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Sample records for nonsense mutation w1282x

  1. Association of a nonsense mutation (W1282X), the most common mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish cystic fibrosis patients in Israel, with presentation of severe disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, T.; Bashan, N.; Seret, H.; Kerem, B.; Kerem, E. ); Augarten, A.; Gazit, E.; Yahav, Y.; Yaar, L. ); Rivlin, Y. ); Tal, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Only about 30% of the cystic fibrosis chromosomes in the Israeli cystic fibrosis patient populations carry the major CF mutation ({Delta}F508). Since different Jewish ethnic groups tended to live as closed isolates until recent times, high frequencies of specific mutations are expected among the remainder cystic fibrosis chromosomes of these ethnic groups. Genetic factors appear to influence the severity of the disease. It is therefore expected that different mutations will be associated with either severe or mild phenotype. Direct genomic sequencing of exons included in the two nucleotide-binding folds of the putative CFTR protein was performed on 119 Israeli cystic fibrosis patients from 97 families. One sequence alteration which is expected to create a termination at residue 1282 (W1282X) was found in 63 chromosomes. Of 95 chromosomes, 57(60%) are of Ashkenazi origin. In conclusion, the W1282X mutation is the most common cystic fibrosis mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish patient population in Israel. This nonsense mutation is associated with presentation of severe disease.

  2. Therapeutic benefit observed with the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor, in a CF patient homozygous for the W1282X CFTR nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Libby, Emily Falk; Peng, Ning; Hadjiliadis, Denis; Bonk, Michael; Solomon, George M; Rowe, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Premature termination codons (PTCs) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene result in nonfunctional CFTR protein and are the proximate cause of ~11% of CF causing alleles. Aminoglycosides and other novel agents are known to induce translational readthrough of PTCs, a potential therapeutic approach. Among PTCs, W1282X CFTR is unique, as it is a C-terminal CFTR mutation that can exhibit partial activity, even in the truncated state. The potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770) is approved for treating CF patients with G551D and other gating mutations. Based on previous studies demonstrating the beneficial effect of ivacaftor for PTC mutations following readthrough in vitro, we hypothesized that ivacaftor may enhance CFTR activity in CF patients expressing W1282X CFTR, and could be further enhanced by readthrough. Ivacaftor significantly increased CFTR activity in W1282X-expressing cells compared to R1162X CFTR cells, and was further enhanced by readthrough with the aminoglycoside G418. Primary nasal epithelial cells from a W1282X homozygous patient showed improved CFTR function in the presence of ivacaftor. Upon ivacaftor administration to the same patient, there was significant improvement in pulmonary exacerbation frequency, BMI, and insulin requirement, whereas FEV1 remained stable over 3years. These studies suggest that ivacaftor may have moderate clinical benefit in patients with preserved expression of the W1282X CFTR mutation by stimulating residual activity of the truncated protein, suggesting the need for further studies including the addition of efficacious readthrough agents.

  3. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S.; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3–5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  4. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3-5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein.

  5. Preimplantation diagnosis of cystic fibrosis by simultaneous detection of the W1282X and delta F508 mutations.

    PubMed

    Avner, R; Laufer, N; Safran, A; Kerem, B S; Friedmann, A; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S

    1994-09-01

    W1282X (W) and delta F508 (delta) are the two most common mutations of the cystic fibrosis Israeli population. Patients who are homozygotes (WW and delta delta) as well as compound heterozygotes (W delta) present a severe phenotype of the disease. In the present study, we have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for the detection of both mutations simultaneously in a single blastomere. Unfertilized human oocytes and single polyspermic blastomeres were subjected to a two-round PCR amplification: a first round of multiplex PCR followed by a second round of nested PCR, done separately at each locus. Clear signals at both loci were obtained in 51% (47/65) of oocytes and 69% (24/35) of blastomeres. The genotype of the single cell analysed was determined by endonuclease digestion of the W products and by heteroduplex formation of the delta F products. This diagnostic system will allow the identification of affected embryos (WW, delta delta, W delta) as well as phenotypically normal carriers (W+, +delta), and therefore may be used for cystic fibrosis preimplantation diagnosis in families who carry either or both mutations.

  6. Correctors and Potentiators Rescue Function of the Truncated W1282X-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) Translation Product*♦

    PubMed Central

    Haggie, Peter M.; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Xu, Haijin; Avramescu, Radu G.; Perdomo, Doranda; Zlock, Lorna; Nielson, Dennis W.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    W1282X is the fifth most common cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation that causes cystic fibrosis. Here, we investigated the utility of a small molecule corrector/potentiator strategy, as used for ΔF508-CFTR, to produce functional rescue of the truncated translation product of the W1282X mutation, CFTR1281, without the need for read-through. In transfected cell systems, certain potentiators and correctors, including VX-809 and VX-770, increased CFTR1281 activity. To identify novel correctors and potentiators with potentially greater efficacy on CFTR1281, functional screens were done of ∼30,000 synthetic small molecules and drugs/nutraceuticals in CFTR1281-transfected cells. Corrector scaffolds of 1-arylpyrazole-4-arylsulfonyl-piperazine and spiro-piperidine-quinazolinone classes were identified with up to ∼5-fold greater efficacy than VX-809, some of which were selective for CFTR1281, whereas others also corrected ΔF508-CFTR. Several novel potentiator scaffolds were identified with efficacy comparable with VX-770; remarkably, a phenylsulfonamide-pyrrolopyridine acted synergistically with VX-770 to increase CFTR1281 function ∼8-fold over that of VX-770 alone, normalizing CFTR1281 channel activity to that of wild type CFTR. Corrector and potentiator combinations were tested in primary cultures and conditionally reprogrammed cells generated from nasal brushings from one W1282X homozygous subject. Although robust chloride conductance was seen with correctors and potentiators in homozygous ΔF508 cells, increased chloride conductance was not found in W1282X cells despite the presence of adequate transcript levels. Notwithstanding the negative data in W1282X cells from one human subject, we speculate that corrector and potentiator combinations may have therapeutic efficacy in cystic fibrosis caused by the W1282X mutation, although additional studies are needed on human cells from W1282X subjects. PMID:27895116

  7. Synthetic aminoglycosides efficiently suppress cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator nonsense mutations and are enhanced by ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaojiao; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Tang, Liping; Biswas, Silpak; Du, Ming; Jackson, Laura A; Dai, Yanying; Belakhov, Valery; Shalev, Moran; Chen, Fuquan; Schacht, Jochen; J Bridges, Robert; Baasov, Timor; Hong, Jeong; Bedwell, David M; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-04-01

    New drugs are needed to enhance premature termination codon (PTC) suppression to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other diseases caused by nonsense mutations. We tested new synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives expressly developed for PTC suppression in a series of complementary CF models. Using a dual-luciferase reporter system containing the four most prevalent CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) nonsense mutations (G542X, R553X, R1162X, and W1282X) within their local sequence contexts (the three codons on either side of the PTC), we found that NB124 promoted the most readthrough of G542X, R1162X, and W1282X PTCs. NB124 also restored full-length CFTR expression and chloride transport in Fischer rat thyroid cells stably transduced with a CFTR-G542XcDNA transgene, and was superior to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides tested. NB124 restored CFTR function to roughly 7% of wild-type activity in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) CF cells (G542X/delF508), a highly relevant preclinical model with endogenous CFTR expression. Efficacy was further enhanced by addition of the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor (VX-770), to airway cells expressing CFTR PTCs. NB124 treatment rescued CFTR function in a CF mouse model expressing a human CFTR-G542X transgene; efficacy was superior to gentamicin and exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic properties, suggesting that in vitro results translated to clinical benefit in vivo. NB124 was also less cytotoxic than gentamicin in a tissue-based model for ototoxicity. These results provide evidence that NB124 and other synthetic aminoglycosides provide a 10-fold improvement in therapeutic index over gentamicin and other first-generation aminoglycosides, providing a promising treatment for a wide array of CFTR nonsense mutations.

  8. Rescue of nonsense mutations by amlexanox in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonsense mutations are at the origin of many cancers and inherited genetic diseases. The consequence of nonsense mutations is often the absence of mutant gene expression due to the activation of an mRNA surveillance mechanism called nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Strategies to rescue the expression of nonsense-containing mRNAs have been developed such as NMD inhibition or nonsense mutation readthrough. Methods Using a dedicated screening system, we sought molecules capable to block NMD. Additionally, 3 cell lines derived from patient cells and harboring a nonsense mutation were used to study the effect of the selected molecule on the level of nonsense-containing mRNAs and the synthesis of proteins from these mutant mRNAs. Results We demonstrate here that amlexanox, a drug used for decades, not only induces an increase in nonsense-containing mRNAs amount in treated cells, but also leads to the synthesis of the full-length protein in an efficient manner. We also demonstrated that these full length proteins are functional. Conclusions As a result of this dual activity, amlexanox may be useful as a therapeutic approach for diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:22938201

  9. Ataluren treatment of patients with nonsense mutation dystrophinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bushby, Katharine; Finkel, Richard; Wong, Brenda; Barohn, Richard; Campbell, Craig; Comi, Giacomo P; Connolly, Anne M; Day, John W; Flanigan, Kevin M; Goemans, Nathalie; Jones, Kristi J; Mercuri, Eugenio; Quinlivan, Ros; Renfroe, James B; Russman, Barry; Ryan, Monique M; Tulinius, Mar; Voit, Thomas; Moore, Steven A; Lee Sweeney, H; Abresch, Richard T; Coleman, Kim L; Eagle, Michelle; Florence, Julaine; Gappmaier, Eduard; Glanzman, Allan M; Henricson, Erik; Barth, Jay; Elfring, Gary L; Reha, Allen; Spiegel, Robert J; O'donnell, Michael W; Peltz, Stuart W; Mcdonald, Craig M; FOR THE PTC124-GD-007-DMD STUDY GROUP

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dystrophinopathy is a rare, severe muscle disorder, and nonsense mutations are found in 13% of cases. Ataluren was developed to enable ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in nonsense mutation (nm) genetic disorders. Methods: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study; males ≥5 years with nm-dystrophinopathy received study drug orally 3 times daily, ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg (N = 57); ataluren 20, 20, 40 mg/kg (N = 60); or placebo (N = 57) for 48 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in 6-Minute Walk Distance (6MWD) at Week 48. Results: Ataluren was generally well tolerated. The primary endpoint favored ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg versus placebo; the week 48 6MWD Δ = 31.3 meters, post hoc P = 0.056. Secondary endpoints (timed function tests) showed meaningful differences between ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg, and placebo. Conclusions: As the first investigational new drug targeting the underlying cause of nm-dystrophinopathy, ataluren offers promise as a treatment for this orphan genetic disorder with high unmet medical need. Muscle Nerve 50: 477–487, 2014 PMID:25042182

  10. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients.

  11. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of POU4F3 Gene Causes Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Mingming; Zhang, Fengguo; Zhou, Yicui; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Qingyin; Bai, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    POU4F3 gene encodes a transcription factor which plays an essential role in the maturation and maintenance of hair cells in cochlea and vestibular system. Several mutations of POU4F3 have been reported to cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in recent years. In this study, we describe a pathogenic nonsense mutation located in POU4F3 in a four-generation Chinese family. Target region capture sequencing was performed to search for the candidate mutations from 81 genes related to nonsyndromic hearing loss in this family. A novel nonsense mutation of POU4F3, c.337C>T (p. Gln113⁎), was identified in a Chinese family characterized by late-onset progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss. The novel mutation cosegregated with hearing loss in this family and was absent in 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The mutation led to a stop codon and thus a truncated protein with no functional domains remained. Transient transfection and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the subcellular localization of the truncated protein differed markedly from normal protein, which could be the underlying reason for complete loss of its normal function. Here, we report the first nonsense mutation of POU4F3 associated with progressive hearing loss and explored the possible underlying mechanism. Routine examination of POU4F3 is necessary for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss in the future. PMID:27999687

  12. A patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and concomitant nonsense mutation in CETP

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Coşkun, Süleyman; Quon, Jennifer; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Baran, Burçin; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Mane, Shrikant M.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has previously been associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, notably obesity, acute coronary syndrome and metabolic syndrome. Reports describing mutations in FTO as well as FTO animal models have further demonstrated a role for FTO in the development of the brain and other organs. Here, we describe a patient born of consanguineous union who presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, and other various phenotypic abnormalities. Whole exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and a nonsense mutation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Exome CNV analysis revealed no disease causing large duplications or deletions within coding regions. Patient’s, her parents’ and non-related control’ fibroblasts were analyzed for morphologic defects, abnormal proliferation, apoptosis and transcriptome profile. We have shown that FTO is located in nucleus of cells from each tested samples. Western blot analysis demonstrated no changes in patient FTO. Q-PCR analysis revealed slightly decreased levels of FTO expression in patient cells compared to controls. No morphological or proliferation differences between the patient and control fibroblasts were observed. There is still much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in FTO contribute to such severe phenotypes. PMID:26740239

  13. A patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and concomitant nonsense mutation in CETP.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Ahmet O; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Coşkun, Süleyman; Quon, Jennifer; Harmancı, Akdes S; Baranoski, Jacob F; Baran, Burçin; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Mane, Shrikant M; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-05-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene has previously been associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, notably obesity, acute coronary syndrome and metabolic syndrome. Reports describing mutations in FTO as well as in FTO animal models have further demonstrated a role for FTO in the development of the brain and other organs. Here, we describe a patient born of consanguineous union who presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia and other various phenotypic abnormalities. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and a nonsense mutation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Exome copy number variation analysis revealed no disease-causing large duplications or deletions within coding regions. Patient's, her parents' and non-related control' fibroblasts were analyzed for morphologic defects, abnormal proliferation, apoptosis and transcriptome profile. We have shown that FTO is located in the nucleus of cells from each tested sample. Western blot analysis demonstrated no changes in patient FTO. Quantitative (qPCR) analysis revealed slightly decreased levels of FTO expression in patient cells compared with controls. No morphological or proliferation differences between the patient and control fibroblasts were observed. There is still much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in FTO contribute to such severe phenotypes.

  14. Identification and characterization of small molecules that inhibit nonsense-mediated RNA decay and suppress nonsense p53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leenus; Grigoryan, Arsen; Wang, Ding; Wang, Jinhua; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Cardozo, Timothy; Gardner, Lawrence B

    2014-06-01

    Many of the gene mutations found in genetic disorders, including cancer, result in premature termination codons (PTC) and the rapid degradation of their mRNAs by nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). We used virtual library screening, targeting a pocket in the SMG7 protein, a key component of the NMD mechanism, to identify compounds that disrupt the SMG7-UPF1 complex and inhibit NMD. Several of these compounds upregulated NMD-targeted mRNAs at nanomolar concentrations, with minimal toxicity in cell-based assays. As expected, pharmacologic NMD inhibition disrupted SMG7-UPF1 interactions. When used in cells with PTC-mutated p53, pharmacologic NMD inhibition combined with a PTC "read-through" drug led to restoration of full-length p53 protein, upregulation of p53 downstream transcripts, and cell death. These studies serve as proof-of-concept that pharmacologic NMD inhibitors can restore mRNA integrity in the presence of PTC and can be used as part of a strategy to restore full-length protein in a variety of genetic diseases.

  15. Gentamicin B1 is a minor gentamicin component with major nonsense mutation suppression activity

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Niesser, Jürgen; Balgi, Aruna D.; Choi, Kunho; Zimmerman, Carla; South, Andrew P.; Anderson, Hilary J.; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Bally, Marcel B.; Roberge, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Nonsense mutations underlie about 10% of rare genetic disease cases. They introduce a premature termination codon (PTC) and prevent the formation of full-length protein. Pharmaceutical gentamicin, a mixture of several related aminoglycosides, is a frequently used antibiotic in humans that can induce PTC readthrough and suppress nonsense mutations at high concentrations. However, testing of gentamicin in clinical trials has shown that safe doses of this drug produce weak and variable readthrough activity that is insufficient for use as therapy. In this study we show that the major components of pharmaceutical gentamicin lack PTC readthrough activity but the minor component gentamicin B1 (B1) is a potent readthrough inducer. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the importance of ring I of B1 in establishing a ribosome configuration that permits pairing of a near-cognate complex at a PTC. B1 induced readthrough at all three nonsense codons in cultured cancer cells with TP53 (tumor protein p53) mutations, in cells from patients with nonsense mutations in the TPP1 (tripeptidyl peptidase 1), DMD (dystrophin), SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), and COL7A1 (collagen type VII alpha 1 chain) genes, and in an in vivo tumor xenograft model. The B1 content of pharmaceutical gentamicin is highly variable and major gentamicins suppress the PTC readthrough activity of B1. Purified B1 provides a consistent and effective source of PTC readthrough activity to study the potential of nonsense suppression for treatment of rare genetic disorders. PMID:28289221

  16. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality. PMID:25830902

  17. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2.

    PubMed

    Witting, N; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic, and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest that this unusual phenotype is caused by translation re-initiation downstream from the mutation site.

  18. Sporadic Hirschsprung`s disease due to a novel nonsense mutation in the RET protooncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Donis-Keller, H.; Langer, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is characterized by a lack of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the hindgut. This is most likely due to a failure of the progenitor cells (that are destined to become the ganglion cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses) to complete their distal migration in the colon. Recently, mutations in the RET protoocogene have been reported in association with HSCR. We report a novel nonsense mutation resulting in a severely truncated protein. Germline DNA from a panel of 6 HSCR patients was analyzed by SSCP for 20 exons of RET. Eight exons were also directly sequenced. We identified a novel mutation within RET exon 2. The mutation (TAC{sub 36}{yields}TAG{sub 36}), which occurs at nucleotide position 108, involves the replacement of tyrosine with a stop codon and results in a truncated 35 amino acid protein. This mutation is the most 5{prime} nonsense mutation reported thus far. Interestingly, the patient has no prior family history of HSCR and was also diagnosed with multiple developmental anomalies including dysplastic kidney. Recent gene targeting studies with mouse models have shown that RET is essential for normal renal development. However, a parallel phenotype has not been seen in other reported HSCR patients with RET mutations. The observations reported here provide evidence that RET plays a role in human renal development. Ongoing studies will determine the extent of RET involvement in sporadic cases of HSCR.

  19. Nonsense suppressor therapies rescue peroxisome lipid metabolism and assembly in cells from patients with specific PEX gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dranchak, Patricia K.; Di Pietro, Erminia; Snowden, Ann; Oesch, Nathan; Braverman, Nancy E.; Steinberg, Steven J.; Hacia, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) are multisystemic autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations in PEX genes required for normal peroxisome assembly and metabolic activities. Here, we evaluated the potential effectiveness of aminoglycoside G418 (geneticin) and PTC124 (ataluren) nonsense suppression therapies for the treatment of PBD patients with disease-causing nonsense mutations. PBD patient skin fibroblasts producing stable PEX2 or PEX12 nonsense transcripts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with a Pex2 nonsense allele all showed dramatic improvements in peroxisomal very long chain fatty acid catabolism and plasmalogen biosynthesis in response to G418 treatments. Cell imaging assays provided complementary confirmatory evidence of improved peroxisome assembly in G418-treated patient fibroblasts. In contrast, we observed no appreciable rescue of peroxisome lipid metabolism or assembly for any patient fibroblast or CHO cell culture treated with various doses of PTC124. Additionally, PTC124 did not show measurable nonsense suppression in immunoblot assays that directly evaluated the read-through of PEX7 nonsense alleles found in PBD patients with rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 1 (RCDP1). Overall, our results support the continued development of safe and effective nonsense suppressor therapies that could benefit a significant subset of individuals with PBDs. Furthermore, we suggest that the described cell culture assay systems could be useful for evaluating and screening for novel nonsense suppressor therapies. PMID:21465523

  20. A mental retardation-linked nonsense mutation in cereblon is rescued by proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Xiaogang; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2013-10-11

    A nonsense mutation in cereblon (CRBN) causes autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation. Cereblon is a substrate receptor for the Cullin-RING E3 ligase complex and couples the ubiquitin ligase to specific ubiquitination targets. The CRBN nonsense mutation (R419X) results in a protein lacking 24 amino acids at its C terminus. Although this mutation has been linked to mild mental retardation, the mechanism by which the mutation affects CRBN function is unknown. Here, we used biochemical and mass spectrometric approaches to explore the function of this mutant. We show that the protein retains its ability to assemble into a Cullin-RING E3 ligase complex and catalyzes the ubiquitination of CRBN-target proteins. However, we find that this mutant exhibits markedly increased levels of autoubiquitination and is more readily degraded by the proteasome than the wild type protein. We also show that the level of the mutant protein can be restored by a treatment of cells with a clinically utilized proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that this agent may be useful for the treatment of mental retardation associated with the CRBN R419X mutation. These data demonstrate that enhanced autoubiquitination and degradation account for the defect in CRBN activity that leads to mental retardation.

  1. Suppression of nonsense mutations as a therapeutic approach to treat genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Kim M; Bedwell, David M

    2011-01-01

    Suppression therapy is a treatment strategy for genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. This therapeutic approach utilizes pharmacological agents that suppress translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs) to restore translation of a full-length, functional polypeptide. The efficiency of various classes of compounds to suppress PTCs in mammalian cells is discussed along with the current limitations of this therapy. We also elaborate on approaches to improve the efficiency of suppression that include methods to enhance the effectiveness of current suppression drugs and the design or discovery of new, more effective suppression agents. Finally, we discuss the role of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in limiting the effectiveness of suppression therapy, and describe tactics that may allow the efficiency of NMD to be modulated in order to enhance suppression therapy.

  2. Nonsense mutations in the hairless gene underlie APL in five families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmi; Wajid, Muhammad; Kraemer, Liv; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    (1) Background Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) is a rare autosomal recessive form of inherited alopecia. Affected individuals present with a distinct pattern of total hair loss on the scalp, axilla and body shortly after birth and are essentially devoid of eyelashes and eyebrows. This form of hair loss is irreversible and the histology is consistent with an absence of mature hair follicles. In addition to total atrichia, APL patients also present with papules and follicular cysts filled with cornified material. Mutations in the Hairless (HR) gene have been shown to underlie APL. (2) Objective Here, we studied five unrelated large Pakistani families with clinical manifestations of APL. (3) Methods Based on previous reports of HR mutations in APL, we performed direct DNA sequencing analysis. (4) Results DNA sequencing of the HR gene in APL patients revealed three novel nonsense mutations in five unrelated families. All affected individuals were homozygous for a nonsense mutation due to C-to-T transitions at different positions in the amino acid sequence. Two families carry the mutation Q323X (CAG-TAG) in exon 3, two families harbor the mutation Q502X (CAG-TAG) in exon 6, and one family had a mutation at R940X (CGA-TGA) in exon 14. Haplotype analysis revealed that all affected individuals of both APL1 and APL16 families were homozygous for the same haplotype, and likewise, the mutation in families APL2 and APL19 was on the the same haplotype. (5) Conclusions We report three novel nonsense mutations in the HR gene in APL. Two of the newly identified mutations, Q323X and Q502X, were found to be shared between unrelated families and marker analysis confirmed an identical homozygous haplotype for APL1 and APL16, and for APL2 and APL19. These findings suggest that Q323X and Q502X did not arise independently, but instead appear to have been propagated in the population. Collectively, these findings contribute further evidence for the involvement of hairless mutations in

  3. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  4. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene in molar oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Arte, S; Tanner, D; Paulin, L; Alaluusua, S; Thesleff, I; Pirinen, S

    2001-10-01

    Development of dentition is controlled by numerous genes, as has been shown by experimental animal studies and mutations that have been identified by genetic studies in man. Here we report a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene that is associated with molar tooth agenesis in a Finnish family. The A340T transversion creates a stop codon at lysine 114, and truncates the coded PAX9 protein at the end of the DNA-binding paired-box. All the affected members of the family were heterozygous for the mutation. The tooth agenesis phenotype involves all permanent second and third molars and most of the first molars and resembles the earlier reported phenotype that was also associated with a PAX9 mutation. The phenotype is presumably a consequence of haploinsufficiency of PAX9. In another Finnish family with molar tooth agenesis, we could not find similar sequence changes in PAX9.

  5. beta zero thalassemia in Sardinia is caused by a nonsense mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Trecartin, R F; Liebhaber, S A; Chang, J C; Lee, K Y; Kan, Y W; Furbetta, M; Angius, A; Cao, A

    1981-01-01

    We report the characterization of a molecular lesion of beta thalassemia in Sardinia. Beta thalassemia in this area is predominantly the beta zero type with low levels of beta-globin mRNA. Translation assay of this messenger RNA in a cell-free system showed beta-globin chain synthesis only with the addition of an amber (UAG) suppressor transfer RNA. Double-stranded complementary DNA prepared from reticulocyte mRNA from a Sardinian patient was cloned in a bacterial plasmid and a beta-globin complementary DNA containing clone was isolated and sequenced. At the position corresponding to amino acid number 39, a single nucleotide mutation converted a glutamine codon (CAG) to an amber termination codon (UAG). We previously reported an amber nonsense mutation at amino acid 17 as a cause of Chinese beta zero thalassemia. Thus, beta zero thalassemia in Sardinia represents the second example of a nonsense mutation, and we predict that other beta zero thalassemias with mutations at various points along the beta-globin chain will be found to form a discrete subgroup of beta zero thalassemia. These experiments further illustrate the heterogeneity of lesions that lead to defective globin chain synthesis in beta thalassemia. Images PMID:6457059

  6. Albinism in the American mink (Neovison vison) is associated with a tyrosinase nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Anistoroaei, R; Fredholm, M; Christensen, K; Leeb, T

    2008-12-01

    Albino phenotypes are documented in various species including the American mink. In other species the albino phenotypes are associated with tyrosinase (TYR) gene mutations; therefore TYR was considered the candidate gene for albinism in mink. Four microsatellite markers were chosen in the predicted region of the TYR gene. Genotypes at the markers Mvi6025 and Mvi6034 were found to be associated with the albino phenotype within an extended half-sib family. A BAC clone containing Mvi6034 was mapped to chromosome 7q1.1-q1.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Subsequent analysis of genomic TYR sequences from wild-type and albino mink samples identified a nonsense mutation in exon 1, which converts a TGT codon encoding cysteine to a TGA stop codon (c.138T>A, p.C46X; EU627590). The mutation truncates more than 90% of the normal gene product including the putative catalytic domains. The results indicate that the nonsense mutation is responsible for the albino phenotype in the American mink.

  7. [Construction of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vector of factor IX gene and its expression in COS-7 cells].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Yang, Lin-Hua; Chai, Bao-Feng; Shen, Quan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Chen, Jian-Fang

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct 4 types of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression plasmids of fIX gene, using pcDNA3.1 plasmid containing fIX cDNA as template, and to identify, then to perform their expression in COS-7 cells. These stop mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis based on PCR, and further confirmed by DNA sequencing. COS-7 cells were transfected with either the wild-type or mutated fIX expression constructs, then the relative expression levels of fIX mRNA were detected by real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The result showed that except the designed sites, there were no other nucleotide mutation in the sequences of four nonsense mutants. The results of real time PCR proved that the nonsense-mutated vectors can be effectively expressed in COS-7 cells. It is concluded that the nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vectors of fIX gene have been successfully constructed and can express in COS-7 cells, which provides the material basis for further researches on mechanism and treatment of FIX deficiency and the function defects caused by nonsense mutation.

  8. Exon 44 nonsense mutation in two-Duchenne muscular dystrophy brothers detected by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a heteroduplex method, we screened the dystrophin exon 43-45 region for point mutations, including small deletions and insertions. The method depends upon the formation of a heteroduplex between wild-type and mutant DNA PCR products. DNA specimens from one hundred and four DMD patients without detected deletions or duplications were multiplexed amplified for exons 43, 44, and 45. The PCR products were mixed with the PCR products from nonaffected controls, electrophoresed, and examined for the presence of altered mobility heteroduplex bands. An exon 44 nonsense mutation in two DMD brothers and a common intron 44 polymorphism were identified using this approach. Although the exon 44-45 region is a hotspot for deletion breakpoints, it does not appear to be prone to point mutations. The technique is extremely useful for screening several exons simultaneously and it allowed us to screen a large number of patients.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in CRYBB1 associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Gu, Feng; He, Xiang; Cao, Zongfu; Li, Xuexi; Tong, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecular defect underlying an autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Methods Twenty-two members of a three-generation pedigree were recruited, clinical examinations were performed, and genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All members were genotyped with polymorphic microsatellite markers adjacent to each of the known cataract-related genes. Linkage analysis was performed after genotyping. Candidate genes were screened for mutation using direct sequencing. Individuals were screened for presence of a mutation by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results Linkage analysis identified a maximum LOD score of 3.31 (recombination fraction [θ]=0.0) with marker D22S1167 on chromosome 22, which flanks the β-crystallin gene cluster (CRYBB3, CRYBB2, CRYBB1, and CRYBA4). Sequencing the coding regions and the flanking intronic sequences of these four candidate genes identified a novel, heterozygous C→T transition in exon 6 of CRYBB1 in the affected individuals of the family. This single nucleotide change introduced a novel BfaI site and was predicted to result in a nonsense mutation at codon 223 that changed a phylogenetically conserved amino acid to a stop codon (p.Q223X). RFLP analysis confirmed that this mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype in all available family members and was not found in 100 normal unrelated individuals from the same ethnic background. Conclusions This study has identified a novel nonsense mutation in CRYBB1 (p.Q223X) associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract. PMID:18432316

  10. Association of a Novel Nonsense Mutation in KIAA1279 with Goldberg-Shprintzen Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    SALEHPOUR, Shadab; HASHEMI-GORJI, Feyzollah; SOLTANI, Ziba; GHAFOURI-FARD, Soudeh; MIRYOUNESI, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome (OMIM 609460) (GOSHS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome distinguished by intellectual disability, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facial characteristics. Most affected individuals also have Hirschsprung disease and/or gyral abnormalities of the brain. This syndrome has been associated with KIAA1279 gene mutations at 10q22.1. Here we report a 16 yr old male patient referred to Center for Comprehensive Genetic Services, Tehran, Iran in 2015 with cardinal features of GOSHS in addition to refractory seizures. Whole exome sequencing in the patient revealed a novel nonsense (stop gain) homozygous mutation in KIAA1279 gene (KIAA1279: NM_015634:exon6:c.C976T:p.Q326X). Considering the wide range of phenotypic variations in GOSHS, relying on phenotypic characteristics for discrimination of GOSH from similar syndromes may lead to misdiagnosis. Consequently, molecular diagnostic tools would help in accurate diagnosis of such overlapping phenotypes. PMID:28277559

  11. Hereditary thrombophilia: identification of nonsense and missense mutations in the protein C gene.

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, G; Hassan, H J; Staempfli, S; Roncuzzi, L; Cianetti, L; Leonardi, A; Vicente, V; Mannucci, P M; Bertina, R; Peschle, C

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the gene for protein C, an anticoagulant serine protease, was analyzed in 29 unrelated patients with hereditary thrombophilia and protein C deficiency. Gene deletion(s) or gross rearrangement(s) was not demonstrable by Southern blot hybridization to cDNA probes. However, two unrelated patients showed a variant restriction pattern after Pvu II or BamHI digestion, due to mutations in the last exon: analysis of their pedigrees, including three or seven heterozygotes, respectively, with approximately 50% reduction of both enzymatic and antigen level, showed the abnormal restriction pattern in all heterozygous individuals, but not in normal relatives. Cloning of protein C gene and sequencing of the last exon allowed us to identify a nonsense and a missense mutation, respectively. In the first case, codon 306 (CGA, arginine) is mutated to an inframe stop codon, thus generating a new Pvu II recognition site. In the second case, a missense mutation in the BamHI palindrome (GGATCC----GCATCC) leads to substitution of a key amino acid (a tryptophan to cysteine substitution at position 402), invariantly conserved in eukaryotic serine proteases. These point mutations may explain the protein C-deficiency phenotype of heterozygotes in the two pedigrees. Images PMID:2437584

  12. A case of pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart defects with a novel GATA6 nonsense mutation: evidence of haploinsufficiency due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Nakao, Atsushi; Sarhat, Ashoor R; Furuya, Akiko; Matsuo, Kumihiro; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Kajino, Hiroki; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Recently, GATA6 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations were reported to cause pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart defects (PACHD [OMIM:600001]). However, the molecular mechanisms resulting from premature termination codons have not been examined in this disorder. The objective of this study was to perform a genetic analysis of a patient with PACHD. A female patient presented with ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia at birth. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine deficiency due to pancreatic agenesis was diagnosed at 1 month of age. PCR-direct sequencing of GATA6 revealed that the patient is heterozygous for a novel de novo nonsense mutation of c.1477C>T, p. Arg493X in exon 5. RT-PCR direct sequencing of the RT-PCR products of total RNA from peripheral blood of the patient for the region encompassing exons 4-6 revealed only the wild-type allele. This finding provides the evidence for the occurrence of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in the p.Arg493X mutation. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of GATA6 transcript in the patient was less than half compared with normal control samples. This is the first evidence that GATA6 haploinsufficiency is caused by NMD in vivo, and we conclude that GATA6 haploinsufficiency causes not only PACHD but may affect other organs derived from the endoderm. Further screenings of GATA6 mutations in patients with various forms of diabetes and/or congenital heart disease with other visceral malformation may reveal the impact of GATA6 mutations on diabetes and congenital malformation.

  13. Nonsense mutation in the glycoprotein Ib. alpha. coding sequence associated with Bernard-Soulier syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Russell, S.R.; Vicente, V.; Scharf, R.E.; Tomer, A.; McMillian, R.; Ruggeri, Z.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Three distinct gene products, the {alpha} and {beta} chains of glycoprotein (GP) Ib and GP IX, constitute the platelet membrane GP Ib-IX complex, a receptor for von Willebrand factor and thrombin involved in platelet adhesion and aggregation. Defective function of the GP Ib-IX complex is the hallmark of a rare congenital bleeding disorder of still undefined pathogenesis, the Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of the disease in one patient in whom immunoblotting of solubilized platelets demonstrated absence of normal GP Ib{alpha} but presence of a smaller immunoreactive species. The truncated polypeptide was also present, along with normal protein, in platelets from the patient's mother and two of his four children. Genetic characterization identified a nucleotide transition changing the Trp-343 codon (TGG) to a nonsense codon (TGA). Such a mutation explains the origin of the smaller GP Ib{alpha}, which by lacking half of the sequence on the carboxyl-terminal side, including the transmembrane domain, cannot be properly inserted in the platelet membrane. Both normal and mutant codons were found in the patient, suggesting that he is a compound heterozygote with a still unidentified defect in the other GP Ib{alpha} allele. Nonsense mutation and truncated GP Ib{alpha} polypeptide were found to cosegregate in four individuals through three generations and were associated with either Bernard-Soulier syndrome or carrier state phenotype. The molecular abnormality demonstrated in this family provides evidence that defective synthesis of GP Ib{alpha} alters the membrane expression of the GP Ib-IX complex and may be responsible for Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

  14. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N.; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Messiaen, Ludwine M.; Bedwell, David M.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H.; Korf, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  15. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1.

  16. Screening for five mutations detects 97% of cystic fibrosis (CF) chromosomes and predicts a carrier frequency of 1:29 in the Jewish Ashkenazi population

    SciTech Connect

    Abeliovich, D.; Lavon, I.P.; Lerer, I.; Cohen, T. ); Cutting, G.R. ); Springer, C.; Avital, A.

    1992-11-01

    To determine the distribution and frequency of cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations in the Israeli population, the authors have screened 96 patients for 11 relatively common mutations. Five mutations - [Delta]F508, G542X, W1282X, N1303K, and 3849 + 10kb C[yields]T-were found to account for 97% of the CF alleles in the Ashkenazi Jews. In contrast, of the 11 mutations tested, only [Delta]F508 was detected in Jewish patients of Sephardic or Oriental origin, accounting for 43% of the CF alleles. Four mutations - [Delta]F508, G542X, W1282X, and N1303K- accounted for 55% of the CF alleles in Arab patients. In a pilot screening study, a random sample of 424 Ashkenazi individuals was analyzed for three mutations - [Delta]F508, W128X, and G542X. Thirteen individuals were detected as heterozygotes (six for [Delta]F508 and seven for W1282X), predicting a heterozygote frequency of 1:29. This is similar to the frequency of carriers in the Caucasian population of northern European ancestry. On the basis of these data, the Ashkenazi populations is considered to be a candidate for CF heterozygote screening. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Nonsense Mutation Inside Anthocyanidin Synthase Gene Controls Pigmentation in Yellow Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rafique, Muhammad Z.; Carvalho, Elisabete; Stracke, Ralf; Palmieri, Luisa; Herrera, Lorena; Feller, Antje; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow raspberry fruits have reduced anthocyanin contents and offer unique possibility to study the genetics of pigment biosynthesis in this important soft fruit. Anthocyanidin synthase (Ans) catalyzes the conversion of leucoanthocyanidin to anthocyanidin, a key committed step in biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Molecular analysis of the Ans gene enabled to identify an inactive ans allele in a yellow fruit raspberry (“Anne”). A 5 bp insertion in the coding region was identified and designated as ans+5. The insertion creates a premature stop codon resulting in a truncated protein of 264 amino acids, compared to 414 amino acids wild-type ANS protein. This mutation leads to loss of function of the encoded protein that might also result in transcriptional downregulation of Ans gene as a secondary effect, i.e., nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Further, this mutation results in loss of visible and detectable anthocyanin pigments. Functional characterization of raspberry Ans/ans alleles via complementation experiments in the Arabidopsis thaliana ldox mutant supports the inactivity of encoded protein through ans+5 and explains the proposed block in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in raspberry. Taken together, our data shows that the mutation inside Ans gene in raspberry is responsible for yellow fruit phenotypes. PMID:28066458

  18. Nonsense Mutation Inside Anthocyanidin Synthase Gene Controls Pigmentation in Yellow Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad Z; Carvalho, Elisabete; Stracke, Ralf; Palmieri, Luisa; Herrera, Lorena; Feller, Antje; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow raspberry fruits have reduced anthocyanin contents and offer unique possibility to study the genetics of pigment biosynthesis in this important soft fruit. Anthocyanidin synthase (Ans) catalyzes the conversion of leucoanthocyanidin to anthocyanidin, a key committed step in biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Molecular analysis of the Ans gene enabled to identify an inactive ans allele in a yellow fruit raspberry ("Anne"). A 5 bp insertion in the coding region was identified and designated as ans(+5). The insertion creates a premature stop codon resulting in a truncated protein of 264 amino acids, compared to 414 amino acids wild-type ANS protein. This mutation leads to loss of function of the encoded protein that might also result in transcriptional downregulation of Ans gene as a secondary effect, i.e., nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Further, this mutation results in loss of visible and detectable anthocyanin pigments. Functional characterization of raspberry Ans/ans alleles via complementation experiments in the Arabidopsis thaliana ldox mutant supports the inactivity of encoded protein through ans(+5) and explains the proposed block in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in raspberry. Taken together, our data shows that the mutation inside Ans gene in raspberry is responsible for yellow fruit phenotypes.

  19. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia.

  20. Readthrough of nonsense mutations in Rett syndrome: evaluation of novel aminoglycosides and generation of a new mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Belakhov, Valery; Werner, Hauke; Wegener, Eike; Gärtner, Jutta; Nudelman, Igor; Baasov, Timor; Huppke, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Thirty-five percent of patients with Rett syndrome carry nonsense mutations in the MECP2 gene. We have recently shown in transfected HeLa cells that readthrough of nonsense mutations in the MECP2 gene can be achieved by treatment with gentamicin and geneticin. This study was performed to test if readthrough can also be achieved in cells endogenously expressing mutant MeCP2 and to evaluate potentially more effective readthrough compounds. A mouse model was generated carrying the R168X mutation in the MECP2 gene. Transfected HeLa cells expressing mutated MeCP2 fusion proteins and mouse ear fibroblasts isolated from the new mouse model were treated with gentamicin and the novel aminoglycosides NB30, NB54, and NB84. The localization of the readthrough product was tested by immunofluorescence. Readthrough of the R168X mutation in mouse ear fibroblasts using gentamicin was detected but at lower level than in HeLa cells. As expected, the readthrough product, full-length Mecp2 protein, was located in the nucleus. NB54 and NB84 induced readthrough more effectively than gentamicin, while NB30 was less effective. Readthrough of nonsense mutations can be achieved not only in transfected HeLa cells but also in fibroblasts of the newly generated Mecp2(R168X) mouse model. NB54 and NB84 were more effective than gentamicin and are therefore promising candidates for readthrough therapy in Rett syndrome patients.

  1. A novel nonsense mutation in the NOG gene causes familial NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Mutai, Hideki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Aki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The human noggin (NOG) gene is responsible for a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations of NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD), which include proximal symphalangism, multiple synostoses, stapes ankylosis with broad thumbs (SABTT), tarsal–carpal coalition syndrome, and brachydactyly type B2. Some of these disorders exhibit phenotypes associated with congenital stapes ankylosis. In the present study, we describe a Japanese pedigree with dactylosymphysis and conductive hearing loss due to congenital stapes ankylosis. The range of motion in her elbow joint was also restricted. The family showed multiple clinical features and was diagnosed with SABTT. Sanger sequencing analysis of the NOG gene in the family members revealed a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.397A>T; p.K133*). In the family, the prevalence of dactylosymphysis and hyperopia was 100% while that of stapes ankylosis was less than 100%. Stapes surgery using a CO2 laser led to a significant improvement of the conductive hearing loss. This novel mutation expands our understanding of NOG-SSD from clinical and genetic perspectives. PMID:27508084

  2. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5

    PubMed Central

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne MM; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos MT; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus PM; Hoefsloot, Lies H; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald JE; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald JC; Schraders, Margit

    2015-01-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gene. The orthologous mouse gene is mutated in the jitterbug mutant that exhibits progressive hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction. Mutation analysis of CLIC5 revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation c.96T>A (p.(Cys32Ter)) that segregated with the hearing loss. Further analysis of CLIC5 in 213 arNSHI patients from mostly Dutch and Spanish origin did not reveal any additional pathogenic variants. CLIC5 mutations are thus not a common cause of arNSHI in these populations. The hearing loss in the present family had an onset in early childhood and progressed from mild to severe or even profound before the second decade. Impaired hearing is accompanied by vestibular areflexia and in one of the patients with mild renal dysfunction. Although we demonstrate that CLIC5 is expressed in many other human tissues, no additional symptoms were observed in these patients. In conclusion, our results show that CLIC5 is a novel arNSHI gene involved in progressive hearing impairment, vestibular and possibly mild renal dysfunction in a family of Turkish origin. PMID:24781754

  3. Rescue of melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) nonsense mutations by aminoglycoside-mediated read-through.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Harald; Mühlhaus, Jessica; Bolze, Florian; Scherag, Susann; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Wiegand, Susanna; Klingenspor, Martin; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike

    2012-05-01

    Aminoglycoside-mediated read-through of stop codons was recently demonstrated for a variety of diseases in vitro and in vivo. About 30 percent of human genetic diseases are the consequence of nonsense mutations. Nonsense mutations in obesity-associated genes like the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), expressed in the hypothalamus, show the impact of premature stop codons on energy homeostasis. Therefore, the MC4R could be a potential pharmaceutical target for obesity treatment and targeting MC4R stop mutations could serve as proof of principle for nonsense mutations in genes expressed in the brain. We investigated four naturally occurring nonsense mutations in the MC4R (W16X, Y35X, E61X, Q307X) located at different positions in the receptor for aminoglycoside-mediated functional rescue in vitro. We determined localization and amount of full-length protein before and after aminoglycoside treatment by fluorescence microscopy, cell surface and total enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Signal transduction properties were analyzed by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assays after transient transfection of MC4R wild type and mutant receptors into COS-7 cells. Functional rescue of stop mutations in the MC4R is dependent on: (i) triplet sequence of the stop codon, (ii) surrounding sequence, (iii) location within the receptor, (iv) applied aminoglycoside and ligand. Functional rescue was possible for W16X, Y35X (N-terminus), less successful for Q307X (C-terminus) and barely feasible for E61X (first transmembrane domain). Restoration of full-length proteins by PTC124 could not be confirmed. Future pharmaceutical applications must consider the potency of aminoglycosides to restore receptor function as well as the ability to pass the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids.

  5. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. PMID:26887242

  6. A nonsense mutation of human XRCC4 is associated with adult-onset progressive encephalocardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Nasca, Alessia; Zanolini, Alice; Cendron, Filippo; d'Adamo, Pio; Costa, Rodolfo; Lamperti, Costanza; Celotti, Lucia; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We studied two monozygotic twins, born to first cousins, affected by a multisystem disease. At birth, they both presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and malformations. Since early adulthood, they developed a slowly progressive neurological syndrome, with cerebellar and pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment, and depression. Dilating cardiomyopathy is also present in both. By whole-exome sequencing, we found a homozygous nucleotide change in XRCC4 (c.673C>T), predicted to introduce a premature stop codon (p.R225*). XRCC4 transcript levels were profoundly reduced, and the protein was undetectable in patients' skin fibroblasts. XRCC4 plays an important role in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), a system that is involved in repairing DNA damage from, for example, ionizing radiations. Gamma-irradiated mutant cells demonstrated reduction, but not abolition, of DSB repair. In contrast with embryonic lethality of the Xrcc4 KO mouse, nonsense mutations in human XRCC4 have recently been associated with primordial dwarfism and, in our cases, with adult-onset neurological impairment, suggesting an important role for DNA repair in the brain. Surprisingly, neither immunodeficiency nor predisposition to malignancy was reported in these patients. PMID:25872942

  7. A nonsense mutation in the DNA repair factor Hebo causes mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Pondarre, Corinne; Pennarun, Gaelle; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Vera, Gabriella; France, Benoit; Chansel, Marie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick; Lopez, Bernard; Soulier, Jean; Bertrand, Pascale; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are human conditions in which one or several cell lineages of the hemopoietic system are affected. They are present at birth or may develop progressively. They are sometimes accompanied by other developmental anomalies. Three main molecular causes have been recognized to result in bone marrow failure syndromes: (1) defects in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA repair pathway, (2) defects in telomere maintenance, and (3) abnormal ribosome biogenesis. We analyzed a patient with mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly who did not present with the typical FA phenotype. Cells from this patient showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiations and phleomycin, attesting to a probable DNA double strand break (dsb) repair defect. Linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ERCC6L2 gene. We identified a new ERCC6L2 alternative transcript encoding the DNA repair factor Hebo, which is critical for complementation of the patient’s DNAdsb repair defect. Sequence analysis revealed three structured regions within Hebo: a TUDOR domain, an adenosine triphosphatase domain, and a new domain, HEBO, specifically present in Hebo direct orthologues. Hebo is ubiquitously expressed, localized in the nucleus, and rapidly recruited to DNAdsb’s in an NBS1-dependent manner. PMID:27185855

  8. Isolation and characterization of nonsense mutations in gene 10 of bacteriophage phi 6.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M D; Mindich, L

    1994-01-01

    Nonsense mutants of bacteriophage phi 6 were isolated by a procedure that involved directed mutagenesis of a cDNA copy of genomic segment M, transcription of this segment, in vitro packaging into procapsids, and transfection of spheroplasts to form viable mutant phage. Recombinant phi 6 viruses that contained amber mutations in two open reading frames, ORF 10 and ORF D, of genomic segment M were isolated. We show that phi 6 protein P10 is the gene product of ORF 10. Further characterization of the phi 6 ORF 10(Am) mutant revealed that phi 6 membrane-associated protein P10 is not required to make enveloped phage particles in infected cells. Enveloped phage particles isolated from a phi 6 ORF 10(Am) infection contained extremely low levels of phi 6 membrane-associated proteins P6 and P3. The low abundance is due to the very low level of P6 synthesis in phi 6 ORF 10(Am)-infected cells. The results suggest that P10 might play a role in regulating the translation of gene 6. Protein P10 was found to be required for host lysis. Images PMID:8139018

  9. Somatic MED12 Nonsense Mutation Escapes mRNA Decay and Reveals a Motif Required for Nuclear Entry.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Tuomas; Kämpjärvi, Kati; Keskitalo, Salla; von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Liu, Xiaonan; Rantanen, Ville; Pitkänen, Esa; Kinnunen, Matias; Kuusanmäki, Heikki; Kontro, Mika; Turunen, Mikko; Mäkinen, Netta; Taipale, Jussi; Heckman, Caroline; Lehti, Kaisa; Mustjoki, Satu; Varjosalo, Markku; Vahteristo, Pia

    2017-03-01

    MED12 is a key component of the transcription-regulating Mediator complex. Specific missense and in-frame insertion/deletion mutations in exons 1 and 2 have been identified in uterine leiomyomas, breast tumors, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here, we characterize the first MED12 5' end nonsense mutation (c.97G>T, p.E33X) identified in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show that it escapes nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) by using an alternative translation initiation site. The resulting N-terminally truncated protein is unable to enter the nucleus due to the lack of identified nuclear localization signal (NLS). The absence of NLS prevents the mutant MED12 protein to be recognized by importin-α and subsequent loading into the nuclear pore complex. Due to this mislocalization, all interactions between the MED12 mutant and other Mediator components are lost. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the MED12 functions and indicate that somatic nonsense mutations in early exons may avoid NMD.

  10. Mild recurrent neuropathy in CMT1B with a novel nonsense mutation in the extracellular domain of the MPZ gene

    PubMed Central

    Lagueny, A; Latour, P; Vital, A; Le Masson, G; Rouanet, M; Ferrer, X; Vital, C; Vandenberghe, A

    2001-01-01

    Clinical, electrophysiological, and neuropathological features are reported associated with a novel heterozygote point mutation in the extracellular domain of the MPZ gene, where a transversion at codon 71 in exon 3 leads to a codon stop: Glu71stop (ie GAA→TAA). A 36 year old woman developed a mild recurrent neuropathy after intensive manual work. The motor nerve conduction velocities were slow without conduction blocks and the nerve biopsy showed signs of demyelination-remyelination, axonal loss, and regular uncompacted myelin lamellae. She inherited the mutation from her father who displayed the same mutation with a normal phenotype. This nonsense mutation may cause a dosage difference of normal P0, and is probably underrepresented in the current mutation data bases. This report further extends the phenotype of MPZ mutations and also emphasises that mild phenotype of CMT1B may be more frequent than has been appreciated.

 PMID:11160475

  11. Permanent neonatal diabetes caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in the glucokinase gene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, O; Díaz González, F; Aragonés, A; Argente, J; Campos-Barros, A

    2008-06-01

    Glucokinase deficiency is an unfrequent cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PND), as only seven patients have been reported, either homozygous for a missense or frameshift mutation or compound heterozygous for both of them. We report here the first known case caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation (Y61X) in the glucokinase gene (GCK) that introduces a premature stop codon, generating a truncated protein that is predicted to be completely inactive as it lacks both the glucose- and the adenosine triphosphate-binding sites. The proband, born to consanguineous parents, was a full-term, intra-uterine growth-retarded male newborn who presented with a glycaemia of 129 mg/dL (7.16 mmol/L) on his second day of life, increasing thereafter up to 288 mg/dL (15.98 mmol/L) and 530 mg/dL (29.41 mmol/L) over the next 24 h, in the face of low serum insulin (<3 muIU/mL; <20.83 pmol/L). He was put on insulin on the third day of life. Insulin has never been discontinued since then. The patient was tested negative for anti-insulin and islet cell antibodies at age 5 months. His father had non-progressive, impaired fasting glucose for several years. The mother was found to be mildly hyperglycaemic only when her glucose was checked after the child was diagnosed. In conclusion, biallelic GCK loss should be considered as a potential cause of PND in children born to consanguineous parents, even if they are not known to be diabetic at the time of PND presentation.

  12. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in POLH in a Chinese pedigree with xeroderma pigmentosum, variant type.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xianning; Qiao, Jianjun; Fang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) is one type of XP, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, and caused by defects in the post replication repair machinery while nucleotide-excision repair (NER) is not impaired. In the present study, we reported a Chinese family with XPV phenotype, which was confirmed by histopathological results. Genetic variants were detected by polymerase chain reaction and exon sequencing. Furthermore, the reported molecular defects in XPV patients from previous literatures were reviewed. A homozygous c.67C>T mutation in the exon 2 of DNA polymerase eta (POLH), a novel non-sense mutation in POLH, was discovered.

  13. A nonsense mutation in the IKBKG gene in mares with incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Towers, Rachel E; Murgiano, Leonardo; Millar, David S; Glen, Elise; Topf, Ana; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Goodship, Judith A; Clarke, Angus J; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a large and heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders characterized by abnormalities in structures of ectodermal origin. Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is an ED characterized by skin lesions evolving over time, as well as dental, nail, and ocular abnormalities. Due to X-linked dominant inheritance IP symptoms can only be seen in female individuals while affected males die during development in utero. We observed a family of horses, in which several mares developed signs of a skin disorder reminiscent of human IP. Cutaneous manifestations in affected horses included the development of pruritic, exudative lesions soon after birth. These developed into wart-like lesions and areas of alopecia with occasional wooly hair re-growth. Affected horses also had streaks of darker and lighter coat coloration from birth. The observation that only females were affected together with a high number of spontaneous abortions suggested an X-linked dominant mechanism of transmission. Using next generation sequencing we sequenced the whole genome of one affected mare. We analyzed the sequence data for non-synonymous variants in candidate genes and found a heterozygous nonsense variant in the X-chromosomal IKBKG gene (c.184C>T; p.Arg62*). Mutations in IKBKG were previously reported to cause IP in humans and the homologous p.Arg62* variant has already been observed in a human IP patient. The comparative data thus strongly suggest that this is also the causative variant for the observed IP in horses. To our knowledge this is the first large animal model for IP.

  14. Nonsense Mediated Decay Resistant Mutations Are a Source of Expressed Mutant Proteins in Colon Cancer Cell Lines with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David S.; Bird, Matthew J.; Jorissen, Robert N.; Yu, Yen Lin; Walker, Franscesa; Zhang, Hui Hua; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High) colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. Methods Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS) by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. Results Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK), but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3). Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12) were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45%) of the MSI-High cell lines tested. Conclusion NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific immunological

  15. A Novel Nonsense Mutation in PANK2 Gene in Two Patients with Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Rezayi, Alireza; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Alipour, Nasrin; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase- associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction and iron accumulation in the brain and axonal spheroids in the central nervous system. It has been shown that the disorder is caused by mutations in PANK2 gene which codes for a mitochondrial enzyme participating in coenzyme A biosynthesis. Here we report two cases of classic PKAN syndrome with early onset of neurodegenerative disorder. Mutational analysis has revealed that both are homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in PANK2 gene (c.T936A (p.C312X)). The high prevalence of consanguineous marriages in Iran raises the likelihood of occurrence of autosomal recessive disorders such as PKAN and necessitates proper premarital genetic counseling. Further research is needed to provide the data on the prevalence of PKAN and identification of common PANK2 mutations in Iranian population. PMID:28357202

  16. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in RP1 that causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in an Indonesian family

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Astuti, Galuh D.N.; Arimadyo, Kentar; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; Cremers, Frans P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying molecular genetic defect in an Indonesian family with three affected individuals who had received a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical evaluation of the family members included measuring visual acuity and fundoscopy, and assessing visual field and color vision. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with Illumina 700k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, and homozygous regions were identified using PLINK software. Mutation analysis was performed with sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene that resided in one of the homozygous regions. The frequency of the identified mutation in the Indonesian population was determined with TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results A novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 4 of the RP1 gene, c.1012C>T (p.R338*), was identified in the proband and her two affected sisters. Unaffected family members either carried two wild-type alleles or were heterozygous carriers of the mutation. The mutation was not present in 184 Indonesian control samples. Conclusions Most of the previously reported RP1 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, and appear to cluster in exon 4. Here, we identified a novel homozygous p.R338* mutation in exon 4 of RP1, and speculate on the mutational mechanisms of different RP1 mutations underlying dominant and recessive RP. PMID:23077400

  17. Nonsense Mutations in SMPX, Encoding a Protein Responsive to Physical Force, Result in X-Chromosomal Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Antje K.; Gandia, Marta; Frommolt, Peter; Maak, Anika; Wicklein, Eva M.; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Wagner, Florian; Viñuela, Antonio; Aguirre, Luis A.; Moreno, Felipe; Maier, Hannes; Rau, Isabella; Gießelmann, Sebastian; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Gal, Andreas; Nürnberg, Peter; Hübner, Christian A.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Kurth, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    The fact that hereditary hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans is reflected by, among other things, an extraordinary allelic and nonallelic genetic heterogeneity. X-chromosomal hearing impairment represents only a minor fraction of all cases. In a study of a Spanish family the locus for one of the X-chromosomal forms was assigned to Xp22 (DFNX4). We mapped the disease locus in the same chromosomal region in a large German pedigree with X-chromosomal nonsyndromic hearing impairment by using genome-wide linkage analysis. Males presented with postlingual hearing loss and onset at ages 3–7, whereas onset in female carriers was in the second to third decades. Targeted DNA capture with high-throughput sequencing detected a nonsense mutation in the small muscle protein, X-linked (SMPX) of affected individuals. We identified another nonsense mutation in SMPX in patients from the Spanish family who were previously analyzed to map DFNX4. SMPX encodes an 88 amino acid, cytoskeleton-associated protein that is responsive to mechanical stress. The presence of Smpx in hair cells and supporting cells of the murine cochlea indicates its role in the inner ear. The nonsense mutations detected in the two families suggest a loss-of-function mechanism underlying this form of hearing impairment. Results obtained after heterologous overexpression of SMPX proteins were compatible with this assumption. Because responsivity to physical force is a characteristic feature of the protein, we propose that long-term maintenance of mechanically stressed inner-ear cells critically depends on SMPX function. PMID:21549336

  18. Molecular basis for hair loss in mice carrying a novel nonsense mutation (Hrrh-R ) in the hairless gene (Hr).

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sundberg, J P; Das, S; Carpenter, D; Cain, K T; Michaud, E J; Voy, B H

    2010-01-01

    Animal models carrying mutations in the hairless (Hr) gene provide a rich resource for study of hair follicle biology. A spontaneous mouse mutant with a phenotype strikingly similar to rhino mutants of Hr arose spontaneously in the mouse facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sequence analysis of Hr in these mutants uncovered a nonsense mutation in exon 12, designated as Hr(rh-R) (rhino, Oak Ridge). The mutation led to significant reduction in Hr mRNA levels, predicted to be due to nonsense-mediated decay. Histological analysis indicated dilated hair follicle infundibula at 14 days of age that rapidly became filled with cornified material. Microarray analyses revealed that expression levels of many genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal regeneration, and wound healing were significantly upregulated before morphological detection of the phenotype, suggesting their role in onset of the Hr(rh-R) phenotype. Identification of this new Hr allele and the underlying molecular alterations allows further understanding of the role of Hr in hair follicle biology.

  19. Carpenter Syndrome: Extended RAB23 Mutation Spectrum and Analysis of Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Dagan; Baynam, Gareth; De Catte, Luc; Elcioglu, Nursel; Gabbett, Michael T; Hudgins, Louanne; Hurst, Jane A; Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Oley, Christine; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2011-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a combination of craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and other congenital malformations, is caused by mutations in RAB23, encoding a member of the Rab-family of small GTPases. In 15 out of 16 families previously reported, the disease was caused by homozygosity for truncating mutations, and currently only a single missense mutation has been identified in a compound heterozygote. Here, we describe a further 8 independent families comprising 10 affected individuals with Carpenter syndrome, who were positive for mutations in RAB23. We report the first homozygous missense mutation and in-frame deletion, highlighting key residues for RAB23 function, as well as the first splice-site mutation. Multi-suture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly have been present in all patients described to date, and abnormal external genitalia have been universal in boys. High birth weight was not evident in the current group of patients, but further evidence for laterality defects is reported. No genotype-phenotype correlations are apparent. We provide experimental evidence that transcripts encoding truncating mutations are subject to nonsense-mediated decay, and that this plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many RAB23 mutations. These observations refine the phenotypic spectrum of Carpenter syndrome and offer new insights into molecular pathogenesis. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21412941

  20. A nonsense mutation in the Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) gene is associated with gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong-Hua; Guo, Wen-Huan; Wu, Jun; Suo, Wen-Hao; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2014-03-10

    XPF/ERCC1 endonuclease is required for DNA lesion repair. To assess effects of a C2169A nonsense mutation in XPF at position 2169 in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 488 cancer patients and 64 gastric tumors. The mutation was mapped using a TaqMan MGB probe. In addition, gastric cancer cell lines were transfected with mutated XPF to explore XPF/ERCC1 interaction, XPF degradation, and DNA repair by a comet assay. The C2169A mutation was not detected in 488 samples of blood genomic DNA, yet was found in 32 of 64 gastric cancer tissue samples (50.0%), resulting in a 194C-terminal amino acid loss in XPF protein and lower expression. Laser micro-dissection confirmed that this point mutation was not present in surrounding normal tissues from the same patients. The truncated form of XPF (tXPF) impaired interaction with ERCC1, was rapidly degraded via ubiquitination, and resulted in reduced DNA repair. In gastric cancers, the mutation was monoallelic, indicating that XPF is a haplo-insufficient DNA repair gene. As the C2169A mutation is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis in the Chinese population, our findings shine light on it as a therapeutic target for early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  2. Identification of a Novel Homozygous Nonsense Mutation Confirms the Implication of GNAT1 in Rod-Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Méjécase, Cécile; Laurent-Coriat, Caroline; Mayer, Claudine; Poch, Olivier; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Prévot, Camille; Antonio, Aline; Boyard, Fiona; Condroyer, Christel; Michiels, Christelle; Blanchard, Steven; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Sahel, José-Alain

    2016-01-01

    GNAT1, encoding the transducin subunit Gα, is an important element of the phototransduction cascade. Mutations in this gene have been associated with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness. Recently, a homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation was identified in a patient with late-onset rod-cone dystrophy. After exclusion of mutations in genes underlying progressive inherited retinal disorders, by targeted next generation sequencing, a 32 year-old male sporadic case with severe rod-cone dystrophy and his unaffected parents were investigated by whole exome sequencing. This led to the identification of a homozygous nonsense variant, c.963C>A p.(Cys321*) in GNAT1, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was heterozygous for this variant whereas the variant was absent in the father. c.963C>A p.(Cys321*) is predicted to produce a shorter protein that lacks critical sites for the phototransduction cascade. Our work confirms that the phenotype and the mode of inheritance associated with GNAT1 variants can vary from autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness to autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. PMID:27977773

  3. A nonsense mutation in the LDL receptor gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in the Druze sect

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, D.; Meiner, V.; Reshef, A.; Leitersdorf, E. ); Levy, Yishai ); Westhytzen, D.R. van der; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Here the authors characterize and LDL receptor mutation that is associated with a distinct haplotype and causes FH in the Druze, a small Middle Eastern Islamic sect with a high degree of inbreeding. The mutation was found in FH families from two distinct Druze villages from the Golan Heights (northern Israel). It was not found either in another Druze FH family residing in a different geographical area nor in eight Arab and four Jewish FH heterozygote index cases whose hypercholesterolemia cosegregates with an identical LDL receptor gene haplotype. The mutation, a single-base substitution, results in a termination codon in exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene that encodes for the fourth repeat of the binding domain of the mature receptor. It can be diagnosed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA from FH patients.

  4. A novel nonsense mutation of the KAL1 gene (p.Trp204*) in Kallmann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El Husny, Antonette Souto; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Fernandes-Caldato, Milena Coelho; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a novel KAL1 mutation in patients affected by Kallmann syndrome. Setting Endocrinology Clinic of the João de Barros Barreto University Hospital – Federal University of Pará, Brazil. Methods Clinical examination, hormone assays and sequencing of exons 5, 6 and 9 of the KAL1 gene in four Brazilian brothers with Kallmann syndrome. Results Detected a novel KAL1 mutation, c.612G.A/p.Trp204*, in four hemizygous brothers with Kallmann syndrome, and five heterozygous female family members. Conclusion The novel p.Trp204* mutation of the KAL1 gene results in the production of a truncated anosmin-1 enzyme in patients with Kallmann syndrome. This finding broadens the spectrum of pathogenic mutations for this disease. PMID:25328414

  5. A comparative evaluation of NB30, NB54 and PTC124 in translational read-through efficacy for treatment of an USH1C nonsense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Tobias; Overlack, Nora; Möller, Fabian; Belakhov, Valery; van Wyk, Michiel; Baasov, Timor; Wolfrum, Uwe; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Translational read-through-inducing drugs (TRIDs) promote read-through of nonsense mutations, placing them in the spotlight of current gene-based therapeutic research. Here, we compare for the first time the relative efficacies of new-generation aminoglycosides NB30, NB54 and the chemical compound PTC124 on retinal toxicity and read-through efficacy of a nonsense mutation in the USH1C gene, which encodes the scaffold protein harmonin. This mutation causes the human Usher syndrome, the most common form of inherited deaf-blindness. We quantify read-through efficacy of the TRIDs in cell culture and show the restoration of harmonin function. We do not observe significant differences in the read-through efficacy of the TRIDs in retinal cultures; however, we show an excellent biocompatibility in retinal cultures with read-through versus toxicity evidently superior for NB54 and PTC124. In addition, in vivo administration of NB54 and PTC124 induced recovery of the full-length harmonin a1 with the same efficacy. The high biocompatibilities combined with the sustained read-through efficacies of these drugs emphasize the potential of NB54 and PTC124 in treating nonsense mutation-based retinal disorders. PMID:23027640

  6. Nonsense but not missense mutations can decrease the abundance of nuclear mRNA for the mouse major urinary protein, while both types of mutations can facilitate exon skipping.

    PubMed Central

    Belgrader, P; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms by which nonsense codons affect RNA metabolism in mammalian cells, nonsense mutations were generated within the gene for the secretory major urinary protein (MUP) of mice. The translation of MUP mRNA normally begins within exon 1 and terminates within exon 6, the penultimate exon. Through the use of Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and assays that couple reverse transcription and PCR, a nonsense mutation within codon 50 of exon 2 or codon 143 of exon 5 was found to reduce the abundance of fully spliced, nuclear MUP mRNA to 10 to 20% of normal without an additional reduction in the abundance of cytoplasmic mRNA. In contrast, a nonsense mutation within codon 172 of exon 5 was found to have no effects on the abundance of MUP mRNA. These findings suggest that a boundary between nonsense mutations that do and do not reduce the abundance of nuclear mRNA exists within the exon preceding the exon that harbors the normal site of translation termination. In this way, the boundary is analogous to the boundary that exists within the penultimate exon of the human gene for the cytosolic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase. Assays for exon skipping, i.e., the removal of an exon as a part of the flanking introns during the process of splicing, reveal that 0.1, 2.0, and 0.1% of MUP mRNA normally lack exon 5, exon 6, and exons 5 plus 6, respectively. Relative to normal, the two nonsense mutations within exon 5 increase the abundance of RNA lacking exon 5 on average 20-fold and increase the abundance of RNA lacking exons 5 plus 6 on average 5-fold. Since only one of these nonsense mutations also reduces the abundance of fully spliced nuclear mRNA to 10 to 20% of normal, the two mechanisms by which a nonsense mutation can alter nuclear RNA metabolism must be distinct. The analysis of missense mutations within codons 143 and 172, some of which retain the nonsense mutation, indicates that the reduction in the abundance of fully spliced nuclear m

  7. Short repeats in the spa gene of Staphylococcus aureus are prone to nonsense mutations: stop codons can be found in strains isolated from patients with generalized infection.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Neela, Vasanthakumari; Shamsudin, Mariana-Nor; Amouzandeh-Nobaveh, Alireza; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich

    2013-11-01

    Fifteen sequences with stop codons have been obtained in the course of standard methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) spa typing. In nine of those sequences, stop codons occurred due to nonsense G-T and A-T transversions. G-T transversions would appear to be frequent in the spa gene, mostly due to symmetric mutational AT-pressure in the whole S. aureus genome and due to replication-associated mutational pressure characteristic of lagging strands of the "chromosome". A-T transversions would appear to be frequent in the spa gene mostly due to transcription-associated mutational pressure. Relative to other S. aureus genes, short repeats in spa are enriched by nonsense sites for G-T and A-T transversions; the probability of being nonsense for A-T transversion is high in that part of spa coding region. 13 out of 15 (87%) of the sequences with stop codons were obtained from strains isolated from patients with generalized S. aureus infection. Truncation of spa at its C-terminus is predicted to result in a protein that possesses functional IgG binding domains unable to be linked to the cell wall. This is discussed in light of the known fact that extracellular spa is a strong virulence factor involved in immune evasion.

  8. Variants of the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor gene found in patients with schizophrenia: Identification of a nonsense mutation and multiple missense changes

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Lind, T.J.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    To determine whether mutations in the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor (D{sub 5}DR) gene are associated with schizophrenia, the gene was examined in 78 unrelated schizophrenic individuals. After amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, products were examined by dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF), a highly sensitive screening method related to single strand conformational polymorphism analysis. All samples with unusual ddF patterns were sequenced to precisely identify the sequence change. In the 156 D{sub 5}DR alleles examined, nine sequence changes were identified. Four of the nine did not affect protein structure; of these, three were silent changes and one was a transition in the 3{prime} untranslated region. The remaining five sequence changes result in protein alterations: of these, one is a missense change in a non-conserved amino acid, 3 are missense changes in amino acids that are conserved in some dopamine D{sub 5} receptors and the last is a nonsense mutation. To investigate whether the nonsense mutation was associated with schizophrenia, 400 additional schizophrenic cases of western European descent and 1914 ethnically-similar controls were screened for the change. One additional schizophrenic carrier was identified and verified by direct genomic sequencing (allele frequency: .0013), but eight carriers also were found and confirmed among the non-schizophrenics (allele frequency: .0021)(p>.25). The gene was re-examined in all newly identified carriers of the nonsense mutation by direct sequencing and/or ddF in search of additional mutations. None were identified. Family studies also were conducted to investigate possible cosegregation of the mutation with other neuropsychiatric diseases, but this was not demonstrated. Thus, the mutation does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia nor does an initial analysis suggest cosegregation with other neuropsychiatric disorders or symptom complexes.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in androgen receptor confers resistance to CYP17 inhibitor treatment in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dong; Gao, Shuai; Valencia, Kevin; Owiredu, Jude; Han, Wanting; de Waal, Eric; Macoska, Jill A; Cai, Changmeng

    2017-01-01

    The standard treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) that blocks transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR). However, ADT invariably leads to the development of castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) with restored activity of AR. CRPC can be further treated with CYP17 inhibitors to block androgen synthesis pathways, but most patients still relapse after a year of such treatment. The mechanisms that drive this progression are not fully understood, but AR activity, at least in a subset of cancers, appears to be restored again. Importantly, AR mutations are more frequently detected in this type of cancer. By analyzing tumor biopsy mRNA from CRPC patients who had developed resistance to CYP17 inhibitor treatment, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation (Q784*) at the ligand binding domain (LBD) of AR, which produces a C-terminal truncated AR protein that lacks intact LBD. This AR-Q784* mutant is transcriptionally inactive, but it is constitutively expressed in the nucleus and can bind to DNA in the absence of androgen. Significantly, our results show that AR-Q784* can heterodimerize with, and enhance the transcriptional activity of, full-length AR. Moreover, expressing AR-Q784* in an AR positive PCa cell line enhances the chromatin binding of endogenous AR and the recruitment of p300 coactivator under the low androgen condition, leading to increased cell growth. This activity of AR-Q784* mimics the function of some AR splice variants, indicating that CYP17 inhibitor treatment in CRPC may select for LBD-truncated forms of AR to restore AR signaling. PMID:28036278

  10. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation of the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene in two siblings with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Li, Haibo; Xiang, Jingjing; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Qin; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Minjuan; Sun, Miao; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the aetiology of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) in two Chinese siblings with typical CIPA symptoms including insensitivity to pain, inability to sweat, and self-mutilating behaviours. Methods Clinical examination and genetic testing were conducted of all available family members, and the findings were used to create a pedigree. Mutation screening using PCR amplification and DNA Sanger sequencing of the entire neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene ( NTRK1) including intron-exon boundaries was used to identify mutations associated with CIPA. Results A novel nonsense mutation (c.7C > T, p. Arg3Ter) and a known splice-site mutation (c.851-33 T > A) were detected in NTRK1 and shown to be associated with CIPA. Conclusion Our findings expand the known mutation spectrum of NTRK1 and provide insights into the aetiology of CIPA.

  11. Partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistant diabetes in a patient with a homozygous nonsense mutation in CIDEC.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Puri, Vishwajeet; Murano, Incoronata; Saudek, Vladimir; Semple, Robert K; Dash, Satya; Hyden, Caroline S S; Bottomley, William; Vigouroux, Corinne; Magré, Jocelyne; Raymond-Barker, Philippa; Murgatroyd, Peter R; Chawla, Anil; Skepper, Jeremy N; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Suliman, Sara; Patch, Ann-Marie; Agarwal, Anil K; Garg, Abhimanyu; Barroso, Inês; Cinti, Saverio; Czech, Michael P; Argente, Jesús; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David B

    2009-08-01

    Lipodystrophic syndromes are characterized by adipose tissue deficiency. Although rare, they are of considerable interest as they, like obesity, typically lead to ectopic lipid accumulation, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistant diabetes. In this paper we describe a female patient with partial lipodystrophy (affecting limb, femorogluteal and subcutaneous abdominal fat), white adipocytes with multiloculated lipid droplets and insulin-resistant diabetes, who was found to be homozygous for a premature truncation mutation in the lipid droplet protein cell death-inducing Dffa-like effector C (CIDEC) (E186X). The truncation disrupts the highly conserved CIDE-C domain and the mutant protein is mistargeted and fails to increase the lipid droplet size in transfected cells. In mice, Cidec deficiency also reduces fat mass and induces the formation of white adipocytes with multilocular lipid droplets, but in contrast to our patient, Cidec null mice are protected against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. In addition to describing a novel autosomal recessive form of familial partial lipodystrophy, these observations also suggest that CIDEC is required for unilocular lipid droplet formation and optimal energy storage in human fat.

  12. Partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistant diabetes in a patient with a homozygous nonsense mutation in CIDEC

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Puri, Vishwajeet; Murano, Incoronata; Saudek, Vladimir; Semple, Robert K; Dash, Satya; Hyden, Caroline S S; Bottomley, William; Vigouroux, Corinne; Magré, Jocelyne; Raymond-Barker, Philippa; Murgatroyd, Peter R; Chawla, Anil; Skepper, Jeremy N; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Suliman, Sara; Patch, Ann-Marie; Agarwal, Anil K; Garg, Abhimanyu; Barroso, Inês; Cinti, Saverio; Czech, Michael P; Argente, Jesús; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David B

    2009-01-01

    Lipodystrophic syndromes are characterized by adipose tissue deficiency. Although rare, they are of considerable interest as they, like obesity, typically lead to ectopic lipid accumulation, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistant diabetes. In this paper we describe a female patient with partial lipodystrophy (affecting limb, femorogluteal and subcutaneous abdominal fat), white adipocytes with multiloculated lipid droplets and insulin-resistant diabetes, who was found to be homozygous for a premature truncation mutation in the lipid droplet protein cell death-inducing Dffa-like effector C (CIDEC) (E186X). The truncation disrupts the highly conserved CIDE-C domain and the mutant protein is mistargeted and fails to increase the lipid droplet size in transfected cells. In mice, Cidec deficiency also reduces fat mass and induces the formation of white adipocytes with multilocular lipid droplets, but in contrast to our patient, Cidec null mice are protected against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. In addition to describing a novel autosomal recessive form of familial partial lipodystrophy, these observations also suggest that CIDEC is required for unilocular lipid droplet formation and optimal energy storage in human fat. PMID:20049731

  13. Identification of a second HOXA2 nonsense mutation in a family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic microtia and distinctive ear morphology.

    PubMed

    Piceci, F; Morlino, S; Castori, M; Buffone, E; De Luca, A; Grammatico, P; Guida, V

    2016-08-09

    Microtia is a congenital defect affecting external ears, which appear smaller and sometimes malformed. Here we describe a five-generation family with isolated bilateral microtia segregating as an autosomal dominant trait. Similar features have been previously observed in an autosomal dominant family with non-syndromic microtia and hearing loss segregating with a HOXA2 nonsense variant. HOXA2 biallelic mutations were also described in an inbreed family with autosomal recessive microtia, hearing impairment and incomplete cleft palate. In our family, sequence analysis detected a heterozygous protein truncating nonsense variant [c.670G>T, p.(Glu224*)] segregating in all affected individuals and absent in public databases. This study confirms the role of HOXA2 gene in dominant isolated microtia and contribute to further define the dysmorphogenetic effect of this gene on ear development.

  14. A Nonsense Mutation in TMEM95 Encoding a Nondescript Transmembrane Protein Causes Idiopathic Male Subfertility in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Hubert; Kölle, Sabine; Wurmser, Christine; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Emmerling, Reiner; Jansen, Sandra; Trottmann, Matthias; Fuerst, Christian; Götz, Kay-Uwe; Fries, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants underlying reduced male reproductive performance have been identified in humans and model organisms, most of them compromising semen quality. Occasionally, male fertility is severely compromised although semen analysis remains without any apparent pathological findings (i.e., idiopathic subfertility). Artificial insemination (AI) in most cattle populations requires close examination of all ejaculates before insemination. Although anomalous ejaculates are rejected, insemination success varies considerably among AI bulls. In an attempt to identify genetic causes of such variation, we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Imputed genotypes of 652,856 SNPs were available for 7962 AI bulls of the Fleckvieh (FV) population. Male reproductive ability (MRA) was assessed based on 15.3 million artificial inseminations. The GWAS uncovered a strong association signal on bovine chromosome 19 (P = 4.08×10−59). Subsequent autozygosity mapping revealed a common 1386 kb segment of extended homozygosity in 40 bulls with exceptionally poor reproductive performance. Only 1.7% of 35,671 inseminations with semen samples of those bulls were successful. None of the bulls with normal reproductive performance was homozygous, indicating recessive inheritance. Exploiting whole-genome re-sequencing data of 43 animals revealed a candidate causal nonsense mutation (rs378652941, c.483C>A, p.Cys161X) in the transmembrane protein 95 encoding gene TMEM95 which was subsequently validated in 1990 AI bulls. Immunohistochemical investigations evidenced that TMEM95 is located at the surface of spermatozoa of fertile animals whereas it is absent in spermatozoa of subfertile animals. These findings imply that integrity of TMEM95 is required for an undisturbed fertilisation. Our results demonstrate that deficiency of TMEM95 severely compromises male reproductive performance in cattle and reveal for the first time a phenotypic effect associated with genomic variation in

  15. Differential protein structural disturbances and suppression of assembly partners produced by nonsense GABRG2 epilepsy mutations: implications for disease phenotypic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juexin; Shen, Dingding; Xia, Geqing; Shen, Wangzhen; Macdonald, Robert L; Xu, Dong; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2016-10-20

    Mutations in GABAA receptor subunit genes are frequently associated with epilepsy, and nonsense mutations in GABRG2 are associated with several epilepsy syndromes including childhood absence epilepsy, generalized tonic clonic seizures and the epileptic encephalopathy, Dravet syndrome. The molecular basis for the phenotypic heterogeneity of mutations is unclear. Here we focused on three nonsense mutations in GABRG2 (GABRG2(R136*), GABRG2(Q390*) and GABRG2(W429*)) associated with epilepsies of different severities. Structural modeling and structure-based analysis indicated that the surface of the wild-type γ2 subunit was naturally hydrophobic, which is suitable to be buried in the cell membrane. Different mutant γ2 subunits had different stabilities and different interactions with their wild-type subunit binding partners because they adopted different conformations and had different surface hydrophobicities and different tendency to dimerize. We utilized flow cytometry and biochemical approaches in combination with lifted whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We demonstrated that the truncated subunits had no to minimal surface expression and unchanged or reduced surface expression of wild-type partnering subunits. The amplitudes of GABA-evoked currents from the mutant α1β2γ2(R136*), α1β2γ2(Q390*) and α1β2γ2(W429*) receptors were reduced compared to the currents from α1β2γ2 receptors but with differentially reduced levels. This thus suggests differential protein structure disturbances are correlated with disease severity.

  16. A novel exon in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene activated by the nonsense mutation E92X in airway epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Will, K; Dörk, T; Stuhrmann, M; Meitinger, T; Bertele-Harms, R; Tümmler, B; Schmidtke, J

    1994-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We report on a novel nonsense mutation that leads to exon skipping and the activation of a cryptic exon. Screening of genomic DNA from 700 German patients with CF uncovered four cases with the nonsense mutation E92X, a G-->T transversion that creates a termination codon and affects the first base of exon 4 of the CFTR gene. Lymphocyte RNA of two CF patients heterozygous for E92X was found to contain the wild type sequence and a differentially spliced isoform lacking exon 4. In RNA derived from nasal epithelial cells of E92X patients, a third fragment of longer size was observed. Sequencing revealed the presence of E92X and an additional 183-bp fragment, inserted between exons 3 and 4. The 183-bp sequence was mapped to intron 3 of the CFTR gene. It is flanked by acceptor and donor splice sites. We conclude that the 183-bp fragment in intron 3 is a cryptic CFTR exon that can be activated in epithelial cells by the presence of the E92X mutation. E92X abolishes correctly spliced CFTR mRNA and leads to severe cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7512993

  17. Differential protein structural disturbances and suppression of assembly partners produced by nonsense GABRG2 epilepsy mutations: implications for disease phenotypic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juexin; Shen, Dingding; Xia, Geqing; Shen, Wangzhen; Macdonald, Robert L.; Xu, Dong; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in GABAA receptor subunit genes are frequently associated with epilepsy, and nonsense mutations in GABRG2 are associated with several epilepsy syndromes including childhood absence epilepsy, generalized tonic clonic seizures and the epileptic encephalopathy, Dravet syndrome. The molecular basis for the phenotypic heterogeneity of mutations is unclear. Here we focused on three nonsense mutations in GABRG2 (GABRG2(R136*), GABRG2(Q390*) and GABRG2(W429*)) associated with epilepsies of different severities. Structural modeling and structure-based analysis indicated that the surface of the wild-type γ2 subunit was naturally hydrophobic, which is suitable to be buried in the cell membrane. Different mutant γ2 subunits had different stabilities and different interactions with their wild-type subunit binding partners because they adopted different conformations and had different surface hydrophobicities and different tendency to dimerize. We utilized flow cytometry and biochemical approaches in combination with lifted whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We demonstrated that the truncated subunits had no to minimal surface expression and unchanged or reduced surface expression of wild-type partnering subunits. The amplitudes of GABA-evoked currents from the mutant α1β2γ2(R136*), α1β2γ2(Q390*) and α1β2γ2(W429*) receptors were reduced compared to the currents from α1β2γ2 receptors but with differentially reduced levels. This thus suggests differential protein structure disturbances are correlated with disease severity. PMID:27762395

  18. Identification of a nonsense mutation in APAF1 that is likely causal for a decrease in reproductive efficiency in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Adams, Heather A; Sonstegard, Tad S; VanRaden, Paul M; Null, Daniel J; Van Tassell, Curt P; Larkin, Denis M; Lewin, Harris A

    2016-08-01

    The HH1 haplotype on chromosome 5 is associated with a reduced conception rate and a deficit of homozygotes at the population level in Holstein cattle. The source HH1 haplotype was traced to the bull Pawnee Farm Arlinda Chief (Chief), who was born in 1962 and has sired more than 16,000 daughters. We identified a nonsense mutation in APAF1 (apoptotic protease activating factor 1;APAF1 p.Q579X) within HH1 using whole-genome resequencing of Chief and 3 of his sons. This mutation is predicted to truncate 670 AA (53.7%) of the encoded APAF1 protein that contains a WD40 domain critical to protein-protein interactions. Initial screening revealed no homozygous individuals for the mutation in 758 animals previously genotyped, whereas all 497 HH1 carriers possessed 1 copy of the mutant allele. Subsequent commercial genotyping of 246,773 Holsteins revealed 5,299 APAF1 heterozygotes and zero homozygotes for the mutation. The causative role of this mutation is also supported by functional data in mice that have demonstrated Apaf1 to be an essential molecule in the cytochrome-c-mediated apoptotic cascade and directly implicated in developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, most Apaf1 homozygous knockouts die by day 16.5 of development. We thus propose that the APAF1 p.Q579X nonsense mutation is the functional equivalent of the Apaf1 knockout. This mutation has caused an estimated 525,000 spontaneous abortions worldwide over the past 35 years, accounting for approximately $420 million in losses. With the mutation identified, selection against the deleterious allele in breeding schemes has aided in eliminating this defect from the population, reducing carrier frequency from 8% in past decades to 2% in 2015.

  19. Limited phenotypic variation of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta in a Danish five-generation family with a novel FAM83H nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Gjørup, Hans; Jensen, Lillian G; Juncker, Inger; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders D; Poulsen, Sven; Hertz, Jens M

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (ADHCAI) is a disease with severe dental manifestations. OBJECTIVES.  The aims were by means of a genome-wide linkage scan to search for the gene underlying the ADHCAI phenotype in a Danish five-generation family and to study the phenotypic variation of the enamel in affected family members. RESULTS.  Significant linkage was found to a locus at chromosome 8q24.3 comprising the gene FAM83H identified to be responsible for ADHCAI in other families. Subsequent sequencing of FAM83H in affected family members revealed a novel nonsense mutation, p.Y302X. Limited phenotypic variation was found among affected family members with loss of translucency and discoloration of the enamel. Extensive posteruptive loss of enamel was found in all teeth of affected subjects. The tip of the cusps on the premolars and molars and a zone along the gingival margin seemed resistant to posteruptive loss of enamel. We have screened FAM83H in another five unrelated Danish patients with a phenotype of ADHCAI similar to that in the five-generation family, and identified a de novo FAM83H nonsense mutation, p.Q452X in one of these patients. CONCLUSION.  We have identified a FAM83H mutation in two of six unrelated families with ADHCAI and found limited phenotypic variation of the enamel in these patients.

  20. Identification and characterisation of an 8.7 kb deletion and a novel nonsense mutation in two Italian families with Sanfilippo syndrome type D (mucopolysaccharidosis IIID).

    PubMed

    Beesley, Clare E; Concolino, Daniela; Filocamo, Mirella; Winchester, Bryan G; Strisciuglio, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type D is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulphatase, one of the enzymes involved in the catabolism of heparan sulphate. Only 15 patients have been described in the literature and just two mutations have been reported to date. We present the clinical, biochemical and molecular analysis of two Italian Sanfilippo D families. Novel homozygous mutations were identified in the affected patients from each family: a large intragenic deletion of 8723 bp encompassing exons 2 and 3 in family 1 and a nonsense mutation, Q272X, in family 2. The deletion is the first large intragenic deletion to be reported in any of the four Sanfilippo subtypes, including Sanfilippo type C in which the gene has recently been identified.

  1. A homozygous nonsense mutation in the {alpha}3 chain gene of laminin 5 (LAMA3) in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa: Prenatal exclusion in a fetus at risk

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, J.A. |; Ciatti, S.; Christiano, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    Mutations in the three genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) that encode the three chains ({alpha}3, {Beta}3, and {gamma}2, respectively) of laminin 5, a protein involved in epidermal-dermal adhesion, have been established as the genetic basis for the inherited blistering skin disorder, Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB). In this study, we performed mutational analysis on genomic DNA from a child with H-JEB and identified a nonsense mutation in the {alpha}3 chain gene (LAMA3) consisting of a homozygous C-to-T transition resulting in a premature termination codon (CGA {r_arrow} TGA) on both alleles. The parents were shown to be heterozygous carriers of the same mutation. Direct mutation analysis was used to perform DNA-based prenatal diagnosis from a chorionic villus biopsy at 10 weeks` gestation in a subsequent pregnancy. The fetus was predicted to be genotypically normal with respect to the LAMA3 mutation. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  2. A nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene leads to reduced susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Larcher, Gérald; Ernoult, Emilie; Bergès, Thierry; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2008-10-01

    Unlike the molecular mechanisms that lead to azole drug resistance, the molecular mechanisms that lead to polyene resistance are poorly documented, especially in pathogenic yeasts. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the reduced susceptibility to polyenes of a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata. Sterol content was analyzed by gas-phase chromatography, and we determined the sequences and levels of expression of several genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. We also investigated the effects of the mutation harbored by this isolate on the morphology and ultrastructure of the cell, cell viability, and vitality and susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. The isolate had a lower ergosterol content in its membranes than the wild type, and the lower ergosterol content was found to be associated with a nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene and induction of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Modifications of the cell wall were also seen, accompanied by increased susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. Finally, this mutation, which resulted in a marked fitness cost, was associated with a higher rate of cell mortality. Wild-type properties were restored by complementation of the isolate with a centromeric plasmid containing a wild-type copy of the ERG6 gene. In conclusion, we have identified the molecular event responsible for decreased susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of C. glabrata. The nonsense mutation detected in the ERG6 gene of this isolate led to a decrease in ergosterol content. This isolate may constitute a useful tool for analysis of the relevance of protein trafficking in the phenomena of azole resistance and pseudohyphal growth.

  3. Severe deficiency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator messenger RNA carrying nonsense mutations R553X and W1316X in respiratory epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hamosh, A; Trapnell, B C; Zeitlin, P L; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Rosenstein, B J; Crystal, R G; Cutting, G R

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common, lethal inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. We have recently reported two African-American patients with nonsense mutations in each CF gene and severe pancreatic disease, but mild pulmonary disease. In order to examine the effect of these nonsense mutations on CF gene expression, bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were obtained from one of these patients (no. 246), a compound heterozygote for nonsense mutations R553X and W1316X; a healthy normal individual; a patient (no. 528) homozygous for the common CF mutation (delta F508); and a CF patient (no. 272) who carries the R553X mutation and a missense mutation, S549N. When mRNA from bronchial cells of the normal individual, the delta F508 homozygote, and the S549N/R553X compound heterozygote was reverse transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers derived from the CF gene, DNA fragments of the predicted size were observed. However, patient no. 246 with nonsense mutations in each CF gene has no detectable cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) messenger RNA, and therefore should have severely diminished, and possibly absent, CFTR protein. Furthermore, less than 2% of the CFTR transcripts in nasal epithelial cells from patient no. 272 (S549N/R553X) were derived from the gene with the nonsense mutation. We conclude that severe reduction in CFTR mRNA causes CF, but can have different consequences in the lung and pancreas. Images PMID:1721624

  4. Missense and nonsense mutations in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene of different goat breeds: association with red and black coat colour phenotypes but with unexpected evidences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Agouti and Extension loci control the relative amount of eumelanin and pheomelanin production in melanocytes that, in turn, affects pigmentation of skin and hair. The Extension locus encodes the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) whose permanent activation, caused by functional mutations, results in black coat colour, whereas other inactivating mutations cause red coat colour in different mammals. Results The whole coding region of the MC1R gene was sequenced in goats of six different breeds showing different coat colours (Girgentana, white cream with usually small red spots in the face; Maltese, white with black cheeks and ears; Derivata di Siria, solid red; Murciano-Granadina, solid black or solid brown; Camosciata delle Alpi, brown with black stripes; Saanen, white; F1 goats and the parental animals). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified: one nonsense mutation (p.Q225X), three missense mutations (p.A81V, p.F250V, and p.C267W), and one silent mutation. The stop codon at position 225 should cause the production of a shorter MC1R protein whose functionality may be altered. These SNPs were investigated in a larger sample of animals belonging to the six breeds. The Girgentana breed was almost fixed for the p.225X allele. However, there was not complete association between the presence of red spots in the face and the presence of this allele in homozygous condition. The same allele was identified in the Derivata di Siria breed. However, its frequency was only 33%, despite the fact that these animals are completely red. The p.267W allele was present in all Murciano-Granadina black goats, whereas it was never identified in the brown ones. Moreover, the same substitution was present in almost all Maltese goats providing evidence of association between this mutation and black coat colour. Conclusion According to the results obtained in the investigated goat breeds, MC1R mutations may determine eumelanic and pheomelanic phenotypes. However

  5. Acute intermittent porphyria: A single-base deletion and a nonsense mutation in the human hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene, predicting truncations of the enzyme polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.L.; Astrin, K.H.; Desnick, R.J.

    1995-08-28

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant inborn error of metabolism that results from the half-normal activity of the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). AIP is an ecogenetic condition, since the life-threatening acute attacks are precipitated by various factors, including drugs, alcohol, fasting, and certain hormones. Biochemical diagnosis is problematic, and the identification of mutations in the HMB-synthase gene provides accurate detection of presymptomatic heterozygotes, permitting avoidance of the acute precipitating factors. By direct solid-phase sequencing, two mutations causing AIP were identified, an adenine deletion at position 629 in exon 11(629delA), which alters the reading frame and predicts premature truncation of the enzyme protein after amino acid 255, and a nonsense mutation in exon 12 (R225X). These mutations were confirmed by either restriction enzyme analysis or family studies of symptomatic patients, permitting accurate presymptomatic diagnosis of affected relatives. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  6. A De Novo Nonsense Mutation in MAGEL2 in a Patient Initially Diagnosed as Opitz-C: Similarities Between Schaaf-Yang and Opitz-C Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Urreizti, Roser; Cueto-Gonzalez, Anna Maria; Franco-Valls, Héctor; Mort-Farre, Sílvia; Roca-Ayats, Neus; Ponomarenko, Julia; Cozzuto, Luca; Company, Carlos; Bosio, Mattia; Ossowski, Stephan; Montfort, Magda; Hecht, Jochen; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Cormand, Bru; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Opitz, John M.; Neri, Giovanni; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Opitz trigonocephaly C syndrome (OTCS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies, variable intellectual and psychomotor disability, and variable cardiac defects with a high mortality rate. Different patterns of inheritance and genetic heterogeneity are known in this syndrome. Whole exome and genome sequencing of a 19-year-old girl (P7), initially diagnosed with OTCS, revealed a de novo nonsense mutation, p.Q638*, in the MAGEL2 gene. MAGEL2 is an imprinted, maternally silenced, gene located at 15q11-13, within the Prader-Willi region. Patient P7 carried the mutation in the paternal chromosome. Recently, mutations in MAGEL2 have been described in Schaaf-Yang syndrome (SHFYNG) and in severe arthrogryposis. Patient P7 bears resemblances with SHFYNG cases but has other findings not described in this syndrome and common in OTCS. We sequenced MAGEL2 in nine additional OTCS patients and no mutations were found. This study provides the first clear molecular genetic basis for an OTCS case, indicates that there is overlap between OTCS and SHFYNG syndromes, and confirms that OTCS is genetically heterogeneous. Genes encoding MAGEL2 partners, either in the retrograde transport or in the ubiquitination-deubiquitination complexes, are promising candidates as OTCS disease-causing genes. PMID:28281571

  7. Loop-tail phenotype in heterozygous mice and neural tube defects in homozygous mice result from a nonsense mutation in the Vangl2 gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Mao, H H; Chen, L; Zhang, F L; Li, K; Xue, Z F

    2013-01-22

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is a powerful point mutagen that can generate random mutations. It has been used to generate mouse mutations to produce phenotypic models of human disease. Neural tube defects (NTD) are common birth defects in which the brain and/or spinal cord can be exposed; however, the mechanisms of these defects are poorly understood. Craniorachischisis is one type of NTD that bears a close resemblance to the phenotype of the loop-tail (Lp) mouse. Here we describe a C57BL/6J Lp mouse generated by ENU-induced mutagenesis. The mutation was mapped to the Vangl2 gene on chromosome 1, near markers D1Mit113 and D1Mit149. Sequence analysis of Vangl2 heterozygotes (Vangl2(m1Yzcm)/+) revealed a C/T transition mutation that resulted in substitution of a glutamine codon for a stop (nonsense) codon at position 449. The Vangl2 protein is involved in epithelium planar cell polarity. The predicted truncated protein would lack the PDZ-domain binding motif involved in protein-protein interaction; therefore, Vangl2(m1Yzcm) may be a loss-of-function mutant. Morphological and histological examination of homozygous mouse embryos revealed a neural tube closure defect that leads to craniorachischisis. This Vangl2(m1Yzcm) mouse represents a valuable model for the study of NTDs in humans.

  8. Mild Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Unravels a Novel Nonsense Mutation of the GLA Gene Associated with the Classical Phenotype of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Olga; Gago, Miguel; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Gaspar, Paulo; Sousa, Nuno; Cunha, Damião

    2017-02-03

    We report on the clinical, biochemical, and genetic findings of a large family with the classical phenotype of Fabry disease due to the novel nonsense mutation c.607G>T (p.E203X) of the GLA gene, which occurs in the active site of the α-galactosidase A enzyme. This report highlights that (i) Fabry disease diagnosis should be considered in all cases of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), even in its milder forms; (ii) a complete evaluation of patients with unexplained LVH is important to find diagnostic red flags of treatable causes of LVH, such as Fabry disease; (iii) cascade family screening is paramount to the earlier diagnosis and treatment of other affected family members; and (iv) the Fabry disease phenotype is highly variable in heterozygote females, even within the same family.

  9. Translational bypass of nonsense mutations in zebrafish rep1, pax2.1 and lamb1 highlights a viable therapeutic option for untreatable genetic eye disease.

    PubMed

    Moosajee, Mariya; Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Ellis, Charles D; Seabra, Miguel C; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y

    2008-12-15

    The extensive molecular genetic heterogeneity seen with inherited eye disease is a major barrier to the development of gene-based therapeutics. The underlying molecular pathology in a considerable proportion of these diseases however are nonsense mutations leading to premature termination codons. A therapeutic intervention targeted at this abnormality would therefore potentially be relevant to a wide range of inherited eye diseases. We have taken advantage of the ability of aminoglycoside drugs to suppress such nonsense mutations and partially restore full-length, functional protein in a zebrafish model of choroideraemia (chm(ru848); juvenile chorio-retinal degeneration) and in two models of ocular coloboma (noi(tu29a) and gup(m189); congenital optic fissure closure defects). In vitro cell-based assays showed significant readthrough with two drugs, gentamicin and paromomycin, which was confirmed by western blot and in vitro prenylation assays. The presence of either aminoglycoside during zebrafish development in vivo showed remarkable prevention of mutant ocular phenotypes in each model and a reduction in multisystemic defects leading to a 1.5-1.7-fold increase in survival. We also identified a significant reduction in abnormal cell death shown by TUNEL assay. To test the hypothesis that optic fissure closure was apoptosis-dependent, the anti-apoptotic agents, curcumin and zVAD-fmk, were tested in gup(m189) embryos. Both drugs were found to reduce the size of the coloboma, providing molecular evidence that cell death is required for optic fissure remodelling. These findings draw attention to the value of zebrafish models of eye disease as useful preclinical drug screening tools in studies to identify molecular mechanisms amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  10. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  11. Identification of inactivating mutations in the JAK1, SYNJ2, and CLPTM1 genes in prostate cancer cells using inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay and microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael R; Hawthorn, Lesleyann; Platt, Julie; Burkhardt, Tania; Cowell, John K; Ionov, Yurij

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a simple analytical method that increases the efficiency of identifying mutant genes in cell lines after the inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). The approach assumes that the spectra of mutant genes differ between cell lines of the same tumor origin. Thus, by analyzing more than one cell line in parallel and taking into account not only changes in mRNA levels after the inhibition of NMD, but also comparing mRNA levels between cell lines before the inhibition of NMD, the vast majority of false positives were eliminated from the analysis. In this study, we used Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to compare mRNA profiles of two prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and LNCaP, before and after emetine treatment. As a result of our modified approach, from the 14,500 genes present on the array, 7 were identified as candidates from LNCaP cells and 1 was identified from PC3 cells. Sequence analysis of five of these candidate genes identified gene-inactivating mutations in four of them. Homozygous mutations were found in the synaptojanin 2 (SYNJ2) and the cleft lip and palate CLPTM1 genes. Two different heterozygous mutations in the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) gene result in complete loss of the protein in several different prostate cancer cell lines.

  12. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  13. Tay-Sachs disease in an Arab family due to c.78G>A HEXA nonsense mutation encoding a p.W26X early truncation enzyme peptide.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Masri, Amira; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), a pan-ethnic, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal disease, results from deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity due to β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (HEXA) mutations. Prenatal/premarital carrier screening programs in the Ashkenazi Jewish community have markedly reduced disease occurrence. We report the first Jordanian Arab TSD patient diagnosed by deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity. HEXA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation, c.78G>A (p.W26X). Previously reported in Arab patients, this mutation is a candidate for TSD screening in Arab populations.

  14. Age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2) in a novel mouse model due to a nonsense mutation in the Mdm1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo; Mandal, Md Nawajes A; Chavali, Venkata R M; Hawes, Norman L; Khan, Naheed W; Hurd, Ronald E; Smith, Richard S; Davisson, Muriel L; Kopplin, Laura; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Iyengar, Sudha K; Heckenlively, John R; Ayyagari, Radha

    2008-12-15

    We observed that a naturally occurring mouse strain developed age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2). These mice had normal fundi, electroretinograms (ERGs) and retinal histology at 6 months of age; vessel attenuation, RPE atrophy and pigmentary abnormalities at 14 months, which progressed to complete loss of photoreceptors and extinguished ERG by 22 months. Genetic analysis revealed that the retinal degeneration in arrd2 segregates in an autosomal recessive manner and the disease gene localizes to mouse chromosome 10. A positional candidate cloning approach detected a nonsense mutation in the mouse double minute-1 gene (Mdm1), which results in the truncation of the putative protein from 718 amino acids to 398. We have identified a novel transcript of the Mdm1 gene, which is the predominant transcript in the retina. The Mdm1 transcript is localized to the nuclear layers of neural retina. Expression of Mdm1 in the retina increases steadily from post-natal day 30 to 1 year, and a high level of Mdm1 are subsequently maintained. The Mdm1 transcript was found to be significantly depleted in the retina of arrd2 mice and the transcript was observed to degrade by nonsense-mediated decay. These results indicate that the depletion of the Mdm1 transcript may underlie the mechanism leading to late-onset progressive retinal degeneration in arrd2 mice. Analysis of a cohort of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) wherein the susceptibility locus maps to chromosome 12q, a region bearing the human ortholog to MDM1, did not reveal association between human MDM1 and AMD.

  15. Novel nonsense and frameshift NTRK1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Liang, J Y; Sun, Z H; Zhang, H; Yao, Z R

    2012-08-13

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA; MIM 256800) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, recurrent episodes of fever, anhidrosis, and mental retardation. It is caused by mutations in the gene coding for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1; MIM# 191315). We screened two Chinese CIPA cases for mutations in the NTRK1 gene and examined their phenotype. Two novel mutations of the NTRK1 gene and two known mutations were identified. Including our two novel mutations, there are now 62 different NTRK1 gene mutations reported in patients with CIPA. We find that a combination of two null alleles usually leads to the severe phenotype, while the mild form of the CIPA disease is associated with at least one mild allele. Thirty-four among the 62 mutations (55%) are located within the tyrosine kinase domain of the NTRK1 protein. We concluded that the tyrosine kinase domain is a hot spot for mutations.

  16. FANCM c.5791C>T nonsense mutation (rs144567652) induces exon skipping, affects DNA repair activity and is a familial breast cancer risk factor.

    PubMed

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Catucci, Irene; Colombo, Mara; Caleca, Laura; Mucaki, Eliseos; Bogliolo, Massimo; Marin, Maria; Damiola, Francesca; Bernard, Loris; Pensotti, Valeria; Volorio, Sara; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus; Sutter, Christian; Surowy, Harald; Sornin, Valérie; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Andrieu, Nadine; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul A; Thompson, Ella; Marchetti, Marina; Verzeroli, Cristina; Tartari, Carmen; Capone, Gabriele Lorenzo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Genuardi, Maurizio; Medici, Veronica; Marchi, Isabella; Federico, Massimo; Tognazzo, Silvia; Matricardi, Laura; Agata, Simona; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Della Puppa, Lara; Cini, Giulia; Gismondi, Viviana; Viassolo, Valeria; Perfumo, Chiara; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Baldassarri, Margherita; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Silvestri, Valentina; Rizzolo, Piera; Spina, Francesca; Vivanet, Caterina; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Gambino, Gaetana; Tommasi, Stefania; Pilato, Brunella; Tondini, Carlo; Corna, Chiara; Bonanni, Bernardo; Barile, Monica; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Balestrino, Luisa; Ottini, Laura; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pierotti, Marco A; Renieri, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Devilee, Peter; Hilbers, Florentine S; van Asperen, Christi J; Viel, Alessandra; Montagna, Marco; Cortesi, Laura; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Hauke, Jan; Schmutzler, Rita K; Papi, Laura; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Lázaro, Conxi; Falanga, Anna; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Campbell, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Kvist, Anders; Ehrencrona, Hans; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Verderio, Paolo; Surralles, Jordi; Rogan, Peter K; Radice, Paolo

    2015-09-15

    Numerous genetic factors that influence breast cancer risk are known. However, approximately two-thirds of the overall familial risk remain unexplained. To determine whether some of the missing heritability is due to rare variants conferring high to moderate risk, we tested for an association between the c.5791C>T nonsense mutation (p.Arg1931*; rs144567652) in exon 22 of FANCM gene and breast cancer. An analysis of genotyping data from 8635 familial breast cancer cases and 6625 controls from different countries yielded an association between the c.5791C>T mutation and breast cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) = 3.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.28-12.11; P = 0.017)]. Moreover, we performed two meta-analyses of studies from countries with carriers in both cases and controls and of all available data. These analyses showed breast cancer associations with OR = 3.67 (95% CI = 1.04-12.87; P = 0.043) and OR = 3.33 (95% CI = 1.09-13.62; P = 0.032), respectively. Based on information theory-based prediction, we established that the mutation caused an out-of-frame deletion of exon 22, due to the creation of a binding site for the pre-mRNA processing protein hnRNP A1. Furthermore, genetic complementation analyses showed that the mutation influenced the DNA repair activity of the FANCM protein. In summary, we provide evidence for the first time showing that the common p.Arg1931* loss-of-function variant in FANCM is a risk factor for familial breast cancer.

  17. FANCM c.5791C>T nonsense mutation (rs144567652) induces exon skipping, affects DNA repair activity and is a familial breast cancer risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Catucci, Irene; Colombo, Mara; Caleca, Laura; Mucaki, Eliseos; Bogliolo, Massimo; Marin, Maria; Damiola, Francesca; Bernard, Loris; Pensotti, Valeria; Volorio, Sara; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus; Sutter, Christian; Surowy, Harald; Sornin, Valérie; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Andrieu, Nadine; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul A.; Thompson, Ella; Marchetti, Marina; Verzeroli, Cristina; Tartari, Carmen; Capone, Gabriele Lorenzo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Genuardi, Maurizio; Medici, Veronica; Marchi, Isabella; Federico, Massimo; Tognazzo, Silvia; Matricardi, Laura; Agata, Simona; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Puppa, Lara Della; Cini, Giulia; Gismondi, Viviana; Viassolo, Valeria; Perfumo, Chiara; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Baldassarri, Margherita; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Silvestri, Valentina; Rizzolo, Piera; Spina, Francesca; Vivanet, Caterina; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Gambino, Gaetana; Tommasi, Stefania; Pilato, Brunella; Tondini, Carlo; Corna, Chiara; Bonanni, Bernardo; Barile, Monica; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Balestrino, Luisa; Ottini, Laura; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pierotti, Marco A.; Renieri, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Devilee, Peter; Hilbers, Florentine S.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Viel, Alessandra; Montagna, Marco; Cortesi, Laura; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Hauke, Jan; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Papi, Laura; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Lázaro, Conxi; Falanga, Anna; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Campbell, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Kvist, Anders; Ehrencrona, Hans; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Verderio, Paolo; Surralles, Jordi; Rogan, Peter K.; Radice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous genetic factors that influence breast cancer risk are known. However, approximately two-thirds of the overall familial risk remain unexplained. To determine whether some of the missing heritability is due to rare variants conferring high to moderate risk, we tested for an association between the c.5791C>T nonsense mutation (p.Arg1931*; rs144567652) in exon 22 of FANCM gene and breast cancer. An analysis of genotyping data from 8635 familial breast cancer cases and 6625 controls from different countries yielded an association between the c.5791C>T mutation and breast cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) = 3.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.28–12.11; P = 0.017)]. Moreover, we performed two meta-analyses of studies from countries with carriers in both cases and controls and of all available data. These analyses showed breast cancer associations with OR = 3.67 (95% CI = 1.04–12.87; P = 0.043) and OR = 3.33 (95% CI = 1.09–13.62; P = 0.032), respectively. Based on information theory-based prediction, we established that the mutation caused an out-of-frame deletion of exon 22, due to the creation of a binding site for the pre-mRNA processing protein hnRNP A1. Furthermore, genetic complementation analyses showed that the mutation influenced the DNA repair activity of the FANCM protein. In summary, we provide evidence for the first time showing that the common p.Arg1931* loss-of-function variant in FANCM is a risk factor for familial breast cancer. PMID:26130695

  18. Three novel germ-line VHL mutations in Hungarian von Hippel-Lindau patients, including a nonsense mutation in a fifteen-year-old boy with renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited highly penetrant tumor syndrome predisposing to retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma among other less frequent complications. Methods Molecular genetic testing of the VHL gene was performed in five unrelated families affetced with type I VHL disease, including seven patients and their available family members. Results Molecular genetic investigations detected three novel (c.163 G > T, c.232A > T and c.555C > A causing p.Glu55X, p.Asn78Tyr and p.Tyr185X protein changes, respectively) and two previously described (c.340 + 1 G > A and c.583C > T, resulting in p.Gly114AspfsX6 and p.195GlnX protein changes, respectively) germline point mutations in the VHL gene. Molecular modeling of the VHL-ElonginC-HIF-1alpha complex predicted that the p.Asn78Tyr amino acid exchange remarkably alters the 77-83 loop structure of VHL protein and destabilizes the VHL-HIF-1alpha complex suggesting that the mutation causes type I phenotype and has high risk to associate to renal cell carcinoma. The novel p.55X nonsense mutation associated to bilateral RCC and retinal angioma in a 15-year-old male patient. Conclusion We describe the earliest onset renal cell carcinoma in VHL disease reported so far in a 15-year-old boy with a nonsense VHL mutation. Individual tailoring of screening schedule based on molecular genetic status should be considered in order to diagnose serious complications as early as possible. Our observations add to the understanding of genotype-phenotype correlation in VHL disease and can be useful for genetic counseling and follow-up of VHL patients. PMID:23298237

  19. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of the AGL Gene in a Romanian Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Anca; Rossmann, Heidi; Bucerzan, Simona; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background. Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme. There is a high phenotypic variability due to different mutations in the AGL gene. Methods and Results. We describe a 2.3-year-old boy from a nonconsanguineous Romanian family, who presented with severe hepatomegaly with fibrosis, mild muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, ketotic fasting hypoglycemia, increased transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. GSD type IIIa was suspected. Accordingly, genomic DNA of the index patient was analyzed by next generation sequencing of the AGL gene. For confirmation of the two mutations found, genetic analysis of the parents and grandparents was also performed. The patient was compound heterozygous for the novel mutation c.3235C>T, p.Gln1079⁎ (exon 24) and the known mutation c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ (exon 12). c.3235 >T, p.Gln1079⁎ was inherited from the father, who inherited it from his mother. c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ was inherited from the mother, who inherited it from her father. Conclusion. We report the first genetically confirmed case of a Romanian patient with GSDIIIa. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype with a novel mutation, in the context of a severe hepatopathy and an early onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26885414

  20. A CLN8 nonsense mutation in the whole genome sequence of a mixed breed dog with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and Australian Shepherd ancestry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juyuan; Johnson, Gary S; Brown, Holly A; Provencher, Michele L; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, Tendai; Taylor, Jeremy F; Schnabel, Robert D; O'Brien, Dennis P; Katz, Martin L

    2014-08-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are hereditary neurodegenerative diseases characterized by seizures and progressive cognitive decline, motor impairment, and vision loss accompanied by accumulation of autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in the central nervous system and elsewhere in the body. Mutations in at least 14 genes underlie the various forms of NCL. One of these genes, CLN8, encodes an intrinsic membrane protein of unknown function that appears to be localized primarily to the endoplasmic reticulum. Most CLN8 mutations in people result in a form of NCL with a late infantile onset and relatively rapid progression. A mixed breed dog with Australian Shepherd and Blue Heeler ancestry developed neurological signs characteristic of NCL starting at about 8months of age. The signs became progressively worse and the dog was euthanized at 21months of age due to seizures of increasing frequency and severity. Postmortem examination of the brain and retinas identified massive accumulations of intracellular autofluorescent inclusions characteristic of the NCLs. Whole genome sequencing of DNA from this dog identified a CLN8:c.585G>A transition that predicts a CLN8:p.Trp195* nonsense mutation. This mutation appears to be rare in both ancestral breeds. All of our 133 archived DNA samples from Blue Heelers, and 1481 of our 1488 archived Australian Shepherd DNA samples tested homozygous for the reference CLN8:c.585G allele. Four of the Australian Shepherd samples tested heterozygous and 3 tested homozygous for the mutant CLN8:c.585A allele. All 3 dogs homozygous for the A allele exhibited clinical signs of NCL and in 2 of them NCL was confirmed by postmortem evaluation of brain tissue. The occurrence of confirmed NCL in 3 of 4 CLN8:c.585A homozygous dogs, plus the occurrence of clinical signs consistent with NCL in the fourth homozygote strongly suggests that this rare truncating mutation causes NCL. Identification of this NCL-causing mutation provides the

  1. A nonsense mutation causing decreased levels of insulin receptor mRNA: Detection by a simplified technique for direct sequencing of genomic DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kadowaki, T.; Kadowaki, H.; Taylor, S.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Mutations in the insulin receptor gene can render the cell resistant to the biological action of insulin. The authors have studied a patient with leprechaunism (leprechaun/Minn-1), a genetic syndrome associated with intrauterine growth retardation and extreme insulin resistance. Genomic DNA from the patient was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction catalyzed by Thermus aquaticus (Taq) DNA polymerase, and the amplified DNA was directly sequenced. A nonsense mutations was identified at codon 897 in exon 14 in the paternal allele of the patient's insulin receptor gene. Levels of insulin receptor mRNA are decreased to <10% of normal in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts and cultured skin fibroblasts from this patient. Thus, this nonsense mutation appears to cause a decrease in the levels of insulin receptor mRNA. In addition, they have obtained indirect evidence that the patient's maternal allele of the insulin receptor gene contains a cis-acting dominant mutation that also decreases the level of mRNA, but by a different mechanism. The nucleotide sequence of the entire protein-coding domain and the sequences of the intron-exon boundaries for all 22 exons of the maternal allele were normal. Presumably, the mutation in the maternal allele maps elsewhere in the insulin receptor gene. Thus, they conclude that the patient is a compound heterozygote for two cis-acting dominant mutations in the insulin receptor gene: (i) a nonsense mutation in the paternal allel that reduces the level of insulin receptor mRNA and (ii) an as yet unidentified mutation in the maternal allele that either decreases the rate of transcription or decreases the stability of the mRNA.

  2. A Homozygous Nonsense Mutation (428G→A) in the Human Secretor (FUT2) Gene Provides Resistance to Symptomatic Norovirus (GGII) Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thorven, Maria; Grahn, Ammi; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Johansson, Hugo; Wahlfrid, Christer; Larson, Göran; Svensson, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Noroviruses (formerly Norwalk-like viruses) are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide and are associated with a significant number of nosocomial and food-borne outbreaks. In this study we show that the human secretor FUT2 gene, which codes for an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase synthesizing the H-type 1 antigen in saliva and mucosa, is associated with susceptibility to norovirus infections. Allelic polymorphism characterization at nucleotide 428 for symptomatic (n = 53) and asymptomatic (n = 62) individuals associated with nosocomial and sporadic norovirus outbreaks revealed that homozygous nonsense mutation (428G→A) in FUT2 segregated with complete resistance for the disease. Of all symptomatic individuals, 49% were homozygous (SeSe) and 51% heterozygous (Sese428) secretors, and none were secretor negative (se428se428), in contrast to 20% nonsecretors (se428se428) among Swedish blood donors (n = 104) (P < 0.0002) and 29% for asymptomatic individuals associated with nosocomial outbreaks (P < 0.00001). Furthermore, saliva from secretor-positive and symptomatic patients but not from secretor-negative and asymptomatic individuals bound the norovirus strain responsible for that particular outbreak. This is the first report showing that the FUT2 nonsecretor (se428se428) genotype is associated with resistance to nosocomial and sporadic outbreaks with norovirus. PMID:16306606

  3. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L. Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M.; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  4. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na+- and HCO3−-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that causes

  5. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-09-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na(+)- and HCO(3)(-)-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that

  6. Suppressed nonsense mutations in the araC gene of Escherichia coli provide three novel variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Schecter, J B

    1983-06-01

    A total of 400 suppressible mutations have been isolated in the araC gene of Escherichia coli. Based on deletion mapping, growth patterns when suppressed, and intragenic recombination, 37 mutants have been determined to contain unique mutations. Rapid plate assays were developed to test for each of the three AraC protein functions: inducing araBAD, repressing araBAD, and araC self-repression. The 185 mutant proteins, resulting from 37 mutants each suppressed by five different suppressors, were assayed for each of the three AraC functions. These plate assays showed that: (i) for each function, some areas of the gene map are more sensitive to mutation than other areas, and (ii) three of the mutant AraC proteins were unlike previously characterized AraC mutants. Enzyme assays on the mutant proteins confirmed their novel character. The first mutant cannot induce araBAD but retains the capacity to perform both repression functions; and the second and third can each perform one of the two repression functions better than it can perform the other. These characteristics suggest that previously proposed models of ara regulation are incomplete.

  7. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the STRC gene in a Korean family with moderate hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sagong, Borum; Baek, Jeong-In; Bok, Jinwoong; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is a heterogeneous disorder that results in a common sensorineural disorder. To date, more than 150 loci and 89 genes have been reported for non-syndromic hearing loss. Next generation sequencing has recently been developed as a powerful genetic strategy for identifying pathogenic mutations in heterogeneous disorders with various causative genes. In this study, we performed targeted sequencing to identify the causative mutation in a Korean family that had moderate hearing loss. We targeted 64 genes associated with non-syndromic hearing loss and sorted the homozygous variations according to the autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of the family. Implementing a bioinformatic platform for filtering and detecting variations allowed for the identification of two variations within different genes (c.650G>A in TRIOBP and c.4057C>T in STRC). These variants were selected for further analysis. Among these, c.4057C>T (p.Q1353X) was a divergent sequence variation between the STRC gene and the STRC pseudogene. This was the critical difference that resulted in loss of the protein-coding ability of the pseudogene. Therefore, we hypothesized that the p.Q1353X variation in the STRC gene is the causative mutation for hearing loss. This result suggests that application of targeted sequencing will be valuable for the diagnosis of heterogeneous disorders.

  8. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mohan; Ramsey, Keri; Grebe, Theresa; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Huentelman, Matthew; Craig, David; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy), or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome. In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister) with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93*) and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*), in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus. Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:26535115

  9. Identification of a Novel NLRP12 Nonsense Mutation (Trp408X) in the Extremely Rare Disease FCAS by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaoru; Dai, Caijun; Zhu, Xiaochun; Liao, Qiumei; Luo, Xu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is an extremely rare autosomal dominant inherited disease. Although there are four genes that have been linked with FCAS, its molecular diagnosis has been challenging in a relatively large proportion of cases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the genetic defect of a recruited FCAS family using exome sequencing followed by in-depth bioinformatics analysis. As a result, a novel heterozygous stop-gain mutation (Trp408X) in NLRP12 was identified in autosomal dominant inherited FCAS with clinical features of recurrent fever and skin urticaria due to cold conditions. When combined with previous studies, all of the reported mutations were found to have occurred in a highly conserved region in the NACHT domain coding sequence in NLRP12 exon 3, suggesting that a screening strategy for FCAS should focus on this area of the gene. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of exome sequencing for clinical diagnosis of genetic disorders and provides molecular insight into FCAS treatment and diagnosis. PMID:27314497

  10. Homozygosity for a novel adenosine deaminase (ADA) nonsense mutation (Q3>X) in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

    SciTech Connect

    Santisteban, I.; Arrendondo-Vega, F.X.; Kelly, S. |

    1994-09-01

    A Somali girl was diagnosed with ADA-deficient SCID at 7 mo; she responded well to PEG-ADA replacement and is now 3.3 yr old. ADA mRNA was undetectable (Northern) in her cultured T cells, but was present in T cells of her parents and two sibs. All PCR-amplified exon 1 genomic clones from the patient had a C>T transition at bp 7 relative to the start of translation, replacing Gln at codon 3 (AGA) with a termination codon (TGA, Q3>X). Patient cDNA (prepared by RT-PCR with a 5{prime} primer that covered codons 1-7) had a previously described polymorphism, K80>R, but was otherwise normal, indicating that no other coding mutations were present. A predicted new genomic BfaI restriction site was used to establish her homozygosity for Q3>X and to analyze genotypes of family members. We also analyzed the segregation of a variable Alu polyA-associated TAAA repeat (AluVpA) situated 5{prime} of the ADA gene. Three different AluVpA alleles were found, one of which was only present in the father and was not associated with his Q3>X allele. Because the father`s RBCs had only {approximately}15% of normal ADA activity, we analyzed his ADA cDNA. We found a G>A transition at bp 425 that substitutes Gln for Arg142, a solvent-accessible residue, and eliminates a BsmAI site in exon 5. ADA activity of the R142>Q in vitro translation product was 20-25% of wild type ADA translation product, suggesting that R142>Q is a new {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency mutation. As expected, Q3>X mRNA did not yield a detectable in vitro translation product. We conclude that the patient`s father is a compound heterozygote carrying the ADA Q3>X/R142>Q genotype. {open_quote}Partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency unassociated with immunodeficiency is relatively common in individuals of African descent. The present findings and previous observations suggest that {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency may have had an evolutionary advantage.

  11. The G428A Nonsense Mutation in FUT2 Provides Strong but Not Absolute Protection against Symptomatic GII.4 Norovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buesa, Javier; Rydell, Gustaf E.; Lidón, Marta Fos; Montava, Rebeca; Mallouh, Reem Abu; Grahn, Ammi; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Bellido, Juan; Arnedo, Alberto; Larson, Göran; Svensson, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    In November 2004, 116 individuals in an elderly nursing home in El Grao de Castellón, Spain were symptomatically infected with genogroup II.4 (GII.4) norovirus. The global attack rate was 54.2%. Genotyping of 34 symptomatic individuals regarding the FUT2 gene revealed that one patient was, surprisingly, a non-secretor, hence indicating secretor-independent infection. Lewis genotyping revealed that Lewis-positive and negative individuals were susceptible to symptomatic norovirus infection indicating that Lewis status did not predict susceptibility. Saliva based ELISA assays were used to determine binding of the outbreak virus to saliva samples. Saliva from a secretor-negative individual bound the authentic outbreak GII.4 Valencia/2004/Es virus, but did not in contrast to secretor-positive saliva bind VLP of other strains including the GII.4 Dijon strain. Amino acid comparison of antigenic A and B sites located on the external loops of the P2 domain revealed distinct differences between the Valencia/2004/Es and Dijon strains. All three aa in each antigenic site as well as 10/11 recently identified evolutionary hot spots, were unique in the Valencia/2004/Es strain compared to the Dijon strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of symptomatic GII.4 norovirus infection of a Lea+b− individual homozygous for the G428A nonsense mutation in FUT2. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the host genetic susceptibility to norovirus infections and evolution of the globally dominating GII.4 viruses. PMID:19440360

  12. The G428A nonsense mutation in FUT2 provides strong but not absolute protection against symptomatic GII.4 Norovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Beatrice; Kindberg, Elin; Buesa, Javier; Rydell, Gustaf E; Lidón, Marta Fos; Montava, Rebeca; Abu Mallouh, Reem; Grahn, Ammi; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Bellido, Juan; Arnedo, Alberto; Larson, Göran; Svensson, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    In November 2004, 116 individuals in an elderly nursing home in El Grao de Castellón, Spain were symptomatically infected with genogroup II.4 (GII.4) norovirus. The global attack rate was 54.2%. Genotyping of 34 symptomatic individuals regarding the FUT2 gene revealed that one patient was, surprisingly, a non-secretor, hence indicating secretor-independent infection. Lewis genotyping revealed that Lewis-positive and negative individuals were susceptible to symptomatic norovirus infection indicating that Lewis status did not predict susceptibility. Saliva based ELISA assays were used to determine binding of the outbreak virus to saliva samples. Saliva from a secretor-negative individual bound the authentic outbreak GII.4 Valencia/2004/Es virus, but did not in contrast to secretor-positive saliva bind VLP of other strains including the GII.4 Dijon strain. Amino acid comparison of antigenic A and B sites located on the external loops of the P2 domain revealed distinct differences between the Valencia/2004/Es and Dijon strains. All three aa in each antigenic site as well as 10/11 recently identified evolutionary hot spots, were unique in the Valencia/2004/Es strain compared to the Dijon strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of symptomatic GII.4 norovirus infection of a Le(a+b-) individual homozygous for the G428A nonsense mutation in FUT2. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the host genetic susceptibility to norovirus infections and evolution of the globally dominating GII.4 viruses.

  13. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Analysis of aberrant splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of the stop codon mutations c.109G>T and c.504_505delCT in 7 patients with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Arnedo, María; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Ribes, Antonia; Pié, Angeles; Bueno, Gloria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Pié, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells can be protected against mutations that generate stop codons by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or nonsense-associated altered splicing (NAS). However, the processes are only partially understood and do not always occur. In this work, we study these phenomena in the stop codon mutations c.109G>T (p.Glu37*) and c.504_505delCT; the second and third most frequent mutations in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency (MIM #246450). The deficiency affects the synthesis of ketone bodies and produces severe disorders during early childhood. We used a minigene approach, real-time quantitative PCR and the inhibition of NMD by puromycin treatment, to study the effect of stop codons on splicing (NAS) and NMD in seven patients. Surprisingly, none of the stop codons studied appears to be the direct cause of aberrant splicing. In the mutation c.109G>T, the splicing is due to the base change G>T at position 109, which is critical and cannot be explained by disruption of exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) elements, by the appearance of exonic splicing silencer (ESS) elements which were predicted by bioinformatic tools or by the stop codons. Moreover, the mutation c.504_505delCT produces two mRNA transcripts both with stop codons that generate simultaneous NMD phenomena. The effects of the mutations studied on splicing seemed to be similar in all the patients. Furthermore, we report a Spanish patient with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria and a novel missense mutation: c.825C>G (p.Asn275Lys).

  15. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  16. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices…

  17. Rimas Tontas. (Nonsense Rhymes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    Part of the series "Coleccion Mini-Libros" (Mini-Book Collection), the booklet is a compilation of 50 short nonsense verses written in Spanish. The author and The Southwest Council of La Raza offer the collection for the use of parents and teachers dedicated to stimulating interest in Spanish among the youth of our country. (EJ)

  18. Molecular Analysis of Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Hungary – An Update to the Mutational Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Ivády, Gergely; Koczok, Katalin; Madar, Laszlo; Gombos, Eva; Toth, Izabella; Gyori, Klaudia; Balogh, István

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In this study the authors present an update to the CFTR mutation profile in Hungary, utilizing data from a selected cohort of 45 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from different regions of the country. Methods Depending on the preceding analysis, four different mutation detection methods were used. A commercial assay targeting the most common CF-causing mutations was performed as the first test followed by an allele specific PCR for CFTRdele2,3(21kb), Sanger sequencing and MLPA analysis of the coding region of the CFTR gene. Results In our recent study 27 different mutations were detected, including 2 novel ones (c.1037_1038insA and c.1394C>T). Besides F508del (c.1521_1523delCTT), the following mutations were found at a frequency of ≥ 4.0%: W1282X (c.3846G>A), N1303K (c.3909C>G), CFTRdele2,3(21kb) (c.54-5940_273+10250del21kb) and 2184insA (c.2052_2053insA). In addition, four mutations (G542X, Y1092X, 621+1G>T, and 2143delT) were found in more than one allele. Conclusions The updated database of Hungarian mutations not only enables to increase the efficiency of the existing diagnostic approach, but also provides a further refined basis for the introduction of the molecular newborn screening (NBS) program in Hungary.

  19. Mutation analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene in native American populations of the southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Grebe, T.A. Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ ); Doane, W.W.; Norman, R.A.; Rhodes, S.N. ); Richter, S.F. ); Clericuzio, C. ); Seltzer, W.K. ); Goldberg, B.E. ); Hernried, L.S. ); McClure, M.; Kaplan, G.

    1992-10-01

    The authors report DNA and clinical analysis of cystic fibrosis (CF) in two previously unstudied, genetically isolated populations: Pueblo and Navajo Native Americans. Direct mutation analysis of six mutations of the CFTR gene - namely, [Delta]F508, G542X, G551D, R553X, N1303K, and W1282X - was performed on PCR-amplified genomic DNA extracted from blood samples. Haplotype analyses with marker/enzyme pairs XV2c/TaqI and KM29/PstI were performed as well. Of the 12 affected individuals studied, no [Delta]F508 mutation was detected; only one G542X mutation was found. None of the other mutations was detected. All affected individuals have either an AA, AC, or CC haplotype, except for the one carrying the G542X mutation, who has the haplotye AB. Clinically, six of the affected individuals examined exhibit growth deficiency, and five (all from the Zuni Pueblo) have a severe CF phenotype. Four of the six Zunis with CF are also microcephalic, a finding not previously noted in CF patients. The DNA data have serious implications for risk assessment of CF carrier status for these people. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Ethnic heterogeneity and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation frequencies in Chicago-area CF families

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.; Lester, L.A.; Mott, C.; Billstrand, C.; Lemke, A.; Ven, K. van der ); Marcus, S.; Kraut, J.; Booth, C. ); Lloyd-Still, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The identification of a common mutation, [Delta]F508, in the CFTR gene allowed, for the first time, the detection of cystic fibrosis (CF) carriers in the general population. Further genetic studies revealed >100 additional disease-causing mutations in this gene, few of which occur on >1% of CF chromosomes in any ethnic group. Prior to establishing counseling guidelines and carrier risk assessments, the authors sought to establish the frequencies of the CFTR mutations that are present in CF families living in the Chicago are, a region notable for its ethnic heterogeneity. Their sample included 283 unrelated CF carriers, with the following ethnic composition: 78% non-Ashkenazi Caucasians, 5% Ashkenazi, 9% African-American, 3% Mexican, 0.3% Native American, and 5% mixed ancestry. When a panel of 10 mutations ([Delta]F508, [Delta]I507, G542X, G551D, R553X, S549N, R1162X, W1282X, N1303K, and 1717-1G[r arrow]A) was used, detection rates ranged from 75% in non-Ashkenazi Caucasians to 40% in African-Americans. These data suggest that the goal of screening for 90%-95% of CF mutations may be unrealistic in this and other, similar US populations. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  1. SNaPshot Assay for the Detection of the Most Common CFTR Mutations in Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Mircevska, Marija; Plaseski, Toso; Filipovski, Vanja; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is the most common CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) that explains about 1–2% of the male infertility cases. Controversial data have been published regarding the involvement of CFTR mutations in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia. Here, we describe single base extension (SNaPshot) assay for detection of 11 common CFTR mutations: F508del, G542X, N1303K, 621+1G->T, G551D, R553X, R1162X, W1282X, R117H, 2184insA and 1717-1G->A and IVS8polyT variants. The assay was validated on 50 previously genotyped samples and was used to screen a total of 369 infertile men with different impairment of spermatogenesis and 136 fertile controls. Our results show that double heterozygosity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) mutations are found in a high percentage (22.7%) of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia, but not in other studied groups of infertile men. The SNaPshot assay described here is an inexpensive, fast and robust method for primary screening of the most common CFTR mutations both in patients with classical CF and CFTR-RD. It can contribute to better understanding of the role of CFTR mutations in impaired spermatogenesis, ultimately leading to improved management of infertile men. PMID:25386751

  2. Interaction of PABPC1 with the translation initiation complex is critical to the NMD resistance of AUG-proximal nonsense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peixeiro, Isabel; Inácio, Ângela; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Luísa; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Romão, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a surveillance pathway that recognizes and rapidly degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (PTC). The strength of the NMD response appears to reflect multiple determinants on a target mRNA. We have previously reported that mRNAs containing PTCs in close proximity to the translation initiation codon (AUG-proximal PTCs) can substantially evade NMD. Here, we explore the mechanistic basis for this NMD resistance. We demonstrate that translation termination at an AUG-proximal PTC lacks the ribosome stalling that is evident in an NMD-sensitive PTC. This difference is associated with demonstrated interactions of the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1, PABPC1, with the cap-binding complex subunit, eIF4G and the 40S recruitment factor eIF3 as well as the ribosome release factor, eRF3. These interactions, in combination, underlie critical 3′–5′ linkage of translation initiation with efficient termination at the AUG-proximal PTC and contribute to an NMD-resistant PTC definition at an early phase of translation elongation. PMID:21989405

  3. The Intronic GABRG2 Mutation, IVS6+2T→G, Associated with CAE Altered Subunit mRNA Intron Splicing, Activated Nonsense-Mediated Decay and Produced a Stable Truncated γ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mengnan; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The intronic GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, was identified in an Australian family with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and febrile seizures (Kananura et al., 2002). The GABRG2 intron 6 splice donor site was found to be mutated from GT to GG. We generated wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) driven by a CMV promoter and expressed them in HEK293T cells and expressed wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit BACs containing the endogenous hGABRG2 promoter in transgenic mice. Wildtype and mutant GABRG2 mRNA splicing patterns were determined in both BAC transfected HEK293T cells and transgenic mouse brain, and in both, the mutation abolished intron 6 splicing at the donor site, activated a cryptic splice site, generated partial intron 6 retention and produced a frame shift in exon 7 that created a premature translation-termination codon (PTC). The resultant mutant mRNA was either degraded partially by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) or translated to a stable, truncated subunit (the γ2-PTC subunit) containing the first 6 GABRG2 exons and a novel frame-shifted 29 aa C terminal tail. The γ2-PTC subunit was homologous to the mollusk acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) but was not secreted from cells. It was retained in the ER and not expressed on the surface membrane, but it did oligomerize with α1 and β2 subunits. These results suggested that the GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, reduced surface αβγ2 receptor levels, thus reducing GABAergic inhibition, by reducing GABRG2 transcript level and producing a stable, nonfunctional truncated subunit that had a dominant negative effect on αβγ2 receptor assembly. PMID:22539854

  4. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan J; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus; Norbury, Gail; Morling, Niels; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2007-05-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both 0.012 (carrier frequency 2.4%). Based on the analysis of AluVpA alleles, the ADA c7C/T mutation was estimated to be approximately 7,100 years old. Approximately 1 out of 5 - 10000 Somali children will be born with ADA deficiency due to an ADA c7C/T mutation, although within certain clans the frequency may be significantly higher. ADA-SCID may be a frequent immunodeficiency disorder in Somalia, but will be underdiagnosed due to the prevailing socioeconomic and nutritional deprivation.

  5. Clinical and genetic investigation of a large Tunisian family with complete achromatopsia: identification of a new nonsense mutation in GNAT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Ouechtati, Farah; Merdassi, Ahlem; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Largueche, Leila; Derouiche, Kaouther; Ouragini, Houyem; Nouira, Sonia; Tiab, Leila; Baklouti, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L; Zografos, Leonidas; Abdelhak, Sonia; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Complete achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C mutations. This retinal disorder is characterized by complete loss of color discrimination due to the absence or alteration of the cones function. The purpose of the present study was the clinical and the genetic characterization of achromatopsia in a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Ophthalmic evaluation included a full clinical examination, color vision testing and electroretinography. Linkage analysis using microsatellite markers flanking CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C genes was performed. Mutations were screened by direct sequencing. A total of 12 individuals were diagnosed with congenital complete achromatopsia. They are members of six nuclear consanguineous families belonging to the same large consanguineous family. Linkage analysis revealed linkage to GNAT2. Mutational screening of GNAT2 revealed three intronic variations c.119-69G>C, c.161+66A>T and c.875-31G>C that co-segregated with a novel mutation p.R313X. An identical GNAT2 haplotype segregating with this mutation was identified, indicating a founder mutation. All patients were homozygous for the p.R313X mutation. This is the first report of the clinical and genetic investigation of complete achromatopsia in North Africa and the largest family with recessive achromatopsia involving GNAT2; thus, providing a unique opportunity for genotype-phenotype correlation for this extremely rare condition.

  6. Identification of a nonsense mutation in APAF1 that is likely causal for a decrease in reproductive efficiency in Holstein dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A haplotype on cattle chromosome 5 carrying a recessive lethal allele was found to originate in a Holstein-Friesian foundation sire. Resequencing led to the identification of a stop-gain mutation in exon 11 of APAF1, a gene known to cause embryonic lethality and neurodevelopmental abnormalities in ...

  7. Cystic fibrosis in Lebanon: distribution of CFTR mutations among Arab communities.

    PubMed

    Desgeorges, M; Mégarbané, A; Guittard, C; Carles, S; Loiselet, J; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1997-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is thought to be rare among the Arab populations from the Middle East and little data have been reported so far. We have studied a sample of 20 families living in Lebanon for several generations and who have at least one child with CF. These families are mainly from the Maronite, Greek Catholic, Greek Orthodox. Shiite or Sunnite groups. We found a 50% rate of consanguineous marriage, independent of the community of origin. The distribution of CF genotypes was determined through the screening of all exons of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene by the technique of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis combined with asymmetric amplification DNA sequencing. A total of ten different mutations accounting for 87.5% of 32 unrelated CF alleles was identified, including two novel putative mutations (E672del and IVS21-28G-->A). Three mutations, delta F508 (37.5%), W1282X (15.6%), and N1303K (9.4%) accounted for 62.5% of CF alleles. Interestingly, in the Maronite group, 66.7% of the delta F508 chromosomes were found to be associated with allele 7 of the IVS8(T)tract, contrasting with the absolute linkage disequilibrium between European delta F508 chromosomes and allele 9. During this study, two previously undescribed polymorphisms (IVS14a + 17del5 and 2691T/C) were also identified.

  8. The beta-globin gene in Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia carries a C----T nonsense mutation at codon 39.

    PubMed

    Guida, S; Giglioni, B; Comi, P; Ottolenghi, S; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G

    1984-04-01

    Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia is an inherited syndrome characterized by the inactivity of the beta-globin gene and the persistent activity of the fetal gamma-globin genes, particularly the A gamma-globin gene. Previous mapping studies with restriction enzymes failed to show any abnormality in the non-alpha globin gene cluster. We have now examined the possibility that this syndrome might result from a single rather than two different defects. Restriction enzyme polymorphisms linked to the delta beta 0-thalassemic non-alpha globin fragments were defined providing the basis for cloning the delta beta 0-thalassemic beta-globin gene from the DNA of a heterozygous patient. This gene appears to carry a C----T single mutation causing the appearance of a stop codon at amino acid position 39 of the beta-globin gene. This mutation was previously reported in beta 0-thalassemic patients, in linkage with different haplotypes. We conclude that Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia is the result of two separate mutations, the former one (unknown) responsible for persistent expression of gamma-globin genes, the latter for beta 0-thalassemia.

  9. Nonsense-mediated mRNA degradation of CtFAD2-1 and development of a perfect molecular marker for olol mutation in high oleic safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Cao, Shijiang; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig; Green, Allan; Singh, Surinder

    2013-09-01

    There are two types of safflower oil, high oleic (HO) with 70-75 % oleic acid and high linoleic (HL) with about 70 % linoleic acid. The original HO trait in safflower, found in an introduction from India, is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus (Knowles and Bill 1964). In the lipid biosynthesis pathway of developing safflower seeds, microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase (FAD2) is largely responsible for the conversion of oleic acid to linoleic acid. In vitro microsomal assays indicated drastically reduced FAD2 enzyme activity in the HO genotype compared to conventional HL safflower. A previous study indicated that a single-nucleotide deletion was found in the coding region of CtFAD2-1 that causes premature termination of translation in the HO genotypes, and the expression of the mutant CtFAD2-1Δ was attenuated in the HO genotypes compared to conventional HL safflower (Guan et al. 2012). In this study, we hypothesise that down-regulation of CtFAD2-1 expression in the HO genotype may be explained by nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). NMD phenomenon, indicated by gene-specific RNA degradation of defective CtFAD2-1Δ, was subsequently confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana seed as well as in the transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We have developed a perfect molecular marker corresponding to the olol mutation that can facilitate a rapid screening and early detection of genotypes carrying the olol mutation for use in marker-assisted selection for the management of the HO trait in safflower breeding programmes.

  10. Nonsense-mediated decay of human HEXA mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, K S; Neufeld, E F

    2001-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), the loss of mRNAs carrying premature stop codons, is a process by which cells recognize and degrade nonsense mRNAs to prevent possibly toxic effects of truncated peptides. Most mammalian nonsense mRNAs are degraded while associated with the nucleus, but a few are degraded in the cytoplasm; at either site, there is a requirement for translation and for an intron downstream of the early stop codon. We have examined the NMD of a mutant HEXA message in lymphoblasts derived from a Tay-Sachs disease patient homozygous for the common frameshift mutation 1278ins4. The mutant mRNA was nearly undetectable in these cells and increased to approximately 40% of normal in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. The stabilized transcript was found in the cytoplasm in association with polysomes. Within 5 h of cycloheximide removal, the polysome-associated nonsense message was completely degraded, while the normal message was stable. The increased lability of the polysome-associated mutant HEXA mRNA shows that NMD of this endogenous mRNA occurred in the cytoplasm. Transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that expression of an intronless HEXA minigene harboring the frameshift mutation or a closely located nonsense codon resulted in half the normal mRNA level. Inclusion of multiple downstream introns decreased the abundance further, to about 20% of normal. Thus, in contrast to other systems, introns are not absolutely required for NMD of HEXA mRNA, although they enhance the low-HEXA-mRNA phenotype.

  11. Frequencies of cystic fibrosis mutations in the Maine population: high proportion of unknown alleles in individuals of French-Canadian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Bayleran, J K; Yan, H; Hopper, C A; Simpson, E M

    1996-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common severe autosomal recessive disorders in Caucasian populations. A mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene causes this disorder. Reported here is the first analysis of CF mutations in the Maine population. We have screened 263 CF chromosomes for 16 previously reported mutations. Analysis of DNA from 124 apparently unrelated CF patients and 15 obligate carrier parents (whose partner and affected child were unavailable for study) resulted in the identification of 91% of the CF alleles and complete genotyping of 85% of the patients. The frequencies (%) of these mutations in the Maine population are delta F508 (75% of the chromosomes), G85E (0.76), R117H (0.76), I148T (1.1), 621 + 1G --> T (1.1), 711 + 1G --> T (3.0), A455E (1.1), 1717-1G --> A (1.1), G542X (1.9), G551D (1.9), R560T (0.76), Y1092X (0.38), W1282X (0.38), and N1303K (1.5). The exon 10 mutation, delta I507, and the exon 11 mutation, R553X, were not observed. Surprisingly, whereas only 5% of the alleles remain unidentified in the non-French population, the unidentified proportion in the French population is 19%. CF testing for the Maine population will be further improved as the as yet unidentified CF mutations in this population are characterized.

  12. Nonsense Suppression as an Approach to Treat Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    In-frame premature termination codons (PTCs) (also referred to as nonsense mutations) comprise ~10% of all disease-associated gene lesions. PTCs reduce gene expression in two ways. First, PTCs prematurely terminate translation of an mRNA, leading to the production of a truncated polypeptide that often lacks normal function and/or is unstable. Second, PTCs trigger degradation of an mRNA by activating nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a cellular pathway that recognizes and degrades mRNAs containing a PTC. Thus, translation termination and NMD are putative therapeutic targets for the development of treatments for genetic diseases caused by PTCs. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the identification of compounds with the ability to suppress translation termination of PTCs (also referred to as readthrough). More recently, NMD inhibitors have also been explored as a way to enhance the efficiency of PTC suppression. Due to their relatively low threshold for correction, lysosomal storage diseases are a particularly relevant group of diseases to investigate the feasibility of nonsense suppression as a therapeutic approach. In this review, the current status of PTC suppression and NMD inhibition as potential treatments for lysosomal storage diseases will be discussed. PMID:28367323

  13. Nonsense-mediated decay in genetic disease: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Miller, Jake N; Pearce, David A

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize various RNA quality control mechanisms to ensure high fidelity of gene expression, thus protecting against the accumulation of nonfunctional RNA and the subsequent production of abnormal peptides. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are largely responsible for protein production, and mRNA quality control is particularly important for protecting the cell against the downstream effects of genetic mutations. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an evolutionarily conserved mRNA quality control system in all eukaryotes that degrades transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs). By degrading these aberrant transcripts, NMD acts to prevent the production of truncated proteins that could otherwise harm the cell through various insults, such as dominant negative effects or the ER stress response. Although NMD functions to protect the cell against the deleterious effects of aberrant mRNA, there is a growing body of evidence that mutation-, codon-, gene-, cell-, and tissue-specific differences in NMD efficiency can alter the underlying pathology of genetic disease. In addition, the protective role that NMD plays in genetic disease can undermine current therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing the production of full-length functional protein from genes harboring nonsense mutations. Here, we review the normal function of this RNA surveillance pathway and how it is regulated, provide current evidence for the role that it plays in modulating genetic disease phenotypes, and how NMD can be used as a therapeutic target.

  14. Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Genetic Disease: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jake N.; Pearce, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize various RNA quality control mechanisms to ensure high fidelity of gene expression, thus protecting against the accumulation of nonfunctional RNA and the subsequent production of abnormal peptides. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are largely responsible for protein production, and mRNA quality control is particularly important for protecting the cell against the downstream effects of genetic mutations. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an evolutionarily conserved mRNA quality control system in all eukaryotes that degrades transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs). By degrading these aberrant transcripts, NMD acts to prevent the production of truncated proteins that could otherwise harm the cell through various insults, such as dominant negative effects or the ER stress response. Although NMD functions to protect the cell against the deleterious effects of aberrant mRNA, there is a growing body of evidence that mutation-, codon-, gene-, cell-, and tissue-specific differences in NMD efficiency can alter the underlying pathology of genetic disease. In addition, the protective role that NMD plays in genetic disease can undermine current therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing the production of full-length functional protein from genes harboring nonsense mutations. Here, we review the normal function of this RNA surveillance pathway and how it is regulated, provide current evidence for the role that it plays in modulating genetic disease phenotypes, and how NMD can be used as a therapeutic target. PMID:25485595

  15. Limited premature termination codon suppression by read-through agents in cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Zomer-van Ommen, D D; Vijftigschild, L A W; Kruisselbrink, E; Vonk, A M; Dekkers, J F; Janssens, H M; de Winter-de Groot, K M; van der Ent, C K; Beekman, J M

    2016-03-01

    Premature termination codon read-through drugs offer opportunities for treatment of multiple rare genetic diseases including cystic fibrosis. We here analyzed the read-through efficacy of PTC124 and G418 using human cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids (E60X/4015delATTT, E60X/F508del, G542X/F508del, R1162X/F508del, W1282X/F508del and F508del/F508del). G418-mediated read-through induced only limited CFTR function, but functional restoration of CFTR by PTC124 could not be confirmed. These studies suggest that better read-through agents are needed for robust treatment of nonsense mutations in cystic fibrosis.

  16. Cardiac energetics: sense and nonsense.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Colin L

    2003-08-01

    1. The background to current ideas in cardiac energetics is outlined and, in the genomic era, the need is stressed for detailed knowledge of mouse heart mechanics and energetics. 2. The mouse heart is clearly different to the rat in terms of its excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and the common assumption that heart rate difference between mice and humans will account for the eightfold difference in myocardial oxygen consumption is wrong, because the energy per beat of the mouse heart is approximately one-third that of the human heart. 3. In vivo evidence suggests that there may well be an eightfold species difference in the non-beating metabolism of mice and human hearts. It is speculated that the magnitude of basal metabolism in the heart is regulatable and that, in the absence of perfusion, it falls to approximately one-quarter of its in vivo rate and that in clinical conditions, such as hibernation, it probably decreases; its magnitude may be controlled by the endothelium. 4. The active energy balance sheet is briefly discussed and it is suggested that the activation heat accounts for 20-25% of the active energy per beat and cross-bridge turnover accounts for the balance. It is argued that force, not shortening, is the major determinant of cardiac energy usage. 5. The outcome of recent cardiac modelling with variants of the Huxley and Hill/Eisenberg models is described. It has been necessary to invoke 'loose coupling' to replicate the low cardiac energy flux measured at low afterloads (medium to high velocities of shortening). 6. Lastly, some of the unexplained or 'nonsense' energetic data are outlined and eight unsolved problems in cardiac energetics are discussed.

  17. Dual mechanisms for the low plasma levels of truncated apolipoprotein B proteins in familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Analysis of a new mouse model with a nonsense mutation in the Apob gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E; Cham, C M; Véniant, M M; Ambroziak, P; Young, S G

    1998-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHbeta), a syndrome characterized by low plasma cholesterol levels, is caused by mutations in the apo-B gene that interfere with the synthesis of apo-B100. FHbeta mutations frequently lead to the synthesis of a truncated form of apo-B, which typically is present in plasma at < 5% of the levels of apo-B100. Although many FHbeta mutations have been characterized, the basic mechanisms causing the low plasma levels of truncated apo-B variants have not been defined. We used gene targeting to create a mutant allele that exclusively yields a truncated apo-B, apo-B83. In mice heterozygous for the Apob83 allele, plasma levels and the size and density distribution of apo-B83-containing lipoproteins were strikingly similar to those observed in humans with FHbeta and an apo-B83 mutation. Analysis of mice carrying the Apob83 mutation revealed two mechanisms for the low plasma levels of apo-B83. First, Apob83 mRNA levels and apo-B83 secretion were reduced 76 and 72%, respectively. Second, apo-B83 was removed rapidly from the plasma, compared with apo-B100. This mouse model provides a new level of understanding of FHbeta and adds new insights into apo-B metabolism. PMID:9502790

  18. Ataluren stimulates ribosomal selection of near-cognate tRNAs to promote nonsense suppression

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bijoyita; Friesen, Westley J.; Tomizawa, Yuki; Leszyk, John D.; Zhuo, Jin; Johnson, Briana; Dakka, Jumana; Trotta, Christopher R.; Xue, Xiaojiao; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Keeling, Kim M.; Mobley, James A.; Rowe, Steven M.; Bedwell, David M.; Welch, Ellen M.; Jacobson, Allan

    2016-01-01

    A premature termination codon (PTC) in the ORF of an mRNA generally leads to production of a truncated polypeptide, accelerated degradation of the mRNA, and depression of overall mRNA expression. Accordingly, nonsense mutations cause some of the most severe forms of inherited disorders. The small-molecule drug ataluren promotes therapeutic nonsense suppression and has been thought to mediate the insertion of near-cognate tRNAs at PTCs. However, direct evidence for this activity has been lacking. Here, we expressed multiple nonsense mutation reporters in human cells and yeast and identified the amino acids inserted when a PTC occupies the ribosomal A site in control, ataluren-treated, and aminoglycoside-treated cells. We find that ataluren’s likely target is the ribosome and that it produces full-length protein by promoting insertion of near-cognate tRNAs at the site of the nonsense codon without apparent effects on transcription, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, or protein stability. The resulting readthrough proteins retain function and contain amino acid replacements similar to those derived from endogenous readthrough, namely Gln, Lys, or Tyr at UAA or UAG PTCs and Trp, Arg, or Cys at UGA PTCs. These insertion biases arise primarily from mRNA:tRNA mispairing at codon positions 1 and 3 and reflect, in part, the preferred use of certain nonstandard base pairs, e.g., U-G. Ataluren’s retention of similar specificity of near-cognate tRNA insertion as occurs endogenously has important implications for its general use in therapeutic nonsense suppression. PMID:27702906

  19. Nonsense surveillance regulates expression of diverse classes of mammalian transcripts and mutes genomic noise.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Joshua T; Sharifi, Neda A; Meyers, Jennifer L; Martinez-Murillo, Francisco; Dietz, Harry C

    2004-10-01

    Premature termination codons induce rapid transcript degradation in eukaryotic cells through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). This pathway can modulate phenotypes arising from nonsense or frameshift mutations, but little is known about the physiologic role of NMD in higher eukaryotes. To address this issue, we examined expression profiles in mammalian cells depleted of Rent1 (also called hUpf1), a factor essential for NMD. Upregulated transcripts included those with upstream open reading frames in the 5' untranslated region, alternative splicing that introduces nonsense codons or frameshifts, introns in the 3' untranslated region or selenocysteine codons. Transcripts derived from ancient transposons and endogenous retroviruses were also upregulated. These RNAs are unified by the presence of a spliced intron at least 50 nucleotides downstream of a termination codon, a context sufficient to initiate NMD. Consistent with direct regulation by NMD, representative upregulated transcripts decayed more slowly in cells deficient in NMD. In addition, inhibition of NMD induced by amino acid starvation upregulated transcripts that promote amino acid homeostasis. These results document that nonsense surveillance is a crucial post-transcriptional regulatory event that influences the expression of broad classes of physiologic transcripts, has been functionally incorporated into essential homeostatic mechanisms and suppresses expression of evolutionary remnants.

  20. Mammalian nonsense codons can be cis effectors of nuclear mRNA half-life.

    PubMed Central

    Belgrader, P; Cheng, J; Zhou, X; Stephenson, L S; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    Frameshift and nonsense mutations within the gene for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) that generate a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the protein coding region have been found to reduce the abundance of the product mRNA that copurifies with nuclei. The cellular process and location of the nonsense codon-mediated reduction have proven difficult to elucidate for technical reasons. We show here, using electron microscopy to judge the purity of isolated nuclei, that the previously established reduction to 25% of the normal mRNA level is evident for nuclei that are free of detectable cytoplasmic contamination. Therefore, the reduction is likely to be characteristic of bona fide nuclear RNA. Fully spliced nuclear mRNA is identified by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and a reverse transcription-PCR assay as the species that undergoes decay in experiments that used the human c-fos promoter to elicit a burst and subsequent shutoff of TPI gene transcription upon the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells. Finally, the finding that deletion of a 5' splice site of the TPI gene results predominantly but not exclusively in the removal by splicing (i.e., skipping) of the upstream exon as a part of the flanking introns has been used to demonstrate that decay is specific to those mRNA products that maintain the nonsense codon. This result, together with our previous results that implicate translation by ribosomes and charged tRNAs in the decay mechanism, indicate that nonsense codon recognition takes place after splicing and triggers decay solely in cis. The possibility that decay takes place during the process of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is discussed. Images PMID:7969159

  1. Mechanism and evidence of nonsense suppression therapy for genetic eye disorders.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rose; Smart, Matthew; Tracey-White, Dhani; Webster, Andrew R; Moosajee, Mariya

    2017-02-01

    Between 5 and 70% of genetic disease is caused by in-frame nonsense mutations, which introduce a premature termination codon (PTC) within the disease-causing gene. Consequently, during translation, non-functional or gain-of-function truncated proteins of pathological significance, are formed. Approximately 50% of all inherited retinal disorders have been associated with PTCs, highlighting the importance of novel pharmacological or gene correction therapies in ocular disease. Pharmacological nonsense suppression of PTCs could delineate a therapeutic strategy that treats the mutation in a gene- and disease-independent manner. This approach aims to suppress the fidelity of the ribosome during protein synthesis so that a near-cognate aminoacyl-tRNA, which shares two of the three nucleotides of the PTC, can be inserted into the peptide chain, allowing translation to continue, and a full-length functional protein to be produced. Here we discuss the mechanisms and evidence of nonsense suppression agents, including the small molecule drug ataluren (or PTC124) and next generation 'designer' aminoglycosides, for the treatment of genetic eye disease.

  2. Inhibition of nonsense-mediated RNA decay by ER stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhelin; Vuong, John K; Zhang, Min; Stork, Cheryl; Zheng, Sika

    2017-03-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) selectively degrades mutated and aberrantly processed transcripts that contain premature termination codons (PTC). Cellular NMD activity is typically assessed using exogenous PTC-containing reporters. We overcame some inherently problematic aspects of assaying endogenous targets and developed a broadly applicable strategy to reliably and easily monitor changes in cellular NMD activity. Our new method was genetically validated for distinguishing NMD regulation from transcriptional control and alternative splicing regulation, and unexpectedly disclosed a different sensitivity of NMD targets to NMD inhibition. Applying this robust method for screening, we identified NMD-inhibiting stressors but also found that NMD inactivation was not universal to cellular stresses. The high sensitivity and broad dynamic range of our method revealed a strong correlation between NMD inhibition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and polysome disassembly upon thapsigargin treatment in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. We found little evidence of calcium signaling mediating thapsigargin-induced NMD inhibition. Instead, we discovered that of the three unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways activated by thapsigargin, mainly protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) was required for NMD inhibition. Finally, we showed that ER stress compounded TDP-43 depletion in the up-regulation of NMD isoforms that had been implicated in the pathogenic mechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, and that the additive effect of ER stress was completely blocked by PERK deficiency.

  3. A system for coordinated analysis of translational readthrough and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stacey L.

    2017-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons, limiting the expression of potentially deleterious truncated proteins. This activity positions the pathway as a regulator of the severity of genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. Because many genetic diseases result from nonsense alleles, therapeutics inducing readthrough of premature termination codons and/or inhibition of NMD have been of great interest. Several means of enhancing translational readthrough have been reported to concomitantly inhibit NMD efficiency, but tools for systematic analysis of mammalian NMD inhibition by translational readthrough are lacking. Here, we introduce a system that allows concurrent analysis of translational readthrough and mRNA decay. We use this system to show that diverse readthrough-promoting RNA elements have similar capacities to inhibit NMD. Further, we provide evidence that the level of translational readthrough required for protection from NMD depends on the distance of the suppressed termination codon from the end of the mRNA. PMID:28323884

  4. Neural substrates of incongruity-resolution and nonsense humor.

    PubMed

    Samson, Andrea C; Hempelmann, Christian F; Huber, Oswald; Zysset, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    By means of functional magnetic resonance imaging the present paper analyzes the neural correlates of processing and appreciating incongruity-resolution and nonsense cartoons. Furthermore, the relation between experience seeking and these neural substrates was investigated as this personality characteristic is known to influence humor appreciation. In the processing of incongruity-resolution stimuli the incongruity of the joke is largely resolvable, whereas in nonsense stimuli it is only partially resolvable and more incongruity remains. The anterior medial prefrontal cortex, bilateral superior frontal gyri and temporo-parietal junctions (TPJ) show more activation during processing of incongruity-resolution than of nonsense cartoons. These differences indicate that processing of incongruity-resolution cartoons requires more integration of multi-sensory information and coherence building, as well as more mental manipulation and organization of information. In addition, less self-reference might be established in nonsense cartoons as it is more absurd and more often deals with impossible situations. Higher experience-seeking scores correlate with increased activation in prefrontal, posterior temporal regions and the hippocampus. This might be due to a more intense exploration of the humorous stimuli as experience seekers tend to search novel mental stimulation. Furthermore, experience seeking was positively associated with brain reactivity towards processing nonsense in contrast to incongruity-resolution stimuli, which is in line with behavioral studies that showed a preference for nonsense humor by experience seekers.

  5. 5-azacytidine inhibits nonsense-mediated decay in a MYC-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Lewis, Joe; Putzker, Kerstin; Becker, Jonas P; Leicht, Stefan; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Batra, Richa; Turnwald, Brad; Jovanovic, Bogdan; Hauer, Christian; Sieber, Jana; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is an RNA-based quality control mechanism that eliminates transcripts bearing premature translation termination codons (PTC). Approximately, one-third of all inherited disorders and some forms of cancer are caused by nonsense or frame shift mutations that introduce PTCs, and NMD can modulate the clinical phenotype of these diseases. 5-azacytidine is an analogue of the naturally occurring pyrimidine nucleoside cytidine, which is approved for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloid leukemia. Here, we reveal that 5-azacytidine inhibits NMD in a dose-dependent fashion specifically upregulating the expression of both PTC-containing mutant and cellular NMD targets. Moreover, this activity of 5-azacytidine depends on the induction of MYC expression, thus providing a link between the effect of this drug and one of the key cellular pathways that are known to affect NMD activity. Furthermore, the effective concentration of 5-azacytidine in cells corresponds to drug levels used in patients, qualifying 5-azacytidine as a candidate drug that could potentially be repurposed for the treatment of Mendelian and acquired genetic diseases that are caused by PTC mutations. PMID:25319547

  6. 5-azacytidine inhibits nonsense-mediated decay in a MYC-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Lewis, Joe; Putzker, Kerstin; Becker, Jonas P; Leicht, Stefan; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Batra, Richa; Turnwald, Brad; Jovanovic, Bogdan; Hauer, Christian; Sieber, Jana; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2014-12-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is an RNA-based quality control mechanism that eliminates transcripts bearing premature translation termination codons (PTC). Approximately, one-third of all inherited disorders and some forms of cancer are caused by nonsense or frame shift mutations that introduce PTCs, and NMD can modulate the clinical phenotype of these diseases. 5-azacytidine is an analogue of the naturally occurring pyrimidine nucleoside cytidine, which is approved for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloid leukemia. Here, we reveal that 5-azacytidine inhibits NMD in a dose-dependent fashion specifically upregulating the expression of both PTC-containing mutant and cellular NMD targets. Moreover, this activity of 5-azacytidine depends on the induction of MYC expression, thus providing a link between the effect of this drug and one of the key cellular pathways that are known to affect NMD activity. Furthermore, the effective concentration of 5-azacytidine in cells corresponds to drug levels used in patients, qualifying 5-azacytidine as a candidate drug that could potentially be repurposed for the treatment of Mendelian and acquired genetic diseases that are caused by PTC mutations.

  7. Efficient analysis of mouse genome sequences reveal many nonsense variants

    PubMed Central

    Steeland, Sophie; Timmermans, Steven; Van Ryckeghem, Sara; Hulpiau, Paco; Saeys, Yvan; Van Montagu, Marc; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Libert, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in coding genes play an important role when using mouse inbred strains as research models. They have been shown to influence research results, explain phenotypical differences between inbred strains, and increase the amount of interesting gene variants present in the many available inbred lines. SPRET/Ei is an inbred strain derived from Mus spretus that has ∼1% sequence difference with the C57BL/6J reference genome. We obtained a listing of all SNPs and insertions/deletions (indels) present in SPRET/Ei from the Mouse Genomes Project (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) and processed these data to obtain an overview of all transcripts having nonsynonymous coding sequence variants. We identified 8,883 unique variants affecting 10,096 different transcripts from 6,328 protein-coding genes, which is about 28% of all coding genes. Because only a subset of these variants results in drastic changes in proteins, we focused on variations that are nonsense mutations that ultimately resulted in a gain of a stop codon. These genes were identified by in silico changing the C57BL/6J coding sequences to the SPRET/Ei sequences, converting them to amino acid (AA) sequences, and comparing the AA sequences. All variants and transcripts affected were also stored in a database, which can be browsed using a SPRET/Ei M. spretus variants web tool (www.spretus.org), including a manual. We validated the tool by demonstrating the loss of function of three proteins predicted to be severely truncated, namely Fas, IRAK2, and IFNγR1. PMID:27147605

  8. The novel Cln1R151X mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) for testing nonsense suppression therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jake N.; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), also known as Batten disease, are a group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders in children characterized by the progressive onset of seizures, blindness, motor and cognitive decline and premature death. Patients with mutations in CLN1 primarily manifest with infantile NCL (INCL or Haltia-Santavuori disease), which is second only to congenital NCL for its age of onset and devastating progression. CLN1 encodes a lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). Nonsense mutations in CLN1 account for 52.3% of all disease causing alleles in infantile NCL, the most common of which worldwide is the p.R151X mutation. Previously, we have shown how nonsense-mediated decay is involved in the degradation of CLN1 mRNA transcripts containing the p.R151X mutation in human lymphoblast cell lines. We have also shown how the read-through drugs gentamicin and ataluren (PTC124) increase CLN1 (PPT1) enzyme activity. Here, we provide the initial characterization of the novel Cln1R151X mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis that we have generated. This nonsense mutation model recapitulates the molecular, histological and behavioral phenotypes of the human disease. Cln1R151X mice showed a significant decrease in Cln1 mRNA level and PPT1 enzyme activity, accumulation of autofluorescent storage material, astrocytosis and microglial activation in the brain. Behavioral characterization of Cln1R151X mice at 3 and 5 months of age revealed significant motor deficits as measured by the vertical pole and rotarod tests. We also show how the read-through compound ataluren (PTC124) increases PPT1 enzyme activity and protein level in Cln1R151X mice in a proof-of-principle study. PMID:25205113

  9. Detecting nonsense for Chinese comments based on logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuolin, Ren; Guang, Chen; Shu, Chen

    2016-07-01

    To understand cyber citizens' opinion accurately from Chinese news comments, the clear definition on nonsense is present, and a detection model based on logistic regression (LR) is proposed. The detection of nonsense can be treated as a binary-classification problem. Besides of traditional lexical features, we propose three kinds of features in terms of emotion, structure and relevance. By these features, we train an LR model and demonstrate its effect in understanding Chinese news comments. We find that each of proposed features can significantly promote the result. In our experiments, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 84.3% which improves the baseline 77.3% by 7%.

  10. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8) does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade. PMID:27279976

  11. The rules and impact of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, Rik G.H.; Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Premature termination codons (PTCs) cause a large proportion of inherited human genetic diseases. PTC-containing transcripts can be degraded by an mRNA surveillance pathway termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). However, the efficiency of NMD varies; it is inefficient when a PTC is located downstream of the last exon junction complex (EJC). We used matched exome and transcriptome data from 9,769 human tumors to systematically elucidate the rules of NMD targeting in human cells. An integrated model incorporating multiple rules beyond the canonical EJC model explains approximately three-quarters of the non-random variance in NMD efficiency across thousands of PTCs. We also show that dosage compensation may mask the effects of NMD. Applying the NMD model identifies signatures of both positive and negative selection on NMD-triggering mutations in human tumors and provides a classification of tumor suppressor genes. PMID:27618451

  12. The rules and impact of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Rik G H; Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Premature termination codons (PTCs) cause a large proportion of inherited human genetic diseases. PTC-containing transcripts can be degraded by an mRNA surveillance pathway termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). However, the efficiency of NMD varies; it is inefficient when a PTC is located downstream of the last exon junction complex (EJC). We used matched exome and transcriptome data from 9,769 human tumors to systematically elucidate the rules of NMD targeting in human cells. An integrated model incorporating multiple rules beyond the canonical EJC model explains approximately three-fourths of the non-random variance in NMD efficiency across thousands of PTCs. We also show that dosage compensation may sometimes mask the effects of NMD. Applying the NMD model identifies signatures of both positive and negative selection on NMD-triggering mutations in human tumors and provides a classification for tumor-suppressor genes.

  13. Chromosome VIII disomy influences the nonsense suppression efficiency and transition metal tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zadorsky, S P; Sopova, Y V; Andreichuk, D Y; Startsev, V A; Medvedeva, V P; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-06-01

    The SUP35 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the translation termination factor eRF3. Mutations in this gene lead to the suppression of nonsense mutations and a number of other pleiotropic phenotypes, one of which is impaired chromosome segregation during cell division. Similar effects result from replacing the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene with its orthologues. A number of genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in the sup35 background result in partial compensation for this suppressor effect. In this study we showed that in S. cerevisiae strains in which the SUP35 orthologue from the yeast Pichia methanolica replaces the S. cerevisiae SUP35 gene, chromosome VIII disomy results in decreased efficiency of nonsense suppression. This antisuppressor effect is not associated with decreased stop codon read-through. We identified SBP1, a gene that localizes to chromosome VIII, as a dosage-dependent antisuppressor that strongly contributes to the overall antisuppressor effect of chromosome VIII disomy. Disomy of chromosome VIII also leads to a change in the yeast strains' tolerance of a number of transition metal salts.

  14. Nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulation by cellular stress: implications for tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) has long been viewed as an important constitutive mechanism to rapidly eliminate mutated mRNAs. More recently, it has been appreciated that NMD also degrades multiple nonmutated transcripts and that NMD can be regulated by wide variety of cellular stresses. Many of the stresses that inhibit NMD, including cellular hypoxia and amino acid deprivation, are experienced in cells exposed to hostile microenvironments, and several NMD-targeted transcripts promote cellular adaptation in response to these environmental stresses. Because adaptation to the microenvironment is crucial in tumorigenesis, and because NMD targets many mutated tumor suppressor gene transcripts, the regulation of NMD may have particularly important implications in cancer. This review briefly outlines the mechanisms by which transcripts are identified and targeted by NMD and reviews the evidence showing that NMD is a regulated process that can dynamically alter gene expression. Although much of the focus in NMD research has been in identifying the proteins that play a role in NMD and identifying NMD-targeted transcripts, recent data about the potential functional significance of NMD regulation, including the stabilization of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, the validation of mRNAs as bona fide NMD targets, and the role of NMD in tumorigenesis, are explored.

  15. Alternative Splicing, Internal Promoter, Nonsense-Mediated Decay, or All Three

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background— Truncating mutations in the giant sarcomeric gene Titin are the most common type of genetic alteration in dilated cardiomyopathy. Detailed studies have amassed a wealth of information about truncating variant position in cases and controls. Nonetheless, considerable confusion exists as to how to interpret the pathogenicity of these variants, hindering our ability to make useful recommendations to patients. Methods and Results— Building on our recent discovery of a conserved internal promoter within the Titin gene, we sought to develop an integrative statistical model to explain the observed pattern of Titin truncation variants in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and population controls. We amassed Titin truncation mutation information from 1714 human dilated cardiomyopathy cases and >69 000 controls and found 3 factors explaining the distribution of Titin mutations: (1) alternative splicing, (2) whether the internal promoter Cronos isoform was disrupted, and (3) whether the distal C terminus was targeted (in keeping with the observation that truncation variants in this region escape nonsense-mediated decay and continue to be incorporated in the sarcomere). A model using these 3 factors had strong predictive performance with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.81. Accordingly, individuals with either the most severe form of dilated cardiomyopathy or whose mutations demonstrated clear family segregation experienced the highest risk profile across all 3 components. Conclusions— We conclude that quantitative models derived from large-scale human genetic and phenotypic data can be applied to help overcome the ever-growing challenges of genetic data interpretation. Results of our approach can be found at http://cvri.ucsf.edu/~deo/TTNtruncationvariant.html. PMID:27625338

  16. Heterologous expression and nonsense suppression provide insights into agonist behavior at α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Post, Michael R; Limapichat, Walrati; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2015-10-01

    The α6-containing subtypes of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are localized to presynaptic terminals of the dopaminergic pathways of the central nervous system. Selective ligands for these nAChRs are potentially useful in both Parkinson's disease and addiction. For these and other goals, it is important to distinguish the binding behavior of agonists at the α6-β2 binding site versus other subtypes. To study this problem, we apply nonsense suppression-based non-canonical amino acid mutagenesis. We report a combination of four mutations in α6β2 that yield high-level heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. By varying mRNA injection ratios, two populations were observed with unique characteristics, likely due to differing stoichiometries. Responses to nine known nAChR agonists were analyzed at the receptor, and their corresponding EC50 values and efficacies are reported. The system is compatible with nonsense suppression, allowing structure-function studies between Trp149 - a conserved residue on loop B found to make a cation-π interaction at several nAChR subtypes - and several agonists. These studies reveal that acetylcholine forms a strong cation-π interaction with the conserved tryptophan, while nicotine and TC299423 do not, suggesting a unique pharmacology for the α6β2 nAChR.

  17. Hyperphosphorylation amplifies UPF1 activity to resolve stalls in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Sébastien; Franks, Tobias M.; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Many gene expression factors contain repetitive phosphorylation sites for single kinases, but the functional significance is poorly understood. Here we present evidence for hyperphosphorylation as a mechanism allowing UPF1, the central factor in nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), to increasingly attract downstream machinery with time of residence on target mRNAs. Indeed, slowing NMD by inhibiting late-acting factors triggers UPF1 hyperphosphorylation, which in turn enhances affinity for factors linking UPF1 to decay machinery. Mutational analyses reveal multiple phosphorylation sites contributing to different extents to UPF1 activity with no single site being essential. Moreover, the ability of UPF1 to undergo hyperphosphorylation becomes increasingly important for NMD when downstream factors are depleted. This hyperphosphorylation-dependent feedback mechanism may serve as a molecular clock ensuring timely degradation of target mRNAs while preventing degradation of non-targets, which, given the prevalence of repetitive phosphorylation among central gene regulatory factors, may represent an important general principle in gene expression. PMID:27511142

  18. Expression of the familial Mediterranean fever gene is regulated by nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Grandemange, Sylvie; Soler, Stephan; Touitou, Isabelle

    2009-12-15

    Mutations in the MEditerranean FeVer (MEFV) gene are responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessively inherited auto-inflammatory disease. Cases of dominant inheritance and phenotype-genotype heterogeneity have been reported; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not currently understood. The FMF protein named pyrin or marenostrin (P/M) is thought to be involved in regulating innate immunity but its function remains subject to controversy. Recent studies postulate that a defect in MEFV expression regulation may play a role in FMF physiopathology. Our group, along with others, has identified several alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts in leukocytes. Since alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathways are usually coupled in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, we hypothesized that NMD could contribute to the regulation of the MEFV gene. To address this issue, we examined the effect of indirect and direct inhibition of NMD on expression of the MEFV transcripts in THP1, monocyte and neutrophil cells. We showed that MEFV is the first auto-inflammatory gene regulated by NMD in both a cell- and transcript-specific manner. These results and preliminary western-blot analyses suggest the possible translation of alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts into several P/M variants according to cell type and inflammatory state. Our results introduce the novel hypothesis that variation of NMD efficiency could play an important role in FMF physiopathology as a potent phenotypic modifier.

  19. ENAM Mutations with Incomplete Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Koruyucu, M.; Gencay, K.; Bayram, M.; Tuna, E.B.; Lee, Z.H.; Kim, J.-W.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetic disease affecting tooth enamel formation. AI can be an isolated entity or a phenotype of syndromes. To date, more than 10 genes have been associated with various forms of AI. We have identified 2 unrelated Turkish families with hypoplastic AI and performed mutational analysis. Whole-exome sequencing identified 2 novel heterozygous nonsense mutations in the ENAM gene (c.454G>T p.Glu152* in family 1, c.358C>T p.Gln120* in family 2) in the probands. Affected individuals were heterozygous for the mutation in each family. Segregation analysis within each family revealed individuals with incomplete penetrance or extremely mild enamel phenotype, in spite of having the same mutation with the other affected individuals. We believe that these findings will broaden our understanding of the clinical phenotype of AI caused by ENAM mutations. PMID:25143514

  20. Identification of two point mutations and a one base deletion in exon 19 of the dystrophin gene by heteroduplex formation.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartello, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-03-01

    Two thirds of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy population have either gene deletions or duplications. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of point mutations or small deletions and duplications that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. The major obstacle in identifying small mutations is due to the large size of the dystrophin gene. We selectively screened 5 DMD exons containing CpG dinucleotides in 110 DMD patients without detectable deletions or duplications. Nonsenses mutations are frequently due to a C- to -T transition within a CG dinucleotide pair. To screen for the nonsense mutations, we used the heteroduplex method. Utilizing this approach, we identified 2 different nonsense mutations and a single base deletion all occurring in exon 19. This is the first report of a clustering of small mutations in the dystrophin gene.

  1. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2(p)) in mice.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Haruka; Kiniwa, Yukiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yang, Mu; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2(p)); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2(p) allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, which prompted us to undertake a molecular genetic analysis of the Oca2 gene of this strain. Our genetic linkage analysis suggests that the locus for the pink-eyed dilution phenotype of NCT is tightly linked to the Oca2 locus. PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that the NCT mouse has a nonsense nucleotide substitution at exon 7 of the Oca2 gene. Examination of three mouse strains (NZW/NSlc, SJL/J, and 129X1/SvJJmsSlc) with the original Oca2(p) allele revealed the presence of a nonsense nucleotide substitution identical to that in the NCT strain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Oca2 transcripts were absent in the skin of NCT mice, suggesting intervention of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Collectively, the data in this study indicate that the nonsense nucleotide substitution in the Oca2 gene underlies the Oca2(p) allele. Our data also indicate that the NCT mouse can be used not only as a cataract model, but also as a model for human type II oculocutaneous albinism.

  2. Isolation and characterization of antisuppressor mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Bock, R M

    1985-01-01

    Nonsense mutations in lacI have been shown to be useful as indicators of the efficiency of nonsense suppression. From strains containing supE and a lacI nonsense mutation, selection for LacI- mutants has resulted in the isolation of four antisuppressor mutations. Tn10 insertions linked to these mutations were isolated and used to group the four mutations into three loci. The asuA1 and asuA2 mutations are linked to trp, reduce suppression by supE approximately twofold, and affect a variety of suppressors. The asuB3 mutation was mapped by P1 cotransduction to rpsL but does not confer resistance to streptomycin. The asuC4 mutation reduced suppression by supE by 95% and was shown biochemically to result in the loss of two pseudouridine modifications from the 3' side of the anticodon stem and loop of tRNA2Gln. This mutation is linked to purF, suggesting that it is a new allele of hisT. Images PMID:3918006

  3. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  5. Familial glucocorticoid receptor haploinsufficiency by non-sense mediated mRNA decay, adrenal hyperplasia and apparent mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Hecart, Annie-Claude; Meduri, Geri; Viengchareun, Say; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fève, Bruno; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques; Lombès, Marc

    2010-10-22

    Primary glucocorticoid resistance (OMIM 138040) is a rare hereditary disease that causes a generalized partial insensitivity to glucocorticoid action, due to genetic alterations of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Investigation of adrenal incidentalomas led to the discovery of a family (eight affected individuals spanning three generations), prone to cortisol resistance, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, arterial hypertension and hypokalemia. This phenotype exacerbated over time, cosegregates with the first heterozygous nonsense mutation p.R469[R,X] reported to date for the GR, replacing an arginine (CGA) by a stop (TGA) at amino-acid 469 in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. In vitro, this mutation leads to a truncated 50-kDa GR lacking hormone and DNA binding capacity, devoid of hormone-dependent nuclear translocation and transactivation properties. In the proband's fibroblasts, we provided evidence for the lack of expression of the defective allele in vivo. The absence of detectable mutated GR mRNA was accompanied by a 50% reduction in wild type GR transcript and protein. This reduced GR expression leads to a significantly below-normal induction of glucocorticoid-induced target genes, FKBP5 in fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling dysfunction involved GR haploinsufficiency due to the selective degradation of the mutated GR transcript through a nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay that was experimentally validated on emetine-treated propositus' fibroblasts. GR haploinsufficiency leads to hypertension due to illicit occupation of renal mineralocorticoid receptor by elevated cortisol rather than to increased mineralocorticoid production reported in primary glucocorticoid resistance. Indeed, apparent mineralocorticoid excess was demonstrated by a decrease in urinary tetrahydrocortisone-tetrahydrocortisol ratio in affected patients, revealing reduced glucocorticoid degradation by renal activity of

  6. Beyond the fringe: when science moves from innovative to nonsense.

    PubMed

    Silver, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Microbiology has experienced examples of highly productive researchers who have gone beyond just interpreting their experimental results with hypotheses and published nonsense that was readily recognized as such by readers. Although the most discussed cases of this pathology come from physics, studies of single-celled microorganisms, virology, and immunology have provided many examples. Five cases are described here along with some generalizations. These are the Lamarckian inheritance of acquired characteristics reported by distinguished and experienced researchers, vectorless DNA transfer and incorporation of bacterial DNA into chromosomes of plants years before vector construction of genetically modified plants was invented, water with memory of immunoglobulin IgE, a new electromagnetic radiation method for identifying bacterial and viral pathogens by the discoverer of human immunodeficiency virus, and the claim of isolation of a new bacterial isolate with arsenic replacing phosphorus in DNA. These examples represent very dissimilar areas, and the only common factor is hubris on the part of experienced researchers. Secondarily, failure of peer review sometimes happens, and journal editors do not step in, sometimes even when alerted before publication. These failures of the publishing process teach us that unnecessary mistakes occur and should warn us all to watch our own enthusiasms.

  7. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  8. Splicing and 3' end formation in the definition of nonsense-mediated decay-competent human beta-globin mRNPs.

    PubMed

    Neu-Yilik, G; Gehring, N H; Thermann, R; Frede, U; Hentze, M W; Kulozik, A E

    2001-02-01

    Premature translation termination codons are common causes of genetic disorders. mRNAs with such mutations are degraded by a surveillance mechanism termed nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), which represents a phylogenetically widely conserved post-transcriptional mechanism for the quality control of gene expression. How NMD-competent mRNPs are formed and specified remains a central question. Here, we have used human beta-globin mRNA as a model system to address the role of splicing and polyadenylation for human NMD. We show that (i) splicing is an indispensable component of the human beta-globin NMD pathway, which cannot be compensated for by exonic beta-globin 'failsafe' sequences; (ii) the spatial requirements of human beta-globin NMD, as signified by the maximal distance of the nonsense mutation to the final exon-exon junction, are less constrained than in yeast; and (iii) non-polyadenylated mRNAs with a histone 3' end are NMD competent. Thus, the formation of NMD-competent mRNP particles critically depends on splicing but does not require the presence of a poly(A) tail.

  9. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  10. Germ-line mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 gene: Correlations with disease severity and retinal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.M.; Kaiser-Kupfer, M.; Eldridge, R.

    1996-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) features bilateral vestibular schwannomas, other benign neural tumors, and cataracts. Patients in some families develop many tumors at an early age and have rapid clinical progression, whereas in other families, patients may not have symptoms until much later and vestibular schwannomas may be the only tumors. The NF2 gene has been cloned from chromosome 22q; most identified germ-line mutations result in a truncated protein and severe NF2. To look for additional mutations and clinical correlations, we used SSCP analysis to screen DNA from 32 unrelated patients. We identified 20 different mutations in 21 patients (66%): 10 nonsense mutations, 2 frameshifts, 7 splice-site mutations, and 1 large in-frame deletion. Clinical information on 47 patients from the 21 families included ages at onset and at diagnosis, numbers of meningiomas, spinal and skin tumors, and presence of cataracts and retinal abnormalities. We compared clinical findings in patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations to those with splice-site mutations. When each patient was considered as an independent random event, the two groups differed (P {le} .05) for nearly every variable. Patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations were younger at onset and at diagnosis and had a higher frequency and mean number of tumors, supporting the correlation between nonsense and frameshift mutations and severe NF2. When each family was considered as an independent random event, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed only for mean ages at onset and at diagnosis. A larger data set is needed to resolve these discrepancies. We observed retinal hamartomas and/or epiretinal membranes in nine patients from five families with four different nonsense mutations. This finding, which may represent a new genotype-phenotype correlation, merits further study. 58 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Nonsense codons can reduce the abundance of nuclear mRNA without affecting the abundance of pre-mRNA or the half-life of cytoplasmic mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J; Maquat, L E

    1993-01-01

    The abundance of the mRNA for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is decreased to approximately 20% of normal by frameshift and nonsense mutations that cause translation to terminate at a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the reading frame. Results of previous studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D suggested that the decrease is not attributable to an increased rate of cytoplasmic mRNA decay. However, the step in TPI RNA metabolism that is altered was not defined, and the use of actinomycin D, in affecting all polymerase II-transcribed genes, could result in artifactual conclusions. In data presented here, the nonsense codon-mediated reduction in the level of TPI mRNA is shown to be characteristic of both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of the cell, indicating that the altered metabolic step is nucleus associated. Neither aberrancies in gene transcription nor aberrancies in RNA splicing appear to contribute to the reduction since there were no accompanying changes in the amount of nuclear run-on transcription, the level of any of the six introns in TPI pre-mRNA, or the size of processed mRNA in the nucleus. Deletion of all splice sites that reside downstream of a nonsense codon does not abrogate the reduction, indicating that the reduction takes place independently of the splicing of a downstream intron. Experiments that placed TPI gene expression under the control of the human c-fos promoter, which can be transiently activated by the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells, verified that there is no detectable effect of a nonsense codon on the turnover of cytoplasmic mRNA. Images PMID:8441420

  12. A nonsense mutation in the tyrosinase gene causes albinism in water buffalo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive hereditary pigmentation disorder affecting humans and several other animal species. Oculocutaneous albinism was studied in a herd of Murrah buffalo to determine the clinical presentation and genetic basis of albinism in this species. Results Clinical examinations and pedigree analysis were performed in an affected herd, and wild-type and OCA tyrosinase mRNA sequences were obtained. The main clinical findings were photophobia and a lack of pigmentation of the hair, skin, horns, hooves, mucosa, and iris. The results of segregation analysis suggest that this disease is acquired through recessive inheritance. In the OCA buffalo, a single-base substitution was detected at nucleotide 1,431 (G to A), which leads to the conversion of tryptophan into a stop codon at residue 477. Conclusion This premature stop codon produces an inactive protein, which is responsible for the OCA buffalo phenotype. These findings will be useful for future studies of albinism in buffalo and as a possible model to study diseases caused by a premature stop codon. PMID:22817390

  13. Phase 3 Extension Study of Ataluren (PTC124) in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Dystrophinopathy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-15

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  14. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides Modulating Activation of a Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Switch Exon in the ATM Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Moreno, Pedro M.D.; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) is an important cancer susceptibility gene that encodes a key apical kinase in the DNA damage response pathway. ATM mutations in the germ line result in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks and predisposition to lymphoid malignancies. ATM expression is limited by a tightly regulated nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) switch exon (termed NSE) located in intron 28. In this study, we identify antisense oligonucleotides that modulate NSE inclusion in mature transcripts by systematically targeting the entire 3.1-kb-long intron. Their identification was assisted by a segmental deletion analysis of transposed elements, revealing NSE repression upon removal of a distant antisense Alu and NSE activation upon elimination of a long terminal repeat transposon MER51A. Efficient NSE repression was achieved by delivering optimized splice-switching oligonucleotides to embryonic and lymphoblastoid cells using chitosan-based nanoparticles. Together, these results provide a basis for possible sequence-specific radiosensitization of cancer cells, highlight the power of intronic antisense oligonucleotides to modify gene expression, and demonstrate transposon-mediated regulation of NSEs. PMID:27658045

  16. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: application to point mutation and carrier detection.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Moxley, R T; Mendell, J R

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, we identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. We conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing.

  17. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R.; Moxley, R.T.

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Mice homozygous for c.451C>T mutation in Cln1 gene recapitulate INCL phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelion, Ashleigh; Zhang, Zhongjian; Li, Yichao; Qian, Haohua; Mukherjee, Anil B

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonsense mutations account for 5–70% of all genetic disorders. In the United States, nonsense mutations in the CLN1/PPT1 gene underlie >40% of the patients with infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease. We sought to generate a reliable mouse model of INCL carrying the most common Ppt1 nonsense mutation (c.451C>T) found in the United States patient population to provide a platform for evaluating nonsense suppressors in vivo. Methods We knocked-in c.451C>T nonsense mutation in the Ppt1 gene in C57 embryonic stem (ES) cells using a targeting vector in which LoxP flanked the Neo cassette, which was removed from targeted ES cells by electroporating Cre. Two independently targeted ES clones were injected into blastocysts to generate syngenic C57 knock-in mice, obviating the necessity for extensive backcrossing. Results Generation of Ppt1-KI mice was confirmed by DNA sequencing, which showed the presence of c.451C>T mutation in the Ppt1 gene. These mice are viable and fertile, although they developed spasticity (a “clasping” phenotype) at a median age of 6 months. Autofluorescent storage materials accumulated throughout the brain regions and in visceral organs. Electron microscopic analysis of the brain and the spleen showed granular osmiophilic deposits. Increased neuronal apoptosis was particularly evident in cerebral cortex and abnormal histopathological and electroretinographic (ERG) analyses attested striking retinal degeneration. Progressive deterioration of motor coordination and behavioral parameters continued until eventual death. Interpretation Our findings show that Ppt1-KI mice reliably recapitulate INCL phenotype providing a platform for testing the efficacy of existing and novel nonsense suppressors in vivo. PMID:25574475

  19. EXOSC3 mutations in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1: novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) represents a group of neurodegenerative disorders with prenatal onset. Eight subtypes have been described thus far (PCH1-8) based on clinical and genetic features. Common characteristics include hypoplasia and atrophy of the cerebellum, variable pontine atrophy, and severe mental and motor impairments. PCH1 is distinctly characterized by the combination with degeneration of spinal motor neurons. Recently, mutations in the exosome component 3 gene (EXOSC3) have been identified in approximately half of the patients with PCH subtype 1. Methods We selected a cohort of 99 PCH patients (90 families) tested negative for mutations in the TSEN genes, RARS2, VRK1 and CASK. Patients in this cohort were referred with a tentative diagnose PCH type 1, 2, 4, 7 or unclassified PCH. Genetic analysis of the EXOSC3 gene was performed using Sanger sequencing. Clinical data, MR images and autopsy reports of patients positive for EXOSC3 mutations were analyzed. Results EXOSC3 mutations were found in twelve families with PCH subtype 1, and were not found in patients with other PCH subtypes. Identified mutations included a large deletion, nonsense and missense mutations. Examination of clinical data reveals a prolonged disease course in patients with a homozygous p.D132A mutation. MRI shows variable pontine hypoplasia in EXOSC3 mediated PCH, where the pons is largely preserved in patients with a homozygous p.D132A mutation, but attenuated in patients with other mutations. Additionally, bilateral cerebellar cysts were found in patients compound heterozygous for a p.D132A mutation and a nonsense allele. Conclusions EXOSC3 mediated PCH shows clear genotype-phenotype correlations. A homozygous p.D132A mutation leads to PCH with possible survival into early puberty, and preservation of the pons. Compound heterozygosity for a p.D132A mutation and a nonsense or p.Y109N allele, a homozygous p.G31A mutation or a p.G135E mutation causes a more rapidly

  20. Aberrant growth and lethality of Arabidopsis deficient in nonsense-mediated RNA decay factors is caused by autoimmune-like response.

    PubMed

    Riehs-Kearnan, Nina; Gloggnitzer, Jiradet; Dekrout, Bettina; Jonak, Claudia; Riha, Karel

    2012-07-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is an evolutionarily conserved RNA quality control mechanism that eliminates transcripts containing nonsense mutations. NMD has also been shown to affect the expression of numerous genes, and inactivation of this pathway is lethal in higher eukaryotes. However, despite relatively detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of NMD, our understanding of its physiological functions is still limited and the underlying causes of lethality are unknown. In this study, we examined the importance of NMD in plants by analyzing an allelic series of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants impaired in the core NMD components SMG7 and UPF1. We found that impaired NMD elicits a pathogen defense response which appears to be proportional to the extent of NMD deficiency. We also demonstrate that developmental aberrations and lethality of the strong smg7 and upf1 alleles are caused by constitutive pathogen response upregulation. Disruption of pathogen signaling suppresses the lethality of the upf1-3 null allele and growth defects associated with SMG7 dysfunction. Interestingly, infertility and abortive meiosis observed in smg7 mutants is not coupled with impaired NMD suggesting a broader function of SMG7 in cellular metabolism. Taken together, our results uncover a major physiological consequence of NMD deficiency in Arabidopsis and revealed multifaceted roles of SMG7 in plant growth and development.

  1. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. From Genotype to Phenotype: Nonsense Variants in SLC13A1 Are Associated with Decreased Serum Sulfate and Increased Serum Aminotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Tise, Christina G.; Perry, James A.; Anforth, Leslie E.; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Backman, Joshua D.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Lewis, Joshua P.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Using genomic applications to glean insights into human biology, we systematically searched for nonsense single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that are rare in the general population but enriched in the Old Order Amish (Amish) due to founder effect. We identified two nonlinked, nonsense SNVs (R12X and W48X) in SLC13A1 (allele frequencies 0.29% and 0.74% in the Amish; enriched 1.2-fold and 3.7-fold, compared to the outbred Caucasian population, respectively). SLC13A1 encodes the apical sodium-sulfate cotransporter (NaS1) responsible for sulfate (re)absorption in the kidneys and intestine. SLC13A1 R12X and W48X were independently associated with a 27.6% (P = 2.7 × 10−8) and 27.3% (P = 6.9 × 10−14) decrease in serum sulfate, respectively (P = 8.8 × 10-20 for carriers of either SLC13A1 nonsense SNV). We further performed the first exome- and genome-wide association study (ExWAS/GWAS) of serum sulfate and identified a missense variant (L348P) in SLC26A1, which encodes the basolateral sulfate-anion transporter (Sat1), that was associated with decreased serum sulfate (P = 4.4 × 10−12). Consistent with sulfate’s role in xenobiotic detoxification and protection against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, SLC13A1 nonsense SNV carriers had higher aminotransferase levels compared to noncarriers. Furthermore, SLC26A1 L348P was associated with lower whole-body bone mineral density (BMD) and higher serum calcium, consistent with the osteochondrodysplasia exhibited by dogs and sheep with naturally occurring, homozygous, loss-of-function mutations in Slc13a1. This study demonstrates the power and translational potential of systematic identification and characterization of rare, loss-of-function variants and warrants additional studies to better understand the importance of sulfate in human physiology, disease, and drug toxicity. PMID:27412988

  3. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): a protein truncation assay yielding identification of mutations in 73% of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Park, V M; Pivnick, E K

    1998-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by mutations in a tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Disease causing mutations are dispersed throughout the gene, which spans 350 kilobases and includes 59 exons. A common consequence of NF1 mutations is introduction of a premature stop codon, and the majority of mutant genes encode truncated forms of neurofibromin. We used a protein truncation assay to screen for mutations in 15 NF1 patients and obtained positive results in 11 of them (73%). Sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA yielded identification of 10 different mutations, including four splicing errors, three small deletions, two nonsense mutations, and one small insertion. Nine mutations were predicted to cause premature termination of translation, while one mutation caused in frame deletion as a result ofexon skipping. In one other case involving abnormal splicing, five different aberrantly spliced transcripts were detected. One germline nonsense mutation (R1306X, 3916C>T) corresponded to the same base change that occurs by mRNA editing in normal subjects. The second nonsense mutation (R2496X) was the sole germline mutation that has been previously described. The subjects studied represented typically affected NF1 patients and no correlations between genotype and phenotype were apparent. A high incidence of ocular hypertelorism was observed. Images PMID:9783703

  4. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P.

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Making Sense of Nonsense Word Fluency: Determining Adequate Progress in Early First-Grade Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Roland H., III; Baker, Scott K.; Peyton, Julia A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine the contribution of initial skill and slope of progress on alphabetic principle to end of first-grade reading outcomes. Initial skill and slope were measured using DIBELS Nonsense Word Fluency. Reading outcomes were measured at the end of first grade with DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency. Students in Oregon Reading First…

  6. Male Readership Differences in Liquor Magazine Ads Employing Nonsensical and Sexual Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.; And Others

    A study examined the attention getting value of nonsensical and sexual humor used in liquor advertisements to determine if one was more effective than the other in attracting male magazine readers. Thirty-two Starch-scored liquor ads taken from 1976 and 1977 issues of "Time,""Newsweek," and "Sports Illustrated" were analyzed by three male readers.…

  7. Number Sense and Number Nonsense: Understanding the Challenges of Learning Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasa, Nancy; Shunkwiler, Sara

    2009-01-01

    How do children learn math--and why do some children struggle with it? The answers are in "Number Sense and Number Nonsense," a straightforward, reader-friendly book for education professionals and an invaluable multidisciplinary resource for researchers. More than a first-ever research synthesis, this highly accessible book brings math…

  8. Characterization of mutations in ATP8B1 associated with hereditary cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Leo W J; Vargas, Julie C; van Mil, Saskia W C; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Strautnieks, Sandra S; van Eijk, Michiel J T; Juijn, Jenneke A; Pabón-Peña, Carlos; Smith, Lauren B; DeYoung, Joseph A; Byrne, Jane A; Gombert, Justijn; van der Brugge, Gerda; Berger, Ruud; Jankowska, Irena; Pawlowska, Joanna; Villa, Erica; Knisely, A S; Thompson, Richard J; Freimer, Nelson B; Houwen, Roderick H J; Bull, Laura N

    2004-07-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) are clinically distinct hereditary disorders. PFIC patients suffer from chronic cholestasis and develop liver fibrosis. BRIC patients experience intermittent attacks of cholestasis that resolve spontaneously. Mutations in ATP8B1 (previously FIC1) may result in PFIC or BRIC. We report the genomic organization of ATP8B1 and mutation analyses of 180 families with PFIC or BRIC that identified 54 distinct disease mutations, including 10 mutations predicted to disrupt splicing, 6 nonsense mutations, 11 small insertion or deletion mutations predicted to induce frameshifts, 1 large genomic deletion, 2 small inframe deletions, and 24 missense mutations. Most mutations are rare, occurring in 1-3 families, or are limited to specific populations. Many patients are compound heterozygous for 2 mutations. Mutation type or location correlates overall with clinical severity: missense mutations are more common in BRIC (58% vs. 38% in PFIC), while nonsense, frameshifting, and large deletion mutations are more common in PFIC (41% vs. 16% in BRIC). Some mutations, however, lead to a wide range of phenotypes, from PFIC to BRIC or even no clinical disease. ATP8B1 mutations were detected in 30% and 41%, respectively, of the PFIC and BRIC patients screened.

  9. Measuring and Detecting Molecular Adaptation in Codon Usage Against Nonsense Errors During Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Michael A.; Shah, Premal; Zaretzki, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) has been documented across a wide range of taxa and is the subject of numerous studies. While most explanations of CUB invoke some type of natural selection, most measures of CUB adaptation are heuristically defined. In contrast, we present a novel and mechanistic method for defining and contextualizing CUB adaptation to reduce the cost of nonsense errors during protein translation. Using a model of protein translation, we develop a general approach for measuring the protein production cost in the face of nonsense errors of a given allele as well as the mean and variance of these costs across its coding synonyms. We then use these results to define the nonsense error adaptation index (NAI) of the allele or a contiguous subset thereof. Conceptually, the NAI value of an allele is a relative measure of its elevation on a specific and well-defined adaptive landscape. To illustrate its utility, we calculate NAI values for the entire coding sequence and across a set of nonoverlapping windows for each gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c genome. Our results provide clear evidence of adaptation to reduce the cost of nonsense errors and increasing adaptation with codon position and expression. The magnitude and nature of this adaptation are also largely consistent with simulation results in which nonsense errors are the only selective force driving CUB evolution. Because NAI is derived from mechanistic models, it is both easier to interpret and more amenable to future refinement than other commonly used measures of codon bias. Further, our approach can also be used as a starting point for developing other mechanistically derived measures of adaptation such as for translational accuracy. PMID:19822731

  10. Mechanism of mutation by thymine starvation in Escherichia coli: clues from mutagenic specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, B A; Glickman, B W

    1985-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms of mutagenesis induced by thymine starvation, we examined the mutational specificity of this treatment in strains of Escherichia coli that are wild type (Ung+) or deficient in uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung-). An analysis of Ung+ his-4 (ochre) revertants revealed that the majority of induced DNA base substitution events were A:T----G:C transitions. However, characterization of lacI nonsense mutations induced by thymine starvation demonstrated that G:C----A:T transitions and all four possible transversions also occurred. In addition, thymineless episodes led to reversion of the trpE9777 frameshift allele. Although the defect in uracil-DNA-glycosylase did not appear to affect the frequency of total mutations induced in lacI by thymine deprivation, the frequency of nonsense mutations was reduced by 30%, and the spectrum of nonsense mutations was altered. Furthermore, the reversion of trpE9777 was decreased by 90% in the Ung- strain. These findings demonstrate that in E. coli, thymine starvation can induce frameshift mutations and all types of base substitutions. The analysis of mutational specificity indicates that more than a single mechanism is involved in the induction of mutation by thymine depletion. We suggest that deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pool imbalances, the removal of uracil incorporated into DNA during thymine starvation, and the induction of recA-dependent DNA repair functions all may play a role in thymineless mutagenesis. PMID:3888966

  11. Biallelic SZT2 Mutations Cause Infantile Encephalopathy with Epilepsy and Dysmorphic Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Hershkovitz, Tova; Heyman, Eli; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Kakar, Naseebullah; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Kornreich, Liora; Thiele, Holger; Bode, Harald; Lagovsky, Irina; Dahary, Dvir; Haviv, Ami; Hubshman, Monika Weisz; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Nürnberg, Peter; Gothelf, Doron; Kubisch, Christian; Shohat, Mordechai; Macaya, Alfons; Borck, Guntram

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are genetically heterogeneous severe disorders in which epileptic activity contributes to neurological deterioration. We studied two unrelated children presenting with a distinctive early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by refractory epilepsy and absent developmental milestones, as well as thick and short corpus callosum and persistent cavum septum pellucidum on brain MRI. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic mutations in seizure threshold 2 (SZT2) in both affected children. The causative mutations include a homozygous nonsense mutation and a nonsense mutation together with an exonic splice-site mutation in a compound-heterozygous state. The latter mutation leads to exon skipping and premature termination of translation, as shown by RT-PCR in blood RNA of the affected boy. Thus, all three mutations are predicted to result in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and/or premature protein truncation and thereby loss of SZT2 function. Although the molecular role of the peroxisomal protein SZT2 in neuronal excitability and brain development remains to be defined, Szt2 has been shown to influence seizure threshold and epileptogenesis in mice, consistent with our findings in humans. We conclude that mutations in SZT2 cause a severe type of autosomal-recessive infantile encephalopathy with intractable seizures and distinct neuroradiological anomalies. PMID:23932106

  12. A Novel PRPF31 Mutation in a Large Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jiyun; Shi, Yi; Lin, Ying; Gong, Bo; Zhu, Xianjun; Ma, Shi; Qiao, Lifeng; Lin, He; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Zhenglin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was intended to identify the disease causing genes in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Methods A genome scan analysis was conducted in this family for disease gene preliminary mapping. Snapshot analysis of selected SNPs for two-point LOD score analysis for candidate gene filter. Candidate gene PRPF31 whole exons' sequencing was executed to identify mutations. Results A novel nonsense mutation caused by an insertion was found in PRPF31 gene. All the 19 RP patients in 1085 family are carrying this heterozygous nonsense mutation. The nonsense mutation is in PRPF31 gene exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961, inserting nucleotide “A” that generates the coding protein frame shift from p.307 and early termination at p.322 in the snoRNA binding domain (NOP domain). Conclusion This report is the first to associate PRPF31 gene's nonsense mutation and adRP and JMD. Our findings revealed that PRPF31 can lead to different clinical phenotypes in the same family, resulting either in adRP or syndrome of adRP and JMD. We believe our identification of the novel “A” insertion mutation in exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961 in PRPF31 can provide further genetic evidence for clinical test for adRP and JMD. PMID:24244300

  13. Nonsense codons in human beta-globin mRNA result in the production of mRNA degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S K; Sigmund, C D; Gross, K W; Maquat, L E

    1992-01-01

    Human beta zero-thalassemic beta-globin genes harboring either a frameshift or a nonsense mutation that results in the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation have been previously introduced into the germ line of mice (S.-K. Lim, J.J. Mullins, C.-M. Chen, K. Gross, and L.E. Maquat, EMBO J. 8:2613-2619, 1989). Each transgene produces properly processed albeit abnormally unstable mRNA as well as several smaller RNAs in erythroid cells. These smaller RNAs are detected only in the cytoplasm and, relative to mRNA, are longer-lived and are missing sequences from either exon I or exons I and II. In this communication, we show by using genetics and S1 nuclease transcript mapping that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation is mechanistically required for the abnormal RNA metabolism. We also provide evidence that generation of the smaller RNAs is a cytoplasmic process: the 5' ends of intron 1-containing pre-mRNAs were normal, the rates of removal of introns 1 and 2 were normal, and studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D demonstrated a precursor-product relationship between full-length mRNA and the smaller RNAs. In vivo, about 50% of the full-length species that undergo decay are degraded to the smaller RNAs and the rest are degraded to undetectable products. Exposure of erythroid cells that expressed a normal human beta-globin transgene to either cycloheximide or puromycin did not result in the generation of the smaller RNAs. Therefore, a drug-induced reduction in cellular protein synthesis does not reproduce this aspect of cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. These data suggest that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation in either exon I or exon II results in the cytoplasmic generation of discrete mRNA degradation products that are missing sequences from exon I or exons I and II. Since these degradation products appear to be the same for all nonsense codons tested, there is no correlation between the position of

  14. A murine Zic3 transcript with a premature termination codon evades nonsense-mediated decay during axis formation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Jehangir N.; Ali, Radiya G.; Warr, Nicholas; Wilson, Heather M.; Bellchambers, Helen M.; Barratt, Kristen S.; Thompson, Amelia J.; Arkell, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The ZIC transcription factors are key mediators of embryonic development and ZIC3 is the gene most commonly associated with situs defects (heterotaxy) in humans. Half of patient ZIC3 mutations introduce a premature termination codon (PTC). In vivo, PTC-containing transcripts might be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). NMD efficiency is known to vary greatly between transcripts, tissues and individuals and it is possible that differences in survival of PTC-containing transcripts partially explain the striking phenotypic variability that characterizes ZIC3-associated congenital defects. For example, the PTC-containing transcripts might encode a C-terminally truncated protein that retains partial function or that dominantly interferes with other ZIC family members. Here we describe the katun (Ka) mouse mutant, which harbours a mutation in the Zic3 gene that results in a PTC. At the time of axis formation there is no discernible decrease in this PTC-containing transcript in vivo, indicating that the mammalian Zic3 transcript is relatively insensitive to NMD, prompting the need to re-examine the molecular function of the truncated proteins predicted from human studies and to determine whether the N-terminal portion of ZIC3 possesses dominant-negative capabilities. A combination of in vitro studies and analysis of the Ka phenotype indicate that it is a null allele of Zic3 and that the N-terminal portion of ZIC3 does not encode a dominant-negative molecule. Heterotaxy in patients with PTC-containing ZIC3 transcripts probably arises due to loss of ZIC3 function alone. PMID:23471918

  15. Pfeiffer syndrome caused by haploinsufficient mutation of FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Tsukuno, M; Suzuki, H; Eto, Y

    1999-01-01

    Mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) cause several dominantly inherited congenital skeletal disorders and syndromes. Recently, these mutations have been suggested to cause either ligand-independent activation of the receptor or a dominant negative inactivation. The analysis of two Japanese patients with Pfeiffer syndrome and postaxial polydactyly of the hand now shows that both carried the same 1119-2A-to-G transition of the FGFR2 gene and this nonsense mutation caused skipping of exon 9(B) and haploinsufficiency of FGFR2.

  16. Beta thalassaemia mutations in Sardinians: implications for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosatelli, C; Leoni, G B; Tuveri, T; Scalas, M T; Di Tucci, A; Cao, A

    1987-01-01

    In this study we have characterised by oligonucleotide hybridisation and direct restriction endonuclease analysis the beta thalassaemia mutation in 494 Sardinian beta thalassaemia heterozygotes. The most prevalent mutation, accounting for 95.4% of the cases, was the nonsense mutation at codon 39. The remainder, in decreasing order of frequency, were a frameshift at codon 6 (2.2%), beta + IVS-1, nt 110 (0.4%), and beta + IVS-2, nt 745 (0.4%). This information allows prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis to be made in the great majority of Sardinian couples at risk for beta thalassaemia. Images PMID:3031299

  17. Biallelic truncating SCN9A mutation identified in four families with congenital insensitivity to pain from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sawal, H A; Harripaul, R; Mikhailov, A; Dad, R; Ayub, M; Jawad Hassan, M; Vincent, J B

    2016-12-01

    (a) Homozygosity-mapping-by-descent of four Bhakkar congenital indifference/insensitivity to pain (CIP) families. (b) Identification of mutation Met1190* in SCN9A. (c) SCN9A/NaV1.7 2D structure (as predicted by CCTOP and SMART) and approximate position of known nonsense (*) and missense (M) mutations ( www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk), as well as the Bhakkar mutation (this study) in red.

  18. RNA surveillance via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay is crucial for longevity in daf-2/insulin/IGF-1 mutant C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Son, Heehwa G.; Seo, Mihwa; Ham, Seokjin; Hwang, Wooseon; Lee, Dongyeop; An, Seon Woo A.; Artan, Murat; Seo, Keunhee; Kaletsky, Rachel; Arey, Rachel N.; Ryu, Youngjae; Ha, Chang Man; Kim, Yoon Ki; Murphy, Coleen T.; Roh, Tae-Young; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V.

    2017-01-01

    Long-lived organisms often feature more stringent protein and DNA quality control. However, whether RNA quality control mechanisms, such as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which degrades both abnormal as well as some normal transcripts, have a role in organismal aging remains unexplored. Here we show that NMD mediates longevity in C. elegans strains with mutations in daf-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. We find that daf-2 mutants display enhanced NMD activity and reduced levels of potentially aberrant transcripts. NMD components, including smg-2/UPF1, are required to achieve the longevity of several long-lived mutants, including daf-2 mutant worms. NMD in the nervous system of the animals is particularly important for RNA quality control to promote longevity. Furthermore, we find that downregulation of yars-2/tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, an NMD target transcript, by daf-2 mutations contributes to longevity. We propose that NMD-mediated RNA surveillance is a crucial quality control process that contributes to longevity conferred by daf-2 mutations. PMID:28276441

  19. Identification of an additional gene required for eukaryotic nonsense mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B S; Culbertson, M R

    1995-01-01

    Loss of function of any one of three UPF genes prevents the accelerated decay of nonsense mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report the identification and DNA sequence of UPF3, which is present in one nonessential copy on chromosome VII. Upf3 contains three putative nuclear localization signal sequences, suggesting that it may be located in a different compartment than the cytoplasmic Upf1 protein. Epitope-tagged Upf3 (FLAG-Upf3) does not cofractionate with polyribosomes or 80S ribosomal particles. Double disruptions of UPF1 and UPF3 affect nonsense mRNA decay in a manner indistinguishable from single disruptions. These results suggest that the Upf proteins perform related functions in a common pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7479783

  20. APC germline mutations in families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz Rossanese, Lillian Barbosa; De Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations are responsible for the occurrence of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations lead to malignant transformation of adenomas. In this context, considering the significance of APC germline mutations in FAP, we aimed to identify APC germline mutations. In the present study, 20 FAP patients were enrolled. The determination of APC germline mutations was performed using sequencing, and the mutations were compared with clinical markers (gender, age at diagnosis, smoking habits, TNM stage, Astler‑Coller stage, degree of differentiation of adenocarcinoma). The data were compared using the SPSS program, with the Fisher's exact test and χ2 test, considering α=0.05. According to the main results in our sample, 16 alleles with deleterious mutations (80% of the patients) were identified while 7 (35%) patients had no deleterious mutations. There was a predominance of nonsense (45% of the patients) and frameshift (20% of the patients) mutations. There was no statistical significance between the APC germline mutations identified and the clinical variables considered in our study. Only TNM stage was associated with the presence of deleterious mutations. Patients with deleterious mutations had an OR, 0.086 (IC=0.001-0.984); TNM stage I+II in comparison with III+IV, when compared with the patients with no deleterious mutations identified. In this context, as a conclusion, we demonstrated the molecular heterogeneity of APC germline mutations in FAP and the difficulty to perform molecular diagnostics in a Brazilian population, considering the admixed population analyzed.

  1. Role of ADAMTSL4 mutations in FBN1 mutation-negative ectopia lentis patients.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Martin, Jose Antonio; Ahnood, Dana; Charteris, David G; Saggar, Anand; Nischal, Ken K; Comeglio, Paolo; Chandra, Aman; Child, Anne H; Arno, Gavin

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is genetically heterogeneous with both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms. The dominant disorder can be caused by mutations in FBN1, at the milder end of the type-1 fibrillinopathies spectrum. Recently in a consanguineous Jordanian family, recessive EL was mapped to locus 1q21 containing the ADAMTSL4 gene and a nonsense mutation was found in exon 11 (c.1785T>G, p.Y595X). In this study, 36 consecutive probands with EL who did not fulfill the Ghent criteria for MFS were screened for mutations in FBN1 and ADAMTSL4. Causative FBN1 mutations were identified in 23/36 (64%) of probands while homozygous or compound heterozygous ADAMTSL4 mutations were identified in 6/12 (50%) of the remaining probands. Where available, familial screening of these families confirmed the mutation co-segregated with the EL phenotype. This study confirms that homozygous mutations in ADAMTSL4 are associated with autosomal-recessive EL in British families. Furthermore; the first compound heterozygous mutation is described resulting in a PTC and a missense mutation in the PLAC (protease and lacunin) domain. The identification of a causative mutation in ADAMTSL4 may allow the exclusion of Marfan syndrome in these families and guide the clinical management, of particular relevance in young children affected by EL.

  2. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient.

  3. A frequent splicing mutation and novel missense mutations color the updated mutational spectrum of classic galactosemia in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Ramos, Ruben; Gaspar, Ana; Costa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Anabela; Diogo, Luísa; Garcia, Paula; Paiva, Sandra; Martins, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa Leão; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Cardoso, M Teresa; Ferreira, Elena; Sequeira, Sílvia; Leite, Margarida; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity. Patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period, which can be ameliorated by dietary restriction of galactose. Many patients develop long-term complications, with a broad range of clinical symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. The high allelic heterogeneity of GALT gene that characterizes this disorder is thought to play a determinant role in biochemical and clinical phenotypes. We aimed to characterize the mutational spectrum of GALT deficiency in Portugal and to assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations. Direct sequencing of the GALT gene and in silico analyses were employed to evaluate the impact of uncharacterized mutations upon GALT functionality. Molecular characterization of 42 galactosemic Portuguese patients revealed a mutational spectrum comprising 14 nucleotide substitutions: ten missense, two nonsense and two putative splicing mutations. Sixteen different genotypic combinations were detected, half of the patients being p.Q188R homozygotes. Notably, the second most frequent variation is a splicing mutation. In silico predictions complemented by a close-up on the mutations in the protein structure suggest that uncharacterized missense mutations have cumulative point effects on protein stability, oligomeric state, or substrate binding. One splicing mutation is predicted to cause an alternative splicing event. This study reinforces the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classic galactosemia, a monogenic disease whose complex pathogenesis and clinical features emphasize the need to expand the knowledge on this "cloudy" disorder.

  4. The first Slovak Legius syndrome patient carrying the SPRED1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Sekelska, Martina; Briatkova, Lenka; Olcak, Tomas; Bolcekova, Anna; Ilencikova, Denisa; Kadasi, Ludevit; Zatkova, Andrea

    2017-02-02

    Autosomal dominant disorder Legius syndrome (NF1- like syndrome) shows phenotype features that overlap with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), such as CALMs, freckling, macrocephaly and learning disability. Mutation analysis provides an important tool in order to distinguish two entities that have different clinical implications. We analyzed SPRED1 gene by cDNA and/or gDNA sequencing in a cohort of 46 Slovak patients in whom previously NF1 mutation was excluded. In one case we identified a nonsense mutation c.46C>T (p.Arg16*) in exon 2 of SPRED1 gene, confirming diagnosis of Legius syndrome. This mutation was reported previously.

  5. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  6. A Novel ECM1 Splice Site Mutation in Lipoid Proteinosis: Case Report plus Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Linda K.; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Möllenhoff, Katrin; Dekomien, Gabriele; Epplen, Jörg T.; Hoffjan, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lipoid proteinosis (LP) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis known to be caused by mutations in ECM1. Nonsense and missense mutations are the most common variations in LP. Up to date, only 6 splice site mutations have been observed. We report on a 26-year-old female LP patient from a Turkish consanguineous family carrying a novel homozygous splice site mutation in intron 8 of the ECM1 gene and summarize the current knowledge on ECM1 mutations and possible genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27194970

  7. OGG1 Mutations and Risk of Female Breast Cancer: Meta-Analysis and Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Kashif; Mahjabeen, Ishrat; Sabir, Maimoona; Mehmood, Humera; Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    In first part of this study association between OGG1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility was explored by meta-analysis. Second part of the study involved 925 subjects, used for mutational analysis of OGG1 gene using PCR-SSCP and sequencing. Fifteen mutations were observed, which included five intronic mutations, four splice site mutations, two 3′UTR mutations, three missense mutations, and a nonsense mutation. Significantly (p < 0.001) increased (~29 fold) breast cancer risk was associated with a splice site variant g.9800972T>G and 3′UTR variant g.9798848G>A. Among intronic mutations, highest (~15 fold) increase in breast cancer risk was associated with g.9793680G>A (p < 0.009). Similarly ~14-fold increased risk was associated with Val159Gly (p < 0.01), ~17-fold with Gly221Arg (p < 0.005), and ~18-fold with Ser326Cys (p < 0.004) in breast cancer patients compared with controls, whereas analysis of nonsense mutation showed that ~13-fold (p < 0.01) increased breast cancer risk was associated with Trp375STOP in patients compared to controls. In conclusion, a significant association was observed between OGG1 germ line mutations and breast cancer risk. These findings provide evidence that OGG1 may prove to be a good candidate of better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26089588

  8. Germline mutation screening and predictive testing in families with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brauch, H.; Glavac, D.; Pausch, F.

    1994-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal inheritable disease that predisposes gene carriers to develop tumors in the eyes, central nervous system, kidney, adrenal gland, pancreas and epididymis. VHL type 1 is without phenochromocytoma (P); VHL type 2 is with P. Screening for germline mutations and preclinical diagnosis in families with VHL disease has become feasible since the VHL gene was isolated. We applied Southern blotting and hybridization with g7cDNA to detect rearrangements, PCR-SSCP and sequencing to detect missense, nonsense and splice mutations, and primer-specified restriction map modification to detect a P-specific missense mutation. In 48 apparently unrelated VHL families mainly from Germany, we identified 20/48 (42%) VHL mutations: 7 (14.5%) rearrangements, 9/48 (19%) missense mutations affecting nt505, 1/48 (2%) splice site mutation, 2/48 (4%) other missense mutations, and 1/48 (2%) nonsense mutation. The predominance of the nt505 mutation in 9 German families with VHL type 2 suggests that this genotype expresses the VHL/P disease pattern. Predictive testing for VHL gene carriers in families with specific mutations identified 7 asymptomatic gene carriers. VHL manifestations have been confirmed by clinical examination in two individuals. Early molecular diagnosis may result in a successful management of VHL disease and prolong survival of VHL patients.

  9. Mutation discovery for Mendelian traits in non-laboratory animals: a review of achievements up to 2012.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Hobbs, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    Within two years of the re-discovery of Mendelism, Bateson and Saunders had described six traits in non-laboratory animals (five in chickens and one in cattle) that show single-locus (Mendelian) inheritance. In the ensuing decades, much progress was made in documenting an ever-increasing number of such traits. In 1987 came the first discovery of a causal mutation for a Mendelian trait in non-laboratory animals: a non-sense mutation in the thyroglobulin gene (TG), causing familial goitre in cattle. In the years that followed, the rate of discovery of causal mutations increased, aided mightily by the creation of genome-wide microsatellite maps in the 1990s and even more mightily by genome assemblies and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips in the 2000s. With sequencing costs decreasing rapidly, by 2012 causal mutations were being discovered in non-laboratory animals at a rate of more than one per week. By the end of 2012, the total number of Mendelian traits in non-laboratory animals with known causal mutations had reached 499, which was half the number of published single-locus (Mendelian) traits in those species. The distribution of types of mutations documented in non-laboratory animals is fairly similar to that in humans, with almost half being missense or non-sense mutations. The ratio of missense to non-sense mutations in non-laboratory animals to the end of 2012 was 193:78. The fraction of non-sense mutations (78/271 = 0.29) was not very different from the fraction of non-stop codons that are just one base substitution away from a stop codon (21/61 = 0.34).

  10. GLI3 mutations in syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly in two Indian families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi; Singh, Chandra Bhan; Bhattacharya, Visweswar; Singh, Subodh Kumar; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-03-01

    The GLI3 protein is a zinc finger transcription factor, expressed early in development. The GLI3 gene exhibits allelic heterogeneity as mutations in this gene are associated with several developmental syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. The present study reports two cases: first, a familial case of Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly Syndrome (GCPS); the second is a sporadic case with both postaxial polydactyly (PAP) type A and B. Resequencing of GLI3 gene reveals a previously reported nonsense truncation mutation g.42007251G > A (p.R792X; rs121917714) in the GCPS family and a novel single nucleotide insertion g.42004239_42004240insA (p.E1478X) in the sporadic case of postaxial polydactyly (PAP). Both nonsense truncation mutations; p.R792X (GCPS) and p.E1478X (PAP) introduce a premature stop codon leading to loss of C-terminal domains.

  11. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. Images Figure 2 PMID:7611292

  12. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  13. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, ihas long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice. PMID:27626311

  14. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  15. Virus Escape and Manipulation of Cellular Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Bognanni, Claudia; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a cellular RNA turnover pathway targeting RNAs with features resulting in aberrant translation termination, has recently been found to restrict the replication of positive-stranded RNA ((+)RNA) viruses. As for every other antiviral immune system, there is also evidence of viruses interfering with and modulating NMD to their own advantage. This review will discuss our current understanding of why and how NMD targets viral RNAs, and elaborate counter-defense strategies viruses utilize to escape NMD. PMID:28124995

  16. SDHA loss-of-function mutations in KIT-PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors identified by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Moore, Richard; Thiessen, Nina; Heinrich, Michael C; Gnocchi, Chiara; Santini, Donatella; Catena, Fausto; Formica, Serena; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita; Pession, Andrea; Biasco, Guido

    2011-06-22

    Approximately 10%-15% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults do not harbor any mutation in the KIT or PDGFRA genes (ie, KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs). Recently, mutations in SDHB and SDHC (which encode succinate dehydrogenase subunits B and C, respectively) but not in SDHA and SDHD (which encode subunits A and D, respectively) were identified in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. To search for novel pathogenic mutations, we sequenced the tumor transcriptome of two young adult patients who developed sporadic KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs by using a massively parallel sequencing approach. The only variants identified as disease related by computational analysis were in SDHA. One patient carried the homozygous nonsense mutation p.Ser384X, the other patient was a compound heterozygote harboring a p.Arg31X nonsense mutation and a p.Arg589Trp missense mutation. The heterozygous nonsense mutations in both patients were present in germline DNA isolated from peripheral blood. Protein structure analysis indicates that all three mutations lead to functional inactivation of the protein. This is the first report, to our knowle dge, that identifies SDHA inactivation as a common oncogenic event in GISTs that lack a mutation in KIT and PDGFRA.

  17. A compound heterozygous mutation in the FMO3 gene: the first pediatric case causes fish odor syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Trimethylaminuria (TMAuria), known as “fish odor syndrome,” is a congenital metabolic disorder characterized by an odor resembling that of rotting fish. This odor is caused by the secretion of trimethylamine (TMA) in the breath, sweat, and body secretions and the excretion of TMA along with urine. TMAuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). Most TMAuria cases are caused by missense mutations, but nonsense mutations have also been reported in these cases. Here, we describe the identification of a novel FMO3 gene mutation in a patient with TMAuria and her family. A 3-year-old girl presented with a strong corporal odor after ingesting fish. Genomic DNA sequence analysis revealed that she had compound heterozygous FMO3 mutations; One mutation was the missense mutation p.Val158Ile in exon 3, and the other was a novel nonsense mutation, p.Ser364X, in exon 7 of the FMO3 gene. Familial genetic analyses showed that the p.Val158Ile mutation was derived from the same allele in the father, and the p.Ser364X mutation was derived from the mother. This is the first description of the p.Ser364X mutation, and the first report of a Korean patient with TMAuria caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations. PMID:28392825

  18. Spectrum of MECP2 gene mutations in a cohort of Indian patients with Rett syndrome: report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Raha, Sarbani; Sanghavi, Daksha; Maitra, Anurupa; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-02-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting females and characterized by developmental regression, epilepsy, stereotypical hand movements, and motor abnormalities. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10,000 female births. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations within methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Over 270 individual nucleotide changes which cause pathogenic mutations have been reported. However, eight most commonly occurring missense and nonsense mutations account for almost 70% of all patients. We screened 90 individuals with Rett syndrome phenotype. A total of 19 different MECP2 mutations and polymorphisms were identified in 27 patients. Of the 19 mutations, we identified 7 (37%) frameshift, 6 (31%) nonsense, 14 (74%) missense mutations and one duplication (5%). The most frequent pathogenic changes were: missense p.T158M (11%), p.R133C (7.4%), and p.R306C (7.4%) and nonsense p.R168X (11%), p.R255X (7.4%) mutations. We have identified two novel mutations namely p.385-388delPLPP present in atypical patients and p.Glu290AlafsX38 present in a classical patient of Rett syndrome. Sequence homology for p.385-388delPLPP mutation revealed that these 4 amino acids were conserved across mammalian species. This indicated the importance of these 4 amino acids in structure and function of the protein. A novel variant p.T479T has also been identified in a patient with atypical Rett syndrome. A total of 62 (69%) patients remained without molecular genetics diagnosis that necessitates further search for mutations in other genes like CDKL5 and FOXG1 that are known to cause Rett phenotype. The majority of mutations are detected in exon 4 and only one mutation was present in exon 3. Therefore, our study suggests the need for screening exon 4 of MECP2 as first line of diagnosis in these patients.

  19. Nonsensical Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2012-01-01

    The Dadaists were an unconventional group of artists who used their art to rebel against civilization in the early twentieth century. They experimented with a variety of media and often used machines as themes in their artwork. Dadaist artist Kurt Schwitters incorporated city refuse into his collages, including bus tickets, newspapers, cartons,…

  20. P53 gene mutations in breast cancers in Midwestern U.S. women: Null as well as missense-type mutations are associated with poor prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Blaszyk, H.; Hartmann, A.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Differences in patterns of p53 gene mutation in different types of cancers support the idea that analysis of acquired alterations in this gene will be useful as a {open_quotes}mutagen test{close_quotes}. We are studying the pattern of p53 gene mutation in sporadic breast carcinomas in high and low risk populations. All translated exons and adjacent splice regions have been analyzed in 53 primary breast cancers from Midwestern U.S. Caucasian women. A total of 21 mutations were found in exons 2-11 and splice regions (39.6%). The mutations include 8 missense, 4 nonsense, 1 splice site point mutation, and 8 microdeletions. Comparisons of the pattern of mutations within exons 5-9 show that the frequency of missense mutations (44%) was lower in breast cancers of U.S. Midwestern women than in most tumor types and in breast cancers in other populations. Compared to breast cancers reported in a Scottish population, Midwestern U.S. women have a high frequency of microdeletion mutations (p=0.006) and a low frequency of G:C-T:A transversions (p=0.046). These findings suggest that environmental or endogenous factors contribute to p53 mutagenesis in mammary tissue to different extents among different populations. The presence of a mutation was associated with shorter time to disease recurrence (p=0.05) and shorter survival (p=0.003) (median duration of follow-up 19 months). Both putative dominant negative missense-type mutations (missense and in-frame microdeletions; p=0.001) and null mutations (hemizygous nonsense and frameshift mutations; p=0.007) were associated with poor prognosis. Thus, tumors with missense p53 mutations associated with altered binding to other proteins, altered transcriptional regulation and a dramatic increase in p53 protein concentration have similar clinical outcomes to tumors with null mutations associated with truncated or garbled proteins.

  1. Mutation Update and Review of Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Froese, D Sean; Huemer, Martina; Suormala, Terttu; Burda, Patricie; Coelho, David; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Landolt, Markus A; Kožich, Viktor; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is caused by mutations in the MTHFR gene and results in hyperhomocysteinemia and varying severity of disease, ranging from neonatal lethal to adult onset. Including those described here, 109 MTHFR mutations have been reported in 171 families, consisting of 70 missense mutations, 17 that primarily affect splicing, 11 nonsense mutations, seven small deletions, two no-stop mutations, one small duplication, and one large duplication. Only 36% of mutations recur in unrelated families, indicating that most are "private." The most common mutation is c.1530A>G (numbered from NM_005957.4, p.Lys510 = ) causing a splicing defect, found in 13 families; the most common missense mutation is c.1129C>T (p.Arg377Cys) identified in 10 families. To increase disease understanding, we report enzymatic activity, detected mutations, and clinical onset information (early, <1 year; or late, >1 year) for all published patients available, demonstrating that patients with early onset have less residual enzyme activity than those presenting later. We also review animal models, diagnostic approaches, clinical presentations, and treatment options. This is the first large review of mutations in MTHFR, highlighting the wide spectrum of disease-causing mutations.

  2. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  3. Mutational Spectrum of DMD Mutations in Dystrophinopathy Patients: Application of Modern Diagnostic Techniques to a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Gappmaier, Eduard; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda; Mendell, Jerry; Wall, Cheryl; King, Wendy; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne; Mathews, Katherine D.; Stephan, Carrie; Laubenthal, Karla; Wong, Brenda; Morehart, Paula; Meyer, Amy; Finkel, Richard; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Day, John W.; Dalton, Joline C.; Margolis, Marcia; Hinton, Veronica; Weiss, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, are responsible for the dystrophinopathies Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), and X-linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy (XLDC). Mutation analysis has traditionally been challenging, due to the large gene size (79 exons over 2.2 Mb of genomic DNA). We report a very large aggregate data set comprised of DMD mutations detected in samples from patients enrolled in the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a multicenter research consortium, and in referral samples submitted for mutation analysis with a diagnosis of dystrophinopathy. We report 1111 mutations in the DMD gene, including 891 mutations with associated phenotypes. These results encompass 506 point mutations (including 294 nonsense mutations) and significantly expand the number of mutations associated with the dystrophinopathies, highlighting the utility of modern diagnostic techniques. Our data supports the uniform hypermutability of CGA>TGA mutations, establishes the frequency of polymorphic muscle (Dp427m) protein isoforms and reveals unique genomic haplotypes associated with `private' mutations. We note that 60% of these patients would be predicted to benefit from skipping of a single DMD exon using antisense oligonucleotide therapy, and 62% would be predicted to benefit from an inclusive multi-exon skipping approach directed toward exons 45 through 55. PMID:19937601

  4. Suppression of TGA Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis spoIIR Gene by prfB Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Karow, Margaret L.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Lovett, Paul S.; Piggot, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    An unexpectedly high proportion of TGA nonsense mutations was obtained in a collection of chemically induced mutations in the spoIIR locus of Bacillus subtilis. Of 11 different mutations obtained, TGA mutations were found in four codons, whereas only three codons yielded missense mutations. Six suppressors of the TGA mutations were isolated, and five of the suppressing mutations were mapped to the prfB gene encoding protein release factor 2. These are the first mutations shown to map to the B. subtilis prfB locus. The sequence of the prfB gene was completed, and two revisions of the published sequence were made. The five prfB mutations also resulted in suppression of the catA86-TGA mutation to between 19 and 54% of the expression of catA86+, compared to the readthrough level of 6% in the prfB+ strain. N-terminal sequencing of suppressed catA86-TGA-specified protein demonstrated that the amino acid inserted at UGA because of the prfB1 mutations was tryptophan. PMID:9696765

  5. Identification of two HEXA mutations causing infantile-onset Tay-Sachs disease in the Persian population.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Rezazadeh, Jamileh; Shadmehri, Azam Ahmadi; Haghighi, Amirreza; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    The β-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) mutations in the first reported cases of infantile Tay-Sachs disease in the Persian population were identified in two unrelated consanguineous families. The clinical diagnoses of the affected infants were confirmed by their markedly deficient levels of HEXA activity in plasma or peripheral leukocytes. The specific causative mutation in each family was determined by sequencing the HEXA alleles in both sets of related parents. Two mutations were identified: c.1A>G (p.MIV), which obliterated the initiating methionine in codon 1, and c.1177C>T (p.R393X), which predicted a termination codon or nonsense mutation.

  6. Novel PTPRQ mutations identified in three congenital hearing loss patients with various types of hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Naoko; Moteki, Hideaki; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Takahashi, Masahiro; Arai, Yasuhiro; Shearer, A Eliot; Sloan, Christina M; Nishio, Shin-ya; Kolbe, Diana L; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Smith, Richard J H; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present three patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by the novel PTPRQ mutations, including clinical manifestations and phenotypic features. Methods Two hundred and twenty (220) Japanese subjects with sensorineural hearing loss from unrelated and non-consanguineous families were enrolled in the study. Targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel sequencing of all known non-syndromic hearing loss genes was performed to identify the genetic cause of hearing loss. Results Four novel causative PTPRQ mutations were identified in three cases. Case 1 had progressive profound SNHL with homozygous nonsense mutation. Case 2 had non-progressive profound SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (nonsense and missense mutation). Case 3 had non-progressive moderate SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (missense and splice site mutation). Caloric test and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test showed vestibular dysfunction in Case 1. Conclusion Hearing loss levels and progression among the present cases were varied, and there seem to be no obvious correlation between genotypes and the phenotypic features of their hearing loss. The PTPRQ mutation appeared to be responsible for the vestibular dysfunction. PMID:25788564

  7. Congenital myopathy is caused by mutation of HACD1

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Emad; Reish, Orit; Ohno, Yusuke; Scheetz, Todd; DeLuca, Adam; Searby, Charles; Regev, Miriam; Benyamini, Lilach; Fellig, Yakov; Kihara, Akio; Sheffield, Val C.; Parvari, Ruti

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are heterogeneous inherited diseases of muscle characterized by a range of distinctive histologic abnormalities. We have studied a consanguineous family with congenital myopathy. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous non-sense mutation in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase 1 (HACD1) in affected individuals. The mutation results in non-sense mediated decay of the HACD1 mRNA to 31% of control levels in patient muscle and completely abrogates the enzymatic activity of dehydration of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, the third step in the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). We describe clinical findings correlated with a deleterious mutation in a gene not previously known to be associated with congenital myopathy in humans. We suggest that the mutation in the HACD1 gene causes a reduction in the synthesis of VLCFAs, which are components of membrane lipids and participants in physiological processes, leading to congenital myopathy. These data indicate that HACD1 is necessary for muscle function. PMID:23933735

  8. Nonsense mutation of an MYB transcription factor is associated with purple-blue flower color in soybean.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryoji; Benitez, Eduardo R; Oyoo, Maurice E; Khan, Nisar A; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that the recessive allele of the W2 locus generated purple-blue color and high vacuolar pH of flower petals in soybean. The location of W2 gene was reportedly close to simple sequence repeat marker Satt318 in molecular linkage group B2. We used information from the soybean genome to clone a candidate gene for W2. An MYB transcription factor gene belonging to G20 group was found in the vicinity of Satt318. Full-length cDNAs were cloned from purple-flowered cultivar Harosoy (W2 allele) and purple-blue flowered cultivars, Nezumisaya and w2-20 (w2 allele), by reverse transcription-PCR and designated as GmMYB-G20-1. Its open reading frame was 1083 bp long that encoded 361 amino acids in Harosoy. GmMYB-G20-1 had 53.7% similarity in amino acid sequence with the PH4 gene of petunia controlling blueness and vacuolar pH of flower petals. GmMYB-G20-1 of Nezumisaya and w2-20 had 3 base substitutions compared with that of Harosoy. The first substitution generated a stop codon in the MYB domain, resulting in truncated polypeptides. Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker was developed to detect the base substitution. The polymorphic CAPS marker co-segregated with alleles at the W2 locus in the F(2) population. These results suggest that GmMYB-G20-1 might correspond to the W2 gene.

  9. Characterization of an RNase Z nonsense mutation identified exclusively in environment-conditioned genic male sterile rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-line system that is becoming more and more important for development of rice hybrids depends on environmentally conditioned genic male sterility (EGMS) due to either photoperiod (PGMS), or temperature (TGMS), or both (PTGMS). Up to 18 EGMS genes have been mapped with two being cloned, but contro...

  10. WISP3 mutational analysis in Indian patients diagnosed with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia and report of a novel mutation at p.Y198*

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, M.; Rajagopal, K.; Sugumar, L. K.; Balaji, V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the pattern of mutations of the WISP3 gene in clinically identified progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) in an Indian population. Patients and Methods A total of 15 patients with clinical features of PPD were enrolled in this study. Genomic DNA was isolated and polymerase chain reaction performed to amplify the WISP3 gene. Screening for mutations was done by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, beginning with the fifth exon and subsequently proceeding to the remaining exons. Sanger sequencing was performed for both forward and reverse strands to confirm the mutations. Results In all, two of the 15 patients had compound heterozygous mutations: one a nonsense mutation c.156C>A (p.C52*) in exon 2, and the other a missense mutation c.677G>T (p.G226V) in exon 4. All others were homozygous, with three bearing a nonsense mutation c.156C>A (p.C52*) in exon 2, three a missense mutation c.233G>A (p.C78Y) in exon 2, five a missense mutation c.1010G>A (p.C337Y) in exon 5, one a nonsense mutation c.348C>A (p.Y116*) in exon 3, and one with a novel deletion mutation c.593_597delATAGA (p.Y198*) in exon 4. Conclusion We identified a novel mutation c.593_597delATAGA (p.Y198*) in the fourth exon of the WISP3 gene. We also confirmed c.1010G>A as one of the common mutations in an Indian population with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia. Cite this article: V. Madhuri, M. Santhanam, K. Rajagopal, L. K. Sugumar, V. Balaji. WISP3 mutational analysis in Indian patients diagnosed with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia and report of a novel mutation at p.Y198* Bone Joint Res 2016;5:301–306. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.2000520. PMID:27436824

  11. A mutation screening platform for rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and the detection of sinapine biosynthesis mutants.

    PubMed

    Harloff, Hans-Joachim; Lemcke, Susanne; Mittasch, Juliane; Frolov, Andrej; Wu, Jian Guo; Dreyer, Felix; Leckband, Gunhild; Jung, Christian

    2012-03-01

    We developed two mutant populations of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) using EMS (ethylmethanesulfonate) as a mutagen. The populations were derived from the spring type line YN01-429 and the winter type cultivar Express 617 encompassing 5,361 and 3,488 M(2) plants, respectively. A high-throughput screening protocol was established based on a two-dimensional 8× pooling strategy. Genes of the sinapine biosynthesis pathway were chosen for determining the mutation frequencies and for creating novel genetic variation for rapeseed breeding. The extraction meal of oilseed rape is a rich protein source containing about 40% protein. Its use as an animal feed or human food, however, is limited by antinutritive compounds like sinapine. The targeting-induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) strategy was applied to identify mutations of major genes of the sinapine biosynthesis pathway. We constructed locus-specific primers for several TILLING amplicons of two sinapine synthesis genes, BnaX.SGT and BnaX.REF1, covering 80-90% of the coding sequences. Screening of both populations revealed 229 and 341 mutations within the BnaX.SGT sequences (135 missense and 13 nonsense mutations) and the BnaX.REF1 sequences (162 missense, 3 nonsense, 8 splice site mutations), respectively. These mutants provide a new resource for breeding low-sinapine oilseed rape. The frequencies of missense and nonsense mutations corresponded to the frequencies of the target codons. Mutation frequencies ranged from 1/12 to 1/22 kb for the Express 617 population and from 1/27 to 1/60 kb for the YN01-429 population. Our TILLING resource is publicly available. Due to the high mutation frequencies in combination with an 8× pooling strategy, mutants can be routinely identified in a cost-efficient manner. However, primers have to be carefully designed to amplify single sequences from the polyploid rapeseed genome.

  12. Identification of Printed Nonsense Words for an Individual with Autism: A Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Stimulus Fading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redhair, Emily

    2011-01-01

    This study compared a stimulus fading (SF) procedure with a constant time delay (CTD) procedure for identification of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonsense words for a participant with autism. An alternating treatments design was utilized through a computer-based format. Receptive identification of target words was evaluated using a computer…

  13. Identification of Printed Nonsense Words for an Individual with Autism: A Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Stimulus Fading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redhair, Emily I.; McCoy, Kathleen M.; Zucker, Stanley H.; Mathur, Sarup R.; Caterino, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This study compared a stimulus fading (SF) procedure with a constant time delay (CTD) procedure for identification of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonsense words for a participant with autism. An alternating treatments design was utilized through a computer-based format. Receptive identification of target words was evaluated using a computer…

  14. Effects of Temporal Sequencing and Auditory Discrimination on Children's Memory Patterns for Tones, Numbers, and Nonsense Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gromko, Joyce Eastlund; Hansen, Dee; Tortora, Anne Halloran; Higgins, Daniel; Boccia, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether children's recall of tones, numbers, and words was supported by a common temporal sequencing mechanism; whether children's patterns of memory for tones, numbers, and nonsense words were the same despite differences in symbol systems; and whether children's recall of tones, numbers, and nonsense…

  15. An Examination of the Relation of Nonsense Word Fluency Initial Status and Gains to Reading Outcomes for Beginning Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fien, Hank; Park, Yonghan; Baker, Scott K.; Smith, Jean L. Mercier; Stoolmiller, Mike; Kame'enui, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    A theory-based approach was used to investigate the relations among Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) initial skill status in the fall of first grade, NWF growth across the school year, and end-of-year oral reading fluency and reading comprehension (RC) skill. Hypotheses were anchored to Perfetti's verbal efficiency theory and the role of automaticity…

  16. Making sense of nonsense in British Sign Language (BSL): The contribution of different phonological parameters to sign recognition.

    PubMed

    Orfanidou, Eleni; Adam, Robert; McQueen, James M; Morgan, Gary

    2009-04-01

    Do all components of a sign contribute equally to its recognition? In the present study, misperceptions in the sign-spotting task (based on the word-spotting task; Cutler & Norris, 1988) were analyzed to address this question. Three groups of deaf signers of British Sign Language (BSL) with different ages of acquisition (AoA) saw BSL signs combined with nonsense signs, along with combinations of two nonsense signs. They were asked to spot real signs and report what they had spotted. We will present an analysis of false alarms to the nonsense-sign combinations-that is, misperceptions of nonsense signs as real signs (cf. van Ooijen, 1996). Participants modified the movement and handshape parameters more than the location parameter. Within this pattern, however, there were differences as a function of AoA. These results show that the theoretical distinctions between form-based parameters in sign-language models have consequences for online processing. Vowels and consonants have different roles in speech recognition; similarly, it appears that movement, handshape, and location parameters contribute differentially to sign recognition.

  17. Identification of one novel mutation in the EVC2 gene in a Chinese family with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng; Bao, Kun; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2012-12-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, and dysplastic nails and teeth. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene. Here, we identified a novel nonsense mutation p.W828X (c.2484G>A) in exon 14 and a recurrent nonsense mutation p. R399X (c.1195C>T) in exon 10 of EVC2 gene in a Chinese boy with EvC. Identification of a novel genotype in EvC will provide clues to the phenotype-genotype relations and may assist not only in the clinical diagnosis of EvC but also in the interpretation of genetic information used for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  18. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  19. [Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and human monogenic disease].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Ting; Xu, Wang-Yang; Gu, Ming-Min

    2012-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a widespread quality control mechanism in eukaryotic cells. It can recognize and degrade aberrant transcripts harbouring a premature translational termination codon (PTC), and thereby prevent the production of C-terminally truncated proteins which might be deleterious. Approximately, 30% of human genetic diseases are caused by transcripts containing PTCs. These transcripts are potential targets of NMD. As for monogenic diseases, NMD has effects on the phenotype or mode of inheritance. Here, we explain the mechanism of this surveillance pathway, and take several neuromuscular disorders as examples to discuss its influence for human monogenic diseases. The deeper understanding for NMD will shed light on the nosogenesis and therapies of monogenic diseases.

  20. Degradation of Gadd45 mRNA by nonsense-mediated decay is essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan O; Moore, Kristin A; Chapin, Alex; Hollien, Julie; Metzstein, Mark M

    2016-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway functions to degrade both abnormal and wild-type mRNAs. NMD is essential for viability in most organisms, but the molecular basis for this requirement is unknown. Here we show that a single, conserved NMD target, the mRNA coding for the stress response factor growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible 45 (GADD45) can account for lethality in Drosophila lacking core NMD genes. Moreover, depletion of Gadd45 in mammalian cells rescues the cell survival defects associated with NMD knockdown. Our findings demonstrate that degradation of Gadd45 mRNA is the essential NMD function and, surprisingly, that the surveillance of abnormal mRNAs by this pathway is not necessarily required for viability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12876.001 PMID:26952209

  1. Attenuation of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay facilitates the response to chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Maximilian W.; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) limits the production of aberrant mRNAs containing a premature termination codon and also controls the levels of endogenous transcripts. Here we show that when human cells are treated with clinically used chemotherapeutic compounds, NMD activity declines partly as a result of the proteolytic production of a dominant-interfering form of the key NMD factor UPF1. Production of cleaved UPF1 functions to upregulate genes involved in the response to apoptotic stresses. The biological consequence is the promotion of cell death. Combined exposure of cells to a small molecule inhibitor of NMD, NMDI-1, and the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin leads to enhanced cell death, while inhibiting UPF1 cleavage protects cells from doxorubicin challenge. We propose a model to explain why the expression levels of genes producing mRNAs of diverse structure that encode proteins of diverse function are under the purview of NMD. PMID:25808464

  2. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay modulates immune receptor levels to regulate plant antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Gloggnitzer, Jiradet; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Srinivasan, Arunkumar; Kusenda, Branislav; Riehs, Nina; Stampfl, Hansjörg; Bautor, Jaqueline; Dekrout, Bettina; Jonak, Claudia; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Parker, Jane E; Riha, Karel

    2014-09-10

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved eukaryotic RNA surveillance mechanism that degrades aberrant mRNAs. NMD impairment in Arabidopsis is linked to constitutive immune response activation and enhanced antibacterial resistance, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that NMD contributes to innate immunity in Arabidopsis by controlling the turnover of numerous TIR domain-containing, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (TNL) immune receptor-encoding mRNAs. Autoimmunity resulting from NMD impairment depends on TNL signaling pathway components and can be triggered through deregulation of a single TNL gene, RPS6. Bacterial infection of plants causes host-programmed inhibition of NMD, leading to stabilization of NMD-regulated TNL transcripts. Conversely, constitutive NMD activity prevents TNL stabilization and impairs plant defense, demonstrating that host-regulated NMD contributes to disease resistance. Thus, NMD shapes plant innate immunity by controlling the threshold for activation of TNL resistance pathways.

  3. MYO5B mutations cause microvillus inclusion disease and disrupt epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Hess, Michael W; Schiefermeier, Natalia; Pfaller, Kristian; Ebner, Hannes L; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Ponstingl, Hannes; Partsch, Joachim; Röllinghoff, Barbara; Köhler, Henrik; Berger, Thomas; Lenhartz, Henning; Schlenck, Barbara; Houwen, Roderick J; Taylor, Christopher J; Zoller, Heinz; Lechner, Silvia; Goulet, Olivier; Utermann, Gerd; Ruemmele, Frank M; Huber, Lukas A; Janecke, Andreas R

    2008-10-01

    Following homozygosity mapping in a single kindred, we identified nonsense and missense mutations in MYO5B, encoding type Vb myosin motor protein, in individuals with microvillus inclusion disease (MVID). MVID is characterized by lack of microvilli on the surface of enterocytes and occurrence of intracellular vacuolar structures containing microvilli. In addition, mislocalization of transferrin receptor in MVID enterocytes suggests that MYO5B deficiency causes defective trafficking of apical and basolateral proteins in MVID.

  4. Detection of mutations in health care: Strategy for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.M.; Du, D.; Mostachfi, H.

    1994-09-01

    For diseases such as retinoblastoma, diagnosis of germline mutations in the RB1 gene is the only effective way to predict which members of a family will develop tumors, since each family has its own unique mutation. In order to develop a routine clinical test for mutation identification, we are using retinoblastoma as a model system for three reasons: the genetics of retinoblastoma are well understood; most of the heritable retinoblastomas are caused by new germline mutations; and the consequences of mutation identification and carrier status are clear. The mutations responsible for retinoblastoma fall into three broad classes: deletions, insertions and/or rearrangements, missense or nonsense point mutations, and translocations. Each class requires a different detection technique. Initial screening by quantitative amplification of each exon detects large and small deletions and insertions. Samples for which all exons appear normal are then directly sequenced. Samples that still appear to be normal are studied by FISH with probes flanking RB1 in order to detect translocations. Data analysis, lab coordination and patient reporting are managed using new software to efficiently handle the large amounts of data collected. The software techniques and strategy for mutation identification will be applicable to any genetic disease locus with a high proportion of new mutations, for example other tumor suppressor loci.

  5. Identities and frequencies of mutations of the otoferlin gene (OTOF) causing DFNB9 deafness in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Choi, BY; Ahmed, ZM; Riazuddin, S; Bhinder, MA; Shahzad, M; Husnain, T; Riazuddin, S; Griffith, AJ; Friedman, TB

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in OTOF, encoding otoferlin, cause non-syndromic recessive hearing loss. The goal of our study was to define the identities and frequencies of OTOF mutations in a model population. We screened a cohort of 557 large consanguineous Pakistani families segregating recessive, severe-to-profound, prelingual-onset deafness for linkage to DFNB9. There were 13 families segregating deafness consistent with linkage to markers for DFNB9. We analyzed the genomic nucleotide sequence of OTOF and detected probable pathogenic sequence variants among all 13 families. These include the previously reported nonsense mutation p.R708X and 10 novel variants: 3 nonsense mutations (p.R425X, p.W536X, and p.Y1603X), 1 frameshift (c.1103_1104delinsC), 1 single amino acid deletion (p.E766del) and 5 missense substitutions of conserved residues (p.L573R, p.A1090E, p.E1733K, p.R1856Q and p.R1939W). OTOF mutations thus account for deafness in 13 (2.3%) of 557 Pakistani families. This overall prevalence is similar, but the mutation spectrum is different from those for Western populations. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an alternative splice isoform of OTOF expressed in the human cochlea. This isoform must be required for human hearing because it encodes a unique alternative C-terminus affected by some DFNB9 mutations. PMID:19250381

  6. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    SciTech Connect

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. High frequency strand slippage mutations in CTCF in MSI-positive endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Zighelboim, Israel; Mutch, David G; Knapp, Amy; Ding, Li; Xie, Mingchao; Cohn, David E; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with defective mismatch repair acquire large numbers of strand slippage mutations including frameshifts in coding sequence repeats. We identified a mutational hotspot, p.T204fs, in the insulator-binding protein (CTCF) in MSI-positive endometrial cancers. Although CTCF was described as a significantly mutated gene by the endometrial cancer TCGA, the A₇ track variants leading to T204 frameshifts were not reported. Reanalysis of TCGA data using Pindel revealed frequent T204fs mutations, confirming CTCF is an MSI target gene and revealed the same frameshifts in tumors with intact mismatch repair. We show that T204fs transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay and as such, T204fs mutations are unlikely to act as dominant negatives. The spectrum and pattern of mutations observed is consistent with CTCF acting as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor.

  8. Likelihood models of somatic mutation and codon substitution in cancer genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ziheng; Ro, Simon; Rannala, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The role of somatic mutation in cancer is well established and several genes have been identified that are frequent targets. This has enabled large-scale screening studies of the spectrum of somatic mutations in cancers of particular organs. Cancer gene mutation databases compile the results of many studies and can provide insight into the importance of specific amino acid sequences and functional domains in cancer, as well as elucidate aspects of the mutation process. Past studies of the spectrum of cancer mutations (in particular genes) have examined overall frequencies of mutation (at specific nucleotides) and of missense, nonsense, and silent substitution (at specific codons) both in the sequence as a whole and in a specific functional domain. Existing methods ignore features of the genetic code that allow some codons to mutate to missense, or stop, codons more readily than others (i.e., by one nucleotide change, vs. two or three). A new codon-based method to estimate the relative rate of substitution (fixation of a somatic mutation in a cancer cell lineage) of nonsense vs. missense mutations in different functional domains and in different tumor tissues is presented. Models that account for several potential influences on rates of somatic mutation and substitution in cancer progenitor cells and allow biases of mutation rates for particular dinucleotide sequences (CGs and dipyrimidines), transition vs. transversion bias, and variable rates of silent substitution across functional domains (useful in detecting investigator sampling bias) are considered. Likelihood-ratio tests are used to choose among models, using cancer gene mutation data. The method is applied to analyze published data on the spectrum of p53 mutations in cancers. A novel finding is that the ratio of the probability of nonsense to missense substitution is much lower in the DNA-binding and transactivation domains (ratios near 1) than in structural domains such as the linker, tetramerization

  9. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Johannsson, O; Ostermeyer, E A; Håkansson, S; Friedman, L S; Johansson, U; Sellberg, G; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Sele, V; Olsson, H; King, M C; Borg, A

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P<.001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers.

  10. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsson, O.; Ostermeyer, E. A.; Håkansson, S.; Friedman, L. S.; Johansson, U.; Sellberg, G.; Brøndum-Nielsen, K.; Sele, V.; Olsson, H.; King, M. C.; Borg, A.

    1996-01-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P<.001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. Images Figure 1a Figure 1b PMID:8644702

  11. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsson, O.; Hakansson, S.; Johannson, U.

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P < .001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of desmosomal gene mutations in Han Chinese patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiujuan; Chen, Minglong; Song, Hualian; Wang, Benqi; Chen, Hongwu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Feng, Shangpeng; Zhang, Fengxiang; Ju, Weizhu; Li, Mingfang; Gu, Kai; Cao, Kejiang; Wang, Dao W; Yang, Bing

    2015-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a cardiomyopathy that primarily involves the right ventricle. Mutations in desmosomal genes have been associated with ARVC. But its prevalence and spectrum are much less defined in the Chinese population, especially Han Chinese, a majority ethnic group in China; also the genotype-phenotype correlation regarding left ventricular involvement is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the genotype in Han Chinese patients with ARVC and the phenotype regarding cardiac left ventricle involvement in mutation carriers of ARVC. 48 Han Chinese patients were recruited into the present study based on the Original International Task Force Criteria of ARVC. Clinical data were reassessed according to the modified criteria published in 2010. A total of 36 subjects were diagnosed with ARVC; 12 patients were diagnosed with suspected ARVC. Five desmosomal genes (PKP2, DSG2, DSP, DSC2 and JUP) were sequenced directly from genomic DNA. Among the 36 patients, 21 mutations, 12 of which novel, were discovered in 19 individuals (19 of 36, 53%). The distribution of the mutations was 25% in PKP2, 14% in DSP, 11% in DSG2, 6% in JUP, and 3% in DSC2. Multiple mutations were identified in 2 subjects (2 of 36, 6%); both had digenic heterozygosity. Eight mutations, of which six were novel, were located in highly conserved regions. Seven mutations introduced a stop codon prematurely, which would result in premature termination of the protein synthesis. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed that LDVd and LDVs parameters were significantly larger in nonsense mutation carriers than in carriers of other mutations. In this comprehensive desmosome genetic analysis, 21 mutations were identified in five desmosomal genes in a group of 48 local Han Chinese subjects with ARVC, 12 of which were novel. PKP2 mutations were the most common variants. Left ventricular involvement could be a sign that the patient is a carrier of a

  13. Two novel distinct COL1A2 mutations highlight the complexity of genotype-phenotype correlations in osteogenesis imperfecta and related connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Miriam S; Schwabe, Georg C; Ehlers, Christian; Marschall, Christoph; Reis, André; Thiel, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard

    2013-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by variable symptoms including predisposition to fractures. Despite the identification of numerous mutations, a reliable genotype-phenotype correlation has remained notoriously difficult. We now describe two patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and novel, so far undescribed mutations in the COL1A2 gene, further highlighting this complexity. A 3-year-old patient presented with features reminiscent of a connective tissue disorder, with joint hypermobility, Wormian bones, streaky lucencies in the long bones and relative macrocephaly. The patient carried a heterozygous c.1316G > A (p.Gly439Asp) mutation in the COL1A2 gene located in a triple-helix region, in which glycine substitutions have been assumed to cause perinatal lethal OI (Sillence type II). A second family with type I osteogenesis imperfecta carried a heterozygous nonsense mutation c.4060C > T (p.Gln1354X) within the last exon of COL1A2. Whereas other heterozygous nonsense mutations in COL1A2 do not lead to a phenotype, in this case the mRNA is presumed to escape nonsense-mediated decay. Therefore the predicted COL1A2 propeptide lacks the last 13 C-terminal amino acids, suggesting that the OI phenotype results from decelerated assembly and overmodification of the collagen triple helix. The presented COL1A2 mutations exemplify the complexity of COL1A2 genotype-phenotype correlation in genetic counselling in OI.

  14. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  15. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  16. Hypomorphic NOTCH3 mutation in an Italian family with CADASIL features.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Mosca, Lorena; Erro, Roberto; Cervasio, Mariarosaria; Allocca, Roberto; Vitale, Carmine; Leonardi, Antonio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Del Basso-De Caro, Maria Laura; Barone, Paolo; Penco, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is because of NOTCH3 mutations affecting the number of cysteine residues. In this view, the role of atypical NOTCH3 mutations is still debated. Therefore, we investigated a family carrying a NOTCH3 nonsense mutation, with dominantly inherited recurrent cerebrovascular disorders. Among 7 family members, 4 received a clinical diagnosis of CADASIL. A heterozygous truncating mutation in exon 3 (c.307C>T, p.Arg103X) was found in the 4 clinically affected subjects and in one 27-year old lady, only complaining of migraine with aura. Magnetic resonance imaging scans found typical signs of small-vessel disease in the 4 affected subjects, supporting the clinical diagnosis. Skin biopsies did not show the typical granular osmiophilic material, but only nonspecific signs of vascular damage, resembling those previously described in Notch3 knockout mice. Interestingly, messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis supports the hypothesis of an atypical NOTCH3 mutation, suggesting a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In conclusion, the present study broadens the spectrum of CADASIL mutations, and, therefore, opens new insights about Notch3 signaling.

  17. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations on the Neo-Y Chromosome of Japan Sea Stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Makino, Takashi; Kitano, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Degeneration of Y chromosomes is a common evolutionary path of XY sex chromosome systems. Recent genomic studies in flies and plants have revealed that even young neo-sex chromosomes with the age of a few million years show signs of Y degeneration, such as the accumulation of nonsense and frameshift mutations. However, it remains unclear whether neo-Y chromosomes also show rapid degeneration in fishes, which often have homomorphic sex chromosomes. Here, we investigated whether a neo-Y chromosome of Japan Sea stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus), which was formed by a Y-autosome fusion within the last 2 million years, accumulates deleterious mutations. Our previous genomic analyses did not detect excess nonsense and frameshift mutations on the Japan Sea stickleback neo-Y. In the present study, we found that the nonrecombining region of the neo-Y near the fusion end has accumulated nonsynonymous mutations altering amino acids of evolutionarily highly conserved residues. Enrichment of gene ontology terms related to protein phosphorylation and cellular protein modification process was found in the genes with potentially deleterious mutations on the neo-Y. These results suggest that the neo-Y of the Japan Sea stickleback has already accumulated mutations that may impair protein functions.

  18. Mutations of GJB2 encoding connexin 26 contribute to non-syndromic moderate and severe hearing loss in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Salman, Midhat; Bashir, Rasheeda; Imtiaz, Ayesha; Maqsood, Azra; Mujtaba, Ghulam; Iqbal, Muddassar; Naz, Sadaf

    2015-08-01

    Mutations of GJB2 which encode connexin 26, contribute to 6-7 % of profound deafness in Pakistan. We investigated the involvement of GJB2 mutations in a cohort of 84 pedigrees and 86 sporadic individuals with moderate or severe hearing loss. Individuals in eight consanguineous families and four sporadic cases (9.52 and 4.65 %, respectively) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for p.W24X or p.W77X mutations in GJB2. These two variants are also among the most common mutations known to cause profound deafness in South Asia. The association of identical mutations with both profound and less severe phenotype of hearing loss suggests that alleles of other genes modify the phenotype due to these GJB2 nonsense mutations. Our study demonstrates that GJB2 mutations are an important contributor to aetiology of moderate to severe hearing loss in Pakistan.

  19. Screening for MYO15A Gene Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic, GJB2 Negative Iranian Deaf Population

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Shearer, A. Eliot; Babanejad, Mojgan; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Almadani, Seyed Navid; Nikzat, Nooshin; Jalalvand, Khadijeh; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Abtahi, Rezvan; Azadeh, Batool; Smith, Richard J.H.; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    MYO15A is located at the DFNB3 locus on chromosome 17p11.2, and encodes myosin-XV, an unconventional myosin critical for the formation of stereocilia in hair cells of cochlea. Recessive mutations in this gene lead to profound autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in humans and the shaker2 (sh2) phenotype in mice. Here, we performed a study on 140 Iranian families in order to determine mutations causing ARNSHL. The families, who were negative for mutations in GJB2, were subjected to linkage analysis. Eight of these families showed linkage to the DFNB3 locus, suggesting a MYO15A mutation frequency of 5.71% in our cohort of Iranian population. Subsequent sequencing of the MYO15A gene led to identification of 7 previously unreported mutations, including 4 missense mutations, 1 nonsense mutation, and 2 deletions in different regions of the myosin-XV protein. PMID:22736430

  20. Mutations in the human GlyT2 gene define a presynaptic component of human startle disease

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Mark I.; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Duguid, Ian C.; Thomas, Philip; Beatty, Sarah; Graham, Gail E.; Armstrong, Linlea; Shiang, Rita; Abbott, Kim J.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Stephenson, John B.P.; Owen, Michael J.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Smart, Trevor G.; Supplisson, Stéphane; Harvey, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperekplexia is a human neurological disorder characterized by an excessive startle response and is typically caused by missense and nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 subunit (GLRA1)1-3. Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed in isolated sporadic cases with mutations in other postsynaptic glycinergic proteins including the GlyR β subunit (GLRB)4, gephyrin (GPHN)5 and RhoGEF collybistin (ARHGEF9)6. However, many sporadic patients diagnosed with hyperekplexia do not carry mutations in these genes2-7. Here we reveal that missense, nonsense and frameshift mutations in the presynaptic glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2) gene (SLC6A5)8 also cause hyperekplexia. Patients harbouring mutations in SLC6A5 presented with hypertonia, an exaggerated startle response to tactile or acoustic stimuli, and life-threatening neonatal apnoea episodes. GlyT2 mutations result in defective subcellular localisation and/or decreased glycine uptake, with selected mutations affecting predicted glycine and Na+ binding sites. Our results demonstrate that SLC6A5 is a major gene for hyperekplexia and define the first neurological disorder linked to mutations in a Na+/Cl−-dependent transporter for a classical fast neurotransmitter. By analogy, we suggest that in other human disorders where defects in postsynaptic receptors have been identified, similar symptoms could result from defects in the cognate presynaptic neurotransmitter transporter. PMID:16751771

  1. An ERP Study of Syntactic Processing in English and Nonsense Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiko; Neville, Helen J.

    2007-01-01

    The timecourse of the interaction between syntactic and semantic information during sentence processing in monolingual native English speakers was investigated using event-related potentials (ERPs). To examine the effects of semantic information on syntactic processing, the results for normal English sentences were compared to those for semantically impoverished nonsense (Jabberwocky) sentences. Within each sentence type condition, half of the sentences contained a syntactic violation. Violations elicited a larger amplitude N1 and more negative ERPs around 200 ms after the onset of the critical word relative to the grammatical condition. Although these effects were observed in both sentence types, they were anteriorly distributed for English sentences only. Moreover, the P600 elicited by the syntactic violation was attenuated in processing Jabberwocky as compared to English sentences. These results suggest that semantic and syntactic information are integrated during the earlier stages of syntactic processing indexed by the anterior negativities, and that these interactions continue in the later stages of processing indexed by the P600. PMID:17173867

  2. NMD Classifier: A reliable and systematic classification tool for nonsense-mediated decay events

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Lin, Hsuan-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) degrades mRNAs that include premature termination codons to avoid the translation and accumulation of truncated proteins. This mechanism has been found to participate in gene regulation and a wide spectrum of biological processes. However, the evolutionary and regulatory origins of NMD-targeted transcripts (NMDTs) have been less studied, partly because of the complexity in analyzing NMD events. Here we report NMD Classifier, a tool for systematic classification of NMD events for either annotated or de novo assembled transcripts. This tool is based on the assumption of minimal evolution/regulation–an event that leads to the least change is the most likely to occur. Our simulation results indicate that NMD Classifier can correctly identify an average of 99.3% of the NMD-causing transcript structural changes, particularly exon inclusions/exclusions and exon boundary alterations. Researchers can apply NMD Classifier to evolutionary and regulatory studies by comparing NMD events of different biological conditions or in different organisms. PMID:28369084

  3. Studies on nonsense mediated decay reveal novel therapeutic options for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D

    2009-01-01

    Scientific breakthroughs have often led to commercially viable patents mainly in the field of engineering. Commercialization in the field of medicine has been restricted mostly to machinery and engineering on the one hand and therapeutic drugs for common chronic ailments such as cough, cold, headache, etc, on the other. Sequencing of the human genome has attracted the attention of pharmaceutical companies and now biotechnology has become a goldmine for commercialization of products and processes. Recent advances in our understanding of basic biological processes have resulted in the opening of new avenues for treatment of human genetic diseases, especially single gene disorders. A significant proportion of human genetic disorders have been shown to be caused due to degradation of transcripts for specific genes through a process called nonsense mediated decay (NMD). The modulation of NMD provides a viable therapeutic option for treatment of several genetic disorders and therefore has been a good prospect for patenting and commercialization. In this review the molecular basis for NMD and attempts to treat genetic diseases which result from NMD are discussed.

  4. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay modulate expression of important regulatory genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Simpson, Craig G.; Syed, Naeem H.; Lewandowska, Dominika; Marquez, Yamile; Kusenda, Branislav; Marshall, Jacqueline; Fuller, John; Cardle, Linda; McNicol, Jim; Dinh, Huy Q.; Barta, Andrea; Brown, John W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) coupled to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional mechanism for regulating gene expression. We have used a high-resolution AS RT–PCR panel to identify endogenous AS isoforms which increase in abundance when NMD is impaired in the Arabidopsis NMD factor mutants, upf1-5 and upf3-1. Of 270 AS genes (950 transcripts) on the panel, 102 transcripts from 97 genes (32%) were identified as NMD targets. Extrapolating from these data around 13% of intron-containing genes in the Arabidopsis genome are potentially regulated by AS/NMD. This cohort of naturally occurring NMD-sensitive AS transcripts also allowed the analysis of the signals for NMD in plants. We show the importance of AS in introns in 5′ or 3′UTRs in modulating NMD-sensitivity of mRNA transcripts. In particular, we identified upstream open reading frames overlapping the main start codon as a new trigger for NMD in plants and determined that NMD is induced if 3′-UTRs were >350 nt. Unexpectedly, although many intron retention transcripts possess NMD features, they are not sensitive to NMD. Finally, we have shown that AS/NMD regulates the abundance of transcripts of many genes important for plant development and adaptation including transcription factors, RNA processing factors and stress response genes. PMID:22127866

  5. Dichotic listening to speech: background and preliminary data for digits, sentences, and nonsense syllables.

    PubMed

    Noffsinger, D; Martinez, C D; Wilson, R H

    1994-07-01

    Three tests of dichotic listening utilizing speech signals as stimuli are included on the VA-CD Tonal and Speech Materials for Auditory Perceptual Assessment, Disc 1.0. They include a dichotic monosyllabic digits task, a dichotic synthetic sentences task, and a dichotic nonsense syllable (CV) task. Since the materials were specially recorded or created and recorded for use on the VA-CD, normative data were collected at nine universities/medical centers in the United States involving 120 young listeners. Data revealed that these listeners had little difficulty correctly identifying digits or synthetic sentences when they were presented at 50-70 dB HL in a dichotic format requiring two responses to each trial. At the same presentation levels and under two onset-time conditions (0- and 90-msec onset stagger), correct responsiveness was less frequent when the stimuli were dichotic CVs. However, scores fell in ranges consistent with previous studies and useful for seeking lesion effects. Although careful definition of stimuli, standardization of materials, and the relative stability offered by audio compact disc technology were prime reasons for making the VA-CD, another goal was to offer the clinician-researcher a range of difficulty among the procedures on the disc. Data from the normative trials using dichotic speech signals suggest that the goal has been accomplished.

  6. De novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 in individuals with intellectual disability and postnatal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Schäfgen, Johanna; Cremer, Kirsten; Becker, Jessica; Wieland, Thomas; Zink, Alexander M; Kim, Sarah; Windheuser, Isabelle C; Kreiß, Martina; Aretz, Stefan; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Engels, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    Recently, germline variants of the transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 have been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the knowledge about the associated clinical picture remains fragmentary. In this study, two individuals with de novo TCF20 sequence variants were identified in a cohort of 313 individuals with intellectual disability of unknown aetiology, which was analysed by whole exome sequencing using a child-parent trio design. Both detected variants - one nonsense and one frameshift variant - were truncating. A comprehensive clinical characterisation of the patients yielded mild intellectual disability, postnatal tall stature and macrocephaly, obesity and muscular hypotonia as common clinical signs while ASD was only present in one proband. The present report begins to establish the clinical picture of individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 which includes features such as proportionate overgrowth and muscular hypotonia. Furthermore, intellectual disability/developmental delay seems to be fully penetrant amongst known individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20, whereas ASD is shown to be incompletely penetrant. The transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 is hereby added to the growing number of genes implicated in the aetiology of both ASD and intellectual disability. Furthermore, such de novo variants of TCF20 may represent a novel differential diagnosis in the overgrowth syndrome spectrum.

  7. Detection of induced mutations in CaFAD2 genes by next-generation sequencing leading to the production of improved oil composition in Crambe abyssinica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jihua; Salentijn, Elma M J; Huang, Bangquan; Denneboom, Christel; Qi, Weicong; Dechesne, Annemarie C; Krens, Frans A; Visser, Richard G F; van Loo, Eibertus N

    2015-05-01

    Crambe abyssinica is a hexaploid oil crop for industrial applications. An increase of erucic acid (C22:1) and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in crambe oil is a valuable improvement. An increase in oleic acid (C18:1), a reduction in PUFA and possibly an increase in C22:1 can be obtained by down-regulating the expression of fatty acid desaturase2 genes (CaFAD2), which code for the enzyme that converts C18:1 into C18:2. We conducted EMS-mutagenesis in crambe, followed by Illumina sequencing, to screen mutations in three expressed CaFAD2 genes. Two novel analysis strategies were used to detect mutation sites. In the first strategy, mutation detection targeted specific sequence motifs. In the second strategy, every nucleotide position in a CaFAD2 fragment was tested for the presence of mutations. Seventeen novel mutations were detected in 1100 one-dimensional pools (11 000 individuals) in three expressed CaFAD2 genes, including non-sense mutations and mis-sense mutations in CaFAD2-C1, -C2 and -C3. The homozygous non-sense mutants for CaFAD2-C3 resulted in a 25% higher content of C18:1 and 25% lower content of PUFA compared to the wild type. The mis-sense mutations only led to small changes in oil composition. Concluding, targeted mutation detection using NGS in a polyploid was successfully applied and it was found that a non-sense mutation in even a single CaFAD2 gene can lead to changes in crambe oil composition. Stacking the mutations in different CaFAD2 may gain additional changes in C18:1 and PUFA contents.

  8. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B, thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome.

  9. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B, thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome. PMID:28144446

  10. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-01-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations. Images PMID:8097261

  11. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-03-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations.

  12. Multiple sulfatase deficiency in a Turkish family resulting from a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Yiş, Uluç; Pepe, Stefano; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia; Dirik, Eray

    2008-05-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease that affects post-translational activation of all of the sulfatases. Since biochemical and clinical findings are variable, the diagnosis is difficult in most of the cases. Missense, nonsense, microdeletion and splicing mutations in SUMF1 gene were found in all of the MSD patients analyzed. Here, we present clinical findings of two consanguineous patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency. They were found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.739G > C causing a p.G247R amino acid substitution in the SUMF1 protein.

  13. Clinical and molecular studies in two families with Fraser syndrome: a new FRAS1 gene mutation, prenatal ultrasound findings and implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Ogur, G; Zenker, M; Tosun, M; Ekici, F; Schanze, D; Ozyilmaz, B; Malatyalioglu, E

    2011-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, variable expression of cutaneous syndactyly of fingers and toes, genital ambiguity and renal agenesis/dysgenesis. We present here molecular and clinical findings of four fetuses with FS from two families. Molecular genetic studies in the two families revealed mutations in FRAS1 gene allowing better genetic counselling and subsequent prenatal diagnosis in one of the two families. In family one, a nonsense mutation (c.3730C>T, p.R1244X) previously described in a Polish patient was found. In family two a novel nonsense mutation previously not known was detected (c.370C>T, p.R124X). PGD is planned for family 1.

  14. SRSF2 Mutations Contribute to Myelodysplasia Through Mutant-Specific Effects on Exon Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee; Ilagan, Janine O.; Liang, Yang; Daubner, Gerrit M.; Lee, Stanley C.-W.; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Li, Yue; Chung, Young Rock; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Michele; Cho, Hana; Hana, Min-Kyung; Zebari, Ahmad S.; Aumann, Shlomzion; Park, Christopher Y.; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis; Modis, Yorgo; Allain, Frederic H.-T.; Halene, Stephanie; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations affecting spliceosomal proteins are the most common class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), yet their role in MDS pathogenesis has not been delineated. Here we report that mutations affecting the splicing factor SRSF2 directly impair hematopoietic differentiation in vivo, which is not due to SRSF2 loss of function. By contrast, SRSF2 mutations alter SRSF2’s normal sequence-specific RNA binding activity, thereby altering recognition of specific exonic splicing enhancer motifs to drive recurrent mis-splicing of key hematopoietic regulators. This includes SRSF2 mutation-dependent splicing of EZH2 that triggers nonsense-mediated decay, which, in turn, results in impaired hematopoietic differentiation. These data provide a mechanistic link between a mutant spliceosomal protein, alterations in splicing of key regulators, and impaired hematopoiesis. PMID:25965569

  15. Three novel mutations of APC gene in Chinese patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Sen; Qu, Shengqiang; Wang, Yu; Tang, Qingzhu; Ma, Hongwei; Luo, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of colonic adenomas and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), encoding a large multidomain protein involved in antagonizing the Wnt signaling pathway, has been identified as the main causative gene responsible for FAP. In this study, we identified three novel mutations as well as two recurrent mutations in the APC in five Chinese FAP families by sequencing. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that among these mutations, a nonsense mutation (c.2510C>G) and two small deletions (c.2016_2047del, c.3180_3184del) led to the truncation of the APC protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the colorectal samples from affected individuals, respectively. Our study expands the database on mutations of APC and provides evidence to understand the function of APC in FAP.

  16. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G.; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G.; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene. PMID:12651888

  17. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-03-15

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene.

  18. Mutations in the SLC3A1 transporter gene in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Raben, N.; Aksentijevich, I.

    1995-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the development of kidney stones. Guided by the identification of the SLC3A1 amino acid-transport gene on chromosome 2, we recently established genetic linkage of cystinuria to chromosome 2p in 17 families, without evidence for locus heterogeneity. Other authors have independently identified missense mutations in SLC3A1 in cystinuria patients. In this report we describe four additional cystinuria-associated mutations in this gene: a frameshift, a deletion, a transversion inducing a critical amino acid change, and a nonsense mutation. The latter stop codon was found in all of eight Ashkenazi Jewish carrier chromosomes examined. This report brings the number of disease-associated mutations in this gene to 10. We also assess the frequency of these mutations in our 17 cystinuria families. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-12-03

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47 ± 3.522 years vs. 59 ± 11.687 years, P = 0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients.

  20. Molecular analysis of SALL1 mutations in Townes-Brocks syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhase, J; Taschner, P E; Burfeind, P; Pasche, B; Newman, B; Blanck, C; Breuning, M H; ten Kate, L P; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P; Mitulla, B; Seidel, J; Kirkpatrick, S J; Pauli, R M; Wargowski, D S; Devriendt, K; Proesmans, W; Gabrielli, O; Coppa, G V; Wesby-van Swaay, E; Trembath, R C; Schinzel, A A; Reardon, W; Seemanova, E; Engel, W

    1999-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation syndrome characterized by anal, renal, limb, and ear anomalies. Recently, we showed that mutations in the putative zinc finger transcription factor gene SALL1 cause TBS. To determine the spectrum of SALL1 mutations and to investigate the genotype-phenotype correlations in TBS, we examined 23 additional families with TBS or similar phenotypes for SALL1 mutations. In 9 of these families mutations were identified. None of the mutations has previously been described. Two of these mutations are nonsense mutations, one of which occurred in three unrelated families. Five of the mutations are short deletions. All of the mutations are located 5' of the first double zinc finger (DZF) encoding region and are therefore predicted to result in putative prematurely terminated proteins lacking all DZF domains. This suggests that only SALL1 mutations that remove the DZF domains result in TBS. We also present evidence that in rare cases SALL1 mutations can lead to phenotypes similar to Goldenhar syndrome. However, phenotypic differences in TBS do not seem to depend on the site of mutation. PMID:9973281

  1. Functional analysis reveals that RBM10 mutations contribute to lung adenocarcinoma pathogenesis by deregulating splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiawei; Sun, Yue; Huang, Yin; Song, Fan; Huang, Zengshu; Bao, Yufang; Zuo, Ji; Saffen, David; Shao, Zhen; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    RBM10 is an RNA splicing regulator that is frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and has recently been proposed to be a cancer gene. How RBM10 mutations observed in LUAD affect its normal functions, however, remains largely unknown. Here integrative analysis of RBM10 mutation and RNA expression data revealed that LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations exhibit a mutational spectrum similar to that of tumor suppressor genes. In addition, this analysis showed that RBM10 mutations identified in LUAD patients lacking canonical oncogenes are associated with significantly reduced RBM10 expression. To systematically investigate RBM10 mutations, we developed an experimental pipeline for elucidating their functional effects. Among six representative LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations, one nonsense and one frameshift mutation caused loss-of-function as expected, whereas four missense mutations differentially affected RBM10-mediated splicing. Importantly, changes in proliferation rates of LUAD-derived cells caused by these RBM10 missense mutants correlated with alterations in RNA splicing of RBM10 target genes. Together, our data implies that RBM10 mutations contribute to LUAD pathogenesis, at least in large part, by deregulating splicing. The methods described in this study should be useful for analyzing mutations in additional cancer-associated RNA splicing regulators. PMID:28091594

  2. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease.

  3. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  4. GNAS Mutations in Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1a and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Manuel C; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) is characterized by hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia due to parathyroid hormone resistance, in association with the features of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1a is caused by maternally inherited inactivating mutations of Gs-alpha, which is encoded by a complex imprinted locus termed GNAS. Paternally inherited mutations can lead either to pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP) characterized by AHO alone, or to progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), characterized by severe heterotopic ossification. The clinical aspects and molecular genetics of PHP1a and its related disorders are reviewed together with the 343 kindreds with Gs-alpha germline mutations reported so far in the literature. These 343 (176 different) mutations are scattered throughout the 13 exons that encode Gs-alpha and consist of 44.9% frameshift, 28.0% missense, 14.0% nonsense, and 9.0% splice-site mutations, 3.2% in-frame deletions or insertions, and 0.9% whole or partial gene deletions. Frameshift and other highly disruptive mutations were more frequent in the reported 37 POH kindreds than in PHP1a/PPHP kindreds (97.3% vs. 68.7%, P < 0.0001). This mutation update and respective genotype–phenotype data may be of use for diagnostic and research purposes and contribute to a better understanding of these complex disorders. PMID:25219572

  5. PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in Slovenian families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vouk, Katja; Strmecki, Lana; Stekrova, Jitka; Reiterova, Jana; Bidovec, Matjaz; Hudler, Petra; Kenig, Anton; Jereb, Simona; Zupanic-Pajnic, Irena; Balazic, Joze; Haarpaintner, Guido; Leskovar, Bostjan; Adamlje, Anton; Skoflic, Antun; Dovc, Reina; Hojs, Radovan; Komel, Radovan

    2006-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in at least two different loci. Prior to performing mutation screening, if DNA samples of sufficient number of family members are available, it is worthwhile to assign the gene involved in disease progression by the genetic linkage analysis. Methods We collected samples from 36 Slovene ADPKD families and performed linkage analysis in 16 of them. Linkage was assessed by the use of microsatellite polymorphic markers, four in the case of PKD1 (KG8, AC2.5, CW3 and CW2) and five for PKD2 (D4S1534, D4S2929, D4S1542, D4S1563 and D4S423). Partial PKD1 mutation screening was undertaken by analysing exons 23 and 31–46 and PKD2 . Results Lod scores indicated linkage to PKD1 in six families and to PKD2 in two families. One family was linked to none and in seven families linkage to both genes was possible. Partial PKD1 mutation screening was performed in 33 patients (including 20 patients from the families where linkage analysis could not be performed). We analysed PKD2 in 2 patients where lod scores indicated linkage to PKD2 and in 7 families where linkage to both genes was possible. We detected six mutations and eight polymorphisms in PKD1 and one mutation and three polymorphisms in PKD2. Conclusion In our study group of ADPKD patients we detected seven mutations: three frameshift, one missense, two nonsense and one putative splicing mutation. Three have been described previously and 4 are novel. Three newly described framesfift mutations in PKD1 seem to be associated with more severe clinical course of ADPKD. Previously described nonsense mutation in PKD2 seems to be associated with cysts in liver and milder clinical course. PMID:16430766

  6. The incidence of PAX6 mutation in patients with simple aniridia: an evaluation of mutation detection in 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Axton, R; Hanson, I; Danes, S; Sellar, G; van Heyningen, V; Prosser, J

    1997-01-01

    Twelve aniridia patients, five with a family history and seven presumed to be sporadic, were exhaustively screened in order to test what proportion of people with aniridia, uncomplicated by associated anomalies, carry mutations in the human PAX6 gene. Mutations were detected in 90% of the cases. Three mutation detection techniques were used to determine if one method was superior for this gene. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used on RT-PCR products, SSCP on genomic PCR amplifications, and chemical cleavage of mismatch on both RT-PCR and genomic amplifications. For RT-PCR products, only the translated portion of the gene was screened. On genomic products exons 1 to 13 (including 740 bp of the 3' untranslated sequence and all intron/exon boundaries) were screened, as was a neuroretina specific enhancer in intron 4. Ten of the possible 12 mutations in the five familial cases and five of the sporadic patients were found, all of which conformed to a functional outcome of haploinsufficiency. Five were splice site mutations (one in the donor site of intron 4, two in the donor site of intron 6, one in each of the acceptor sites of introns 8 and 9) and five were nonsense mutations in exons 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. SSCP analysis of individually amplified exons, with which nine of the 10 mutations were seen, was the most useful detection method for PAX6. Images PMID:9138149

  7. SLC1A4 mutations cause a novel disorder of intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, spasticity and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Marek-Yagel, D; Eyal, E; Barel, O; Oz Levi, D; Hoffmann, C; Ruzzo, E K; Ganelin-Cohen, E; Lancet, D; Pras, E; Rechavi, G; Nissenkorn, A; Anikster, Y; Goldstein, D B; Ben Zeev, B

    2015-10-01

    Two unrelated patients, presenting with significant global developmental delay, severe progressive microcephaly, seizures, spasticity and thin corpus callosum (CC) underwent trio whole-exome sequencing. No candidate variant was found in any known genes related to the phenotype. However, crossing the data of the patients illustrated that they both manifested pathogenic variants in the SLC1A4 gene which codes the ASCT1 transporter of serine and other neutral amino acids. The Ashkenazi patient is homozygous for a deleterious missense c.766G>A, p.(E256K) mutation whereas the Ashkenazi-Iraqi patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and a nonsense c.945delTT, p.(Leu315Hisfs*42) mutation. Structural prediction demonstrates truncation of significant portion of the protein by the nonsense mutation and speculates functional disruption by the missense mutation. Both mutations are extremely rare in general population databases, however, the missense mutation was found in heterozygous mode in 1:100 Jewish Ashkenazi controls suggesting a higher carrier rate among Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that SLC1A4 is the disease causing gene of a novel neurologic disorder manifesting with significant intellectual disability, severe postnatal microcephaly, spasticity and thin CC. The role of SLC1A4 in the serine transport from astrocytes to neurons suggests a possible pathomechanism for this disease and implies a potential therapeutic approach.

  8. Acetylcholine receptor pathway mutations explain various fetal akinesia deformation sequence disorders.

    PubMed

    Michalk, Anne; Stricker, Sigmar; Becker, Jutta; Rupps, Rosemarie; Pantzar, Tapio; Miertus, Jan; Botta, Giovanni; Naretto, Valeria G; Janetzki, Catrin; Yaqoob, Nausheen; Ott, Claus-Eric; Seelow, Dominik; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Fiebig, Britta; Wirth, Brunhilde; Hoopmann, Markus; Walther, Marisa; Körber, Friederike; Blankenburg, Markus; Mundlos, Stefan; Heller, Raoul; Hoffmann, Katrin

    2008-02-01

    Impaired fetal movement causes malformations, summarized as fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS), and is triggered by environmental and genetic factors. Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) components are suspects because mutations in the fetally expressed gamma subunit (CHRNG) of AChR were found in two FADS disorders, lethal multiple pterygium syndrome (LMPS) and Escobar syndrome. Other AChR subunits alpha1, beta1, and delta (CHRNA1, CHRNB1, CHRND) as well as receptor-associated protein of the synapse (RAPSN) previously revealed missense or compound nonsense-missense mutations in viable congenital myasthenic syndrome; lethality of homozygous null mutations was predicted but never shown. We provide the first report to our knowledge of homozygous nonsense mutations in CHRNA1 and CHRND and show that they were lethal, whereas novel recessive missense mutations in RAPSN caused a severe but not necessarily lethal phenotype. To elucidate disease-associated malformations such as frequent abortions, fetal edema, cystic hygroma, or cardiac defects, we studied Chrna1, Chrnb1, Chrnd, Chrng, and Rapsn in mouse embryos and found expression in skeletal muscles but also in early somite development. This indicates that early developmental defects might be due to somite expression in addition to solely muscle-specific effects. We conclude that complete or severe functional disruption of fetal AChR causes lethal multiple pterygium syndrome whereas milder alterations result in fetal hypokinesia with inborn contractures or a myasthenic syndrome later in life.

  9. De Novo Mutations in CHAMP1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Maja; Cremer, Kirsten; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Denecke, Jonas; Haack, Tobias B.; Zink, Alexander M.; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Johannsen, Jessika; Alhaddad, Bader; Pfundt, Rolph; Fuchs, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kubisch, Christian; Engels, Hartmut; Lessel, Davor

    2015-01-01

    CHAMP1 encodes a protein with a function in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and in the regulation of chromosome segregation, both of which are known to be important for neurodevelopment. By trio whole-exome sequencing, we have identified de novo deleterious mutations in CHAMP1 in five unrelated individuals affected by intellectual disability with severe speech impairment, motor developmental delay, muscular hypotonia, and similar dysmorphic features including short philtrum and a tented upper and everted lover lip. In addition to two frameshift and one nonsense mutations, we found an identical nonsense mutation, c.1192C>T (p.Arg398∗), in two affected individuals. All mutations, if resulting in a stable protein, are predicted to lead to the loss of the functionally important zinc-finger domains in the C terminus of the protein, which regulate CHAMP1 localization to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding for their pathogenicity. We thus establish deleterious de novo mutations in CHAMP1 as a cause of intellectual disability. PMID:26340335

  10. Thirty-nine novel neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) gene mutations identified in Slovak patients.

    PubMed

    Nemethova, Martina; Bolcekova, Anna; Ilencikova, Denisa; Durovcikova, Darina; Hlinkova, Katarina; Hlavata, Anna; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kadasi, Ludevit; Zatkova, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    We performed a complex analysis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene in Slovakia based on direct cDNA sequencing supplemented by multiple ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. All 108 patients had café-au-lait spots, 85% had axilary and/or inguinal freckling, 61% neurofibromas, 36% Lisch nodules of the iris and 31% optic pathway glioma, 5% suffered from typical skeletal disorders, and 51% of patients had family members with NF1. In 78 of the 86 (90.7%) index patients our analysis revealed the presence of NF1 mutations, 68 of which were small changes (87.2%), including 39 (50%) novel. Among the identified mutations the most prevalent were small deletions and insertions causing frameshift (42.3%), followed by nonsense (14.1%), missense (12.8%), and typical splicing (11.5%) mutations. Type 1 NF1 deletions and intragenic deletions/duplication were identified in five cases each (6.4%). Interestingly, in five other cases nontypical splicing variants were found, whose real effect on NF1 transcript would have remained undetected if using a DNA-based method alone, thus underlying the advantage of using the cDNA-based sequencing. We show that Slovak NF1 patients have a similar repertoire of NF1 germline mutations compared to other populations, with some prevalence of small deletions/insertions and a decreased proportion of nonsense mutations.

  11. Loss-of-Function Mutations of ILDR1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment DFNB42

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Guntram; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Kakar, Naseebullah; von Ameln, Simon; Grillet, Nicolas; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Ansar, Muhammad; Basit, Sulman; Javed, Qamar; Morell, Robert J.; Nasreen, Nabilah; Shearer, A. Eliot; Ahmad, Adeel; Kahrizi, Kimia; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Ali, Rana A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Goebel, Ingrid; Meyer, Nicole C.; Kimberling, William J.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Schiller, Martin R.; Bahlo, Melanie; Najmabadi, Hossein; Gillespie, Peter G.; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Richard J.H.; Ahmad, Wasim; Müller, Ulrich; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By analyzing additional consanguineous families with homozygosity at this locus, we detected ILDR1 mutations in the affected individuals of 10 more families from Pakistan and Iran. The identified ILDR1 variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations as well as a start codon mutation in the family that originally defined the DFNB42 locus. ILDR1 encodes the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1, a putative transmembrane receptor of unknown function. In situ hybridization detected expression of Ildr1, the murine ortholog, early in development in the vestibule and in hair cells and supporting cells of the cochlea. Expression in hair cell- and supporting cell-containing neurosensory organs is conserved in the zebrafish, in which the ildr1 ortholog is prominently expressed in the developing ear and neuromasts of the lateral line. These data identify loss-of-function mutations of ILDR1, a gene with a conserved expression pattern pointing to a conserved function in hearing in vertebrates, as underlying nonsyndromic prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:21255762

  12. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Immunity Can Help Identify Human Polycistronic Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Guy; Shweiki, Dorit

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic polycistronic transcription units are rare and only a few examples are known, mostly being the outcome of serendipitous discovery. We claim that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) immune structure is a common characteristic of polycistronic transcripts, and that this immunity is an emergent property derived from all functional CDSs. The human RefSeq transcriptome was computationally screened for transcripts capable of eliciting NMD, and which contain an additional ORF(s) potentially capable of rescuing the transcript from NMD. Transcripts were further analyzed implementing domain-based strategies in order to estimate the potential of the candidate ORF to encode a functional protein. Consequently, we predict the existence of forty nine novel polycistronic transcripts. Experimental verification was carried out utilizing two different types of analyses. First, five Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets from published NMD-inhibition studies were used, aiming to explore whether a given mRNA is indeed insensitive to NMD. All known bicistronic transcripts and eleven out of the twelve predicted genes that were analyzed, displayed NMD insensitivity using various NMD inhibitors. For three genes, a mixed expression pattern was observed presenting both NMD sensitivity and insensitivity in different cell types. Second, we used published global translation initiation sequencing data from HEK293 cells to verify the existence of translation initiation sites in our predicted polycistronic genes. In five of our genes, the predicted rescuing uORFs are indeed identified as translation initiation sites, and in two additional genes, one of two predicted rescuing uORF is verified. These results validate our computational analysis and reinforce the possibility that NMD-immune architecture is a parameter by which polycistronic genes can be identified. Moreover, we present evidence for NMD-mediated regulation controlling the production of one or more proteins encoded in the

  13. The late steps of plant nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Benkovics, Anna H; Nyikó, Tünde; Debreczeny, Mónika; Hiripi, László; Kerényi, Zoltán; Kondorosi, Éva; Silhavy, Dániel

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic quality control system that identifies and degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (PTCs). If translation terminates at a PTC, the UPF1 NMD factor binds the terminating ribosome and recruits UPF2 and UPF3 to form a functional NMD complex, which triggers the rapid decay of the PTC-containing transcript. Although NMD deficiency is seedling lethal in plants, the mechanism of plant NMD remains poorly understood. To understand how the formation of the NMD complex leads to transcript decay we functionally mapped the UPF1 and SMG7 plant NMD factors, the putative key players of NMD target degradation. Our data indicate that the cysteine-histidine-rich (CH) and helicase domains of UPF1 are only essential for the early steps of NMD, whereas the heavily phosphorylated N- and C-terminal regions play a redundant but essential role in the target transcript degradation steps of NMD. We also show that both the N- and the C-terminal regions of SMG7 are essential for NMD. The N terminus contains a phosphoserine-binding domain that is required for the early steps of NMD, whereas the C terminus is required to trigger the degradation of NMD target transcripts. Moreover, SMG7 is a P-body component that can also remobilize UPF1 from the cytoplasm into processing bodies (P bodies). We propose that the N- and C-terminal phosphorylated regions of UPF1 recruit SMG7 to the functional NMD complex, and then SMG7 transports the PTC-containing transcripts into P bodies for degradation.

  14. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  15. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-10-04

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

  16. Deep brain stimulation modulates nonsense-mediated RNA decay in Parkinson’s patients leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonsense-Mediated decay (NMD) selectively degrades mRNA transcripts that carry premature stop codons. NMD is often triggered by alternative splicing (AS) modifications introducing such codons. NMD plays an important regulatory role in brain neurons, but the in vivo dynamics of AS and NMD changes in neurological diseases and under treatment were scarcely explored. Results Here, we report exon arrays analysis of leukocyte mRNA AS events prior to and following Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) neurosurgery, which efficiently improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD), the leading movement disorder, and is increasingly applied to treat other diseases. We also analyzed publicly available exon array dataset of whole blood cells from mixed early and advanced PD patients. Our in-house exon array dataset of leukocyte transcripts was derived from advanced PD patients’ pre- and post-DBS stimulation and matched healthy control volunteers. The mixed cohort exhibited 146 AS changes in 136 transcripts compared to controls, including 9 NMD protein-level assessed events. In comparison, PD patients from our advanced cohort differed from healthy controls by 319 AS events in 280 transcripts, assessed as inducing 27 protein-level NMD events. DBS stimulation induced 254 AS events in 229 genes as compared to the pre-DBS state including 44 NMD inductions. A short, one hour electrical stimulus cessation caused 234 AS changes in 125 genes compared to ON-stimulus state, 22 of these were assessed for NMD. Functional analysis highlighted disease-induced DNA damage and inflammatory control and its reversal under ON and OFF stimulus as well as alternative splicing in all the tested states. Conclusions The study findings indicate a potential role for NMD both in PD and following electrical brain stimulation. Furthermore, our current observations entail future implications for developing therapies for PD, and for interfering with the impaired molecular mechanisms that

  17. DNMT3A Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li; Walter, Matthew J.; McLellan, Michael D.; Lamprecht, Tamara; Larson, David E.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack; Welch, John; Harris, Christopher C.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Townsend, R. Reid; Fulton, Robert S.; Dooling, David J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Schmidt, Heather; Zhang, Qunyuan; Osborne, John R.; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; McGrath, Sean D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Conyers, Joshua J.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd; Walker, Jason; Kalicki, Joelle; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H.; Link, Daniel C.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The genetic alterations responsible for an adverse outcome in most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unknown. METHODS Using massively parallel DNA sequencing, we identified a somatic mutation in DNMT3A, encoding a DNA methyltransferase, in the genome of cells from a patient with AML with a normal karyotype. We sequenced the exons of DNMT3A in 280 additional patients with de novo AML to define recurring mutations. RESULTS A total of 62 of 281 patients (22.1%) had mutations in DNMT3A that were predicted to affect translation. We identified 18 different missense mutations, the most common of which was predicted to affect amino acid R882 (in 37 patients). We also identified six frameshift, six nonsense, and three splice-site mutations and a 1.5-Mbp deletion encompassing DNMT3A. These mutations were highly enriched in the group of patients with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile (56 of 166 patients, or 33.7%) but were absent in all 79 patients with a favorable-risk cytogenetic profile (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The median overall survival among patients with DNMT3A mutations was significantly shorter than that among patients without such mutations (12.3 months vs. 41.1 months, P<0.001). DNMT3A mutations were associated with adverse outcomes among patients with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile or FLT3 mutations, regardless of age, and were independently associated with a poor outcome in Cox proportional-hazards analysis. CONCLUSIONS DNMT3A mutations are highly recurrent in patients with de novo AML with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile and are independently associated with a poor outcome. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:21067377

  18. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) for Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.

  19. A BLOC-1 Mutation Screen Reveals a Novel BLOC1S3 Mutation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 8 (HPS-8)

    PubMed Central

    Cullinane, Andrew R; Curry, James A; Golas, Gretchen; Pan, James; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Hess, Richard A; White, James G; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis and is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and a bleeding diathesis. Over the past decade, we screened 250 patients with HPS-like symptoms for mutations in the genes responsible for HPS subtypes 1–6. We identified 38 individuals with no functional mutations, and therefore, we analyzed all 8 genes encoding the Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1) proteins in these individuals. Here we describe the identification of a novel nonsense mutation in BLOC1S3 (HPS-8) in a 6 year-old Iranian boy. This mutation caused nonsense mediated decay of BLOC1S3 mRNA and destabilized the BLOC-1 complex. Our patient’s melanocytes showed aberrant localization of TYRP1, with increased plasma-membrane trafficking. These findings confirm a common cellular defect for HPS patients with defects in BLOC-1 subunits. We identified only 2 patients with BLOC-1 defects in our cohort, suggesting that other HPS genes remain to be identified. PMID:22709368

  20. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: Analysis of More than 7,000 Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  1. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  2. Novel FLG null mutations in Korean patients with atopic dermatitis and comparison of the mutational spectra in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Young Min

    2015-09-01

    Filaggrin is essential for the development of the skin barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin have been identified as major predisposing factors for atopic disorders. Molecular analysis of the FLG gene in this study showed nine null and one unclassified mutation in 13 of 81 Korean patients with atopic dermatitis (AD): five novel null mutations (i.e. p.S1405*, c.5671_5672delinsTA, p.W1947*, p.G2025* and p.E3070*); four reported null mutations (i.e. c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022*); and one unclassified mutation (i.e. c.306delAAAGCACAG). These variants are nonsense, premature termination codon or in-frame deletion expected to cause loss-of-function of FLG. Genotype-phenotype correlation is not obvious in Korean AD patients with FLG null mutations. According to a review of the mutational spectra of the FLG gene in the Asian populations, FLG null mutations appeared to be unique in each population but some mutations such as p.R501*, c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022* were commonly found in at least two of the selected Asian populations including Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Singaporean Chinese or Taiwanese. Further investigations on a larger group of Korean AD would be necessary to elucidate its clinical pathogenesis and mutational spectrum related to specific FLG null mutations for AD.

  3. Novel mutations in the RB1 gene from Chinese families with a history of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Jia, Renbing; Zhao, Junyang; Fan, Jiayan; Zhou, YiXiong; Han, Bing; Song, Xin; Wu, Li; Zhang, He; Song, Huaidong; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is an aggressive eye cancer that develops during infancy and is divided into two clinical types, sporadic and heritable. RB1 has been identified as the only pathological gene responsible for heritable retinoblastoma. Here, we identified 11 RB1 germline mutations in the Han pedigrees of 17 bilateral retinoblastoma patients from China. Four mutations were nonsense mutations, five were splice site mutations, and two resulted in a frame shift due to an insertion or a deletion. Three of the mutations had not been previously reported, and the p.Q344L mutation occurred in two generations of retinoblastoma patients. We investigated phenotypic-genotypic relationships for the novel mutations and showed that these mutations affected the expression, location, and function of the retinoblastoma protein. Abnormal protein localization was observed after transfection of the mutant genes. In addition, changes in the cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rates were observed when the Saos-2 cell line was transfected with plasmids encoding the mutant RB1 genes. Our findings expand the spectrum of known RB1 mutations and will benefit the investigation of RB1 mutation hotspots. Genetic counseling can be offered to families with heritable RB1 mutations.

  4. Mutational characteristics of ANK1 and SPTB genes in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Jeong, D-C; Yoo, J; Jang, W; Chae, H; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Lee, J W; Chung, N-G; Kim, M; Kim, Y

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mutational characteristics in Korean hereditary spherocytosis (HS) patients. Relevant literatures including genetically confirmed cases with well-documented clinical summaries and relevant information were also reviewed to investigate the mutational gene- or domain-specific laboratory and clinical association. Twenty-five HS patients carried one heterozygous mutation of ANK1 (n = 13) or SPTB (n = 12) but not in SPTA1, SLC4A1, or EPB42. Deleterious mutations including frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations were identified in 91% (21/23), and non-hotspot mutations were dispersed across multiple exons. Genotype-phenotype correlation was clarified after combined analysis of the cases and the literature review; anemia was most severe in HS patients with mutations on the ANK1 spectrin-binding domain (p < 0.05), and SPTB mutations in HS patients spared the tetramerization domain in which mutations of hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis are located. Splenectomy (17/75) was more frequent in ANK1 mutant HS (32%) than in HS with SPTB mutation (10%) (p = 0.028). Aplastic crisis occurred in 32.0% of the patients (8/25; 3 ANK1 and 5 SPTB), and parvovirus B19 was detected in 88%. The study clarifies ANK1 or SPTB mutational characteristics in HS Korean patients. The genetic association of laboratory and clinical aspects suggests comprehensive considerations for genetic-based management of HS.

  5. The Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations Nearly Unseen by Selection in a Bacterium with Multiple Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Marcus M; Cooper, Vaughn S

    2016-11-01

    Mutation accumulation (MA) experiments employ the strategy of minimizing the population size of evolving lineages to greatly reduce effects of selection on newly arising mutations. Thus, most mutations fix within MA lines independently of their fitness effects. This approach, more recently combined with genome sequencing, has detailed the rates, spectra, and biases of different mutational processes. However, a quantitative understanding of the fitness effects of mutations virtually unseen by selection has remained an untapped opportunity. Here, we analyzed the fitness of 43 sequenced MA lines of the multi-chromosome bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia that had each undergone 5554 generations of MA and accumulated an average of 6.73 spontaneous mutations. Most lineages exhibited either neutral or deleterious fitness in three different environments in comparison with their common ancestor. The only mutational class that was significantly overrepresented in lineages with reduced fitness was the loss of the plasmid, though nonsense mutations, missense mutations, and coding insertion-deletions were also overrepresented in MA lineages whose fitness had significantly declined. Although the overall distribution of fitness effects was similar between the three environments, the magnitude and even the sign of the fitness of a number of lineages changed with the environment, demonstrating that the fitness of some genotypes was environmentally dependent. These results present an unprecedented picture of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations in a bacterium with multiple chromosomes and provide greater quantitative support for the theory that the vast majority of spontaneous mutations are neutral or deleterious.

  6. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  7. Mutations in IMPG2, Encoding Interphotoreceptor Matrix Proteoglycan 2, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Collin, Rob W.J.; Banin, Eyal; Ingeborgh van den Born, L.; Coene, Karlien L.M.; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Zelinger, Lina; Khan, Muhammad I.; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Erdinest, Inbar; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Voesenek, Krysta; Blokland, Ellen A.W.; Strom, Tim M.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Qamar, Raheel; Banfi, Sandro; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases caused by progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified two families, each with three affected siblings sharing large overlapping homozygous regions that harbored the IMPG2 gene on chromosome 3. Sequence analysis of IMPG2 in the two index cases revealed homozygous mutations cosegregating with the disease in the respective families: three affected siblings of Iraqi Jewish ancestry displayed a nonsense mutation, and a Dutch family displayed a 1.8 kb genomic deletion that removes exon 9 and results in the absence of seven amino acids in a conserved SEA domain of the IMPG2 protein. Transient transfection of COS-1 cells showed that a construct expressing the wild-type SEA domain is properly targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas the mutant lacking the seven amino acids appears to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutation analysis in ten additional index cases that were of Dutch, Israeli, Italian, and Pakistani origin and had homozygous regions encompassing IMPG2 revealed five additional mutations; four nonsense mutations and one missense mutation affecting a highly conserved phenylalanine residue. Most patients with IMPG2 mutations showed an early-onset form of RP with progressive visual-field loss and deterioration of visual acuity. The patient with the missense mutation, however, was diagnosed with maculopathy. The IMPG2 gene encodes the interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan IMPG2, which is a constituent of the interphotoreceptor matrix. Our data therefore show that mutations in a structural component of the interphotoreceptor matrix can cause arRP. PMID:20673862

  8. Mutation spectrum of NF1 and clinical characteristics in 78 Korean patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Sohn, Young Bae; Jeong, Seon Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju; Messiaen, Ludwine M

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders in humans. NF1 is caused by mutations of the NF1 gene. Mutation detection is complex owing to the large size of the NF1 gene, the presence of pseudogenes, and the great variety of mutations. Also, few probable genotype-phenotype correlations have been found in NF1. In this study 78 Korean patients from 60 families were screened for NF1 mutations. Mutation analysis of the entire coding region and flanking splice sites was carried out and included the use of a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, multiplex ligation probe amplification, or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype relationship were assessed. Fifty-two distinct NF1 mutations were identified in 60 families. The mutations included 30 single base substitutions (12 missense and 18 nonsense), 11 missplicing mutations, seven small insertion or deletions, and four gross deletions. Sixteen (30.8%) mutations were novel; c.1A>G, c.2033_2034insC, c.2540T>C, c.4537C>T, c.5546G>A, c.6792C>A, and c.6792C>G were recurrently identified. The mutations were evenly distributed across exon 1 through intron 47 of NF1, and no mutational hot spots were found. A genotype-phenotype analysis suggests that there is no clear relationship between specific mutations and clinical features. This analysis revealed a wide spectrum of NF1 mutations in Korean patients. As technologies advance in molecular genetics, the mutation detection rate will increase. Considering that 30.8% of detected mutations were novel, exhaustive mutation analysis of NF1 may be an important tool in early diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  9. FOXL2 mutations and genomic rearrangements in BPES.

    PubMed

    Beysen, Diane; De Paepe, Anne; De Baere, Elfride

    2009-02-01

    The FOXL2 gene is one of 10 forkhead genes, the mutations of which lead to human developmental disorders, often with ocular manifestations. Mutations in FOXL2 are known to cause blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), an autosomal dominant eyelid malformation associated (type I) or not (type II) with ovarian dysfunction, leading to premature ovarian failure (POF). In addition, a few mutations have been described in patients with isolated POF. Here, we review all currently described FOXL2 sequence variations and genomic rearrangements in BPES and POF. Using a combined mutation detection approach, it is possible to identify the underlying genetic defect in a major proportion (88%) of typical BPES patients. Of all genetic defects found in our BPES cohort, intragenic mutations represent 81%. They include missense changes, frameshift and nonsense mutations, in-frame deletions, and duplications, that are distributed along the single-exon gene. Genomic rearrangements comprising both deletions encompassing FOXL2 and deletions located outside its transcription unit, represent 12% and 5% of all genetic defects in our BPES cohort, respectively. One of the challenges of genetic testing in BPES is the establishment of genotype-phenotype correlations, mainly with respect to the ovarian phenotype. Genetic testing should be performed in the context of genetic counseling, however, and should be systematically complemented by a multidisciplinary clinical follow-up. Another challenge for health care professionals involved in BPES is the treatment of the eyelid phenotype and the prevention or treatment of POF.

  10. Mutations in WNT1 Cause Different Forms of Bone Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Katharina; Beleggia, Filippo; Kayserili, Hülya; Barnes, Aileen M.; Steiner, Magdalena; Semler, Oliver; Fischer, Björn; Yigit, Gökhan; Janda, Claudia Y.; Becker, Jutta; Breer, Stefan; Altunoglu, Umut; Grünhagen, Johannes; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Jochen; Schinke, Thorsten; Makareeva, Elena; Lausch, Ekkehart; Cankaya, Tufan; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Lapunzina, Pablo; Temtamy, Samia; Aglan, Mona; Zabel, Bernhard; Eysel, Peer; Koerber, Friederike; Leikin, Sergey; Garcia, K. Christopher; Netzer, Christian; Schönau, Eckhard; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.; Mundlos, Stefan; Amling, Michael; Kornak, Uwe; Marini, Joan; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We report that hypofunctional alleles of WNT1 cause autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, a congenital disorder characterized by reduced bone mass and recurrent fractures. In consanguineous families, we identified five homozygous mutations in WNT1: one frameshift mutation, two missense mutations, one splice-site mutation, and one nonsense mutation. In addition, in a family affected by dominantly inherited early-onset osteoporosis, a heterozygous WNT1 missense mutation was identified in affected individuals. Initial functional analysis revealed that altered WNT1 proteins fail to activate canonical LRP5-mediated WNT-regulated β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, osteoblasts cultured in vitro showed enhanced Wnt1 expression with advancing differentiation, indicating a role of WNT1 in osteoblast function and bone development. Our finding that homozygous and heterozygous variants in WNT1 predispose to low-bone-mass phenotypes might advance the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for congenital forms of bone fragility, as well as for common forms of age-related osteoporosis. PMID:23499309

  11. Base substitution mutations in uridinediphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferase 76G1 gene of Stevia rebaudiana causes the low levels of rebaudioside A: mutations in UGT76G1, a key gene of steviol glycosides synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Heng; Huang, Su-Zhen; Han, Yu-Lin; Yuan, Hai-Yan; Gu, Chun-Sun; Zhao, Yan-Hai

    2014-07-01

    Steviol glycosides, extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert) Bertoni, are calorie-free sugar substitute of natural origin with intensely sweet (Boileau et al., 2012). Stevioside and rebaudioside A are the two main kinds of the diterpenic glycosides. We analyzed the concentration of stevioside and rebaudioside A in Stevia leaves of about 500 samples (hybrid progenies) and discovered a mutation plant "Z05" with very low levels of rebaudioside A. Because UGT76G1, a uridinediphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases, is responsible for the conversion from stevioside to rebaudioside A (Richman et al., 2005), so mutation identification was done by sequencing the candidate gene, UGT76G1. In this study molecular analysis of two strains revealed a heterozygotic nonsense mutation of c.389T > G (p.L121X) in UGT76G1. Meanwhile, we found some amino acid substitutions significant change the protein structure. And the difference of enzyme activity between two strains proved the lack of functionality of UGT76G1 of the mutation "Z05". So the nonsense mutation and amino acid substitution mutation resulted in the low levels of rebaudioside A.

  12. Hyperinducibility as a result of mutation in structural genes and self-catabolite repression in the ara operon.

    PubMed

    Katz, L; Englesberg, E

    1971-07-01

    Mutations in gene araB producing an l-arabinose-negative phenotype cause either an increase (hyperinducible), decrease (polar), or have no effect at all on the inducible rate of expression of the l-arabinose operon. Fourteen araB gene mutants exhibiting such effects were shown to be the result of: nonsense, frameshift, or missense mutations. All missense mutants were hyperinducible, exhibiting approximately a twofold increase in rate of l-arabinose isomerase production. All frameshift and most nonsense mutants exhibited polar effect. One nonsense mutant was hyperinducible. The cis-dominant polar effect of nonsense and frameshift mutants (as compared to induced wild type) were more pronounced in arabinose-utilizing merodiploids and in araBaraC(c) double mutants where inducible and constitutive enzyme levels are respectively determined. On the other hand, in arabinose-utilizing merodiploids, missense mutations no longer exhibited hyperinducibility but displayed a wild-type level of operon expression. Increases in the wild type-inducible rate of expression of the operon were found when growth rate was dependent on the concentration of l-arabinose. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate also stimulated expression of the operon with the wild type in a mineral l-arabinose medium. These observations are explained on the basis that the steady-state expression of the l-arabinose operon OIBAD is dependent on the concentration of (i) l-arabinose, the effector of this system, which stimulates the expression of the operon, and (ii) catabolite repressors, produced from l-arabinose, which dampen the expression of the operon. We have termed the latter phenomenon "self-catabolite" repression.

  13. NFKB2 mutation in common variable immunodeficiency and isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chuan; Wang, Fen; Tong, Anli; Zhang, Xiao-Qian; Song, Hong-Mei; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Lyu, Wei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Xia, Wei-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) with central adrenal insufficiency is a recently defined clinical syndrome caused by mutations in the nuclear factor kappa-B subunit 2 (NFKB2) gene. We present the first case of NFKB2 mutation in Asian population. Methods and Results An 18-year-old Chinese female with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency was admitted due to adrenal crisis and pneumonia. She had a history of recurrent respiratory infections since childhood and ectodermal abnormalities were noted during physical examination. Immunologic tests revealed panhypogammaglobulinemia and deficient natural killer (NK)-cell function. DNA sequencing of NFKB2 identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.2563 A>T, p.855: Lys>∗) in the patient but not her parents. Conclusion Clinicians should be alert to comorbidities of adrenal insufficiency and ectodermal dysplasia in CVID patients as these might suggest a rare hereditary syndrome caused by NFKB2 mutation. PMID:27749582

  14. A novel mutation in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist associated with intrauterine disease onset.

    PubMed

    Altiok, Ender; Aksoy, Figen; Perk, Yıldız; Taylan, Fulya; Kim, Peter W; Ilıkkan, Barbaros; Asal, Gülten Turkkani; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Sanal, Ozden

    2012-10-01

    Deficiency of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) is a recently described rare autoinflammatory disease, caused by loss of function mutations in IL1RN leading to the unopposed activation of the IL-1 pathway. We describe a novel nonsense mutation in the IL1RN gene, associated with early intrauterine onset, death and multiorgan involvement in a prematurely born baby. The protein prediction model indicated that the novel Q119X mutation would result in a nonfunctional protein by impairing the ability of the IL-1Ra to bind and antagonize signaling through the IL-1R. Since the disorder may mimic severe bacterial infections and the treatment with anakinra is life saving, we intend to raise awareness of the syndrome and the possibility of a founder mutation that may lead to the diagnosis of additional cases in Turkey. The clinical suspicion of DIRA is critical to avoid improper management of the patients with antibiotics alone and death from multiorgan failure.

  15. The stop mutation R553X in the CFTR gene results in exon skipping

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.; Shackleton, S.; Harris, A. )

    1994-01-15

    Stop or nonsense mutations are known to disrupt gene function in a number of different ways. The authors have studied the effects of the stop mutation R553X in exon 11 of the CFTR gene by analyzing mRNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells harvested from patients with cystic fibrosis. Four patients who were compound heterozygotes for the R553X mutation were studied. Ten non-CF control subjects were also studied. In all four patients, full-length CFTR mRNA was identified, but only a very small proportion of this was derived from the R553X allele. A smaller transcript, lacking exon 11, was also seen in the R553X patients but not in the controls. Most of this transcript was derived from the R553X allele. These results suggest that the R553X mutation results in skipping of the exon in which it is located. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  16. A case of classical galactosemia: identification and characterization of 3 distinct mutations in galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene in a single family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Kaur, Gurjit; Thapa, Babu R; Prasad, Rajendra; Kulkarni, Ketan

    2011-07-01

    Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism. In the very first instance of its kind from India, the authors report the presence of three different galatose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene mutations, associated with galactosemia, in a single Indian family. One of the three mutations, S307X, is a novel mutation (GenBank Accession number GQ355273) and is of nonsense nature causing the truncation of the GALT protein resulting in the decreased enzyme activity. The authors have also emphasized the importance of introduction of new born screening program for galactosemia and its genetic analysis in select settings across the country.

  17. Prevalence of PALB2 mutations in Australasian multiple-case breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Population-based studies of breast cancer have estimated that some PALB2 mutations confer a breast cancer risk (penetrance) comparable to the average pathogenic mutation in BRCA2. As this risk is of clinical relevance, we sought to identify mono-allelic PALB2 mutations and determine their frequencies in multiple-case breast cancer families attending Familial Cancer Clinics in Australia and New Zealand. Methods The youngest affected woman, not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2, from 747 multiple-case breast cancer families participating in kConFab were selected for PALB2 mutation screening. The coding and flanking intronic regions of PALB2 in DNA extracted from blood were screened using high-resolution melt curve analysis with Sanger sequencing confirmation. Where possible, relatives of women found to carry PALB2 mutations were genotyped for the family-specific mutation, mutant transcripts were characterised and breast tumours arising in mutation carriers were recalled and reviewed. Missense mutations were assessed for potential to disrupt protein function via SIFT, Align GVGD and Polyphen-2. Results The mutation screen identified two nonsense mutations (PALB2 c.3113G>A in eight women and PALB2 c.196C>T in one woman), two frameshift mutations (PALB2 c.1947_1948insA and PALB2 c.2982_2983insT each in one woman), 10 missense variants, eight synonymous variants and four variants in intronic regions. Of the four PALB2 mutations identified that were predicted to produce truncated protein products, only PALB2 c.1947_1948insA had not previously been reported. PALB2 c.3113G>A and PALB2 c.196C>T were previously identified in the Australian population whereas PALB2 c.2982_2983insT was previously reported in the UK population. Transcripts derived from three of these mutant PALB2 alleles were vulnerable to nonsense-mediated decay. One missense mutation (PALB2 c.2993G>A) was predicted to disrupt protein function via the three in silico assessment methods

  18. Germline mutations of the PTCH gene in Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Miki; Takahashi, Katsu; Kawabata, Tomohiro; Kosugi, Shinji; Murakami, Kenichiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Nishigori, Chikako; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    2005-01-01

    We identified seven novel germline mutations of the PTCH gene in eight unrelated Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). In order to ensure genetic diagnosis, all 23 coding exons of the PTCH gene were amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Mutations were found in all eight patients with NBCCS. The mutations detected in this study include one insertion/deletion mutation, one 1-bp insertion, two 1-bp deletions, one nonsense mutation and two missense mutations. None of the mutations have been previously reported. Five mutations caused premature stop codons that are predicted to result in a truncated protein. In the two missense mutations, the strong basic residue arginine was substituted by serine or glycine in highly conserved components of the putative transmembrane domain of PTCH, and these mutations may therefore affect the conformation and function of the PTCH protein. No phenotype-genotype relationships were found in the Japanese NBCCS patients, consistent with results of previous studies on NBCCS in African-American and Caucasian patients.

  19. Mutations in the proenteropeptidase gene are the molecular cause of congenital enteropeptidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Maier, Esther M; Bück, Cornelius; Mayerhofer, Peter U; Kappler, Matthias; Haworth, James C; Moroz, Stanley P; Hadorn, Hans-Beat; Sadler, J Evan; Roscher, Adelbert A

    2002-01-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase [E.C.3.4.21.9]) is a serine protease of the intestinal brush border in the proximal small intestine. It activates the pancreatic proenzyme trypsinogen, which, in turn, releases active digestive enzymes from their inactive pancreatic precursors. Congenital enteropeptidase deficiency is a rare recessively inherited disorder leading, in affected infants, to severe failure to thrive. The genomic structure of the proenteropeptidase gene (25 exons, total gene size 88 kb) was characterized in order to perform DNA sequencing in three clinically and biochemically proved patients with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency who were from two families. We found compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutations (S712X/R857X) in two affected siblings and found compound heterozygosity for a nonsense mutation (Q261X) and a frameshift mutation (FsQ902) in the third patient. In accordance with the biochemical findings, all four defective alleles identified are predicted null alleles leading to a gene product not containing the active site of the enzyme. These data provide first evidence that proenteropeptidase-gene mutations are the primary cause of congenital enteropeptidase deficiency.

  20. A homozygous mutation in ADAMTSL4 causes autosomal-recessive isolated ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Dina; Sato, T Shawn; Kohilan, Abdulghani; Tayeh, Marwan; Chen, Shan; Leal, Suzanne; Al-Salem, Mahmoud; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2009-02-01

    Ectopia lentis is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is characterized by the subluxation of the lens resulting from the disruption of the zonular fibers. Patients with ectopia lentis commonly present with a marked loss in visual acuity in addition to a number of possibly accompanying ocular complications including cataract, myopia, and retinal detachment. We here describe an isolated form of ectopia lentis in a large inbred family that shows autosomal-recessive inheritance. We map the ectopia lentis locus in this family to the pericentromeric region on chromosome 1 (1p13.2-q21.1). The linkage region contains well more than 60 genes. Mutation screening of four candidate genes revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 11 of ADAMTSL4 (p.Y595X; c.1785T-->G) in all affected individuals that is absent in 380 control chromosomes. The mutation would result in a truncated protein of half the original length, if the mRNA escapes nonsense-mediated decay. We conclude that mutations in ADAMTSL4 are responsible for autosomal-recessive simple ectopia lentis and that ADAMTS-like4 plays a role in the development and/or integrity of the zonular fibers.

  1. Rediscovery by Whole Genome Sequencing: Classical Mutations and Genome Polymorphisms in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, Kevin; Wiest, Aric E.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Classical forward genetics has been foundational to modern biology, and has been the paradigm for characterizing the role of genes in shaping phenotypes for decades. In recent years, reverse genetics has been used to identify the functions of genes, via the intentional introduction of variation and subsequent evaluation in physiological, molecular, and even population contexts. These approaches are complementary and whole genome analysis serves as a bridge between the two. We report in this article the whole genome sequencing of eighteen classical mutant strains of Neurospora crassa and the putative identification of the mutations associated with corresponding mutant phenotypes. Although some strains carry multiple unique nonsynonymous, nonsense, or frameshift mutations, the combined power of limiting the scope of the search based on genetic markers and of using a comparative analysis among the eighteen genomes provides strong support for the association between mutation and phenotype. For ten of the mutants, the mutant phenotype is recapitulated in classical or gene deletion mutants in Neurospora or other filamentous fungi. From thirteen to 137 nonsense mutations are present in each strain and indel sizes are shown to be highly skewed in gene coding sequence. Significant additional genetic variation was found in the eighteen mutant strains, and this variability defines multiple alleles of many genes. These alleles may be useful in further genetic and molecular analysis of known and yet-to-be-discovered functions and they invite new interpretations of molecular and genetic interactions in classical mutant strains. PMID:22384341

  2. Rediscovery by Whole Genome Sequencing: Classical Mutations and Genome Polymorphisms in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Kevin; Wiest, Aric E.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-06-02

    Classical forward genetics has been foundational to modern biology, and has been the paradigm for characterizing the role of genes in shaping phenotypes for decades. In recent years, reverse genetics has been used to identify the functions of genes, via the intentional introduction of variation and subsequent evaluation in physiological, molecular, and even population contexts. These approaches are complementary and whole genome analysis serves as a bridge between the two. We report in this article the whole genome sequencing of eighteen classical mutant strains of Neurospora crassa and the putative identification of the mutations associated with corresponding mutant phenotypes. Although some strains carry multiple unique nonsynonymous, nonsense, or frameshift mutations, the combined power of limiting the scope of the search based on genetic markers and of using a comparative analysis among the eighteen genomes provides strong support for the association between mutation and phenotype. For ten of the mutants, the mutant phenotype is recapitulated in classical or gene deletion mutants in Neurospora or other filamentous fungi. From thirteen to 137 nonsense mutations are present in each strain and indel sizes are shown to be highly skewed in gene coding sequence. Significant additional genetic variation was found in the eighteen mutant strains, and this variability defines multiple alleles of many genes. These alleles may be useful in further genetic and molecular analysis of known and yet-to-be-discovered functions and they invite new interpretations of molecular and genetic interactions in classical mutant strains.

  3. Dysferlin Gene Mutation Spectrum in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Dysferlinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Qin; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Wei; Lyu, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhao-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysferlinopathy is caused by mutations in the dysferlin (DYSF) gene. Here, we described the genetic features of a large cohort of Chinese patients with this disease. Methods: Eighty-nine index patients were included in the study. DYSF gene analysis was performed by Sanger sequencing in 41 patients and targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) in 48 patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was performed to detect exon duplication/deletion in patients with only one pathogenic mutation. Results: Among the 89 index patients, 79 patients were demonstrated to carry two disease-causing (73 cases) or possibly disease-causing mutations (6 cases), including 26 patients with homozygous mutations. We identified 105 different mutations, including 59 novel ones. Notably, in 13 patients in whom only one pathogenic mutation was initially found by Sanger sequencing or NGS, 3 were further identified to carry exon deletions by MLPA. The mutations identified in this study appeared to cluster in the N-terminal region. Mutation types included missense mutations (30.06%), nonsense mutations (17.18%), frameshift mutations (30.67%), in-frame deletions (2.45%), intronic mutations (17.79%), and exonic rearrangement (1.84%). No genotype-phenotype correlation was identified. Conclusions: DYSF mutations in Chinese patients clustered in the N-terminal region of the gene. Exonic rearrangements were found in 23% of patients with only one pathogenic mutation identified by Sanger sequencing or NGS. The novel mutations found in this study greatly expanded the mutational spectrum of dysferlinopathy. PMID:27647186

  4. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The patterns of p53 gene mutations differ inside and outside of exons 5-8 in breast and other cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Blaszyk, H.; McGovern, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most studies of the p53 gene in tumors examine only exons 5-8. In these exons, there is a predominance of missense mutations clustered in four regions of high evolutionary conservation. We previously found 64 mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene in 194 primary breast cancers. Herein, we report 18 additional mutations found by analyzing the promotor region, the first noncoding exon, and the remaining coding exons. Mutations were found in exons 4, 9, and 10, and flanking splice junctions, but not in the promotor region or in exons 1, 2, 3, and 11. Outside of exons 5-8 not a single missense mutation was found. Microdeletions and microinsertions predominate but nonsense and splice site mutations also occur. In contrast, the majority of mutations in exons 5-8 were missense changes which exclusively occurred at amino acids that were identical in all known p53 sequences which represent about 1.6 billion years of evolutionary divergence. The difference in the mutational pattern between these two regions of the p53 gene is due to a lack of missense and inframe microdeletion mutations outside exons 5-8 (p<.0001), whereas frameshift deletions and insertions, nonsense mutations and splicing defects are equally distributed over the gene. A review of the literature shows that the difference in the patterns of mutation inside and outside of exons 5-8 we have found in breast cancer is present in other types of cancers as well. These data show the importance of comparing equivalent exons when examining the pattern of p53 gene mutation in different populations. In addition, the paucity of missense mutations in breast and other cancers (even at amino acids identical throughout p53 gene evolution) indicates that at least some of the missense mutations in exons 2-4 and 9-11 result in a phenotype other than malignant transformation.

  6. Construction and testing of a bacterial luciferase reporter gene system for in vivo measurement of nonsense suppression in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Weiser, J; Buriánková, K; Kalachová, L; Branny, P; Pernodet, J L

    2006-01-01

    A reporter gene system, based on luciferase genes from Vibrio harvei, was constructed for measurement of translation nonsense suppression in Streptomyces. Using the site-directed mutagenesis the TCA codon in position 13 of the luxB gene was replaced by all of the three stop codons individually. By cloning of luxA and luxB genes under the control of strong constitutive Streptomyces promoter ermE* in plasmid pUWL201 we created Wluxl with the wild-type sequence and pWlux2, pWlux3 and pWlux4 plasmids containing TGA-, TAG- and TAA-stop codons, respectively. Streptomyces lividans TK 24 was transformed with the plasmids and the reporter system was tested by growth of the strain in the presence of streptomycin as a translation accuracy modulator. Streptomycin increased nonsense suppression on UAA nearly 10-fold and more than 20-fold on UAG. On the other hand, UGA, the most frequent stop signal in Streptomyces, the effect was negligible.

  7. A Nonsense Variant in the ST14 Gene in Akhal-Teke Horses with Naked Foal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anina; Hiemesch, Theresa; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Neuditschko, Markus; Bachmann, Iris; Rieder, Stefan; Mikko, Sofia; Penedo, M. Cecilia; Tarasova, Nadja; Vitková, Martina; Sirtori, Nicolò; Roccabianca, Paola; Leeb, Tosso; Welle, Monika M.

    2017-01-01

    Naked foal syndrome (NFS) is a genodermatosis in the Akhal-Teke horse breed. We provide the first scientific description of this phenotype. Affected horses have almost no hair and show a mild ichthyosis. So far, all known NFS affected horses died between a few weeks and 3 yr of age. It is not clear whether a specific pathology caused the premature deaths. NFS is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait. We mapped the disease causing genetic variant to two segments on chromosomes 7 and 27 in the equine genome. Whole genome sequencing of two affected horses, two obligate carriers, and 75 control horses from other breeds revealed a single nonsynonymous genetic variant on the chromosome 7 segment that was perfectly associated with NFS. The affected horses were homozygous for ST14:c.388G>T, a nonsense variant that truncates >80% of the open reading frame of the ST14 gene (p.Glu130*). The variant leads to partial nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant transcript. Genetic variants in the ST14 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 11 in humans. Thus, the identified equine ST14:c.388G>T variant is an excellent candidate causative variant for NFS, and the affected horses represent a large animal model for a known human genodermatosis. Our findings will enable genetic testing to avoid the nonintentional breeding of NFS-affected foals. PMID:28235824

  8. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Effectors Are Essential for Zebrafish Embryonic Development and Survival ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Nadine; Huntzinger, Eric; Weiler, Catrin; Saulière, Jérôme; Schmidt, Steffen; Sonawane, Mahendra; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway promotes rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature translation termination codons (PTCs or nonsense codons), preventing accumulation of potentially detrimental truncated proteins. In metazoa, seven genes (upf1, upf2, upf3, smg1, smg5, smg6, and smg7) have been identified as essential for NMD; here we show that the zebrafish genome encodes orthologs of upf1, upf2, smg1, and smg5 to smg7 and two upf3 paralogs. We also show that Upf1 is required for degradation of PTC-containing mRNAs in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, its depletion has a severe impact on embryonic development, early patterning, and viability. Similar phenotypes are observed in Upf2-, Smg5-, or Smg6-depleted embryos, suggesting that zebrafish embryogenesis requires an active NMD pathway. Using cultured cells, we demonstrate that the ability of a PTC to trigger NMD is strongly stimulated by downstream exon-exon boundaries. Thus, as in mammals and plants but in contrast to invertebrates and fungi, NMD is coupled to splicing in zebrafish. Our results together with previous studies show that NMD effectors are essential for vertebrate embryogenesis and suggest that the coupling of splicing and NMD has been maintained in vertebrates but lost in fungi and invertebrates. PMID:19414594

  9. A nonsense polymorphism in the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor increases the risk for venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Javier; González-Conejero, Rocio; Soria, Jose Manuel; González-Porras, Jose Ramón; Pérez-Ceballos, Elena; Lecumberri, Ramón; Roldán, Vanessa; Souto, Juan Carlos; Miñano, Antonia; Hernández-Espinosa, David; Alberca, Ignacio; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Vicente, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a hemostatic serpin with anticoagulant activity. As for antithrombin, deficiency of ZPI could have relevant thrombotic consequences. We have studied 6 genetic modifications affecting the ZPI gene, identifying 5 haplotypes. Haplotype H5 is featured by a stop codon at position 67. The relevance of these genetic modifications and haplotypes in venous thrombosis was evaluated in a case-control study including 1018 patients and 1018 age- and sex-matched controls. Surprisingly, the H5 haplotype was found in 0.9% of controls, supporting that the Arg67Stop change is a low frequency nonsense polymorphism. The prevalence of this haplotype increased significantly in patients (3.0%), one of whom was in a homozygous state. Multivariate analysis confirms that carriers have a 3.3-fold risk of developing venous thrombosis (P = .002; 95% CI: 1.5-7.1). Moreover, we observed a significant association of this polymorphism with familial history of thrombosis (P < .001). Our study supports that the ZPI Arg67Stop nonsense polymorphism might be an independent genetic risk factor for venous thrombosis. This polymorphism has slightly lower prevalence but similar thrombotic risk than the FV Leiden or prothrombin 20210A. Although further studies are required, all available data support that the ZPI is a candidate to play a significant role in thrombosis and should be evaluated in thrombophilic studies. (Blood. 2006;108:177-183) PMID:16527896

  10. The mutY gene: a mutator locus in Escherichia coli that generates G.C----T.A transversions.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Y; Cabrera, M; Cupples, C G; Miller, J H

    1988-04-01

    We have used a strain with an altered lacZ gene, which reverts to wild type via only certain transversions, to detect transversion-specific mutators in Escherichia coli. Detection relied on a papillation technique that uses a combination of beta-galactosides to reveal blue Lac+ papillae. One class of mutators is specific for the G.C----T.A transversion as determined by the reversion pattern of a set of lacZ mutations and by the distribution of forward nonsense mutations in the lacI gene. The locus responsible for the mutator phenotype is designated mutY and maps near 64 min on the genetic map of E. coli. The mutY locus may act in a similar but reciprocal fashion to the previously characterized mutT locus, which results in A.T----C.G transversions.

  11. Congenital Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies Resulting from Novel De Novo Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cunnusamy, Khrishen; Bowman, Charles B.; Beebe, Walter; Gong, Xin; Hogan, R. Nick; Mootha, V. Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe two cases of congenital corneal endothelial edema resulting from novel de novo mutations. Methods Case A patient was a 15 months old Caucasian infant and Case B patient was a 3 year old Hispanic child presenting with bilateral cloudy corneas since birth. Clinicopathological findings are presented. DNA samples were screened for mutations in candidate genes by Sanger sequencing. Results Slit-lamp examination of Case A patient revealed stromal edema and haze. Histology of keratoplasty button showed stromal thickening with loss of endothelium and thin Descemet’s membrane. Sanger sequencing established the diagnosis of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED) by detection of a compound heterozygous mutation in SLC4A11. The proband displayed a novel de novo frameshift mutation in one SLC4A11 allele, p.(Pro817Argfs*32), in conjunction with a maternally inherited missense mutation in SLC4A11, p.(Arg869His). Case B patient similarly presented with stromal edema and stromal haze. Histopathological analysis revealed a spongy epithelium, focal discontinuities in Bowman’s layer, stromal thickening with areas of compacted posterior stroma, variable thickness of Descemet’s membrane, and regional multilayered endothelium. Sanger sequencing found a novel de novo nonsense mutation in the first exon of ZEB1, p.(Cys7*). Conclusions To our knowledge, we present the earliest clinical presentation of posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy resulting from a de novo mutation in ZEB1. Additionally, we present a CHED case with a thin Descemet’s membrane with a novel compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutation. In the absence of a family history or consanguinity, de novo mutations may result in congenital corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:26619383

  12. Characterization of variegate porphyria mutations using a minigene approach.

    PubMed

    Granata, Barbara Xoana; Baralle, Marco; De Conti, Laura; Parera, Victoria; Rossetti, Maria Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that affect the skin and/or nervous system. In 2008, three unrelated patients were diagnosed with variegate porphyria at the CIPYP (Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias). Sequencing of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene, the gene altered in this type of porphyria, revealed three previously undescribed mutations: c.338+3insT, c.807G>A, and c.808-1G>C. As these mutations do not affect the protein sequence, we hypothesized that they might be splicing mutations. RT-PCRs performed on the patient's mRNAs showed normal mRNA or no amplification at all. This result indicated that the aberrant spliced transcript is possibly being degraded. In order to establish whether they were responsible or not for the patient's disease by causing aberrant splicing, we utilized a minigene approach. We found that the three mutations lead to exon skipping; therefore, the abnormal mRNAs are most likely degraded by a mechanism such as nonsense-mediated decay. In conclusion, these mutations are responsible for the disease because they alter the normal splicing pathway, thus providing a functional explanation for the appearance of disease and highlighting the use of minigene assays to complement transcript analysis.

  13. Mutations in TMEM76* cause mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (Sanfilippo C syndrome).

    PubMed

    Hrebícek, Martin; Mrázová, Lenka; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Durand, Stéphanie; Roslin, Nicole M; Nosková, Lenka; Hartmannová, Hana; Ivánek, Robert; Cízkova, Alena; Poupetová, Helena; Sikora, Jakub; Urinovská, Jana; Stranecký, Viktor; Zeman, Jirí; Lepage, Pierre; Roquis, David; Verner, Andrei; Ausseil, Jérome; Beesley, Clare E; Maire, Irène; Poorthuis, Ben J H M; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Diggelen, Otto P; Wevers, Ron A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fujiwara, T Mary; Majewski, Jacek; Morgan, Kenneth; Kmoch, Stanislav; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2006-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (MPS IIIC, or Sanfilippo C syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A: alpha -glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (N-acetyltransferase), which leads to impaired degradation of heparan sulfate. We report the narrowing of the candidate region to a 2.6-cM interval between D8S1051 and D8S1831 and the identification of the transmembrane protein 76 gene (TMEM76), which encodes a 73-kDa protein with predicted multiple transmembrane domains and glycosylation sites, as the gene that causes MPS IIIC when it is mutated. Four nonsense mutations, 3 frameshift mutations due to deletions or a duplication, 6 splice-site mutations, and 14 missense mutations were identified among 30 probands with MPS IIIC. Functional expression of human TMEM76 and the mouse ortholog demonstrates that it is the gene that encodes the lysosomal N-acetyltransferase and suggests that this enzyme belongs to a new structural class of proteins that transport the activated acetyl residues across the cell membrane.

  14. Mutational analysis of NF2 by in vitro expression assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pulaski, K.; Pettingell, W.; MacCollin, M.; Gusella, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of multiple nervous system tumors. The recently cloned NF2 tumor suppressor gene encodes a novel member of a family of cytoskeleton associated proteins. Because the majority of germline mutational events of the NF2 gene cause gross truncation of the protein product, we investigated the feasibility of a single step protein-based screen for mutation. Total cellular RNA extracted from blood or cell lines was used to synthesize cDNA from mRNA using reverse transcriptase. Two rounds of PCR amplification were carried out. The 5{prime} primer contained an in-frame T7 promoter followed by an initiation methionine within a Kozak consensus sequence. The antisense 3{prime} primer contained the native stop codon followed by a poly (A) tail. The resulting product was used in a cell-free coupled transcription/translation reaction which was visualized on a standard protein separating gel. We were able to amplify 95% of the coding sequence of the NF2 gene with a single set of primers which produced a 1724 basepair product. Normal transcripts produced an approximately 66 KDa protein product while transcripts which contained known nonsense or splice site mutations produced truncated protein products in addition to the normal sized product. Estimation of the location of the mutation could be determined by the extent of the protein shift. This system may improve both efficiency and sensitivity of mutational analysis of the NF2 gene.

  15. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  16. Mutational analysis of the HGSNAT gene in Italian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (Sanfilippo C syndrome). Mutation in brief #959. Online.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Anthony Olind; Filocamo, Mirella; Di Rocco, Maja; Sersale, Giovanna; Lübke, Torben; di Natale, Paola; Cosma, Maria Pia; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) describes any inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from an inability to catabolize glycosaminoglycans. MPS III (or Sanfilippo syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a failure to degrade heparan sulphate. There are four subtypes of MPS III, each categorized by a deficiency in a specific enzyme involved in the heparan sulphate degradation pathway. The genes mutated in three of these (MPS IIIA, MPS IIIB, and MPS IIID) have been cloned for some time. However, only very recently has the gene for MPS IIIC (heparin acetyl CoA: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase, or HGSNAT) been identified. Its product (previously termed transmembrane protein 76, or TMEM76) has little sequence similarity to other proteins of known function, although it is well conserved among all species. In this study, a group of MPS IIIC patients, who are mainly of Italian origin, have been clinically characterized. Furthermore, mutational analysis of the HGSNAT gene in these patients resulted in the identification of nine alleles, of which eight are novel. Three splice-site mutations, three frameshift deletions resulting in premature stop codons, one nonsense mutation, and two missense mutations were identified. The latter are of particular interest as they are located in regions which are predicted to be of functional significance. This research will aid in determining the molecular basis of HGSNAT protein function, and the mechanisms underlying MPS IIIC.

  17. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Somatic Mutations in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer genomes harbor complex mutational landscapes. Somatic alterations have been predominantly discovered in breast cancer patients of European ancestry; however, little is known about somatic aberration in patients of other ethnic groups including Asians. In the present study, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was conducted in DNA extracted from tumor and matched adjacent normal tissue samples from eleven early onset breast cancer patients who were included in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We discovered 159 somatic missense and ten nonsense mutations distributed among 167 genes. The most frequent 50 somatic mutations identified by WES were selected for validation using Sequenom MassARRAY system in the eleven breast cancer patients and an additional 433 tumor and 921 normal tissue/blood samples from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Among these 50 mutations selected for validation, 32 were technically validated. Within the validated mutations, somatic mutations in the TRPM6, HYDIN, ENTHD1, and NDUFB10 genes were found in two or more tumor samples in the replication stage. Mutations in the ADRA1B, CBFB, KIAA2022, and RBM25 genes were observed once in the replication stage. To summarize, this study identified some novel somatic mutations for breast cancer. Future studies will need to be conducted to determine the function of these mutations/genes in the breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26870154

  18. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  19. Fibrinogen Šumperk II: dysfibrinogenemia in an individual with two coding mutations.

    PubMed

    Kotlín, Roman; Suttnar, Jiří; Cápová, Irena; Hrachovinová, Ingrid; Urbánková, Marie; Dyr, Jan Evangelista

    2012-05-01

    Fibrinogen—a 340-kDa glycoprotein—plays a crucial role in blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, wound healing, and other physiological processes. A mutation in fibrinogen may lead to congenital dysfibrinogenemia,a rare disease characterized by the functional deficiency of fibrinogen. About 580 cases of abnormal fibrinogens have been reported worldwide; thereof 335 cases in the fibrinogen Aa chain[1]. To our knowledge, only five cases of abnormal fibrinogens with two mutations [2–6] and one case of two different mutations in the same family [7] have been described earlier. A 52-year-old female was examined for bleeding. Routine hemostasis screening resulted in a diagnosis of dysfibrinogenemia. Functional testing revealed prolonged fibrin polymerization, prolonged lysis of the clot, abnormal fibrin morphology,and fibrinopeptides release. Genetic analysis showed two heterozygous nonsense mutations—previously described mutation AaGly13Glu and a novel mutation Aa Ser314Cys. The mutation Aa Gly13-Glu was found in her brother and niece, but there was no evidence in either of the mutation Aa Ser314Cys. While mutation Aa Gly13Glu is responsible for abnormal fibrinopeptide release and prolonged thrombin time, the novel mutation Aa Ser314Cys seems to affect fibrin morphology and fibrinolysis.

  20. C1q deficiency: identification of a novel missense mutation and treatment with fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Topaloglu, Rezan; Taskiran, Ekim Z; Tan, Cagman; Erman, Baran; Ozaltin, Fatih; Sanal, Ozden

    2012-07-01

    A Turkish patient with C1q deficiency presented with a lupus-like disease, and a new missense mutation at A chain is presented. To characterize the genetic defect, all exons of the genes for the A, B, and C chains of C1q were sequenced in the patient. This revealed a missense mutation in the collagen-like domain of the A chain, p.Gly31 Arg. No other sequence variants, including the common silent mutations, were found in the three chains. Exon 1 of the C1q A chain was sequenced in 105 samples from healthy controls for this particular mutation. None of these carried the mutation. The C1q-deficient patient was treated with fresh frozen plasma infusions. Our findings showed that Turkish patients may have different mutations than the previously described common mutation, and once again, not only nonsense mutations but also missense mutations cause hereditary C1q deficiency. Regular fresh frozen plasma infusions to the patient have been clinically and therapeutically successful.

  1. Identification and characterisation of mutations associated with von Willebrand disease in a Turkish patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Daniel J; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Cartwright, Ashley; Al-Shammari, Nawal S; Coyle, Rachael E; Eckert, Michaela; Al-Buhairan, Ahlam M; Messenger, Sarah L; Budde, Ulrich; Gürsel, Türkiz; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Peake, Ian R; Goodeve, Anne C

    2013-08-01

    Several cohort studies have investigated the molecular basis of von Willebrand disease (VWD); however, these have mostly focused on European and North American populations. This study aimed to investigate mutation spectrum in 26 index cases (IC) from Turkey diagnosed with all three VWD types, the majority (73%) with parents who were knowingly related. IC were screened for mutations using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and analysis of all von Willebrand factor gene (VWF) exons and exon/intron boundaries. Selected missense mutations were expressed in vitro. Candidate VWF mutations were identified in 25 of 26 IC and included propeptide missense mutations in four IC (two resulting in type 1 and two in recessive 2A), all influencing VWF expression in vitro. Four missense mutations, a nonsense mutation and a small in-frame insertion resulting in type 2A were also identified. Of 15 type 3 VWD IC, 13 were homozygous and two compound heterozygous for 14 candidate mutations predicted to result in lack of expression and two propeptide missense changes. Identification of intronic breakpoints of an exon 17-18 deletion suggested that the mutation resulted from non-homologous end joining. This study provides further insight into the pathogenesis of VWD in a population with a high degree of consanguineous partnerships.

  2. Genetic Prion Disease Caused by PRNP Q160X Mutation Presenting with an Orbitofrontal Syndrome, Cyclic Diarrhea, and Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jamie C.; Rojas, Julio C.; Bang, Jee; Legati, Andrea; Rankin, Katherine P.; Forner, Sven; Miller, Zachary A.; Karydas, Anna M.; Coppola, Giovanni; Grouse, Carrie K.; Ralph, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pathogenic truncating mutations in the prion gene (PRNP) usually present with prolonged disease courses with severe neurofibrillary tangle and cerebral amyloidosis pathology, but more atypical phenotypes also occur, including those with dysautonomia and peripheral neuropathy. We describe the neurological, cognitive, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features of a 31-year-old man presenting with an orbitofrontal syndrome, gastrointestinal symptoms, and peripheral neuropathy associated with PRNP Q160X nonsense mutation, with symptom onset at age 27. The mutation was also detected in his asymptomatic father and a symptomatic paternal cousin; several members of prior generations died from early onset dementia. This is the first report of a family affected with the nonsense PRNP mutation Q160X displaying clear autosomal dominant disease in multiple family members and reduced penetrance. This case strengthens the evidence suggesting an association between PRNP truncating mutations and prion systemic amyloidosis. PRNP gene testing should be considered in any patient with atypical dementia, especially with early onset and neuropathy, even in the absence of a family history. PMID:27716661

  3. RAB23 Mutations in Carpenter Syndrome Imply an Unexpected Role for Hedgehog Signaling in Cranial-Suture Development and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Dagan ; Seelow, Dominik ; Jehee, Fernanda S. ; Perlyn, Chad A. ; Alonso, Luís G. ; Bueno, Daniela F. ; Donnai, Dian ; Josifiova, Dragana ; Mathijssen, Irene M. J. ; Morton, Jenny E. V. ; Ørstavik, Karen Helene ; Sweeney, Elizabeth ; Wall, Steven A. ; Marsh, Jeffrey L. ; Nürnberg, Peter ; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita ; Wilkie, Andrew O. M. 

    2007-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, the cardinal features of which include craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and cardiac defects. Using homozygosity mapping, we found linkage to chromosome 6p12.1-q12 and, in 15 independent families, identified five different mutations (four truncating and one missense) in RAB23, which encodes a member of the RAB guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) family of vesicle transport proteins and acts as a negative regulator of hedgehog (HH) signaling. In 10 patients, the disease was caused by homozygosity for the same nonsense mutation, L145X, that resides on a common haplotype, indicative of a founder effect in patients of northern European descent. Surprisingly, nonsense mutations of Rab23 in open brain mice cause recessive embryonic lethality with neural-tube defects, suggesting a species difference in the requirement for RAB23 during early development. The discovery of RAB23 mutations in patients with Carpenter syndrome implicates HH signaling in cranial-suture biogenesis—an unexpected finding, given that craniosynostosis is not usually associated with mutations of other HH-pathway components—and provides a new molecular target for studies of obesity. PMID:17503333

  4. A biochemical specific locus mutation system in mice.

    PubMed

    Malling, H V; Valcovic, L R

    1977-09-21

    Two mouse strains DBA/2J and C57BL/6J are heteromorphic with respect to the electrophoretic mobility of at least 8 enzymes and the beta-hemoglobin chain. The genotype of DBA/2J for these markers is: Es-1, Es-3, Gpd-1, Gpi-1, Id-1, Mod-1, Pmg-1, Dip-1 and Hbb; and of C57B1/6J: Es-1, Es-3, Gpd-1, Gpi-1, Id-1, Mod-1, Pgm-1, Dip-1 and Hbb. Electrophoresis on tissues of interstrain hybrids will show the two parental bands and additional hybrid bands if the enzyme is a polymeric structure. In specific locus mutations which result in loss of activity (deletions, nonsense mutations), the hybrid resembles the non-mutated parent. In the mutation results in a change in electrophoretic mobility, some of the bands on the gel will either run faster or slower compared to the hybrid bands in a normal F1 animal. Fifty DBA/2J males were irradiated with gamma-rays from a Co60 source with two doses of 500 R at 24-h intervals at a dose rate of 95 R/min. After this irradiation the males were sterile for approximately 3 months. After the males regained their fertility, they were continuously mated to C57BL/6 females. Thus far somewhat over 2600 animals have been tested and four new mutations detected, giving a frequency of approximately 1.7 X 10(-4) mutations per locus per generation. The four mutations are: two independent mutations at Hbb, one at Mod-1 and one at Id-1.

  5. Foxp2 mutations impair auditory-motor association learning.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Simone; Fisher, Simon E; Ehret, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 transcription factor gene cause the best-described examples of monogenic speech and language disorders. Acquisition of proficient spoken language involves auditory-guided vocal learning, a specialized form of sensory-motor association learning. The impact of etiological Foxp2 mutations on learning of auditory-motor associations in mammals has not been determined yet. Here, we directly assess this type of learning using a newly developed conditioned avoidance paradigm in a shuttle-box for mice. We show striking deficits in mice heterozygous for either of two different Foxp2 mutations previously implicated in human speech disorders. Both mutations cause delays in acquiring new motor skills. The magnitude of impairments in association learning, however, depends on the nature of the mutation. Mice with a missense mutation in the DNA-binding domain are able to learn, but at a much slower rate than wild type animals, while mice carrying an early nonsense mutation learn very little. These results are consistent with expression of Foxp2 in distributed circuits of the cortex, striatum and cerebellum that are known to play key roles in acquisition of motor skills and sensory-motor association learning, and suggest differing in vivo effects for distinct variants of the Foxp2 protein. Given the importance of such networks for the acquisition of human spoken language, and the fact that similar mutations in human FOXP2 cause problems with speech development, this work opens up a new perspective on the use of mouse models for understanding pathways underlying speech and language disorders.

  6. Identification of KMT2D and KDM6A mutations by exome sequencing in Korean patients with Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Sohn, Young Bae; Ko, Jung Min; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Song, Ji Sun; Moon, Jea Woo; Yang, Bo Kyoung; Ha, Il Soo; Bae, Eun Jung; Jin, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) (OMIM#147920) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome. Recently, pathogenic variants in KMT2D and KDM6A were identified as the causes of KS in 55.8-80.0% of patients. To elucidate further the molecular characteristics of Korean patients with KS, we screened a cohort of patients with clinically defined KS for mutations in KMT2D and KDM6A. Whole-exome sequencing and direct sequencing for validation were performed in 12 patients with a clinical suspicion of KS. KMT2D and KDM6A mutations were identified in 11 (91.7%) patients. No recurrent mutation was observed, and 10 out of the 11 mutations found were novel. KMT2D mutations were detected in 10 patients, including four small deletions or insertions and four nonsense and two missense mutations. One girl had a novel splice-site mutation in KDM6A. Each patient had a unique individual mutation. This is the first report of mutational analysis via exome sequencing in Korean patients with KS. Because the mutation-detection rate was high in this study, rigorous mutation analysis of KMT2D and KDM6A may be an important tool for the early diagnosis and genetic counseling of Korean patients with KS.

  7. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profi ling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identifi ed 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no signifi cant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confi ned to the high-grade region. PMID:26191234

  8. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profiling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identified 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no significant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confined to the high-grade region.

  9. Novel TCAP Mutation c.32C>A Causing Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2G

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Amirtharaj; Sunitha, Balaraju; Vinodh, Kandavalli; Polavarapu, Kiran; Katkam, Shiva Krishna; Modi, Sailesh; Bharath, M. M. Srinivas; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Nalini, Atchayaram; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2014-01-01

    TCAP encoded telethonin is a 19 kDa protein, which plays an important role in anchoring titin in Z disc of the sarcomere, and is known to cause LGMD2G, a rare muscle disorder characterised by proximal and distal lower limb weakness, calf hypertrophy and loss of ambulation. A total of 300 individuals with ARLGMD were recruited for this study. Among these we identified 8 clinically well characterised LGMD2G cases from 7 unrelated Dravidian families. Clinical examination revealed predominantly proximo - distal form of weakness, scapular winging, muscle atrophy, calf hypertrophy and foot drop, immunoblot showed either complete absence or severe reduction of telethonin. Genetic analysis revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.32C>A, p.(Ser11*) in three patients of a consanguineous family and an 8 bp homozygous duplication c.26_33dupAGGTGTCG, p.(Arg12fs31*) in another patient. Both mutations possibly lead to truncated protein or nonsense mediated decay. We could not find any functionally significant TCAP mutation in the remaining 6 samples, except for two other polymorphisms, c.453A>C, p.( = ) and c.-178G>T, which were found in cases and controls. This is the first report from India to demonstrate TCAP association with LGMD2G. PMID:25055047

  10. The million mutation project: A new approach to genetics in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Owen; Edgley, Mark; Strasbourger, Pnina; Flibotte, Stephane; Ewing, Brent; Adair, Ryan; Au, Vinci; Chaudhry, Iasha; Fernando, Lisa; Hutter, Harald; Kieffer, Armelle; Lau, Joanne; Lee, Norris; Miller, Angela; Raymant, Greta; Shen, Bin; Shendure, Jay; Taylor, Jon; Turner, Emily H.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Moerman, Donald G.; Waterston, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    We have created a library of 2007 mutagenized Caenorhabditis elegans strains, each sequenced to a target depth of 15-fold coverage, to provide the research community with mutant alleles for each of the worm's more than 20,000 genes. The library contains over 800,000 unique single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with an average of eight nonsynonymous changes per gene and more than 16,000 insertion/deletion (indel) and copy number changes, providing an unprecedented genetic resource for this multicellular organism. To supplement this collection, we also sequenced 40 wild isolates, identifying more than 630,000 unique SNVs and 220,000 indels. Comparison of the two sets demonstrates that the mutant collection has a much richer array of both nonsense and missense mutations than the wild isolate set. We also find a wide range of rDNA and telomere repeat copy number in both sets. Scanning the mutant collection for molecular phenotypes reveals a nonsense suppressor as well as strains with higher levels of indels that harbor mutations in DNA repair genes and strains with abundant males associated with him mutations. All the strains are available through the Caenorhabditis Genetics Center and all the sequence changes have been deposited in WormBase and are available through an interactive website. PMID:23800452

  11. Mutations in the GlyT2 Gene (SLC6A5) Are a Second Major Cause of Startle Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Eloisa; Chung, Seo-Kyung; James, Victoria M.; Robinson, Angela; Gill, Jennifer L.; Remy, Nathalie; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Drew, Cheney J. G.; Cagdas, Sophie; Cameron, Duncan; Cowan, Frances M.; Del Toro, Mireria; Graham, Gail E.; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Masri, Amira; Rivera, Serge; Scalais, Emmanuel; Shiang, Rita; Sinclair, Kate; Stuart, Catriona A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Wise, Grahame; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R.; Topf, Maya; Thomas, Rhys H.; Supplisson, Stéphane; Rees, Mark I.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hyperekplexia or startle disease is characterized by an exaggerated startle response, evoked by tactile or auditory stimuli, leading to hypertonia and apnea episodes. Missense, nonsense, frameshift, splice site mutations, and large deletions in the human glycine receptor α1 subunit gene (GLRA1) are the major known cause of this disorder. However, mutations are also found in the genes encoding the glycine receptor β subunit (GLRB) and the presynaptic Na+/Cl−-dependent glycine transporter GlyT2 (SLC6A5). In this study, systematic DNA sequencing of SLC6A5 in 93 new unrelated human hyperekplexia patients revealed 20 sequence variants in 17 index cases presenting with homozygous or compound heterozygous recessive inheritance. Five apparently unrelated cases had the truncating mutation R439X. Genotype-phenotype analysis revealed a high rate of neonatal apneas and learning difficulties associated with SLC6A5 mutations. From the 20 SLC6A5 sequence variants, we investigated glycine uptake for 16 novel mutations, confirming that all were defective in glycine transport. Although the most common mechanism of disrupting GlyT2 function is protein truncation, new pathogenic mechanisms included splice site mutations and missense mutations affecting residues implicated in Cl− binding, conformational changes mediated by extracellular loop 4, and cation-π interactions. Detailed electrophysiology of mutation A275T revealed that this substitution results in a voltage-sensitive decrease in glycine transport caused by lower Na+ affinity. This study firmly establishes the combination of missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice site mutations in the GlyT2 gene as the second major cause of startle disease. PMID:22700964

  12. Human SMG-1, a novel phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase, associates with components of the mRNA surveillance complex and is involved in the regulation of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akio; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Kashima, Isao; Taya, Yoichi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2001-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved surveillance mechanism that eliminates imperfect mRNAs that contain premature translation termination codons (PTCs) and code for nonfunctional or potentially harmful polypeptides. We show that a novel phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase, hSMG-1, is a human ortholog of a product of Caenorhabditis elegans smg-1, one of seven smg genes involved in NMD. hSMG-1 phosphorylates hUPF1/SMG-2 in vivo and in vitro at specific serine residues in SQ motifs. hSMG-1 can associate with hUPF1/SMG-2 and other components of the surveillance complex. In particular, overexpression of a kinase-deficient point mutant of hSMG-1, hSMG-1-DA, results in a marked suppression of the PTC-dependent β-globin mRNA degradation; whereas that of wild-type hSMG-1 enhances it. We also show that inhibitors of hSMG-1 induce the accumulation of truncated p53 proteins in human cancer cell lines with p53 PTC mutation. Taken together, we conclude that hSMG-1 plays a critical role in NMD through the direct phosphorylation of hUPF1/SMG-2 in the evolutionally conserved mRNA surveillance complex. PMID:11544179

  13. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  14. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  15. A novel KMT2D mutation resulting in Kabuki syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Mo, Guiling; Ling, Yaojun; Ji, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and varying degrees of mental retardation. Patients with KS often present with facial, skeletal, visceral and dermatoglyphic abnormalities, cardiac anomalies and immunological defects. Mutation of the lysine methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D) gene (formerly known as MLL2) is the primary cause of KS. The present study reported the case of a 4-year-old Chinese girl who presented with atypical KS, including atypical facial features, unclear speech and suspected mental retardation. A diagnosis of KS was confirmed by genetic testing, which revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 16 of KMT2D (c.4485C>A, Tyr1495Ter). To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel mutation that has not been reported previously. The present case underscores the importance of genetic testing in KS diagnosis. PMID:27573763

  16. Antisuppressor mutation in Escherichia coli defective in biosynthesis of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Cannon, J F; Webb, F H; Bock, R M

    1985-01-01

    Mutations in three Escherichia coli K-12 genes were isolated that reduce the efficiency of the lysine-inserting nonsense suppressor supL. These antisuppressor mutations asuD, asuE, and asuF map at 61.9, 25.3, and 76.3 min, respectively, on the E. coli chromosome. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the mutant strains revealed the reason for the antisuppressor phenotype for two of these genes. The activity of lysyl-tRNA synthetase was reduced in strains with asuD mutations. The modification of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine, the wobble base of tRNALys, was impaired in asuE mutant strains, presumably at the 2-thiolation step. Images PMID:3881393

  17. First case of L1CAM gene mutation identified in MASA syndrome in Asia.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Yonehiro; Takuma, Yuuichi; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Mami

    2005-06-01

    We report here the first case of an L1CAM gene mutation identified in mental retardation, adducted thumbs, shuffling gait, and aphasia (MASA) syndrome in Japan. The patient was a 10-year-old boy with mild mental retardation, bilateral adducted thumbs and corpus callosum hypoplasia. His family had no history of MASA syndrome. The L1CAM gene contained a nonsense mutation (R1166X) in exon 26 in the cytoplasmic domain. No mutation was found in the extracellular and transmembrane domains of L1CAM. The abnormal development of axon tracts resulting in the corpus callosum hypoplasia and adducted thumbs appears to be caused by malfunction of the cytoplasmic domain of L1CAM.

  18. Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency in Serbia: Two Novel Mutations and Evidence of Genotype-Phenotype Association

    PubMed Central

    Andrejević, Slađana; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Košnik, Mitja; Mijanović, Radovan; Bonači-Nikolić, Branka; Rijavec, Matija

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent life-threatening oedemas and/or abdominal pain and caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1. We sought to investigate the spectrum of SERPING1 mutations in Serbia and the possible genotype-phenotype association. C1-INH-HAE was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria in 40 patients from 27 families; four were asymptomatic. Mutational analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Disease-causing mutations in SERPING1 were identified in all patients. In C1-INH-HAE type I, we identified 19 different mutations, including 6 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 2 small deletions, 1 small insertion, 2 splicing defects and 2 large deletions. Two of the mutations (c.300C>T and c.1184_1185insTA) are reported here for the first time. All C1-INH-HAE type II patients from three families harboured the same substitution (c.1396C>T). Based on the type of mutation identified in the SERPING1 gene, patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (nonsense, frameshift, large deletions/insertions, splicing defect, and mutations at Arg444) or group 2 (missense, excluding mutations at Arg444). Significant differences were found in the clinical severity score (P = 0.005), prevalence of laryngeal (P = 0.040) and facial (P = 0.013) oedema, and long-term prophylaxis (P = 0.023) between the groups with different types of mutations. Because our population consisted of related subjects, differences in the severity score between mutation groups were further confirmed using the generalized estimating equation (P = 0.038). Our study identified 20 different disease-causing mutations, including two novel mutations, in all C1-INH-HAE patients, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene. Furthermore, it appears that mutations with a clear effect

  19. Loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene associate with psoriasis vulgaris in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengmao; Xiong, Zhimin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Li, Fangfang; Lu, Lina; Li, Wei; Su, Juan; Liu, Yalan; Liu, Deyuan; Xie, Zhiguo; Peng, Yu; Kuang, Yehong; Wu, Lisha; Zhang, Jianglin; Pan, Qian; Tang, Beisha; Chen, Xiang; Xia, Kun

    2012-07-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG; OMIM #135940) have been reported to cause the semi-dominant keratinizing disorders such as ichthyosis vulgaris (IV; OMIM #146700) and atopic dermatitis (AD; OMIM #605803). Recent linkage analysis and immunohistochemical studies suggest the possible contribution of FLG to psoriatic susceptibility. However, no susceptibility variant in FLG gene associated with psoriasis (OMIM #177900) has been identified. In this study, we identified a non-sense mutation of FLG (p.K4022X) in a Chinese psoriasis/IV coexisting family. The homozygous p.K4022X mutation was detected in a psoriasis patient, whereas the heterozygous p.K4022X mutation was identified in two IV patients and four apparently normal family members. We also genotyped p.K4022X variant in 441 sporadic Chinese psoriasis patients and found homozygous mutation in two patients, while no homozygous variant was found in 500 control individuals. After sequencing the entire coding region of FLG gene in 441 psoriasis patients, we identified another five mutations (p.R826X, p.W2583X, c.7945delA, c.3321delA and p.Q2417X). Although all six FLG mutations as a whole was not significantly associated with psoriasis (P = 0.105), mutation p.K4022X was significantly associated with psoriasis (P < 0.05). Our data thus indicates an association of FLG with psoriasis in Chinese population.

  20. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene mutations in Canadian subjects with abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hegele, R A

    2000-03-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by defective assembly and secretion of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. ABL results from mutations in the gene encoding the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). We sequenced the MTP gene in six Canadian subjects with ABL, of whom four were found to be simple homozygotes and two were found to be compound heterozygotes for MTP gene mutations. Of the 8 MTP gene mutations identified, 6 had not been previously reported, including two new nonsense mutations (K448X and K842X), two new missense mutations (S590I and G746E), one new frameshift mutation (1820del1) and one new splice donor site mutation (G1770A). Despite appropriate treatment with high doses of fat-soluble vitamins in all subjects, there was a wide variation in the progression and severity of the clinical phenotypes. For example, the presence of severe retinopathy and neuropathy did not correlate with the type and position of the mutation, but rather with the age at diagnosis and onset of treatment with fat-soluble vitamins. These findings suggest that genetic and non-genetic factors can modulate the clinical impact of mutant MTP in ABL patients.

  1. Different RPGR exon ORF15 mutations in Canids provide insights into photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Acland, Gregory M; Wu, Wen X; Johnson, Jennifer L; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Tulloch, Brian; Vervoort, Raf; Wright, Alan F; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2002-05-01

    The canine disease, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA), is similar to human RP3, an X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa, and maps to the same region in the X chromosome. Analysis of the physical map of the XLPRA and RP3 intervals shows a high degree of conservation in terms of genes and their order. We have found different mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene in two distinct mutant dog strains (XLPRA1, XLPRA2). Microdeletions resulting in a premature stop or a frameshift mutation result in very different retinal phenotypes, which are allele-specific and consistent for each mutation. The phenotype associated with the frameshift mutation in XLPRA2 is very severe and manifests during retinal development; the phenotype resulting from the XLPRA1 nonsense mutation is expressed only after normal photoreceptor morphogenesis. Splicing of RPGR mRNA transcripts in retina is complex, and either exon ORF15 or exon 19 can be a terminal exon. The retina-predominant transcript contains ORF15 as a terminal exon, and is expressed in normal and mutant retinas. The frameshift mutation dramatically alters the deduced amino acid sequence, and the protein aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The cellular and molecular results in the two canine RPGR exon ORF15 mutations have implications for understanding the phenotypic variability found in human RP3 families that carry similar mutations.

  2. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations in Slovene hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families

    PubMed Central

    NOVAKOVIĆ, SRDJAN; MILATOVIĆ, MAŠA; CERKOVNIK, PETRA; STEGEL, VIDA; KRAJC, MATEJA; HOČEVAR, MARKO; ŽGAJNAR, JANEZ; VAKSELJ, ALEŠ

    2012-01-01

    The estimated proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers among all breast and ovarian cancer cases is 5–10%. According to the literature, inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumour-suppressor genes, account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. The aim of this report is to present novel mutations that have not yet been described in the literature and pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations which have been detected in HBOC families for the first time in the last three years. In the period between January 2009 and December 2011, 559 individuals from 379 families affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Three novel mutations were detected: one in BRCA1 - c.1193C>A (p.Ser398*) and two in BRCA2 - c.5101C>T (p.Gln1701*) and c.5433_5436delGGAA (p.Glu1811Aspfs*3). These novel mutations are located in the exons 11 of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and encode truncated proteins. Two of them are nonsense while one is a frameshift mutation. Also, 11 previously known pathogenic mutations were detected for the first time in the HBOC families studied here (three in BRCA1 and eight in BRCA2). All, except one cause premature formation of stop codons leading to truncation of the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 proteins. PMID:22923021

  3. Clinical and Mutational Analysis of the GCDH Gene in Malaysian Patients with Glutaric Aciduria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yakob, Yusnita; Abdul Azize, Nor Azimah; Md Yunus, Zabedah; Huey Yin, Leong; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Lock Hock, Ngu

    2016-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme encoded by the GCDH gene. In this study, we presented the clinical and molecular findings of seven GA1 patients in Malaysia. All the patients were symptomatic from infancy and diagnosed clinically from large excretion of glutaric and 3-hydroxyglutaric acids. Bidirectional sequencing of the GCDH gene revealed ten mutations, three of which were novel (Gln76Pro, Glu131Val, and Gly390Trp). The spectrum of mutations included eight missense mutations, a nonsense mutation, and a splice site mutation. Two mutations (Gln76Pro and Arg386Gln) were homozygous in two patients with parental consanguinity. All mutations were predicted to be disease causing by MutationTaster2. In conclusion, this is the first report of both clinical and molecular aspects of GA1 in Malaysian patients. Despite the lack of genotype and phenotype correlation, early diagnosis and timely treatment remained the most important determinant of patient outcome. PMID:27672653

  4. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Xu, Haikun; An, Wei; Zhu, Dechun; Li, Dejun

    2016-06-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  5. Interplay between DMD Point Mutations and Splicing Signals in Dystrophinopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  6. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  7. Congenital long QT syndrome with compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bando, Sachiko; Soeki, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Akaike, Masashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Sata, Masataka

    2014-07-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a genetic disorder encompassing a family of mutations that can lead to aberrant ventricular electrical activity. We report on two brothers with long QT syndrome caused by compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited from parents who had no prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography. The proband had syncope, and his elder brother suffered from ventricular fibrillation. Genetic testing revealed that both brothers had multiple mutations in the KCNH2 gene, including a missense mutation of C1474T (exon 6) as well as a frameshift/nonsense mutation, resulting from the insertion of 25 nucleotides, which caused an altered amino acid sequence beginning at codon 302 and a premature termination codon (i.e., TAG) at codon 339 (exon 4). Family genetic screening found that their father had the same frameshift mutation, and their mother and sister had the same missense mutation, in the KCNH2 gene. However, these other family members were asymptomatic, with normal QT intervals on electrocardiography. These results suggest that compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited independently from the parents made the phenotypes of their sons more severe.

  8. Spectrum of mutations in Lebanese patients with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Karam, Pascale E; Alhamra, Rasha Shahabeddeen; Nemer, Georges; Usta, Julnar

    2013-02-15

    Phenylketonuria is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting from phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Genetic basis of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency has been reported in various European and Asian countries with few reports available in Arab populations of the Mediterranean region. This is the first pilot study describing phenotype and genotype of 23 Lebanese patients with phenylketonuria. 48% of the patients presented mainly with neurological signs at a mean age of 2 years 9 months, as newborn screening is not yet a nationwide policy. 56.5% of the patients had classical phenylketonuria. Thirteen different mutations were identified: splice site 52%, frameshift 31%, and missense 17% with no nonsense mutations. IVS10-11G>A was found mainly in Christians at high relative frequency whereas Muslims carried the G352fs and R261Q mutations. A rare splice mutation IVS7+1G>T, not described before, was identified in the homozygous state in one family with moderate phenylketonuria phenotype. Genotype-phenotype correlation using Guldberg arbitrary value method showed high consistency between predicted and observed phenotypes. Calculated homozygosity rate was 0.07 indicating the genetic heterogeneity in our patients. Our findings underline the admixture of different ethnicities and religions in Lebanon that might help tracing back the PAH gene flux history across the Mediterranean region.

  9. Identification of CANT1 Mutations in Desbuquois Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Oulès, Bénédicte; Bertoli, Marta; Chami, Mounia; Fradin, Mélanie; Alanay, Yasemin; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Bitoun, Pierre; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Krebs, Alexander; Le Merrer, Martine; Mortier, Geert; Shafeghati, Yousef; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Robertson, Stephen P.; Le Goff, Carine; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia is a severe condition characterized by short stature, joint laxity, scoliosis, and advanced carpal ossification with a delta phalanx. Studying nine Desbuquois families, we identified seven distinct mutations in the Calcium-Activated Nucleotidase 1 gene (CANT1), which encodes a soluble UDP-preferring nucleotidase belonging to the apyrase family. Among the seven mutations, four were nonsense mutations (Del 5′ UTR and exon 1, p.P245RfsX3, p.S303AfsX20, and p.W125X), and three were missense mutations (p.R300C, p.R300H, and p.P299L) responsible for the change of conserved amino acids located in the seventh nucleotidase conserved region (NRC). The arginine substitution at position 300 was identified in five out of nine families. The specific function of CANT1 is as yet unknown, but its substrates are involved in several major signaling functions, including Ca2+ release, through activation of pyrimidinergic signaling. Importantly, using RT-PCR analysis, we observed a specific expression in chondrocytes. We also found electron-dense material within distended rough endoplasmic reticulum in the fibroblasts of Desbuquois patients. Our findings demonstrate the specific involvement of a nucleotidase in the endochondral ossification process. PMID:19853239

  10. Germ-line mutational analysis of the TSC2 gene in 90 tuberous-sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Au, K S; Rodriguez, J A; Finch, J L; Volcik, K A; Roach, E S; Delgado, M R; Rodriguez, E; Northrup, H

    1998-01-01

    Ninety patients with tuberous-sclerosis complex (TSC) were tested for subtle mutations in the TSC2 gene, by means of single-strand conformational analysis (SSCA) of genomic DNA. Patients included 56 sporadic cases and 34 familial probands. For all patients, SSCA was performed for each of the 41 exons of the TSC2 gene. We identified 32 SSCA changes, 22 disease-causing mutations, and 10 polymorphic variants. Interestingly, we detected mutations at a much higher frequency in the sporadic cases (32%) than in the multiplex families (9%). Among the eight families for which linkage to the TSC2 region had been determined, only one mutation was found. Mutations were distributed equally across the gene; they included 5 deletions, 3 insertions, 10 missense mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 2 tandem duplications. We did not detect an increase in mutations either in the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domains of TSC2 or in the activating domains that have been identified in rat tuberin. We did not detect any mutations in the exons (25 and 31) that are spliced out in the isoforms. There was no evidence for correspondence between variability of phenotype and type of mutation (missense versus early termination). Diagnostic testing will be difficult because of the genetic heterogeneity of TSC (which has at least two causative genes: TSC1 and TSC2), the large size of the TSC2 gene, and the variety of mutations. More than half of the mutations that we identified (missense, small in-frame deletion, and tandem duplication) are not amenable to the mutation-detection methods, such as protein-truncation testing, that are commonly employed for genes that encode proteins with tumor-suppressor function. PMID:9463313

  11. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T.

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  12. Clinical presentation and mutation analysis of VHL disease in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Li, De-Ling; Kang, Peng; Ji, Nan; Yang, Jun; Liu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Li-Wei; Jia, Gui-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited neoplastic disorder characterized by marked phenotypic variability and age-dependent penetrance. This disease is caused by germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Systematic physical examinations, imaging assessments and molecular genetic tests for the VHL gene were performed in a large Chinese VHL family. The examined Chinese VHL family, which has 25 members from four generations, including 7 diagnosed VHL patients and 2 asymptomatic mutation carriers. The average ages of first onset for generations I, II, and III were 37, 30 and 16, respectively. The male:female ratio among VHL patients was 6:1. Molecular genetic investigations detected the c.433C>T [p.Q145X] nonsense mutation in the VHL gene. Molecular modeling of the VHL-ElonginC- ElonginB-HIF-1α complex predicted that the p.Q145X mutation markedly alters the L7 loop structure of the β-domain of the VHL protein (pVHL), destabilizes the VHL-HIF-1αcomplex, and induces the truncation of pVHL. We speculate that the p.Q145X nonsense mutation leads to relatively obvious familial aggregation. This mutation causes the type I phenotype of VHL disease and is associated with a high risk of retinal and central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastomas (HGBs) and visceral cysts, but a low risk of renal cell carcinoma. Moreover, within a VHL family, the average ages of first onset became younger in successive generations, and the CNS HGBs are more likely to occur in male patients.

  13. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X.; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Martin, Jorge H.; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions. PMID:28205584

  14. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X; Forlenza, Kimberly N; Martin, Jorge H; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K; Butler, Merlin G; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-02-16

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions.

  15. Diagnosis of Xeroderma Pigmentosum Groups A and C by Detection of Two Prevalent Mutations in West Algerian Population: A Rapid Genotyping Tool for the Frequent XPC Mutation c.1643_1644delTG.

    PubMed

    Bensenouci, Salima; Louhibi, Lotfi; De Verneuil, Hubert; Mahmoudi, Khadidja; Saidi-Mehtar, Nadhira

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Considering that XP patients have a defect of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway which enables them to repair DNA damage caused by UV light, they have an increased risk of developing skin and eyes cancers. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of the prevalent XPA and XPC genes mutations-nonsense mutation (c.682C>T, p.Arg228X) and a two-base-pair (2 bp) deletion (c.1643_1644delTG or p.Val548Ala fsX25), respectively-in 19 index cases from 19 unrelated families in the West of Algeria. For the genetic diagnosis of XPA gene, we proceeded to PCR-RFLP. For the XPC gene, we validated a routine analysis which includes a specific amplification of a short region surrounding the 2 bp deletion using a fluorescent primer and fragment sizing (GeneScan size) on a sequencing gel. Among the 19 index cases, there were 17 homozygous patients for the 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene and 2 homozygous patients carrying the nonsense XPA mutation. Finally, XPC appears to be the major disease-causing gene concerning xeroderma pigmentosum in North Africa. The use of fragment sizing is the simplest method to analyze this 2 bp deletion for the DNA samples coming from countries where the mutation c.1643_1644delTG of XPC gene is prevalent.

  16. TBK1 Mutation Spectrum in an Extended European Patient Cohort with Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Perrone, Federica; Dillen, Lubina; Heeman, Bavo; Bäumer, Veerle; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Bleecker, Jan; Baets, Jonathan; Gelpi, Ellen; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Perneczky, Robert; Synofzik, Matthis; Just, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Jordanova, Albena; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltényi, Gabriel; Simões do Couto, Frederico; Ramirez, Alfredo; Jessen, Frank; Heneka, Michael T; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Danek, Adrian; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Jonghe, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P; Sleegers, Kristel; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Goeman, Johan; Nuytten, Dirk; Smets, Katrien; Robberecht, Wim; Damme, Philip Van; Bleecker, Jan De; Santens, Patrick; Dermaut, Bart; Versijpt, Jan; Michotte, Alex; Ivanoiu, Adrian; Deryck, Olivier; Bergmans, Bruno; Delbeck, Jean; Bruyland, Marc; Willems, Christiana; Salmon, Eric; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Hernández, Isabel; Boada, Mercè; Ruiz, Agustín; Sorbi, Sandro; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Santana, Isabel; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Maetzler, Walter; Matej, Radoslav; Fraidakis, Matthew J; Kovacs, Gabor G; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Testi, Silvia

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the mutation spectrum of the TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) gene and its associated phenotypic spectrum by exonic resequencing of TBK1 in a cohort of 2,538 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or FTD plus ALS, ascertained within the European Early-Onset Dementia Consortium. We assessed pathogenicity of predicted protein-truncating mutations by measuring loss of RNA expression. Functional effect of in-frame amino acid deletions and missense mutations was further explored in vivo on protein level and in vitro by an NFκB-induced luciferase reporter assay and measuring phosphorylated TBK1. The protein-truncating mutations led to the loss of transcript through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. For the in-frame amino acid deletions, we demonstrated loss of TBK1 or phosphorylated TBK1 protein. An important fraction of the missense mutations compromised NFκB activation indicating that at least some functions of TBK1 are lost. Although missense mutations were also present in controls, over three times more mutations affecting TBK1 functioning were found in the mutation fraction observed in patients only, suggesting high-risk alleles (P = 0.03). Total mutation frequency for confirmed TBK1 LoF mutations in the European cohort was 0.7%, with frequencies in the clinical subgroups of 0.4% in FTD, 1.3% in ALS, and 3.6% in FTD-ALS.

  17. Identification of 123 previously unreported mutations in the F8 gene of Iranian patients with haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Ravanbod, S; Rassoulzadegan, M; Rastegar-Lari, G; Jazebi, M; Enayat, S; Ala, F

    2012-05-01

    In Haemophilia A (HA), the deficiency in coagulation factor VIII is caused by mutations in the F8 gene. In the past, HA carrier detection in Iran used to be carried out by tracking polymorphic DNA markers - a technical strategy with poor efficacy and accuracy. For some 10 years, however, mutations have been identified by direct DNA sequencing at the Iranian Comprehensive Haemophilia Care Centre (ICHCC), resulting in the detection of 580 different mutations and accurate carrier detection. The aim of this study was to characterize and report the unreported mutations not recorded in the F8 HAMSTeRS database and HGMD, which we have detected amongst all the mutations hitherto identified. After excluding introns 1 and 22 inversions, direct DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations among our patients. These were then confirmed in another affected relative or obligate carrier. Severe cases of HA, where no mutation could be identified, were further investigated by the MLPA method. The new, unreported mutations identified include: 51 missense, 15 nonsense, 45 frame-shifts, 11 splice-site, 1 duplications. We report a large spectrum of mutations identified in the course of the past 10 years at the ICHCC, which offers this service to all patients from regions throughout Iran. Aside from the common introns 1 and 22 inversions, this work demonstrates a high degree of heterogeneity in F8 mutations. The establishment of a comprehensive Iranian HA database will improve the care and genetic counselling of Iranian HA families.

  18. Protein Structure-Function Relationship at Work: Learning from Myopathy Mutations of the Slow Skeletal Muscle Isoform of Troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Anupom; Jin, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is the sarcomeric thin filament anchoring subunit of the troponin complex in striated muscles. A nonsense mutation in exon 11 of the slow skeletal muscle isoform of TnT (ssTnT) gene (TNNT1) was found in the Amish populations in Pennsylvania and Ohio. This single nucleotide substitution causes a truncation of the ssTnT protein at Glu180 and the loss of the C-terminal tropomyosin (Tm)-binding site 2. As a consequence, it abolishes the myofilament integration of ssTnT and the loss of function causes an autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy (NM). More TNNT1 mutations have recently been reported in non-Amish ethnic groups with similar recessive NM phenotypes. A nonsense mutation in exon 9 truncates ssTnT at Ser108, deleting Tm-binding site 2 and a part of the middle region Tm-binding site 1. Two splicing site mutations result in truncation of ssTnT at Leu203 or deletion of the exon 14-encoded C-terminal end segment. Another splicing mutation causes an internal deletion of the 39 amino acids encoded by exon 8, partially damaging Tm-binding site 1. The three splicing mutations of TNNT1 all preserve the high affinity Tm-binding site 2 but still present recessive NM phenotypes. The molecular mechanisms for these mutations to cause myopathy provide interesting models to study and understand the structure-function relationship of TnT. This focused review summarizes the current knowledge of TnT isoform regulation, structure-function relationship of TnT and how various ssTnT mutations cause recessive NM, in order to promote in depth studies for further understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of TNNT1 myopathies toward the development of effective treatments. PMID:27790152

  19. Novel and recurrent germline and somatic mutations in a cohort of 67 patients from 48 families with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome including the phenotypic variant of multiple familial trichoepitheliomas and correlation with the histopathologic findings in 379 biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Petr; Vanecek, Tomas; Steiner, Petr; Kacerovska, Denisa; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Cribier, Bernard; Rose, Christian; Vazmitel, Marina; Carlson, J Andrew; Emberger, Michael; Martinek, Petr; Pearce, Robert L; Pearn, John; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2013-02-01

    Brooke-Spiegler syndrome (BSS) is a rare, inherited, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple adnexal cutaneous neoplasms including spiradenoma, cylindroma, spiradenocylindroma, and trichoepithelioma. The syndrome of multiple familial trichoepitheliomas (MFT) is considered a phenotypic variant of BSS in which patients present with trichoepitheliomas only. We studied germline and somatic mutations of the CYLD gene by direct sequencing in patients with BSS (n = 49) and MFT (n = 18) using peripheral blood and 90 samples of frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue selected from 379 available histology specimens. Germline CYLD mutations were found in 51 patients (76%) from 36 families (75%). Germline CYLD mutations were found in 43 of the 49 patients with BSS (88%) but in only 8 of 18 MFT cohort (44%). Twenty-one frameshift, 15 nonsense, 3 missense, and 4 splice site mutations were found in patients with BSS, whereas 1 frameshift, 5 nonsense, and 2 splice site mutations were identified in the MFT cohort. Five novel mutations were identified including 4 frameshift mutations (c.1027dupA/p.T343NfsX7, c.2155dupA/p.M719NfsX5, c.2288_2289delTT/p.F763X, and c.2641delG/p.D881TfsX32) and 1 nonsense mutation (c.2713C>T/p. Q905X). Of the 76 tumors from 32 patients with a germline CYLD mutation, 12 were spiradenomas, 15 spiradenocylindromas, 26 cylindromas, 15 trichoepitheliomas, and 7 were other tumor types. Somatic mutations were detected in 67 specimens of these 76 tumors (88%). Of the 67 somatic mutations, 21 (31%) represented a sequence alteration and 46 (69%) showed loss of heterozygosity. In the remaining 9 cases (12%), the somatic changes remained unknown. A germline CYLD mutation was not detected in 14 tumor samples from 8 patients. In these 14 tumors, somatic mutations were identified in 6 samples (43%), all consisting of sequence alterations (1 sample showed 2 different sequence alterations). In the remaining 8 samples (53

  20. Skoura - a genetic island for congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis among Moroccan Jews, as determined by a novel mutation in the NTRK1 gene.

    PubMed

    Suriu, C; Khayat, M; Weiler, M; Kfir, N; Cohen, C; Zinger, A; Aslanidis, C; Schmitz, G; Falik-Zaccai, T C

    2009-03-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare, autosomal recessive neurologic disorder, characterized by absence of reaction to painful stimuli, mental retardation, self- mutilating behavior, anhidrosis, and recurrent episodes of hyperthermia. Mutations in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1, a receptor phosphorylated by nerve growth factor, have been documented in diverse ethnic groups. We identified the same novel nonsense mutation in two unrelated families of Moroccan Jewish descent, each with two affected siblings. This possible founder mutation may trace to the rural Jewish village in southern Morocco from where both these families originated. Genetic screening for the causative mutation among 300 unrelated Moroccan Jews did not reveal carriers for the causative mutation, thus excluding high risk for CIPA in this ethnic subpopulation.

  1. Mutation in LEMD3 (Man1) Associated with Osteopoikilosis and Late-Onset Generalized Morphea: A New Buschke-Ollendorf Syndrome Variant

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Laumann, Anne; Ferguson, Polly; Varga, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Buschke-Ollendorf syndrome (BOS) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by osteopoikilosis and other bone abnormalities, accompanied by skin lesions, most frequently connective tissue nevi. BOS is caused by mutations in the LEMD3 gene, which encodes the inner nuclear membrane protein Man1. We describe a unique case of osteopoikilosis associated with late-onset localized scleroderma and familial LEMD3 mutations. Case Report. A 72-year-old woman presented with adult-onset diffuse morphea and bullous skin lesions. Evaluation revealed multiple hyperostotic lesions (osteopoikilosis) suggestive of BOS. DNA sequencing identified a previously undescribed nonsense mutation (Trp621X) in the LEMD3 gene encoding Man1. Two additional family members were found to have osteopoikilosis and carry the same LEMD3 mutation. Conclusions and Relevance. We report a unique familial LEMD3 mutation in an individual with osteopoikilosis and late-onset morphea. We propose that this constellation represents a novel syndromic variant of BOS. PMID:27382493

  2. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron-exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services.

  3. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J.; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L.; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E.; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron–exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services. PMID:25575445

  4. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  5. Mutational analysis of the PEX gene in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Holm, I A; Huang, X; Kunkel, L M

    1997-04-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is a dominant disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting and abnormal vitamin D metabolism. PEX, the gene that is defective in HYP and is located on Xp22.1, is homologous to members of the neutral endopeptidase family. However, the complete coding sequence of the PEX cDNA, the structure of the PEX gene, and the role that PEX plays in phosphate transport remain unknown. We determined the genomic structure of the published PEX gene, which was found to be composed of 18 short exons, and demonstrated that the genomic organization of PEX shares homology to members of the family of neutral endopeptidases. Primer sets were designed from the intron sequence, to amplify each PEX exon from genomic DNA of HYP patients. Mutations in PEX were identified in 9/22 unrelated HYP patients, confirming that defects in PEX are responsible for HYP. The mutations detected included three nonsense mutations, a 1-bp deletion leading to a frameshift, a donor splice-site mutation, and missense mutations in four patients. Although the entire PEX gene has not been identified and some mutations may have been missed, the lack of detection of mutations in the remaining 13 patients, especially in 1 patient who has an apparently balanced, de novo 9;13 translocation, implies that there may be other loci involved in the generation of the HYP phenotype.

  6. Three Novel Mutations in Iranian Patients with Tay-Sachs Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Solmaz; Eskandari, Nasim; Aryani, Omid; Salehpour, Shadab; Zaman, Talieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), or GM2 gangliosidosis, is a lethal autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA), resulting in lysosomal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. The aim of this study was to identify the TSD-causing mutations in an Iranian population. Methods: In this study, we examined 31 patients for TSD-causing mutations using PCR, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Results: Molecular genetics analysis of DNA from 23 patients of TSD revealed mutations that has been previously reported, including four-base duplications c.1274_1277dupTATC in exon 11 and IVS2+1G>A, deletion TTAGGCAAGGGC in exon 10 as well as a few novel mutations, including C331G, which altered Gln>Glu in HEXB, A>G, T>C, and p.R510X in exon 14, which predicted a termination codon or nonsense mutation. Conclusion: In conclusion, with the discovery of these novel mutations, the genotypic spectrum of Iranian patients with TSD disease has been extended and could facilitate definition of disease-related mutations. PMID:24518553

  7. Molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance: mutations and polymorphisms in the human aldolase B gene.

    PubMed

    Tolan, D R

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human aldolase B gene that result in hereditary fructose intolerance have been characterized extensively. Although the majority of subjects have been from northern Europe, subjects from other geographical regions and ethnic groups have been identified. At present 21 mutations have been reported; 15 of these are single base substitutions, resulting in nine amino acid replacements, four nonsense codons, and two putative splicing defects. Two large deletions, two four-base deletions, a single-base deletion, and a seven-base deletion/one-base insertion have been found. This last mutation leads to a defect in splicing and it is likely that one of the small deletions does as well. Regions of the enzyme where mutations have been observed recurrently are encoded by exons 5 and 9. Indeed, the three most common mutations are found in these exons. Two of these prevalent HFI mutations arose from a common ancestor and spread throughout the population by genetic drift. This finding was based on linkage to two sequence polymorphisms, which are among very few informative polymorphic markers that have been identified within the aldolase B gene. Because of the prevalence of a few HFI alleles, and the recent advances in molecular methods for identifying and screening for mutation, the diagnosis of HFI by molecular screening methods should become routine. These molecular diagnostic methods will be extremely beneficial for this often difficult to diagnose and sometimes fatal disease.

  8. Three Novel Mutations in the NPHS1 Gene in Vietnamese Patients with Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Lien; Pham, Van Dem; Nguyen, Thu Huong; Pham, Trung Kien; Nguyen, Thi Quynh Huong

    2017-01-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome, a rare and severe disease, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The disease manifests shortly after birth and occurs predominantly in families of Finnish origin but has now been observed in all countries and races. Mutations in the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin, are the main causes of congenital nephrotic syndrome in patients. In this study, we report the first mutational analysis of the NPHS1 gene in three unrelated children from three different Vietnamese families. These patients were examined and determined to be suffering from congenital nephrotic syndrome in the Department of Pediatrics, Vietnam National Hospital of Pediatrics. All 29 exons and exon-intron boundaries of NPHS1 were analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Genetic analysis of the NPHS1 gene revealed one compound heterozygous variant p.Glu117Lys, one heterozygous missense mutation p.Asp310Asn, and one heterozygous frame-shifting mutation (c.3250_3251insG causing p.Val1084Glyfs⁎12) in patient 1. In patient 2, one heterozygous variant p.Glu117Lys and one novel heterozygous missense mutation p.Ser324Ala were identified. Finally, a novel missense mutation p.Arg802Leu and a novel nonsense mutation (c.2442C>G causing p.K792⁎) were identified in patient 3.

  9. The prevalence of melanocortin-4 receptor gene mutations in Slovak obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Polák, Emil; Vitáriušová, Eva; Celec, Peter; Pribilincová, Zuzana; Košťálová, Ľudmila; Hlavatá, Anna; Kovács, László; Kádaši, Ľudevít

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) deficiency is the most frequent monogenic form of obesity. The contribution of MC4R mutations to the Slovak population has not been investigated as yet. We screened the coding sequence of the MC4R gene in a cohort of 210 Slovak obese children and adolescents. We identified four different mutations in four patients, giving a mutation detection rate of 0.95%. Of these, three were missense mutations previously identified and characterized by other research groups (p.R7C, p.S127L and p. R305W, respectively). One was a novel nonsense mutation p.W174* detected in a severely obese 7-year-old boy. This mutation was further analyzed in family segregation analysis and exhibited variable penetrance. Two known amino acid polymorphisms (p.V103I and p.I251L) were also identified in seven subjects of our cohort group. We also performed multifactorial statistical analysis to determine the influence of genotypes on standard biochemical blood markers. No significant influence was observed in carriers of DNA variants on tested parameters. We conclude that rare heterozygous MC4R mutations contribute to the onset of obesity only in a few cases in the Slovak population.

  10. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  11. Germline mutations of regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1, RTEL1, in Dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Ballew, Bari J; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin; Giri, Neelam; Boland, Joseph; Burdett, Laurie; Alter, Blanche P; Savage, Sharon A

    2013-04-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome caused by aberrant telomere biology. The classic triad of dysplastic nails, abnormal skin pigmentation, and oral leukoplakia is diagnostic of DC, but substantial clinical heterogeneity exists; the clinically severe variant Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, severe immunodeficiency, enteropathy, and intrauterine growth retardation. Germline mutations in telomere biology genes account for approximately one-half of known DC families. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in RTEL1, a helicase with critical telomeric functions, in two families with HH. In the first family, two siblings with HH and very short telomeres inherited a premature stop codon from their mother who has short telomeres. The proband from the second family has HH and inherited a premature stop codon in RTEL1 from his father and a missense mutation from his mother, who also has short telomeres. In addition, inheritance of only the missense mutation led to very short telomeres in the proband's brother. Targeted sequencing identified a different RTEL1 missense mutation in one additional DC proband who has bone marrow failure and short telomeres. Both missense mutations affect the helicase domain of RTEL1, and three in silico prediction algorithms suggest that they are likely deleterious. The nonsense mutations both cause truncation of the RTEL1 protein, resulting in loss of the PIP box; this may abrogate an important protein-protein interaction. These findings implicate a new telomere biology gene, RTEL1, in the etiology of DC.

  12. Update on Novel CCM Gene Mutations in Patients with Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Scimone, Concetta; Bramanti, Placido; Alafaci, Concetta; Granata, Francesca; Piva, Francesco; Rinaldi, Carmela; Donato, Luigi; Greco, Federica; Sidoti, Antonina; D'Angelo, Rosalia

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are lesions affecting brain microvessels. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood. Conventional classification criterion is based on genetics, and thus, familial and sporadic forms can be distinguished; however, classification of sporadic cases with multiple lesions still remains uncertain. To date, three CCM causative genes have been identified: CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, with both sporadic and familial cases, we identified several mutations in CCM genes. This study represents further molecular screening in a cohort of 19 Italian patients enrolled by us in the few last years and classified into familial, sporadic and sporadic with multiple lesions cases. Direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis were performed to detect point mutations and large genomic rearrangements, respectively. Effects of detected mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated by an in silico approach and by western blot analysis. A novel nonsense mutation in CCM1 and a novel missense mutation in CCM2 were detected; moreover, several CCM2 gene polymorphisms in sporadic CCM patients were reported. We believe that these data enrich the mutation spectrum of CCM genes, which is useful for genetic counselling to identify both familial and sporadic CCM cases, as early as possible.

  13. A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation associated with type I-A (tyroinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Oetting, W.S.; Witkop, C.J. Jr.; Brown, S.A.; Fryer, J.P.; Bloom, K.E.; King, R.A. ); Colomer, R. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have determined the mutations in the tyrosinase gene from 12 unrelated Puerto Rican individuals who have type I-A (tyrosinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). All but one individual are of Hispanic descent. Nine individuals were homozygous for a missense mutation (G47D) in exon I at codon 47. Two individuals were heterozygous for the G47D mutation, with one having a missense mutation at codon 373 (T373K) in the homologous allele and the other having an undetermined mutation in the homologous allele. One individual with negroid features was homozygous for a nonsense mutation (W236X). The population migration between Puerto Rico and the Canary Islands is well recognized. Analysis of three individuals with OCA from the Canary Islands showed that one was a compound heterozygote for the G47D mutation and for a novel missense mutation (L216M), one was homozygous for a missense mutation (P81L), and one was heterozygous for the missense mutation P81L. The G47D and P81L missense mutations have been previously described in extended families in the United States. Haplotypes were determined using four polymorphisms linked to the tyrosinase locus. Haplotype analysis showed that the G47D mutation occurred on a single haplotype, consistent with a common founder for all individuals having this mutation. Two different haplotypes were found associated with the P81L mutation, suggesting that this may be either a recurring mutation for the tyrosinase gene or a recombination between haplotypes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. GALNS mutations in Indian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Bidchol, Abdul Mueed; Dalal, Ashwin; Shah, Hitesh; S, Suryanarayana; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kabra, Madhulika; Gupta, Neerja; Danda, Sumita; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Phadke, Shubha R; Kapoor, Seema; Kamate, Mahesh; Verma, I C; Puri, Ratna Dua; Sankar, V H; Devi, A Radha Rama; Patil, S J; Ranganath, Prajnya; Jain, S Jamal Md Nurul; Agarwal, Meenal; Singh, Ankur; Mishra, Pallavi; Tamhankar, Parag M; Gopinath, Puthiya Mundyat; Nagarajaram, H A; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Girisha, Katta Mohan

    2014-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (Morquio syndrome A, MPS IVA) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). The mutation spectrum in this condition is yet to be determined in Indians. We aimed to analyze the mutations in the GALNS gene in Asian Indians with MPS IVA. All the exons and the adjacent intronic regions of the gene were amplified and sequenced in sixty-eight unrelated Indian families. We identified 136 mutant alleles comprising of 40 different mutations. We report twenty-two novel mutations that comprise of seventeen missense (p.Asn32Thr, p.Leu36Arg, p.Pro52Leu, p.Pro77Ser, p.Cys79Arg, p.His142Pro, p.Tyr191Asp, p.Asn204Thr, p.Gly188Ser, p.Phe216Ser, p.Trp230Cys, p.Ala291Ser, p.Gly317Arg, p.His329Pro, p.Arg386Ser, p.Glu450Gly, p.Cys501Ser), three splice-site variants (c.120+1G>C, c.1003-3C>G, c.1139+1G>A), one nonsense mutation (p.Gln414*) and one frameshift mutation (p.Pro420Leufs*440). Eighteen mutations have been reported earlier. Among these p.Ser287Leu (8.82%), p.Phe216Ser (7.35%), p.Asn32Thr (6.61%) and p.Ala291Ser (5.88%) were the most frequent mutations in Indian patients but were rare in the mutational profiles reported in other populations. These results indicate that the Indian patients may have a distinct mutation spectrum compared to those of other populations. Mutant alleles in exon 1, 7 and 8 accounted for 44.8% of the mutations, and sequencing of these exons initially may be a cost-effective approach in Asian Indian patients. This is the largest study on molecular analysis of patients with MPS IVA reported in the literature, and the first report from India.

  15. A novel CYP27B1 mutation causes a feline vitamin D-dependent rickets type IA

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, Robert A; Ellis, Melanie R; Grahn, Jennifer C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-01-01

    A 12-week-old domestic cat presented at a local veterinary clinic with hypocalcemia and skeletal abnormalities suggestive of rickets. Osteomalacia (rickets) is a disease caused by impaired bone mineralization leading to an increased prevalence of fractures and deformity. Described in a variety of species, rickets is most commonly caused by vitamin D or calcium deficiencies owing to both environmental and or genetic abnormalities. Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-1A) is a result of the enzymatic pathway defect caused by mutations in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1-alpha-hydroxylase gene [cytochrome P27 B1 (CYP27B1)]. Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, regulates calcium homeostasis, which requires sufficient dietary calcium availability and correct hormonal function for proper bone growth and maintenance. Patient calcitriol concentrations were low while calcidiol levels were normal suggestive of VDDR-1A. The entire DNA coding sequencing of CYP27B1 was evaluated. The affected cat was wild type for previously identified VDDR-1A causative mutations. However, six novel mutations were identified, one of which was a nonsense mutation at G637T in exon 4. The exon 4 G637T nonsense mutation results in a premature protein truncation, changing a glutamic acid to a stop codon, E213X, likely causing the clinical presentation of rickets. The previously documented genetic mutation resulting in feline VDDR-1A rickets, as well as the case presented in this research, result from novel exon 4 CYP27B1 mutations, thus exon 4 should be the initial focus of future sequencing efforts. PMID:22553308

  16. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-05

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling.

  17. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T.; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Banin, Eyal; Bocquet, Beatrice; De Baere, Elfride; Casteels, Ingele; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Drumare, Isabelle; Friedburg, Christoph; Gottlob, Irene; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Kellner, Ulrich; Koenekoop, Robert; Kohl, Susanne; Leroy, Bart P.; Lorenz, Birgit; McLean, Rebecca; Meire, Francoise; Meunier, Isabelle; Munier, Francis; de Ravel, Thomy; Reiff, Charlotte M.; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sharon, Dror; Schorderet, Daniel; Schwartz, Sharon; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P.; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339∗]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339∗]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling. PMID:27063057

  18. A brachytic dwarfism trait (dw) in peach trees is caused by a nonsense mutation within the gibberellic acid receptor PpeGID1c.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Hadiarto, Toto; Srinivasan, Chinnathambi; Scorza, Ralph; Dardick, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors controlling tree size and shape. Here, we studied the genetic basis for a recessive brachytic dwarfism trait (dw) in peach (Prunus persica) that has little or no effect on fruit development. A sequencing-based mapping strategy positioned dw on the distal end of chromosome 6. Further sequence analysis and fine mapping identified a candidate gene for dw as a non-functional allele of the gibberellic acid receptor GID1c. Expression of the two GID1-like genes found in peach, PpeGID1c and PpeGID1b, was analyzed. GID1c was predominantly expressed in actively growing vegetative tissues, whereas GID1b was more highly expressed in reproductive tissues. Silencing of GID1c in plum via transgenic expression of a hairpin construct led to a dwarf phenotype similar to that of dw/dw peaches. In general, the degree of GID1c silencing corresponded to the degree of dwarfing. The results suggest that PpeGID1c serves a primary role in vegetative growth and elongation, whereas GID1b probably functions to regulate gibberellic acid perception in reproductive organs. Modification of GID1c expression could provide a rational approach to control tree size without impairing fruit development.

  19. A mutation spectrum that includes GNAS, KRAS and TP53 may be shared by mucinous neoplasms of the appendix.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kieko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Takuo; Yimit, Alkam; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Takahashi, Makoto; Yao, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Appendiceal mucinous tumors (AMTs) are classified as low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) or mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs), although their carcinogenesis is not well understood. As somatic activating mutations of GNAS are considered to be characteristic of LAMNs while TP53 mutations have been shown to be specific to MACs, MACs are unlikely to result from transformation of LAMNs. However, emerging evidence also shows the presence of GNAS mutations in MACs. We examined 16 AMTs (11 LAMNs and 5 MACs) for genetic alterations of GNAS, KRAS, BRAF, TP53, CTNNB1, and TERT promoter in order to elucidate the possibility of a shared genetic background in the two tumor types. Extensive histological examination revealed the presence of a low-grade component in all cases of MAC. GNAS mutations were detected in two LAMNs and in one MAC, although the GNAS mutation in this MAC was a nonsense mutation (Q227X) expected not to be activating mutation. TP53 mutations were detected in three LAMNs; they were frequently detected in MACs. KRAS mutations were detected in three LAMNs and three MACs, and CTNNB1 mutations were detected in two LAMNs. KRAS mutation and activating mutation of GNAS occurred exclusively in AMTs. BRAF and TERT mutations were not detected. Overexpression of p53 was observed in only two MACs, and p53 immunostaining clearly discriminated the high-grade lesion from a low-grade component in one. These findings suggest that p53 overexpression plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of AMTs and that, in addition to mutations of GNAS, KRAS and TP53 alterations might be shared by AMTs, thus providing evidence for the possible progression of LAMNs to MAC.

  20. Chromatoid Body Protein TDRD6 Supports Long 3’ UTR Triggered Nonsense Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Fanourgakis, Grigorios; Akpinar, Müge; Dahl, Andreas; Jessberger, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Chromatoid bodies (CBs) are spermiogenesis-specific organelles of largely unknown function. CBs harbor various RNA species, RNA-associated proteins and proteins of the tudor domain family like TDRD6, which is required for a proper CB architecture. Proteome analysis of purified CBs revealed components of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) machinery including UPF1. TDRD6 is essential for UPF1 localization to CBs, for UPF1-UPF2 and UPF1-MVH interactions. Upon removal of TDRD6, the association of several mRNAs with UPF1 and UPF2 is disturbed, and the long 3’ UTR-stimulated but not the downstream exon-exon junction triggered pathway of NMD is impaired. Reduced association of the long 3’ UTR mRNAs with UPF1 and UPF2 correlates with increased stability and enhanced translational activity. Thus, we identified TDRD6 within CBs as required for mRNA degradation, specifically the extended 3’ UTR-triggered NMD pathway, and provide evidence for the requirement of NMD in spermiogenesis. This function depends on TDRD6-promoted assembly of mRNA and decay enzymes in CBs. PMID:27149095

  1. Expression and purification of histone H3 proteins containing multiple sites of lysine acetylation using nonsense suppression.

    PubMed

    Young, Isaac A; Mittal, Chitvan; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common post-translational modification, which is especially prevalent in histone proteins in chromatin. A number of strategies exist for generating histone proteins containing lysine acetylation, but an especially attractive approach is to genetically encode acetyl-lysine residues using nonsense suppression. This strategy has been successfully applied to single sites of histone acetylation. However, because histone acetylation can often occur at multiple sites simultaneously, we were interested in determining whether this approach could be extended. Here we show that we can express histone H3 proteins that incorporate up to four sites of lysine acetylation on the histone tail. Because the amount of expressed multi-acetylated histone is reduced relative to the wild type, a purification strategy involving affinity purification and ion exchange chromatography was optimized. This expression and purification strategy ultimately generates H3 histone uniformly acetylated at the desired position at levels and purity sufficient to assemble histone octamers. Histone octamers containing four sites of lysine acetylation were assembled into mononucleosomes and enzymatic assays confirmed that this acetylation largely blocks further acetylation by the yeast SAGA acetyltransferase complex.

  2. RNA sequencing of synaptic and cytoplasmic Upf1-bound transcripts supports contribution of nonsense-mediated decay to epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Claire M.; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.; Engel, Tobias; Mooney, Catherine; Diviney, Mairead; Venø, Morten T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Farrell, Michael A.; O’Brien, Donncha F.; Delanty, Norman; Henshall, David C.

    2017-01-01

    The nonsense mediated decay (NMD) pathway is a critical surveillance mechanism for identifying aberrant mRNA transcripts. It is unknown, however, whether the NMD system is affected by seizures in vivo and whether changes confer beneficial or maladaptive responses that influence long-term outcomes such the network alterations that produce spontaneous recurrent seizures. Here we explored the responses of the NMD pathway to prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) and investigated the effects of NMD inhibition on epilepsy in mice. Status epilepticus led to increased protein levels of Up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (Upf1) within the mouse hippocampus. Upf1 protein levels were also higher in resected hippocampus from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Immunoprecipitation of Upf1-bound RNA from the cytoplasmic and synaptosomal compartments followed by RNA sequencing identified unique populations of NMD-associated transcripts and altered levels after status epilepticus, including known substrates such as Arc as well as novel targets including Inhba and Npas4. Finally, long-term video-EEG recordings determined that pharmacologic interference in the NMD pathway after status epilepticus reduced the later occurrence of spontaneous seizures in mice. These findings suggest compartment-specific recruitment and differential loading of transcripts by NMD pathway components may contribute to the process of epileptogenesis. PMID:28128343

  3. Nonsense-Mediated Decay Restricts LncRNA Levels in Yeast Unless Blocked by Double-Stranded RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Vogt, Nicolas; Dallongeville, Anne-Sophie; Gautheret, Daniel; Morillon, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antisense long non-coding (aslnc)RNAs represent a substantial part of eukaryotic transcriptomes that are, in yeast, controlled by the Xrn1 exonuclease. Nonsense-Mediated Decay (NMD) destabilizes the Xrn1-sensitive aslncRNAs (XUT), but what determines their sensitivity remains unclear. We report that 3′ single-stranded (3′-ss) extension mediates XUTs degradation by NMD, assisted by the Mtr4 and Dbp2 helicases. Single-gene investigation, genome-wide RNA analyses, and double-stranded (ds)RNA mapping revealed that 3′-ss extensions discriminate the NMD-targeted XUTs from stable lncRNAs. Ribosome profiling showed that XUT are translated, locking them for NMD activity. Interestingly, mutants of the Mtr4 and Dbp2 helicases accumulated XUTs, suggesting that dsRNA unwinding is a critical step for degradation. Indeed, expression of anticomplementary transcripts protects cryptic intergenic lncRNAs from NMD. Our results indicate that aslncRNAs form dsRNA that are only translated and targeted to NMD if dissociated by Mtr4 and Dbp2. We propose that NMD buffers genome expression by discarding pervasive regulatory transcripts. PMID:26805575

  4. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E.; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additional examples identified >50 such exons in genes with a variety of functions. These exons are unusually frequent in genes that encode splicing activators and are unexpectedly enriched in the so-called “ultraconserved” elements in the mammalian lineage. Further analysis show that NMD of mRNAs for splicing activators such as SR proteins is triggered by splicing activation events, whereas NMD of the mRNAs for negatively acting hnRNP proteins is triggered by splicing repression, a polarity consistent with widespread homeostatic control of splicing regulator gene expression. We suggest that the extreme genomic conservation surrounding these regulatory splicing events within splicing factor genes demonstrates the evolutionary importance of maintaining tightly tuned homeostasis of RNA-binding protein levels in the vertebrate cell. PMID:17369403

  5. A Competition between Stimulators and Antagonists of Upf Complex Recruitment Governs Human Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Guramrit; Rebbapragada, Indrani; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway subjects mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) to rapid decay. The conserved Upf1–3 complex interacts with the eukaryotic translation release factors, eRF3 and eRF1, and triggers NMD when translation termination takes place at a PTC. Contrasting models postulate central roles in PTC-recognition for the exon junction complex in mammals versus the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) in other eukaryotes. Here we present evidence for a unified model for NMD, in which PTC recognition in human cells is mediated by a competition between 3′ UTR–associated factors that stimulate or antagonize recruitment of the Upf complex to the terminating ribosome. We identify cytoplasmic PABP as a human NMD antagonizing factor, which inhibits the interaction between eRF3 and Upf1 in vitro and prevents NMD in cells when positioned in proximity to the termination codon. Surprisingly, only when an extended 3′ UTR places cytoplasmic PABP distally to the termination codon does a downstream exon junction complex enhance NMD, likely through increasing the affinity of Upf proteins for the 3′ UTR. Interestingly, while an artificial 3′ UTR of >420 nucleotides triggers NMD, a large subset of human mRNAs contain longer 3′ UTRs but evade NMD. We speculate that these have evolved to concentrate NMD-inhibiting factors, such as PABP, in spatial proximity of the termination codon. PMID:18447585

  6. Global analyses of UPF1 binding and function reveal expanded scope of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Jessica A; Robertson, Alex D; Burge, Christopher B

    2013-10-01

    UPF1 is a DNA/RNA helicase with essential roles in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and embryonic development. How UPF1 regulates target abundance and the relationship between NMD and embryogenesis are not well understood. To explore how NMD shapes the embryonic transcriptome, we integrated genome-wide analyses of UPF1 binding locations, NMD-regulated gene expression, and translation in murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We identified over 200 direct UPF1 binding targets using crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) and revealed a repression pathway that involves 3' UTR binding by UPF1 and translation but is independent of canonical targeting features involving 3' UTR length and stop codon placement. Interestingly, NMD targeting of this set of mRNAs occurs in other mouse tissues and is conserved in human. We also show, using ribosome footprint profiling, that actively translated upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are enriched in transcription factor mRNAs and predict mRNA repression by NMD, while poorly translated mRNAs escape repression. Together, our results identify novel NMD determinants and targets and provide context for understanding the impact of UPF1 and NMD on the mESC transcriptome.

  7. Posttranscriptional Control of the Stem Cell and Neurogenic Programs by the Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Chih H.; Shao, Ada; Shum, Eleen Y.; Espinoza, Josh L.; Huang, Lulu; Karam, Rachid; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms dictating whether a cell proliferates or differentiates have undergone intense scrutiny but remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a central component in the nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) pathway—UPF1—plays a key role in this decision by promoting the proliferative, undifferentiated cell state. UPF1 acts, in part, by destabilizing the NMD substrate encoding the TGFβ inhibitor, SMAD7, and stimulating TGFβ signaling. UPF1 also promotes the decay of mRNAs encoding many other proteins that oppose the proliferative, undifferentiated cell state. Neural differentiation is triggered when NMD is downregulated by neurally expressed microRNAs (miRNAs). This UPF1-miRNA circuitry is highly conserved and harbors negative feedback loops that act as a molecular switch. Our results suggest that the NMD RNA decay pathway collaborates with the TGF-β signaling pathway to lock-in the stem-like state, a cellular state that is stably reversed when neural differentiation signals that induce NMD-repressive miRNAs are received. PMID:24529710

  8. Biochemical and molecular characterization of GALT gene from Indian galactosemia patients: identification of 10 novel mutations and their structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Thapa, Babu R; Kaur, Gurjit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-12-24

    Classical Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism caused by severe reduction or absence of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) enzyme. Till date, no reports are available on clinical and molecular spectrum of galactosemia from Indian population. The characterization of underlying GALT gene lesions was performed in 55 unrelated galactosemia patients. The GALT mutational spectrum comprised 16 distinct mutations including 10 previously unreported mutations. N314D was the most common mutation with a frequency of 40% followed by Q188R at 2.7%. The novel GALT gene mutations included 6 missense mutations viz. Y89H, Q103R, P166A, S181F, K285R, R333L; one nonsense mutation, S307X and 3 silent mutations--Q103Q, K210K and H319H. The functional significance of the novel GALT missense mutations was investigated using SNPs&GO and SIFT tools. Further, modeling studies using 3D models of mutant and wild type GALT proteins revealed mutations to exert their effects at the molecular level by altering H-bonds, salt bridges, secondary structure or surface features. The study highlighted the heterogeneity of classical galactosemia in the Indian population and also emphasizes the importance of GALT gene analysis in diagnosis of galactosemia. It also revealed that the Indian GALT mutational profile differs significantly from other populations studied.

  9. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis.

  10. Mutations in NGLY1 Cause an Inherited Disorder of the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation (ERAD) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Gregory M.; Shashi, Vandana; Bainbridge, Matthew; Gambello, Michael J.; Zahir, Farah R.; Bast, Thomas; Crimian, Rebecca; Schoch, Kelly; Platt, Julia; Cox, Rachel; Bernstein, Jonathan; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Rhonda S.; Bibb, Audrey; Jones, Melanie; Hegde, Madhuri; Graham, Brett H.; Need, Anna C.; Oviedo, Angelica; Schaaf, Christian P.; Boyle, Sean; Butte, Atul J.; Chen, Rong; Clark, Michael J.; Haraksingh, Rajini; Cowan, Tina M.; He, Ping; Langlois, Sylvie; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Snyder, Michael; Gibbs, Richard; Freeze, Hudson H.; Goldstein, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway is responsible for the translocation of misfolded proteins across the ER membrane into the cytosol for subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In order to understand the spectrum of clinical and molecular findings in a complex neurological syndrome, we studied a series of eight patients with inherited deficiency of N-glycanase 1 (NGLY1), a novel disorder of cytosolic ERAD dysfunction. Methods Whole-genome, whole-exome or standard Sanger sequencing techniques were employed. Retrospective chart reviews were performed in order to obtain clinical data. Results All patients had global developmental delay, a movement disorder, and hypotonia. Other common findings included hypo- or alacrima (7/8), elevated liver transaminases (6/7), microcephaly (6/8), diminished reflexes (6/8), hepatocyte cytoplasmic storage material or vacuolization (5/6), and seizures (4/8). The nonsense mutation c.1201A>T (p.R401X) was the most common deleterious allele. Conclusions NGLY1 deficiency is a novel autosomal recessive disorder of the ERAD pathway associated with neurological dysfunction, abnormal tear production, and liver disease. The majority of patients detected to date carry a specific nonsense mutation that appears to be associated with severe disease. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to enlarge as cases with a more broad range of mutations are detected. PMID:24651605

  11. NF1 mutation rather than individual genetic variability is the main determinant of the NF1-transcriptional profile of mutations affecting splicing.

    PubMed

    Pros, Eva; Larriba, Sara; López, Eva; Ravella, Anna; Gili, M Lluïsa; Kruyer, Helena; Valls, Joan; Serra, Eduard; Lázaro, Conxi

    2006-11-01

    A significant number of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mutations result in exon skipping. The majority of these mutations do not occur in the canonical splice sites and can produce different aberrant transcripts whose proportions have not been well studied. It has been hypothesized that differences in the mutation-determined NF1-transcriptional profile could partially explain disease variability among patients bearing the same NF1 splice defect. In order to gain insight into these aspects, we analyzed the proportion of the different transcripts generated by nine NF1-splicing mutations in 30 patients. We assessed the influence of the mutation in the NF1-related transcriptional profiles and investigated the existence of individual differences in a global manner. We analyzed potential differences in tissue-specific transcriptional profiles and evaluated the influence of sample processing and mRNA nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). Small transcriptional differences were found in neurofibromas and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells (SC) compared to blood. We also detected a higher cell culture-dependent NMD. We observed that mutation per se explains 93.5% of the profile variability among mutations studied. However, despite the importance of mutation in determining the proportion of NF1 transcripts generated, we found certain variability among patients with the same mutation. From our results, it seems that genetic factors influencing RNA processing play a minor role in determining the NF1-transcriptional profile. Nevertheless neurofibromin studies would clarify whether these small differences translate into significant functional changes that could explain the great clinical expressivity observed in the disease or any of the disease-related traits.

  12. Molecular basis of severe factor XI deficiency in seven families from the west of France. Seven novel mutations, including an ancient Q88X mutation.

    PubMed

    Quélin, F; Trossaërt, M; Sigaud, M; Mazancourt, P D E; Fressinaud, E

    2004-01-01

    Inherited factor (F)XI deficiency is a rare disorder in the general population, though it is commonly found in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. In particular, two mutations--a stop mutation (type II) and a missense mutation (type III)--which are responsible for FXI deficiency, predominate. The bleeding tendency associated with plasma FXI deficiency in patients is variable, with approximately 50% of patients exhibiting excessive post-traumatic or postsurgical bleeding. In this study, we identified the molecular basis of FXI deficiency in 10 patients belonging to six unrelated families of the Nantes area in France and one family of Lebanese origin. As in Ashkenazi Jewish or in French Basque patients, we have identified a new ancient mutation in exon 4 resulting in Q88X, specific to patients from Nantes, that can result in a severely truncated polypeptide. Homozygous Q88X was found in a severely affected patient with an inhibitor to FXI and in three other unrelated families, either as homozygous, heterozygous or compound heterozygous states. Other identified mutations are two nonsense mutations in the FXI gene, in exon 7 and 15, resulting in R210X and C581X, respectively, which were identified in three families. A novel insertion in exon 3 (nucleotide 137 + G), which causes a stop codon, was characterized. Finally, sequence analysis of all 15 exons of the FXI gene revealed three missense mutations resulting in G336R and G350A (exon 10) and T575M (exon 15). Two mutations (T575M and G350A) with discrepant antigen and functional values are particularly interesting because most of the described mutations are associated with the absence of secreted protein.

  13. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis lacking a known EVER1 or EVER2 mutation.

    PubMed

    McDermott, David F; Gammon, Bryan; Snijders, Peter J; Mbata, Ihunanya; Phifer, Beth; Howland Hartley, A; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Murphy, Philip M; Hwang, Sam T

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with specific human papillomavirus serotypes. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been reported. Nonsense mutations in the genes EVER1 and EVER2 have been identified in over 75% of cases. We present epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a father and a son with typical histologic and clinical findings that occur in the absence of mutations in EVER1 or EVER2. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis in this father/son pair in a nonconsanguinous pedigree is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. This is the first report of autosomal dominant transmission of epidermodysplasia verruciformis, providing further evidence of the genetic heterogeneity of epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

  14. Germline Mutations in FAN1 Cause Hereditary Colorectal Cancer by Impairing DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Seguí, Nuria; Mina, Leonardo B; Lázaro, Conxi; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Pons, Tirso; Navarro, Matilde; Bellido, Fernando; López-Doriga, Adriana; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Pineda, Marta; Guinó, Elisabet; Vidal, August; Soto, José Luís; Caldés, Trinidad; Durán, Mercedes; Urioste, Miguel; Rueda, Daniel; Brunet, Joan; Balbín, Milagros; Blay, Pilar; Iglesias, Silvia; Garré, Pilar; Lastra, Enrique; Sánchez-Heras, Ana Beatriz; Valencia, Alfonso; Moreno, Victor; Pujana, Miguel Ángel; Villanueva, Alberto; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel; Surrallés, Jordi; Puente, Xose S; Valle, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Identification of genes associated with hereditary cancers facilitates management of patients with family histories of cancer. We performed exome sequencing of DNA from 3 individuals from a family with colorectal cancer who met the Amsterdam criteria for risk of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These individuals had mismatch repair-proficient tumors and each carried nonsense variant in the FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 gene (FAN1), which encodes a nuclease involved in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair. We sequenced FAN1 in 176 additional families with histories of colorectal cancer and performed in vitro functional analyses of the mutant forms of FAN1 identified. We detected FAN1 mutations in approximately 3% of families who met the Amsterdam criteria and had mismatch repair-proficient cancers with no previously associated mutations. These findings link colorectal cancer predisposition to the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway, supporting the connection between genome integrity and cancer risk.

  15. Mutations in the proteolytic enzyme calpain 3 cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Broux, O; Allamand, V; Fougerousse, F; Chiannilkulchai, N; Bourg, N; Brenguier, L; Devaud, C; Pasturaud, P; Roudaut, C

    1995-04-07

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of inherited diseases whose genetic etiology has yet to be elucidated. The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) constitute a genetically heterogeneous group with LGMD2A mapping to chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1. The gene encoding the muscle-specific calcium-activated neutral protease 3 (CANP3) large subunit is located in this region. This cysteine protease belongs to the family of intracellular calpains. Fifteen nonsense, splice site, frameshift, or missense calpain mutations cosegregate with the disease in LGMD2A families, six of which were found within La Réunion island patients. A digenic inheritance model is proposed to account for the unexpected presence of multiple independent mutations in this small inbred population. Finally, these results demonstrate an enzymatic rather than a structural protein defect causing a muscular dystrophy, a defect that may have regulatory consequences, perhaps in signal transduction.

  16. Myoclonus in fraternal twin toddlers: a French family with a novel mutation in the SGCE gene.

    PubMed

    Thümmler, Susanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Pincemaille, Olivier; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Perelman, Serge

    2009-11-01

    Myoclonus dystonia is a rare movement disorder caused by mutations in the SGCE gene on chromosome 7q21 (DYT11) encoding the epsilon-sarcoglycan. Myoclonus is present in almost all patients and affects most often neck, trunk and upper limbs. Dystonia is present in about half of the patients. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant with variable clinical expression and maternal imprinting. Onset is usually in childhood or adolescence. Alcohol might relieve symptoms. We present a 33 month old girl and her twin brother with disabling involuntary jerky movements during intentional tasks. Family history of this French family was positive for the paternal uncle, his two daughters and the paternal great grandfather. Sequencing of the SGCE gene revealed a novel nonsense mutation c.942C>A (p.Tyr314X) in exon 7, confirming the diagnosis of myoclonus dystonia. Treatment with valproic acid significantly reduced myoclonic episodes and ameliorated life quality.

  17. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families.

  18. Identification of eight mutations and three sequence variations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, N.; Costes, B.; Girodon, E.; Martin, J.; Fanen, P.; Goossens, M. )

    1994-05-15

    To determine cystic fibrosis (CF) defects in a sample of 224 non-[Delta]F508 CF chromosomes, the authors used denaturing gradient gel multiplex analysis of CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene segments, a strategy based on blind exhaustive analysis rather than a search for known mutations. This process allowed detection of 11 novel variations comprising two nonsense mutations (Q890X and W1204X), a splice defect (405 + 4 A [yields] G), a frameshift (3293delA), four presumed missense mutations (S912L, H949Y, L1065P, Q1071P), and three sequence polymorphisms (R31C or 223 C/T, 3471 T/C, and T1220I or 3791 C/T). The authors describe these variations, together with the associated phenotype when defects on both CF chromosomes were identified. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Mutations in the translated region of the lactase gene (LCT) underlie congenital lactase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kokkonen, Jorma; Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Komu, Hanna; Varilo, Teppo; Peltonen, Leena; Savilahti, Erkki; Jarvela, Irma

    2006-02-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. We initially assigned the CLD locus by linkage and linkage disequilibrium on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. Here we report the molecular background of CLD via characterization of five distinct mutations in the coding region of the lactase (LCT) gene. Twenty-seven patients out of 32 (84%) were homozygous for a nonsense mutation, c.4170T-->A (Y1390X), designated "Fin(major)." Four rare mutations--two that result in a predicted frameshift and early truncation at S1666fsX1722 and S218fsX224 and two point mutations that result in substitutions Q268H and G1363S of the 1,927-aa polypeptide--confirmed the lactase mutations as causative for CLD. These findings facilitate genetic testing in clinical practice and enable genetic counseling for this severe disease. Further, our data demonstrate that, in contrast to common adult-type hypolactasia (lactose intolerance) caused by a variant of the regulatory element, the severe infancy form represents the outcome of mutations affecting the structure of the protein inactivating the enzyme.

  20. Mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sandy Chan; Sears, Renee L.; Lemos, Roberta R.; Quintáns, Beatriz; Huang, Alden; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nevarez, Lisette; Mamah, Catherine; Zatz, Mayana; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Fullerton, Janice M.; Adair, John C.; Berner, Jon E.; Bower, Matthew; Brodaty, Henry; Carmona, Olga; Dobricić, Valerija; Fogel, Brent L.; García-Estevez, Daniel; Goldman, Jill; Goudreau, John L.; Hopfer, Suellen; Janković, Milena; Jaumà, Serge; Jen, Joanna C.; Kirdlarp, Suppachok; Klepper, Joerg; Kostić, Vladimir; Lang, Anthony E.; Linglart, Agnès; Maisenbacher, Melissa K.; Manyam, Bala V.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia; Mitarnun, Witoon; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mueller, Jennifer; Novaković, Ivana; Paucar, Martin; Paulson, Henry; Simpson, Sheila A.; Svenningsson, Per; Tuite, Paul; Vitek, Jerrold; Wetchaphanphesat, Suppachok; Williams, Charles; Yang, Michele; Schofield, Peter R.; de Oliveira, João R. M.; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr’s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We performed a mutational analysis of SLC20A2, the first gene found to cause IBGC, to assess its genetic contribution to familial IBGC. We recruited 218 subjects from 29 IBGC-affected families of varied ancestry and collected medical history, neurological exam, and head CT scans to characterize each patient’s disease status. We screened our patient cohort for mutations in SLC20A2. Twelve novel (nonsense, deletions, missense, and splice site) potentially pathogenic variants, one synonymous variant, and one previously reported mutation were identified in 13 families. Variants predicted to be deleterious cosegregated with disease in five families. Three families showed nonsegregation with clinical disease of such variants, but retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging data strongly suggested previous misclassification. Overall, mutations in SLC20A2 account for as many as 41 % of our familial IBGC cases. Our screen in a large series expands the catalog of SLC20A2 mutations identified to date and demonstrates that mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial IBGC. Non-perfect segregation patterns of predicted deleterious variants highlight the challenges of phenotypic assessment in this condition with highly variable clinical presentation. PMID:23334463

  1. CRISPR Repair Reveals Causative Mutation in a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Justus, Sally; Lee, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Lijuan; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Bassuk, Alexander G; Mahajan, Vinit B; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-08-01

    Massive parallel sequencing enables identification of numerous genetic variants in mutant organisms, but determining pathogenicity of any one mutation can be daunting. The most commonly studied preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa called the "rodless" (rd1) mouse is homozygous for two mutations: a nonsense point mutation (Y347X) and an intronic insertion of a leukemia virus (Xmv-28). Distinguishing which mutation causes retinal degeneration is still under debate nearly a century after the discovery of this model organism. Here, we performed gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and demonstrated that the Y347X mutation is the causative variant of disease. Genome editing in the first generation produced animals that were mosaic for the corrected allele but still showed neurofunction preservation despite low repair frequencies. Furthermore, second-generation CRISPR-repaired mice showed an even more robust rescue and amelioration of the disease. This predicts excellent outcomes for gene editing in diseased human tissue, as Pde6b, the mutated gene in rd1 mice, has an orthologous intron-exon relationship comparable with the human PDE6B gene. Not only do these findings resolve the debate surrounding the source of neurodegeneration in the rd1 model, but they also provide the first example of homology-directed recombination-mediated gene correction in the visual system.

  2. A prevalent mutation with founder effect in xeroderma pigmentosum group C from north Africa.

    PubMed

    Soufir, Nadem; Ged, Cecile; Bourillon, Agnes; Austerlitz, Frederic; Chemin, Cécile; Stary, Anne; Armier, Jacques; Pham, Daniele; Khadir, Khadija; Roume, Joelle; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Bouadjar, Bakar; Taieb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Benchiki, Hakima; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sarasin, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is associated with an inherited defect of the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER). In this study, we investigated the involvement of XP genes in 86 XP patients belonging to 66 unrelated families, most of them consanguineous and originating from Maghreb. Sequencing analysis was performed either directly (44 probands) or after having previously characterized the involved XP gene by complementation assay (22 families). XPC and XPA mutations were respectively present in 56/66 and 8/66 probands. Strikingly, we identified the same homozygous frameshift mutation c.1643_1644delTG (p.Val548AlafsX25) in 87% of XP-C patients. Haplotype analysis showed a common founder effect for this mutation in the Mediterranean region, with an estimated age of 50 generations or 1,250 years. Among 7/8 XP-A patients, we found the previously reported nonsense homozygous XPA mutation (p.Arg228X). Six mutations--to our knowledge previously unreported--(five in XPC, one in XPA) were also identified. In conclusion, XPC appears to be the major disease-causing gene concerning xeroderma pigmentosum in North Africa. As the (p.Val548AlafsX25) XPC mutation is responsible for a huge proportion of XP cases, our data imply an obvious simplification of XP molecular diagnosis, at least in North Africa.

  3. Classification and Tie2 mutations in spinal and soft tissue vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei; Jiang, Renbing; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Lisha; Wang, Hua; Li, Wenting; Li, Yiqun; Du, Xiang; Bai, Jingping

    2015-10-15

    Vascular anomalies included hemangiomas and vascular malformations (VMs). VMs are mediated by mutations in the endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinase Tie2 (TEK),which is essential for angiogenesis and vascular stabilization. We identified five types of Tie2 mutations in 80 patients with soft tissue or spinal VMs by PCR including the previously detected missense mutations 2690A>G (Y897C), 2740C>T (L914F), 2743C>T (R915C), and two nonsense mutations 2763G>A, 2688C>T, we identified Tie2 mutation in primary spinal VMs for the first time. Tie2 mutations were found to be absent in 33 patients with hemangiomas and DNA samples of VMs. In addition, we showed that Tie2 mRNA expression in spinal VMs was similar to soft tissue VMs, but obviously lower than infant hemangiomas (P<0.01). This study provides new insights into spinal VMs, the association of Tie2 and vascular anomalies needs to be further discussed.

  4. Screening for germline mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene in NF2 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, A.A.; Ruttledge, M.H.; Rangaratnam, A.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease with over 95% penetrance which predisposes gene carriers to develop multiple tumors of the central nervous system. The NF2 gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene which was previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 22, and has recently been identified, using positional cloning techniques. The gene encodes a protein, schwannomin (SCH), which is highly homologous to the band 4.1 protein family. In an attempt to identify and characterize mutations which lead to the manifestation of the disease, we have used single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) to screen for germline mutations in all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 59 unrelated NF2 patients, representing both familial and new mutations. A total of 27 migration abnormalities was found in 26 patients. Using direct sequencing analysis, the majority of these variants were found to result in nonsense, splice-site or frameshift mutations. Mutations identified in familial NF2 patients segregate in the family, and may prove to be useful tools for a simple and direct SSCA-based technique of presymptomatic or prenatal diagnosis in relatives of patients with NF2. This may be of particular importance in children of patients who have new mutations in the NF2 gene, where linkage analysis may not be feasible.

  5. Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Desirée; Bode, Claudia; Kenefeck, Rupert; Hou, Tie Zheng; Wing, James B; Kennedy, Alan; Bulashevska, Alla; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Grüning, Björn A; Unger, Susanne; Frede, Natalie; Baumann, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Dueckers, Gregor; Niehues, Tim; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Kanariou, Maria; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Warnatz, Klaus; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Thimme, Robert; Hasselblatt, Peter; Emmerich, Florian; Cathomen, Toni; Backofen, Rolf; Fisch, Paul; Seidl, Maximilian; May, Annette; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Ikemizu, Shinji; Salzer, Ulrich; Franke, Andre; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2014-12-01

    The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses, and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We studied a large family in which five individuals presented with a complex, autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune clinical features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with previously undescribed splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. Clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 genetically proven CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected). However, CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in both patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whereas Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers in these individuals, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers. Taken together, mutations in CTLA4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding result in disrupted T and B cell homeostasis and a complex immune dysregulation syndrome.

  6. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease.

  7. How the leopard hides its spots: ASIP mutations and melanism in wild cats.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alexsandra; David, Victor A; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Barsh, Gregory S; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of melanism (darkening of the background coloration) is documented in 13 felid species, in some cases reaching high frequencies at the population level. Recent analyses have indicated that it arose multiple times in the Felidae, with three different species exhibiting unique mutations associated with this trait. The causative mutations in the remaining species have so far not been identified, precluding a broader assessment of the evolutionary dynamics of melanism in the Felidae. Among these, the leopard (Panthera pardus) is a particularly important target for research, given the iconic status of the 'black panther' and the extremely high frequency of melanism observed in some Asian populations. Another felid species from the same region, the Asian golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii), also exhibits frequent records of melanism in some areas. We have sequenced the coding region of the Agouti Signaling Protein (ASIP) gene in multiple leopard and Asian golden cat individuals, and identified distinct mutations strongly associated with melanism in each of them. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detected among the P. pardus individuals was caused by a nonsense mutation predicted to completely ablate ASIP function. A different SNP was identified in P. temminckii, causing a predicted amino acid change that should also induce loss of function. Our results reveal two additional cases of species-specific mutations implicated in melanism in the Felidae, and indicate that ASIP mutations may play an important role in naturally-occurring coloration polymorphism.

  8. The MECP2 gene mutation screening in Rett syndrome patients from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Matijević, Tanja; Knezević, Jelena; Barisić, Ingeborg; Resić, Biserka; Culić, Vida; Pavelić, Jasminka

    2006-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females and is usually sporadic. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been found in more than 80% of females with typical features of RTT. In this study, we analyzed 15 sporadic cases of RTT. In 7 of 15 patients (47%), we detected pathogenic mutations in the coding parts of MECP2 fourth exon. We found two missense (T158M, R133C), two nonsense (R168X, R270X), two frameshift mutations (P217fs and a double deletion of 28-bp at 1132-1159 and 10-bp at 1167-1176), and one in-frame deletion (L383_E392del10). To our knowledge, the last two mutations have not been reported yet. We also detected one previously described polymorphism (S194S). In conclusion, these results show that the fourth exon should be the first one analyzed because it harbors most of the known mutations. Moreover, mutation-negative cases should be further analyzed for gross rearrangements. This is the first study of its kind in Croatia and it enabled us to give the patients an early confirmation of RTT diagnosis.

  9. Novel mutations in SKIV2L and TTC37 genes in Malaysian children with trichohepatoenteric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Way Seah; Teo, Kai Ming; Ng, Ruey Terng; Chong, Sze Yee; Kee, Boon Pin; Chua, Kek Heng

    2016-07-15

    Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is classically associated with intractable diarrhea with an onset within the first few months of life. Herein, we investigated and reported novel mutations in two causal genes in 3 Malaysian cases. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood obtained from patients in two Malaysian Chinese families. The exons of SKIV2L and TTC37 genes were amplified and sequenced by bi-directional sequencing to identify the point mutations within the coding sequence. Three Chinese boys from two families with characteristic features and clinical course were diagnosed with THES. In family-1, two point mutations were identified in the SKIV2L gene (c.1891G>A and c.3187C>T). In family-2, a single-nucleotide duplication (c.3426dupA) was found in the TTC37 gene. These mutations cause the production of abnormal non-functional gene product leading to the clinical manifestations in the patients. We reported three point mutations, which have not been previously described in other patients with THES in SKIV2L and TTC37 genes, including one nonsense, one frameshift, and one missense mutations.

  10. How the Leopard Hides Its Spots: ASIP Mutations and Melanism in Wild Cats

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Alexsandra; David, Victor A.; Johnson, Warren E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Barsh, Gregory S.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of melanism (darkening of the background coloration) is documented in 13 felid species, in some cases reaching high frequencies at the population level. Recent analyses have indicated that it arose multiple times in the Felidae, with three different species exhibiting unique mutations associated with this trait. The causative mutations in the remaining species have so far not been identified, precluding a broader assessment of the evolutionary dynamics of melanism in the Felidae. Among these, the leopard (Panthera pardus) is a particularly important target for research, given the iconic status of the ‘black panther’ and the extremely high frequency of melanism observed in some Asian populations. Another felid species from the same region, the Asian golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii), also exhibits frequent records of melanism in some areas. We have sequenced the coding region of the Agouti Signaling Protein (ASIP) gene in multiple leopard and Asian golden cat individuals, and identified distinct mutations strongly associated with melanism in each of them. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detected among the P. pardus individuals was caused by a nonsense mutation predicted to completely ablate ASIP function. A different SNP was identified in P. temminckii, causing a predicted amino acid change that should also induce loss of function. Our results reveal two additional cases of species-specific mutations implicated in melanism in the Felidae, and indicate that ASIP mutations may play an important role in naturally-occurring coloration polymorphism. PMID:23251368

  11. Update of the spectrum of GJB2 gene mutations in 152 Moroccan families with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bakhchane, Amina; Bousfiha, Amale; Charoute, Hicham; Salime, Sara; Detsouli, Mustapha; Snoussi, Khalid; Nadifi, Sellama; Kabine, Mostafa; Rouba, Hassan; Dehbi, Hind; Roky, Rachida; Charif, Majida; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2016-06-01

    Deafness is one of the most common genetic diseases in humans and is subject to important genetic heterogeneity. The most common cause of non syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is mutations in the GJB2 gene. This study aims to update and evaluate the spectrum of GJB2 allele variants in 152 Moroccan multiplex families with non syndromic hearing loss. Seven different mutations were detected: c.35delG, p.V37I, p.E47X, p.G200R, p.Del120E, p.R75Q, the last three mutations were described for the first time in Moroccan deaf patients, in addition to a novel nonsense mutation, the c.385G>T which is not referenced in any database. Sixty six families (43.42%) have mutations in the coding region of GJB2, while the homozygous c.35delG mutation still to date the most represented 51/152 (33.55%). The analysis of the geographical distribution of mutations located in GJB2 gene showed more allelic heterogeneity in the north and center compared to the south of Morocco. Our results showed that the GJB2 gene is a major contributor to non syndromic hearing loss in Morocco. Thus, this report of the GJB2 mutations spectrum all over Morocco has an important implication for establishing a suitable molecular diagnosis.

  12. Mutational spectrum of the oral-facial-digital type I syndrome: a study on a large collection of patients.

    PubMed

    Prattichizzo, Clelia; Macca, Marina; Novelli, Valeria; Giorgio, Giovanna; Barra, Adriano; Franco, Brunella

    2008-10-01

    Oral-facial-digital type I (OFDI) syndrome is a male-lethal X-linked dominant developmental disorder belonging to the heterogeneous group of oral-facial-digital syndromes (OFDS). OFDI is characterized by malformations of the face, oral cavity, and digits. Central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and cystic kidney disease can also be part of this condition. This rare genetic disorder is due to mutations in the OFD1 gene that encodes a centrosome/basal body protein necessary for primary cilium assembly and for left-right axis determination, thus ascribing OFDI to the growing number of disorders associated to ciliary dysfunction. We now report a mutation analysis study in a cohort of 100 unrelated affected individuals collected worldwide. Putative disease-causing mutations were identified in 81 patients (81%). We describe 67 different mutations, 64 of which represent novel mutations, including 36 frameshift, nine missense, 11 splice-site, and 11 nonsense mutations. Most of them concentrate in exons 3, 8, 9, 12, 13, and 16, suggesting that these exons may represent mutational hotspots. Phenotypic characterization of the patients provided a better definition of the clinical features of OFDI syndrome. Our results indicate that renal cystic disease is present in 60% of cases >18 years of age. Genotype-phenotype correlation did not reveal significant associations apart for the high-arched/cleft palate most frequently associated to missense and splice-site mutations. Our results contribute to further expand our knowledge on the molecular basis of OFDI syndrome.

  13. A Novel Mutation of the HNF1B Gene Associated With Hypoplastic Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease and Neonatal Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvelos, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Magda; Lobo, Luísa; Medeira, Ana; Sousa, Ana Berta; Simão, Carla; Lemos, Manuel Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1B) plays an important role in embryonic development, namely in the kidney, pancreas, liver, genital tract, and gut. Heterozygous germline mutations of HNF1B are associated with the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). Affected individuals may present a variety of renal developmental abnormalities and/or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A Portuguese 19-month-old male infant was evaluated due to hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and renal dysfunction diagnosed in the neonatal period that progressed to stage 5 chronic renal disease during the first year of life. His mother was diagnosed with a solitary hypoplastic microcystic left kidney at age 20, with stage 2 chronic renal disease established at age 35, and presented bicornuate uterus, pancreatic atrophy, and gestational diabetes. DNA sequence analysis of HNF1B revealed a novel germline frameshift insertion (c.110_111insC or c.110dupC) in both the child and the mother. A review of the literature revealed a total of 106 different HNF1B mutations, in 236 mutation-positive families, comprising gross deletions (34%), missense mutations (31%), frameshift deletions or insertions (15%), nonsense mutations (11%), and splice-site mutations (8%). The study of this family with an unusual presentation of hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease with neonatal renal dysfunction identified a previously unreported mutation of the HNF1B gene, thereby expanding the spectrum of known mutations associated with renal developmental disorders. PMID:25700310

  14. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3.

  15. Short communication: novel truncating mutations in the CFTR gene causing a severe form of cystic fibrosis in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Lenarduzzi, S; Morgutti, M; Crovella, S; Coiana, A; Rosatelli, M C

    2014-11-14

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. More than 1800 different mutations have been described to date. Here, we report 3 novel mutations in CFTR in 3 Italian CF patients. To detect and identify 36 frequent mutations in Caucasians, we used the INNO-LiPA CFTR19 and INNO-LiPA CFTR17+Tn Update kits (Innogenetics; Ghent, Belgium). Our first analysis did not reveal both of the responsible mutations; thus, direct sequencing of the CFTR gene coding region was performed. The 3 patients were compound heterozygous. In one allele, the F508del (c.1521_1523delCTT, p.PHE508del) mutation in exon 11 was observed in each case. For the second allele, in patient No.1, direct sequencing revealed an 11-base pair deletion (GAGGCGATACT) in exon 14 (c.2236_2246del; pGlu746Alafs*29). In patient No. 2, direct sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation at nucleotide 3892 (c.3892G>T) in exon 24. In patient No. 3, direct sequencing revealed a deletion of cytosine in exon 27 (c.4296delC; p.Asn1432Lysfs*16). These 3 novel mutations indicate the production of a truncated protein, which consequently results in a non-functional polypeptide.

  16. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha; Rasmussen, Torsten B.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Nissen, Peter H.; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Hansen, Jakob; Pinto, Yigal M.; Boesen, Thomas; Mogensen, Jens; Bross, Peter

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  17. Different mutation profiles associated to P53 accumulation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    López, Ignacio; P Oliveira, Ligia; Tucci, Paula; Alvarez-Valín, Fernando; A Coudry, Renata; Marín, Mónica

    2012-05-10

    The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is one of the most frequently mutated in different types of human cancer. Particularly in colorectal cancer (CRC), it is believed that TP53 mutations play a role in the adenoma-carcinoma transition of tumors during pathological process. In order to analyze TP53 expressed alleles in CRC, we examined TP53 mRNA in tumor samples from 101 patients with sporadic CRC. Samples were divided in two groups defined according to whether they exhibit positive or negative P53 protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The presence of TP53 mutation was a common event in tumors with an overall frequency of 54.5%. By direct sequencing, we report 42 different TP53 sequence changes in 55 CRC patients, being two of them validated polymorphisms. TP53 mutations were more frequent in positive than in negative P53 detection group (p<0.0001), being the precise figures 79.6% and 30.8%, respectively. In addition, the mutation profiles were also different between the two groups of samples; while most of the mutations detected in P53 positive group were missense (38 out of 39), changes in P53 negative detection group include 7 insertions/deletions, 6 missense, 2 nonsense and 1 silent mutation. As previously observed, most mutations were concentrated in regions encoding P53 DNA binding domain (DBD). Codons 175, 248 and 273 together account for 36.7% of point mutations, in agreement with previous observations provided that these codons are considered mutation hotspots. Interestingly,