been followed, these large sigma values will drive the hazard, particularly for low annual frequencies of exceedance. Therefore, from a post-PEGASOS perspective, the key issues in the context of ground-motion prediction for PSHA for the near future are to better understand the aleatory variability of ground motion and to develop suites of ground-motion prediction equations that employ the same parameter definitions. The latter is a global rather than a regional challenge which might be a desirable long-term goal for projects similar to the PEER NGA (Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center, Next

  17. TARGETED PRINCIPLE COMPONENT ANALYSIS: A NEW MOTION ARTIFACT CORRECTION APPROACH FOR NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Cooper, Robert J; Boas, David A

    2014-03-01

    As near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) broadens its application area to different age and disease groups, motion artifacts in the NIRS signal due to subject movement is becoming an important challenge. Motion artifacts generally produce signal fluctuations that are larger than physiological NIRS signals, thus it is crucial to correct for them before obtaining an estimate of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses. There are various methods for correction such as principle component analysis (PCA), wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation. Here, we introduce a new approach to motion artifact correction, targeted principle component analysis (tPCA), which incorporates a PCA filter only on the segments of data identified as motion artifacts. It is expected that this will overcome the issues of filtering desired signals that plagues standard PCA filtering of entire data sets. We compared the new approach with the most effective motion artifact correction algorithms on a set of data acquired simultaneously with a collodion-fixed probe (low motion artifact content) and a standard Velcro probe (high motion artifact content). Our results show that tPCA gives statistically better results in recovering hemodynamic response function (HRF) as compared to wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation for the Velcro probe. It results in a significant reduction in mean-squared error (MSE) and significant enhancement in Pearson's correlation coefficient to the true HRF. The collodion-fixed fiber probe with no motion correction performed better than the Velcro probe corrected for motion artifacts in terms of MSE and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Thus, if the experimental study permits, the use of a collodion-fixed fiber probe may be desirable. If the use of a collodion-fixed probe is not feasible, then we suggest the use of tPCA in the processing of motion artifact contaminated data.

  18. Implementation of a markerless motion analysis method to quantify hyperkinesis in males with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Khan, Hassan; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Wimmer, Markus A

    2014-02-01

    Hyperactive behavior - and implicitly, motion - in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) has been historically described using behavioral rating scales. While rating scales are the current standard outcome measures used in clinical research, they have limitations including their qualitative nature and subjectivity. The advent of new motion capture technologies has provided the opportunity to develop quantitative methods for measuring hyperactive motion. The hypotheses for this study were that a novel markerless motion analysis method (1) can quantitatively measure kinematic parameters, (2) can differentiate the level of hyperkinesis between control and FXS populations, and (3) will correlate with blind-reviewer synchronous video-capture methods and behavioral rating scale scores. Twenty young males (7-control, 13-FXS; ages 9-32) were studied using a standardized protocol in a markerless motion analysis suite. Behavioral scale questionnaires were filled out by parents and those scores were correlated with motion parameters (frequency and total traveled distance) of body segments during 30s of story listening while standing in the observation space. The markerless system was able to track subjects and the two populations displayed significantly different quantities of motion, with larger amounts of motion in the FXS group (p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients between frequency counts obtained from the markerless system and rater-based video capture were between 0.969 and 0.996 (p < 0.001). Significant correlations between rating scale scores and motion parameters ranged from 0.462 ≤ r ≤ 0.568 (p ≤ 0.040). These results suggest feasibility and validity of a markerless system as a non-invasive method able to quantify motion in individuals with hyperkinesis.

  19. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the nontumor side in order to elevate the tongue tip and blade for /s/. Method Velocity fields were extracted from tagged magnetic resonance images in the left, middle, and right tongue of 3 patients and 10 controls. Principal components (PCs) analysis quantified motion differences and distinguished between the subject groups. Results PCs 1 and 2 represented variance in (a) size and independence of the tongue tip, and (b) direction of motion of the tip, body, or both. Patients and controls were correctly separated by a small number of PCs. Conclusions Motion of the tumor slice was different between patients and controls, but the nontumor side of the patients’ tongues did not show excessive or adaptive motion. Both groups contained apical and laminal /s/ users, and 1 patient created apical /s/ in a highly unusual manner. PMID:24023377

  20. GENERAL THEORY OF THE ROTATION OF THE NON-RIGID EARTH AT THE SECOND ORDER. I. THE RIGID MODEL IN ANDOYER VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Getino, J.; Miguel, D.; Escapa, A.

    2010-05-15

    This paper is the first part of an investigation where we will present an analytical general theory of the rotation of the non-rigid Earth at the second order, which considers the effects of the interaction of the rotation of the Earth with itself, also named as the spin-spin coupling. Here, and as a necessary step in the development of that theory, we derive complete, explicit, analytical formulae of the rigid Earth rotation that account for the second-order rotation-rotation interaction. These expressions are not provided in this form by any current rigid Earth model. Working within the Hamiltonian framework established by Kinoshita, we study the second-order effects arising from the interaction of the main term in the Earth geopotential expansion with itself, and with the complementary term arising when referring the rotational motion to the moving ecliptic. To this aim, we apply a canonical perturbation method to solve analytically the canonical equations at the second order, determining the expressions that provide the nutation-precession, the polar motion, and the length of day. In the case of the motion of the equatorial plane, nutation-precession, we compare our general approach with the particular study for this motion developed by Souchay et al., showing the existence of new terms whose numerical values are within the truncation level of 0.1 {mu}as adopted by those authors. These terms emerge as a consequence of not assuming in this work the same restrictive simplifications taken by Souchay et al. The importance of these additional contributions is that, as the analytical formulae show, they depend on the Earth model considered, in such a way that the fluid core resonance could amplify them significatively when extending this theory to the non-rigid Earth models.

  1. Analysis of preflutter and postflutter characteristics with motion-matched aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the equations of dynamic equilibrium for a lifting surface from Lagrange's equation is reviewed and restated for general exponential growing and decaying oscillatory motion. Aerodynamic forces for this motion are obtained from the three-dimensional supersonic kernel function that is newly generalized to complex reduced frequencies. Illustrative calculations were made for two flutter models at supersonic Mach numbers. Preflutter and postflutter motion isodecrement curves were obtained. This type of analysis can be used to predict preflutter behavior during flutter testing and to predict postflutter behavior for use in the design of flutter suppression systems.

  2. Heart rate monitoring from wrist-type PPG based on singular spectrum analysis with motion decision.

    PubMed

    Yang Wang; Zhiwen Liu; Bin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Heart rate (HR) monitoring is necessary for daily healthcare. Wrist-type photoplethsmography (PPG) is a convenient and non-invasive technique for HR monitoring. However, motion artifacts (MA) caused by subjects' movements can extremely interfere the results of HR monitoring. In this paper, we propose a high accuracy method using motion decision, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and spectral peak searching for daily HR estimation. The proposed approach was evaluated on 8 subjects under a series of different motion states. Compared with electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded simultaneously, the experimental results indicated that the averaged absolute estimation error was 2.33 beats per minute (BPM).

  3. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction and motion analysis of living, crawling cells.

    PubMed

    Soll, D R

    1999-01-01

    A computer-assisted three-dimensional dynamic image analysis system (3D-DIAS) has been developed for reconstructing and motion analyzing living, crawling cells. The system simultaneously reconstructs the cell surface, the nucleus and pseudopodia, both expanding and retracting. Although this system has been developed for single cell analysis, it can be used for the dynamic reconstruction and motion analysis of cells in early embryos, the human heart and any other cell, organ or object changing shape over time. Ongoing development of a dynamic analysis system with a confocal front-end, a high speed reconstruction system, a near-real time system and a virtual reality system are described.

  4. Mouse whole-body organ mapping by non-rigid registration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Green, Heather; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Automatic small animal whole-body organ registration is challenging because of subject's joint structure, posture and position difference and loss of reference features. In this paper, an improved 3D shape context based non-rigid registration method is applied for mouse whole-body skeleton registration and lung registration. A geodesic path based non-rigid registration method is proposed for mouse torso skin registration. Based on the above registration methods, a novel non-rigid registration framework is proposed for mouse whole-body organ mapping from an atlas to new scanned CT data. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the method on lung and skin registration. A whole-body organ mapping was performed on three target data and the selected organs were compared with the manual outlining results. The robust of the method has been demonstrated.

  5. Digital resolver for helicopter model blade motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. S.; Berry, J. D.; Park, S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the development and initial testing of a digital resolver to replace existing analog signal processing instrumentation. Radiometers, mounted directly on one of the fully articulated blades, are electrically connected through a slip ring to analog signal processing circuitry. The measured signals are periodic with azimuth angle and are resolved into harmonic components, with 0 deg over the tail. The periodic nature of the helicopter blade motion restricts the frequency content of each flapping and yaw signal to the fundamental and harmonics of the rotor rotational frequency. A minicomputer is employed to collect these data and then plot them graphically in real time. With this and other information generated by the instrumentation, a helicopter test pilot can then adjust the helicopter model's controls to achieve the desired aerodynamic test conditions.

  6. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-06-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned approximately 0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motionwas estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spotmotion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate.

  7. Analysis for the stick-slip motion of differential power screw actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-bo; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Xue-jun; Tang, Jin-long; Zhang, Yu-dong

    2011-08-01

    The model for differential power screw transmission is established, and the mathematical expression of the stick-slip motion is derived based on the friction, in addition, influences of parameters of differential power screw transmission on the stick-slip motion are analyzed qualitatively. Based on dynamical equations of the analysis, the precision and stability of the designed differential power screw actuator is obtained, and the result is compared to it with software SIMULINK to verify.

  8. Nonrigid registration of carotid ultrasound and MR images using a "twisting and bending" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Nuwan D.; Chiu, Bernard; Samani, Abbas; Spence, J. David; Parraga, Grace; Samarabandu, Jagath; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation resulting in cerebral emboli is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Most strokes associated with carotid atherosclerosis can be prevented by lifestyle/dietary changes and pharmacological treatments if identified early by monitoring carotid plaque changes. Plaque composition information from magnetic resonance (MR) carotid images and dynamic characteristics information from 3D ultrasound (US) are necessary for developing and validating US imaging tools to identify vulnerable carotid plaques. Combining these images requires nonrigid registration to correct the non-linear miss-alignments caused by relative twisting and bending in the neck due to different head positions during the two image acquisitions sessions. The high degree of freedom and large number of parameters associated with existing nonrigid image registration methods causes several problems including unnatural plaque morphology alteration, computational complexity, and low reliability. Our approach was to model the normal movement of the neck using a "twisting and bending model" with only six parameters for nonrigid registration. We evaluated our registration technique using intra-subject in-vivo 3D US and 3D MR carotid images acquired on the same day. We calculated the Mean Registration Error (MRE) between the segmented vessel surfaces in the target image and the registered image using a distance-based error metric after applying our "twisting bending model" based nonrigid registration algorithm. We achieved an average registration error of 1.33+/-0.41mm using our nonrigid registration technique. Visual inspection of segmented vessel surfaces also showed a substantial improvement of alignment with our non-rigid registration technique.

  9. Non-rigid registration of medical images based on ordinal feature and manifold learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Liu, Jin; Zang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of medical imaging technology, medical image research and application has become a research hotspot. This paper offers a solution to non-rigid registration of medical images based on ordinal feature (OF) and manifold learning. The structural features of medical images are extracted by combining ordinal features with local linear embedding (LLE) to improve the precision and speed of the registration algorithm. A physical model based on manifold learning and optimization search is constructed according to the complicated characteristics of non-rigid registration. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and applicability of the proposed registration scheme.

  10. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  11. Joint motion pattern classification by cluster analysis of kinematic, demographic, and subjective variables.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jaejin; Shin, Hyunjung; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify joint motion patterns by classifying the full range of motion (ROM) into several sections. Forty participants were stratified by age and gender and they performed 18 full-swing motions at a self-selected speed. Joint angle, angular velocity, angular acceleration, and subjective discomfort rating were collected for each motion. K-means cluster analyses were used to classify joint motion patterns and ROM sections. The results showed that two or three clusters were mainly determined by the kinematic variables of angular velocity and acceleration. The motions of three clusters showed that the ROM sections of low and moderate velocity with moderate and high accelerations occurred in the initial (negative) and terminal (positive) phases, respectively, whereas those of high velocity with low acceleration were shown in the mid (neutral) phase. The motions of two clusters revealed that while the patterns of high velocity and high acceleration were found on the positive side of the ROM, those of low velocity and low acceleration were on the negative and neutral sides. The ROM sections close to both ends of the ROM may have a larger physical load than the others. This study provides information that could be useful for developing postural analysis tools for dynamic work.

  12. Vibronic structure of the cyclopentadienyl radical and its nonrigid van der Waals cluster with nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1995-09-01

    Fluorescence excitation and two color mass resolved excitation spectroscopy are employed to study the D1(2A2″)←D0(2E1″) vibronic transitions of the cyclopentadienyl radical (cpd) and its van der Waals cluster with nitrogen. The radical is created by photolysis of the cyclopentadiene dimer and cooled by expansion from a supersonic nozzle. The cpd(N2)1 cluster is generated in this cooling process. Mass resolved excitation spectra of cpd are obtained for the first 1200 cm-1 of the D1←D0 transition. The excitation spectrum of cpd(N2)1 shows a complicated structure for the origin transition. With the application of hole burning spectroscopy, we are able to assign all the cluster transitions to a single isomer. The features are assigned to a 55 cm-1 out-of-plane van der Waals mode stretch and contortional (rotational) motions of the N2 molecule with respect to the cpd radical. Empirical potential energy calculations are used to predict the properties of this cluster and yield the following results: (1) the N2 molecular axis is perpendicular to the cpd fivefold axis and parallel to the plane of the cpd ring with the two molecular centers of mass lying on the fivefold ring axis; (2) the binding energy of cpd(N2)1 is 434 cm-1; and (3) the rotational motion of the N2 molecule is essentially unhindered about the cpd fivefold axis. The molecular symmetry group D5h(MS) is applied to the nonrigid cluster, and optical selection rules exclude even↔odd transitions (Δn=0, ±2, ±4,... allowed) between the different contortional levels. Tentative assignments are given to the observed contortional features based on these considerations. The barrier to internal rotation is also small in the excited state. The results for the cpd(N2)1 van der Waals cluster are compared to those for the benzene (N2)1 and benzyl radical (N2)1 clusters.

  13. Ground motion issues for seismic analysis of tall buildings: A status report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bozorgnia, Y.; Campbell, K.W.; Luco, N.; Moehle, J.P.; Naeim, F.; Somerville, P.; Yang, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) is coordinating a major multidisciplinary programme, the Tall Buildings Initiative (TBI), to address critical technical issues related to the design and analysis of new tall buildings located in coastal California. The authors of this paper, listed alphabetically, are involved in various research studies related to ground motion modelling, selection, modification and simulation for analysis of tall buildings. This paper summarizes the scope and progress of ongoing activities related to ground motion issues for response history analysis of tall buildings.

  14. Correcting waveform bias using principal component analysis: Applications in multicentre motion analysis studies.

    PubMed

    Clouthier, Allison L; Bohm, Eric R; Rudan, John F; Shay, Barbara L; Rainbow, Michael J; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    Multicentre studies are rare in three dimensional motion analyses due to challenges associated with combining waveform data from different centres. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a statistical technique that can be used to quantify variability in waveform data and identify group differences. A correction technique based on PCA is proposed that can be used in post processing to remove nuisance variation introduced by the differences between centres. Using this technique, the waveform bias that exists between the two datasets is corrected such that the means agree. No information is lost in the individual datasets, but the overall variability in the combined data is reduced. The correction is demonstrated on gait kinematics with synthesized crosstalk and on gait data from knee arthroplasty patients collected in two centres. The induced crosstalk was successfully removed from the knee joint angle data. In the second example, the removal of the nuisance variation due to the multicentre data collection allowed significant differences in implant type to be identified. This PCA-based technique can be used to correct for differences between waveform datasets in post processing and has the potential to enable multicentre motion analysis studies.

  15. Experimental and numerical analysis of rider motion in weave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, A.; Formentini, M.; Tognazzo, M.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycle dynamics is characterised by the presence of modes of vibration that may become unstable and lead to dangerous conditions. In particular, the weave mode shows large yaw and roll oscillations of the rear frame and out of phase oscillations of the front frame about the steer axis. The presence of the rider influences the modes of vibration, since the mass, stiffness and damping of limbs modify the dynamic properties of the system; moreover, at low frequency the rider can control oscillations. There are few experimental results dealing with the response of the rider in the presence of large oscillations of the motorcycle. This lack is due to the difficulty of carrying out measurements on the road and of reproducing the phenomena in the laboratory. This paper deals with a research programme aimed at measuring the oscillations of the rider's body on a running motorcycle in the presence of weave. First, testing equipment is presented. It includes a special measurement device that is able to measure the relative motion between the rider and the motorcycle. Then the road tests carried out at increasing speeds (from 160 to 210 km/h) are described and discussed. Best-fitting methods are used for identifying the main features of measured vibrations in terms of natural frequencies, damping ratios and modal shapes. The last section deals with the comparison between measured and simulated response of the motorcycle-rider system in weave conditions; good agreement was found.

  16. Contribution of saccadic motion to intravitreal drug transport: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Ram K; Barocas, Victor H

    2011-05-01

    The vitreous humor liquefies with age and readily sloshes during eye motion. The objective was to develop a computational model to determine the effect of sloshing on intravitreal drug transport for transscleral and intra-vitreal drug sources at various locations A finite element model based on a telescopic implicit envelope tracking scheme was developed to model drug dispersion. Flow velocities due to saccadic oscillations were solved for and were used to simulate drug dispersion. Saccades induced a three-dimensional flow field that indicates intense drug dispersion in the vitreous. Model results showed that the time scale for transport decreased for the sloshing vitreous when compared to static vitreous. Macular concentrations for the sloshing vitreous were found be much higher than that for the static vitreous. For low viscosities the position of the intravitreal source did not have a big impact on drug distribution. Model results show that care should be taken when extrapolating animal data, which are mostly done on intact vitreous, to old patients whose vitreous might be a liquid. The decrease in drug transport time scales and changes in localized concentrations should be considered when deciding on treatment modalities and dosing strategies.

  17. Contribution of Saccadic Motion to Intravitreal Drug Transport: Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Ram K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The vitreous humor liquefies with age and readily sloshes during eye motion. The objective was to develop a computational model to determine the effect of sloshing on intravitreal drug transport for transscleral and intra-vitreal drug sources at various locations Methods A finite element model based on a telescopic implicit envelope tracking scheme was developed to model drug dispersion. Flow velocities due to saccadic oscillations were solved for and were used to simulate drug dispersion. Results Saccades induced a three-dimensional flow field that indicates intense drug dispersion in the vitreous. Model results showed that the time scale for transport decreased for the sloshing vitreous when compared to static vitreous. Macular concentrations for the sloshing vitreous were found be much higher than that for the static vitreous. For low viscosities the position of the intravitreal source did not have a big impact on drug distribution. Conclusion Model results show that care should be taken when extrapolating animal data, which are mostly done on intact vitreous, to old patients whose vitreous might be a liquid. The decrease in drug transport time scales and changes in localized concentrations should be considered when deciding on treatment modalities and dosing strategies. PMID:21258958

  18. Continuum Mechanical Analysis of Collective Motion of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itami, Teturo

    Group of robots that works mainly in macroscopic systems is considered as a continuum. We need not mount specific sensors for mutual information among these robots. Increasing number of the robots makes it difficult to predict collective motion of the robots. To give a well organized strategy of designing the task, we describe these robots as that like fluid in continuum mechanics, where number density f_1 (\\vec{x},\\vec{p}; t) of the robots located at around \\vec{x} with momentum around \\vec{p} at time t is a main variable. Also we propose methods to move these robots by external potential energy V(\\vec{x};t). To specify a concept, we take a transportation system by group of robots. The objects located at \\vec{X}(t) that do not feel a potential V(\\vec{X}(t);t) can be transported by a collision with the robots moving aimlessly under the potential force -\\frac{\\partial V(\\vec{x};t)}{\\partial \\vec{x}}. The new scheme of a design based on continuum mechanics is validated by direct method of dynamical development of the system in time.

  19. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography–Guided Positioning of Laryngeal Cancer Patients with Large Interfraction Time Trends in Setup and Nonrigid Anatomy Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Gangsaas, Anne Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Quint, Sandra; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate interfraction setup variations of the primary tumor, elective nodes, and vertebrae in laryngeal cancer patients and to validate protocols for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided correction. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, CBCT-measured displacements in fractionated treatments were used to investigate population setup errors and to simulate residual setup errors for the no action level (NAL) offline protocol, the extended NAL (eNAL) protocol, and daily CBCT acquisition with online analysis and repositioning. Results: Without corrections, 12 of 26 patients treated with radical radiation therapy would have experienced a gradual change (time trend) in primary tumor setup ≥4 mm in the craniocaudal (CC) direction during the fractionated treatment (11/12 in caudal direction, maximum 11 mm). Due to these trends, correction of primary tumor displacements with NAL resulted in large residual CC errors (required margin 6.7 mm). With the weekly correction vector adjustments in eNAL, the trends could be largely compensated (CC margin 3.5 mm). Correlation between movements of the primary and nodal clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the CC direction was poor (r{sup 2}=0.15). Therefore, even with online setup corrections of the primary CTV, the required CC margin for the nodal CTV was as large as 6.8 mm. Also for the vertebrae, large time trends were observed for some patients. Because of poor CC correlation (r{sup 2}=0.19) between displacements of the primary CTV and the vertebrae, even with daily online repositioning of the vertebrae, the required CC margin around the primary CTV was 6.9 mm. Conclusions: Laryngeal cancer patients showed substantial interfraction setup variations, including large time trends, and poor CC correlation between primary tumor displacements and motion of the nodes and vertebrae (internal tumor motion). These trends and nonrigid anatomy variations have to be considered in the choice of setup verification protocol

  20. Motion Analysis of 100 Mediastinal Lymph Nodes: Potential Pitfalls in Treatment Planning and Adaptive Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Pantarotto, Jason R.; Piet, Anna H.M.; Vincent, Andrew; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The motion of mediastinal lymph nodes may undermine local control with involved-field radiotherapy. We studied patterns of nodal and tumor motion in 41 patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography planning scans were retrospectively evaluated to identify patients with clearly visible mediastinal lymph nodes. One hundred nodes from 14 patients with Stage I and 27 patients with Stage III were manually contoured in all 4D computed tomography respiratory phases. Motion was derived from changes in the nodal center-of-mass position. Primary tumors were also delineated in all phases for 16 patients with Stage III disease. Statistical analysis included a multivariate mixed-effects model of grouped data. Results: Average 3D nodal motion during quiet breathing was 0.68 cm (range, 0.17-1.64 cm); 77% moved greater than 0.5 cm, and 10% moved greater than 1.0 cm. Motion was greatest in the lower mediastinum (p = 0.002), and nodes measuring 2 cm or greater in diameter showed motion similar to that in smaller nodes. In 11 of 16 patients studied, at least one node moved more than the corresponding primary tumor. No association between 3D primary tumor motion and nodal motion was observed. For mobile primary tumors, phase offsets between the primary tumor and nodes of two or more and three or more phases were observed for 33% and 12% of nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Mediastinal nodal motion is common, with phase offsets seen between the primary tumor and different nodes in the same patient. Patient-specific information is needed to ensure geometric coverage, and adaptive strategies based solely on the primary tumor may be misleading.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: stochastic Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Earle, K A; Mielczarek, A; Kubica, A; Milewska, A; Moscicki, J

    2011-12-14

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000)] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Right ventricular strain analysis from three-dimensional echocardiography by using temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meihua; Ashraf, Muhammad; Broberg, Craig S.; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of right ventricle (RV) motion is important for study of the mechanism of congenital and acquired diseases. Unlike left ventricle (LV), motion estimation of RV is more difficult because of its complex shape and thin myocardium. Although attempts of finite element models on MR images and speckle tracking on echocardiography have shown promising results on RV strain analysis, these methods can be improved since the temporal smoothness of the motion is not considered. Methods: The authors have proposed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation method in which a spatiotemporal transformation is estimated by optimization of a registration energy functional of the velocity field in their earlier work. The proposed motion estimation method is a fully automatic process for general image sequences. The authors apply the method by combining with a semiautomatic myocardium segmentation method to the RV strain analysis of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences of five open-chest pigs under different steady states. Results: The authors compare the peak two-point strains derived by their method with those estimated from the sonomicrometry, the results show that they have high correlation. The motion of the right ventricular free wall is studied by using segmental strains. The baseline sequence results show that the segmental strains in their methods are consistent with results obtained by other image modalities such as MRI. The image sequences of pacing steady states show that segments with the largest strain variation coincide with the pacing sites. Conclusions: The high correlation of the peak two-point strains of their method and sonomicrometry under different steady states demonstrates that their RV motion estimation has high accuracy. The closeness of the segmental strain of their method to those from MRI shows the feasibility of their method in the study of RV function by using 3D echocardiography. The strain analysis of the

  3. Right ventricular strain analysis from three-dimensional echocardiography by using temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijun; Zhu, Meihua; Ashraf, Muhammad; Broberg, Craig S; Sahn, David J; Song, Xubo

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of right ventricle (RV) motion is important for study of the mechanism of congenital and acquired diseases. Unlike left ventricle (LV), motion estimation of RV is more difficult because of its complex shape and thin myocardium. Although attempts of finite element models on MR images and speckle tracking on echocardiography have shown promising results on RV strain analysis, these methods can be improved since the temporal smoothness of the motion is not considered. The authors have proposed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation method in which a spatiotemporal transformation is estimated by optimization of a registration energy functional of the velocity field in their earlier work. The proposed motion estimation method is a fully automatic process for general image sequences. The authors apply the method by combining with a semiautomatic myocardium segmentation method to the RV strain analysis of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences of five open-chest pigs under different steady states. The authors compare the peak two-point strains derived by their method with those estimated from the sonomicrometry, the results show that they have high correlation. The motion of the right ventricular free wall is studied by using segmental strains. The baseline sequence results show that the segmental strains in their methods are consistent with results obtained by other image modalities such as MRI. The image sequences of pacing steady states show that segments with the largest strain variation coincide with the pacing sites. The high correlation of the peak two-point strains of their method and sonomicrometry under different steady states demonstrates that their RV motion estimation has high accuracy. The closeness of the segmental strain of their method to those from MRI shows the feasibility of their method in the study of RV function by using 3D echocardiography. The strain analysis of the pacing steady states shows the potential

  4. Large scale track analysis for wide area motion imagery surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, C. J.; van Huis, J. R.; Baan, J.

    2016-10-01

    Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) enables image based surveillance of areas that can cover multiple square kilometers. Interpreting and analyzing information from such sources, becomes increasingly time consuming as more data is added from newly developed methods for information extraction. Captured from a moving Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), the high-resolution images allow detection and tracking of moving vehicles, but this is a highly challenging task. By using a chain of computer vision detectors and machine learning techniques, we are capable of producing high quality track information of more than 40 thousand vehicles per five minutes. When faced with such a vast number of vehicular tracks, it is useful for analysts to be able to quickly query information based on region of interest, color, maneuvers or other high-level types of information, to gain insight and find relevant activities in the flood of information. In this paper we propose a set of tools, combined in a graphical user interface, which allows data analysts to survey vehicles in a large observed area. In order to retrieve (parts of) images from the high-resolution data, we developed a multi-scale tile-based video file format that allows to quickly obtain only a part, or a sub-sampling of the original high resolution image. By storing tiles of a still image according to a predefined order, we can quickly retrieve a particular region of the image at any relevant scale, by skipping to the correct frames and reconstructing the image. Location based queries allow a user to select tracks around a particular region of interest such as landmark, building or street. By using an integrated search engine, users can quickly select tracks that are in the vicinity of locations of interest. Another time-reducing method when searching for a particular vehicle, is to filter on color or color intensity. Automatic maneuver detection adds information to the tracks that can be used to find vehicles based on their

  5. Motion coordination and performance analysis of multiple vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikrant

    In this dissertation, issues related to multiple vehicle systems are studied. First, the issue of vehicular congestion is addressed and its effect on the performance of some systems studied. Motion coordination algorithms for some systems of interest are also developed. The issue of vehicular congestion is addressed by characterizing the effect of increasing the number of vehicles, in a bounded region, on the speed of the vehicles. A multiple vehicle routing problem is considered where vehicles are required to stay velocity-dependent distance away from each other to avoid physical collisions. Optimal solutions to the minimum time routing are characterized and are found to increase with the square root of the number of vehicles in the environment, for different distributions of the sources and destinations of the vehicles. The second issue addressed is that of the effect of vehicular congestion on the delay associated with data delivery in wireless networks where vehicles are used to transport data to increase the wireless capacity of the network. Tight bounds on the associated delay are derived. The next problem addressed is that of covering an arbitrary path-connected two dimensional region, using multiple unmanned aerial vehicles, in minimum time. A constant-factor optimal algorithm is presented for any given initial positions of the vehicles inside the environment. The last problem addressed is that of the deployment of an environment monitoring network of mobile sensors to improve the network lifetime and sensing quality. A distributed algorithm is presented that improves the system's performance starting from an initial deployment.

  6. Nucleic acid binding drugs. Part XIII. Molecular motion in a drug-nucleic acid model system: thermal motion analysis of a proflavine-dinucleoside crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, A K; Neidle, S

    1985-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the intercalation complex between proflavine and cytidylyl-3',5'-guanosine (CpG) has been studied by thermalmotion analysis. This has provided information on the translational and librational motions of individual groups in the complex. Many of these motions are similar to, though of larger magnitude than in uncomplexed dinucleosides. Pronounced librational effects were observed along the base pairs and in the plane of the drug chromophore. PMID:4034394

  7. Coherence motion perception in developmental dyslexia: a meta-analysis of behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Mariagrazia; Simonelli, Letizia; Giovagnoli, Sara; Bolzani, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude of the association between developmental dyslexia (DD) and motion sensitivity is evaluated in 35 studies, which investigated coherence motion perception in DD. A first analysis is conducted on the differences between DD groups and age-matched control (C) groups. In a second analysis, the relationship between motion coherence threshold and reading ability is considered. Globally, the mean effect size (ES) is moderate (d = 0.675, 2334 subjects) with a large value (d = 0.747) for the between-groups differences in motion perception and a smaller mean ES (d = 0.178) for the correlational studies. The influence on ES of the stimuli parameters and subjects age is analyzed. The number of dots, the age of the subjects, and the type of analysis (i.e. between-group or correlational) are significantly related to the ES. Looking at the ES values, a smaller number of dots constituting the stimuli are associated with larger ES and, interestingly, the children studies are associated with lower ES in comparison with the researches evaluating adults. The large ES value supports the importance of studying motion perception deficits in DD groups, consistently with the claim that dorsal impairment/noise-exclusion deficit could be one of the risk factor of reading difficulties.

  8. Channel opening motion of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as suggested by normal mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Lu, Benzhuo; Grant, Barry; Law, Richard J; McCammon, J Andrew

    2006-01-13

    The gating motion of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha7 was investigated with normal mode analysis (NMA) of two homology models. The first model, referred to as model I, was built from both the Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) and the transmembrane (TM) domain of the Torpedo marmorata nAChR. The second model, referred to as model C, was based solely on the recent electron microscopy structure of the T. marmorata nAChR. Despite structural differences, both models exhibit nearly identical patterns of flexibility and correlated motions. In addition, both models show a similar global twisting motion that may represent channel gating. The similar results obtained for the two models indicate that NMA is most sensitive to the contact topology of the structure rather than its finer detail. The major difference between the low-frequency motions sampled for the two models is that a symmetrical pore-breathing motion, favoring channel opening, is present as the second most dominant motion in model I, whilst largely absent from model C. The absence of this mode in model C can be attributed to its less symmetrical architecture. Finally, as a further goal of the present study, an approximate open channel model, consistent with many experimental findings, has been produced.

  9. Non-rigid connector: The wand to allay the stresses on abutment

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Saurav; Khongshei, Arlingstone; Gupta, Tapas; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01

    The use of rigid connectors in 5-unit fixed dental prosthesis with a pier abutment can result in failure of weaker retainer in the long run as the pier abutment acts as a fulcrum. Non-rigid connector placed on the distal aspect of pier seems to reduce potentially excess stress concentration on the pier abutment. PMID:22346166

  10. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandula, Ján

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  11. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  12. Particle Motion Analysis Reveals Nanoscale Bond Characteristics and Enhances Dynamic Range for Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Visser, Emiel W A; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-03-22

    Biofunctionalized colloidal particles are widely used as labels in bioanalytical assays, lab-on-chip devices, biophysical research, and in studies on live biological systems. With detection resolution going down to the level of single particles and single molecules, understanding the nature of the interaction of the particles with surfaces and substrates becomes of paramount importance. Here, we present a comprehensive study of motion patterns of colloidal particles maintained in close proximity to a substrate by short molecular tethers (40 nm). The motion of the particles (500-1000 nm) was optically tracked with a very high localization accuracy (below 3 nm). A surprisingly large variation in motion patterns was observed, which can be attributed to properties of the particle-molecule-substrate system, namely the bond number, the nature of the bond, particle protrusions, and substrate nonuniformities. Experimentally observed motion patterns were compared to numerical Monte Carlo simulations, revealing a close correspondence between the observed motion patterns and properties of the molecular system. Particles bound via single tethers show distinct disc-, ring-, and bell-shaped motion patterns, where the ring- and bell-shaped patterns are caused by protrusions on the particle in the direct vicinity of the molecular attachment point. Double and triple tethered particles exhibit stripe-shaped and triangular-shaped motion patterns, respectively. The developed motion pattern analysis allows for discrimination between particles bound by different bond types, which opens the possibility to improve the limit of detection and the dynamic range of bioanalytical assays, with a projected increase of dynamic range by nearly 2 orders of magnitude.

  13. High-Speed Video Analysis of Damped Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we acquire and analyse high-speed videos of a spring-mass system oscillating in glycerin at different temperatures. Three cases of damped harmonic oscillation are investigated and analysed by using high-speed video at a rate of 120 frames s[superscript -1] and Tracker Video Analysis (Tracker) software. We present empirical data for…

  14. High-Speed Video Analysis of Damped Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we acquire and analyse high-speed videos of a spring-mass system oscillating in glycerin at different temperatures. Three cases of damped harmonic oscillation are investigated and analysed by using high-speed video at a rate of 120 frames s[superscript -1] and Tracker Video Analysis (Tracker) software. We present empirical data for…

  15. Analysis of means of improving the uncontrolled lateral motions of personal airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, Marion O , Jr

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical analysis has been made of means of improving the uncontrolled motions of personal airplanes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether such airplanes could be made to fly uncontrolled for an indefinite period of time without getting into dangerous attitudes and for a reasonable period of time (1 to 3 min) without deviating excessively from their original course. The results of this analysis indicated that the uncontrolled motions of a personal airplane could be made safe as regards spiral tendencies and could be greatly improved as regards maintenance of course without resort to an autopilot. The only way to make the uncontrolled motions completely satisfactory as regards continuous maintenance of course, however, is to use a conventional type of autopilot.

  16. A realistic computed tomography simulator for small motion analysis of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Shima; Zouaoui, Karim; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a realistic simulator for the Computed Tomography (CT) scan process for motion analysis. In fact, we are currently developing a new framework to find small motion from the CT scan. In order to prove the fidelity of this framework, or potentially any other algorithm, we present in this paper a simulator to simulate the whole CT acquisition process with a priori known parameters. In other words, it is a digital phantom for the motion analysis that can be used to compare the results of any related algorithm with the ground-truth realistic analytical model. Such a simulator can be used by the community to test different algorithms in the biomedical imaging domain. The most important features of this simulator are its different considerations to simulate the best the real acquisition process and its generality.

  17. Discomfort Evaluation of Truck Ingress/Egress Motions Based on Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nam-Chul; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative discomfort evaluation method based on biomechanical analysis results for human body movement, as well as its application to an assessment of the discomfort for truck ingress and egress. In this study, the motions of a human subject entering and exiting truck cabins with different types, numbers, and heights of footsteps were first measured using an optical motion capture system and load sensors. Next, the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) ratios of the muscles were calculated through a biomechanical analysis of the musculoskeletal human model for the captured motion. Finally, the objective discomfort was evaluated using the proposed discomfort model based on the MVC ratios. To validate this new discomfort assessment method, human subject experiments were performed to investigate the subjective discomfort levels through a questionnaire for comparison with the objective discomfort levels. The validation results showed that the correlation between the objective and subjective discomforts was significant and could be described by a linear regression model. PMID:26067194

  18. Three-dimensional Motion Analysis of the Ankle during Backward Walking

    PubMed Central

    Soda, Naoki; Ueki, Tsutomu; Aoki, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to perform kinematic and kinetic analyses of the ankle during both forward and backward walking using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Subjects] The subjects were 11 healthy adults. [Methods] Measurements of forward and backward walking motions were taken using a three-dimensional motion analysis device and 3 ground reaction force plates. The analysis segment was the standing phase and the items analyzed were walking time, maximum dorsal flexion of the ankle, maximum angle of plantar flexion, peak ankle power in the sagittal plane, workload of the ankle, and work rate. Statistical analysis consisted of comparisons using the t-test for each of the items measured during both forward and backward walking. [Results] The backward walking group had significantly lower ankle power, workload, and work rate. [Conclusion] The propulsive force in backward walking must come from some factor other than the ankle. The analysis of joint power is an important index for understanding the motion. PMID:24259844

  19. Development of walking analysis system consisting of mobile force plate and motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Wataru; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Aikawa, Masataka; Shiojima, Kouzou; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    In walking analysis, which is one useful method for efficient physical rehabilitation, the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientation data are measured during walking. In the past, these data were measured by a 3D motion analysis system consisting of high-speed cameras and force plates, which must be installed in the floor. However, a conventional 3D motion analysis system can measure the ground reaction force and the center of pressure just on force plates during a few steps. In addition, the subjects' stride lengths are limited because they have to walk on the center of the force plate. These problems can be resolved by converting conventional devices into wearable devices. We used a measuring device consisting of portable force plates and motion sensors. We developed a walking analysis system that calculates the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientations and measured a walking subject to estimate this system. We simultaneously used a conventional 3D motion analysis system to compare with our development system and showed its validity for measurements of ground reaction force and the center of pressure.

  20. Motion interference analysis and optimal control of an electronic controlled bamboo-dance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xu, Liang; Hu, Xiaobin

    2017-08-01

    An electric bamboo-dance mechanism was designed and developed to realize mechanism of automation and mechanization. For coherent and fluent motion, ANSYS finite element analysis was applied on movement interference. Static structural method was used for analyzing dynamic deflection and deformation of the slender rod, while modal analysis was applied on frequency analysis to avoid second deformation caused by resonance. Therefore, the deformation in vertical and horizontal direction was explored and reasonable optimization was taken to avoid interference.

  1. Animation control of surface motion capture.

    PubMed

    Tejera, Margara; Casas, Dan; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Surface motion capture (SurfCap) of actor performance from multiple view video provides reconstruction of the natural nonrigid deformation of skin and clothing. This paper introduces techniques for interactive animation control of SurfCap sequences which allow the flexibility in editing and interactive manipulation associated with existing tools for animation from skeletal motion capture (MoCap). Laplacian mesh editing is extended using a basis model learned from SurfCap sequences to constrain the surface shape to reproduce natural deformation. Three novel approaches for animation control of SurfCap sequences, which exploit the constrained Laplacian mesh editing, are introduced: 1) space–time editing for interactive sequence manipulation; 2) skeleton-driven animation to achieve natural nonrigid surface deformation; and 3) hybrid combination of skeletal MoCap driven and SurfCap sequence to extend the range of movement. These approaches are combined with high-level parametric control of SurfCap sequences in a hybrid surface and skeleton-driven animation control framework to achieve natural surface deformation with an extended range of movement by exploiting existing MoCap archives. Evaluation of each approach and the integrated animation framework are presented on real SurfCap sequences for actors performing multiple motions with a variety of clothing styles. Results demonstrate that these techniques enable flexible control for interactive animation with the natural nonrigid surface dynamics of the captured performance and provide a powerful tool to extend current SurfCap databases by incorporating new motions from MoCap sequences.

  2. An e-textile system for motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Edmison, Josh; Jones, Mark; Lockhart, Thurmon; Martin, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Electronic textiles (e-textiles) offer the promise of home health care devices that integrate seamlessly into the wearer's everyday lifestyle while providing a higher level of functionality than current devices. Existing gait analysis systems are cumbersome laboratory-based systems that, while providing valuable information, would be difficult or impossible to deploy in the home. Yet gait analysis systems offer the promise of preventing and/or mitigating the serious effects of falls in the elderly population. This paper proposes an e-textile solution to this problem along with a design approach for realizing a solution that is inexpensive and usable across the elderly population. Preliminary results are given to demonstrate the promise of the proposed system.

  3. AN E-TEXTILE SYSTEM FOR MOTION ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    EDMISON, Josh; JONES, Mark; LOCKHART, Thurmon; MARTIN, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Electronic textiles (e-textiles) offer the promise of home health care devices that integrate seamlessly into the wearer’s everyday lifestyle while providing a higher level of functionality than current devices. Existing gait analysis systems are cumbersome laboratory-based systems that, while providing valuable information, would be difficult or impossible to deploy in the home. Yet gait analysis systems offer the promise of preventing and/or mitigating the serious effects of falls in the elderly population. This paper proposes an e-textile solution to this problem along with a design approach for realizing a solution that is inexpensive and usable across the elderly population. Preliminary results are given to demonstrate the promise of the proposed system. PMID:15718659

  4. Wearable inertial sensors in swimming motion analysis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Magalhaes, Fabricio Anicio; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Gatta, Giorgio; Fantozzi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The use of contemporary technology is widely recognised as a key tool for enhancing competitive performance in swimming. Video analysis is traditionally used by coaches to acquire reliable biomechanical data about swimming performance; however, this approach requires a huge computational effort, thus introducing a delay in providing quantitative information. Inertial and magnetic sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers, have been recently introduced to assess the biomechanics of swimming performance. Research in this field has attracted a great deal of interest in the last decade due to the gradual improvement of the performance of sensors and the decreasing cost of miniaturised wearable devices. With the aim of describing the state of the art of current developments in this area, a systematic review of the existing methods was performed using the following databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, IEEE Xplore, Google Scholar, Scopus and Science Direct. Twenty-seven articles published in indexed journals and conference proceedings, focusing on the biomechanical analysis of swimming by means of inertial sensors were reviewed. The articles were categorised according to sensor's specification, anatomical sites where the sensors were attached, experimental design and applications for the analysis of swimming performance. Results indicate that inertial sensors are reliable tools for swimming biomechanical analyses.

  5. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  6. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue.

  7. The adaptation of GDL motion recognition system to sport and rehabilitation techniques analysis.

    PubMed

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R

    2016-06-01

    The main novelty of this paper is presenting the adaptation of Gesture Description Language (GDL) methodology to sport and rehabilitation data analysis and classification. In this paper we showed that Lua language can be successfully used for adaptation of the GDL classifier to those tasks. The newly applied scripting language allows easily extension and integration of classifier with other software technologies and applications. The obtained execution speed allows using the methodology in the real-time motion capture data processing where capturing frequency differs from 100 Hz to even 500 Hz depending on number of features or classes to be calculated and recognized. Due to this fact the proposed methodology can be used to the high-end motion capture system. We anticipate that using novel, efficient and effective method will highly help both sport trainers and physiotherapist in they practice. The proposed approach can be directly applied to motion capture data kinematics analysis (evaluation of motion without regard to the forces that cause that motion). The ability to apply pattern recognition methods for GDL description can be utilized in virtual reality environment and used for sport training or rehabilitation treatment.

  8. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D.; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue. PMID:26600996

  9. A Potential Echocardiographic Classification for Constrictive Pericarditis Based on Analysis of Abnormal Septal Motion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Lin, Zaw; Celemajer, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon condition that could be easily confused with congestive heart failure. In symptomatic patients, septal "wobble" on echocardiography may be an important sign of constrictive physiology. This study was planned to investigate the effects of constriction on septal motion as identified by echocardiography. Methods In this retrospective observational study, nine consecutive patients with constriction underwent careful echocardiographic analysis of the interventricular septum (IVS) with slow motion 2-dimensional echocardiography and inspiratory manoeuvres. Six patients who had undergone cardiac magnetic resonance imaging underwent similar analysis. Findings were correlated with haemodynamic data in five patients who had undergone cardiac catheterisation studies. Results In mild cases of constriction a single wobble of the IVS was seen during normal respiration. In more moderate cases a double motion of the septum (termed "double wobble") was seen where the septum bowed initially into the left ventricle (LV) cavity in diastole then relaxed to the middle only to deviate again into the LV cavity late in diastole after atrial contraction. In severe cases, the septum bowed into the LV cavity for the full duration of diastole (pan-diastolic motion). We describe how inspiration also helped to characterize the severity of constriction especially in mild to moderate cases. Conclusion Echocardiography appears a simple tool to help diagnose constriction and grade its severity. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the type of wobble motions helps to grade the severity of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26448822

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE MOTION OF AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET IN A BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Plávalová, Eva; Solovaya, Nina A. E-mail: solov@sai.msu.ru

    2013-11-01

    More than 10% of extra-solar planets (EPs) orbit in a binary or multiple stellar system. We investigated the motion of planets revolving in binary systems in the case of the three-body problem. We carried out an analysis of the motion of an EP revolving in a binary system with the following conditions: (1) a planet in a binary system revolves around one of the components (parent star); (2) the distance between the star's components is greater than that between the parent star and the orbiting planet (ratio of the semi-major axes is a small parameter); and (3) the mass of the planet is smaller than the mass of the stars, but is not negligible. The Hamiltonian of the system without short periodic terms was used. We expanded the Hamiltonian in terms of the Legendre polynomial and truncated after the second-order term, depending on only one angular variable. In this case, the solution of the system was obtained and the qualitative analysis of the motion was produced. We have applied this theory to real EPs and compared to the numerical integration. Analyses of the possible regions of motion are presented. It is shown that stable and unstable motions of EPs are possible. We applied our calculations to two binary systems hosting an EP and calculated the possible values for their unknown orbital elements.

  11. Contextual variables and time-motion analysis in soccer.

    PubMed

    Castellano, J; Blanco-Villaseñor, A; Alvarez, D

    2011-06-01

    Using a multi-camera computerised tracking system the present study aimed to provide a detailed analysis of the work-rate profile of a team of elite soccer players during official matches of the Spanish Premier League. Observation-based performance measures were obtained from 434 individual samples. 6 physical parameters involving the distance covered by players were analysed: standing intensity (0-11 km·h (-1)), low-intensity running (11.1-14 km·h (-1)), moderate-intensity running (14.1-17 km·h (-1)), high-intensity running (17.1-21 km·h (-1)), very high-intensity running (21.1-24 km·h (-1)) and sprinting (>24 km·h (-1)). These intensity thresholds were considered with respect to 4 contextual variables: MATCH STATUS, MATCH LOCATION, OPPONENT LEVEL and MATCH HALF, which were analysed in relation to the EFFECTIVE PLAYING TIME. A descriptive analysis and a multivariate mixed model were employed for the analysis of change processes in soccer. The distance total covered (m) by players at different work intensities during the EFFECTIVE PLAYING TIME was greater when playing at HOME (3 931 vs. 3 887 AWAY), when the reference team was LOSING (3 975 vs. 3 837 DRAWING and 3 921 WINNING) and when the level of the opposing team was HIGHER (4 032 vs. 3 938 MEDIUM and 3 736 BOTTOM). By contrast, their physical performance decreased during the 2NDHALF of matches (3 822 vs. 3 985 1ST HALF).

  12. Influence of the tidal variations of the angular velocity on the rotation of the non-rigid Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás

    2017-04-01

    The lunisolar perturbation induces variations of the Earth's angular velocity components with nearly diurnal period, modulated by combinations of the orbital frequencies of the Moon and the Sun. These tidal variations of the angular velocity give rise to a redistribution of mass of the non-rigid Earth that, in turn, affects its rotational motion. We present a model of the former effect for a two-layer elastic Earth. Specifically, following the Hamiltonian formalism, we obtain formulae of this contribution for the precession and nutation of the Earth's figure axis. The analytical nature of our model allows its numerical evaluation for different Earth rheological models, providing values within current threshold requirements. For example, we obtain a value of the precession rate in longitude about 11 milliarcseconds per century, entailing a variation of the dynamical ellipticity of the Earth of two parts per million, comparable to other recent second order contributions to the precession rate (Baenas et al. 2017). Therefore, the effects of tidal variations of the angular velocity should be considered in the enhancement of the accuracy of the IAU2000 and IAU2006 nutation and precession theories.

  13. Cultural meanings of nature: an analysis of contemporary motion pictures.

    PubMed

    Pollio, Howard R; Anderson, John; Levasseur, Priscilla; Thweatt, Michael

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate current cultural meanings of nature, the authors asked 65 undergraduate students to "list 3 movies in which nature was an important aspect of the film." They also were asked to specify the natural element that stood out to them and describe "how it related to the overall theme of the movie." Two independent groups of raters skilled in interpretive analysis developed thematic meanings from these responses. Following this, in a 2nd study, a different group of participants rated the 18 most frequently mentioned natural elements on thematic scales derived from the initial interpretive analysis. Participants in the 1st study mentioned 33 different movies at least twice and 5 themes that captured the meaning of nature in these films. Correlational results derived from the 2nd study indicated that rating scales reflecting these 5 themes formed 2 distinct groups; the first group described settings in which nature is experienced as adversarial and plays a significant role in dramatic action, and the second group defined settings in which nature is viewed either as a place of refuge or simply as a locale in which ongoing narrative action occurs. The general conclusion reached in both studies concerns the often noted but not always appreciated fact that movies--similar to everyday events and actions--always take place in specific settings and that neither life events nor dramatic narratives can be understood apart from specific settings.

  14. Actigraphy and motion analysis: new tools for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Teicher, M H

    1995-01-01

    Altered locomotor activity is a cardinal sign of several psychiatric disorders. With advances in technology, activity can now be measured precisely. Contemporary studies quantifying activity in psychiatric patients are reviewed. Studies were located by a Medline search (1965 to present; English language only) cross-referencing motor activity and major psychiatric disorders. The review focused on mood disorders and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Activity levels are elevated in mania, agitated depression, and ADHD and attenuated in bipolar depression and seasonal depression. The percentage of low-level daytime activity is directly related to severity of depression, and change in this parameter accurately mirrors recovery. Demanding cognitive tasks elicit fidgeting in children with ADHD, and precise measures of activity and attention may provide a sensitive and specific marker for this disorder. Circadian rhythm analysis enhances the sophistication of activity measures. Affective disorders in children and adolescents are characterized by an attenuated circadian rhythm and an enhanced 12-hour harmonic rhythm (diurnal variation). Circadian analysis may help to distinguish between the activity patterns of mania (dysregulated) and ADHD (intact or enhanced). Persistence of hyperactivity or circadian dysregulation in bipolar patients treated with lithium appears to predict rapid relapse once medication is discontinued. Activity monitoring is a valuable research tool, with the potential to aid clinicians in diagnosis and in prediction of treatment response.

  15. SMART USE OF COMPUTER-AIDED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA) TO CHARACTERIZE SPERM MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) has evolved over the past fifteen years to provide an objective, practical means of measuring and characterizing the velocity and parttern of sperm motion. CASA instruments use video frame-grabber boards to capture multiple images of spermato...

  16. Applying a Resources Framework to Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittman, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest one redefinition of common clusters of questions used to analyze student responses on the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation. Our goal is to propose a methodology that moves beyond an analysis of student learning defined by correct responses, either on the overall test or on clusters of questions defined solely by content. We use…

  17. SMART USE OF COMPUTER-AIDED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA) TO CHARACTERIZE SPERM MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) has evolved over the past fifteen years to provide an objective, practical means of measuring and characterizing the velocity and parttern of sperm motion. CASA instruments use video frame-grabber boards to capture multiple images of spermato...

  18. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  19. Time-correlation analysis of simulated water motion in flexible and rigid gramicidin channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S W; Jakobsson, E; Subramaniam, S; McCammon, J A

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been done on a system consisting of the polypeptide membrane channel former gramicidin, plus water molecules in the channel and caps of waters at the two ends of the channel. In the absence of explicit simulation of the surrounding membrane, the helical form of the channel was maintained by artificial restraints on the peptide motion. The characteristic time constant of the artificial restraint was varied to assess the effect of the restraints on the channel structure and water motions. Time-correlation analysis was done on the motions of individual channel waters and on the motions of the center of mass of the channel waters. It is found that individual water molecules confined in the channel execute higher frequency motions than bulk water, for all degrees of channel peptide restraint. The center-of-mass motion of the chain of channel waters (which is the motion that is critical for transmembrane transport, due to the mandatory single filing of water in the channel) does not exhibit these higher frequency motions. The mobility of the water chain is dramatically reduced by holding the channel rigid. Thus permeation through the channel is not like flow through a rigid pipe; rather permeation is facilitated by peptide motion. For the looser restraints we used, the mobility of the water chain was not very much affected by the degree of restraint. Depending on which set of experiments is considered, the computed mobility of our water chain in the flexible channel is four to twenty times too high to account for the experimentally measured resistance of the gramicidin channel to water flow. From this result it appears likely that the peptide motions of an actual gramicidin channel embedded in a lipid membrane may be more restrained than in our flexible channel model, and that these restraints may be a significant modulator of channel permeability. For the completely rigid channel model the "trapping" of the water molecules in

  20. Continental deformation accommodated by non-rigid passive bookshelf faulting: An example from the Cenozoic tectonic development of northern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Andrew V.; Yin, An

    2016-05-01

    Collision-induced continental deformation commonly involves complex interactions between strike-slip faulting and off-fault deformation, yet this relationship has rarely been quantified. In northern Tibet, Cenozoic deformation is expressed by the development of the > 1000-km-long east-striking left-slip Kunlun, Qinling, and Haiyuan faults. Each have a maximum slip in the central fault segment exceeding 10s to ~ 100 km but a much smaller slip magnitude (~< 10% of the maximum slip) at their terminations. The along-strike variation of fault offsets and pervasive off-fault deformation create a strain pattern that departs from the expectations of the classic plate-like rigid-body motion and flow-like distributed deformation end-member models for continental tectonics. Here we propose a non-rigid bookshelf-fault model for the Cenozoic tectonic development of northern Tibet. Our model, quantitatively relating discrete left-slip faulting to distributed off-fault deformation during regional clockwise rotation, explains several puzzling features, including the: (1) clockwise rotation of east-striking left-slip faults against the northeast-striking left-slip Altyn Tagh fault along the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, (2) alternating fault-parallel extension and shortening in the off-fault regions, and (3) eastward-tapering map-view geometries of the Qimen Tagh, Qaidam, and Qilian Shan thrust belts that link with the three major left-slip faults in northern Tibet. We refer to this specific non-rigid bookshelf-fault system as a passive bookshelf-fault system because the rotating bookshelf panels are detached from the rigid bounding domains. As a consequence, the wallrock of the strike-slip faults deforms to accommodate both the clockwise rotation of the left-slip faults and off-fault strain that arises at the fault ends. An important implication of our model is that the style and magnitude of Cenozoic deformation in northern Tibet vary considerably in the east

  1. Propagating labels of the human brain based on non-rigid MR image registration: an evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckemann, Rolf A.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Rueckert, Daniel; Hill, Derek L. G.; Hammers, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    Background: In order to perform statistical analysis of cohorts based on images, reliable methods for automated anatomical segmentation are required. Label propagation (LP) from manually segmented atlases onto newly acquired images is a particularly promising approach. Methods: We investigated LP on a set of 6 three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance data sets of the brains of normal individuals. For each image, a manually prepared segmentation of 67 structures was available. Each subject image was used in turn as an atlas and registered non-rigidly to each other subject's image. The resulting transformations were applied to the label sets, yielding five different generated segmentations for each subject, which we compared with the native manual segmentations using an overlap measure (similarity index, SI). We then reviewed the LP results for five structures with varied anatomical and label characteristics visually to determine how the registration procedure had affected the delineation of their boundaries. Results: The majority of structures propagated well as measured by SI (SI > 70 in 80% of measurements). Boundaries that were marked in the atlas image by definite intensity differences were congruent, with good agreement between the manual and the generated segmentations. Some boundaries in the manual segmentation were defined as planes marked by landmarks; such boundaries showed greater mismatch. In some cases, the proximity of structures with similar intensity distorted the LP results: e.g., parts of the parahippocampal gyrus were labeled as hippocampus in two cases. Conclusion: The size and shape of anatomical structures can be determined reliably using label propagation, especially where boundaries are defined by distinct differences in grey scale image intensity. These results will inform further work to evaluate potential clinical uses of information extracted from images in this way.

  2. The Accuracy of Screw Axis Analysis Using Position Data from Anatomical Motion Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-05

    Hip Motion ........ . 57 7-2 Screw Axis Analysis for the Sacro -iliac Joint. 57 viii " LIST OF FIGURES Figure Title Page 2-1 Systems Anthropometry Data...analyzed are the hip, and the sacro -iliac joint. The bone movements analyzed are the femur moving relative to the left inominate for hip motion, and the...sacrum moving relative to the inominate for the sacro -iliac joint. The cadaver used was a Caucasian male who was 80 years old. The primary cause of

  3. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  4. Forecasting pulsatory motion for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery: an analysis of algorithms from respiratory motion prediction.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Floris; Bruder, Ralf; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Recently, radiosurgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, especially atrial fibrillation, has been proposed. Using the CyberKnife, focussed radiation will be used to create ablation lines on the beating heart to block unwanted electrical activity. Since this procedure requires high accuracy, the inevitable latency of the system (i.e., the robotic manipulator following the motion of the heart) has to be compensated for. We examine the applicability of prediction algorithms developed for respiratory motion prediction to the prediction of pulsatory motion. We evaluated the MULIN, nLMS, wLMS, SVRpred and EKF algorithms. The test data used has been recorded using external infrared position sensors, 3D ultrasound and the NavX catheter systems. With this data, we have shown that the error from latency can be reduced by at least 10 and as much as 75% (44% average), depending on the type of signal. It has also been shown that, although the SVRpred algorithm was successful in most cases, it was outperformed by the simple nLMS algorithm, the EKF or the wLMS algorithm in a number of cases. We have shown that prediction of cardiac motion is possible and that the algorithms known from respiratory motion prediction are applicable. Since pulsation is more regular than respiration, more research will have to be done to improve frequency-tracking algorithms, like the EKF method, which performed better than expected from their behaviour on respiratory motion traces.

  5. Reliability and concurrent validity of a Smartphone, bubble inclinometer and motion analysis system for measurement of hip joint range of motion.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Paula C; Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A

    2015-05-01

    Traditional methods of assessing joint range of motion (ROM) involve specialized tools that may not be widely available to clinicians. This study assesses the reliability and validity of a custom Smartphone application for assessing hip joint range of motion. Intra-tester reliability with concurrent validity. Passive hip joint range of motion was recorded for seven different movements in 20 males on two separate occasions. Data from a Smartphone, bubble inclinometer and a three dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system were collected simultaneously. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), coefficients of variation (CV) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were used to assess reliability. To assess validity of the Smartphone application and the bubble inclinometer against the three dimensional motion analysis system, intraclass correlation coefficients and fixed and proportional biases were used. The Smartphone demonstrated good to excellent reliability (ICCs>0.75) for four out of the seven movements, and moderate to good reliability for the remaining three movements (ICC=0.63-0.68). Additionally, the Smartphone application displayed comparable reliability to the bubble inclinometer. The Smartphone application displayed excellent validity when compared to the three dimensional motion analysis system for all movements (ICCs>0.88) except one, which displayed moderate to good validity (ICC=0.71). Smartphones are portable and widely available tools that are mostly reliable and valid for assessing passive hip range of motion, with potential for large-scale use when a bubble inclinometer is not available. However, caution must be taken in its implementation as some movement axes demonstrated only moderate reliability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mesoscopic analysis of motion and conformation of cross-bridges.

    PubMed

    Borejdo, J; Rich, R; Midde, K

    2012-12-01

    The orientation of a cross-bridge is widely used as a parameter in determining the state of muscle. The conventional measurements of orientation, such as that made by wide-field fluorescence microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or X-ray diffraction or scattering, report the average orientation of 10(12)-10(9) myosin cross-bridges. Under conditions where all the cross-bridges are immobile and assume the same orientation, for example in normal skeletal muscle in rigor, it is possible to determine the average orientation from such global measurements. But in actively contracting muscle, where a parameter indicating orientation fluctuates in time, the measurements of the average value provide no information about cross-bridge kinetics. To avoid problems associated with averaging information from trillions of cross-bridges, it is necessary to decrease the number of observed cross-bridges to a mesoscopic value (i.e. the value affected by fluctuations around the average). In such mesoscopic regimes, the averaging of the signal is minimal and dynamic behavior can be examined in great detail. Examples of mesoscopic analysis on skeletal and cardiac muscle are provided.

  7. A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing.

    PubMed

    White, Dominic J; Olsen, Peter D

    2010-05-01

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean +/- SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 +/- 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 +/- 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 +/- 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 +/- 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 +/- 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was approximately 1:4 for attempting a problem and approximately 13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

  8. Analysis of tissue changes, measurement system effects, and motion artifacts in echo decorrelation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Nagle, Anna; Subramanian, Swetha; Douglas Mast, T.

    2015-01-01

    Echo decorrelation imaging, a method for mapping ablation-induced ultrasound echo changes, is analyzed. Local echo decorrelation is shown to approximate the decoherence spectrum of tissue reflectivity. Effects of the ultrasound measurement system, echo signal windowing, electronic noise, and tissue motion on echo decorrelation images are determined theoretically, leading to a method for reduction of motion and noise artifacts. Theoretical analysis is validated by simulations and experiments. Simulated decoherence of the scattering medium was recovered with root-mean-square error less than 10% with accuracy dependent on the correlation window size. Motion-induced decorrelation measured in an ex vivo pubovisceral muscle model showed similar trends to theoretical motion-induced decorrelation for a 2.1 MHz curvilinear array with decorrelation approaching unity for 3–4 mm elevational displacement or 1–1.6 mm range displacement. For in vivo imaging of porcine liver by a 7 MHz linear array, theoretical decorrelation computed using image-based motion estimates correlated significantly with measured decorrelation (r = 0.931, N = 10). Echo decorrelation artifacts incurred during in vivo radiofrequency ablation in the same porcine liver were effectively compensated based on the theoretical echo decorrelation model and measured pre-treatment decorrelation. These results demonstrate the potential of echo decorrelation imaging for quantification of heat-induced changes to the scattering tissue medium during thermal ablation. PMID:25697993

  9. Analysis of intracranial aneurysm wall motion and its effects on hemodynamic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; De Craene, Mathieu; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamics, and in particular Wall Shear Stress (WSS), is thought to play a critical role in the progression and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Wall motion is related to local biomechanical properties of the aneurysm, which in turn are associated with the amount of damage undergone by the tissue. The underlying hypothesis in this work is that injured regions show differential motion with respect to normal ones, allowing a connection between local wall biomechanics and a potential mechanism of wall injury such as elevated WSS. In a previous work, a novel method was presented combining wall motion estimation using image registration techniques with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations in order to provide realistic intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. It was shown that, when compared to compliant vessels, rigid models tend to overestimate WSS and produce smaller areas of elevated WSS and force concentration, being the observed differences related to the magnitude of the displacements. This work aims to further study the relationships between wall motion, flow patterns and risk of rupture in aneurysms. To this end, four studies containing both 3DRA and DSA studies were analyzed, and an improved version of the method developed previously was applied to cases showing wall motion. A quantification and analysis of the displacement fields and their relationships to flow patterns are presented. This relationship may play an important role in understanding interaction mechanisms between hemodynamics, wall biomechanics, and the effect on aneurysm evolution mechanisms.

  10. Analysis of tissue changes, measurement system effects, and motion artifacts in echo decorrelation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Nagle, Anna; Subramanian, Swetha; Douglas Mast, T

    2015-02-01

    Echo decorrelation imaging, a method for mapping ablation-induced ultrasound echo changes, is analyzed. Local echo decorrelation is shown to approximate the decoherence spectrum of tissue reflectivity. Effects of the ultrasound measurement system, echo signal windowing, electronic noise, and tissue motion on echo decorrelation images are determined theoretically, leading to a method for reduction of motion and noise artifacts. Theoretical analysis is validated by simulations and experiments. Simulated decoherence of the scattering medium was recovered with root-mean-square error less than 10% with accuracy dependent on the correlation window size. Motion-induced decorrelation measured in an ex vivo pubovisceral muscle model showed similar trends to theoretical motion-induced decorrelation for a 2.1 MHz curvilinear array with decorrelation approaching unity for 3-4 mm elevational displacement or 1-1.6 mm range displacement. For in vivo imaging of porcine liver by a 7 MHz linear array, theoretical decorrelation computed using image-based motion estimates correlated significantly with measured decorrelation (r = 0.931, N = 10). Echo decorrelation artifacts incurred during in vivo radiofrequency ablation in the same porcine liver were effectively compensated based on the theoretical echo decorrelation model and measured pre-treatment decorrelation. These results demonstrate the potential of echo decorrelation imaging for quantification of heat-induced changes to the scattering tissue medium during thermal ablation.

  11. Energy Consumption Analysis Procedure for Robotic Applications in different task motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Iman; Aris, Ishak b.; Hamiruce Marhaban, Mohammad; Juraiza Ishak, Asnor

    2015-11-01

    This work proposes energy analysis method for humanoid robot, seen from simple motion task to complex one in energy chain. The research developed a procedure suitable for analysis, saving and modelling of energy consumption not only in this type of robot but also in most robots that based on electrical power as an energy source. This method has validated by an accurate integration using Matlab software for the power consumption curve to calculate the energy of individual and multiple servo motors. Therefore, this study can be considered as a procedure for energy analysis by utilizing the laboratory instruments capabilities to measure the energy parameters. We performed a various task motions with different angular speed to find out the speed limits in terms of robot stability and control strategy. A battery capacity investigation have been searched for several types of batteries to extract the power modelling equation and energy density parameter for each battery type, Matlab software have been built to design the algorithm and to evaluate experimental amount of the energy which is represented by area under the curve of the power curves. This will provide a robust estimation for the required energy in different task motions to be considered in energy saving (i.e., motion planning and real time scheduling).

  12. Phototaxis of Haloarcula marismortui revealed through a novel microbial motion analysis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Yang, Chii-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Haloarcula marismortui has been described to be nonmotile prior to the recent identification of flagellar filaments, suggesting the motile nature of H. marismortui. Here we observed the locomotion of freshly cultured H. marismortui cells and tracked the swimming trajectories via ImageJ. Trajectories of H. marismortui are intrinsically noisy, posing difficulties in motion analysis with previously established algorithms. By introducing the concept of "window vector," a Microsoft Excel-VBA-implemented microbial motion analysis algorithm reported here was able to (1) discriminate nonswimming objects from swimming cells without empirical customization by applying a power-law relationship and (2) reduce the noise caused by Brownian motion, thus enhancing the accuracy of swim reversal identification. Based on this motion analysis algorithm, two recently identified sensory rhodopsins, HmSRI and HmSRII, were shown to mediate photoattractant and photorepellent responses, respectively, revealing the phototactic activity of H. marismortui, the only archaeon showing such phenomenon other than Halobacterium salinarum. © 2010 U.S. Government. Journal Compilation. The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Novel 3-dimensional motion analysis method for measuring the lumbar spine range of motion: repeatability and reliability compared with an electrogoniometer.

    PubMed

    Tojima, Michio; Ogata, Naoshi; Yozu, Arito; Sumitani, Masahiko; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2013-10-01

    Repeatability and reliability for measuring methods for real-time lumbar range of motion. We established a novel set of marker positions for 3-dimensional motion analysis (VICON system) to determine lumbar spine range of motion (LROM) and lumbar motion precisely; we compared the repeatability and reliability of VICON system with those of an electrogoniometer. The assessment of the LROM using x-ray is still one of the most precise methods, despite the radiation exposure. To avoid this, alternative methods, such as the VICON system and electrogoniometer, have been widely used. No study has reported the repeatability and reliability of LROM measurements using a VICON system and electrogoniometer. The VICON system and electrogoniometer measured LROM and lumbar motion in 7 healthy males during 7 days. Differences between both systems were analyzed using Bland-Altman plots. Repeatability and reliability of the LROM measurements was assessed using coefficients of multiple correlations and intraclass correlation coefficients, respectively. Standard error of measurement was calculated to quantify the systematic error in LROM measurements. The mean maximum LROM values using the VICON system/electrogoniometer were 42°/52° for flexion, 17°/24° for extension, 16°/16° for lateral bending, and 8°/2° for axial rotation, respectively. Between VICON system and the electrogoniometer, Bland-Altman plots revealed no discrepancies in LROM values except for flexion.Coefficients of multiple correlations for LROM showed excellent repeatability. LROM measurements with VICON system showed excellent reliability for flexion and extension and fair-to-good reliability for other motions. LROM measurements with the electrogoniometer showed excellent reliability for flexion and fair-to-good reliability for other motions. Except for axial rotation, maximum intraclass correlation coefficients using VICON system were more reliable than the electrogoniometer for measuring lumbar motion. VICON

  14. Improved dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using nonrigid registration on sequential SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Edwin C. I.; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Song, Na

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Voxel-level and patient-specific 3D dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) typically involves serial nuclear medicine scans. Misalignment of the images can result in reduced dosimetric accuracy. Since the scans are typically performed over a period of several days, there will be patient movement between scans and possible nonrigid organ deformation. This work aims to implement and evaluate the use of nonrigid image registration on a series of quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) images for TRT dosimetry. Methods: A population of 4D extended cardiac torso phantoms, comprised of three In-111 Zevalin biokinetics models and three anatomical variations, was generated based on the patient data. The authors simulated QSPECT acquisitions at five time points. At each time point, individual organ and whole-body deformation between scans were modeled by translating/rotating organs and the body up to 5°/voxels, keeping ≤5% difference in organ volume. An analytical projector was used to generate realistic noisy projections for a medium energy general purpose collimator. Projections were reconstructed using OS-EM algorithm with geometric collimator detector response, attenuation, and scatter corrections. The QSPECT images were registered using organ-based nonrigid image registration method. The cumulative activity in each voxel was obtained by integrating the activity over time. Dose distribution images were obtained by convolving the cumulative activity images with a Y-90 dose kernel. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for organs-of-interest were analyzed. Results: After nonrigid registration, the mean differences in organ doses compared to the case without misalignment were improved from (−15.50 ± 5.59)% to (−2.12 ± 1.05)% and (−7.28 ± 2.30)% to (−0.23 ± 0.71)% for the spleen and liver, respectively. For all organs, the cumulative DVHs showed improvement after nonrigid registration and the normalized absolute error of differential DVHs ranged from 6.79% to

  15. Dynamic motion analysis of dart throwers motion visualized through computerized tomography and calculation of the axis of rotation.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Y; Troupis, J M; Patel, M; Smith, J; Crossett, M

    2014-05-01

    We used a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) mapping method to model the wrist in dynamic unrestricted dart throwers motion in three men and four women. With the aid of precision landmark identification, a 3D coordinate system was applied to the distal radius and the movement of the carpus was described. Subsequently, with dynamic 3D reconstructions and freedom to position the camera viewpoint anywhere in space, we observed the motion pathways of all carpal bones in dart throwers motion and calculated its axis of rotation. This was calculated to lie in 27° of anteversion from the coronal plane and 44° of varus angulation relative to the transverse plane. This technique is a safe and a feasible carpal imaging method to gain key information for decision making in future hand surgical and rehabilitative practices.

  16. Rigid body motion analysis system for off-line processing of time-coded video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Walter L.; Shortis, Mark R.

    1995-09-01

    Photogrammetry affords the only noncontact means of providing unambiguous six-degree-of- freedom estimates for rigid body motion analysis. Video technology enables convenient off- the-shelf capability for obtaining and storing image data at frame (30 Hz) or field (60 Hz) rates. Videometry combines these technologies with frame capture capability accessible to PCs to allow unavailable measurements critical to the study of rigid body dynamics. To effectively utilize this capability, however, some means of editing, post processing, and sorting substantial amounts of time coded video data is required. This paper discusses a prototype motion analysis system built around PC and video disk technology, which is proving useful in exploring applications of these concepts to rigid body tracking and deformation analysis. Calibration issues and user interactive software development associated with this project will be discussed, as will examples of measurement projects and data reduction.

  17. ΔΔPT: a comprehensive toolbox for the analysis of protein motion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal Mode Analysis is one of the most successful techniques for studying motions in proteins and macromolecules. It can provide information on the mechanism of protein functions, used to aid crystallography and NMR data reconstruction, and calculate protein free energies. Results ΔΔPT is a toolbox allowing calculation of elastic network models and principle component analysis. It allows the analysis of pdb files or trajectories taken from; Gromacs, Amber, and DL_POLY. As well as calculation of the normal modes it also allows comparison of the modes with experimental protein motion, variation of modes with mutation or ligand binding, and calculation of molecular dynamic entropies. Conclusions This toolbox makes the respective tools available to a wide community of potential NMA users, and allows them unrivalled ability to analyse normal modes using a variety of techniques and current software. PMID:23758746

  18. Earth orientation from lunar laser ranging and an error analysis of polar motion services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data are obtained on the basis of the timing of laser pulses travelling from observatories on earth to retroreflectors placed on the moon's surface during the Apollo program. The modeling and analysis of the LLR data can provide valuable insights into earth's dynamics. The feasibility to model accurately the lunar orbit over the full 13-year observation span makes it possible to conduct relatively long-term studies of variations in the earth's rotation. A description is provided of general analysis techniques, and the calculation of universal time (UT1) from LLR is discussed. Attention is also given to a summary of intercomparisons with different techniques, polar motion results and intercomparisons, and a polar motion error analysis.

  19. Hilbert-Huang transform analysis of dynamic and earthquake motion recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, R.R.; Ma, S.; Safak, E.; Hartzell, S.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the rationale of Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for analyzing dynamic and earthquake motion recordings in studies of seismology and engineering. In particular, this paper first provides the fundamentals of the HHT method, which consist of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert spectral analysis. It then uses the HHT to analyze recordings of hypothetical and real wave motion, the results of which are compared with the results obtained by the Fourier data processing technique. The analysis of the two recordings indicates that the HHT method is able to extract some motion characteristics useful in studies of seismology and engineering, which might not be exposed effectively and efficiently by Fourier data processing technique. Specifically, the study indicates that the decomposed components in EMD of HHT, namely, the intrinsic mode function (IMF) components, contain observable, physical information inherent to the original data. It also shows that the grouped IMF components, namely, the EMD-based low- and high-frequency components, can faithfully capture low-frequency pulse-like as well as high-frequency wave signals. Finally, the study illustrates that the HHT-based Hilbert spectra are able to reveal the temporal-frequency energy distribution for motion recordings precisely and clearly.

  20. Statistical analysis of surrogate signals to incorporate respiratory motion variability into radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Matthias; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Marx, Mirko; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory motion and its variability lead to location uncertainties in radiation therapy (RT) of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Current approaches for motion compensation in RT are usually driven by respiratory surrogate signals, e.g., spirometry. In this contribution, we present an approach for statistical analysis, modeling and subsequent simulation of surrogate signals on a cycle-by-cycle basis. The simulated signals represent typical patient-specific variations of, e.g., breathing amplitude and cycle period. For the underlying statistical analysis, all breathing cycles of an observed signal are consistently parameterized using approximating B-spline curves. Statistics on breathing cycles are then performed by using the parameters of the B-spline approximations. Assuming that these parameters follow a multivariate Gaussian distribution, realistic time-continuous surrogate signals of arbitrary length can be generated and used to simulate the internal motion of tumors and organs based on a patient-specific diffeomorphic correspondence model. As an example, we show how this approach can be employed in RT treatment planning to calculate tumor appearance probabilities and to statistically assess the impact of respiratory motion and its variability on planned dose distributions.

  1. Multi-level model for 2D human motion analysis and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foures, Thomas; Joly, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the proposition of a model for human motion analysis in a video. Its main caracteristic is to adapt itself automatically to the current resolution, the actual quality of the picture, or the level of precision required by a given application, due to its possible decomposition into several hierarchical levels. The model is region-based to address some analysis processing needs. The top level of the model is only defined with 5 ribbons, which can be cut into sub-ribbons regarding to a given (or an expected) level of details. Matching process between model and current picture consists in the comparison of extracted subject shape with a graphical rendering of the model built on the base of some computed parameters. The comparison is processed by using a chamfer matching algorithm. In our developments, we intend to realize a platform of interaction between a dancer and tools synthetizing abstract motion pictures and music in the conditions of a real-time dialogue between a human and a computer. In consequence, we use this model in a perspective of motion description instead of motion recognition: no a priori gestures are supposed to be recognized as far as no a priori application is specially targeted. The resulting description will be made following a Description Scheme compliant with the movement notation called "Labanotation".

  2. Error analysis of motion correction method for laser scanning of moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, S.; Lohani, B.

    2014-05-01

    The limitation of conventional laser scanning methods is that the objects being scanned should be static. The need of scanning moving objects has resulted in the development of new methods capable of generating correct 3D geometry of moving objects. Limited literature is available showing development of very few methods capable of catering to the problem of object motion during scanning. All the existing methods utilize their own models or sensors. Any studies on error modelling or analysis of any of the motion correction methods are found to be lacking in literature. In this paper, we develop the error budget and present the analysis of one such `motion correction' method. This method assumes availability of position and orientation information of the moving object which in general can be obtained by installing a POS system on board or by use of some tracking devices. It then uses this information along with laser scanner data to apply correction to laser data, thus resulting in correct geometry despite the object being mobile during scanning. The major application of this method lie in the shipping industry to scan ships either moving or parked in the sea and to scan other objects like hot air balloons or aerostats. It is to be noted that the other methods of "motion correction" explained in literature can not be applied to scan the objects mentioned here making the chosen method quite unique. This paper presents some interesting insights in to the functioning of "motion correction" method as well as a detailed account of the behavior and variation of the error due to different sensor components alone and in combination with each other. The analysis can be used to obtain insights in to optimal utilization of available components for achieving the best results.

  3. Principal Component Analysis of the Longitudinal Carotid Wall Motion in Association with Vascular Stiffness: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yli-Ollila, Heikki; Tarvainen, Mika P; Laitinen, Tomi P; Laitinen, Tiina M

    2016-12-01

    The longitudinal motion of the carotid wall during a heart cycle has a multiphasic waveform. Recent studies have examined the amplitude of this motion. Instead of amplitude measurements, we focus on making a detailed characterization of the motion waveform. Two-minute carotid ultrasound videos were obtained for 19 healthy volunteers, and a speckle tracking algorithm was used to measure the motion of the carotid wall. Principal component analysis revealed the characteristic features of wall motion and their relation to known arterial stiffness indices. By estimating two principal components, we could account for more than 92% of the variation in the motion graphs. The first principal component derived from the longitudinal motion curves was significantly correlated to pulse pressure, indicating that the main dominant base waveform of the longitudinal motion was related to blood pressure. The second principal component derived from the longitudinal motion curves had multiple significant correlations to known stiffness indices, indicating that the stronger biphasic structure of the motion curve, especially on the adventitia layer, was associated with higher distensibility and compliance, as well as reduced carotid artery stiffness. According to this study, the second principal component of the longitudinal motion may be a useful parameter reflecting vascular health. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SU-E-J-194: Continuous Patient Surface Monitoring and Motion Analysis During Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E; Rioux, A; Benedict, S; Yamamoto, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Continuous monitoring of the SBRT lung patient motion during delivery is critical for ensuring adequate target volume margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This work assesses the deviation of the patient surface motion using a real-time surface tracking system throughout treatment delivery. Methods: Our SBRT protocol employs abdominal compression to reduce the diaphragm movement to within 1 cm, and this is confirmed daily with fluoroscopy. Most patients are prescribed 3–5 fractions, and on treatment day a repeat motion analysis with fluoroscopy is performed, followed by a kV CBCT is aligned with the original planning CT image for 3D setup confirmation. During this entire process a patient surface data restricted to whole chest or the sternum at the middle of the breathing cycle was captured using AlignRT optical surface tracking system and defined as a reference surface. For 10 patients, the deviation of the patient position from the reference surface was recorded during the SBRT delivery in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction at 3–6 measurements per second. Results: On average, the patient position deviated from the reference surface more than 4 mm, 3 mm and 2 mm in the AP direction for 0.95%, 3.7% and 11.1% of the total treatment time, respectively. Only one of the 10 patients showed that the maximum deviation of the patient surface during the SBRT delivery was greater than 1 cm. The average deviation of the patient surface from the reference surface during the SBRT delivery was not greater than 1.6 mm for any patient. Conclusion: This investigation indicates that AP motion can be significant even though the frequency is low. Continuous monitoring during SBRT has demonstrated value in monitoring patient motion ensuring that margins selected for SBRT are appropriate, and the use of non-ionizing and high-frequency imaging can provide useful indicators of motion during treatment.

  5. A Framework for the Validation of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Maps Using Strong Ground Motion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydlon, S. A.; Beroza, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent debate on the efficacy of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA), and the utility of hazard maps (i.e. Stein et al., 2011; Hanks et al., 2012), has prompted a need for validation of such maps using recorded strong ground motion data. Unfortunately, strong motion records are limited spatially and temporally relative to the area and time windows hazard maps encompass. We develop a framework to test the predictive powers of PSHA maps that is flexible with respect to a map's specified probability of exceedance and time window, and the strong motion receiver coverage. Using a combination of recorded and interpolated strong motion records produced through the ShakeMap environment, we compile a record of ground motion intensity measures for California from 2002-present. We use this information to perform an area-based test of California PSHA maps inspired by the work of Ward (1995). Though this framework is flexible in that it can be applied to seismically active areas where ShakeMap-like ground shaking interpolations have or can be produced, this testing procedure is limited by the relatively short lifetime of strong motion recordings and by the desire to only test with data collected after the development of the PSHA map under scrutiny. To account for this, we use the assumption that PSHA maps are time independent to adapt the testing procedure for periods of recorded data shorter than the lifetime of a map. We note that accuracy of this testing procedure will only improve as more data is collected, or as the time-horizon of interest is reduced, as has been proposed for maps of areas experiencing induced seismicity. We believe that this procedure can be used to determine whether PSHA maps are accurately portraying seismic hazard and whether discrepancies are localized or systemic.

  6. Depth information in natural environments derived from optic flow by insect motion detection system: a model analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwegmann, Alexander; Lindemann, Jens P; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the depth structure of the environment is crucial for moving animals in many behavioral contexts, such as collision avoidance, targeting objects, or spatial navigation. An important source of depth information is motion parallax. This powerful cue is generated on the eyes during translatory self-motion with the retinal images of nearby objects moving faster than those of distant ones. To investigate how the visual motion pathway represents motion-based depth information we analyzed its responses to image sequences recorded in natural cluttered environments with a wide range of depth structures. The analysis was done on the basis of an experimentally validated model of the visual motion pathway of insects, with its core elements being correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs). It is the key result of our analysis that the absolute EMD responses, i.e., the motion energy profile, represent the contrast-weighted nearness of environmental structures during translatory self-motion at a roughly constant velocity. In other words, the output of the EMD array highlights contours of nearby objects. This conclusion is largely independent of the scale over which EMDs are spatially pooled and was corroborated by scrutinizing the motion energy profile after eliminating the depth structure from the natural image sequences. Hence, the well-established dependence of correlation-type EMDs on both velocity and textural properties of motion stimuli appears to be advantageous for representing behaviorally relevant information about the environment in a computationally parsimonious way.

  7. Depth information in natural environments derived from optic flow by insect motion detection system: a model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwegmann, Alexander; Lindemann, Jens P.; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the depth structure of the environment is crucial for moving animals in many behavioral contexts, such as collision avoidance, targeting objects, or spatial navigation. An important source of depth information is motion parallax. This powerful cue is generated on the eyes during translatory self-motion with the retinal images of nearby objects moving faster than those of distant ones. To investigate how the visual motion pathway represents motion-based depth information we analyzed its responses to image sequences recorded in natural cluttered environments with a wide range of depth structures. The analysis was done on the basis of an experimentally validated model of the visual motion pathway of insects, with its core elements being correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs). It is the key result of our analysis that the absolute EMD responses, i.e., the motion energy profile, represent the contrast-weighted nearness of environmental structures during translatory self-motion at a roughly constant velocity. In other words, the output of the EMD array highlights contours of nearby objects. This conclusion is largely independent of the scale over which EMDs are spatially pooled and was corroborated by scrutinizing the motion energy profile after eliminating the depth structure from the natural image sequences. Hence, the well-established dependence of correlation-type EMDs on both velocity and textural properties of motion stimuli appears to be advantageous for representing behaviorally relevant information about the environment in a computationally parsimonious way. PMID:25136314

  8. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  9. Summary of transformation equations and equations of motion used in free flight and wind tunnel data reduction and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, T. G.; Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    Basic formulations for developing coordinate transformations and motion equations used with free-flight and wind-tunnel data reduction are presented. The general forms presented include axes transformations that enable transfer back and forth between any of the five axes systems that are encountered in aerodynamic analysis. Equations of motion are presented that enable calculation of motions anywhere in the vicinity of the earth. A bibliography of publications on methods of analyzing flight data is included.

  10. Clinical evaluation of motion and position sense in the upper extremities of the elderly using motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-yi; Wu, Yi-hui

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure kinesthetic accuracy in healthy older adults by using arm position and motion matching tests. We investigated the effect of task type, joint angle, and matching arm results on kinesthetic accuracy in the upper extremities of 17 healthy right-handed older adults. Blinded subjects were asked to match positions and motions at four reference joint angles: 1) shoulder flexion, 0°-60°; 2) elbow flexion, 90°-135°; 3) wrist extension, 0°-50° in the sagittal plane; and 4) shoulder abduction, 0°-60° in the frontal plane. The absolute difference in angular displacement between the reference and matching arms was calculated to determine kinesthetic accuracy. Results showed that subjects were more accurate at matching motion than position tasks (P=0.03). Shoulder and elbow joints were more sensitive than wrist joints in perceiving passive positions and motions (P<0.05). The effect of the matching arm was found only when matching the joint angles of shoulder abduction and wrist extension (P<0.01). These results are comparable to findings of other studies that used machine-generated kinesthetic stimuli. The manual measurement of kinesthetic accuracy could be effective as a preliminary screening tool for therapists in clinical settings.

  11. Ab Initio Effective Rovibrational Hamiltonians for Non-Rigid Molecules via Curvilinear VMP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.

    2017-06-01

    Accurate predictions of spectroscopic constants for non-rigid molecules are particularly challenging for ab initio theory. For all but the smallest systems, ``brute force'' diagonalization of the full rovibrational Hamiltonian is computationally prohibitive, leaving us at the mercy of perturbative approaches. However, standard perturbative techniques, such as second order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), are based on the approximation that a molecule makes small amplitude vibrations about a well defined equilibrium structure. Such assumptions are physically inappropriate for non-rigid systems. In this talk, we will describe extensions to curvilinear vibrational Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (VMP2) that account for rotational and rovibrational effects in the molecular Hamiltonian. Through several examples, we will show that this approach provides predictions to nearly microwave accuracy of molecular constants including rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters, Coriolis coupling constants, and anharmonic vibrational and tunneling frequencies.

  12. Free-form deformation based non-rigid registration on breast cancer MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangbin; Suo, Shiteng; Lu, Xuesong; Li, Yuehua; Chen, Li; Zhang, Su

    2013-07-01

    High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound treatment combined with magnetic resonance technology (MRI-guided HIFU, MRgHIFU) can protect the thermal ablation without harming the surrounding tissue by using MRI for target positioning, where image registration plays an important role in the implementation of precise treatment. In this paper, we apply three-dimension free-form deformation non-rigid registration on treatment plan amendments and tracking of breast cancer. Free-form deformation based and demons based non-rigid registration are respectively employed on breast cancer MR imaging required at different times before and after for comparison. The results of the experiments show that the registration performed on the breast tumor image data with slight and larger deformation is effective, and the mutual information of the ROI increased from 1.49 before registration to 1.53.

  13. Nonrigid registration of 3D longitudinal optical coherence tomography volumes with choroidal neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiangding; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D registration method for retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes. The proposed method consists of five main steps: First, a projection image of the 3D OCT scan is created. Second, the vessel enhancement filter is applied on the projection image to detect vessel shadow. Third, landmark points are extracted based on both vessel positions and layer information. Fourth, the coherent point drift method is used to align retinal OCT volumes. Finally, a nonrigid B-spline-based registration method is applied to find the optimal transform to match the data. We applied this registration method on 15 3D OCT scans of patients with Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV). The Dice coefficients (DSC) between layers are greatly improved after applying the nonrigid registration.

  14. Evaluation and validation methods for intersubject nonrigid 3D image registration of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ting; Starreveld, Yves P.; Peters, Terry M.

    2005-04-01

    This work presents methodologies for assessing the accuracy of non-rigid intersubject registration algorithms from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. The first method was based on a set of 43 anatomical landmarks. MRI brain images of 12 subjects were non-rigidly registered to the standard MRI dataset. The "gold-standard" coordinates of the 43 landmarks in the target were estimated by averaging their coordinates after 6 tagging sessions. The Euclidean distance between each landmark of a subject after warping to the reference space and the homologous "gold-standard" landmark on the reference image was considered as the registration error. Another method based on visual inspection software displaying the spatial change of colour-coded spheres, before and after warping, was also developed to evaluate the performance of the non-rigid warping algorithms within the homogeneous regions in the deep-brain. Our methods were exemplified by assessing and comparing the accuracy of two intersubject non-rigid registration approaches, AtamaiWarp and ANIMAL algorithms. From the first method, the average registration error was 1.04mm +/- 0.65mm for AtamaiWarp, and 1.59mm +/- 1.47mm for ANIMAL. With maximum registration errors of 2.78mm and 3.90mm respectively, AtamaiWarp and ANIMAL located 58% and 35% landmarks respectively with registration errors less than 1mm. A paired t-test showed that the differences in registration error between AtamaiWarp and ANIMAL were significant (P < 0.002) demonstrating that AtamaiWarp, in addition to being over 60 times faster than ANIMAL, also provides more accurate results. From the second method, both algorithms treated the interior of homogeneous regions in an appropriate manner.

  15. A novel scheme for automatic nonrigid image registration using deformation invariant feature and geometric constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-10-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for non-rigid deformation images which are more complicated and common in remote sensing images, such as distorted UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) images or scanning imaging images caused by flutter. Traditional non-rigid image registration methods are based on the correctly matched corresponding landmarks, which usually needs artificial markers. It is a rather challenging task to locate the accurate position of the points and get accurate homonymy point sets. In this paper, we proposed an automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm which mainly consists of three steps: To begin with, we introduce an automatic feature point extraction method based on non-linear scale space and uniform distribution strategy to extract the points which are uniform distributed along the edge of the image. Next, we propose a hybrid point matching algorithm using DaLI (Deformation and Light Invariant) descriptor and local affine invariant geometric constraint based on triangulation which is constructed by K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Based on the accurate homonymy point sets, the two images are registrated by the model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline). Our method is demonstrated by three deliberately designed experiments. The first two experiments are designed to evaluate the distribution of point set and the correctly matching rate on synthetic data and real data respectively. The last experiment is designed on the non-rigid deformation remote sensing images and the three experimental results demonstrate the accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared with other traditional methods.

  16. Analysis of wave packet motion in frequency and time domain: oxazine 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Sobotta, Constanze; Dürr, Regina; Pulvermacher, Horst; Malkmus, Stephan

    2006-08-17

    Wave packet motion in the laser dye oxazine 1 in methanol is investigated by spectrally resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The spectral range of 600-690 nm was accessible by amplified broadband probe pulses covering the overlap region of ground-state bleach and stimulated emission signal. The influence of vibrational wave packets on the optical signal is analyzed in the frequency domain and the time domain. For the analysis in the frequency domain an algorithm is presented that accounts for interference effects of neighbored vibrational modes. By this method amplitude, phase and decay time of vibrational modes are retrieved as a function of probe wavelength and distortions due to neighbored modes are reduced. The analysis of the data in the time domain yields complementary information on the intensity, central wavelength, and spectral width of the optical bleach spectrum due to wave packet motion.

  17. Gait motion analysis in the unrestrained condition of trans-femoral amputee with a prosthetic limb.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Uno, Ryuji; Matsuda, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Trans-femoral amputees must regain moving pattern by refined rehabilitation program using ground reaction forces, joint angles and joint moments applied on a prosthetic limb. On the other hand, understanding those loads and kinematic variables is indispensable for gait analysis based on the biomechanical consideration of trans-femoral amputees. However, conventional prosthetic gait training systems cannot measure long continuous walking motions. In this paper, ground reaction forces and kinematic parameters applied on trans-femoral prosthesis are measured by the prosthetic gait motion analysis system using mobile force plate and attitude sensor for the unrestrained gait measurement. As a result of the experiments, the patterns of antero-posterior axis ground reaction forces and joint moments about the medio-lateral axis are remarkably different among the five activities. Finally, the effectiveness of the developed prosthetic gait training system to consider biomechanics and kinematics in trans-femoral prosthesis is validated.

  18. Motion of a Moving Elastic Beam Carrying a Moving MASS—ANALYSIS and Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, S.; YOUM, Y.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, vibrational motion of an elastic beam fixed on a moving cart and carrying a moving mass is investigated. The equations of motion of the beam-mass-cart system are derived and the coupled dynamic equations are solved by the unconstrained modal analysis. In modal analysis, the exact normal mode solutions corresponding to the eigenfrequencies for each position of the moving mass and the ratios of the weight of the beam-mass-cart system are used. Proper transformation of time solutions between the normal modes for a position and those for the next position of the moving mass is also considered. Numerical simulations are carried out to obtain open-loop responses of the system in tracking pre-designed paths of the moving mass. The simulation results show that the model predicts the dynamic behavior of the beam-mass-cart system well. Experiments are carried out to show the validity of the proposed analytical method.

  19. A measurement approach based on micro-Doppler maps for signature and motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, R.; Sona, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a novel and comprehensive measurement approach is proposed for the detection and analysis of human motion signature. The approach combines theoretical concepts and tools of micro-Doppler theory, image processing, and human modeling, in a original way. The attention is primarily focused on the description of the most meaningful parameters influencing the accuracy of the obtained signature. The ultimate purpose is to provide a framework through which organizing, comparing, and merging future research activities, ideas and results in the field of human motion signature analysis for security, health and disaster recovery purposes. Some simulation and experimental results underlying the feasibility and effectiveness of the measurement approach are also summarized and analyzed.

  20. A First- and Second-Order Motion Energy Analysis of Peripheral Motion Illusions Leads to Further Evidence of “Feature Blur” in Peripheral Vision

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Arthur G.; Knight, Emily J.; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Background Anatomical and physiological differences between the central and peripheral visual systems are well documented. Recent findings have suggested that vision in the periphery is not just a scaled version of foveal vision, but rather is relatively poor at representing spatial and temporal phase and other visual features. Shapiro, Lu, Huang, Knight, and Ennis (2010) have recently examined a motion stimulus (the “curveball illusion”) in which the shift from foveal to peripheral viewing results in a dramatic spatial/temporal discontinuity. Here, we apply a similar analysis to a range of other spatial/temporal configurations that create perceptual conflict between foveal and peripheral vision. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate how the differences between foveal and peripheral vision affect super-threshold vision, we created a series of complex visual displays that contain opposing sources of motion information. The displays (referred to as the peripheral escalator illusion, peripheral acceleration and deceleration illusions, rotating reversals illusion, and disappearing squares illusion) create dramatically different perceptions when viewed foveally versus peripherally. We compute the first-order and second-order directional motion energy available in the displays using a three-dimensional Fourier analysis in the (x, y, t) space. The peripheral escalator, acceleration and deceleration illusions and rotating reversals illusion all show a similar trend: in the fovea, the first-order motion energy and second-order motion energy can be perceptually separated from each other; in the periphery, the perception seems to correspond to a combination of the multiple sources of motion information. The disappearing squares illusion shows that the ability to assemble the features of Kanisza squares becomes slower in the periphery. Conclusions/Significance The results lead us to hypothesize “feature blur” in the periphery (i.e., the peripheral visual system

  1. Tracking and Motion Analysis of Crack Propagations in Crystals for Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Duchaineau, M; Goldgof, D B

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis for a discovery in molecular dynamics. Recent simulations have shown that velocities of crack propagations in crystals under certain conditions can become supersonic, which is contrary to classical physics. In this research, they present a framework for tracking and motion analysis of crack propagations in crystals. It includes line segment extraction based on Canny edge maps, feature selection based on physical properties, and subsequent tracking of primary and secondary wavefronts. This tracking is completely automated; it runs in real time on three 834-image sequences using forty 250 MHZ processors. Results supporting physical observations are presented in terms of both feature tracking and velocity analysis.

  2. Inertial sensor-based two feet motion tracking for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Nhat; Suh, Young Soo

    2013-04-29

    Two feet motion is estimated for gait analysis. An inertial sensor is attached on each shoe and an inertial navigation algorithm is used to estimate the movement of both feet. To correct inter-shoe position error, a camera is installed on the right shoe and infrared LEDs are installed on the left shoe. The proposed system gives key gait analysis parameters such as step length, stride length, foot angle and walking speed. Also it gives three dimensional trajectories of two feet for gait analysis.

  3. Transfer Function Analysis of the Longitudinal Motion of the Common Carotid Artery Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yli-Ollila, Heikki; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Laitinen, Tomi P.; Laitinen, Tiina M.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal motion of the carotid wall is a potential new measure of arterial stiffness. Despite the over decade long research on the subject, the driving force and the specific longitudinal kinetics of the carotid wall has remained unclear. In this study, a transfer function analysis with 20 healthy subjects is presented to derive how the energy from the blood pressure moves the innermost arterial wall longitudinally and how the kinetic energy is then transferred to the outermost arterial layer. The power spectrums display that the main kinetic energy of the longitudinal motion is on band 0–3 Hz with a peak on the 1.1 Hz frequency. There is a large variation among the individuals, how the energy from the blood pressure transfers into the longitudinal motion of the arterial wall since the main direction of the longitudinal motion varies individually and because early arterial stiffening potentially has an effect on the time characteristics of the energy transfer. The energy transfer from the innermost to the outermost wall layer is more straightforward: on average, a 17% of the longitudinal amplitude is lost and an 18.9 ms delay is visible on the 1.0 Hz frequency. PMID:28082917

  4. Unsteady Aerodynamic and Dynamic Analysis of the Meridian UAS in a Rolling-Yawing Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykins, Ryan

    The nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic effects of operating the Meridian unmanned aerial system (UAS) in crosswinds and at high angular rates is investigated in this work. The Meridian UAS is a large autonomous aircraft, with a V-tail configuration, operated in Polar Regions for the purpose of remotely measuring ice sheet thickness. The inherent nonlinear coupling produced by the V-tail, along with the strong atmospheric disturbances, has made classical model identification methods inadequate for proper model development. As such, a powerful tool known as Fuzzy Logic Modeling (FLM) was implemented to generate time-dependent, nonlinear, and unsteady aerodynamic models using flight test data collected in Greenland in 2011. Prior to performing FLM, compatibility analysis is performed on the data, for the purpose of systematic bias removal and airflow angle estimation. As one of the advantages of FLM is the ability to model unsteady aerodynamics, the reduced frequency for both longitudinal and lateral-directional motions is determined from the unbiased data, using Theodorsen's theory of unsteadiness, which serves as an input parameter in modeling. These models have been used in this work to identify pilot induced oscillations, unsteady coupling motions, unsteady motion due to the slipstream and cross wind interaction, and destabilizing motions and orientations. This work also assesses the accuracy of preliminary aircraft dynamic models developed using engineering level software, and addresses the autopilot Extended Kalman Filter state estimations.

  5. Chaotic Phenomena and Analysis of Natural Circulation Flow Instability under Rolling Motion Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. C.; Gao, P. Z.

    2010-03-01

    Experimental study on natural circulation flow instability under rolling motion is carried out and the results show that the complex flow oscillations are formed due to the overlapped effect of the rolling motion (trough instability) and density wave oscillation. The system becomes more instable because of the occurrence of complex flow oscillations. Complex flow oscillations only occur in the case of high subcooling and may be divided into two types: regular and irregular complex flow oscillations. Under the same thermo hydraulic conditions, the marginal stability boundary (MSB) of regular complex oscillations is similar to that of density wave oscillation without rolling motion. And the influences of rolling amplitude and rolling period on its MSB are slight. Chaotic characteristics are found in irregular complex oscillation flow under rolling motion condition. Based on the experimental data and G-P method, correlation dimension and Kolmogorov entropy are gotten with time series analysis. The results show that complex oscillation has fractal dimension and positive Kolmogorov entropy and is typical chaotic time series.

  6. Thermal Property Analysis of Axle Load Sensors for Weighing Vehicles in Weigh-in-Motion System

    PubMed Central

    Burnos, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Systems which permit the weighing of vehicles in motion are called dynamic Weigh-in-Motion scales. In such systems, axle load sensors are embedded in the pavement. Among the influencing factors that negatively affect weighing accuracy is the pavement temperature. This paper presents a detailed analysis of this phenomenon and describes the properties of polymer, quartz and bending plate load sensors. The studies were conducted in two ways: at roadside Weigh-in-Motion sites and at a laboratory using a climate chamber. For accuracy assessment of roadside systems, the reference vehicle method was used. The pavement temperature influence on the weighing error was experimentally investigated as well as a non-uniform temperature distribution along and across the Weigh-in-Motion site. Tests carried out in the climatic chamber allowed the influence of temperature on the sensor intrinsic error to be determined. The results presented clearly show that all kinds of sensors are temperature sensitive. This is a new finding, as up to now the quartz and bending plate sensors were considered insensitive to this factor. PMID:27983704

  7. Thermal Property Analysis of Axle Load Sensors for Weighing Vehicles in Weigh-in-Motion System.

    PubMed

    Burnos, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-12-15

    Systems which permit the weighing of vehicles in motion are called dynamic Weigh-in-Motion scales. In such systems, axle load sensors are embedded in the pavement. Among the influencing factors that negatively affect weighing accuracy is the pavement temperature. This paper presents a detailed analysis of this phenomenon and describes the properties of polymer, quartz and bending plate load sensors. The studies were conducted in two ways: at roadside Weigh-in-Motion sites and at a laboratory using a climate chamber. For accuracy assessment of roadside systems, the reference vehicle method was used. The pavement temperature influence on the weighing error was experimentally investigated as well as a non-uniform temperature distribution along and across the Weigh-in-Motion site. Tests carried out in the climatic chamber allowed the influence of temperature on the sensor intrinsic error to be determined. The results presented clearly show that all kinds of sensors are temperature sensitive. This is a new finding, as up to now the quartz and bending plate sensors were considered insensitive to this factor.

  8. Generalized analysis of thermally activated domain-wall motion in Co/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Umachi, Chinedum K.; Bono, David C.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion driven by magnetic field and electric current is investigated experimentally in out-of-plane magnetized Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. We directly extract the thermal activation energy barrier for DW motion and observe the dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and viscous flow. Further analysis reveals that the activation energy must be corrected with a factor dependent on the Curie temperature, and we derive a generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion. By using this generalized equation, we quantify the efficiency of current-induced spin torque in assisting DW motion. Current produces no effect aside from Joule heating in the multilayer with 7-Å thick Co layers, whereas it generates a finite spin torque on DWs in the multilayer with atomically thin 3-Å Co layers. These findings suggest that conventional spin-transfer torques from in-plane spin-polarized current do not drive DWs in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers.

  9. NPS State Vector Analysis and Relative Motion Plotting Software for STS-51. Appendix C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California AD-A282 910 ,: ,.TIC ELECTE THESIS NPS STATE VECTOR ANALYSIS AND RELATIVE MOTION PLOTTING SOFTWARE FOR...STS-51 APPENDIX C by Lieutenant Lee A. Barker March, 1994 Thesis Advisor: Dr. Rudolf Panholzer "Approved -for public releas; distribution is...buffer, then process "* all the valid samples. */ if (this- > ring-full YES) I samples = this- > ringmax; begin-time - this->begintme = this-> ring

  10. Analysis of myocardial motion using generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Rose, Stephen E.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Veidt, Martin; Bennett, Cameron J.; Doddrell, David M.

    2000-06-01

    Heart wall motion abnormalities are the very sensitive indicators of common heart diseases, such as myocardial infarction and ischemia. Regional strain analysis is especially important in diagnosing local abnormalities and mechanical changes in the myocardium. In this work, we present a complete method for the analysis of cardiac motion and the evaluation of regional strain in the left ventricular wall. The method is based on the generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the left ventricle. The whole method combines dynamical tracking of tag deformation, simulating cardiac movement and accurately computing the regional strain distribution. More specifically, the analysis of cardiac motion is performed in three stages. Firstly, material points within the myocardium are tracked over time using a semi-automated snake-based tag tracking algorithm developed for this purpose. This procedure is repeated in three orthogonal axes so as to generate a set of one-dimensional sample measurements of the displacement field. The 3D-displacement field is then reconstructed from this sample set by using a generalized vector spline model. The spline reconstruction of the displacement field is explicitly expressed as a linear combination of a spline kernel function associated with each sample point and a polynomial term. Finally, the strain tensor (linear or nonlinear) with three direct components and three shear components is calculated by applying a differential operator directly to the displacement function. The proposed method is computationally effective and easy to perform on tagged MR images. The preliminary study has shown potential advantages of using this method for the analysis of myocardial motion and the quantification of regional strain.

  11. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis of LatMix -EM-APEX Float Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis...identify mechanisms of small-scale processes––i.e., internal tides, inertial waves , nonlinear internal waves , vortical modes, and turbulence mixing...focus as the complex interplay of internal waves from a variety of sources and turbulence makes this a current locus of uncertainty. Our focus is on

  12. An Analysis of Potential Predictive Parameters of Motion Sickness Using a Computerized Biophysical Data Acquisition System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    goggles reverses the visual scene while another . -’.. 4 5 type inverts it. Both types produce motion sickness by sending visual signals to the brain...Further, the non- susceptible subjects showed a pattern of symptom appearance, followed by symptom abatement , and then reappearance. This . ,. -..81...as possible to 109 %" 6i F baseline values to measure symptom abatement . Data Analsi. Computer analysis programs must be • .developed or purchased for

  13. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  14. Registration of 3D point clouds and meshes: a survey from rigid to nonrigid.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gary K L; Cheng, Zhi-Quan; Lai, Yu-Kun; Langbein, Frank C; Liu, Yonghuai; Marshall, David; Martin, Ralph R; Sun, Xian-Fang; Rosin, Paul L

    2013-07-01

    Three-dimensional surface registration transforms multiple three-dimensional data sets into the same coordinate system so as to align overlapping components of these sets. Recent surveys have covered different aspects of either rigid or nonrigid registration, but seldom discuss them as a whole. Our study serves two purposes: 1) To give a comprehensive survey of both types of registration, focusing on three-dimensional point clouds and meshes and 2) to provide a better understanding of registration from the perspective of data fitting. Registration is closely related to data fitting in which it comprises three core interwoven components: model selection, correspondences and constraints, and optimization. Study of these components 1) provides a basis for comparison of the novelties of different techniques, 2) reveals the similarity of rigid and nonrigid registration in terms of problem representations, and 3) shows how overfitting arises in nonrigid registration and the reasons for increasing interest in intrinsic techniques. We further summarize some practical issues of registration which include initializations and evaluations, and discuss some of our own observations, insights and foreseeable research trends.

  15. Stratification approach for 3-D euclidean reconstruction of nonrigid objects from uncalibrated image sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Q M Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3-D reconstruction of nonrigid objects from uncalibrated image sequences. Under the assumption of affine camera and that the nonrigid object is composed of a rigid part and a deformation part, we propose a stratification approach to recover the structure of nonrigid objects by first reconstructing the structure in affine space and then upgrading it to the Euclidean space. The novelty and main features of the method lies in several aspects. First, we propose a deformation weight constraint to the problem and prove the invariability between the recovered structure and shape bases under this constraint. The constraint was not observed by previous studies. Second, we propose a constrained power factorization algorithm to recover the deformation structure in affine space. The algorithm overcomes some limitations of a previous singular-value-decomposition-based method. It can even work with missing data in the tracking matrix. Third, we propose to separate the rigid features from the deformation ones in 3-D affine space, which makes the detection more accurate and robust. The stratification matrix is estimated from the rigid features, which may relax the influence of large tracking errors in the deformation part. Extensive experiments on synthetic data and real sequences validate the proposed method and show improvements over existing solutions.

  16. EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Senneville, B. Denis; Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.

    2016-10-01

    Image registration is part of a large variety of medical applications including diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and/or treatment effectiveness and, more recently, therapy guidance. Such applications usually involve several imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, either separately or combined. In the current work, we propose a non-rigid multi-modal registration method (namely EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration) that aims at maximizing edge alignment between the images being registered. The proposed algorithm requires only contrasts between physiological tissues, preferably present in both image modalities, and assumes deformable/elastic tissues. Given both is shown to be well suitable for non-rigid co-registration across different image types/contrasts (T1/T2) as well as different modalities (CT/MRI). This is achieved using a variational scheme that provides a fast algorithm with a low number of control parameters. Results obtained on an annotated CT data set were comparable to the ones provided by state-of-the-art multi-modal image registration algorithms, for all tested experimental conditions (image pre-filtering, image intensity variation, noise perturbation). Moreover, we demonstrate that, compared to existing approaches, our method possesses increased robustness to transient structures (i.e. that are only present in some of the images).

  17. Robust non-rigid point set registration using student's-t mixture model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jian; Dai, Yakang; Zhou, Zhe; Chen, Shi

    2014-01-01

    The Student's-t mixture model, which is heavily tailed and more robust than the Gaussian mixture model, has recently received great attention on image processing. In this paper, we propose a robust non-rigid point set registration algorithm using the Student's-t mixture model. Specifically, first, we consider the alignment of two point sets as a probability density estimation problem and treat one point set as Student's-t mixture model centroids. Then, we fit the Student's-t mixture model centroids to the other point set which is treated as data. Finally, we get the closed-form solutions of registration parameters, leading to a computationally efficient registration algorithm. The proposed algorithm is especially effective for addressing the non-rigid point set registration problem when significant amounts of noise and outliers are present. Moreover, less registration parameters have to be set manually for our algorithm compared to the popular coherent points drift (CPD) algorithm. We have compared our algorithm with other state-of-the-art registration algorithms on both 2D and 3D data with noise and outliers, where our non-rigid registration algorithm showed accurate results and outperformed the other algorithms.

  18. EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration.

    PubMed

    Denis de Senneville, B; Zachiu, C; Ries, M; Moonen, C

    2016-10-21

    Image registration is part of a large variety of medical applications including diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and/or treatment effectiveness and, more recently, therapy guidance. Such applications usually involve several imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, either separately or combined. In the current work, we propose a non-rigid multi-modal registration method (namely EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration) that aims at maximizing edge alignment between the images being registered. The proposed algorithm requires only contrasts between physiological tissues, preferably present in both image modalities, and assumes deformable/elastic tissues. Given both is shown to be well suitable for non-rigid co-registration across different image types/contrasts (T1/T2) as well as different modalities (CT/MRI). This is achieved using a variational scheme that provides a fast algorithm with a low number of control parameters. Results obtained on an annotated CT data set were comparable to the ones provided by state-of-the-art multi-modal image registration algorithms, for all tested experimental conditions (image pre-filtering, image intensity variation, noise perturbation). Moreover, we demonstrate that, compared to existing approaches, our method possesses increased robustness to transient structures (i.e. that are only present in some of the images).

  19. Fixtureless geometric inspection of nonrigid parts using "generalized numerical inspection fixture"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radvar Esfahlan, Hassan

    Free-form nonrigid parts form the substance of today's automotive and aerospace industries. These parts have different shapes in free state due to their dimensional and geometric variations, gravity and residual strains. For the geometric inspection of such compliant parts, special inspection fixtures, in combination with coordinate measuring systems (CMM) and/or optical data acquisition devices (scanners) are used. This inevitably causes additional costs and delays that result in a lack of competitiveness in the industry. The goal of this thesis is to facilitate the dimensional and geometrical inspection of flexible components from a point cloud without using a jig or secondary conformation operation. More specifically, we aim to develop a methodology to localize and quantify the profile defects in the case of thin shells which are typical to the aerospace and automotive industries. The presented methodology is based on the fact that the interpoint geodesic distance between any two points of a shape remains unchangeable during an isometric deformation. This study elaborates on the theory and general methods for the metrology of nonrigid parts. We have developed a Generalized Numerical Inspection Fixture (GNIF), a robust methodology which merges existing technologies in metric and computational geometry, nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques, and finite element methods to introduce a general approach to the fixtureless geometrical inspection of nonrigid parts.

  20. Coil compaction and aneurysm growth: image-based quantification using non-rigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Craene, Mathieu; Pozo, José María; Villa, Maria Cruz; Vivas, Elio; Sola, Teresa; Guimaraens, Leopoldo; Blasco, Jordi; Macho, Juan; Frangi, Alejandro

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms is a minimally-invasive technique recognized as a valid alternative to surgical clipping. However, endovascular treatment can be associated to aneurysm recurrence, either due to coil compaction or aneurysm growth. The quantification of coil compaction or aneurysm growth is usually performed by manual measurements or visual inspection of images from consecutive follow-ups. Manual measurements permit to detect large global deformation but might have insufficient accuracy for detecting subtle or more local changes between images. Image inspection permits to detect a residual neck in the aneurysm but do not differentiate aneurysm growth from coil compaction. In this paper, we propose to quantify independently coil compaction and aneurysm growth using non-rigid image registration. Local changes of volume between images at successive time points are identified using the Jacobian of the non-rigid transformation. Two different non-rigid registration strategies are applied in order to explore the sensitivity of Jacobian-based volume changes against the registration method, FFD registration based on mutual information and Demons. This volume-variation measure has been applied to four patients of which a series of 3D Rotational Angiography (3DRA) images obtained at different controls separated from two months to two years were available. The evolution of coil and aneurysm volumes along the period has been obtained separately, which allows distinguishing between coil compaction and aneurysm growth. On the four cases studied in this paper, aneurysm recurrence was always associated to aneurysm growth, as opposed to strict coil compaction.

  1. Two Phase Non-Rigid Multi-Modal Image Registration Using Weber Local Descriptor-Based Similarity Metrics and Normalized Mutual Information

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Yi; Hu, Jiani

    2013-01-01

    Non-rigid multi-modal image registration plays an important role in medical image processing and analysis. Existing image registration methods based on similarity metrics such as mutual information (MI) and sum of squared differences (SSD) cannot achieve either high registration accuracy or high registration efficiency. To address this problem, we propose a novel two phase non-rigid multi-modal image registration method by combining Weber local descriptor (WLD) based similarity metrics with the normalized mutual information (NMI) using the diffeomorphic free-form deformation (FFD) model. The first phase aims at recovering the large deformation component using the WLD based non-local SSD (wldNSSD) or weighted structural similarity (wldWSSIM). Based on the output of the former phase, the second phase is focused on getting accurate transformation parameters related to the small deformation using the NMI. Extensive experiments on T1, T2 and PD weighted MR images demonstrate that the proposed wldNSSD-NMI or wldWSSIM-NMI method outperforms the registration methods based on the NMI, the conditional mutual information (CMI), the SSD on entropy images (ESSD) and the ESSD-NMI in terms of registration accuracy and computation efficiency. PMID:23765270

  2. Probing the time course of head-motion cues integration during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirohito M; Toshima, Iwaki; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Kashino, Makio

    2014-01-01

    The perceptual organization of auditory scenes is a hard but important problem to solve for human listeners. It is thus likely that cues from several modalities are pooled for auditory scene analysis, including sensory-motor cues related to the active exploration of the scene. We previously reported a strong effect of head motion on auditory streaming. Streaming refers to an experimental paradigm where listeners hear sequences of pure tones, and rate their perception of one or more subjective sources called streams. To disentangle the effects of head motion (changes in acoustic cues at the ear, subjective location cues, and motor cues), we used a robotic telepresence system, Telehead. We found that head motion induced perceptual reorganization even when the acoustic scene had not changed. Here we reanalyzed the same data to probe the time course of sensory-motor integration. We show that motor cues had a different time course compared to acoustic or subjective location cues: motor cues impacted perceptual organization earlier and for a shorter time than other cues, with successive positive and negative contributions to streaming. An additional experiment controlled for the effects of volitional anticipatory components, and found that arm or leg movements did not have any impact on scene analysis. These data provide a first investigation of the time course of the complex integration of sensory-motor cues in an auditory scene analysis task, and they suggest a loose temporal coupling between the different mechanisms involved.

  3. A comparative analysis of modal motions for the gyroscopic and non-gyroscopic two degree-of-freedom conservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; An, Hua-Zhen; Qian, Ying-Jing; Zhang, Wei; Melnik, Roderick V. N.

    2016-12-01

    The synchronous in-unison motions in vibrational mechanics and the non-synchronous out-of-unison motions are the most frequently found periodic motions in every fields of science and everywhere in the universe. In contrast to the in-unison normal modes, the out-of-unison complex modes feature a π/2 phase difference. By the complex mode analysis we classify the out-of-unison planar motion into two types, gyroscopic motions and elliptic motions. It is found that the gyroscopic and elliptic motions have different characteristics for a two degree-of-freedom (2DOF) system. The gyroscopic motion involves two distinct frequencies with, respectively, two corresponding complex modes. However, the elliptic motion the nonlinear non-gyroscopic 2DOF system with repeated frequencies involves only single frequency with corresponding two complex modes. The study of the differences and similarities of the gyroscopic and elliptic modes sheds new light on the in-depth mechanism of the planar motions in the universe and the man-made engineering systems.

  4. A computer program for an analysis of the relative motion of a space station and a free flying experiment module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the relative motion of a free flying experiment module in the vicinity of a space station under the perturbative effects of drag and earth oblateness was made. A listing of a computer program developed for determining the relative motion of a module utilizing the Cowell procedure is presented, as well as instructions for its use.

  5. Synchronized video and motion analysis for the assessment of procedures in the operating theater.

    PubMed

    Dosis, Aristotelis; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Bello, Fernando; Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Gillies, Duncan; Darzi, Ara

    2005-03-01

    Objective assessment of surgical skill has recently been shown to be possible through the use of dexterity-based and video analysis systems. The aim of this study was to synchronize these 2 modalities to produce a comprehensive surgical assessment tool. The Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device is a dexterity-based motion analysis device that has been developed in the Department of Surgical Oncology and Technology by the Surgical Computing and Imaging Research Group. Further advances to this system have been made to enable synchronized acquisition of hand kinematics and video from real procedures, and their concurrent analysis. To test the feasibility of the system, 10 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed by 5 different surgeons on consenting patients were recorded. Analysis focused on the entire procedure and also on specific parts of the operation such as the clipping and cutting of the cystic duct and artery. Dexterity analysis was performed using the objective measures of time, path length, number of movements, velocities, and trajectories. Comparative analysis of a surgeon's dexterity was carried out on the whole procedure and by using the synchronized zoom facility in the software. Kinematic signals revealed rapid changes in velocity caused by alternating between different instruments or occurring after complications such as bleeding. This new motion analysis system has been shown to be an effective tool for the comprehensive assessment of operative procedures.

  6. The freedom to heal: nonrigid immobilization by a halo orthosis.

    PubMed

    Genin, Guy M; Rosenberg, Stuart P; Seger, Laura M; Tran, Elizabeth L; Rivet, Dennis J; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2014-11-01

    Halo orthoses present a paradox. On the one hand, the nominally rigid immobilization they provide to the head aims to remove loads on the cervical spine following injury or surgery, and the devices are retightened routinely to maintain this. On the other hand, bone growth and remodeling are well known to require mechanical stressing. How are these competing needs balanced? To understand this trade-off in an effective, commercial halo orthosis, the authors quantified the response of a commercial halo orthosis to physiological loading levels, applied symmetrically about the sagittal plane. They showed for the first time that after a few cycles of loading analogous to a few steps taken by a patient, the support presented by a standard commercial halo orthosis becomes nonlinear. When analyzed through straightforward structural modeling, these data revealed that the nonlinearity permits mild head motion while severely restricting larger motion. These observations are useful because they open the possibility that halo orthosis installation could be optimized to transfer mild spinal loads that support healing while blocking pathological loads.

  7. The Validity and Reliability of Motion Analysis in Patellar Tendon Reflex Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Lai Kuan; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Lim, Kheng Seang

    2013-01-01

    Background The deep tendon reflex assessments that are essential to the accurate diagnosis of neurological or neuromuscular disorders are conducted subjectively in clinical neurology. Our aim was to assess deep tendon reflexes objectively with a new reflex quantification method. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study used a motion analysis technique to collect quantitative measurements for both the input and output of normal patellar tendon reflex. Reflex responses were measured as knee angles. The patellar tendon reflexes of 100 healthy subjects were examined using 6 levels of tendon taps, where all the assessments were captured using motion capture system. A linear relationship was found between the experimental maximum tapping velocity and tapping angle (coefficient of determination = 0.989), which was consistent with the theoretical values. Tapping velocities were predictable according to tapping angles. The findings proved the reproducibility of tapping method in producing consistent input. The reflex amplitude was consistent between two randomly assigned groups, and linearly proportionate to the tapping velocity. Conclusions/Significance The findings on reflex amplitude indicate that motion analysis is a valid and reliable method of assessing and measuring deep tendon reflexes. PMID:23409022

  8. The validity and reliability of motion analysis in patellar tendon reflex assessment.

    PubMed

    Tham, Lai Kuan; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Lim, Kheng Seang

    2013-01-01

    The deep tendon reflex assessments that are essential to the accurate diagnosis of neurological or neuromuscular disorders are conducted subjectively in clinical neurology. Our aim was to assess deep tendon reflexes objectively with a new reflex quantification method. The present study used a motion analysis technique to collect quantitative measurements for both the input and output of normal patellar tendon reflex. Reflex responses were measured as knee angles. The patellar tendon reflexes of 100 healthy subjects were examined using 6 levels of tendon taps, where all the assessments were captured using motion capture system. A linear relationship was found between the experimental maximum tapping velocity and tapping angle (coefficient of determination = 0.989), which was consistent with the theoretical values. Tapping velocities were predictable according to tapping angles. The findings proved the reproducibility of tapping method in producing consistent input. The reflex amplitude was consistent between two randomly assigned groups, and linearly proportionate to the tapping velocity. The findings on reflex amplitude indicate that motion analysis is a valid and reliable method of assessing and measuring deep tendon reflexes.

  9. Comparative abilities of Microsoft Kinect and Vicon 3D motion capture for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Alexandra; West, Alexandre M; Bronner, Shaw; Noah, Jack Adam

    2014-07-01

    Biomechanical analysis is a powerful tool in the evaluation of movement dysfunction in orthopaedic and neurologic populations. Three-dimensional (3D) motion capture systems are widely used, accurate systems, but are costly and not available in many clinical settings. The Microsoft Kinect™ has the potential to be used as an alternative low-cost motion analysis tool. The purpose of this study was to assess concurrent validity of the Kinect™ with Brekel Kinect software in comparison to Vicon Nexus during sagittal plane gait kinematics. Twenty healthy adults (nine male, 11 female) were tracked while walking and jogging at three velocities on a treadmill. Concurrent hip and knee peak flexion and extension and stride timing measurements were compared between Vicon and Kinect™. Although Kinect measurements were representative of normal gait, the Kinect™ generally under-estimated joint flexion and over-estimated extension. Kinect™ and Vicon hip angular displacement correlation was very low and error was large. Kinect™ knee measurements were somewhat better than hip, but were not consistent enough for clinical assessment. Correlation between Kinect™ and Vicon stride timing was high and error was fairly small. Variability in Kinect™ measurements was smallest at the slowest velocity. The Kinect™ has basic motion capture capabilities and with some minor adjustments will be an acceptable tool to measure stride timing, but sophisticated advances in software and hardware are necessary to improve Kinect™ sensitivity before it can be implemented for clinical use.

  10. A Simple Force-Motion Relation for Migrating Cells Revealed by Multipole Analysis of Traction Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    For biophysical understanding of cell motility, the relationship between mechanical force and cell migration must be uncovered, but it remains elusive. Since cells migrate at small scale in dissipative circumstances, the inertia force is negligible and all forces should cancel out. This implies that one must quantify the spatial pattern of the force instead of just the summation to elucidate the force-motion relation. Here, we introduced multipole analysis to quantify the traction stress dynamics of migrating cells. We measured the traction stress of Dictyostelium discoideum cells and investigated the lowest two moments, the force dipole and quadrupole moments, which reflect rotational and front-rear asymmetries of the stress field. We derived a simple force-motion relation in which cells migrate along the force dipole axis with a direction determined by the force quadrupole. Furthermore, as a complementary approach, we also investigated fine structures in the stress field that show front-rear asymmetric kinetics consistent with the multipole analysis. The tight force-motion relation enables us to predict cell migration only from the traction stress patterns. PMID:24411233

  11. A simple force-motion relation for migrating cells revealed by multipole analysis of traction stress.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2014-01-07

    For biophysical understanding of cell motility, the relationship between mechanical force and cell migration must be uncovered, but it remains elusive. Since cells migrate at small scale in dissipative circumstances, the inertia force is negligible and all forces should cancel out. This implies that one must quantify the spatial pattern of the force instead of just the summation to elucidate the force-motion relation. Here, we introduced multipole analysis to quantify the traction stress dynamics of migrating cells. We measured the traction stress of Dictyostelium discoideum cells and investigated the lowest two moments, the force dipole and quadrupole moments, which reflect rotational and front-rear asymmetries of the stress field. We derived a simple force-motion relation in which cells migrate along the force dipole axis with a direction determined by the force quadrupole. Furthermore, as a complementary approach, we also investigated fine structures in the stress field that show front-rear asymmetric kinetics consistent with the multipole analysis. The tight force-motion relation enables us to predict cell migration only from the traction stress patterns. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Image segmentation and registration for the analysis of joint motion from 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.; Fassbind, Michael; Rohr, Eric; Ledoux, William

    2006-03-01

    We report an image segmentation and registration method for studying joint morphology and kinematics from in vivo MRI scans and its application to the analysis of ankle joint motion. Using an MR-compatible loading device, a foot was scanned in a single neutral and seven dynamic positions including maximal flexion, rotation and inversion/eversion. A segmentation method combining graph cuts and level sets was developed which allows a user to interactively delineate 14 bones in the neutral position volume in less than 30 minutes total, including less than 10 minutes of user interaction. In the subsequent registration step, a separate rigid body transformation for each bone is obtained by registering the neutral position dataset to each of the dynamic ones, which produces an accurate description of the motion between them. We have processed six datasets, including 3 normal and 3 pathological feet. For validation our results were compared with those obtained from 3DViewnix, a semi-automatic segmentation program, and achieved good agreement in volume overlap ratios (mean: 91.57%, standard deviation: 3.58%) for all bones. Our tool requires only 1/50 and 1/150 of the user interaction time required by 3DViewnix and NIH Image Plus, respectively, an improvement that has the potential to make joint motion analysis from MRI practical in research and clinical applications.

  13. Motion based markerless gait analysis using standard events of gait and ensemble Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Nalini; Mitra, Anish; Duric, Zoran; Gerber, Naomi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to gait analysis using ensemble Kalman filtering which permits markerless determination of segmental movement. We use image flow analysis to reliably compute temporal and kinematic measures including the translational velocity of the torso and rotational velocities of the lower leg segments. Detecting the instances where velocity changes direction also determines the standard events of a gait cycle (double-support, toe-off, mid-swing and heel-strike). In order to determine the kinematics of lower limbs, we model the synergies between the lower limb motions (thigh-shank, shank-foot) by building a nonlinear dynamical system using CMUs 3D motion capture database. This information is fed into the ensemble Kalman Filter framework to estimate the unobserved limb (upper leg and foot) motion from the measured lower leg rotational velocity. Our approach does not require calibrated cameras or special markers to capture movement. We have tested our method on different gait sequences collected from the sagttal plane and presented the estimated kinematics overlaid on the original image frames. We have also validated our approach by manually labeling the videos and comparing our results against them.

  14. An Elastic Analysis of a Plated Bone to Determine Fracture Gap Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, F. W.; Vannah, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    An elastic analysis to determine fracture gap motions occurring in the osteotomized and plated canine femur was performed using the finite element program NASTRAN. The femur was idealized as a hollow right cylinder, and transverse anisotropy was assumed for the elastic properties of the bone. A 3-D 360 degree model consisting of 224 isoparametric quadrilateral hexahedral and 11 beam elements was created. A range of plate stiffnesses was tested by varying the modulus of elasticity of the plate from 207 GPa to 1 GPA. Moments were applied in the plane of the plate, about the axis of the plate, and in the plane of the screws. Results showed that, for plates of typical geometry and elastic modulus under 10 GPa, the contribution to fracture gap motion occurring due to deformation in the bone was negligible compared to that contribution from deformation in the plate.

  15. Representation of the Physiological Factors Contributing to Postflight Changes in Functional Performance Using Motion Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2010-01-01

    Astronauts experience changes in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. To understand how changes in physiological function influence functional performance, a testing procedure has been developed that evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. Astronauts complete seven functional and physiological tests. The objective of this project is to use motion tracking and digitizing software to visually display the postflight decrement in the functional performance of the astronauts. The motion analysis software will be used to digitize astronaut data videos into stick figure videos to represent the astronauts as they perform the Functional Tasks Tests. This project will benefit NASA by allowing NASA scientists to present data of their neurological studies without revealing the identities of the astronauts.

  16. Tissue motion tracking at the edges of a radiation treatment field using local optical flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, P. T.; Pistorius, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of tracking the motion of an intruding organ-at-risk (OAR) at the edges of a treatment field using a local optical flow analysis of electronic portal images. An intruding OAR was simulated by modifying the portal images obtained by irradiating a programmable phantom's lung tumour. A rectangular treatment aperture was assumed and the edges of the beam's eye view (BEV) were partitioned into clusters/grids according to the width of the multi-leaf collimators (MLC). The optical flow velocities were calculated and the motion accuracy in these clusters was analysed. A velocity error of 0.4 ± 1.4 mm/s with a linearity of 1.04 for tracking an object intruding at 10mm/s (max) was obtained.

  17. External respiratory motion: shape analysis and custom realistic respiratory trace generation.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Sarah; Becker, Nathan; Smith, Wendy

    2012-08-01

    The authors developed a realistic respiratory trace generating (RTG) tool for use with phantom and simulation studies. The authors analyzed the extent of abdominal wall motion from a real-time position management system database comprised of 125 lung, liver, and abdominal patients to determine the shape and extent of motion. Using Akaike's information criterion (AIC), the authors compared different model types to find the optimal realistic model of respiratory motion. The authors compared a family of sigmoid curves and determined a four parameter sigmoid fit was optimal for over 98% patient inhale and exhale traces. This fit was also better than sin (2)(x) for 98% of patient exhale and 70% of patient inhale traces and better than sin (x) for 100% of both patient inhale and exhale traces. This analysis also shows that sin (2)(x) is better than sin (x) for over 95% of patient inhale and exhale traces. With results from shape and extent of motion analysis, we developed a realistic respiratory trace generating (RTG) software tool. The software can be run in two modes: population and user defined. In population mode, the RTG draws entirely from the population data including inter- and intra fraction amplitude and period variability and baseline drift. In user-defined mode, the user customizes the respiratory parameters by inputting the peak-to-peak amplitude, period, end exhale position, as well as controls variability in these parameters and baseline drift. This work provides a method of generating custom respiratory data that can be used for initial implementation and testing of new technologies.

  18. Large-deformation modal coordinates for nonrigid vehicle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.; Fleischer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The derivation of minimum-dimension sets of discrete-coordinate and hybrid-coordinate equations of motion of a system consisting of an arbitrary number of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in tree topology is presented. These equations are useful for the simulation of dynamical systems that can be idealized as tree-like arrangements of substructures, with each substructure consisting of either a rigid body or a collection of elastically interconnected rigid bodies restricted to small relative rotations at each connection. Thus, some of the substructures represent elastic bodies subjected to small strains or local deformations, but possibly large gross deformations, in the hybrid formulation, distributed coordinates referred to herein as large-deformation modal coordinates, are used for the deformations of these substructures. The equations are in a form suitable for incorporation into one or more computer programs to be used as multipurpose tools in the simulation of spacecraft and other complex electromechanical systems.

  19. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  20. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M. L.; Marins, João C. B.; Silvatti, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems. PMID:27513846

  1. An analysis system of human motion based on micro-environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Changjiang; Chen, Xiaoning

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the problem that the traditional positioning device cannot carry on the high precision positioning and the motion characteristic analysis problem to the moving target in the micro environment, a small wear device capable of low power consumption can be designed, which can record the human movement trajectory and time, Analysis of the Motion Characteristics of Software. To achieve a ± 0.5m high-precision positioning, the device uses GPS positioning which can reduce the power consumption of GPRS data transmission by optimizing the structure; finally, through the program we write, the system can analyze the flow and behavior analysis of people within the scope already. From the test we can know that: the device can complete the analysis and processing of information such as high-precision positioning and behavioral path of the moving target (human) in the micro-environment of the specific area; Also the analysis software can deal with the information such as residence time, moving target number and single target position of some specific areas in the micro-environment.

  2. Atomic resolution structure of prokaryotic phospholipase A2: analysis of internal motion and implication for a catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2003-05-15

    We have found a secreted phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2), EC 3.1.1.4) from Streptomyces violaceoruber A-2688, which is the first PLA(2) identified in prokaryote, and determined its tertiary structure by NMR and X-ray analyses. In this study, we collected the X-ray diffraction data of the bacterial PLA(2) at room temperature (297 K) using conventional MoK(alpha) radiation and refined the structure at a 1.05 A resolution. The atomic resolution analysis led us to introduce disordered conformations and hydrogen atoms into a full anisotropic model. The molecular motion, which is expressed as the sum of rigid-body motion and internal motion of protein, is roughly estimated as the thermal motion when the X-ray diffraction data are collected at room temperature. In this study, we applied a TLS (rigid-body motion in terms of translation, libration, and screw motions) model to analyze the rigid-body motion of the bacterial PLA(2) and calculated the internal motion by subtracting the estimate of the rigid-body motion from the observed anisotropic temperature factor. We also subjected the TLS model to estimate the internal motion of the bovine pancreatic PLA(2) using the anisotropic temperature factor deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Both results indicate that the localization of regions exhibiting larger internal motion in the bacterial PLA(2) is almost the same as that in the bovine pancreatic PLA(2), suggesting that although the tertiary structure of the bacterial PLA(2) is strikingly different from that of the bovine pancreatic PLA(2), the internal motion, which is associated with the calcium(II) ion-binding, phospholipid-binding, and allosteric interfacial activation, is commonly observed in both PLA(2)s.

  3. Sensitivity of Tumor Motion Simulation Accuracy to Lung Biomechanical Modeling Approaches and Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the Neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  4. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  5. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  6. Nonrigid registration of dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images using deformable FEM model and CT image warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Unlu, Mehmet; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Coman, Ioana; Feiglin, David

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to correct for motion artifacts in dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images, to improve differential-image quality, and to increase accuracy of time-activity curves. Dynamic PET studies, with subjects prone, and breast suspended freely employed a protocol with 50 frames, each 1-minute long. A 30 s long CT scan was acquired immediately before the first PET frame. F-18-FDG was administered during the first PET time frame. Fiducial skin markers (FSMs) each containing ~0.5 μCi of Ge-68 were taped to each breast. In our PET/PET registration method we utilized CT data. For corresponding FSMs visible on the 1 st and n th frames, the geometrical centroids of FSMs were found and their displacement vectors were estimated and used to deform the finite element method (FEM) mesh of the CT image (registered with 1 st PET frame) to match the consecutive dynamic PET time frames. Each mesh was then deformed to match the 1 st PET frame using known FSM displacement vectors as FEM loads, and the warped PET timeframe volume was created. All PET time frames were thus nonrigidly registered with the first frame. An analogy between orthogonal components of the displacement field and the temperature distribution in steady-state heat transfer in solids is used, via standard heat-conduction FEM software with "conductivity" of surface elements set arbitrarily significantly higher than that of volume elements. Consequently, the surface reaches steady state before the volume. This prevents creation of concentrated FEM loads at the locations of FSMs and reaching incorrect FEM solution. We observe improved similarity between the 1 st and n th frames. The contrast and the spatial definition of metabolically hyperactive regions are superior in the registered 3D images compared to unregistered 3D images. Additional work is needed to eliminate small image artifacts due to FSMs.

  7. New estimates of the inertia tensor and rotation of the triaxial nonrigid Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Wenbin

    2010-12-01

    The Earth's rotation is perturbed by mass redistributions and relative motions within the Earth system, as well as by the torques from both the internal Earth and celestial bodies. The present study aims to establish a theory to incorporate all these factors perturbing the rotation state of the triaxial Earth, just like the traditional rotation theory of the axial-symmetric Earth. First of all, we reestimate the Earth's inertia tensor on the basis of two new gravity models, EIGEN-GL05C and EGM2008. Then we formulate the dynamic equations and obtain their normal modes for an Earth model with a triaxial anelastic mantle, a triaxial fluid core, and dissipative oceans. The periods of the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation are successfully recovered, being ˜433 and ˜430 mean solar days, respectively. Further, the Liouville equations and their general solutions for that triaxial nonrigid Earth are deduced. The Liouville equations are characterized by the complex frequency-dependent transfer functions, which incorporate the effects of triaxialities and deformations of both the mantle and the core, as well as the effects of the mantle anelasticity, the equilibrium, and dissipative ocean tides. Complex transfer functions just reflect the fact that decays and phase lags exist in the Earth's response to the periodic forcing. Our theory reduces to the traditional rotation theory of the axial-symmetric Earth when assuming rotational symmetry of the inertia tensor. Finally, the present theory is applied to the case of atmospheric-oceanic excitation. The effective atmospheric-oceanic angular momentum function (AMF) χeff = χeff1 + iχeff2 for the present theory is compared with the AMF χeffsym = χeff1sym + iχeff2sym for the traditional theory and the observed AMF χobs = χ1obs + iχ2obs; we find that the difference between χeff and χeffsym is of a few milliseconds of arc (mas) and can sometimes exceed 10 mas. In addition, spectrum analyses indicate that χeff is

  8. Kinematic analysis of wrist motion during simulated colonoscopy in first-year gastroenterology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Ruff, Kevin C; Ramirez, Francisco C; Wu, Qing; Mohankumar, Deepika; Santello, Marco; Fleischer, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastroenterology trainees acquire skill and proficiency in performing colonoscopies at different rates. The cause for heterogeneous competency among the trainees is unclear. Kinematic analysis of the wrist joint while performing colonoscopy can objectively assess the variation in wrist motion. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that the time spent by the trainees in extreme ranges of wrist motion will decrease as the trainees advance through the fellowship year. Subjects and methods: Five first-year gastroenterology fellows were prospectively studied at four intervals while performing simulated colonoscopies. The setting was an endoscopy simulation laboratory at a tertiary care center. Kinematic assessment of wrist motion was done using a magnetic position/orientation tracker held in place by a custom-made arm sleeve and hand glove. The main outcome measure was time spent performing each of four ranges of wrist motion (mid, center, extreme, and out) for each wrist degree of freedom (pronation/supination, flexion/extension, and adduction/abduction). Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the time spent for wrist movements across the three degrees of freedom throughout the study period. However, fellows spent significantly less time in extreme range (1.47 ± 0.34 min vs. 2.44 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.004) and center range (1.02 ± 0.34 min vs 1.9 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.01) at the end of the study compared to the baseline evaluation. The study was limited by the small number of subjects and performance of colonoscopies on a simulator rather than live patients. Conclusions: Gastroenterology trainees alter the time spent at the extreme range of wrist motion as they advance through training. Endoscopy training during the first 10 months of fellowship may have beneficial effects on learning ergonomically correct motion patterns. PMID:26716123

  9. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion

  10. MRI signal intensity based B-spline nonrigid registration for pre- and intraoperative imaging during prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Sota; Tokuda, Junichi; Elhawary, Haytham; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M C; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-01

    To apply an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm to MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy clinical data and to assess its accuracy. A nonrigid registration of preoperative MRI to intraoperative MRI images was carried out in 16 cases using a Basis-Spline algorithm in a retrospective manner. The registration was assessed qualitatively by experts' visual inspection and quantitatively by measuring the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for total gland (TG), central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ), the mutual information (MI) metric, and the fiducial registration error (FRE) between corresponding anatomical landmarks for both the nonrigid and a rigid registration method. All 16 cases were successfully registered in less than 5 min. After the nonrigid registration, DSC values for TG, CG, PZ were 0.91, 0.89, 0.79, respectively, the MI metric was -0.19 +/- 0.07 and FRE presented a value of 2.3 +/- 1.8 mm. All the metrics were significantly better than in the case of rigid registration, as determined by one-sided t-tests. The intensity-based nonrigid registration method using clinical data was demonstrated to be feasible and showed statistically improved metrics when compare to only rigid registration. The method is a valuable tool to integrate pre- and intraoperative images for brachytherapy.

  11. MRI Signal Intensity Based B-Spline Nonrigid Registration for Pre- and Intraoperative Imaging During Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Sota; Tokuda, Junichi; Elhawary, Haytham; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.C.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To apply an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm to MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy clinical data and to assess its accuracy. Materials and Methods A nonrigid registration of preoperative MRI to intraoperative MRI images was carried out in 16 cases using a Basis-Spline algorithm in a retrospective manner. The registration was assessed qualitatively by experts’ visual inspection and quantitatively by measuring the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for total gland (TG), central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ), the mutual information (MI) metric, and the fiducial registration error (FRE) between corresponding anatomical landmarks for both the nonrigid and a rigid registration method. Results All 16 cases were successfully registered in less than 5 min. After the nonrigid registration, DSC values for TG, CG, PZ were 0.91, 0.89, 0.79, respectively, the MI metric was −0.19 ± 0.07 and FRE presented a value of 2.3 ± 1.8 mm. All the metrics were significantly better than in the case of rigid registration, as determined by one-sided t-tests. Conclusion The intensity-based nonrigid registration method using clinical data was demonstrated to be feasible and showed statistically improved metrics when compare to only rigid registration. The method is a valuable tool to integrate pre- and intraoperative images for brachytherapy. PMID:19856437

  12. Motion analysis of a motorcycle taking into account the rider's effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaopeng; Murakami, Shintaroh; Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, to analyse the rider's effects on the motion of a motorcycle, we model a rider-motorcycle system by taking into account the leaning motion of the rider's upper torso and his/her arm connection with the handlebars. The nonlinearity of the tyre force is introduced by utilising hyperbolic tangent functions to approximate a Magic Formula tyre model. On the basis of a derived nonlinear state-space model, we analyse the effects of not only the rider's arms but also his/her postures during steady turning by simulations. The rider's postures including lean-with, lean-in and lean-out are realised by adding the lean torque to the rider's upper torso. The motorcycle motion and the rider's effects are analysed in the case where the friction coefficient of the road surface changes severely during steady turning. In addition, a linearised state-space model is derived during steady turning, and a stability analysis of the rider-motorcycle system is performed.

  13. Biomechanics Analysis of Combat Sport (Silat) By Using Motion Capture System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhilmi Kaharuddin, Muhammad; Badriah Khairu Razak, Siti; Ikram Kushairi, Muhammad; Syawal Abd. Rahman, Mohamed; An, Wee Chang; Ngali, Z.; Siswanto, W. A.; Salleh, S. M.; Yusup, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    ‘Silat’ is a Malay traditional martial art that is practiced in both amateur and in professional levels. The intensity of the motion spurs the scientific research in biomechanics. The main purpose of this abstract is to present the biomechanics method used in the study of ‘silat’. By using the 3D Depth Camera motion capture system, two subjects are to perform ‘Jurus Satu’ in three repetitions each. One subject is set as the benchmark for the research. The videos are captured and its data is processed using the 3D Depth Camera server system in the form of 16 3D body joint coordinates which then will be transformed into displacement, velocity and acceleration components by using Microsoft excel for data calculation and Matlab software for simulation of the body. The translated data obtained serves as an input to differentiate both subjects’ execution of the ‘Jurus Satu’. Nine primary movements with the addition of five secondary movements are observed visually frame by frame from the simulation obtained to get the exact frame that the movement takes place. Further analysis involves the differentiation of both subjects’ execution by referring to the average mean and standard deviation of joints for each parameter stated. The findings provide useful data for joints kinematic parameters as well as to improve the execution of ‘Jurus Satu’ and to exhibit the process of learning a movement that is relatively unknown by the use of a motion capture system.

  14. Liver microcirculation analysis by red blood cell motion modeling in intravital microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Walid S; Schmugge, Stephen J; Kraftchick, Jerrod P; Clemens, Mark G; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been used to visualize the microcirculation by imaging fluorescent labeled red blood cells (RBCs). Traditionally, microcirculation has been modeled by computing the mean velocity of a few, randomly selected, manually tracked RBCs. However, this protocol is tedious, time consuming, and subjective with technician related bias. We present a new method for analyzing the microcirculation by modeling the RBC motion through automatic tracking. The tracking of RBCs is challenging as in each image, as many as 200 cells move through a complex network of vessels at a wide range of speeds while deforming in shape. To reliably detect RBCs traveling at a wide range of speeds, a window of temporal template matching is applied. Then, cells appearing in successive frames are corresponded based on the motion behavior constraints in terms of the direction, magnitude, and path. The performance evaluation against a ground truth indicates the detection accuracy up to 84% TP at 6% FP and a correspondence accuracy of 89%. We include an in-depth discussion on comparison of the microcirculation based on motion modeling from the proposed automated method against a mean velocity from manual analysis protocol in terms of precision, objectivity, and sensitivity.

  15. Receiver Function Analysis of Strong-motion Stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Huang, Jyun-Yan

    2016-04-01

    The Kaohsiung City and Pingtung County are located in southern Taiwan and bounded on the west side by several active faults. The shallow velocity structure of thick alluvium basin in this area should be delineated to understand the seismic site effect of strong ground motion. Receiver Function (RF) is a conventional technique for studying the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the seismometer. But, the RF analysis of high-frequency acceleration seismograms is also proved to be feasible for estimating shallow structures recently. This study applied the RF technique on the Strong-motion records of almost one-hundred TSMIP stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area to estimate the shallow shear-wave velocity structures. The averaged RFs of all stations exhibit the obvious variation because of the different geologies and site conditions. After the forward modeling of RFs based on the Genetic Algorithms (GA) searching, the shallow shear-wave velocity structures beneath all the strong-motion stations in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area were estimated to delineate the iso-depth contour maps of the main formation interfaces and a preliminary shallow 3D velocity model.

  16. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  17. Live cell microscopy analysis of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break motion

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, B.; Splinter, J.; Durante, M.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the spatiotemporal organization of DNA damage processing by live cell microscopy analysis in human cells. In unirradiated U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cancer cells, a fast confined and Brownian-like motion of DNA repair protein foci was observed, which was not altered by radiation. By analyzing the motional activity of GFP-53BP1 foci in live cells up to 12-h after irradiation, we detected an additional slower mobility of damaged chromatin sites showing a mean square displacement of ≈0.6 μm2/h after exposure to densely- or sparsely-ionizing radiation, most likely driven by normal diffusion of chromatin. Only occasionally, larger translational motion connected to morphological changes of the whole nucleus could be observed. In addition, there was no general tendency to form repair clusters in the irradiated cells. We conclude that long-range displacements of damaged chromatin domains do not generally occur during DNA double-strand break repair after introduction of multiple damaged sites by charged particles. The occasional and in part transient appearance of cluster formation of radiation-induced foci may represent a higher mobility of chromatin along the ion trajectory. These observations support the hypothesis that spatial proximity of DNA breaks is required for the formation of radiation-induced chromosomal exchanges. PMID:19221031

  18. Evaluating the Reproducibility of Motion Analysis Scanning of the Spine during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Gipsman, Aaron; Rauschert, Lisa; Daneshvar, Michael; Knott, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Formetric 4D dynamic system (Diers International GmbH, Schlangenbad, Germany) is a rasterstereography based imaging system designed to evaluate spinal deformity, providing radiation-free imaging of the position, rotation, and shape of the spine during the gait cycle. Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate whether repeated measurements with the Formetric 4D dynamic system would be reproducible with a standard deviation of less than +/− 3 degrees. This study looked at real-time segmental motion, measuring kyphosis, lordosis, trunk length, pelvic, and T4 and L1 vertebral body rotation. Methods. Twenty healthy volunteers each underwent 3 consecutive scans. Measurements for kyphosis, lordosis, trunk length, and rotations of T4, L1, and the pelvis were recorded for each trial. Results. The average standard deviations of same-day repeat measurements were within +/− 3 degrees with a range of 0.51 degrees to 2.3 degrees. Conclusions. The surface topography system calculated reproducible measurements with error ranges comparable to the current gold standard in dynamic spinal motion analysis. Therefore, this technique should be considered of high clinical value for reliably evaluating segmental motion and spinal curvatures and should further be evaluated in the setting of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:26556423

  19. Nonlinear analysis of cylindrical and conical hysteretic whirl motions in rotor-dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The internal friction of a rotor-shaft-support system is mainly due to the shaft structural hysteresis and to some possible shrink-fit release of the assembly. The experimentation points out the destabilizing effect of the internal friction in the over-critical rotor running. Nevertheless, this detrimental influence may be efficiently counterbalanced by other external dissipative sources located in the supports or by a proper anisotropic configuration of the support stiffness. The present analysis considers a rotor-shaft system which is symmetric with respect to the mid-span and is constrained by viscous-flexible supports with different stiffness on two orthogonal planes. The cylindrical and conical whirling modes are easily uncoupled and separately analysed. The internal dissipation is modelled by nonlinear Coulombian forces and moments, which counteract the translational and rotational motion of the rotor relative to a frame rotating with the shaft ends. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved by averaging approaches of the Krylov-Bogoliubov type. In both the over-critical whirling motions, cylindrical and conical, stable limit cycles may be attained whose amplitude is as large as the external dissipation applied by the supports is low. The stiffness anisotropy of the supports may be recognised as quite beneficial for the cylindrical whirl.

  20. Time Series Analysis of Particle Tracking Data for Molecular Motion on the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenxia; Huerta, Gabriel; Steinberg, Stanly; Zúñiga, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Biophysicists use single particle tracking (SPT) methods to probe the dynamic behavior of individual proteins and lipids in cell membranes. The mean squared displacement (MSD) has proven to be a powerful tool for analyzing the data and drawing conclusions about membrane organization, including features like lipid rafts, protein islands, and confinement zones defined by cytoskeletal barriers. Here, we implement time series analysis as a new analytic tool to analyze further the motion of membrane proteins. The experimental data track the motion of 40 nm gold particles bound to Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHCI) molecules on the membranes of mouse hepatoma cells. Our first novel result is that the tracks are significantly autocorrelated. Because of this, we developed linear autoregressive models to elucidate the autocorrelations. Estimates of the signal to noise ratio for the models show that the autocorrelated part of the motion is significant. Next, we fit the probability distributions of jump sizes with four different models. The first model is a general Weibull distribution that shows that the motion is characterized by an excess of short jumps as compared to a normal random walk. We also fit the data with a chi distribution which provides a natural estimate of the dimension d of the space in which a random walk is occurring. For the biological data, the estimates satisfy 1 < d < 2, implying that particle motion is not confined to a line, but also does not occur freely in the plane. The dimension gives a quantitative estimate of the amount of nanometer scale obstruction met by a diffusing molecule. We introduce a new distribution and use the generalized extreme value distribution to show that the biological data also have an excess of long jumps as compared to normal diffusion. These fits provide novel estimates of the microscopic diffusion constant. Previous MSD analyses of SPT data have provided evidence for nanometer-scale confinement zones that

  1. Time series analysis of particle tracking data for molecular motion on the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenxia; Huerta, Gabriel; Steinberg, Stanly; Zúñiga, Martha

    2009-11-01

    Biophysicists use single particle tracking (SPT) methods to probe the dynamic behavior of individual proteins and lipids in cell membranes. The mean squared displacement (MSD) has proven to be a powerful tool for analyzing the data and drawing conclusions about membrane organization, including features like lipid rafts, protein islands, and confinement zones defined by cytoskeletal barriers. Here, we implement time series analysis as a new analytic tool to analyze further the motion of membrane proteins. The experimental data track the motion of 40 nm gold particles bound to Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHCI) molecules on the membranes of mouse hepatoma cells. Our first novel result is that the tracks are significantly autocorrelated. Because of this, we developed linear autoregressive models to elucidate the autocorrelations. Estimates of the signal to noise ratio for the models show that the autocorrelated part of the motion is significant. Next, we fit the probability distributions of jump sizes with four different models. The first model is a general Weibull distribution that shows that the motion is characterized by an excess of short jumps as compared to a normal random walk. We also fit the data with a chi distribution which provides a natural estimate of the dimension d of the space in which a random walk is occurring. For the biological data, the estimates satisfy 1 < d < 2, implying that particle motion is not confined to a line, but also does not occur freely in the plane. The dimension gives a quantitative estimate of the amount of nanometer scale obstruction met by a diffusing molecule. We introduce a new distribution and use the generalized extreme value distribution to show that the biological data also have an excess of long jumps as compared to normal diffusion. These fits provide novel estimates of the microscopic diffusion constant. Previous MSD analyses of SPT data have provided evidence for nanometer-scale confinement zones that

  2. Automatic generation of the non-holonomic equations of motion for vehicle stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaker, B. P.; Rieveley, R. J.

    2010-09-01

    The mathematical analysis of vehicle stability has been utilised as an important tool in the design, development, and evaluation of vehicle architectures and stability controls. This paper presents a novel method for automatic generation of the linearised equations of motion for mechanical systems that is well suited to vehicle stability analysis. Unlike conventional methods for generating linearised equations of motion in standard linear second order form, the proposed method allows for the analysis of systems with non-holonomic constraints. In the proposed method, the algebraic constraint equations are eliminated after linearisation and reduction to first order. The described method has been successfully applied to an assortment of classic dynamic problems of varying complexity including the classic rolling coin, the planar truck-trailer, and the bicycle, as well as in more recent problems such as a rotor-stator and a benchmark road vehicle with suspension. This method has also been applied in the design and analysis of a novel three-wheeled narrow tilting vehicle with zero roll-stiffness. An application for determining passively stable configurations using the proposed method together with a genetic search algorithm is detailed. The proposed method and software implementation has been shown to be robust and provides invaluable conceptual insight into the stability of vehicles and mechanical systems.

  3. Reliability and validity of the WATSMART three-dimensional optoelectric motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Scholz, J P

    1989-08-01

    Reliability and validity of the WATSMART (Waterloo Spatial Motion Analysis Recording Technique) system was evaluated under static and dynamic conditions. In experiment 1, infrared light-emitting diodes (IREDs) were placed at the axis and along the arms of a clinical goniometer. Twelve angles in 5-degree increments were each recorded 10 times at each of three spatial locations. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and analysis-of-variance procedures to determine within-trial variability. The ICCs for all spatial locations exceeded .99. The 95% confidence interval for each angle was less than 0.5 degree in all cases. Criterion-referenced instrument validity was assessed with regression analysis. Slopes of the regression of reconstructed angle on reference angle were close to unity for each spatial location. A systematic error, however, that increased as the goniometer was rotated 45 degrees away from the cameras was evident. In experiment 2, a robotic arm was fitted with four IREDs and made to repeat a defined movement trajectory 10 times at each of three spatial locations. The ICCs for portions of each trajectory ranged from .20 to .99. The results show that reliable and valid results can be obtained from this motion analysis system if adequate precautions are taken to reduce unwanted light reflections. Reliability and validity decreased somewhat as the object was rotated further away from the plane in which the cameras were mounted.

  4. The Eye, Film, And Video In High-Speed Motion Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyzer, William G.

    1987-09-01

    The unaided human eye with its inherent limitations serves us well in the examination of most large-scale, slow-moving, natural and man-made phenomena, but constraints imposed by inertial factors in the visual mechanism severely limit our ability to observe fast-moving and short-duration events. The introduction of high-speed photography (c. 1851) and videography (c. 1970) served to stretch the temporal limits of human perception by several orders of magnitude so critical analysis could be performed on a wide range of rapidly occurring events of scientific, technological, industrial, and educational interest. The preferential selection of eye, film, or video imagery in fulfilling particular motion analysis requirements is determined largely by the comparative attributes and limitations of these methods. The choice of either film or video does not necessarily eliminate the eye, because it usually continues as a vital link in the analytical chain. The important characteristics of the eye, film, and video imagery in high-speed motion analysis are discussed with particular reference to fields of application which include biomechanics, ballistics, machine design, mechanics of materials, sports analysis, medicine, production engineering, and industrial trouble-shooting.

  5. Calibration of a Hall effect displacement measurement system for complex motion analysis using a neural network.

    PubMed

    Northey, G W; Oliver, M L; Rittenhouse, D M

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics studies often require the analysis of position and orientation. Although a variety of transducer and camera systems can be utilized, a common inexpensive alternative is the Hall effect sensor. Hall effect sensors have been used extensively for one-dimensional position analysis but their non-linear behavior and cross-talk effects make them difficult to calibrate for effective and accurate two- and three-dimensional position and orientation analysis. The aim of this study was to develop and calibrate a displacement measurement system for a hydraulic-actuation joystick used for repetitive motion analysis of heavy equipment operators. The system utilizes an array of four Hall effect sensors that are all active during any joystick movement. This built-in redundancy allows the calibration to utilize fully connected feed forward neural networks in conjunction with a Microscribe 3D digitizer. A fully connected feed forward neural network with one hidden layer containing five neurons was developed. Results indicate that the ability of the neural network to accurately predict the x, y and z coordinates of the joystick handle was good with r(2) values of 0.98 and higher. The calibration technique was found to be equally as accurate when used on data collected 5 days after the initial calibration, indicating the system is robust and stable enough to not require calibration every time the joystick is used. This calibration system allowed an infinite number of joystick orientations and positions to be found within the range of joystick motion.

  6. Temporal change of photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis investigated through motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Tamaki, Shun; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation to a strong light is one of the essential characteristics of green algae, yet lacking relatively the information about the photophobic responses of Eukaryotic microalgae. We investigated the photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis over a time course of several hours with alternated repetition of blue-light pulse illumination and spatially patterned blue-light illumination. Four distinctive photophobic motions in response to strong blue light were identified in a trace image analysis, namely on-site rotation, running and tumbling, continuous circular swimming, and unaffected straightforward swimming. The cells cultured in autotrophic conditions under weak light showed mainly the on-site rotation response at the beginning of blue-light illumination, but they acquired more blue-light tolerant responses of running and tumbling, circular swimming, or straightforward swimming. The efficiency of escaping from a blue-light illuminated area improved markedly with the development of these photophobic motions. Time constant of 3.0 h was deduced for the evolution of photophobic responses of E. gracilis. The nutrient-rich metabolic status of the cells resulting from photosynthesis during the experiments, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthesized nutrient products in balance between formation and consumption, was the main factor responsible for the development of photophobic responses. The reduction-oxidation status in and around E. gracilis cells did not affect their photophobic responses significantly, unlike the case of photophobic responses and phototaxis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. This study shows that the evolution of photophobic motion type of E. gracilis is dominated mainly by the nutrient metabolic status of the cells. The fact suggests that the nutrient-rich cells have a higher threshold for switching the flagellar motion from straightforward swimming to rotation under a strong light. PMID:28234984

  7. Temporal change of photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis investigated through motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Tamaki, Shun; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation to a strong light is one of the essential characteristics of green algae, yet lacking relatively the information about the photophobic responses of Eukaryotic microalgae. We investigated the photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis over a time course of several hours with alternated repetition of blue-light pulse illumination and spatially patterned blue-light illumination. Four distinctive photophobic motions in response to strong blue light were identified in a trace image analysis, namely on-site rotation, running and tumbling, continuous circular swimming, and unaffected straightforward swimming. The cells cultured in autotrophic conditions under weak light showed mainly the on-site rotation response at the beginning of blue-light illumination, but they acquired more blue-light tolerant responses of running and tumbling, circular swimming, or straightforward swimming. The efficiency of escaping from a blue-light illuminated area improved markedly with the development of these photophobic motions. Time constant of 3.0 h was deduced for the evolution of photophobic responses of E. gracilis. The nutrient-rich metabolic status of the cells resulting from photosynthesis during the experiments, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthesized nutrient products in balance between formation and consumption, was the main factor responsible for the development of photophobic responses. The reduction-oxidation status in and around E. gracilis cells did not affect their photophobic responses significantly, unlike the case of photophobic responses and phototaxis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. This study shows that the evolution of photophobic motion type of E. gracilis is dominated mainly by the nutrient metabolic status of the cells. The fact suggests that the nutrient-rich cells have a higher threshold for switching the flagellar motion from straightforward swimming to rotation under a strong light.

  8. Quantitative comparison of current models for trunk motion in human movement analysis.

    PubMed

    Leardini, Alberto; Biagi, Fabio; Belvedere, Claudio; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2009-08-01

    A number of different models for human trunk kinematics during locomotion have been proposed, though mainly addressing specific clinical questions rather than general populations. These differ considerably for the skeletal segments considered, marker-set, anatomical axis and frame definitions, and joint conventions. The scope of the present study is to compare quantitatively these models on the basis of the same motion. Ten subjects were analysed, instrumented with a single comprehensive marker-set of 14 markers identified from the union of the corresponding from eight current models for trunk kinematics. Activities of daily living (walking, chair rising/sitting, step-up/down), elementary trunk movements (flexion, bending and axial rotation), and isolated motion of the shoulders, both synchronous and asynchronous were collected. Resulting rotations in the three anatomical planes, both in the laboratory and in the pelvis reference frames, were calculated. In addition to the expected bias between the rotation angle time-histories, very different patterns and range of motion were found between the models. In chair rising/sitting, and in the laboratory global frame, the range of flexion averaged over the subjects was measured by the different models in the full scale from about 28 degrees to 44 degrees. In elementary trunk rotation and in the pelvis anatomical reference frame, three models measured about 10 degrees excursion of the coupled bending motion, other two about 38 degrees and 49 degrees on average. In trunk kinematics analysis, it is recommended that all models, both in terms of markers involved and of reference frame definitions, are understood carefully before interpreting the results in clinical decision making.

  9. Stochastic exploration of ambiguities for nonrigid shape recovery.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Fua, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Recovering the 3D shape of deformable surfaces from single images is known to be a highly ambiguous problem because many different shapes may have very similar projections. This is commonly addressed by restricting the set of possible shapes to linear combinations of deformation modes and by imposing additional geometric constraints. Unfortunately, because image measurements are noisy, such constraints do not always guarantee that the correct shape will be recovered. To overcome this limitation, we introduce a stochastic sampling approach to efficiently explore the set of solutions of an objective function based on point correspondences. This allows us to propose a small set of ambiguous candidate 3D shapes and then use additional image information to choose the best one. As a proof of concept, we use either motion or shading cues to this end and show that we can handle a complex objective function without having to solve a difficult nonlinear minimization problem. The advantages of our method are demonstrated on a variety of problems including both real and synthetic data.

  10. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the…

  11. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the…

  12. Proper motion survey and kinematic analysis of the ρ Ophiuchi embedded cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.; Krone-Martins, A.; Bontemps, S.; Despois, D.; Galli, P. A. B.; Bouy, H.; Le Campion, J. F.; Rapaport, M.; Cuillandre, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The ρ Ophiuchi molecular complex and in particular the Lynds L1688 dark cloud is unique in its proximity ( 130 pc), in its richness in young stars and protostars, and in its youth (0.5 Myr). It is certainly one of the best targets currently accessible from the ground to study the early phases of star-formation. Proper motion analysis is a very efficient tool for separating members of clusters from field stars, but very few proper motions are available in the ρ Ophiuchi region since most of the young sources are deeply embedded in dust and gas. Aims: We aim at performing a kinematic census of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the ρ Ophiuchi F core and partially in the E core of the L1688 dark cloud. Methods: We run a proper motion program at the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) with the Son of ISAAC (SOFI) instrument over nine years in the near-infrared. We complemented these observations with various public image databases to enlarge the time base of observations and the field of investigation to 0.5° × 0.5°. We derived positions and proper motions for 2213 objects. From these, 607 proper motions were derived from SOFI observations with a 1.8 mas/yr accuracy while the remaining objects were measured only from auxiliary data with a mean precision of about 3 mas/yr. Results: We performed a kinematic analysis of the most accurate proper motions derived in this work, which allowed us to separate cluster members from field stars and to derive the mean properties of the cluster. From the kinematic analysis we derived a list of 68 members and 14 candidate members, comprising 26 new objects with a high membership probability. These new members are generally fainter than the known ones. We measured a mean proper motion of (μαcosδ, μδ) = (-8.2,-24.3) ± 0.8 mas/yr for the L1688 dark cloud. A supervised classification was applied to photometric data of members to allocate a spectral energy distribution (SED) classification to the unclassified members

  13. Rainbows, water droplets, and seeing--slow motion analysis of experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many physics processes underlying phenomena in atmospheric optics happen on a rather short time scale such that neither the human eye nor video cameras are able to analyze the details. We report applications of high-speed imaging of laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics with subsequent slow motion analysis. The potential to study respective transient effects is investigated in general and for a few phenomena in detail, in particular for rainbow scattering due to single oscillating droplets during free fall, and for light propagation effects through atmospheric paths with turbulences, leading, e.g., to scintillation of stars or shimmering of mirage images.

  14. PROSTATE INTRAFRACTION MOTION ASSESSED BY SIMULTANEOUS KV FLUOROSCOPY AT MV DELIVERY I: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS AND PATTERN ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Justus; Wu, Qiuwen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe prostate intrafraction motion using kV fluoroscopy at treatment delivery for a hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials KV images were acquired during treatment delivery as well as pre and post-treatment Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for each fraction of 30 patients, totaling 571 fractions for analysis. We calculated population statistics, evaluated correlation between interfraction and intrafraction motion, evaluated effect of treatment duration, classified whether motion resolved by post-treatment CBCT, and compared motion magnitude on a per patient basis. Results The elapsed time between pre- and post-CBCTs was (18.6±4.5) minutes. The population mean of motion measured by kV fluoroscopy was (−0.1, 0.5, −0.6) mm, the systematic was (0.5, 1.3, 1.2) mm, and random was (0.9, 1.9, 2.0) mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior axes, respectively. The probability of motion increased with treatment duration, with the mean increasing to (0.0, 1.0, −0.9) mm, and the systematic to (0.6, 1.7, 1.5) mm when measured using post-treatment CBCT. For any motion ≥2mm, ~75% did not resolve by post-treatment CBCT. Motion magnitude varied considerably among patients, with the probability of a 5mm displacement ranging from 0.0% to 58.8%. Conclusions Time dependency of intrafraction motion should be considered to avoid bias in margin assessment, with post-treatment CBCT slightly exaggerating the true motion. The patient-specific nature of the intrafraction motion suggests a patient-specific management approach may be beneficial. PMID:20579817

  15. SEMI-AUTOMATED VECTORIAL ANALYSIS OF ANORECTAL MOTION BY MAGNETIC RESONANCE DEFECOGRAPHY IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS AND FECAL INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Noelting, Jessica; Bharucha, Adil E.; Lake, David S.; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J.G.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inter-observer variability limits the reproducibility of pelvic floor motion measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our aim was to develop a semi-automated program measuring pelvic floor motion in a reproducible and refined manner. Methods Pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction (squeeze) and rectal evacuation were assessed by MRI in 64 women with fecal incontinence (FI) and 64 age-matched controls. A radiologist measured anorectal angles and anorectal junction motion. A semi-automated program did the same and also dissected anorectal motion into perpendicular vectors representing the puborectalis and other pelvic floor muscles, assessed the pubococcygeal angle, and evaluated pelvic rotation. Key Results Manual and semi-automated measurements of anorectal junction motion (r = 0.70; p < 0.0001) during squeeze and evacuation were correlated, as were anorectal angles at rest, squeeze, and evacuation; angle change during squeeze or evacuation were less so. Semi-automated measurements of anorectal and pelvic bony motion were also reproducible within subjects. During squeeze, puborectalis injury was associated (p ≤ 0.01) with smaller puborectalis but not pelvic floor motion vectors, reflecting impaired puborectalis function. The pubococcygeal angle, reflecting posterior pelvic floor motion, was smaller during squeeze and larger during evacuation. However, pubococcygeal angles and pelvic rotation during squeeze and evacuation did not differ significantly between FI and controls. Conclusion & Inferences This semi-automated program provides a reproducible, efficient and refined analysis of pelvic floor motion by MRI. Puborectalis injury is independently associated with impaired motion of puborectalis, not other pelvic floor muscles in controls and women with FI. PMID:22765510

  16. Wave motion analysis in arch structures via wavelet finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Yongying; Miao, Huihui; He, Zhengjia

    2014-01-01

    The application of B-spline wavelet on interval (BSWI) finite element method for wave motion analysis in arch structures is presented in this paper. Instead of traditional polynomial interpolation, scaling functions at certain scales have been adopted to form the shape functions and construct wavelet-based elements. Different from other wavelet numerical methods adding wavelets directly, the element displacement field represented by the coefficients of wavelets expansions is transformed from wavelet space to physical space via the corresponding transformation matrix. The energy functional of the arch is obtained by the generalized shell theory, and the finite element model for wave motion analysis is constructed according to Hamilton's principle and the central difference method in time domain. Taking the practical application into account, damaged arch waveguides are also investigated. Proper analysis of the responses from structure damages allows one to indicate the location very precisely. This paper mainly focuses on the crack in structures. Based on Castigliano's theorem and the Pairs equation, the local flexibility of crack is formulated for BSWI element. Numerical experiments are performed to study the effect of wave propagations in arch waveguides, that is, frequency dispersion and mode spilt in the arch. The responses of the arch with cracks are simulated under the broad-band, narrow-band and chirp excitations. In order to estimate the spatial, time and frequency concentrations of responses, the reciprocal length, time-frequency transform and correlation coefficient are introduced in this investigation.

  17. Analysis of Turbulent Scales of Motion in Premixed Flames Using Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, Peter; Whitman, Samuel; Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Recently, multiscale turbulence-flame interactions in premixed reacting flows have been examined using both physical space and spectral approaches. However, there remains relatively little understanding of how turbulent scales of motion vary through the internal structure of the flame itself (i.e., through premixed flamelets). Such an analysis is made difficult by the inhomogeneity, small scale, and spatial locality of many premixed flames, particularly at high Damköhler and low Karlovitz numbers. Conditional structure functions provide a possible solution to this analysis challenge, and in this talk we present results from the calculation of structure functions using data from highly-resolved direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent premixed flames. The high resolution of the DNS allows structure functions to be calculated normally and tangentially to the local flame surface, revealing the specific effects of the flame on turbulent scales of motion near the scale of the local flame width. Moreover, the conditional nature of the analysis allows the effects of different flame regions (e.g., the preheat and reaction zones) on turbulence to be isolated. The implications of these results for the theory and modeling of turbulent flame physics are outlined.

  18. Motion capability analysis of a quadruped robot as a parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jingjun; Lu, Dengfeng; Zhang, Zhongxiang; Pei, Xu

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the forward and inverse displacement analysis of a quadruped robot MANA as a parallel manipulator in quadruple stance