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Sample records for nonspecific human immunoglobulin

  1. Scintigraphic detection of bone and joint infections with indium-111-labeled nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G

    SciTech Connect

    Oyen, W.J.; Claessens, R.A.; van Horn, J.R.; van der Meer, J.W.; Corstens, F.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The utility of indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) to detect infection of bone and adjacent tissues was investigated. Proof of infection was obtained by cultures taken at surgery. All 32 patients showed focally increased uptake on the technetium-99m- (99mTc) methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphies. Labeled immunoglobulin correctly identified presence, location, extent and soft-tissue involvement of the suspected inflammatory site. In these patients, focally increasing accumulation was noted over 48 hr. Discrimination between infection and sterile inflammatory lesions was not possible. Two fractures, 6-mo-old, and an aseptic loosening of a total-hip prosthesis were not visualized. Side effects after the immunoglobulin administration were not observed. Radiolabeled immunoglobulin is a new and safe radiopharmaceutical for the investigation of infectious bone and joint disease. The sensitivity of this agent appears at least as high as that of labeled leukocytes. However, labeled immunoglobulin can easily be prepared in every nuclear medicine department.

  2. Mannose-containing oligosaccharides of non-specific human secretory immunoglobulin A mediate inhibition of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ashlesh K; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Troutman, Ty; Guentzel, M Neal; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Ali, Syed Khalid; Lauriano, Crystal M; Chambers, James P; Klose, Karl E; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-02-09

    The role of antigen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) has been studied extensively, whereas there is a limited body of evidence regarding the contribution of non-specific SIgA to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the effects of non-specific SIgA against infection with Vibrio cholerae O139 strain MO10 and biofilm formation. Seven day old infant mice deficient in IgA (IgA(-/-) mice) displayed significantly greater intestinal MO10 burden at 24 hr post-challenge when compared to IgA(+/+) pups. Importantly, cross-fostering of IgA(-/-) pups with IgA(+/+) nursing dams reversed the greater susceptibility to MO10 infection, suggesting a role for non-specific SIgA in protection against the infection. Since biofilm formation is associated with virulence of MO10, we further examined the role of human non-specific SIgA on this virulence phenotype of the pathogen. Human non-specific SIgA, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly reduced the biofilm formation by MO10 without affecting the viability of the bacterium. Such an inhibitory effect was not induced by human serum IgA, IgG, or IgM, suggesting a role for the oligosaccharide-rich secretory component (SC) of SIgA. This was supported by the demonstration that SIgA treated with endoglycosidase H, to cleave the high-mannose containing terminal chitobiose residues, did not induce a reduction in biofilm formation by MO10. Furthermore, the addition of free mannose per se, across a wide dose range, induced significant reduction in MO10 biofilm formation. Collectively, these results suggest that mannose containing oligosaccharides within human non-specific secretory IgA can alter important virulence phenotypes of Vibrio cholerae such as biofilm formation, without affecting viability of the microorganism. Such effects may contribute significantly to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Radiolabeled, nonspecific, polyclonal human immunoglobulin in the detection of focal inflammation by scintigraphy: Comparison with gallium-67 citrate and technetium-99m-labeled albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Needleman, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Hansen, W.P.; Kramer, P.B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-03-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG) radiolabeled with /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In was compared to that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate and (/sup 99m/Tc)albumin in rats with deep thigh inflammation due to Escherichia coli infection. Serial scintigrams were acquired at 1, 3, 24, and in some cases, 48 hr after injection. As early as 3 hr postinjection, (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation at the lesion than (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). Both (/sup 125/I)IgG and (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation than (/sup 67/Ga)citrate (p less than 0.01). At 24 hr, IgG image definition increased, while HSA image definition decreased, and the intensity of accumulation of both IgG preparations was greater than that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate or (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). At all imaging times, (/sup 67/Ga)citrate accumulation was surprisingly low. In inflammation produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, or turpentine, (/sup 111/In)IgG accumulation was similar to the results obtained with Escherichia coli. These studies suggest that focal sites of inflammation can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific human polyclonal IgG.

  4. Non-specific immunoglobulin titres against cytomegalovirus: an alternative to hyperimmune presentation.

    PubMed

    Campany Herrero, D; Guiu Segura, J M; Vallvé Alcón, E; Cardona Pacual, I; Monterde Junyent, J

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunoglobulin against cytomegalovirus has demonstrated its effectiveness in preventing and treating infections in solid organ transplantation. Several studies indicate that non-specific immunoglobulin is just as effective. This study aims to determine anti-cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin titres from one of the non-specific immunoglobulin presentations authorised in Spain. This was an observational study, in which we analysed the anti-cytomegalovirus antibody titres from different batches of Flebogamma(®) 5% 5g used at the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron during 2008 and 2009. We analysed 27 batches, which included 18,944 vials of Flebogamma(®) 5%. Depending on the origin, the median concentration of anti-cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin was 28PEI-U/ml and 22PEI-U/ml per vial of North American and Spanish origin, respectively (CI 95% for the difference of the medians 5 to 6PEI-U/ml; p<0.001). The anti-cytomegalovirus antibody concentration of the non-specific immunoglobulin batches analysed was slightly lower than in the specific immunoglobulin preparations. These differences can be compensated by adjusting the dosage. Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  6. Immunoglobulins in human aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    The immunoglobulin concentrations in human aqueous humour from 44 patients aged 35 to 85 years with cataracts were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. IgG was found in all the samples (mean level 7-0 mg/100 ml. IgD, IgA or IgM could not be detected. There was no significant difference in IgG levels in aqueous humour between the two sexes, in different age groups, and in the different types of cataracts. PMID:403928

  7. HPLC chromatofocusing of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Waldrep, J C; Schulte, J R

    1989-03-31

    A method is described for fractionation and analysis of IgA, IgM, and IgG and antibodies in human serum and/or plasma using a combination of HPLC chromatofocusing and immunoassay. A pH 9.0-3.2 gradient is utilized to separate the major proteins in the complex biological samples and monoclonal antibody based ELISAs used to determine the isotype profiles. Antigen-specific ELISAs are subsequently utilized to determine the distribution of antibody species within the chromatofocused specimens. This method is versatile since multiple simultaneous assays can easily be run on each fraction generating extensive qualitative information regarding immunoglobulin classes, subclasses, and antibodies and their distribution profiles. Such spectra will prove useful for experimental kinetic analysis of the humoral immune status of humans and experimental animals.

  8. Use of cellulose derivatives on gold surfaces for reduced nonspecific adsorption of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Volden, Sondre; Zhu, Kaizheng; Nyström, Bo; Glomm, Wilhelm R

    2009-09-01

    This study addresses the design of protein-repellent gold surfaces using hydroxyethyl- and ethyl(hydroxyethyl) cellulose (HEC and EHEC) and hydrophobically modified analogues of these polymers (HM-HEC and HM-EHEC). Adsorption behavior of the protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) onto pure gold and gold surfaces coated with cellulose polymers was investigated and described by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements (CAM). Surfaces coated with the hydrophobically modified cellulose derivatives were found to significantly outperform a reference poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating, which in turn prevented 90% of non-specific protein adsorption as compared to adsorption onto pure gold. HEC and EHEC prevented around 30% and 60% of the IgG adsorption observed on pure gold, while HM-HEC and HM-EHEC were both found to completely hinder biofouling when deposited on the gold substrates. Adsorption behavior of IgG has been discussed in terms of polymer surface coverage and roughness of the applied surfaces, together with hydrophobic interactions between protein and gold, and also polymer-protein interactions.

  9. Changes in the synthesis of antibodies and non-specific immunoglobulins in the spleen perfused in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gurvitch, A. E.; Nikolaeva, Anna

    1971-01-01

    The synthesis of antibodies and non-specific immunoglobulins by the rabbit spleen perfused with culture medium in vitro has been studied using the incorporation of [14C]glycine. Separate perfusion of the two halves of the same spleen provided an opportunity to determine the influence of several factors on the synthesis of these proteins. It was shown that changes in the rate of synthesis of antibodies and non-specific immunoglobulins in the perfused spleen are in some cases similar to the changes observed in the whole organism, and in some cases they are not. Thus, the synthesis of antibodies in the spleen withdrawn 2 days after secondary immunization increased during the 2 days of perfusion and in the spleen taken 4 days after immunization it decreased in the same way as in the whole organism. However, in the spleen taken 3 days after secondary immunization, the synthesis of antibodies during the perfusion period remained unchanged. Another distinction from the processes occurring in the living body was that the increased rate of antibody synthesis in the perfused spleen was not associated with an increase in nonspecific immunoglobulins synthesis. PMID:5129998

  10. Nonspecificity in a nonimmune human scFv repertoire.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ryan L; Zhao, Jessie; Le, Doris; Wittrup, K Dane

    2017-09-14

    Efforts to develop effective antibody therapeutics are frequently hampered by issues such as aggregation and nonspecificity, often only detected in late stages of the development process. In this study, we used a high throughput cross-reactivity assay to select nonspecific clones from a naïve human repertoire scFv library displayed on the surface of yeast. Most antibody families were de-enriched; however, the rarely expressed VH6 family was highly enriched among nonspecific clones, representing almost 90% of isolated clones. Mutational analysis of this family reveals a dominant role of CDRH2 in driving nonspecific binding. Homology modeling of a panel of VH6 antibodies shows a constrained beta-sheet structure in CDRH2 that is not present in other families, potentially contributing to nonspecificity of the family. These findings confirm the common decision to exclude VH6 from synthetic antibody libraries, and support VH6 polyreactivity as a possible important role for the family in early ontogeny and cause for its overabundance in cases of some forms of autoimmunity.

  11. Immunoglobulin production by human-mouse somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    Studies on immunoglobulin production in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids suggest: 1. The structural genes for heavy chain immunoglobulins are carried on chromsome 6, probably on the short arm or the proximal half of the long arm of the chromosome. 2. The structural gene for kappa light chain immunoglobulin may be carried on chromsome 11. 3. The occurrence of immunoglobulin molecules on the cell surface requires the presence of chromosome 2.

  12. Cloned transchromosomic calves producing human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Yoshimi; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Choi, Yoon J; Naeem, Rizwan; Tomizuka, Kazuma; Sullivan, Eddie J; Knott, Jason G; Duteau, Anae; Goldsby, Richard A; Osborne, Barbara A; Ishida, Isao; Robl, James M

    2002-09-01

    Human polyclonal antibodies (hPABs) are useful therapeutics, but because they are available only from human donors, their supply and application is limited. To address this need, we prepared a human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector containing the entire unrearranged sequences of the human immunoglobulin (hIg) heavy-chain (H) and lambda (lambda) light-chain loci. The HAC vector was introduced into bovine primary fetal fibroblasts using a microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) approach. Primary selection was carried out, and the cells were used to produce cloned bovine fetuses. Secondary selection was done on the regenerated fetal cell lines, which were then used to produce four healthy transchromosomic (Tc) calves. The HAC was retained at a high rate (78-100% of cells) in calves and the hIg loci underwent rearrangement and expressed diversified transcripts. Human immunoglobulin proteins were detected in the blood of newborn calves. The production of Tc calves is an important step in the development of a system for producing therapeutic hPABs.

  13. Collaborative study to establish human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2006-11-01

    A study was carried out by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) as part of the joint Biological Standardisation Programme of the Council of Europe and the European Commission with the aim to establish replacement batches of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) human immunoglobulin Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 2. Twenty-eight laboratories participated in this study. The suitability of the candidate reference preparations to serve as working references in the tests for distribution of the molecular size, anticomplementary activity and Fc function, in accordance with the specifications of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918), Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Anti-T lymphocyte immunoglobulin for human use, animal (1928) was demonstrated. The candidates were therefore established as human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and Human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1. The prescribed use of the latter BRP is limited to the test for distribution of molecular size.

  14. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  15. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M. E.; Buchan, A.; Skinner, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6803822

  16. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects.

  17. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  18. The INIS Study. International Neonatal Immunotherapy Study: non-specific intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for suspected or proven neonatal sepsis: an international, placebo controlled, multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Sepsis is an important cause of neonatal death and perinatal brain damage, particularly in preterm infants. While effective antibiotic treatment is essential treatment for sepsis, resistance to antibiotics is increasing. Adjuvant therapies, such as intravenous immunoglobulin, therefore offer an important additional strategy. Three Cochrane systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials in nearly 6,000 patients suggest that non-specific, polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulin is safe and reduces sepsis by about 15% when used as prophylaxis but does not reduce mortality in this situation. When intravenous immunoglobulin is used in the acute treatment of neonatal sepsis, however, there is a suggestion that it may reduce mortality by 45%. However, the existing trials of treatment were small and lacked long-term follow-up data. This study will assess reliably whether treatment of neonatal sepsis with intravenous immunoglobulin reduces mortality and adverse neuro-developmental outcome. Methods and design A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind trial. Babies with suspected or proven neonatal sepsis will be randomised to receive intravenous immunoglobulin therapy or placebo. Eligibility criteria Babies must be receiving antibiotics and have proven or suspected serious infection AND have at least one of the following: birthweight less than 1500 g OR evidence of infection in blood culture, cerebrospinal fluid or usually sterile body fluid OR be receiving respiratory support via an endotracheal tube AND there is substantial uncertainty that intravenous immunoglobulin is indicated. Exclusion criteria Babies are excluded if intravenous immunoglobulin has already been given OR intravenous immunoglobulin is thought to be needed OR contra-indicated. Trial treatment Babies will be given either 10 ml/kg of intravenous immunoglobulin or identical placebo solution over 4–6 hours, repeated 48 hours later. Primary outcome Mortality or major disability at two years

  19. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  20. Polyomavirus BK Neutralizing Activity in Human Immunoglobulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Parmjeet S; Schonder, Kristine; Shapiro, Ron; Farasati, Nousha; Huang, Yuchen

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infection can cause nephropathy in the allograft kidney. No well-established drug treatment is available at this time. Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have been used as an empiric therapy without proof of effectiveness. Methods We tested five lots of commercially available IVIG preparations from two different suppliers for polyomavirus neutralizing activity. BKV and mouse polyomavirus were used to infect human and murine host cells, respectively, with or without prior treatment with IVIG. Neutralization activity was measured by quantitation of viral DNA after 7 days in culture. Results Coincubation of BKV but not mouse polyomavirus with clinically relevant concentrations of IVIG derived from healthy and hepatitis B vaccinated subjects caused more than 90% inhibition of viral DNA yield after 7 days in culture. Consistent with a direct neutralizing mechanism, this effect was significantly diminished if viral infection was performed in immunoglobulin pretreated cells or if immunoglobulin treatment was delayed 2 hr after addition of infectious virus. Conclusion Human IVIG preparations contain BKV neutralizing antibodies. Data on neutralizing capacity of these antibodies are presented to aid dose exploration in clinical trials seeking to validate the use of IVIG in patients with BKV infection. PMID:20568674

  1. Regulation of immunoglobulin secretion by factor H of human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Tsokos, G C; Inghirami, G; Tsoukas, C D; Balow, J E; Lambris, J D

    1985-01-01

    As human B lymphocytes and macrophages carry surface receptors for Factor H (B1H), we investigated the possibility that this complement component regulates their function. Factor H inhibits immunoglobulin secretion by peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with pokeweed mitogen if present at the initiation of the cultures and at concentrations greater than 50 micrograms/ml. Factor H also inhibited stimulation and differentiation of purified B cells into immunoglobulin-secreting cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The inhibitory effect of Factor H was abrogated if anti-Factor H antibody was present in the cultures. EBV-transformed B-cell lines secreted less immunoglobulin if Factor H was present in the culture for at least 4 days. Culture of MNC with Factor H did not lead to the generation of suppressor T cells or macrophages. In contrast, Factor H did not cause proliferation of human peripheral total MNC or enriched T-cell or B-cell subpopulations. Also, Factor H did not inhibit the proliferation of MNC in response to several mitogens and antigens. Our results strongly indicate that Factor H is able to block human B-cell differentiation in vitro without blocking the proliferative ability of the cells. Factor H seems to act directly on the B cells through its receptor on their surface, since it inhibited T-dependent and T-independent B-cell differentiation but generated no suppressor cells. Images Figure 1 PMID:2991125

  2. Regulation of immunoglobulin secretion by factor H of human complement.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, G C; Inghirami, G; Tsoukas, C D; Balow, J E; Lambris, J D

    1985-07-01

    As human B lymphocytes and macrophages carry surface receptors for Factor H (B1H), we investigated the possibility that this complement component regulates their function. Factor H inhibits immunoglobulin secretion by peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with pokeweed mitogen if present at the initiation of the cultures and at concentrations greater than 50 micrograms/ml. Factor H also inhibited stimulation and differentiation of purified B cells into immunoglobulin-secreting cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The inhibitory effect of Factor H was abrogated if anti-Factor H antibody was present in the cultures. EBV-transformed B-cell lines secreted less immunoglobulin if Factor H was present in the culture for at least 4 days. Culture of MNC with Factor H did not lead to the generation of suppressor T cells or macrophages. In contrast, Factor H did not cause proliferation of human peripheral total MNC or enriched T-cell or B-cell subpopulations. Also, Factor H did not inhibit the proliferation of MNC in response to several mitogens and antigens. Our results strongly indicate that Factor H is able to block human B-cell differentiation in vitro without blocking the proliferative ability of the cells. Factor H seems to act directly on the B cells through its receptor on their surface, since it inhibited T-dependent and T-independent B-cell differentiation but generated no suppressor cells.

  3. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-01-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level. PMID:465402

  4. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-05-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level.

  5. The transformation of human lymphocytes by monkey antisera to human immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, J. J.; Rogentine, G. N.; Terry, W. D.

    1969-01-01

    Cultures of human peripheral leucocytes were stimulated to incorporate tritiated thymidine when incubated with monkey antisera to human immunoglobulins. Twenty-five of forty-four monkey antisera were active and stimulated 90 per cent of leucocyte (WBC) cultures to incorporate a small but significantly greater amount of tritiated thymidine (TdR3H) than that incorporated by controls. This stimulation of TdR3H uptake correlated with an increase from 2 to 8 per cent lymphoblasts in the cultures. Leucocytes washed free of serum immunoglobulins responded to a greater degree to the anti-immunoglobulin sera than when they were cultured in the presence of human serum. Prior absorption of antisera with either whole serum or homologous immunoglobulin blocked antiserum stimulation completely. The anti-IgG and anti-IgM antisera were consistently more effective than anti-IgA, anti-κ and anti-λ chain antisera. Sequential stimulation by antisera against two different immunoglobulins was not significantly different from those stimulated by only one of the two. Lymphocytes from three asymptomatic subjects with low or absent serum IgA levels transformed as well with anti-IgA as did lymphocytes from subjects with normal serum IgA levels. Antisera were cytotoxic to the lymphocytes only in the presence of complement. Presumably the transformation of human lymphocytes was due to a reaction of anti-immunoglobulin antisera with specific immunoglobulin antigenic determinants present on or in the circulating lymphocytes. PMID:4181572

  6. Enhancer Complexes Located Downstream of Both Human Immunoglobulin Cα Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frederick C.; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Mitchell, Mary; Max, Edward E.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate regulation of human immunoglobulin heavy chain expression, we have cloned DNA downstream from the two human Cα genes, corresponding to the position in the mouse IgH cluster of a locus control region (LCR) that includes an enhancer which regulates isotype switching. Within 25 kb downstream of both the human immunoglobulin Cα1 and Cα2 genes we identified several segments of DNA which display B lymphoid–specific DNase I hypersensitivity as well as enhancer activity in transient transfections. The corresponding sequences downstream from each of the two human Cα genes are nearly identical to each other. These enhancers are also homologous to three regions which lie in similar positions downstream from the murine Cα gene and form the murine LCR. The strongest enhancers in both mouse and human have been designated HS12. Within a 135-bp core homology region, the human HS12 enhancers are ∼90% identical to the murine homolog and include several motifs previously demonstrated to be important for function of the murine enhancer; additional segments of high sequence conservation suggest the possibility of previously unrecognized functional motifs. On the other hand, certain functional elements in the murine enhancer, including a B cell–specific activator protein site, do not appear to be conserved in human HS12. The human homologs of the murine enhancers designated HS3 and HS4 show lower overall sequence conservation, but for at least two of the functional motifs in the murine HS4 (a κB site and an octamer motif  ) the human HS4 homologs are exactly conserved. An additional hypersensitivity site between human HS3 and HS12 in each human locus displays no enhancer activity on its own, but includes a region of high sequence conservation with mouse, suggesting the possibility of another novel functional element. PMID:9294139

  7. Serum Immunoglobulin A Cross-Strain Blockade of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Beltramello, Martina; Swanstrom, Jesica; Jones, Taylor A.; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis, justifying vaccine development despite a limited understanding of strain immunity. After genogroup I (GI).1 norovirus infection and immunization, blockade antibody titers to multiple virus-like particles (VLPs) increase, suggesting that GI cross-protection may occur. Methods. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A was purified from sera collected from GI.1-infected participants, and potential neutralization activity was measured using a surrogate neutralization assay based on antibody blockade of ligand binding. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced to multiple GI VLPs to characterize GI epitopes. Results. Immunoglobulin A purified from day 14 post-GI.1 challenge sera blocked binding of GI.1, GI.3, and GI.4 to carbohydrate ligands. In some subjects, purified IgA preferentially blocked binding of other GI VLPs compared with GI.1, supporting observations that the immune response to GI.1 infection may be influenced by pre-exposure history. For other subjects, IgA equivalently blocked multiple GI VLPs. Only strain-specific mAbs recognized blockade epitopes, whereas strain cross-reactive mAbs recognized nonblockade epitopes. Conclusions. These studies are the first to describe a functional role for serum IgA in norovirus immunity and the first to characterize human monoclonal antibodies to GI strains, expanding our understanding of norovirus immunobiology. PMID:26180833

  8. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  9. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  10. Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of human lymphocytes in immunologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Isabelle; Girard, J. P.; Cruchaud, A.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for γ, α, μ, κ and λ chains in healthy subjects and patients with immunologic disease. In healthy subjects, heavy chains were found on 30·7% of lymphocytes (γ 15·3%, α 7·2% and μ 8·2%) and light chains on 32·8% of cells (κ 20·4% and λ 12·4%). Patients with humoral immune deficiencies had fewer immunoglobulin-bearing cells; sarcoidosis or thymectomy patients had normal or decreased immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes; cells with light chains were fewer than those with heavy chains on their lymphocytes. In some cases, normal levels of serum immunoglobulins were found in the absence of the corresponding immunoglobulin-bearing cells, and in others normal immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes were present in the absence of the corresponding serum immunoglobulins. These data suggest that (1) immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes in blood do not reflect the condition of immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues, and (2) in certain immunologic disorders, either some B-lymphocytes do not synthesize immunoglobulins, or immunoglobulins are in such a situation that the whole molecule or part of the molecule is not visualized by current methods. PMID:4587505

  11. Arabinosylation of recombinant human immunoglobulin-based protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Patrick; Chumsae, Christopher; Racicot, Christopher; Ouellette, David; Ibraghimov, Alexander; Serna, Daniel; Mora, Alessandro; McDermott, Sean; Labkovsky, Boris; Scesney, Susanne; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory; Bose, Sahana; Carrillo, Ralf

    Protein glycosylation is arguably the paramount post-translational modification on recombinant glycoproteins, and highly cited in the literature for affecting the physiochemical properties and the efficacy of recombinant glycoprotein therapeutics. Glycosylation of human immunoglobulins follows a reasonably well-understood metabolic pathway, which gives rise to a diverse range of asparagine-linked (N-linked), or serine/threonine-linked (O-linked) glycans. In N-linked glycans, fucose levels have been shown to have an inverse relationship with the degree of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and high mannose levels have been implicated in potentially increasing immunogenicity and contributing to less favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to potentially reduce the presence of high-mannose species in recombinant human immunoglobulin preparations, as well as facilitate an approximate 100% replacement of fucosylation with arabinosylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture through media supplementation with D-arabinose, an uncommonly used mammalian cell culture sugar substrate. The replacement of fucose with arabinose was very effective and practical to implement, since no cell line engineering or cellular adaptation strategies were required. Arabinosylated recombinant IgGs and the accompanying reduction in high mannose glycans, facilitated a reduction in dendritic cell uptake, increased FcγRIIIa signaling, and significantly increased the levels of ADCC. These aforementioned effects were without any adverse changes to various structural or functional attributes of multiple recombinant human antibodies and a bispecific DVD-Ig. Protein arabinosylation represents an expansion of the N-glycan code in mammalian expressed glycoproteins.

  12. Human immunoglobulin 10 % with recombinant human hyaluronidase: replacement therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Human immunoglobulin is an established replacement therapy for patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) is a spreading factor that temporarily digests hyaluronan in the skin interstitium enabling large volumes of fluid or drug solutions to be infused and absorbed subcutaneously. HyQvia® (IGHy) is a new combination product whereby rHuPH20 is injected subcutaneously, followed by human immunoglobulin 10 % infused through the same needle. Thus, IGHy can be administered at a reduced frequency compared with non-facilitated subcutaneous injection of human immunoglobulin, and with a lower frequency of infusion reactions than with intravenous administration. Home-based administration of IGHy is also feasible for adequately trained patients. IGHy was compared with intravenous human immunoglobulin 10 % in a non-randomized, open-label, phase 3 study in patients aged ≥2 years with PIDs who were receiving human immunoglobulin replacement therapy (n = 87). In this study, trough IgG concentrations, acute serious bacterial infection rates (primary endpoint) and occurrences of adverse events during the IGHy treatment period were generally similar to those observed during an intravenous treatment period. IGHy was associated with a numerically lower rate of systemic adverse events and a numerically higher rate of localized adverse events than those observed with intravenous treatment. Compared with intravenous administration, IGHy was administered at a significantly higher maximum flow rate and at a similar frequency. Most patients preferred IGHy over intravenous administration. IGHy offers a new method for subcutaneous delivery of human immunoglobulin replacement therapy in patients with PIDs.

  13. Three-dimensional structure of an intact human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Silverton, E W; Navia, M A; Davies, D R

    1977-01-01

    We have examined the low-resolution structure of a complete human IgG1 using known domain coordinates from crystallographic investigations of immunoglobulin fragment structures. Our results indicate that the Fc portion of this molecule has a structure similar to that of an isolated Fc fragment, with the carbohydrate moiety playing a central role as the principal contact between the CH2 domains. Carbohydrate also forms a large part of the interface between the Fc and Fab regions. The relative orientations of the variable and constant portions of the Fab regions are intermediate between those reported previously, emphasizing the flexibility of the switch region. These data do not support a two-state allosteric model such as has been proposed for antibody effector functions. Images PMID:270751

  14. Immunological Studies of the Human Placenta CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS ON TROPHOBLASTIC BASEMENT MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W. Page; Jeannet, M.; Creighton, W. D.; Carbonara, A.

    1974-01-01

    Immunohistological and elution studies of the human placenta revealed the presence of IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) which demonstrated specificity for placental but not lung, thyroid, or kidney basement membranes, suggesting the presence of a placenta-specific antigen in TBM. IgG comprised the bulk of immunoglobulin in eluates, and small amounts of IgA, trace amounts of IgM, but no IgE or IgD were identified in eluates. The distribution of IgG subclasses in eluate was not unusual as compared to maternal and neonatal sera, and Gm and Inv typing of eluates indicated that it was of maternal origin. Small amounts of eluate-IgG effectively inhibited the blastogenic response of unrelated lymphocytes to old tuberculin, phytohemagglutinin, and in one- or two-way mixed lymphocyte culture reactions. The inhibition was distinct from nonspecific inhibitors, and dose-response analysis indicated that eluate was very much more potent as an inhibitor than were the nonspecific inhibitors. Inhibition was shown to not be due to anti-HL-A activity, and was probably not due to aggregated IgG or immune complexes. Binding of eluate to lymphocytes was very loose as shown by washing experiments, and no binding could be shown by immunofluorescence. The capacity of eluate IgG to inhibit MLC was retained after pepsin digestion to F(ab′)2, suggesting that the inhibition reactions were immunological. It is suggested that eluate-IgG is maternal blocking antibody to a hitherto uncharacterized trophoblast antigen, and it is speculated that either abnormal antigen or aberrant responses to antigen could result in fetal wastage. Images PMID:4278853

  15. Immunoglobulin patterns in humans over 95 years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Radl, J; Sepers, J M; Skvaril, F; Morell, A; Hijmans, W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin patterns were investigated in seventy-three volunteers older than 95 years. An idiopathic paraproteinaemia was found in 19% of the cases. A restriction of heterogeneity and an imbalance in the kappa/lambda ratio of the immunoglobulins was seen in a number of other sera. Determinations of immunoglobulin levels in sera of individuals without paraproteinaemia showed an increase in IgA and IgG. The quantitations of the IgG subclasses demonstrated that an increase in the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses is responsible for the elevated level of the IgG. The variation in the immunoglobulin levels increased significantly with age of IgM and for the three major IgG subclasses. No abnormalities were found in the urine or in the mixed saliva. These results indicate that selective changes in the extent of the antibody-immunoglobulin repertoire characterize the immunoglobulin pattern of ageing man. PMID:1212818

  16. Affinity Capture and Detection of Immunoglobulin E in Human Serum using an Aptamer-Modified Surface in Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jacquelyn R.; Dick, Lawrence W.; Morgan, Elizabeth J.; McGown, Linda B.

    2008-01-01

    Capture and detection of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in simple solution and in human serum using an aptamer-modified probe surface for affinity Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (affinity MALDI-MS) detection is reported. Detectable signals were obtained for 1 amol of IgE applied either in a single, 1 μL application of 1 pM IgE or after 10 successive, 1 μL applications of 100 fM IgE. In both cases, the surface was rinsed after each application of IgE to remove sample concomitants including salts and free or non-specifically associated proteins. Detection of native IgE, which is the least abundant of the serum immunoglobulins and occurs at sub-nM levels, in human serum was demonstrated and interference from the high abundance immunoglobulins and albumin was investigated. The aptamermodified surface showed high selectivity towards immunoglobulins in serum, with no significant interference from serum albumin. Addition of IgE to the serum suppressed the signals from the other immunoglobulins, confirming the expected selectivity of the aptamer surface towards IgE. Dilution of the serum increased the selectivity toward IgE; the protein was detected without interference in a 10,000-fold dilution of the serum, which is consistent with detection of IgE at amol (pM) levels in standard solutions. PMID:17194151

  17. [Study of human secretory immunoglobulin A. I. Obtaining monospecific antiserum to human secretory immunoglobulin A].

    PubMed

    German, G P; Chernokhvostova, E V; Gol'derman, S Ia

    1975-10-01

    A method of obtaining monospecific antiserum to the human secretory IgA is described. Immunochemically pure secretory IgA (isolated from human colostrum by fractionation with ammonium sulfate and gel-filtration on Sephadex G-200) was used for immunization of rabbits or sheep. Heterologous antibodies were removed by adsorption with commercial gamma globulin, normal serum, the serum of a patient suffering from A-myeloma with the IgA polymere and purified lactoferrin. Monospecific antiserum to the secretory IgA gave a reaction of complete immunological identity with the secretory IgA and a free secretory component.

  18. Spontaneous Production of Immunoglobulin M in Human Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanlei; Zhang, Li; Zheng, Jie; Zhao, Ling; Huang, Jing; Shao, Wenwei; Liao, Qinyuan; Ma, Teng; Geng, Li; Yin, C. Cameron; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that B-1 B cells are the main cell type that is responsible for the production of natural immunoglobulin M (IgM) and can respond to infection by increasing IgM secretion. However, we unexpectedly found that some epithelial cells also can express rearranged IgM transcript that has natural IgM characteristics, such as germline-encoded and restricted rearrangement patterns. Here we studied IgM expression in human non-B cells and found that IgM was frequently expressed by many human epithelial cancer cells as well as non-cancer epithelial cells. Moreover, CD79A and CD79B, two molecules that are physically linked to membranous IgM on the surface of B cells to form the B cell antigen receptor complex, were also expressed on the cell surface of epithelial cancer cells and co-located with IgM. Like the natural IgM, the epithelial cancer cell-derived IgM recognized a series of microbial antigens, such as single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, lipopolysaccharide, and the HEp-2 cell antigen. More important, stimulation of the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), which mimics bacterial infection, substantially increased the secretion of IgM in human epithelial cancer cells. These findings indicate that human epithelial cancer cells as well as non-cancer epithelial cells can spontaneously produce IgM with natural antibody activity. PMID:23251529

  19. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for the fast and selective detection of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The non-specific binding of proteins and the effects of other interferences are avoided by covering the non-adsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The selectivity of the sensor has been tested against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the most abundant protein in plasma. HIgG in aqueous solution with concentrations from 1.25 mg L(-1) (8 nM) can be readily detected with response times of about 10 min. The SWCNT networks that form the basis of the sensor are easily grown by chemical vapour deposition. Silver screen-printed electrodes make the sensor quick to build. The sensitivity obtained with this sensor is similar to other FET devices based on SWCNTs built using much more complicated lithography processes. Moreover, the sensor is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  20. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  1. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  2. [The use of human immunoglobulins--adverse reactions].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2010-09-01

    The primary immunodeficiency, mainly humoral immunity, secondary immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases are the indications for immunoglobulins substitution. The prolonged substitution in primary immunodeficiency includes regular intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in 0.4-0.6 g/kg of body weight every 21-28 days. The purpose of such substitution is decrease of frequency and diminishes the clinical course of infections. The high-dose use of immunoglobulins (1-2 g/kg body weight) is preferred in autoimmune diseases based on suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins. The subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins is an alternative to intravenous way, but the singular dose (0.1 g/kg body weight) is too low for suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins, so this substitution is indicated in primary immunodeficiency only. The adverse events of immunoglobulins differentiate because of time of occurrence and clinical character. The rapid symptoms occurred just after beginning of infusion and often present the clinical features of anaphylactoid reaction. During the infusion the occurring adverse symptoms are mild and the life-threatening situations are very rare. The next periods of typical adverse reaction are 24-48 hrs after infusion, 72 hrs and later. The mechanisms leading to adverse reaction to immunoglobulins are based on presence of IgG dimmers, stimulating high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immunocompetent cells. High level of cytokines is associated with high fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, feeling malaise and sick. The reaction of anti-IgA antibodies present in patient serum with IgA in immunoglobulins preparation is responsible for moderate and severe adverse clinical symptoms. The late adverse events present the symptoms of aseptic meningo-encephalitis. In case of adverse events the stopping of infusion, additions saline/ glucose infusion, anti-histaminic drugs of I and II generation and steroids

  3. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  4. Immunofluorescent studies on human spermatozoa. III. Immunoglobulin classes of human spermatozoal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, K. Brogaard

    1972-01-01

    Antibodies in human sera against four different antigens of human spermatozoa discovered by means of an indirect two-layer immunofluorescence technique (IFT) were characterized by determination of the class of immunoglobulins to which they belonged. A three-layer IFT using monospecific antisera against human IgG, IgA or IgM as the second layer was employed together with fractionation of sera on Sephadex G-200 or DEAE-cellulose followed by testing of the concentrated pools in a two-layer IFT. The study revealed that antibodies against the antigen in the front part of the acrosome were primarily IgM and those against the antigen in the tail primarily IgG. Antibodies against antigens in the equatorial segment and the postnuclear cap showed a varying predominance of these two immunoglobulins. Spermatozoal antibody as IgA was found only in small amounts. PMID:4558409

  5. Supercritical fluid precipitation of recombinant human immunoglobulin from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nesta, D P; Elliott, J S; Warr, J P

    2000-02-20

    Supercritical carbon dioxide was used as an antisolvent for producing recombinant human immunoglobulin G (rIgG) particulate powders. Liquid carbon dioxide (CO(2)) was premixed with ethanol to create a single-phase, modified supercritical fluid (SCF). The modified SCF was then vigorously mixed with a pharmaceutically acceptable, aqueous formulation of rIgG, and the mixture was immediately atomized into a pressurized vessel where rapid expansion of the modified SCF extracted the aqueous phase, resulting in precipitation of the protein powder. The process was reproducible, and resulting powder products were characterized by their aqueous solubilities, and the spectroscopic profile, molecular integrity, and antigen binding activity of the individual soluble fractions. Molecular integrity was assessed via size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SEC), whereas antigen binding activity was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Attempts to characterize particle size and morphology were confounded due to the extremely deliquescent nature of the powders, causing them to absorb moisture rapidly and become gummy. Operational conditions were optimized to a point which yielded powders that were completely soluble, and had ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic and SEC profiles indistinguishable from those of the reference standard starting solution from which the powders were derived. Antigen binding activities of the powders, however, were

  6. Primary response to GAT in F344 rats: anti-GAT antibodies, nonspecific immunoglobulins, and expression of the GAT-13 idiotype.

    PubMed

    Petit, C; Gilbert, M

    1983-08-01

    It has been reported that antigen induces differentiation of two populations of Ig-containing cells: the first one to appear, IgCC, synthesizes nonspecific Ig and the second, AbCC, synthesizes antibodies. Along with other arguments, the observation that nonspecific Ig bear idiotypic determinants, which cross-react with those of antibodies, had led to the hypothesis that IgCC are precursors of AbCC. However, the synthesis of such idiotype-positive nonspecific Ig before the appearance of the antibodies has not yet been proven. This problem was investigated by analyzing the primary response to poly(Glu60-Ala30-Tyr10) (GAT) in F344 rats. Kinetics studies of cells synthesizing Ig expressing a major idiotype (GAT-13), and of cells synthesizing Ig not expressing GAT-13 idiotype, revealed that these two cell populations were undetectable before the appearance of the anti-GAT antibodies. This demonstrates that IgCC differentiation is not a necessary condition for the development of all antibody responses.

  7. [Treatment with human tetanus immunoglobulins in the Emergency Department. Effects of informed consent].

    PubMed

    Massari, M; D'Adamo, F; Santucci, G

    1997-11-01

    The impact of informed consent to tetanus prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins on patients treated in the Emergency Department has been evaluated. Tetanus vaccination history was investigated in 1435 patients in 1995 and in 1300 patients in 1996 with post-traumatic skin lesions. The study has shown that in 1995, 55% and in 1996 49.5% of the total patients studied had not received vaccine for tetanus or boosters for over 10 years. These patients had been proposed the treatment with human tetanus immunoglobulins (TIG). The research was performed comparing the consent obtained before (from 17/5 to 15/7/1995) and after (from 17/5 to 15/7/1996) the introduction of the informed consent. The survey was divided into 15-day periods. In 1995 prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins was refused by 42 patients out of 831 (5%) while, in the following year, by 284 out of 641 (44.3%). Every period examined has shown highly significant differences (p < 0.000). Informing the patients that tetanus prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins can expose them to the risk, at present remote, of transmission of viral infections, has caused a heavy rise of denials to the suggestion of treatment with human immunoglobulins. The amount of the treated patients and the time that was devoted to informed consent would make Emergency Department one of the main places for effective and widespread tetanus prophylaxis. However a greater activity of outer structures would also be hoped for.

  8. [10 years' of production and use of human rabies immunoglobulin in Yugoslavia].

    PubMed

    Romić, M; Tomović, O; Medić, P; Pelević, S; Sindić, M; Popović, M; Gligorović, V; Bogdanović, G; Mitrović, M; Petrović, M; Stankov, S; Lazarević-Ivanc, L; Lalosević, V; Lalosević, D

    2001-01-01

    Application of the rabies immunoglobuline is a compulsory part of the prophylaxis of rabies in all severe, transdermal lesions caused by rabies infected animals. Sylvatic rabies has spread in the past few years throughout the whole Yugoslavia, and human cases of rabies have also been reported in other East European countries. In order to achieve the highest level of rabies prophylaxis, apart from postinfective rabies vaccination, it is necessary to provide passive immunization using specific antibodies against rabies. After successful immunization of the young, healthy volunteers in 1990, National Blood Transfusion Institute, in cooperation with the Pasteur Institute from Novi Sad, prepared the first quantities of immunized plasma by plasmapheresis procedure and human rabies immunoglobuline. Without national production, sufficient quantities of human rabies immunoglobuline could not be provided, since the price on the world market is rather high (over $1000 per patient).

  9. The Nonspecific Binding of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kushari; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Mackenzie, Peter I; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-12-01

    Drugs and other chemicals frequently bind nonspecifically to the constituents of an in vitro incubation mixture, particularly the enzyme source [e.g., human liver microsomes (HLM)]. Correction for nonspecific binding (NSB) is essential for the accurate calculation of the kinetic parameters Km, Clint, and Ki. Many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are lipophilic organic bases that are nonionized at physiologic pH. Attempts to measure the NSB of several TKIs to HLM by equilibrium dialysis proved unsuccessful, presumably due to the limited aqueous solubility of these compounds. Thus, the addition of detergents to equilibrium dialysis samples was investigated as an approach to measure the NSB of TKIs. The binding of six validation set nonionized lipophilic bases (felodipine, isradipine, loratidine, midazolam, nifedipine, and pazopanib) to HLM (0.25 mg/ml) was shown to be unaffected by the addition of CHAPS (6 mM) to the dialysis medium. This approach was subsequently applied to measurement of the binding of axitinib, dabrafenib, erlotinib, gefitinib, ibrutinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, nintedanib, regorafenib, sorafenib, and trametinib to HLM (0.25 mg/ml). As with the validation set drugs, attainment of equilibrium was demonstrated in HLM-HLM and buffer-buffer control dialysis experiments. Values of the fraction unbound to HLM ranged from 0.14 (regorafenib and sorafenib) to 0.93 (nintedanib), and were generally consistent with the known physicochemical determinants of drug NSB. The extensive NSB of many TKIs to HLM underscores the importance of correction for TKI binding to HLM and, presumably, other enzyme sources present in in vitro incubation mixtures.

  10. Opsonization of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites with nonspecific immunoglobulins promotes their phagocytosis by macrophages and inhibits their proliferation in nonphagocytic cells in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, M; Scorza, T; El Bouhdidi, A; Van Beeck, K; Carlier, Y; Dubremetz, J F; Verschueren, H

    1999-11-01

    We have recently shown that Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites grown in in vitro culture can bind unspecific immunoglobulin (Ig) through their Fc moiety. We show now that Fc receptors are also present on T. gondii within the host animal, and that intraperitoneal parasites in immunocompetent mice are saturated with unspecific Ig. We have also investigated the effect of the parasite's Fc receptor on the interaction of tachyzoites with mammalian cells, using the Vero cell line as a model for nonphagocytic host cells and murine peritoneal macrophages in primary culture as a model for phagocytic cells. Coating of tachyzoites with parasite-unrelated Ig did not enhance their invasive capacity in either target cell type, but slightly decreased the parasite proliferation. Moreover, phagocytosis by macrophages was increased by approximately 50% when parasites were coated with unspecific Ig. These results indicate that the Fc receptor on T. gondii affects the balance between invasion and phagocytosis in a way that is detrimental to the parasites.

  11. Human immunoglobulin G levels of viruses and associated glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Sara; Hjalmars, Ulf; Juto, Per; Wadell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Tjönneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Manjer, Jonas; Almquist, Martin; Melin, Beatrice S

    2011-09-01

    Few consistent etiological factors have been identified for primary brain tumors. Inverse associations to asthma and low levels of varicella-zoster virus, immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in prevalent cases have indicted a role for the immune system in the development of glioma. Because samples from prevalent cases of glioma could be influenced by treatments such as steroids and chemotherapy, we investigated pre-diagnostic samples from three large Scandinavian cohorts. To test the hypothesis that immune response levels to these viruses are associated etiologically with glioma risk, we investigated pre-diagnostic immunoglobulin levels for cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus (Ad), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) including the nuclear antigen (EBNA1) using plasma samples from 197 cases of adult glioma and 394 controls collected from population-based cohorts in Sweden and Denmark. Low VZV IgG levels were marginally significantly more common in glioma cases than the controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.13) for the fourth compared with the first quartile (p = 0.06 for trend). These results were more prominent when analyzing cases with blood sampling at least 2 years before diagnosis (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.37-1.08) (p = 0.03). No association with glioma risk was observed for CMV, EBV, and adenovirus.

  12. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  13. Computer models of the human immunoglobulins shape and segmental flexibility.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, R

    1986-06-01

    At present there is interest in the design and deployment of engineered biosensor molecules. Antibodies are the most versatile of the naturally occurring biosensors and it is important to understand their mechanical properties and the ways in which they can interact with their natural ligands. Two dimensional representations are clearly inadequate, and three dimensional representations are too complicated to manipulate except as numerical abstractions in computers. Recent improvements in computer graphics allow these coordinate matrices to be seen and more easily comprehended, and interactive programs permit the modification and reassembly of molecular fragments. The models which result have distinct advantages both over those of lower resolution, and those showing every atom, which are limited to the few fragments(2-5) or mutant molecules for which the X-ray crystallographic coordinates are known. In this review Richard Pumphrey describes the shape and flexibility of immunoglobulin molecules in relation to the three dimensional structure. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Binding analysis of carbon nanoparticles to human immunoglobulin G: Elucidation of the cytotoxicity of CNPs and perturbation of immunoglobulin conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengrui; Yang, Haitao; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The chemical compositions, sizes and fluorescent properties of synthesized carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were characterized. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were used as a model to study the cytotoxicity of CNPs, and the results of the cellular uptake of CNPs yielded excellent results: the CNPs demonstrated good biocompatibility and were non-toxic to the growth of the E. coli cells. Moreover, to assess the potential toxicity of CNPs to human health, the binding behavior of CNPs with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) was examined by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching constants and parameters for the interaction at different temperatures had been calculated according to Scatchard. The thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and free energy change (ΔG), were calculated, and the results indicated strong static quenching and showed that van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the CNP-HIgG complex. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra provided information regarding the conformational alteration of HIgG in the presence of CNPs. These findings help to characterize the interactions between CNPs and HIgG, which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of CNPs, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin g avidity to human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Gorini, Giovanna; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2004-07-01

    Clinical evaluation of a novel fully automated chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin G avidity to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) showed 92.8% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity in detecting a recent (< or =90 days) primary HCMV infection. The assay appears useful for accurately diagnosing recent primary HCMV infections.

  16. Effect of water on the temperatures of human immunoglobulin conformation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur'yash, V. F.; Kokurina, N. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    A differential thermal analysis of native and denaturated human immunoglobulin (G isotype) and mixtures of the native protein with water over the temperature range of 80-570 K is conducted. Temperatures of the protein conformational transitions and the effect of water on them are investigated. The limit of water solubility in the native protein is determined calorimetrically from the enthalpy of excess water phase melting. A physical state diagram of the immunoglobulin-water system over a wide range of temperatures and component concentrations is built and analyzed.

  17. Multi-scale modeling of the phase diagram of Human Immunoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchman, Mark; Buldyrev, Sergey; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George B.

    2014-03-01

    Human Immunoglobulin antibodies IGg is a Y-shape trimer consisting of three folded protein globules, connected by two polypeptide hinges in random conformations linked by disulfide bonds. The solubility and crystallization phase diagrams of immunoglobulin are crucial in understanding various pathological conditions. It is experimentally known that the critical volume fraction of immunoglobulin is three times smaller than for typical globular proteins. In order to explain this phenomenon, we perform a multi-scale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. First we produce all atom simulations of the hinges and compute the distribution of their end-to-end distances. Using these results we construct a simple effective bond potential and study a phase diagram of a system of three sticky hard-spheres linked by these bonds by discrete MD simulations. The results are in good agreement with the experiment.

  18. II Brazilian Consensus on the use of human immunoglobulin in patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Goudouris, Ekaterini Simões; Silva, Almerinda Maria do Rego; Ouricuri, Aluce Loureiro; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Condino, Antonio; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Prando, Carolina Cardoso de Mello; Kokron, Cristina Maria; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Tavares, Fabíola Scancetti; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva; Barreto, Irma Cecília Douglas Paes; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Barros, Myrthes Anna Maragna Toledo; Forte, Wilma Carvalho Neves

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the last few years, new primary immunodeficiencies and genetic defects have been described. Recently, immunoglobulin products with improved compositions and for subcutaneous use have become available in Brazil. In order to guide physicians on the use of human immunoglobulin to treat primary immunodeficiencies, based on a narrative literature review and their professional experience, the members of the Primary Immunodeficiency Group of the Brazilian Society of Allergy and Immunology prepared an updated document of the 1st Brazilian Consensus, published in 2010. The document presents new knowledge about the indications and efficacy of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiencies, relevant production-related aspects, mode of use (routes of administration, pharmacokinetics, doses and intervals), adverse events (major, prevention, treatment and reporting), patient monitoring, presentations available and how to have access to this therapeutic resource in Brazil. PMID:28444082

  19. An Fc receptor for human immunoglobulin G is located within the tegument of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, L M; Hardie, D R

    1991-01-01

    Immunogold electron microscopy has demonstrated that human immunoglobulin G (IgG) can bind to the tegument of human cytomegalovirus virions by the Fc portion of the molecule. This binding was inhibited by preincubation of the Fc probes with protein A. Treatment of AD169 virions with Triton X-100 allowed release of the Fc-binding proteins, which were precipitated and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Polypeptides of approximately 69 and 33 kDa were recovered and shown by immunoblotting to retain their capacity to bind Fc-gold after separation under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. The combined results of blocking experiments, PAGE of precipitates, and Western blots (immunoblots) indicate that the tegument proteins which bind IgG-Fc are identical to those which bind beta 2 microglobulin. Images PMID:1851889

  20. Characterization of a soluble suppressor of human B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis produced by a continuous human suppressor T cell line

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A human suppressor T cell maintained in long-term culture with conditioned medium containing interleukin 2 elaborates a suppressor factor(s) that specifically inhibits human polyclonal B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis. This soluble immune suppressor supernate of immunoglobulin production (CTC-SISS-B) shares a number of features with the previously described suppressive mediator elaborated by concanavalin A-activated human peripheral T cells (SISS-B) including: (a) the inhibition by a noncytotoxic mechanism, (b) the suppression of immunoglobulin biosynthesis either through direct action on the B cell or indirect action via the monocyte, (c) the loss of inhibition in the presence of the monosaccharide L-rhamnose, (d) the elaboration by cells irradiated with 500 ro 2,000 rad, and (e) molecular weights of 60,000-- 90,000. Furthermore, the suppression by this mediator appears to be specific for B cell immunoglobulin production in that CTC-SISS B has no effect on T cell proliferation to mitogens, antigens, an allogeneic cells or on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicate that one possible mechanism of suppressor T cell inhibition of human immunoglobulin production is via the generation of a lectinlike suppressor lymphokine that interacts with defined saccharide determinants on the cell surface of either the B cell or monocyte. PMID:6454754

  1. Potato lectin activates basophils and mast cells of atopic subjects by its interaction with core chitobiose of cell-bound non-specific immunoglobulin E

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, S N; Venkatesh, Y P; Mahesh, P A

    2007-01-01

    A major factor in non-allergic food hypersensitivity could be the interaction of dietary lectins with mast cells and basophils. Because immunoglobulin E (IgE) contains 10–12% carbohydrates, lectins can activate and degranulate these cells by cross-linking the glycans of cell-bound IgE. The present objective focuses on the effect of potato lectin (Solanum tuberosum agglutinin; STA) for its ability to release histamine from basophils in vitro and mast cells in vivo from non-atopic and atopic subjects. In this study, subjects were selected randomly based on case history and skin prick test responses with food, pollen and house dust mite extracts. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with STA at 100 µg/ml concentration. Histamine release was performed using leucocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects and rat peritoneal exudate cells. SPT on 110 atopic subjects using STA showed 39 subjects positive (35%); however, none showed STA-specific IgE; among 20 non-atopic subjects, none were positive by SPT. Maximal histamine release was found to be 65% in atopic subjects (n = 7) compared to 28% in non-atopic subjects (n = 5); the release was inhibited specifically by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine and correlates well with serum total IgE levels (R2 = 0·923). Binding of STA to N-linked glycoproteins (horseradish peroxidase, avidin and IgG) was positive by dot blot and binding assay. As potato lectin activates and degranulates both mast cells and basophils by interacting with the chitobiose core of IgE glycans, higher intake of potato may increase the clinical symptoms as a result of non-allergic food hypersensitivity in atopic subjects. PMID:17362264

  2. Neutralizing activities against seasonal influenza viruses in human intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Hiroyuki; Urayama, Takeru; Hirota, Kazue; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Yunoki, Mikihiro

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B are known seasonal viruses that undergo annual mutation. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-seasonal influenza virus globulins. Although the virus-neutralizing (VN) titer is an indicator of protective antibodies, changes in this titer over extended time periods have yet to be examined. In this study, variations in hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and VN titers against seasonal influenza viruses in IVIG lots over extended time periods were examined. In addition, the importance of monitoring the reactivity of IVIG against seasonal influenza viruses with varying antigenicity was evaluated. A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B influenza virus strains and IVIG lots manufactured from 1999 to 2014 were examined. The HI titer was measured by standard methods. The VN titer was measured using a micro-focus method. IVIG exhibited significant HI and VN titers against all investigated strains. Our results suggest that the donor population maintains both specific and cross-reactive antibodies against seasonal influenza viruses, except in cases of pandemic viruses, despite major antigen changes. The titers against seasonal influenza vaccine strains, including past strains, were stable over short time periods but increased slowly over time. PMID:28331286

  3. Use of human intravenous immunoglobulin in lower motor neuron syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C; Leary, S; Payan, J; Shaw, C; Hu, M; O'Brien, M; Leigh, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether patients with the clinical phenotype of multifocal motor neuropathy but without the electrophysiological criteria for conduction block would respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg).
METHODS—Ten patients were selected with a slowly progressive, asymmetric, lower motor neuron disorder, and were treated prospectively with IVIg at a dose of 2g/kg over 5 days. All subjects had neurophysiological testing to look for evidence of conduction block before treatment. Muscle strength was assessed by MRC grades and hand held myometry, measuring pinch and grip strength. A 20% increase in both pinch and grip myometry was considered a positive response.
RESULTS—In no patient was conduction block detected. Four of the 10 patients showed a positive response to IVIg, with the best response occurring in two patients who presented with weakness but without severe muscle wasting. Three of the four responders have continued to receive IVIg for a mean period of 17 months (range 15-24 months), with continued effect. The response to IVIg was not related to the presence of anti-GM1 antiganglioside antibodies, but responders had a selective pattern of muscle weakness and normal (>90% predicted) vital capacity.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggest that a course of IVIg should be considered in patients with the clinical phenotype of multifocal motor neuropathy but without neurophysiological evidence of conduction block.

 PMID:10369816

  4. Immunogenic and antigenic epitopes of immunoglobulins I. Cross-reactivity of murine monoclonal antibodies to human IgG with the immunoglobulins of certain animal species.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; Porter, P; Senior, S

    1982-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma clones have been isolated following immunization of mice with human IgG. Twenty-five monoclonal antibodies (nine anti-C gamma 3, fourteen anti-C gamma 2, one anit-kappa and one anti-lambda) were selected for study of their cross-reactivity with the IgG of fifteen mammalian species and chicken immunoglobulin. Each antibody exhibited a unique reaction profile suggesting that human IgG expresses a very large repertoire of immunogenic epitopes. Whilst some antibodies showed a very restricted cross-reactivity profile for others a very wide reactivity profile was observed-including two clones producing autoantibodies. Antibodies demonstrating cross-reactivity between human Fc gamma and 7S chicken immunoglobulin allow its definitive assignment as a homologue of human IgG. Four clones demonstrated specificity for bovine IgG subclass gamma 1 and gamma 2 and the degree of reactivity allows their application to qualitative and quantitative assay systems. These studies suggest new perspectives for the characterization of immunoglobulins and the standardization of anti-immunoglobulin reagents. PMID:6173313

  5. Micro-bead injection spectroscopy for label-free automated determination of immunoglobulin G in human serum.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inês I; Magalhães, Luís M; Barreiros, Luisa; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C; Segundo, Marcela A

    2017-09-09

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) represents the major fraction of antibodies in healthy adult human serum, and deviations from physiological levels are a generic marker of disease corresponding to different pathologies. Therefore, screening methods for IgG evaluation are a valuable aid to diagnostics. The present work proposes a rapid, automatic, and miniaturized method based on UV-vis micro-bead injection spectroscopy (μ-BIS) for the real-time determination of human serum IgG with label-free detection. Relying on attachment of IgG in rec-protein G immobilized in Sepharose 4B, a bioaffinity column is automatically assembled, where IgG is selectively retained and determined by on-column optical density measurement. A "dilution-and-shoot" approach (50 to 200 times) was implemented without further sample treatment because interferences were flushed out of the column upon sample loading, with minimization of carryover and cross-contamination by automatically discarding the sorbent (0.2 mg) after each determination. No interference from human serum albumin at 60 mg mL(-1) in undiluted sample was found. The method allowed IgG determination in the range 100-300 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 5.0-60 mg mL(-1) in undiluted samples), with a detection limit of 33 μg mL(-1) (1.7 mg mL(-1) for samples, dilution factor of 50). RSD values were < 9.4 and < 11.7%, for intra and inter-assay precision, respectively, while recovery values for human serum spiked with IgG at high pathological levels were 97.8-101.4%. Comparison to commercial ELISA kit showed no significant difference for tested samples (n = 8). Moreover, time-to-result decreased from several hours to < 5 min and analysis cost decreased 10 times, showing the potential of the proposed approach as a point-of-care method. Graphical abstract Micro-Bead Injection Spectroscopy method for real time, automated and label-free determination of total serum human Immunoglobulin G (IgG). The method was designed for Lab

  6. The physiological effects of human immunoglobulin on severe bronchiolitis patients before and after treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Dong; Li, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xi-Mei; Luo, Song-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to explore the physiological effects of injected human immunoglobulin on patients with severe bronchiolitis before and after treatment. 86 young children with severe bronchiolitis were randomly divided into the observation group (43 cases) and the treatment group (43 cases). On the basis of conventional therapy, the children in the treatment group were given human immunoglobulin (400 mg/kg, 1–3 times) via intravenous injection. 60 healthy young children, as determined by a physical examination given at the Zhumadian Central Hospital, were enrolled as the control group. The T lymphocytes, cytokines, IgA, IgG, and IgM immunoglobulins in the peripheral blood of all 3 groups were measured. The clinical efficacy of the immunoglobulins to mitigate the effects of bronchiolitis and the amount of time for the reduction of symptoms to occur were observed. The serum Ca, Fe, and Zn levels of children with severe bronchiolitis were significantly lower than those of the healthy control group (p < 0.05). As such, the CD8, IgA, IgG, IgM and IFN-γ levels were also significantly lower in the children with severe bronchiolitis than in the children in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CD4, IgE, IL-4, and IL-4/IFN-γ levels and CD4/CD8 ratio were dramatically higher than in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Serum levels of the aforementioned indicators either increased or decreased after IVIG treatment. The amount of time required for coughing, wheezing, and pulmonary rales to seize, and the duration of illness for the children with the severe bronchiolitis children was significantly shorter for those in the treatment group than for those in the observation group. Human immunoglobulin via intravenous injection showed active therapeutical effects on trace elements, T lymphocytes, and cytokines in patients with severe bronchiolitis. PMID:26308393

  7. The physiological effects of human immunoglobulin on severe bronchiolitis patients before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Dong; Li, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xi-Mei; Luo, Song-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to explore the physiological effects of injected human immunoglobulin on patients with severe bronchiolitis before and after treatment. 86 young children with severe bronchiolitis were randomly divided into the observation group (43 cases) and the treatment group (43 cases). On the basis of conventional therapy, the children in the treatment group were given human immunoglobulin (400 mg/kg, 1-3 times) via intravenous injection. 60 healthy young children, as determined by a physical examination given at the Zhumadian Central Hospital, were enrolled as the control group. The T lymphocytes, cytokines, IgA, IgG, and IgM immunoglobulins in the peripheral blood of all 3 groups were measured. The clinical efficacy of the immunoglobulins to mitigate the effects of bronchiolitis and the amount of time for the reduction of symptoms to occur were observed. The serum Ca, Fe, and Zn levels of children with severe bronchiolitis were significantly lower than those of the healthy control group (p < 0.05). As such, the CD8, IgA, IgG, IgM and IFN-γ levels were also significantly lower in the children with severe bronchiolitis than in the children in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CD4, IgE, IL-4, and IL-4/IFN-γ levels and CD4/CD8 ratio were dramatically higher than in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Serum levels of the aforementioned indicators either increased or decreased after IVIG treatment. The amount of time required for coughing, wheezing, and pulmonary rales to seize, and the duration of illness for the children with the severe bronchiolitis children was significantly shorter for those in the treatment group than for those in the observation group. Human immunoglobulin via intravenous injection showed active therapeutical effects on trace elements, T lymphocytes, and cytokines in patients with severe bronchiolitis.

  8. Specific absorption of human serum albumin, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G with selected strains of group A and G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Simmons, A; Myhre, E B; Jonsson, S

    1979-01-01

    Five gram-positive bacterial strains were selected for absorption studies of human serum samples. Strain AR1 (group A, M-type 1) and G148 (group G), with strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding capacities, and strain AW43 (group A, M-type 60), binding both IgA1 and IgA2, were compared with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and with Staphylococcus epidermidis L603. Both AR1 and G148 were capable of completely absorbing out serum IgG. In contrast, S. aureus Cowan I left a fraction unabsorbed, as expected from its known lack of IgG3 binding. Strain AW43 absorbed out all serum IgA, using a 10-microliter bacterial pellet for 20 microliter of serum. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced by S. aureus Cowan I absorption. On the basis of the experiments, a bacterial mixture was designed consisting of S. aureus Cowan I and group A streptococcus strains AR1 and AW43, with absorption characteristics suitable for use in discriminating between early IgM and late IgG and IgA immune responses in routine serological work. A new type of bacteria-mammalian protein binding was discovered. Human serum albumin was completely absorbed out by strain G148 and to a lesser extent by strain AR1 and AW43. S. aureus Cowan I and S. epidermidis were negative. The binding capacity of G148 for albumin equalled that of Cowan I for IgG. The binding pattern of albumin to the strains was different from those of IgG, IgA, IgM, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, or aggregated beta 2-microglobulin and therefore seems to represent another type of bacterial-mammalian interaction with a specific albumin receptor on the surface of streptococci. Images PMID:383609

  9. Physiological Level Production of Antigen-Specific Human Immunoglobulin in Cloned Transchromosomic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle. PMID:24205120

  10. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  11. Human immunoglobulin D in colostrum, saliva and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, H F; Matthews, J B; Flack, V; Jefferis, R

    1979-01-01

    An antiserum raised to a partially purified preparation of secretory IgA isolated from human colostrum was shown to contain antibodies directed against human IgD. The inferred presence of IgD in the human colostrum was confirmed and also its association with antibody activity, as demonstrated by the presence of anti-E. coli antibodies. IgD was also shown to be present in whole saliva, parotid saliva and amniotic fluid, but could not be detected in jejunal juice. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:111882

  12. [Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin bioassay using cultured normal human thyroid cells].

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yamauchi, K; Tanaka, H; Mori, Y; Takatsuki, K; Yamamoto, M; Matsui, N; Tomita, A

    1985-08-20

    It is currently believed that the thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) of Graves' disease is involved in the pathogenesis of hyperthyroidism through the stimulation of the adenylate cyclase-cyclic AMP system. To evaluate this mechanism, TSI in the serum of patients with Graves' disease was determined by its ability to generate cyclic AMP (cAMP) in monolayer cells prepared from a normal thyroid gland. The thyroid tissue was digested with collagenase, and the liberated follicles were collected from the supernatant and cultured for 7 days. One gram of thyroid tissue yielded more than 1 X 10(7) monolayer cells which were stored in aliquots at -80C. Cells (1 approximately 2 X 10(4)/0.28 cm2 microtiter well) were incubated for 4 hours in 0.2 ml Hanks solution poor in NaCl, with various amounts of bovine TSH (bTSH) or 1.5 mg/ml Graves' serum IgG extracted by polyethylene glycol. cAMP accumulated in medium and cells was measured by RIA. Total cAMP (both medium and cells) was about 4 times higher when NaCl was deleted from Hanks solution. Moreover, as more than 90% of the cAMP was released into the medium, it was possible to omit the measurement of cellular cAMP, which requires extraction. The increase in medium cAMP concentration was dependent upon the number of cells, incubation time, and dose of bTSH. Time course and dose response curves in medium cAMP stimulated by IgG from 3 Graves' patients paralleled those of bTSH equivalent units. Accordingly, TSI activity could be expressed in bTSH equivalent units (bTSH microUeq). The assay could detect 1.0 or 3.3 microU/ml of bTSH and was highly reproducible. TSI activity in all of 16 IgGs from normal subjects was under 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml, while it was greater than 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml in IgGs from 33 of 37 (89%) untreated patients with Graves disease. Of the 13 patients followed for 2 to 7 months while on antithyroid drugs, 12 had greater than 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml and, with the exception of one, all showed a decrease in

  13. Recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous infusion of human immunoglobulins for primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard L; Melamed, Isaac; Stein, Mark R; Gupta, Sudhir; Puck, Jennifer; Engl, Werner; Leibl, Heinz; McCoy, Barbara; Empson, Victoria G; Gelmont, David; Schiff, Richard I

    2012-10-01

    Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IGSC) replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency (PI) is equally efficacious to intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV), induces fewer systemic reactions, and may be self-infused. Limited SC infusion volumes and reduced bioavailability, however, necessitate multiple infusion sites, more frequent treatment, and dose adjustment to achieve pharmacokinetic equivalence. Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) increases SC tissue permeability and facilitates dispersion and absorption, enabling administration of monthly doses in one site. This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of rHuPH20-facilitated IGSC (IGHy) in patients with PI. In this open-label, multicenter phase III study, 87 patients with PI aged ≥2 years received 10% IGIV for 3 months, then IGHy (n = 83) for approximately 14 to 18 months at 108% of the IGIV dose. IGHy infusions began weekly, increasing to 3- or 4-week intervals. The majority (94.0%) of IGHy infusions were administered every 3 or 4 weeks, using one site (median, 1.09/month), with a mean volume of 292.2 mL. The bioavailability of IGHy measured by area under the concentration versus time curve was 93.3% of IGIV, which is pharmacokinetically equivalent. Systemic reactions were less frequent with IGHy than with IGIV (8.3% vs 25.0% of infusions). Local reactions to IGHy were generally mild to moderate, with a rate of 0.203 per infusion. The acute serious bacterial infection rate per subject-year for IGHy was low (0.025; upper 99% CI limit, 0.046). Overall infection rates per subject-year were 2.97 for IGHy and 4.51 for IGIV. IGHy was effective, safe, and pharmacokinetically equivalent to IGIV at the same administration intervals, but it caused fewer systemic reactions. Tolerability was good despite high infusion volumes and rates. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasmonic Enhancement of Luminescence of Fluorscein Isothiocyanate and Human Immunoglobulin Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanenka, A. A.; Vaschenko, S. V.; Stankevich, V. V.; Lunevich, A. Ya.; Glukhov, Yu. F.; Gaponenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    Plasmonic enhancement of the luminescence of fl uorescein isothiocyanate and human immunoglobulin conjugates near silver nanoparticles was investigated as functions of the nanoparticle-conjugate distance and the excitation polarization. The maximum luminescence enhancement of 7.4 was achieved for p-polarized excitation and nanoparticle-conjugate distance 3.3 nm. The luminescence enhancement factor increased experimentally for p-polarized excitation and decreased for s-polarized excitation as compared with unpolarized excitation.

  15. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  16. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  17. Immunization by blood-type antigen in human immunoglobulin products before ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Sato, Sumihiko; Kubota, Keiichi; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Teraoka, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    A 29-year-old man wanted to receive an ABO-incompatible kidney transplant. His blood type was O, and the donor, his father, was A1. After endoscopic splenectomy performed before kidney transplantation, the recipient developed a high fever and leukocytosis, and he was treated with antibiotics and 5 g of human immunoglobulin products by intravenous infusion for 3 d. Soon after the infusions, his anti-blood type A antibody titer (anti-A titer) rose, and several sessions of plasma-exchange (PEX) and double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) failed to lower it. Three courses of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody were administered to suppress the antibody production more specifically, and the rituximab infusions and repeated PEX and DFPP session lowered the anti-A titer and enabled kidney transplantation. Mild humoral rejection was observed 16 d after transplantation, but the recipient's serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL when discharged from the hospital. The increased anti-A titer may have been due to immunization by blood-type A antigen, with the human immunoglobulin products given to the patient being the source of the antigen. Administration of human immunoglobulin products to recipients of ABO-incompatible kidney transplants should be avoided, because it may cause an unexpected increase in anti-blood-type antibody titer.

  18. Selective removal, recovery, and characterization of immunoglobulins from human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, T W; Magnuson, J S; Yip, T T

    1989-12-01

    Investigations into the mechanisms by which Ig in human colostrum influence the development and maturation of both the gastrointestinal and the immune systems of human milk-fed term and preterm infants have been restricted by the paucity of purified human milk Ig. We have developed a simple adsorption procedure for the selective removal and quantitative recovery (95-100%) of intact Ig (secretory IgA, IgG, and IgM) present in human colostral whey. The procedure exploits the rapid, ionic-strength dependent, thiophilic adsorption of Ig during a single pass of colostral whey through a column of beaded agarose with immobilized thioether-sulfone ligands (Anal Biochem 1986;159:217-226). The purity and composition of the adsorbed Ig were verified by SDS-PAGE and sensitive silver-staining protein detection procedures; proteins of approximately 78-80 kD (secretory component), 50-60 kD (heavy chain), and 25 kD (light chain) were observed. The identity, structural integrity, and relative concentrations of the recovered Ig were confirmed by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, rocket immunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. These results were analyzed and compared with reported values for the concentration of human milk Ig. Thus, the use of thiophilic adsorption appears to facilitate 1) selective removal of Ig from colostrum, enabling the evaluation of remaining components for growth- and immune-potentiating properties, and 2) selective immobilization and recovery of Ig from colostrum under conditions consistent with preserved biologic activity.

  19. Increased detection of human cardiac troponin I by a decrease of nonspecific adsorption in diluted self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J.; Shankar, Karthik

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity for detecting and measuring disease biomarkers (such as human cardiac troponin I, cTnI) by a decrease of nonspecific adsorption in diluted self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on planar sputtered gold films. Combining grazing angle Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and antibody-antigen-antibody (sandwich) fluorescence-based immunoassay, we examined the relationship of sensitivity, specificity of detection of cTnI and the level of nonspecific protein adsorption in the following SAMs: pure MHA (16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid, 1 mM, with head COO-, x = 1.0), a mixed SAM comprising MHA (0.1 mM) and UDT (1-undecane thiol, 0.9 mM, with hydrophobic head CH3, x = 0.1UDT), and a mixed SAM comprising MHA (0.1 mM) and MUD (11-mercapto-1-undecanol, 0.9 mM, with hydrophilic head OH, x = 0.1MUD). Our data revealed that nonspecific binding to SAMs is favored in the following order: CH3 > COO- > OH, consistent with previous studies. Compared with pure SAMs, diluting MHA SAMs with MUD increases the sensitivity of cTnI, whereas diluted MHA SAMs with UDT has the same sensitivity of detection of cTnI, suggesting it is the nature of the second diluting thiol that plays an important role on the amount of adsorbed protein on the surface. We obtained a 10-fold increase in the limit of detection of cTnI to 10 ng/ml using x = 0.1MUD due to a decrease of nonspecific binding. Further, specific binding between the antigen cTnI and its antibody is unaltered on pure and diluted SAMs.

  20. Immunological studies of human placentae: the distribution and character of immunoglobulins in chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P M; Natvig, J B; Ystehede, U A; Faulk, W P

    1977-01-01

    All four human IgG subclasses, and both kappa and lambda light chains, were detected by immunofluorescence in similar distributions in chorionic villi of human placentae. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant subclasses. No evidence was obtained for local enzymatic digestion of IgG during placental transfer. Most of the IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) was loosely bound and could be removed by prolonged washing, although some appeared to be more tightly bound to small segments of the TBM. IgM, but not IgA, was present in small amounts in placental villous structures. Immunoglobulin was never observed within the syncytiotrophoblast. Antisera to IgG genetic (Gm) markers were used to locate IgG thought to be of foetal or maternal origin. The presence of paternal Gm markers not carried by the mother was taken as evidence for foetal IgG. Foetal (paternal) Gm markers were observed in placentae, although maternal IgG was the major immunoglobulin present in placental villi. Both maternal and foetal IgG were demonstrated in fibrinoid deposits, vessel walls and the cytoplasm of some stromal cells. Only foetal IgG was definitively observed in the immunoglobulin that is tightly bound to the TBM. PMID:342151

  1. Sheep, rabbit and chicken antisera against a human VH fragment: reactivity with immunoglobulins and lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen, T E; Lea, T

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against a human VH fragment obtained from an IgG3, VH II, kappa protein (KUP) were raised in rabbits, sheep and chicken. The three types of anti-VH antisera reacted equally well with both intact immunoglobulin molecules and isolated heavy chains. The antisera did not detect any free heavy chain specific antigens by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests although they reacted with some antigens which were more or less hidden on intact immunoglobulin molecules but well expressed on isolated heavy chains. The antisera reacted with more than 90% of IgG, IgA and IgM present in normal pooled serum. Experiments with T cells from normal peripheral blood indicated that the sheep and rabbit anti-VH antisera reacted with a 70,000 mol.wt T-cell surface antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6802746

  2. Recombinant Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) RL13 Binds Human Immunoglobulin G Fc

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Mirko; Calò, Stefano; D'Aurizio, Romina; Lilja, Anders; Pacchiani, Nicola; Merola, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein RL13 has recently been described to be present in all primary isolates but rapidly mutated in culture adapted viruses. Although these data suggest a crucial role for this gene product in HCMV primary infection, no function has so far been assigned to this protein. Working with RL13 expressed in isolation in transfected human epithelial cells, we demonstrated that recombinant RL13 from the clinical HCMV isolates TR and Merlin have selective human immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding properties towards IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes. An additional Fc binding protein, RL12, was also identified as an IgG1 and IgG2 binding protein but not further characterized. The glycoprotein RL13 trafficked to the plasma membrane where it bound and internalized exogenous IgG or its constant fragment (Fcγ). Analysis of RL13 ectodomain mutants suggested that the RL13 Ig-like domain is responsible for the Fc binding activity. Ligand-dependent internalization relied on a YxxL endocytic motif located in the C-terminal tail of RL13. Additionally, we showed that the tyrosine residue could be replaced by phenylalanine but not by alanine, indicating that the internalization signal was independent from phosphorylation events. In sum, RL13 binds human IgG and may contribute to HCMV immune evasion in the infected host, but this function does not readily explain the instability of the RL13 gene during viral propagation in cultured cells. PMID:23226246

  3. Immune suppression induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: effects on immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Vitale, L A; Welham, D A

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces an immunosuppressive factor (ISF) which has been shown to suppress mitogen- and antigen-induced DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes. In this study, we examined purified A. actinomycetemcomitans ISF for its ability to alter immunoglobulin production by human B cells. The ISF caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM production. Preexposure to ISF was not required to achieve maximal inhibition of immunoglobulin synthesis, as previously observed for its effect on T-cell activation. Nevertheless, the ISF appeared to act by irreversibly affecting the early stages of cell activation. While PWM-induced immunoglobulin production is under the influence of T-regulatory circuits, it appears that the ISF interacts directly with B cells. First, ISF failed to alter either the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or the expression of IL-2 receptors on T cells. Second, experiments in which individual purified populations of cells were exposed to ISF, washed, and placed back into tissue culture indicated that when all cells (i.e., T cells, B cells, and monocytes) were exposed to ISF, significant suppression was observed. However, when only one cell population was treated with ISF, suppression of both IgG and IgM synthesis was observed only when the B-cell-enriched population was exposed to ISF. These results in conjunction with our earlier findings suggest that the ISF functions via the activation of a regulatory subpopulation of B lymphocytes, which in turn either directly or indirectly (via suppressor T cells) downregulate both B- and T-cell responsiveness. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. This suppression may enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:2254014

  4. Intra-cerebral injection of neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G and human complement produces neuromyelitis optica lesions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Saadoun, Samira; Waters, Patrick; Bell, B. Anthony; Vincent, Angela; Verkman, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with autoantibodies against the glial water channel protein aquaporin-4. It has recently been reported that immunoglobulin from neuromyelitis optica patients injected peripherally does not cause lesions in naive rats, but only when pre-existing central nervous system inflammation is present. Here, we investigated whether immunoglobulin G from aquaporin-4-autoantibody-positive neuromyelitis optica patients has the potential to damage the central nervous system either alone or in the presence of human complement. Immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients did not activate mouse complement and was not pathogenic when injected into mouse brain. However, co-injection of immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients with human complement produced neuromyelitis optica-like lesions in mice. Within 12 h of co-injecting immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients and human complement, there was a striking loss of aquaporin-4 expression, glial cell oedema, myelin breakdown and axonal injury, but little intra-parenchymal inflammation. At 7 days, there was extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, perivascular deposition of activated complement components, extensive demyelination, loss of aquaporin-4 expression, loss of reactive astrocytes and neuronal cell death. In behavioural studies, mice injected with immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients and human complement into the right hemisphere preferentially turned to the right at 7 days. No brain inflammation, demyelination or right-turning behaviour was seen in wild-type mice that received immunoglobulin G from non-neuromyelitis optica patients with human complement, or in aquaporin-4-null mice that received immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients with human complement. We conclude that co-injection of immunoglobulin G from neuromyelitis optica patients with human complement

  5. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  6. Purification of human immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor using affinity chromatography and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, S V; Golikova, E A; Kireev, F D; Lopatnikova, J A

    2013-04-30

    Autoantibodies to cytokines are important biological effector molecules that can regulate cytokine activities. The aim of the study was to develop a protocol to purify autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor from human serum, for use as a calibration material to determine the absolute content of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proposed protocol includes a set of affinity chromatography methods, namely, Bio-Gel P6DG sorbent to remove albumin from serum, Protein G Sepharose 4 Fast Flow to obtain a total immunoglobulin G fraction of serum immunoglobulins, and Affi-Gel 15 to obtain specifically antibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The addition of a magnetic separation procedure to the protocol eliminated contaminant tumor necrosis factor from the fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The protocol generated a pure fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor, and enabled us to determine the absolute concentrations of different subclasses of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor in apparently healthy donors.

  7. Suppressive effect of functional drinking yogurt containing specific egg yolk immunoglobulin on Helicobacter pylori in humans.

    PubMed

    Horie, K; Horie, N; Abdou, A M; Yang, J-O; Yun, S-S; Chun, H-N; Park, C-K; Kim, M; Hatta, H

    2004-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen that infects over 50% of the population worldwide. It is the most important etiologic agent of gastroduodenal ulcers and malignancies. Helicobacter pylori urease enzyme is considered the main factor for the organism's colonization in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Hens immunized with the purified urease produce a highly specific anti-H. pylori urease immunoglobulin (IgY-urease) in their egg yolks. Immunoglobulin Y-urease was stable at 60 to 65 degrees C for 30 min and at pH 4.0 for 7 h. Its activity was lost at 80 degrees C for 20 min and at pH 2 for 4 h. Specially designed functional drinking yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium spp. with 1% egg yolk IgY-urease was produced commercially. Immunoglobulin Y-urease activity showed stability in the product up to 7 d, and then decreased to 85% after 3 wk of storage. A clinical study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of IgY-urease yogurt to suppress infection in humans. Forty-two volunteers who tested positive for H. pylori using a 13C-urea breath test were recruited. A total of 450 mL of IgY-urease (test group) or IgY-urease-free yogurt (control group) was consumed in 150-mL portions 3 times daily for 4 wk. Volunteers were tested after 2 and 4 wk; urea breath test values significantly decreased in the test group compared with the control group. The results indicate that suppression of H. pylori infection in humans could be achieved by consumption of drinking yogurt fortified with IgY-urease.

  8. Heterogeneity of nonimmune immunoglobulin Fc reactivity among gram-positive cocci: description of three major types of receptors for human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Myhre, E B; Kronvall, G

    1977-09-01

    Two hundred and thirty strains of various gram-positive cocci were tested for quantitative, nonimmune binding of radiolabeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). The majority of coagulase-positive staphylococci and streptococci belonging to serogroups C and G showed a high uptake of IgG. The binding of immunoglobulin to group A streptococci was considerably less, with a number of strains completely negative. None of the pneumococcal or the group B or D streptococcal strains displayed any binding capacity. Heterogeneity of the IgG reactivity of various reactive strains was studied in an inhibition assay using 10 different animal serum pools. Three different inhibition patterns were seen, each of them revealing a striking degree of homogeneity within single bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, respectively, constituted two homogeneous groups which differed markedly from each other and from C and G streptococci. No differences were observed between group C and G streptococci. Based on the profound differences between these homogeneous groups, three major types of Fc receptors could be defined. Type I and II Fc receptors were found on S. aureus and on group A streptococci, respectively. Fc receptor type III represented the immunoglobulin-binding structure of both group C and G streptococci.

  9. Complex-specific immunoglobulin M antibody patterns in humans infected with alphaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Calisher, C H; el-Kafrawi, A O; Al-Deen Mahmud, M I; Travassos da Rosa, A P; Bartz, C R; Brummer-Korvenkontio, M; Haksohusodo, S; Suharyono, W

    1986-01-01

    Sera from humans with serologically confirmed eastern equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, Pogosta (Ockelbo), Mayaro, Ross River, and chikungunya virus infections were tested by immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody capture enzyme immunoassay. Diagnostically useful IgM antibody titers were detected, and selected sera with high IgM antibody titers were tested for IgM antibody with nine heterologous alphaviruses. The results provide evidence for the complex specificity of IgM antibody and indicate the usefulness of this test in both individual cases and epidemic situations. PMID:3009526

  10. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy biosensor with interdigitated electrode for detection of human immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ryuzo; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Wang, Huihui; Yokoyama, Takuya; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daiju; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-02-15

    Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) that have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together were utilized in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to build a label-free human immunoglobulin A (IgA) immunosensor. Anti-human IgA (anti-IgA) was employed as an IgA receptor and was covalently immobilized on the IDE surface through a self-assembled monolayer, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. EIS measurements revealed that the specific adsorption of IgA onto the immobilized anti-IgA gave rise to a clear increase in the value of interfacial charge transfer resistance (R(ct)). A linear relationship between ΔR(ct) and the logarithm of IgA concentration was found for the concentration range of 0.01-100 ng/mL. No modulation of R(ct) was detected by immersing the sensor in solutions of other proteins such as human immunoglobulin G or bovine serum albumin, which confirmed a high selectivity of this immunosensor for IgA. These results demonstrated that the anti-IgA receptor simply immobilized on the IDE surface can provide a sensitive biosensor.

  11. Cysteine Protease Secreted by Paragonimus westermani Attenuates Effector Functions of Human Eosinophils Stimulated with Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Myeong Heon; Kita, Hirohito; Park, Hae Young; Seoh, Ju Young

    2001-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated surface, such as that found on helminth parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for eosinophil activation. The cysteine proteases secreted by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play an important role in evasion of the immune response by degrading the host immunoglobulins. In this study, we investigated whether cysteine proteases in the excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM), which cause pulmonary or extrapulmonary paragonimiasis in human beings, could modify effector functions of human eosinophils stimulated with IgG. We coated 96-well plates with human IgG in the absence or presence of the ESP produced by PwNEM. When eosinophils were incubated in the wells coated with IgG in the presence of the ESP, eosinophil degranulation and superoxide production were significantly reduced compared with results for cells incubated in wells coated with IgG alone. This inhibitory effect of the ESP on IgG-induced superoxide production was dose dependent and was significantly abolished by pretreatment of the ESP with heat. These findings suggest that the cysteine proteases secreted by PwNEM attenuate both activation and degranulation of eosinophils stimulated with IgG. Thus, the cysteine proteases produced by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play crucial roles in evasion of IgG-dependent eosinophil helminthotoxicity and in reduction of eosinophil-associated tissue inflammation during the migratory period. PMID:11179333

  12. Cellular myeloperoxidase activity in human monocytes stimulated by hyposialylated immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dodon, M D; Gazzolo, L; Quash, G A

    1984-01-01

    When hyposialylated , immunoglobulins become immunogenic and tend to form aggregates. In pursuit of the possibility that hyposialylated immunoglobulins (hs-Ig) can trigger human mononuclear phagocytic cells, we have investigated the effects of such hs-Ig on the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of these cells. The incubation of human monocytes with aggregated hs-Ig leads to the decrease of intracellular MPO activity. This decrease is dependent on the incubation time, on the amount of hs-Ig added, and on the degree of aggregation. Incubation with unaggregated hs-Ig has a similar effect, thus providing evidence that the loss of sialic acid residues per se is enough to render these molecules capable of decreasing the MPO content of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, human rheumatoid factors, isolated from the sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and previously characterized as hyposailylated Ig, interact in the same way with monocytes in triggering the MPO decrease. These observations imply that hs-Ig may be considered as active stimuli in the induction of inflammatory processes, through the initiation of oxidative reactions. PMID:6329948

  13. Variations in riboflavin binding by human plasma: identification of immunoglobulins as the major proteins responsible

    SciTech Connect

    Innis, W.S.; McCormick, D.B.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    Riboflavin binding by plasma proteins from healthy human subjects was examined by equilibrium dialysis using a physiological concentration of (2-14C)riboflavin (0.04 microM). Binding ranged from 0.080 to 0.917 pmole of riboflavin/mg of protein (with a mean +/- SD of 0.274 +/- 0.206), which corresponded to 4.14 to 49.4 pmole/ml of plasma (15.5 +/- 11.0) (N = 34). Males and females yielded similar results. Upon fractionation of plasma by gel filtration, the major riboflavin-binding components eluted with albumin and gamma-globulins. Albumin was purified and found to bind riboflavin only very weakly (Kd = 3.8 to 10.4 mM), although FMN and photochemical degradation products (e.g., lumiflavine and lumichrome) were more tightly bound. Binding in the gamma-globulin fraction was attributed to IgG and IGA because the binding protein(s) and immunoglobulins copurified using various methods were removed by treatment of plasma with protein A-agarose, and were coincident upon immunoelectrophoresis followed by autoradiography to detect (2-14C)riboflavin. Differences among the plasma samples correlated with the binding recovered with the immunoglobulins. Binding was not directly related to the total IgG or IgA levels of subjects. Hence, it appears that the binding is due to a subfraction of these proteins. These findings suggest that riboflavin-binding immunoglobulins are a major cause of variations in riboflavin binding in human circulation, and may therefore affect the utilization of this micronutrient.

  14. Evaluation of a Candidate International Standard Preparation for Human Anti-Toxoplasma Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Rigsby, Peter; Rijpkema, Sjoerd; Guy, Edward C.; Francis, Janet; Gaines Das, Rose

    2004-01-01

    A freeze-dried human serum preparation containing immunoglobulin G (IgG) to Toxoplasma gondii was assessed for its suitability as an international reference reagent in an international collaborative study by 24 laboratories from 17 countries. This candidate standard was compared with the third international standard (IS) for human anti-Toxoplasma serum, TOXM, with the previous second IS, TOXS, and with a range of other serum samples. Samples were tested with the Sabin-Feldman dye test and a range of agglutination assays and enzyme immunoassays. This study emphasizes the need for appropriate standards if intermethod agreement of estimates is to be achieved. On the basis of the results of this study, the preparation was established by the World Health Organization as the first IS for human anti-Toxoplasma IgG, with an assigned potency of 20 IU per ampoule of total anti-Toxoplasma antibodies. PMID:15528706

  15. Depletion of albumin and immunoglobulin G from human serum using epitope-imprinted polymers as artificial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Lu, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Yee-Fung; Tsai, Sheng-Hung; Chakraborty, Subrata; Zhai, Wei-Jun; Tai, Dar-Fu

    2013-07-01

    Serum is a readily available source for noninvasive studies in clinical research, but it contains abundant proteins such as albumin and immunoglobulin G that can hinder the presence of low-abundant proteins as well as decrease sample loading capacity of analytical methods. Therefore, depletion of these two proteins is required to observe low-abundance serum proteins. Molecularly imprinted polymers are template-induced artificial antibodies with the ability to recognize and selectively bind the target molecule. In this study, artificial albumin and immunoglobulin G antibodies were developed by using two epitopes of human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G as templates. Acrylic acid, acrylamide, and N-acryl tyramine were the corresponding monomers; N,N'-ethylene bisacrylamide served as a cross-linker, and cellulosic fibers were used as a supporting matrix. The adsorption capacity of these artificial antibodies was 15.2 mg, 10 mg, and 15 μL per gram for human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, and human serum, respectively. The dissociation constant (Kd ) of these artificial antibodies toward the human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G was 1 μM and 0.6 μM, respectively. The biomimetic properties of these artificial antibodies, coupled with their economical and rapid production, high specificity and their reusability, make them attractive for protein separation and analysis.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS FACTOR AND ITS INTERACTION WITH HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN

    PubMed Central

    Danes, B. Shannon; Litwin, Stephen D.; Hütteroth, Thomas H.; Cleve, Hartwig; Bearn, Alexander G.

    1973-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis factor activity (CFFA), assayed as the ability to stop oyster ciliary movement, was present in serum-free medium from actively growing cystic fibrosis skin fibroblast cultures. CFFA was associated with a low molecular weight, negatively charged molecule that contained no uronic acid and was heat and pH labile. When CFFA-positive media were mixed with human IgG1, the CFFA was chromatographically displaced and emerged with the IgG1 fraction on column chromatography. Experiments in which various immunoglobulins were added to CFFA-positive culture media and then incubated with specific anti-immunoglobulins suggested that CFFA binding was class specific for human IgG, subclass specific for IgG1 and IgG2, and occurred with intact unaggregated heavy chains but not with κ- and λ-light chains, or Fab, Fc, and F(ab')2 fragments. The serum protein β2-microglobulin, which has structural homology to IgG, also bound CFFA. PMID:4709272

  17. Complementarity-determining region 2 is implicated in the binding of staphylococcal protein A to human immunoglobulin VHIII variable regions.

    PubMed

    Randen, I; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Thompson, K M; Pascual, V; Førre, O; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    1993-10-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) has two distinct binding sites on human immunoglobulins. In addition to binding to the Fc region of most IgG molecules, an "alternative" binding site has been localized to the Fab region of human immunoglobulins encoded by heavy chain variable gene segments belonging to the VHIII family. Comparison of amino acid sequences of closely related SPA-binding and -non-binding proteins suggested that VHIII-specific residues in the second complementarity-determining region (CDR2) were likely responsible for SPA binding activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single amino acid residue in CDR2 converted an IgM rheumatoid factor which did not bind SPA to an SPA binder. These findings, therefore, locate a critical site involved in SPA binding to the CDR2 of human immunoglobulins encoded by VHIII family gene segments.

  18. Analysis of human immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1995-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes a widely distributed sexually transmitted disease (STD). Since immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to specific trichomonad immunogens are found in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) from patients with trichomoniasis, a potential mechanism of immune evasion by this parasite might be the ability of T. vaginalis proteinases to degrade human immunoglobulins (Igs). Incubation of human IgG with lysates of T. vaginalis organisms resulted in time- and concentration-dependent degradation of the heavy chain. Secretory IgA was degraded similarly. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, when added to trichomonal lysates, abolished IgG and IgA degradation, while EDTA, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, did not. Substrate-gel electrophoresis with human IgG, IgM, or IgA copolymerized with acrylamide revealed several distinct cysteine proteinases in both lysates and culture supernatants from logarithmically growing parasites that degraded all classes of human antibodies. Trichomonal lysates and supernatants of numerous isolates tested all had Ig-degrading activity. Finally, proteolytic activity against IgG was detected in most (26 of 33; 78%) VWs from patients with trichomoniasis. In contrast, 18 of 28 (65%) VWs from women without trichomoniasis or from patients infected with other STDs had no detectable proteinases when tested in an identical manner. The other 10 of these 28 VWs (35%) had smaller amounts of detectable Ig-degrading proteinases. These differences in Ig-degrading proteinase activity between patients with and without trichomoniasis, regardless of coinfecting STDs, were statistically significant (P = 0.001). These results illustrate that T. vaginalis is capable of degrading human Igs. PMID:7642267

  19. Specific and non-specific folate binding protein in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Corrocher, R.; De Sandre, G.; Ambrosetti, A.; Pachor, M. L.; Bambara, L. M.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of tritiated folic acid by supernatants prepared from extracts of normal and leukaemic leucocytes, normal mucosa, and malignant tumours from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract has been measured using Sephadex-gel filtration and albumin-coated charcoal techniques. Non-specific binding (measured by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration) was almost invariably greater than specific binding measured by albumin-coated charcoal separation of bound and unbound folate. In nine normal leucocyte extracts, binding measured by Sephadex G-75 filtration ranged from 1·3 to 18·2 (mean 8·2) pg/mg protein and by albumin-coated charcoal from 1·0 to 14·8 (mean 6·7) pg/mg protein. Raised specific binding was found in the extracts from leucocytes of eight of 14 patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia, in four substantially so (389, 121, 108, 59·7 pg/mg protein), but was only marginally increased in one of eight cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and in two of five cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Binding was normal in the extracts of all three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia tested. Among the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract binding was greatest by the duodenal mucosa and liver. Extracts of carcinoma of the stomach and colon bound greater amounts of 3H-folic acid than the corresponding normal mucosal extracts but the differences were not large. Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography showed more than one binding peak in the extracts of liver and duodenum but only one peak in the other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, and only one peak, of molecular weight either about 50 000 or over 200 000, in the leucocyte extracts. PMID:670421

  20. Detection of orchitis and sacroiliitis due to brucellosis by 99mTc polyclonal human immunoglobulin scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kadanali, Ayten; Uslu, Hatice; Bayraktar, Rezan; Varoglu, Erhan

    2012-07-01

    Here, we report 1 case of Brucella orchitis detected by 99mTc human immunoglobulin scintigraphy and confirmed by testicular ultrasound. A 29-year-old farmer was admitted to our hospital with fever, fatigue, arthralgia, and painful scrotal swelling that had appeared 12 days before admission. Clinically, right sacroiliitis was recorded through the Fabere test Unilateral sacroiliitis and orchitis were detected by 99mTc human immunoglobulin scintigraphy. Hypoechoic left testicular lesions and swelling of the concurrent epididymis were seen on a testicular ultrasound examination. Wright agglutination test and blood specimen culture for Brucella species were positive.

  1. Purification of human immunoglobulins by sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Perosa, F; Carbone, R; Ferrone, S; Dammacco, F

    1990-03-27

    We have tested the usefulness of sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulfate to purify human monoclonal and polyclonal immunoglobulins from sera of 11 patients with monoclonal gammapathy (4 IgG kappa, 2 IgG lambda, 2 IgM kappa, 1 IgA kappa, 2 IgA lambda), four patients with autoimmune diseases and four healthy donors. In terms of purity and activity of Ig as well as execution time and cost, this two-step non-chromatographic procedure is highly efficient for the purification of IgG, IgA and IgM, thus offering several advantages over other methods of purification. Therefore, this procedure may have useful application in the preparation of human Ig for structural studies and therapeutic purposes.

  2. Generation and targeting of human tumor-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells transduced with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Gyobu, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takemasa; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Chamoto, Kenji; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Kawarada, You; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Nishimura, Takashi

    2004-02-15

    CD4+ Th cells, in particular IFN-gamma-producing Th1 cells, play a critical role in the activation and maintenance of Tc1 cells that are essential for tumor eradication. Here, we report the generation of artificial tumor-specific Th1 and Tc1 cells from nonspecifically activated T cells using a lentiviral transduction system. Anti-CD3-activated T cells from healthy human donors were transduced with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor gene composed of single-chain variable fragments derived from an anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific monoclonal antibody fused to an intracellular signaling domain derived from the cytoplasmic portions of membrane-bound CD28 and CD3zeta. These artificial tumor-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells, termed Tc1- and Th1-T bodies, respectively, could be targeted to CEA+ tumor cells independently of MHC restriction. Specifically, Tc1-T bodies demonstrated high cytotoxicity and produced IFN-gamma in response to CEA+ tumor cell lines but not CEA- tumors. Although Th1-T bodies exhibited low cytotoxicity, they secreted high levels of IFN-gamma and interleukin-2 in response to CEA+ tumor cells. Such CEA+ tumor-specific activation was not observed in mock gene-transduced nonspecific Tc1 and Th1 cells. Moreover, Tc1- and Th1-T bodies exhibited strong antitumor activities against CEA+ human lung cancer cells implanted into RAG2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, combined therapy with Tc1- and Th1-T bodies resulted in enhanced antitumor activities in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Tc1- and Th1-T bodies represent a promising alternative to current methods for the development of effective adoptive immunotherapies.

  3. Immunoglobulins in Nasal Secretions of Healthy Humans: Structural Integrity of Secretory Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and Occurrence of Neutralizing Antibodies to IgA1 Proteases of Nasal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Line; Rasmussen, Trine Tang; Reinholdt, Jesper; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro. Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11 healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and, subsequently, concentrations in undiluted secretions could thereby be calculated. IgA, mainly in the secretory form, was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be the dominant isotype in all subjects, and the vast majority of IgA (median, 91%) was of the A1 subclass, corroborating results of previous analyses at the level of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Levels of serum-type immunoglobulins were low, except for four subjects in whom levels of IgG corresponded to 20 to 66% of total IgA. Cumulative levels of IgA, IgG, and IgM in undiluted secretions ranged from 260 to 2,494 (median, 777) μg ml−1. IgA1 protease-producing bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Streptococcus mitis biovar 1) were isolated from the nasal cavities of seven subjects at 2.1 × 103 to 7.2 × 106 CFU per ml of undiluted secretion, corresponding to 0.2 to 99.6% of the flora. Nevertheless, α-chain fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity were not detected in secretions from any subject by immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of autologous

  4. Evaluation of unintended effects in the composition of tomatoes expressing a human immunoglobulin A against rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paloma; Fernandez-del-Carmen, Asun; Rambla, Jose L; Presa, Silvia; Mico, Amparo; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2014-08-13

    The production of neutralizing immunoglobulin A (IgA) in edible fruits as a means of oral passive immunization is a promising strategy for the inexpensive treatment of mucosal diseases. This approach is based on the assumption that the edible status remains unaltered in the immunoglobulin-expressing fruit, and therefore extensive purification is not required for mucosal delivery. However, unintended effects associated with IgA expression such as toxic secondary metabolites and protein allergens cannot be dismissed a priori and need to be investigated. This paper describes a collection of independent transgenic tomato lines expressing a neutralizing human IgA against rotavirus, a mucosal pathogen producing severe diarrhea episodes. This collection was used to evaluate possible unintended effects associated with recombinant IgA expression. A comparative analysis of protein and secondary metabolite profiles using wild type lines and other commercial varieties failed to find unsafe features significantly associated with IgA expression. Preliminary, the data indicate that formulations derived from IgA tomatoes are as safe for consumption as equivalent formulations derived from wild type tomatoes.

  5. The influence of sodium perfluorooctanoate on the conformational transitions of human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Messina, Paula V; Prieto, Gerardo; Salgado, Francisco; Varela, Carla; Nogueira, Montserrat; Dodero, Verónica; Ruso, Juan M; Sarmiento, Félix

    2007-07-19

    In the field of bioscience, the study of the interactions between blood proteins and fluorinated materials is very important from both theoretical and applied points of view. Fluorinated materials have potential use in drug delivery, as blood substitutes, and in biotechnology. Using a combination of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) spectroscopies and ion-selective electrodes, the complete interaction of sodium perfluorooctanoate (SPFO) and the most important immunoglobulin (on a quantitative basis) in human serum, immunoglobulin G (IgG), has been evaluated. The study has been focused on bulk solution. By the application of an SPFO selective electrode, it was determined that there were true specific unions between surfactant molecules and IgG structure. The experimental data were presented as Koltz and Scatchard plots and analyzed on the basis of an empirical Hill equation. The conformational changes at the bulk solution were well characterized by UV-vis and UV-CD spectroscopies. As a consequence of these changes, the protein structure was affected.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin in persons with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C V; Goodroad, B K; Cummins, L M; Henry, K; Balfour, H H; Rhame, F S

    1997-01-01

    Hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is an intravenous immunoglobulin prepared from HIV-infected asymptomatic donors with a CD4 cell count greater than 400 cells/microl and a high titer of antibody to HIV-1 p24 protein. Twelve persons with AIDS received four doses of HMG (two at 50 mg/kg of body weight and then two at 200 mg/kg) every 28 days. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated by measurement of anti-p24 antibody. HIVIG was well tolerated, and all participants completed the study. Three subjects who were not receiving Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis developed PCP. The mean value for HIVIG clearance was 3.02 ml/kg/day at 50 mg/kg and 3.65 ml/kg/day at 200 mg/kg (P = 0.027); the mean trough antibody titers (reciprocal units) were 1,442 and 4,428, respectively. This study indicates that high titers of anti-p24 antibody can be maintained with a monthly administration schedule of HIVIG and that short-term safety is acceptable. Comparisons to evaluate the therapeutic potential of HIVIG are justified. PMID:9210687

  7. Specific immobilization of human immunoglobulin G on gold-coated silicon microcantilever array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Tewari, Rupinder; Bajpai, Ram Prakash; Bharadwaj, Lalit Mohan; Raiteri, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a procedure for immobilizing human immunoglobulin G (IgG) on an array of gold-coated silicon microcantilevers. The procedure employed protein A for the specific immobilization of human IgG on the gold surface. Protein A bound specifically to the gold-coated upper surface of the silicon microcantilever and had no interaction with the silicon surface. It binds to the constant F c regions of human IgG keeping the antigen binding sites on the variable F ab region free to bind to antigens. Fluorescent microscopy was done to analyze qualitatively the biomolecular binding of human IgG using FITC labeled goat anti-human IgG. The immobilization densities of protein A and human IgG were 112+/-19 ng/cm2 and 629+/-23ng/cm2, as determined employing horse radish peroxidase (HRP) labeled biomolecules by 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetramethyl benzidine (TMB) substrate assay. The uniformness of the biomolecular coatings was further determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to cross-validate the immobilization density of functional human IgG molecules immobilized on the gold surface w.r.t. that obtained by TMB substrate assay.

  8. Membrane-bound immunoglobulins on human leukemic cells. Evidence for humoral immune responses of patients to leukemia-associated antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Metzgar, R S; Mohanakumar, T; Miller, D S

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulins were detected on the membranes of human leukemic cells by a microcytotoxicity technique. A significant percentage of lymphocytes from normal donors failed to react with goat antisera to human heavy chain determinants or to lambda-light chains. Lymphocytes from some normal donors, however, did react with antisera to k-light chains. A high percentage (50-90) of cells from some leukemia patients were killed by antisera to light chains and by one or more antisera to heavy chain determinants. Trypsin treatment of leukemic cells resulted in a loss of cytotoxic activity with all immunoglobulin antisera. Reactivity with the k-light chain antiserum was detectable 2 h after trypsinization of chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells and 8 h after treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemic (ALL) cells. Reactivity with the antisera to heavy chain determinants and lambda-light chains could not be detected 8 and 48 h after trypsinization of CML and ALL cells, respectively. The cytotoxic activity of the immunoglobulin antisera to heavy chains was abolished by absorption with the specific immunoglobulin used to define the antisera by precipitation. Eluates (pH 3.2) prepared from leukemic cells which reacted by cytotoxicity with the immunoglobulin antisera were shown to contain immunoglobulins of different heavy chain classes. In addition, some of the eluates had cytotoxic antibody activity to human leukemia cells. The specificity of the eluted antibodies is similar to the specificity previously described for cytophilic antibodies from leukemic patients and nonhuman primate antisera to human leukemia cells. The possible in vitro detection and in vivo significance of the eluted non-complement-fixing antibodies is considered. PMID:807598

  9. Overexpression of immunoglobulin G prompts cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in human urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei-Yu; Li, Hao-Yong; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Jin, Ying-Xia; Wang, Sheng-Xing; Peng, Xiao-Hui; Ou, Shan-Ji

    2013-06-01

    Only B lymphocytes can express immunoglobulins according to the traditional immunological theories, and the expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein was found in certain human cancer cells recently. However, the expression pattern of IgG and its possible role in human urothelial carcinoma are still elusive. In this study, we investigated the expression of IgG in two human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, T24 and BIU-87, and in 56 cases of clinical urothelial carcinoma tissues. The mRNA of IgG was positively detected by in situ hybridization and reverse transcription PCR; furthermore, IgG protein was also positively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, blockade of tumor-derived IgG by either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides increased cell apoptosis and inhibited cell growth in bladder cancer cell lines in vitro, and antihuman IgG antibody could suppress the growth of xenotransplant tumor in vivo. In addition, either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides enhanced the sensitivity to mitomycin C in bladder cancer cell line T24. Furthermore, blockade of IgG in bladder cancer cell T24 resulted in upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results indicated that bladder cancer cells were capable of expressing IgG, and blockade of IgG expression induced cell apoptosis through activation of caspase-dependent pathway. A novel potential targeted therapy for bladder cancer will be possibly developed based on these data.

  10. Phagocytosis of virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes requires specific immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, C W; Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1991-01-01

    No studies to date clearly define the interactions between Porphyromonas gingivalis and human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), nor has a protective role for antibody to P. gingivalis been defined. Using a fluorochrome phagocytosis microassay, we investigated PMN phagocytosis and killing of P. gingivalis as a function of P. gingivalis-specific antibody. Sera from a nonimmune rabbit and a healthy human subject were not opsonic for virulent P. gingivalis A7436, W83, and HG405; phagocytosis of these strains (but not 33277) required opsonization with hyperimmune antiserum (RaPg). Diluting RaPg with a constant complement source decreased proportionally the number of P. gingivalis A7436 cells phagocytosed per phagocytic PMN. Enriching for the immunoglobulin G fraction of RAPg A7436 enriched for opsonic activity toward A7436. An opsonic evaluation of 18 serum samples from adult periodontitis patients revealed that only 3 adult periodontitis sera of 17 with elevated immunoglobulin G to P. gingivalis A7436 were opsonic for A7436 and, moreover, that the serum sample with the highest enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titer was most opsonic (patient 1). However, the opsonic activity of serum from patient 1 was qualitatively and not just quantitatively different from that of the nonopsonic human sera (but was less effective opsonin than RaPg). Strain variability was observed in resistance of P. gingivalis to phagocytosis, and opsonization was strain specific for some, but not all, strains tested. An evaluation of killing of A7436 revealed that serum killing and extracellular killing of P. gingivalis were less effective alone when compared with intracellular PMN killing alone. PMID:2037370

  11. Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G from transchromosomic bovines inhibits MERS-CoV in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luke, Thomas; Wu, Hua; Zhao, Jincun; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Coleman, Christopher M; Jiao, Jin-An; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Liu, Ye; Postnikova, Elena N; Ork, Britini L; Glenn, Gregory; Flyer, David; Defang, Gabriel; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Kochel, Tadeusz; Wang, Jonathan; Nie, Wensheng; Smith, Gale; Hensley, Lisa E; Olinger, Gene G; Kuhn, Jens H; Holbrook, Michael R; Johnson, Reed F; Perlman, Stanley; Sullivan, Eddie; Frieman, Matthew B

    2016-02-17

    As of 13 November 2015, 1618 laboratory-confirmed human cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including 579 deaths, had been reported to the World Health Organization. No specific preventive or therapeutic agent of proven value against MERS-CoV is currently available. Public Health England and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium identified passive immunotherapy with neutralizing antibodies as a treatment approach that warrants priority study. Two experimental MERS-CoV vaccines were used to vaccinate two groups of transchromosomic (Tc) bovines that were genetically modified to produce large quantities of fully human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. Vaccination with a clade A γ-irradiated whole killed virion vaccine (Jordan strain) or a clade B spike protein nanoparticle vaccine (Al-Hasa strain) resulted in Tc bovine sera with high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralizing antibody titers in vitro. Two purified Tc bovine human IgG immunoglobulins (Tc hIgG), SAB-300 (produced after Jordan strain vaccination) and SAB-301 (produced after Al-Hasa strain vaccination), also had high ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers without antibody-dependent enhancement in vitro. SAB-301 was selected for in vivo and preclinical studies. Administration of single doses of SAB-301 12 hours before or 24 and 48 hours after MERS-CoV infection (Erasmus Medical Center 2012 strain) of Ad5-hDPP4 receptor-transduced mice rapidly resulted in viral lung titers near or below the limit of detection. Tc bovines, combined with the ability to quickly produce Tc hIgG and develop in vitro assays and animal model(s), potentially offer a platform to rapidly produce a therapeutic to prevent and/or treat MERS-CoV infection and/or other emerging infectious diseases. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  13. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu Ogi,; Hironao Nagai,; Yuji Fukunishi,; Taiji Yanagida,; Masahiko Hirao,; Masayoshi Nishiyama,

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-μm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  14. Rationale for the development of IMC-3G3, a fully human immunoglobulin G subclass 1 monoclonal antibody targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav D; Loizos, Nick; Youssoufian, Hagop; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2010-02-15

    A large body of evidence suggests that the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family and associated receptors are potential targets in oncology therapeutic development because of their critical roles in the proliferation and survival of various cancers and in the regulation and growth of the tumor stroma and blood vessels. Several small molecules that nonspecifically target the PDGF signaling axis are in current use or development as anticancer therapies. However, for the majority of these agents, PDGF and its receptors are neither the primary targets nor the principal mediators of anticancer activity. IMC-3G3, a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1, specifically binds to the human PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) with high affinity and blocks PDGF ligand binding and PDGFRalpha activation. The results of preclinical studies and the frequent expression of PDGFRalpha in many types of cancer and in cancer-associated stroma support a rationale for the clinical development of IMC-3G3. Currently, IMC-3G3 is being evaluated in early clinical development for patients with several types of solid malignancies.

  15. Multiple protein extract microarray for profiling human food-specific immunoglobulins A, M, G and E.

    PubMed

    Renault, N K; Gaddipati, S R; Wulfert, F; Falcone, F H; Mirotti, L; Tighe, P J; Wright, V; Alcocer, M J C

    2011-02-01

    Existing food immunoglobulin (Ig) tests require large volumes of serum, are limited to one immunoglobulin class, are not amenable to high throughput analysis and only give a limited picture of the immunological response to food antigens. Conversely a new generation of Component Resolved Diagnostic systems using pure proteins is highly specific and totally dependent on the availability of the protein in its recombinant or natural origin form. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-concept of a microarray test based on protein extracts of food components. Our approach relies on innovations on three different fronts: the novelty of using arrayed food samples sequentially extracted with detergent and chaotropic agents, the ability to measure four different Ig classes simultaneously and the ability to analyse the generated data via a suitable bioinformatics/statistical analysis interface. This approach combines high numerical power of microarrays with automation, high throughput analysis and enables detailed investigation of the Ig profiles to food antigens. The prototype shown contains extracts of approximately 350 food ingredients that cover most of the food products found in the UK. Here we showed that the use of a sequential extraction technique to solubilise and then denature food samples has its benefits in the assessment of variations in antigenicity when tested with human sera. A patient dependent degree of class specificity was observed with human sera (IgG specificity correlates well with IgA>IgM>IgE). Besides generating a simultaneous profile for IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE the array system has shown good discrimination between challenge responders in atopic and non-atopic individuals. Poly- and mono-specific IgE responders were easily identified. The mathematical modelling of specific IgE content showed good correlations when compared with established IgE antibody testing assay (UniCAP). Although in its proof-of-principle stages, the immune profiling technique described

  16. Protein-G-based human immunoglobulin G biosensing by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugimura, Kaiki; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daijyu; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was developed for the determination of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Protein G, which specifically binds to IgG, was employed as the molecular receptor. Protein G was covalently immobilized on interdigitated electrodes through a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) composed of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 6-mercaptohexanol. It was found that the mixing ratio of the SAM markedly affected the sensor performance. The sample prepared on 25% MUA SAM exhibited a linear behavior in the concentration range of 0.01-10 ng/mL, which is a record low detection for EIS-based IgG sensors. On the other hand, the sample on 100% MUA SAM showed no IgG-sensing action. A possible mechanism of the mixing ratio that affects the sensing performance was proposed.

  17. [Improvement of the EIA kit for the detection of tetanus immunoglobulin in human sera].

    PubMed

    Lee, H F; Tseng, L R

    1991-05-01

    For the program to eliminate tetanus neonatorum in this country, we have improved the sensitivity of enzyme immunoassay kit (EIA kit) prepared on 1987 for the detection of human tetanus immunoglobulin (TIG) by competitive principle. (Chinese J Microbiol Immunol 1987; 20: 269-278) Horse-radish peroxidase-conjugated to tetanus toxoid monoclonal antibody was involved in the new kit, and tetanus hybridoma clones were prepared by this laboratory. The lowest detectable TIG level is 0.05 IU/ml serum instead of 0.1 IU/ml serum. The dose-response curve and cut-off determination system of the new EIA kit are better than those of the original one. We proposed that the newly designed EIA kit could be used for understanding the TIG level in women who are in the age group for giving birth and in the tetanus vaccination group.

  18. Anti-ghrelin immunoglobulins modulate ghrelin stability and its orexigenic effect in obese mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Kuniko; Legrand, Romain; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; François, Marie; Tennoune, Naouel; Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Inui, Akio; Fetissov, Sergueï O.

    2013-01-01

    Obese individuals often have increased appetite despite normal plasma levels of the main orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Here we show that ghrelin degradation in the plasma is inhibited by ghrelin-reactive IgG immunoglobulins, which display increased binding affinity to ghrelin in obese patients and mice. Co-administration of ghrelin together with IgG from obese individuals, but not with IgG from anorectic or control patients, increases food intake in rats. Similarly, chronic injections of ghrelin together with IgG from ob/ob mice increase food intake, meal frequency and total lean body mass of mice. These data reveal that in both obese humans and mice, IgG with increased affinity for ghrelin enhances ghrelin’s orexigenic effect, which may contribute to increased appetite and overeating. PMID:24158035

  19. Immunoglobulin-sulfated polysaccharide interactions. Binding of agaropectin and heparin by human IgG proteins

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of immunoglobulins with certain acidic polysaccharides was demonstrated by the binding of the sulfated glycans agaropectin and heparin by certain human IgG proteins. Heparin-binding IgG proteins can distinguish between the molecular forms of heparin derived from porcine intestine, bovine lung, and rat skin. The major specificity of these proteins is for native and certain high molecular weight subunit components of rat skin heparin. The interactions with multi-chain and single chain rat skin heparin are stable under physiological conditions and involve the Fab and, more specifically, the Fv region of the IgG molecule. These reactions occur as a result of an electrostatic interaction between cationic sites on certain IgG proteins and anionic sulfate resides of agaropectin or heparin. The characteristics of heparin-IgG interaction resemble those of heparin with other plasma proteins, the interactions of which have biological significance. PMID:7252414

  20. Construction of Human Immunoglobulin Combinatorial Library and Screening of Phage Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Wan-Rong; Xu, Jing

    1997-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin combinatorial library was generated by using phage surface-display expression system, and phage antibodies (Fab fragments) to hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) were screened from it. The products by half-nested PCR using signal peptide sequences as primers were superior in quality and quantity to those by PCR with conserved sequences in the 5'-end variable regions as primers. After three round of selections by biopanning, the ratio of positive clone was 69%. The inhibition assay showed the phage antibodies to be specifically anti-HbsAg. The V(H) genes were derived from V(H) I and V(H) III, while V(L)s belonged to V(lambda) II and V(lambda) I as shown by DNA sequencing.

  1. Induction of immunoglobulin G4 in human filariasis: an indicator of immunoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Adjobimey, T.; Hoerauf, A.

    2010-01-01

    Filarial parasites are known to induce a large range of immunoregulatory mechanisms, including the induction of alternatively activated macrophages and regulatory T cells. These mechanisms are used to evade and down‐modulate the host’s immune system, to support parasite survival. Several reports have focused on some of these mechanisms, in humans and murine models, but the complex immunoregulatory networks associated with filarial infections remain unclear. Recent publications have conferred a role for regulatory T cells in the ability of helminth parasites to modulate human immune responses, such cells promoting the induction of the non‐complement‐fixing immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4). High plasma concentrations of IgG4 have been reported in hypo‐responsive and asymptomatic cases of helminth infection. In both human lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, the asymptomatic infections are characterised by high plasma concentrations of IgG4 (compared with those of IgE) and of the complement‐fixing antibodies IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. In asymptomatic filarial infection, elevations in IgG4 are also often associated with high worm loads and with high plasma levels of the immunomodulatory interleukin‐10. Here, various aspects of the induction of IgG4 in humans and it roles in the immunomodulation of the human responses to filarial parasites are reviewed. PMID:20863434

  2. Sequences of human immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for recombination and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, F C; Brooker, J S; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced the entire human S mu and S gamma 4 immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch regions, and have also completed the sequence of human S epsilon. S mu is composed predominantly of GAGCT and GGGCT pentameric repeats, with these units also being found in S epsilon at a much lower density. S mu-S gamma 4 matches are infrequent, but S gamma 4 contains a cluster of repeated sequences similar to units in mouse gamma switch sites and unrelated to the S mu repeats, suggesting that S mu-S gamma homology is not important in mu-gamma switching. We examined our epsilon and gamma 4 sequences for features that could regulate production of 'sterile' transcripts preceding switch recombination. There is an Evolutionarily Conserved Sequence (ECS) upstream from the human and mouse S epsilon regions that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for human and mouse epsilon sterile transcripts. Similarly, an ECS upstream from S gamma 4 is homologous to a mouse sequence that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for mouse gamma 2b sterile transcripts. The epsilon and gamma 4 conserved segments contain potential Interferon Stimulable Response Elements (ISRE's) that are identical between human epsilon and gamma 4. PMID:2124350

  3. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of human immunoglobulin epsilon chain cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Seno, M; Kurokawa, T; Ono, Y; Onda, H; Sasada, R; Igarashi, K; Kikuchi, M; Sugino, Y; Nishida, Y; Honjo, T

    1983-01-01

    DNA complementary to mRNA of human immunoglobulin E heavy chain (epsilon chain) isolated and purified from U266 cells has been synthesized and inserted into the PstI site of pBR322 by G-C tailing. This recombinant plasmid was used to transform E. coli chi 1776 to screen 1445 tetracycline resistant colonies. Nine clones (pGETI - 9) containing cDNA coding for the human epsilon chain were recognized by colony hybridization and Southern blotting analysis with a nick-translated human IgE genome fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the longest cDNA contained in pGET2 was determined. The results indicate that the sequence of 1657 nucleotides codes for 494 amino acids covering a part of the variable region and all of the constant region of the human epsilon chain. Most of the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence is in substantial agreement with that reported. Furthermore a termination codon after the -COOH terminal amino acid marks the beginning of a 3' untranslated region of 125 nucleotides with a poly A tail. Taking this into account, the structure of the human epsilon chain mRNA, except a part of the 5' end, is conserved fairly well in the cDNA insert in pGET2. Images PMID:6300763

  4. Interaction of Human Complement with Sbi, a Staphylococcal Immunoglobulin-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Julia D.; Leung, Elisa; Atkins, Karen L.; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus N.; Lango, Lea; Bernadó, Pau; Bagby, Stefan; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Foster, Timothy J.; Isenman, David E.; van den Elsen, Jean M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcal immunoglobulin-binding protein, Sbi, is a 436-residue protein produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus. It was previously characterized as being cell surface-associated and having binding capacity for human IgG and β2-glycoprotein I. Here we show using small angle x-ray scattering that the proposed extracellular region of Sbi (Sbi-E) is an elongated molecule consisting of four globular domains, two immunoglobulin-binding domains (I and II) and two novel domains (III and IV). We further show that together domains III and IV (Sbi-III-IV), as well as domain IV on its own (Sbi-IV), bind complement component C3 via contacts involving both the C3dg fragment and the C3a anaphylatoxin domain. Preincubation of human serum with either Sbi-E or Sbi-III-IV is inhibitory to all complement pathways, whereas domain IV specifically inhibits the alternative pathway. Monitoring C3 activation in serum incubated with Sbi fragments reveals that Sbi-E and Sbi-III-IV both activate the alternative pathway, leading to consumption of C3. By contrast, inhibition of this pathway by Sbi-IV does not involve C3 consumption. The observation that Sbi-E activates the alternative pathway is counterintuitive to intact Sbi being cell wall-associated, as recruiting complement to the surface of S. aureus would be deleterious to the bacterium. Upon re-examination of this issue, we found that Sbi was not associated with the cell wall fraction, but rather was found in the growth medium, consistent with it being an excreted protein. As such, our data suggest that Sbi helps mediate bacterial evasion of complement via a novel mechanism, namely futile fluid-phase consumption. PMID:18434316

  5. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handen, Benjamin L.; Melmed, Raun D.; Hansen, Robin L.; Aman, Michael G.; Burnham, David L.; Bruss, Jon B.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI…

  6. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handen, Benjamin L.; Melmed, Raun D.; Hansen, Robin L.; Aman, Michael G.; Burnham, David L.; Bruss, Jon B.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI…

  7. Mapping of human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments outside the major IGH locus

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, R.F.; Cox, D.W. |

    1994-09-01

    Physical mapping of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster (IGH) on chromosome 14 has previously shown that the locus includes at least 63 variable region (VH) gene segments. Fifteen VH gene segments are located on six NotI DNA restriction fragments that are not within the mapped region of IGH. We have used human/rodent somatic cell hybrid lines to map these genes segments, as it was previously not proven that they are located in the chromosome 14 IGH locus. Four gene segments map to human chromosome 16 and two to chromosome 15. Apparently, four of the six NotI fragments, representing 11 VH gene segments, are not located within the chromosome 14 IGH locus. In addition, we have demonstrated that a YAC containing a functional human telomere, and mapping to 14qter, is located at the telomeric end of the IGH gene cluster physical map and contains at least four VH gene segments. This YAC is collinear with the existing physical map of genomic DNA. We conclude that our original physical map of IGH represents almost the entire locus on chromosome 14 and that the 11 gene segments newly mapped are not part of the functional IGH locus. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Natural polyreactive secretory immunoglobulin A autoantibodies as a possible barrier to infection in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Quan, C P; Berneman, A; Pires, R; Avrameas, S; Bouvet, J P

    1997-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was investigated in human secretions for the presence of natural antibodies (Abs) acting as the first "immune barrier" to infection before induction or boosting of specific responses. These molecules could be the secretory counterpart of the natural Abs in serum that were previously shown by our laboratory to be polyreactive to autoantigens. Significant levels of S-IgA Abs to human actin, myosin, tubulin, and spectrin were detected in 10 saliva and 8 colostrum samples from normal subjects. Computer-assisted analysis of immunoblots of extracts from human muscles showed these Abs to react with a large number of autoantigens. Their polyreactivity was confirmed by cross-inhibition and by immunoblotting studies of affinity-purified natural Abs, assayed against a large variety of surface or secreted antigens from Streptococcus pyogenes. The thiocyanate elution method showed that functional affinities of some natural Abs can be of the same order of magnitude as those of tetanus vaccine antitoxins. Moreover, nonimmune binding of these natural Abs to the gut protein Fv (Fv-fragment binding protein) can enhance their effector functions. This demonstrates that human secretions contain polyreactive auto-Abs which can also react with pathogens. These secretory Abs of "skeleton key" specificities are possibly produced by a primordial B-1-cell-associated immune system and can be involved in a plurispecific mucosal protection against pathogens, irrespective of the conventional immune response. PMID:9316998

  9. Opsonic effect of jacalin and human immunoglobulin A on type II group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, N R; Concepcion, N F; Anthony, B F

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effect of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the IgA-binding lectin jacalin on the phagocytosis of type II group B streptococci (GBS). Strains possessing the trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-resistant components of the c protein (II/c) and type II GBS lacking the c protein (II) were examined by radiolabeled bacterial uptake, bactericidal assays, and electron microscopy. Type II/c GBS resisted phagocytosis by monocytes (4.9% +/- 0.8% uptake, mean +/- SE, n = 25) compared with type II GBS (8.5% +/- 1.4% uptake, n = 14, P = 0.03). Phagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was also less for the type II/c strain 78-471 than for the type II strain 79-176 (68% +/- 5% versus 86% +/- 4% reduction in CFU at 45 min, P = 0.03). IgA binding did not explain the resistance of type II/c GBS to phagocytosis. The uptake of type II/c GBS was not significantly different after opsonization in cord sera lacking endogenous IgA (5.93% +/- 1.4%) than in the same cord sera after addition of exogenous IgA (5.48% +/- 1.4%, P = 0.69, n = 9). Attempts to remove serum IgA with the IgA-binding lectin jacalin resulted in the binding of IgA-jacalin complexes to II/c GBS. This combination of nonspecific IgA and jacalin increased uptake of II/c GBS from 4.9% +/- 0.8% to 11.8% +/- 1.9% (P = 0.002). Jacalin also combined with specific, immune, monoclonal IgA bound to the surface of Haemophilus influenzae and promoted the uptake of these bacteria. Jacalin and IgA mediated phagocytosis of II/c GBS via receptors that were not dependent on divalent cations and that were not modulated by plating monocytes on antigen-antibody complexes. Images PMID:2228238

  10. II Brazilian Consensus on the use of human immunoglobulin in patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Goudouris, Ekaterini Simões; Rego Silva, Almerinda Maria do; Ouricuri, Aluce Loureiro; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Prando, Carolina Cardoso; Kokron, Cristina Maria; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Tavares, Fabíola Scancetti; Silva Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues; Barreto, Irma Cecília; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Barros, Myrthes Anna; Forte, Wilma Carvalho Neves

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years, new primary immunodeficiencies and genetic defects have been described. Recently, immunoglobulin products with improved compositions and for subcutaneous use have become available in Brazil. In order to guide physicians on the use of human immunoglobulin to treat primary immunodeficiencies, based on a narrative literature review and their professional experience, the members of the Primary Immunodeficiency Group of the Brazilian Society of Allergy and Immunology prepared an updated document of the 1st Brazilian Consensus, published in 2010. The document presents new knowledge about the indications and efficacy of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiencies, relevant production-related aspects, mode of use (routes of administration, pharmacokinetics, doses and intervals), adverse events (major, prevention, treatment and reporting), patient monitoring, presentations available and how to have access to this therapeutic resource in Brazil. RESUMO Nos últimos anos, novas imunodeficiências primárias e defeitos genéticos têm sido descritos. Recentemente, produtos de imunoglobulina, com aprimoramento em sua composição e para uso por via subcutânea, tornaram-se disponíveis em nosso meio. Com o objetivo de orientar o médico no uso da imunoglobulina humana para o tratamento das imunodeficiências primárias, os membros do Grupo de Assessoria em Imunodeficiências da Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunologia produziram um documento que teve por base uma revisão narrativa da literatura e sua experiência profissional, atualizando o I Consenso Brasileiro publicado em 2010. Apresentam-se novos conhecimentos sobre indicações e eficácia do tratamento com imunoglobulina nas imunodeficiências primárias, aspectos relevantes sobre a produção, forma de utilização (vias de administração, farmacocinética, doses e intervalos), efeitos adversos (principais efeitos, prevenção, tratamento e notificação), monitorização do

  11. Simple way to determine nonspecific effects of plasma and serum components in radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.V.; Hussa, R.O.

    1982-01-15

    A simple approach is validated for the determination of nonspecific effects of human plasma and serum in the radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The approach is based on the findings that, despite differences in the degree of inhibition of /sup 125/I-hCG binding to its receptors and antibodies by nonhormonal components in different dilutions of pool plasma and serum, the standard curves (plotted as the percentage of control for each serum or plasma dilution) are superimposable. The approach consists of (1) running a single standard curve with no pool plasma or serum, (2) including a set of ''correction'' tubes which contain pool plasma or serum diluted correspondingly to the dilution of the unknown samples in the assay, (3) dividing the counts per minute found in the correction tubes into the counts per minute of the unknown samples and multiplying by 100, and (4) using this value to obtain the amount of hCG in the unknown samples by comparison with the no pool plasma or serum standard curve.

  12. Simple way to determine nonspecific effects of plasma and serum components in radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.V.; Hussa, R.O.

    1982-01-15

    A simple approach is validated for the determination of nonspecific effects of human plasma and serum in the radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The approach is based on the findings that, despite differences in the degree of inhibition of /sup 125/I-hCG binding to its receptors and antibodies by nonhormonal components in different dilutions of pool plasma and serum, the standard curves (plotted as the percentage of control for each serum or plasma dilution) are superimposable. The approach consists of (1) running a single standard curve with no pool plasma or serum, (2) including a set of correction tubes which contain pool plasma or serum diluted correspondingly to the dilution of the unknown samples in the assay, (3) dividing the counts per minute found in the correction tubes into the counts per minute of the unknown samples and multiplying by 100, and (4) using this value to obtain the amount of hCG in the unknown samples by comparison with the no pool plasma or serum standard curve.

  13. Oligoclonal Bands of Immunoglobulins in Serum Leading to Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Soong, John; Riley, Roger; Mcpherson, Richard

    2016-02-01

    To present a unique case where detection of oligoclonal bands in serum led to the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A 64-year-old man treated for hypertension for 11 years had laboratory tests ordered by his primary care physician, including serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and serum immunofixation electrophoresis. The total protein serum protein concentration was elevated at 9.6 g/dL. The SPE showed an oligoclonal pattern of multiple discrete bands in the γ region; the concentration of one band was approximately 1 g/dL and that of two bands was approximately 0.5 g/dL each, with multiple smaller overlapping bands at approximately 0.1 g/dL each. All fractions by SPE were within reference intervals except for the γ fraction, which was elevated at 3.4 g/dL. The IFE demonstrated that this oligoclonal pattern was a mixture of multiple bands of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-λ and IgG-κ. The patient's HIV-1 antibody screen and HIV-1 Western blot were positive on three subsequent visits with strongly positive HIV-1 antibody index values of more than 50 (cutoff value of 1.0 for reactivity). The etiology of HIV-associated clonal immunoglobulin bands is hypothesized to result from chronic antigenic stimulation leading to B-cell hyperplasia. In this regard, hypergammaglobulinemia is a well-known consequence of HIV infection due to B-cell activation, associated with paraproteins, and can be seen at any stage of the disease. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Anti-Fab antibodies in humans. Predominance of minor immunoglobulin G subclasses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Persselin, J E; Stevens, R H

    1985-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing analyses of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) demonstrate two populations of antibodies directed against the Fab portion of pooled human IgG. One population is composed of polyclonal alkaline anti-Fab antibodies (alpha FABA) and the other, acidic alpha FABA which are more clonally restricted. In this study we have identified the immunoglobulin classes and subclasses of these antibodies in RA sera. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) demonstrated alpha FABA in RA sera to be predominantly IgG. A large portion of IgG alpha FABA existed as immune complexes, inasmuch as dialysis of RA sera against 6 M urea before ELISA analysis was necessary for maximal detection of alpha FABA activity. Chromatofocusing of RA sera isolated alpha FABA of different charges and revealed the acidic clonally restricted alpha FABA to be IgG4 and IgG3, whereas the polyclonal alkaline group contained IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3. Overall, acidic IgG3 and IgG4 comprised 70% of IgG alpha FABA, and high levels of IgG4 were seen in most RA sera. When alpha FABA were elevated in normal sera, they were primarily of the IgG4 subclass, and also existed as immune complexes. Serum anti-Fab activity was removed by adsorption of sera with Fab fragments. Anti-Fab antibodies of both kappa and lambda light-chain types were present in RA sera, and F(ab')2 fragments of RA serum immunoglobulin were found to possess anti-Fab activity. These studies indicate that alpha FABA in RA sera are limited to the IgG class, and that most of these antibodies exist as immune complexes and display clonal and minor IgG subclass restriction. Images PMID:3928684

  15. Intravenous immunoglobulin products contain specific antibodies to recombinant human tau protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lynnae M; Coffey, Mary P; Klaver, Andrea C; Loeffler, David A

    2013-08-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products are prepared from plasma immunoglobulins from healthy donors. Pilot studies suggest that IVIG may stabilize cognitive functioning in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. This study measured antibodies to recombinant human tau protein in the IVIG products Gammagard (Baxter), Gamunex (Talecris), and Flebogamma (Grifols). Anti-tau antibodies were measured by ELISA, subtracting IVIG's polyvalent binding from its binding to tau-coated wells to calculate specific anti-tau antibody levels. Because polyvalent binding of IVIG products may interfere with ELISA measurement of their specific antibody levels, the percentage of binding of each IVIG product to tau-coated wells that was specific for tau was also determined. Specific anti-tau antibodies were detected in all three IVIG products, with significant differences between these products (p<0.001) even when Flebogamma's anti-tau antibodies were doubled to account for its preparation as a 5% solution vs. 10% solutions for Gammagard and Gamunex (means: Gammagard, 3.1 μg/ml; Gamunex, 2.5 μg/ml; Flebogamma, 1.2 μg/ml). The percentages of each IVIG product's specific binding to tau-coated wells also varied between the various products (p<0.001) and between all pairs of IVIG products (means: Gammagard, 73.1%; Flebogamma, 54.5%; Gamunex, 37.4%; p<0.01 for all pairwise comparisons). These findings indicate that IVIG products contain specific anti-tau antibodies. The concentrations of these antibodies and the percentages of specific binding of IVIG to tau-coated wells vary between IVIG products. Further studies are indicated to determine if IVIG also contains antibodies to pathologic forms of tau.

  16. Analysis and comparison of the mouse and human immunoglobulin heavy chain JH-Cmu-Cdelta locus.

    PubMed

    Koop, B F; Richards, J E; Durfee, T D; Bansberg, J; Wells, J; Gilliam, A C; Chen, H L; Clausell, A; Tucker, P W; Blattner, F R

    1996-02-01

    We report here 23,686 bases of contiguous DNA sequences from the mouse germline immunoglobulin heavy chain (H) constant (C) mu delta region. The sequence spans the joining (JH) regions, the mu constant region (C mu), the delta constant region (C delta) coding regions, a domain relic, the mu switch region (S mu), seven blocks of simple sequence repeats, a large unique sequence inverted repeat, a large unique sequence forward repeat, and all of the intervening material. A comparison of this 23.7-kb region with the corresponding human C mu/C delta region reveals clear homology in the coding and introns of C mu but not in the 5' flanking J gene segments nor in the intergenic and C delta regions. This mixed pattern of similarity between the human and the mouse sequences contrasts with high levels of similarity found in the T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region and alpha and beta myosin genes and the very low levels found in the gamma-crystallin, XRCC1, and beta-globin gene clusters. The human and mouse comparison further suggests the incorporation of novel sequences into expressed genes of IgD.

  17. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-03-09

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM(+) mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab' fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production.

  18. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM+ mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab′ fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  19. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  20. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  1. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  2. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients.

  3. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  4. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  5. Three transposed elements in the intron of a human VK immunoglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Osterholzer, E; Zachau, H G

    1987-11-25

    Two gene segments coding for the variable region of human immunoglobulin light chains of the kappa type (VK genes, ref. 2) were found to have unusual structures. The two genes which are called A6 and A22 are located in duplicated gene clusters. Their restriction maps are very similar. About 4 kb of the A22 gene region were sequenced. It turned out that the intron contains an insert with the characteristics of a transposed element. The inserted DNA of 1.2 kb length contains imperfect direct and inverted repeats at its ends; at the insertion site a duplication of five nucleotides was found. Within the inserted DNA one copy each of an Alu element and of the simple sequence motif (T-G)17 were identified. Also these two repetitive sequences are themselves flanked by short direct repeats. The major inserted DNA has no significant homology to published human nucleic acid sequences. The whole structure is interpreted best by assuming a sequential insertion of the three elements. The coding region of the VK gene itself has several mutations which by themselves would render it a pseudogene; we assume that the insertion event(s) occurred prior to the mutations. According to mapping and hybridization data A6 is very similar to A22.

  6. Global gene regulation during activation of immunoglobulin class switching in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Fear, David J.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) to IgE is a tightly regulated process central to atopic disease. To profile the B-cell transcriptional responses underlying the activation of the germinal centre activities leading to the generation of IgE, naïve human B-cells were stimulated with IL-4 and anti-CD40. Gene expression and alternative splicing were profiled over 12 days using the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A total of 1,399 genes, forming 13 temporal profiles were differentially expressed. CCL22 and CCL17 were dramatically induced but followed a temporal trajectory distinct from classical mediators of isotype switching. AICDA, NFIL3, IRF4, XBP1 and BATF3 shared a profile with several genes involved in innate immunity, but with no recognised role in CSR. A transcription factor BHLHE40 was identified at the core of this profile. B-cell activation was also accompanied by variation in exon retention affecting >200 genes including CCL17. The data indicate a circadian component and central roles for the Th2 chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in the activation of CSR. PMID:27897229

  7. The Specificity Patterns of Human Immunoglobulin G Antibodies in Serum Differ from Those in Autologous Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Berneman, Armand; Belec, Laurent; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Bouvet, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The specificity patterns of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to streptococcal antigens in serum and autologous secretions were compared in order to determine whether IgG found in human secretions is exclusively of serum origin or can also be locally produced irrespective of the systemic immune system. Surface antigens from a type 6 M-protein strain of Streptococcus pyogenes were extracted by cell wall digestion and subjected to sodium lauryl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. After being blotted onto nitrocellulose, the antigens were incubated with purified IgG from various body fluids: saliva, cervicovaginal secretions, seminal fluid, and colostrum. Binding was then revealed with labeled antibodies to human Fcγ fragments. The antibody specificity patterns obtained by computer-assisted analysis were compared with those of paired sera. Major variations were observed between serum and secretions, as well as between different secretions from the same subject. These results are in favor of IgG-associated local immunity within different tissue compartments. This IgG response to mucosal antigens can complement that of secretory IgA in the defense against pathogens and should be taken into account during topical vaccinations. PMID:9712763

  8. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-04-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents.

  9. Evaluation of capillary zone electrophoresis for the determination of protein composition in therapeutic immunoglobulins and human albumins.

    PubMed

    Christians, Stefan; van Treel, Nadine Denise; Bieniara, Gabriele; Eulig-Wien, Annika; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Giess, Siegfried

    2016-07-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) provides an alternative means of separating native proteins on the basis of their inherent electrophoretic mobilities. The major advantage of CZE is the quantification by UV detection, circumventing the drawbacks of staining and densitometry in the case of gel electrophoresis methods. The data of this validation study showed that CZE is a reliable assay for the determination of protein composition in therapeutic preparations of human albumin and human polyclonal immunoglobulins. Data obtained by CZE are in line with "historical" data obtained by the compendial method, provided that peak integration is performed without time correction. The focus here was to establish a rapid and reliable test to substitute the current gel based zone electrophoresis techniques for the control of protein composition of human immunoglobulins or albumins in the European Pharmacopoeia. We believe that the more advanced and modern CZE method described here is a very good alternative to the procedures currently described in the relevant monographs.

  10. Solid-phase immune electron microscopy with human immunoglobulin M for serotyping of Norwalk-like viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D C; Lightfoot, N F; Pether, J V

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase immune electron microscopy method that uses protein A, goat anti-human immunoglobulin M (IgM), and human serum is described. Evaluation of the method with different immunoglobulin fractions showed that human IgM constituted the major virus capture antibody. The method appeared to distinguish between two Norwalk-like virus serotypes and demonstrated specific IgM responses to these serotypes in infected individuals. Further work is being carried out to define the relationship of these two serotypes to the previously described Norwalk agent (A. Z. Kapikian, R. G. Wyatt, R. Dolin, T. S. Thornhill, A. R. Kalica, and R. M. Chanock, J. Virol. 10:1075-1081, 1972), and four subsequent hospital outbreaks are being studied. PMID:2838506

  11. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  12. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  13. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Catherine L; Laffy, Julie M J; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O'Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  14. Elimination of soluble 123I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in humans; the effect of splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Halma, C; Daha, M R; van Furth, R; Camps, J A; Evers-Schouten, J H; Pauwels, E K; Lobatto, S; Van Es, L A

    1989-07-01

    To study the role of the spleen in the elimination of immune complexes we examined mononuclear phagocyte system function in eight healthy controls and eight splenectomized patients, with soluble 123I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G (AIgG). No differences were found between the two groups in elimination and degradation of AIgG. The loss of splenic function was compensated for by increased uptake of AIgG by the liver. With the dose of 123I-AIgG used in this study (10 micrograms/kg body weight), significant generation of C3a was observed. No correlation was found between erythrocyte CR1 number and the fraction of aggregates that bound to erythrocytes.

  15. The human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor binds to Streptococcus pneumoniae via domains 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Lamm, Michael E; Li, Hongmin; Corthesy, Blaise; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2003-11-28

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a major cause of bacterial pneumonia, middle ear infection (otitis media), sepsis, and meningitis. Our previous study demonstrated that the choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of S. pneumoniae binds to the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and enhances pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we sought to determine the CbpA-binding motif on pIgR by deletional analysis. The extra-cellular portion of pIgR consists of five Ig-like domains (D1-D5), each of which contains 104-114 amino acids and two disulfide bonds. Deletional analysis of human pIgR revealed that the lack of either D3 or D4 resulted in the loss of CbpA binding, whereas complete deletions of domains D1, D2, and D5 had undetectable impacts. Subsequent analysis showed that domains D3 and D4 together were necessary and sufficient for the ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, CbpA binding of pIgR did not appear to require Ca2+ or Mg2+. Finally, treating pIgR with a reducing agent abolished CbpA binding, suggesting that disulfide bonding is required for the formation of CbpA-binding motif(s). These results strongly suggest a conformational CbpA-binding motif(s) in the D3/D4 region of human pIgR, which is functionally separated from the IgA-binding site(s).

  16. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  17. A baboon syndrome induced by intravenous human immunoglobulins: report of a case and immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, A; Tréchot, P; Granel, F; Lonchamp, P; Faure, G; Schmutz, J L; Béné, M C

    1999-01-01

    Following the second series of intravenous human immunoglobulins (IVIg; 0.4 g/kg) prescribed to treat a sensorimotor polyneuritis, a 28-year-old woman developed pompholyx that recurred after each of the following monthly treatments with IVIg. During the administration of the 10th series, the patient developed a typical baboon syndrome. Immunohistochemical studies of a skin biopsy revealed an unexpected epidermal expression of P-selectin, usually expressed by endothelial cells. Patch, prick and intradermal tests performed with IVIg on the back, arms and buttocks gave negative results on immediate and delayed readings. IVIg were re-administered, with the informed consent of the patient, and induced a generalized maculopapular rash. This is the first reported case of baboon syndrome induced by IVIg. Although extensive skin testing was performed, all test sites remained negative. We wonder whether IVIg could reproduce immunological mechanisms involved in the 3 types of systemic contact dermatitis (pompholyx, baboon syndrome and maculopapular rash), including the epidermal expression of P-selectin.

  18. The human VK locus. Characterization of a duplicated region encoding 28 different immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Huber, E; Lorenz, W; Osterholzer, E; Pargent, W; Pech, M; Pohlenz, H D; Zimmer, F J; Zachau, H G

    1988-01-05

    Two large regions of the human multigene family coding for the variable parts of the immunoglobulin light chains of the K type (VK) have been characterized on cosmid clones. The two germline regions, called Aa and Ab, span together 250,000 base-pairs and comprise 28 different VK gene segments, nine of which have been sequenced. There is a preponderance of VKII genes but genes belonging to subgroups I and III, and genes that cannot be easily assigned to one of the known subgroups, are interspersed within the VKII gene clusters. A number of pseudogenes have been identified. Within the Aa and Ab regions, all gene segments are organized in the same transcriptional orientation. The regions Aa and Ab, whose restriction maps are highly homologous, were shown not to be allelic structures; they must have arisen by a duplication event. Taken together with previous results, one can conclude that the major part of the VK locus exists in duplicated form. One individual has been found who has only one copy of some of the duplicated regions. By chromosomal walking, the A regions could be linked to the O regions, an analysis of which has been reported. The A regions contribute about one-third of the VK genes so far identified.

  19. Behavior of human immunoglobulin G adsorption onto immobilized Cu(II) affinity hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Borsoi-Ribeiro, Mariana; Bresolin, Igor Tadeu Lazzarotto; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves

    2013-10-01

    Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) chelating ligands were immobilized on poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) (PEVA) hollow-fiber membranes after activation with epichlorohydrin or butanediol diglycidyl ether (bisoxirane). The affinity membranes complexed with Cu(II) were evaluated for adsorption of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). The effects of matrix activation and buffer system on adsorption of IgG were studied. Isotherms of batch IgG adsorption onto finely cut membranes showed that neither of the chelates, IDA-Cu(II) or TREN-Cu(II), had a Langmuirean behavior with negative cooperativity for IgG binding. A comparison of equilibrium and dynamic maximum capacities showed that the dynamic capacity for a mini-cartridge in a cross-flow filtration mode (52.5 and 298.4 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively) was somewhat higher than the equilibrium capacity (9.2 and 73.3 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively). When mini-cartridges were used, the dynamic adsorption capacity of IDA-Cu(II) was the same for both mini-cartridge and agarose gel.

  20. Affinity purification of egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) using a human mycoplasma protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuemei; Diraviyam, Thirumalai; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-02-15

    Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) is a superior functional equivalent to mammalian IgG. However, the preparation of refined and highly purified IgY is still attributed as difficult task. Protein M (a transmembrane protein from human mycoplasma) has been newly demonstrated as an ideal affinity regent for mammalian antibody purification. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between protein M and IgY. The results showed protein M could be a superior affinity reagent for IgY, scFv as well as IgYΔFc, based on pull down and western blot investigations; in addition, it was found that ∼125 times increase of effective IgY in the elutent was obtained using protein M affinity chromatography column compared with traditional IgY extraction methods. This indicates, the purification strategy of protein M is entirely different to traditional IBPs and the salient purification feature of protein M would be a breakthrough for purifying not only non-mammalian antibodies, but also monoclonal antibodies and engineered antibodies based on variable region.

  1. Clinical course of acute canine polyradiculoneuritis following treatment with human IV immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hirschvogel, Katrin; Jurina, Konrad; Steinberg, Tanja A; Matiasek, Lara A; Matiasek, Kaspar; Beltrán, Elsa; Fischer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of dogs with acute canine polyradiculoneuritis (ACP) is restricted to physical rehabilitation and supportive care. In humans with Guillain-Barré syndrome, the counterpart of ACP, randomized trials show that IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) speeds recovery. The authors of the current study hypothesized that dogs with ACP would tolerate IVIg well and recover faster than dogs managed with supportive treatment only. Sixteen client-owned dogs with ACP were treated with IVIg, and 14 client-owned dogs served as a retrospective control group. Diagnosis was confirmed using clinical features, electrodiagnostics, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and muscle/nerve biopsies. The duration of the initial progressive phase, the time from IVIg administration until the dogs were ambulating without assistance, and the duration of the complete episode were evaluated. Adverse reactions (anaphylaxis, mild hematuria) were observed in two dogs. Dogs treated with IVIg were ambulating without assistance after a median of 27.5 days (range, 15-127 days) from onset of clinical signs. The control group was ambulatory without assistance at a median of 75.5 days (range, 5-220 days). Even though this result is not statistically significant, there is a clear trend toward faster recovery in dogs treated with IVIg.

  2. Structural analysis of substitution patterns in alleles of human immunoglobulin VH genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Vargas-Madrazo, Enrique

    2005-05-01

    The diversity in repertoires of antibodies (Abs) needed in response to the antigen challenge is produced by evolutionary and somatic processes. The mechanisms operating at a somatic level have been studied in great detail. In contrast, neither the mechanisms nor the strategies of diversification at an evolutionary level have yet been understood in similar detail. Particularly, the substitution patterns in alleles of immunoglobulin genes (Igs) have not been systematically studied. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of studies which link the analysis at a genetic level of the diversification of repertoires with the structural consequences at the protein level of the changes in DNA information. For the purpose of systematically characterizing the strategies of evolutionary diversification through sequence variation at alleles, in this work, we built a database for all the alleles of the IGHV locus in humans reported until now. Based on these data, we performed diverse analyses of substitution patterns and linked these results with studies at the protein level. We found that the sequence diversification in different alleles does not operate with equal intensity for all V genes. Our studies, both of the number of substitutions and of the type of amino acid change per sub-segment of the V-REGION evidenced differences in the selective pressure to which these regions are exposed. The implications of these results for understanding the evolutionary diversification strategies, as well as for the somatic generation of antibody repertoires are discussed.

  3. Clinical significance of leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expression in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xueshan; Miao, Fang; Cao, Yanning; Xue, Jiangnan; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is broadly expressed on the majority of immune cells; however, the biological role of LAIR in solid tumors has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, using immunohistochemical staining analysis, the expression of LAIR-1 in human cervical cancer (HCC) and nontumor-adjacent tissue specimens was determined, and the results indicated that the expression of LAIR-1 in HCC tissue was higher compared with that in noncancerous tissue. The χ2 test was used to analyze the correlation between the expression of LAIR-1 in tumor tissues with clinicopathological parameters. The results showed that the expression of LAIR-1 in the cancer cell nucleus was significantly associated with tumor size, pathological differentiation, T classification and clinical stage. In addition, the expression in the cytoplasm was evidently associated with the number of positive lymph nodes. The HCC cell line, ME-180, which does not express LAIR-1, was stably transfected using LAIR-1 cDNA. Cell Counting Kit-8 and an annexin V assay showed that the overexpression of LAIR-1 in ME-180 cells suppressed the proliferation and anti-apoptosis capacity of the cells. These findings demonstrated that LAIR-1 is markedly overexpressed in HCC tissue, and that its expression status is associated with tumor progression. LAIR-1 may be a biomarker and target in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:28105100

  4. Quantifying the thrombogenic potential of human plasma-derived immunoglobulin products.

    PubMed

    Germishuizen, W A; Gyure, D C; Stubbings, D; Burnouf, T

    2014-09-01

    Polyvalent immunoglobulin G (IgG) products obtained by fractionation of human plasma are used to treat a broad range of conditions, including immunodeficiency syndromes and autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Recent incidences of increased thromboembolic events (TEEs) associated with intravenous (IV) IgG (IVIG) led to recalls of some products and increased regulatory oversight of manufacturing processes in order to ensure that products are essentially free of procoagulant/thrombogenic plasma protein contaminants. Laboratory investigations have now identified activated factor XI (FXIa) as the likely causative agent of IVIG-related TEEs. Quantification of the thrombogenic potential is becoming a requirement made to fractionators (a) to validate the capacity of IVIG and subcutaneous IgG manufacturing processes to remove procoagulant contaminants and (b) to establish the safety of the final products. However, in the absence of a recommended test by the main regulatory authorities, several analytical approaches have been evaluated by fractionators, regulators, and university groups. This review focuses on the scientific rationale, merits, and applications of several analytical methods of quantifying the thrombogenic potential of IgG products and intermediates to meet the latest regulatory requirements. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding site on human immunoglobulin G for the affinity ligand HWRGWV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Williams, D. Keith; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Cavanagh, John; Muddiman, David C.; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383–Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. PMID:20049844

  6. Pooled human immunoglobulins reduce adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, K A; van der Mei, H C; Gottenbos, B; Grainger, D W; van Horn, J R; Busscher, H J

    2000-08-01

    The influence of pooled polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) interactions with both bacteria and model substrates in altering Pseudomonas aeruginosa surface adhesion is reported. Opsonization of this pathogen by polyclonal human IgG and preadsorption of IgG to glass surfaces both effectively reduce initial deposition rates and surface growth of P. aeruginosa IFO3455 from dilute nutrient broth in a parallel plate flow chamber. Polyclonal IgG depleted of P. aeruginosa-specific antibodies reduces the initial deposition rate or surface growth to levels intermediate between exposed and nonexposed IgG conditions. Bacterial surface properties are changed in the presence of opsonizing IgG. Plateau contact angle analysis via sessile drop technique shows a drop in P. aeruginosa surface hydrophobicity after IgG exposure consistent with a more hydrophilic IgG surface coat. Zeta potential values for opsonized versus nonopsonized bacteria exhibit little change. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements provide surface compositional evidence for IgG attachment to bacterial surfaces. Surface elemental ratios attributed to IgG protein signals versus those attributed primarily to bacterial polysaccharide surface or lipid membrane change with IgG opsonization. Direct evidence for antibody-modified P. aeruginosa surface properties correlates both with reduction of bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces under flow in nutrient medium reported and previous reports of IgG efficacy against P. aeruginosa motility in vitro and infection in vivo.

  7. Diminished clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Westedt, M L; Pauwels, E K; Evers-Schouten, J H; Voetman, A A; Cats, A; van Es, L A

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of the capacity of the mononuclear phagocyte system to remove immune complexes from the circulation was performed by the administration of 125I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G (AIgG) to patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and healthy volunteers. It was found that the rate at which AIgG disappeared from the circulation was significantly prolonged in patients with RA, t1/2 61 +/- 49 min, versus 26 +/- 8 min in healthy volunteers (p less than 0.01). We were not able to establish a correlation between the t1/2 of AIgG and immune complex levels in the circulation, or between t1/2 and articular disease activity (Ritchie index). The sites of removal of AIgG from the circulation were analysed by determining radioactivity levels detectable over liver, spleen and heart. No correlation was found between t1/2 and liver/spleen uptake ratios. We have demonstrated that the removal of AIgG from the circulation of patients with RA is abnormal, though the biological significance of this finding remains to be determined.

  8. Thermal aggregation of human immunoglobulin G in arginine solutions: Contrasting effects of stabilizers and destabilizers.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2017-11-01

    Arginine is widely used as aggregation suppressor of proteins in biotechnology and pharmaceutics. However, why the effect of arginine depends on the types of proteins and stresses, including monoclonal antibodies, is still unclear. Here we investigated the precise processes of the thermal aggregation of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the presence of additives. As expected, arginine was the best additive to suppress the formation of insoluble aggregates during heat treatment, though it was unable to preserve the monomer content. A systematic analysis of the additives showed that sugars and kosmotropic ion inhibit the formation of soluble oligomers. These behaviors indicate that the thermal aggregation of IgG occurs by (i) the formation of soluble oligomers, which is triggered by the unfolding process that can be stabilized by typical osmolytes, and (ii) the formation of insoluble aggregates through weak cluster-cluster interactions, which can be suppressed by arginine. Understanding the detailed mechanism of arginine will provide useful information for the rational formulation design of antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of human immunoglobulins and lysozyme in epoxy-embedded lymph nodes: effect of different fixatives and of proteolytic digestion.

    PubMed

    Dell'Orto, P; Viale, G; Colombi, R; Braidotti, P; Coggi, G

    1982-07-01

    The postembedding immunoperoxidase staining technique for the localization of immunoglobulins (light and heavy chains) and of lysozyme has been successfully applied to epoxy-embedded human lymph nodes, after removal of the resin. Glutaraldehyde-containing fixatives appear to be suitable for the immunohistochemical localization of human immunoglobulins and lysozyme, provided that the masked antigenicity of these proteins is recovered by proteolytic digestion of the tissue sections using 0.4% pepsin or 0.1% trypsin. Nonglutaraldehyde-containing fixatives allow the immunolocalization of human immunoglobulins without any enzymatic pretreatment. This study shows that tissues routinely fixed in glutaraldehyde and embedded for ultrastructural investigations are actually suitable for immunohistochemical studies on human immunoglobulins and lysozyme.

  10. Hinge-Region O-Glycosylation of Human Immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)*

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Rombouts, Yoann; Visser, Remco; Koeleman, Carolien A.M.; Kammeijer, Guinevere S.M.; Jansen, Bas C.; Rispens, Theo; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Vidarsson, Gestur; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is one of the most abundant proteins present in human serum and a fundamental component of the immune system. IgG3 represents ∼8% of the total amount of IgG in human serum and stands out from the other IgG subclasses because of its elongated hinge region and enhanced effector functions. This study reports partial O-glycosylation of the IgG3 hinge region, observed with nanoLC-ESI-IT-MS(/MS) analysis after proteolytic digestion. The repeat regions within the IgG3 hinge were found to be in part O-glycosylated at the threonine in the triple repeat motif. Non-, mono- and disialylated core 1-type O-glycans were detected in various IgG3 samples, both poly- and monoclonal. NanoLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS with electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and CE-MS/MS with CID fragmentation were used to determine the site of IgG3 O-glycosylation. The O-glycosylation site was further confirmed by the recombinant production of mutant IgG3 in which potential O-glycosylation sites had been knocked out. For IgG3 samples from six donors we found similar O-glycan structures and site occupancies, whereas for the same samples the conserved N-glycosylation of the Fc CH2 domain showed considerable interindividual variation. The occupancy of each of the three O-glycosylation sites was found to be ∼10% in six serum-derived IgG3 samples and ∼13% in two monoclonal IgG3 allotypes. PMID:25759508

  11. Disodium cromoglycate enhances ongoing immunoglobulin production in vitro in human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, H; Yoshida, A; Ishioka, C; Mikawa, H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) upon human immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and IgG subclasses production by purified B cells was studied. DSCG enhanced IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgA production in a dose-dependent fashion, while DSCG failed to induce IgE production at any concentrations tested by purified B cells. When B cells were separated into small resting and large activated B cells, DSCG failed to induce Ig production from small resting B cells in the presence or absence of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I (SAC). In contrast, in large activated B cells DSCG significantly enhanced all types of Ig production (two-to threefold), especially IgG4 production (seven-to 11-fold), except IgE, which large B cells did not produce. The enhancement of IgG subclass production was not subclass switching, since DSCG failed to enhance IgG1 production in B cells depleted of surface IgG1+ cells (sIgG1+ cells). Similarly, DSCG did not enhance IgG2, IgG3 or IgG4 production from sIgG2-, sIgG3- or sIgG4- B cells, respectively, Interleukin-4 (IL-4) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) also enhanced Ig production except IgG4 from large activated B cells. The enhancing effect of DSCG was not mediated by IL-4 or IL-6 since anti-IL-4 or anti-IL-6 antibody failed to block the DSCG-induced enhancement. DSCG also enhanced IgG2 and IgM production from human B-cell lines GM-1500 and CBL, respectively. These results suggest that DSCG directly and preferentially stimulates activated B cells which are producing Ig and, in addition, enhances their Ig production. PMID:1904400

  12. Rearrangement and expression of the immunoglobulin μ-chain gene in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Sun, Xiaoping; Gong, Xiaoting; He, Zhiqiao; Chen, Lei; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig), a characteristic marker of B cells, has been reported to be expressed in epithelial cells, with a suggested role in their growth and survival. We have previously reported that IgG heavy chain is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not in the monocytes or neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms or healthy controls. In the present study, we assessed IgM heavy chain expression and repertoire in human myeloid cells. We detected VHμDJHμ rearrangement and expression in 7/7 AML cell lines, 7/14 primary myeloblasts from AML patients, and interestingly, 8/20 monocytes and 3/20 neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms and healthy individuals. We also found evidence of somatic hypermutation of the variable (V) gene segments in AML-derived IgM gene rearrangements but not in IgM from monocytes or neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms and healthy individuals. Furthermore, IgM VHμDJHμ gene rearrangements in AML cell lines, primary myeloblasts, and monocytes and neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms showed a restricted V usage and repertoire, whereas the VHμDJHμ gene rearrangements in monocytes and neutrophils from healthy individuals displayed more diversity. Anti-human IgM inhibited cell proliferation, but did not induce apoptosis in AML cell lines. Our findings suggest that AML-derived IgM might be a novel AML-related molecule that is involved in leukemogenesis and AML progression and might serve as a useful molecular marker for designing targeted therapy and monitoring minimal residual disease. PMID:24141767

  13. Human recombinant antimannan immunoglobulin G1 antibody confers resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mason X; Bohlman, M Charlotte; Itatani, Carol; Burton, Dennis R; Parren, Paul W H I; St Jeor, Stephen C; Kozel, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Mannan is a major cell wall component found in Candida species. Natural antimannan antibody is present in sera from most normal adults, but its role in host resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop recombinant human antimannan antibody and to study its protective function. A phage Fab display combinatorial library containing Fab genes from bone marrow lymphocytes was screened with Candida albicans yeast cells and chemically purified mannan. One antimannan Fab, termed M1, was converted to a full-length immunoglobulin G1 antibody, M1g1, and M1g1 was produced in CHO cells. The M1g1 epitope was found in C. albicans serotypes A and B, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. Its expression was active at both 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C and uniform over the cell surface. BALB/c mice passively immunized with M1g1 were more resistant than control mice to a lethal hematogenous infection by C. albicans, as evidenced by extension of survival in an M1g1 dose-dependent manner (P, 0.08 to <0.001) and by reduction in number of infection foci and their size in the kidney. In vitro studies found that M1g1 promoted phagocytosis and phagocytic killing of C. albicans yeast cells by mouse peritoneal macrophages and was required for activation of the mouse complement cascade. Thus, human antimannan antibody may have a protective role in host resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  14. Excretion of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 through Polarized Epithelium by Immunoglobulin A▿

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Alison; Lamm, Michael E.; Huang, Yung T.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is transmitted primarily sexually across mucosal surfaces. After infection, HIV propagates initially in the lamina propria below the polarized epithelium and causes extensive destruction of mucosal T cells. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies, produced in the lamina propria and then transcytosed across the mucosal epithelium into the lumen, can be the first line of immune defense against HIV. Here, we used IgA monoclonal antibodies against HIV envelope proteins to investigate the abilities of polarized primate and human epithelial cells to excrete HIV virions from the basolateral to the apical surface via polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR)-mediated binding and the internalization of HIV-IgA immune complexes. African green monkey kidney cells expressing pIgR demonstrated HIV excretion that was dependent on the IgA concentration and the exposure time. Matched IgG antibodies with the same variable regions as the IgA antibodies and IgA antibodies to non-HIV antigens had no HIV excretory function. A mixture of two IgA anti-bodies against gp120 and gp41 showed a synergistic increase in the level of HIV excreted. The capacity for HIV excretion correlated with the ability of IgA antibodies to bind HIV and of the resulting immune complexes to bind pIgR. Consistent with the epithelial transcytosis of HIV-IgA immune complexes, the colocalization of HIV proteins and HIV-specific IgA was detected intracellularly by confocal microscopy. Our results suggest the potential of IgA antibodies to excrete HIV from mucosal lamina propria, thereby decreasing the viral burden, access to susceptible cells, and the chronic activation of the immune system. PMID:18829757

  15. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important.

  16. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes.

  17. Clinical use of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    McClelland, D B; Yap, P L

    1984-02-01

    The use of immunoglobulins for prophylaxis and therapy are reviewed. Normal and hyperimmune immunoglobulins have well established clinical applications. These are summarized in Table 14. This form of therapy has now entered a period of rapid change due to the availability of human immunoglobulins which are safe for intravenous use, permitting large doses to be given rapidly. This will permit reappraisal of many conventional applications and exploration of new possibilities for the use of these products. The approaching wide availability of monoclonal antibodies for clinical use will open up a further wide range of new therapeutic applications, providing that concerns over the products' safety are allayed .

  18. Mass Value Assignment of Total and Subclass Immunoglobulin G in a Human Standard Anthrax Reference Serum

    PubMed Central

    Semenova, V. A.; Steward-Clark, E.; Stamey, K. L.; Taylor, T. H.; Schmidt, D. S.; Martin, S. K.; Marano, N.; Quinn, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    An anti-Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (anti-AVA) standard human reference serum pool, AVR414, has been prepared, and the total and protective antigen (PA)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were quantified. AVR414 was prepared by plasmapheresis of healthy adults who had received a minimum of four subcutaneous injections of AVA. Mass values (in milligrams per milliliter) for total IgG and IgG subclasses 1 to 4 were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Anti-PA-specific IgG assignment (in micrograms per milliliter) was done by consensus of two complementary approaches: homologous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with affinity-purified anti-PA IgG as a calibrator and summation of mean PA-specific IgG subclass concentrations determined by IgG subclass-specific ELISA using the United States National Reference Preparation for Human Serum Proteins as a standard. The total IgG concentration assigned to AVR414 reference serum was 8.33 mg/ml. IgG subclass concentrations were the following: for IgG1, 4.48 mg/ml; for IgG2, 3.35 mg/ml; for IgG3, 0.37 mg/ml; and for IgG4, 0.30 mg/ml. The assigned mass value for total anti-PA-specific IgG was 141.2 μg/ml. Anti-PA-specific IgG subclass concentrations were the following: for IgG1, 79.6 μg/ml; for IgG2, 35.3 μg/ml; for IgG3, 3.2 μg/ml; and for IgG4, 25.3 μg/ml. Human reference serum pool AVR414 will have direct application in the standardization of anthrax serological assays, in reagent qualification, and as a standard for quantification of PA-specific IgG in humans who have been vaccinated with or otherwise exposed to Bacillus anthracis PA. PMID:15358653

  19. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun; Bartish, Margarita; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Børglum, Anders D; Gatti, Richard A; Törngren, Therese; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-02-17

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism underlying BRCA1's function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  20. The effect of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) on \\textit{ex vivo} activation of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Basyreva, Liliya Yu; Brodsky, Ilya B; Gusev, Alexander A; Zhapparova, Olga N; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Gusev, Sergey A; Shor, Dana Ben-Ami; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been widely used to treat various conditions, including inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. IVIG has been shown to have a direct influence on neutrophils, eosinophils and lymphocytes. However, many aspects IVIG's effect on neutrophils activation still remain unknown. To evaluate the effect of IVIG on PMA-induced activation of neutrophils, with and without priming with TNF-α, in a series of in vitro experiments performed on whole blood. Our data coincided with well-known literature indicating that the effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on human leukocytes includes activation of neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, increase of chemiluminescence (CL) and induction of netosis, resulting in assembly of traps. In presence of IVIG (10 mg/mL), CL was reduced by 25% in response to PMA compared to PMA-induced leukocyte activation without IVIG. Decreasing IVIG concentration to 1 mg/mL and below did not inhibit PMA-induced activation of CL.PMA-induced activation after TNF-α priming resulted in approximately 50% increase of amplitude of CL response to PMA. Moreover, maximum CL was reached by minute 5, which was more rapid than in the absence of TNF-α-priming (in this case maximum CL was reached by minute 15).The IVIG concentrations did not affect morphological changes of leukocytes after sequential addition of TNF-α and PMA. IVIG had no effect on leukocyte content and on PMA-induced CL of primed leukocytes.Addition of IVIG under TNF-α priming significantly increased the number of traps in the smears in response to PMA activation. Of note, such an increase in the number of traps was depended on the IVIG concentration in plasma. In conclusion, we suggest that IVIG is able to reduce the degradation of traps under priming with TNF-α. Moreover, IVIG might switch the activation of primed leukocytes to netosis.

  1. Usefulness of high-dose intravenous human immunoglobulins treatment for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Michele; Buiatti, Alessandra; Merlo, Marco; Massa, Laura; Fabris, Enrico; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2013-11-01

    The management of refractory recurrent pericarditis is challenging. Previous clinical reports have noted a beneficial effect of high-dose intravenous human immunoglobulins (IvIgs) in isolated and systemic inflammatory disease-related forms. In this article, we analyzed retrospectively our clinical experience with IvIg therapy in a series of clinical cases of pericarditis refractory to conventional treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 9 patients (1994 to 2010) with refractory recurrent pericarditis, who received high-dose IvIg as a part of their medical treatment. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, or colchicine treatment was not discontinued during IvIg treatment. No patients had a history of autoimmune or connective tissue diseases. During an average period of 11 months from the first recurrence, patients had experienced a mean of 5 relapses before the first IvIg treatment. In 4 cases, patients showed complete clinical remission with no further relapse after the first IvIg cycle. Two patients experienced a single minor relapse, responsive to short-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In 2 patients, we performed a second cycle of IvIg after a recurrence of pericarditis, with subsequent complete remission. One patient did not respond to 3 cycles of IvIg and subsequently underwent pericardial window and long-term immunosuppressive treatment. No major adverse effect was observed in consequence of IvIg administration in all the cases. In conclusion, although IvIg mode of action is still poorly understood in this setting, this treatment can be considered as an option in patients with recurrent pericarditis refractory to conventional medical treatment and, in our small series, has proved to be effective in 8 of 9 cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intravenous human immunoglobulins for refractory recurrent pericarditis: a systematic review of all published cases.

    PubMed

    Imazio, Massimo; Lazaros, George; Picardi, Elisa; Vasileiou, Panagiotis; Carraro, Mara; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Belli, Riccardo; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Refractory recurrent pericarditis is a major clinical challenge after colchicine failure, especially in corticosteroid-dependent patients. Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) have been proposed as possible therapeutic options for these cases. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of IVIGs in this context. Studies reporting the use of IVIG for the treatment of recurrent pericarditis and published up to October 2014 were searched in several databases. All references found, upon initial assessment at title and abstract level for suitability, were consequently retrieved as full reports for further appraisal. Among the 18 citations retrieved, 17 reports (4 case series and 13 single case reports, with an overall population of 30 patients) were included. The mean disease duration was 14 months and the mean number of recurrences before IVIG was 3. Approximately 47% of patients had idiopathic recurrent pericarditis, 10% had an infective cause, and the remainder a systemic inflammatory disease. Nineteen out of the 30 patients (63.3%) were on corticosteroids at IVIG commencement. IVIGs were generally administered at a dose of 400-500 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days with repeated cycles according to the clinical response. Complications were uncommon (headache in ~3%) and not life-threatening. After a mean follow-up of approximately 33th months, recurrences occurred in 26.6% of cases after the first IVIG cycle, and 22 of the 30 patients (73.3%) were recurrence-free. Five patients (16.6%) were on corticosteroids at the end of the follow-up. IVIGs are rapidly acting, well tolerated, and efficacious steroid-sparing agents in refractory pericarditis.

  3. The impact of glycosylation on the biological function and structure of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Arnold, James N; Wormald, Mark R; Sim, Robert B; Rudd, Pauline M; Dwek, Raymond A

    2007-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are the major secretory products of the adaptive immune system. Each is characterized by a distinctive set of glycoforms that reflects the wide variation in the number, type, and location of their oligosaccharides. In a given physiological state, glycoform populations are reproducible; therefore, disease-associated alterations provide diagnostic biomarkers (e.g., for rheumatoid arthritis) and contribute to disease pathogenesis. The oligosaccharides provide important recognition epitopes that engage with lectins, endowing the immunoglobulins with an expanded functional repertoire. The sugars play specific structural roles, maintaining and modulating effector functions that are physiologically relevant and can be manipulated to optimize the properties of therapeutic antibodies. New molecular models of all the immunoglobulins are included to provide a basis for informed and critical discussion. The models were constructed by combining glycan sequencing data with oligosaccharide linkage and dynamics information from the Glycobiology Institute experimental database and protein structural data from "The Protein Data Bank."

  4. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  5. Immunogenicity and efficacy of Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan peptide mimotope-protein conjugates in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Lees, Andrew; Belouski, Shelley Sims; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2004-01-01

    Peptide mimotopes of capsular polysaccharides have been proposed as antigens for vaccines against encapsulated pathogens. In this study, we determined the antibody response to and efficacy of P13, a peptide mimetic of the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), in mice that produce human antibodies. P13 was conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and administered subcutaneously in Alhydrogel with or without CpG to mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin loci (XenoMouse mice) and expressing either immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) (G2 mice) or IgG4 (G4 mice). Mice were vaccinated and revaccinated two or three times. The serum antibody responses of the mice to GXM and P13 and antibody idiotype expression were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that both P13-TT and P13-DT were antigenic, inducing a mimetic response to P13 in both G2 and G4 mice, and immunogenic, inducing a mimotope response including VH3 (idiotype)-positive antibodies to GXM in G2 but not G4 mice. CpG led to higher titers of IgG to P13 and GXM in P13-TT-vaccinated G2 mice. C. neoformans challenge of P13-protein conjugate-vaccinated and control G2 mice induced anamnestic IgG- and VH3-positive responses to GXM and was associated with a significantly decreased risk of death and a prolongation of survival in P13-DT-vaccinated mice compared to phosphate-buffered saline-treated or protein carrier-vaccinated mice. These findings reveal that P13 elicited a human antibody response with VH3 expression in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice that has been observed for human antibodies to GXM and support the concept that peptide mimotope-based vaccines may hold promise for the treatment of C. neoformans infections.

  6. Performance evaluation of Mimetic Ligand™ B14-triazole-FractoAIMs adsorbents for the capture of human monoclonal immunoglobulin G from cell culture feed.

    PubMed

    Horak, Jeannie; Hofer, Stefan; Sadler, Chris; Williams, Sharon; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    The new affinity-type Mimetic Ligand™ B14 was coupled with a 1,2-diaminoethane spacer (2LP) and a [1,2,3]-triazole spacer (TRZ) to three different support media. In addition to the agarose-based PuraBead and the polymethacrylate-type Fractogel, three new polymeric support media were introduced, the FractoAIMs 1, 2, and 3 (FA1, FA2, and FA3). These new FA supports differ in pore size as well as density of epoxide groups. The immobilization of the B14-ligand onto an azide-group-modified surface was performed with a copper (I)-mediated Click reaction. The IgG capture performance was tested for various ligand-spacer support combinations using cell culture feed containing human immunoglobulin G(1) (hIgG(1)). The most promising adsorbent, B14-TRZ-FA3, was further optimized by improving the surface chemistry through a triple endcapping concept employing an improved Click reaction protocol. This new technique enabled the most efficient deactivation of residual azide groups. In a direct comparison with a commercially available Protein A media, B14-TRZ-FA3 3× ec provided superior results at fast flow-rates and low bed-height. Dynamic binding capacities of 11.4 g/L for 10% breakthrough of hIgG(1), elution capacities of 16.0 g/L hIgG(1) and a recovery of 86% were achieved. The same results were obtained for a dialyzed and pre-purified feed solution, which is a clear indicator that triple-endcapped affinity support surfaces are practically inert to the non-specific binding of host cell proteins.

  7. Expression and secretion of immunoglobulin alpha heavy chain with diverse VDJ recombinations by human epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Li, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zeng, Liang; Liu, Hai-dan; Hu, Duosha; Deng, Xiyun; Tang, Min; Shi, Ying; Gong, Jianping; Cao, Ya

    2007-03-01

    Generally, only B lymphocytes express immunoglobulin. Recently, we found the expression of Ig alpha heavy chain in human epithelial cancer cells unexpectedly. We first detected Ig VDJ-Calpha and Ialpha-Calpha transcripts in multiple cancer cell lines. Further, the configuration of the Ig heavy chain genomic locus was analyzed in human cancer cells. We found that cancer cells have the recombination VDJ region, but bear Ig Salpha region in germline configuration, which is different from Ig expression pattern in B cells. And human epithelial cancers possess the essential effectors including RAG-1 and RAG-2, but not activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein. These provide further proofs for Ig alpha expression. In addition, we found that human cancer cells not only express the protein of Ig alpha chain, but also secrete the protein in secretory IgA (SIgA) pattern. Importantly, diverse CDR3 recombinations were found in human cancer cells of different epithelial origin. Since IgA is the key immunoglobulin which contributes to local immunity of mucous membrane, the aberrant expression of Ig alpha heavy chain might increase our further comprehension to development and immunity of cancers.

  8. An Organic Field-effect Transistor with an Extended-gate Electrode Capable of Detecting Human Immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Minamiki, Tsukuru; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Yui; Kurita, Ryoji; Niwa, Osamu; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report on the development of an extended-gate type organic field-effect transistor (OFET)-based immunosensor for the detection of human immunoglobulin A (IgA). The titration results of IgA exhibited shifts in the transfer characteristics of the OFET sensor device with increasing IgA concentration. A linear detection range from 0 to 10 μg/mL was realized with a detection limit of 2.1 μg/mL, indicating that the OFET-based immunosensor can be potentially applied to the monitoring of infectious diseases and psychological stress in daily life.

  9. Separation of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and immunoglobulin G by a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongmo; Chae, Junseok

    2009-04-01

    This report describes a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column that effectively preseparates raw samples for medical point-of-care testing (POCT) devices. The minicolumn is constructed of polydimethylsiloxane fabricated on a glass slide. The minicolumn separates 300 ng/ml of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) from an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-rich solution (100 μg/ml) in 7.7 min, with 2.23 resolution and 0.018 mm plate height. The complete analyte discrimination shows potential for the sample preparation stage of POCT devices for cancer screening, prognosis, and monitoring.

  10. Molecular Basis of Passive Stress Relaxation in Human Soleus Fibers: Assessment of the Role of Immunoglobulin-Like Domain Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Trombitás, K.; Wu, Y.; McNabb, M.; Greaser, M.; Kellermayer, M. S. Z.; Labeit, S.; Granzier, H.

    2003-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as “spacers” that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (>∼20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation. PMID:14581214

  11. Molecular basis of passive stress relaxation in human soleus fibers: assessment of the role of immunoglobulin-like domain unfolding.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Wu, Y; McNabb, M; Greaser, M; Kellermayer, M S Z; Labeit, S; Granzier, H

    2003-11-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as "spacers" that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (> approximately 20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation.

  12. Efficacy of Polyvalent Human Immunoglobulins in an Animal Model of Neuromyelitis Optica Evoked by Intrathecal Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Toyka, Klaus V.; Sommer, Claudia; Geis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders (NMOSD) are associated with autoantibodies (ABs) targeting the astrocytic aquaporin-4 water channels (AQP4-ABs). These ABs have a direct pathogenic role by initiating a variety of immunological and inflammatory processes in the course of disease. In a recently-established animal model, chronic intrathecal passive-transfer of immunoglobulin G from NMOSD patients (NMO-IgG), or of recombinant human AQP4-ABs (rAB-AQP4), provided evidence for complementary and immune-cell independent effects of AQP4-ABs. Utilizing this animal model, we here tested the effects of systemically and intrathecally applied pooled human immunoglobulins (IVIg) using a preventive and a therapeutic paradigm. In NMO-IgG animals, prophylactic application of systemic IVIg led to a reduced median disease score of 2.4 on a 0–10 scale, in comparison to 4.1 with sham treatment. Therapeutic IVIg, applied systemically after the 10th intrathecal NMO-IgG injection, significantly reduced the disease score by 0.8. Intrathecal IVIg application induced a beneficial effect in animals with NMO-IgG (median score IVIg 1.6 vs. sham 3.7) or with rAB-AQP4 (median score IVIg 2.0 vs. sham 3.7). We here provide evidence that treatment with IVIg ameliorates disease symptoms in this passive-transfer model, in analogy to former studies investigating passive-transfer animal models of other antibody-mediated disorders. PMID:27571069

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance Studies of the Specific Interactions of Hexamer Peptide Ligands with Human Immunoglobulin G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nafisa

    This study characterizes the human immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding on peptides grafted onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and the binding events are studied primarily using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The dissertation also seeks to determine the optimum surface preparation and surface chemistry approaches for grafting the peptide so that the sensor surfaces demonstrate enhanced selectivity and sensitivity in both laboratory and industrial settings. Peptide covalent grafting was performed on pure and mixed SAMs, the surfaces were characterized and the peptide densities were quantified. Theoretical models were developed and implemented to describe the binding mechanism of IgG with grafted ligands. Protein A was grafted onto SPR sensors and subsequent IgG binding characteristics were compared side-by-side to those of peptide-IgG binding. It was found that Protein A-based sensors showed much higher selectivities and higher binding capacities than their peptides based counterparts. Oligo(ethylene glycol) alkanethiol-based pure and mixed SAMs were grafted with peptides in order to determine the optimal surface among these, for enhanced selectivity. Among the mixed SAMs formed from different precursor solutions, a surface with peptides grafted onto mixed SAMs formulated from 10% amine-terminated/90% hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols showed optimum selectivity. Studies were carried out to increase the peptide density via grafting of branched amines onto surfaces. The branched amine-based peptide surfaces displayed improved sensitivities and similar selectivities to the surfaces based on un-branched amine termini. Kinetic analyses were carried out to determine the characteristics of IgG binding to ligands grafted in the abovementioned methods. Kinetic analysis of binding indicated that Protein A-IgG interactions have concentrationdependent affinity properties that could be attributed to the allosteric effects of the interaction. The lack of tertiary

  14. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful.

  15. Calibration of the human immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size (batch 1) and for Fc function and molecular size (batches 1 & 2).

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Costanzo, A; Daas, A; Buchheit, K-H

    2012-04-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation batch 3 (BRP3) for Human Immunoglobulin was established in 2005. Stocks of this BRP are dwindling and a replacement batch is needed to serve as working standard in the tests for distribution of molecular size by HPLC, anticomplementary activity (ACA) and Fc function, in accordance with the requirements of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) carried out a project (BSP099) to establish replacement batches for this BRP. The project was run in 2 phases, a prequalification phase (Phase 1) and an international collaborative study (Phase 2) involving 19 laboratories. Three batches of candidate materials of various sizes, Samples A, B and C, were procured from 2 different manufacturers on the European market. Based on the results of the study, Sample A was shown to be suitable as a reference standard for the ACA test and for molecular size determination by HPLC, whereas Samples B and C were demonstrated to be suitable for the Fc function test and for the molecular size determination by HPLC. All 3 BRPs are to be used in conjunction with the monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The BRPs were adopted by the Ph. Eur. Commission at its 141st session in November 2011 as official Ph. Eur. Human Immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size Batch 1 (Sample A) and Fc function and molecular size Batch 1 and Batch 2 (Samples B and C respectively).

  16. Triple Immunoglobulin Gene Knockout Transchromosomic Cattle: Bovine Lambda Cluster Deletion and Its Effect on Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/−; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/− and bIGL−/−; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ). PMID:24603704

  17. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  18. Quantitation of biotin-binding immunoglobulins G, A, and M in Human Sera Using F(ab')2anti-human immunoglobulin-coated microplates.

    PubMed

    Muratsugu, Makoto; Yazawa, Ayaka; Fujiwara, Sami; Nishida, Satsuki; Fukui, Toru

    2008-03-01

    Biotin-binding IgG (B-IgG) in human sera was quantified using previously developed F(ab')(2)anti-human IgG-coated multiwell microplates (Muratsugu M. et al., 2003, Biol. Pharm. Bull., 26, 1605--1608). The levels of B-IgG in sera, however, were higher than those we predicted. In this study, we modified the assay using F(ab')2anti-human IgG-coated multiwell microplates and successfully quantified the levels of B-IgG in sera. The cause of the unpredicted results was discussed in the text. In addition, the levels of biotin-binding IgA (B-IgA) and IgM (B-IgM) in sera could be measured using F(ab')2anti-human IgA- or IgM-coated multiwell microplates. We quantified B-IgG, B-IgA, and B-IgM in sera from healthy specimens and patients with bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, epilepsy, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin V(H)6 genes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-10-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated V(H)6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of V(H)6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T-B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old.

  20. Rapid infusions of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l are safe and well tolerated in immunodeficiencies and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Alberto Bosi, A; Reichert, Dietmar; Janssen, Jan; Lamacchia, Donatella; Nappi, Liliana; Pecoraro, Antonio; Milito, Cinzia; Ferraro, Andrea; Matucci, Andrea; Bacchiarri, Francesca; Carrai, Valentina; Hibbeler, Azra; Speckman, Elisabet; Guarnieri, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Serena; Quinti, Isabella

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is accepted as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for primary and secondary immunodeficiencies (ID) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Adverse reactions of IVIg are usually mild, comprising transient flu-like symptoms, change in blood pressure and tachycardia. However IVIg therapy can be burdensome for both patients and healthcare facilities, since the infusion may take up to 4h to administer. The objective of our multicentre, prospective, open-label phase III trial was to evaluate the tolerability and safety of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l (Ig VENA) at high intravenous infusion rates in adult patients with ID and ITP who had previously tolerated IVIg treatment, by progressively increasing infusion rate up to 8ml/kg/hr. 39 ID patients received three infusions, 5 ITP patients received up to a maximum of 5 infusions for a maximum of 5days. Overall 55 adverse events were reported in 18 patients, and all were mild and self-limiting. Two serious adverse events occurred in ID patients and 1 in an ITP patient; none was fatal or treatment-related. No clinically significant changes or abnormalities were observed in vital signs, laboratory results and HRQoL. In summary, in this study, more rapid IVIg infusions were well tolerated by ID and ITP patients, while maintaining their quality of life, helping to minimise the time spent in outpatient hospital visiting to potentially optimise adherence to treatment.

  1. Method for Extracting Viral Hemagglutination-Inhibiting Antibodies from the Nonspecific Inhibitors of Serum

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, William A.; Mundon, Francis K.; Top, Franklin H.; Russell, Philip K.

    1970-01-01

    Various methods are used to remove nonspecific inhibitors from sera before titering viral hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. These methods have several undesirable features; some are tedious and time-consuming, some remove antibody along with nonspecific inhibitors, and different techniques are usually required to remove the nonspecific inhibitors for different viruses. This communication describes a single method that uses diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex to extract the immunoglobulin G antibodies for several viruses from nonspecific inhibitors. The procedure is fast, simple to perform, and removed the nonspecific inhibitors for influenza, Western equine encephalitis, dengue-2, and rubella viruses. Images PMID:5463576

  2. Fish Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  3. Disordered salivary immunoglobulin secretion and sodium transport in human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, K T; Sullivan, K M; Schubert, M M; Truelove, E L; Shulman, H M; Sale, G E; Morton, T H; Rice, J C; Witherspoon, R P; Storb, R; Thomas, E D

    1983-05-01

    Whole saliva samples and lip biopsies were collected from 12 allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients who developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and from 10 healthy allogeneic and syngeneic recipients without GVHD. Six of ten biopsies from patients with chronic GVHD had lichenoid stomatitis or sialadenitis, or both, with sialodochitis. Seven of nine biopsies from patients free of chronic GVHD were entirely normal, and two had either mild glandular or mucosal changes. Salivary gland involvement in chronic GVHD was associated with decreased or absent levels of salivary IgA and inorganic phosphate, decreased salivary flow rates, and increased concentrations of salivary sodium, albumin, and IgG. The most striking abnormalities were found in patients with histologic evidence of sialadenitis. In contrast, marrow transplant recipients without chronic GVHD had normal salivary immunoglobulin and electrolyte levels. Secretory IgA deficiency may contribute to the frequent sinobronchial infections observed in patients with chronic GVHD.

  4. Biological variation of immunoglobulin concentrations in normal human tears related to age and sex.

    PubMed

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S; Mathur, G P; Saha, K

    1978-06-01

    Single radial immunodiffusion method was used to measure the concentration of IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD in tears of 220 healthy individuals aged from 2 to 86 years. Relation of the values to age and sex has been evaluated statistically by regression analysis method. Mean IgA level was 30.7 mg/100 ml. IgG could be detected in 200 samples and the level was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgM was detected in only 7 samples and the value was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgD could not be detected in any of the sample. The IgA level in males and that in females differs significantly, the females having a higher mean value. The IgA level appears to increase in both sexes with age. No relationship with age and sex could be established in other types of immunoglobulins.

  5. Two ultrastructural distribution patterns of immunoglobulin G in human placenta and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Korteweg, Christine; Qiu, Yamei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Zhengshan; Huang, Guowei; Li, Weiqiu; Gu, Jiang

    2014-11-01

    The placenta is known to protect the fetus from infection and maternal rejection. In a previous study, we demonstrated that placental trophoblasts can synthesize immunoglobulin G (IgG). In this study, we investigated the distribution of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, and IgA), IgG receptors (FcRn and FcgammaRIII), and complement proteins in placental trophoblasts at the ultrastructural level. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of IgG1 heavy chain (IGHG1), recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1), RAG2, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) with nested RT-PCR in primary cultured trophoblasts. The mRNA transcripts of IGHG1, RAG1, RAG2, and AID were all identified in primary trophoblasts, further establishing the IgG-producing capacity of trophoblasts. At the ultrastructural level with colloidal gold-labeled antibodies, IgG was found to be distributed in two distinct locations in syncytiotrophoblasts. For one, it was colocalized with FcRn in endosome displaying low electron density, and for the other it was colocalized with complement C1q in medium-electron density irregular structures that have not been reported previously. This characteristic distribution suggests that IgG is likely processed through two molecular mechanisms in syncytiotrophoblasts: receptor-bound transportation across the syncytiotrophoblast and formation of immune complexes with locally produced IgG. The latter mechanism is probably aimed at neutralizing detrimental maternal anti-paternal major histocompatibility complex antibodies. Our findings support the hypothesis that placenta-produced IgG can selectively react with maternal anti-fetus antibodies and provide a mechanism of fetomaternal tolerance to protect the fetus from maternal immune rejection.

  6. Anti-Human Platelet Antigen-1a Immunoglobulin G Preparation Intended to Prevent Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ying-Jan; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Björn; Kjaer, Mette; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a severe disease that is caused by maternal alloantibodies generated during pregnancy or at delivery as a result of incompatibility between maternal and fetal human platelet antigens (HPAs) inherited from the father. Antibody-mediated immune suppression using anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulins is thought to be able to prevent FNAIT caused by HPA-1a. A fractionation process to prepare anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) from human plasma was therefore developed. Anti-HPA-1a plasma was obtained from volunteer mothers who underwent alloimmunization against HPA-1a during a previous pregnancy. Plasma was cryoprecipitated and the supernatant treated with caprylic acid and solvent/detergent (S/D), purified by chromatography, nanofiltered, concentrated, and sterile-filtered. The anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin fraction was characterized for purity and safety. PAK12 and quantitative monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assays were used to detect anti-HPA-1a IgG. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) removal during nanofiltration was assessed by spiking experiments, using cell culture-derived reporter HCV and luciferase analysis. The caprylic acid treatment precipitated non-Ig proteins yielding a 90% pure Ig supernatant. S-HyperCel chromatography of the S/D-treated supernatant followed by HyperCel STAR AX provided high IgG recovery (>80%) and purity (>99.5%), and efficient IgA and IgM removal. Concentrations of complement factors C3 and C4 were < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/dL, respectively. The final IgG could be nanofiltered on Planova 20N under conditions removing more than 3 log HCV infectivity to baseline mock infection level, and concentrated to ca. 30 g/L. Proteolytic activity and thrombin generation were low in the final fraction. The Pak12 and MAIPA assays showed good recovery of anti-HPA-1a throughout the process. Clinical-grade HPA-1a IgG can be prepared using a process compliant with current quality requirements

  7. Defensins, Lectins, Mucins and Secretory Immunoglobulin A: Microbe-Binding Biomolecules that Contribute to Mucosal Immunity in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors – enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A – that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes. PMID:27841019

  8. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  9. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral human immunoglobulin for gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Handen, Benjamin L; Melmed, Raun D; Hansen, Robin L; Aman, Michael G; Burnham, David L; Bruss, Jon B; McDougle, Christopher J

    2009-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI symptoms. Endpoint analysis revealed no significant differences across treatment groups on a modified global improvement scale (validated in irritable bowel syndrome studies), number of daily bowel movements, days of constipation, or severity of problem behaviors. IGOH was well-tolerated; there were no serious adverse events. This study demonstrates the importance of conducting rigorous trials in children with autism and casts doubt on one GI mechanism presumed to exert etiological and/or symptomatic effects in this population.

  10. Successful clearance of human parainfluenza virus type 2 viraemia with intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulin in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kalimuddin, Shirin; Sessions, October M; Hou, Yan'An; Ooi, Eng Eong; Sim, David; Cumaraswamy, Sivathasan; Tan, Teing Ee; Lai, Siang Hui; Low, Chian Yong

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) infection as an aetiology of acute viral myocarditis is rare, with only few cases reported in the literature to date. Here we report a case of fulminant HPIV-2 myocarditis in a 47 year-old man with viraemia who was successfully treated with intravenous ribavirin and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). There are currently no recommendations on the treatment of HPIV myocarditis. We are, to our knowledge, the first to report a patient with a documented HPIV-2 viraemia that subsequently cleared after the initiation of antiviral therapy. Although it is difficult to definitively attribute the patient's clinical improvement to ribavirin or IVIG alone, our case does suggest that clinicians may wish to consider initiating ribavirin and IVIG in patients with HPIV myocarditis and persistent viraemia not responding to supportive measures alone.

  11. Rotavirus specific plasma secretory immunoglobulin in children with acute gastroenteritis and children vaccinated with an attenuated human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Daniel; Vásquez, Camilo; Corthésy, Blaise; Franco, Manuel A; Angel, Juana

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV)–specific secretory immunoglobulin (RV-SIg) has been previously detected in serum of naturally RV infected children and shown to reflect the intestinal Ig immune response. Total plasma SIgA and plasma RV-SIg were evaluated by ELISA in children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV infection and in 50 children vaccinated with the attenuated RIX4414 human RV vaccine and 62 placebo recipients. RV-SIg was only detected in children with evidence of previous RV infection or with acute RV gastroenteritis. Vaccinees had higher RV-SIg titers than placebo recipients and RV-SIg titers increased after the second vaccine dose. RV-SIg measured after the second dose correlated with protection when vaccinees and placebo recipients were analyzed jointly. RV-SIg may serve as a valuable correlate of protection for RV vaccines. PMID:23839157

  12. Cloning of size-selected human immunoglobulin heavy-chain rearrangements from third complementarity-determining region fingerprint profiles.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, F M; Tami, J; Sanz, I E

    1996-01-01

    Methods have been developed to rapidly visualize the size distribution of third complementarity-determining regions (CDR3) in immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) molecules. DNA fragments spanning the Ig or TCR CDR3 are generated by PCR using primers at fixed positions in the variable and constant segments. These fragments differ in length due to size variation of the CDR3s. Visualization of the amplification products in polyacrylamide gels as a "CDR3 fingerprint profile" is a rough measure for the complexity of the Ig and TCR antigen-binding specificities. We report an adaptation of this method for the analysis of human Ig heavy-chain genes that incorporates silver staining, which allows for the fine analysis of specific regions of the profiles. This is especially useful for the study of low-abundant transcripts.

  13. Human-specific evolution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Guethlein, Lisbeth A

    2012-03-19

    In placental mammals, natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphocytes that make unique contributions to immune defence and reproduction, functions essential for survival of individuals, populations and species. Modulating these functions are conserved and variable NK-cell receptors that recognize epitopes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In humans, for example, recognition of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the CD94:NKG2A receptor is conserved, whereas recognition of HLA-A, B and C by the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is diversified. Competing demands of the immune and reproductive systems, and of T-cell and NK-cell immunity-combined with the segregation on different chromosomes of variable NK-cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands-drive an unusually rapid evolution that has resulted in unprecedented levels of species specificity, as first appreciated from comparison of mice and humans. Counterparts to human KIR are present only in simian primates. Observed in these species is the coevolution of KIR and the four MHC class I epitopes to which human KIR recognition is restricted. Unique to hominids is the emergence of the MHC-C locus as a supplier of specialized and superior ligands for KIR. This evolutionary trend is most highly elaborated in the chimpanzee. Unique to the human KIR locus are two groups of KIR haplotypes that are present in all human populations and subject to balancing selection. Group A KIR haplotypes resemble chimpanzee KIR haplotypes and are enriched for genes encoding KIR that bind HLA class I, whereas group B KIR haplotypes are enriched for genes encoding receptors with diminished capacity to bind HLA class I. Correlating with their balance in human populations, B haplotypes favour reproductive success, whereas A haplotypes favour successful immune defence. Evolution of the B KIR haplotypes is thus unique to the human species.

  14. Suppressant effect of human or equine rabies immunoglobulins on the immunogenicity of post-exposure rabies vaccination under the 2-1-1 regimen: a field trial in Indonesia. MAS054 Clinical Investigator Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.; Simanjuntak, G. H.; Soerjosembodo, S.; Koesharyono, C.

    1998-01-01

    WHO's reference protocol for post-exposure rabies vaccination advises five intramuscular injections on days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 30; in addition, rabies immunoglobulins (RIG) must be given to serious cases of exposure (grade III severity). Some studies indicate that these immunoglobulins suppress the immunogenicity of rabies vaccine when administered according to an alternative protocol of four injections (2-1-1) on days 0, 7, and 21, which was therefore not recommended for grade III exposures. To test this effect, we conducted a multicentre study in Indonesia using three groups of subjects. One group received only the Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV, Verorab, usual commercial lot) according to the 2-1-1 schedule. The second and third groups received the same schedule of PVRV, plus either equine rabies immunoglobulins (ERIG, 40 IU/kg body weight) or human rabies immunoglobulins (HRIG, 20 IU/kg body weight). Our results confirmed the immunoglobulin suppressant effect, which was more pronounced with human than equine immunoglobulins. In both groups receiving immunoglobulins, the seroconversion rates did not reach 100% on day 28 and the geometric mean antibody titre was lower. Thus, WHO's recommendation in 1992 of the reference protocol plus immunoglobulins for severe cases is substantiated by these results in Indonesian subjects. If the 2-1-1 regimen is chosen by the treating physician and immunoglobulins are indicated, preference should be given to purified equine RIG, which also costs less than human RIG. PMID:9868840

  15. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-08

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  16. Identification of Candida albicans antigens reactive with immunoglobulin E antibody of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, A; Homma, M; Torii, S; Tanaka, K

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans antigens which reacted with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies of 57 allergic patients were detected by immunoblotting. Of the various antigens, the 175-, 125-, 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigenic components reacted most frequently with the patient sera. To purify the major antigens, C. albicans cells were fractionated. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, but the 175- and 125-kDa antigens were not recovered in any fraction. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were purified from cytoplasmic fractions by DEAE and P11 ion-exchange chromatography. Antigens were isolated by cutting bands out of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The purified components confirmed by immunoblotting were next processed for amino acid sequencing. Parts of the sequences of the 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens had significant levels of homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolytic enzyme enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and aldolase, respectively. Rabbit IgG antibodies prepared against the 46- and 43-kDa antigens strongly cross-reacted with the homologous proteins of S. cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase did not cross-react with IgE of patient sera. This result suggests that IgE antibodies against only small parts of their epitopes are elevated in the allergic patients. Since enolase is reported to be a major antigen for systemic candidiasis, this enzyme may be the immunodominant protein in both allergies and fungal infections. Images PMID:1548078

  17. Normal human immunoglobulin G4 is bispecific: it has two different antigen-combining sites.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, J; Van Ree, R; Perdok, G J; Van Doorn, H R; Tan, K Y; Aalberse, R C

    1999-08-01

    Unlike other immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses, IgG4 antibodies in plasma have been reported to be functionally monovalent. In this paper we show that the apparent monovalency of circulating IgG4 is caused by asymmetry of plasma IgG4. A large fraction of plasma IgG4 molecules have two different antigen-binding sites, resulting in bispecificity. Sera from patients with IgG4 antibodies to both house dust mite and grass pollen induced cross-linking of Sepharose-bound grass pollen antigen to radiolabelled house dust mite allergen Der p I. This bispecific binding activity was not observed in sera with IgG4 antibodies to either grass pollen or house dust mite exclusively. Depletion of IgG4 antibodies resulted in disappearance of the bispecific activity. By size exclusion chromatography we excluded the possibility that bispecific activity was caused by aggregation of IgG4 antibodies. These results indicate that circulating (polyclonal) IgG4 antibodies have two different antigen-binding sites and therefore are functionally monovalent antibodies.

  18. Brain bioavailability of human intravenous immunoglobulin and its transport through the murine blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    St-Amour, Isabelle; Paré, Isabelle; Alata, Wael; Coulombe, Katherine; Ringuette-Goulet, Cassandra; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Vandal, Milène; Soulet, Denis; Bazin, Renée; Calon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is currently evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of various disorders of the central nervous system. To assess its capacity to reach central therapeutic targets, the brain bioavailability of IVIg must be determined. We thus quantified the passage of IVIg through the blood–brain barrier (BBB) of C57Bl/6 mice using complementary quantitative and qualitative methodologies. As determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a small proportion of systemically injected IVIg was detected in the brain of mice (0.009±0.001% of injected dose in the cortex) whereas immunostaining revealed localization mainly within microvessels and less frequently in neurons. Pharmacokinetic analyses evidenced a low elimination rate constant (0.0053  per hour) in the cortex, consistent with accumulation within cerebral tissue. In situ cerebral perfusion experiments revealed that a fraction of IVIg crossed the BBB without causing leakage. A dose-dependent decrease of brain uptake was consistent with a saturable blood-to-brain transport mechanism. Finally, brain uptake of IVIg after a subchronic treatment was similar in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease compared with nontransgenic controls. In summary, our results provide evidence of BBB passage and bioavailability of IVIg into the brain in the absence of BBB leakage and in sufficient concentration to interact with the therapeutic targets. PMID:24045402

  19. Human malignant T cells capable of inducing an immunoglobulin class switch

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the existence of a "switch" T cell derived from a patient with mycosis fungoides/Sezary's syndrome. The serum immunoglobulin profile in this patient revealed high IgG and IgA but no detectable IgM. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from this patient secreted only IgG and IgA in the presence of pokeweed mitogen. T cells (Trac) co-cultured with normal allogeneic non-T cells and pokeweed mitogen resulted in only IgG and IgA PFC, with little or no IgM secretion. There was no evidence of active suppression of IgM. Rather, these T cells appeared to induce an Ig class switch from IgM to IgG and IgA, when co-cultured with mu+ tonsillar B cells. Further evidence was obtained using mononuclear cells derived from a patient with immunodeficiency and hyper-IgM, a syndrome characterized by a lack of IgG and IgA secretion. The addition of Trac cells to either peripheral blood mononuclear cells or non-T cells from a patient with hyper-IgM syndrome resulted in new secretion of IgG, with a concomitant decrease in IgM secretion, whereas control T cells were not effective in inducing secretion of any isotype other than IgM. Isolated Tac+ T cells from Trac appear to be responsible for this effect. PMID:2981951

  20. A study of immunoglobulin classes present on the membrane and in the cytoplasm of human tonsil plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M; Viale, G; Risso, A; Pernis, B

    1976-08-01

    The problem of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing plasma cells expressed membrane Ig has been investigated using cells from human tonsils. In tonsils, IgG-containing cells are predominant, but a certain number of IgM, IgA and IgD-containing cells are also present. By using a double staining immunofluorescent technique for the simultaneous detection of membrane and intracytoplasmic Ig, it has been possible to ascertain that the large majority of IgA, IgM and IgD-containing cells had membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) of a class coincident with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. In addition a noticeable proportion of IgM-containing cells expressed membrane IgD, thus indicating that a certain number of these cells bore both membrane IgM and IgD. About 60% of IgG-containing cells had membrane IgG, while the remaining cells did not express mIg. Furthermore the surface staining of these cells was generally fainter than that of the cells containing other Ig classes. Experiments on the surface light chain type expressed by the single Ig-containing cells (IgCC) as compared to that found in the cytoplasm have shown that in the large majority of IgCC the light chain type of mIg coincided with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. Discordant light chain types of membrane and cytoplasmic Ig were found on about 12% of IgCC only. These values can be taken as a measure of how many IgCC had passively acquired mIg.

  1. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Survival and digestibility of orally-administered immunoglobulin preparations containing IgG through the gastrointestinal tract in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasion, Victoria S; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-03-07

    Oral immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations are prime examples of medicinal nutrition from natural sources. Plasma products containing Ig have been used for decades in animal feed for intestinal disorders to mitigate the damaging effects of early weaning. These preparations reduce overall mortality and increase feed utilization in various animal species leading to improved growth. Oral administration of Ig preparations from human serum as well as bovine colostrum and serum have been tested and proven to be safe as well as effective in human clinical trials for a variety of enteric microbial infections and other conditions which cause diarrhea. In infants, children, and adults, the amount of intact IgG recovered in stool ranges from trace amounts up to 25% of the original amount ingested. It is generally understood that IgG can only bind to antigens within the GI tract if the Fab structure is intact and has not been completely denatured through acidic pH or digestive proteolytic enzymes. This is a comprehensive review of human studies regarding the survivability of orally-administered Ig preparations, with a focus on IgG. This review also highlights various biochemical studies on IgG which potentially explain which structural elements are responsible for increased stability against digestion.

  3. Highly sensitive detection of cancer antigen human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 using novel chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Yang, Yiheng; Wang, Lifen; Lv, Li; Zhu, Jie; Han, Wenqi; Wang, Enxia; Guo, Xin; Zhen, Yuhong

    2015-05-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an important biomarker that plays a crucial role in therapeutic decision-making for breast cancer patients. Ensuring the accuracy and reproducibility of HER2 assays by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) requires high sensitive and specific antibodies. Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is a kind of avian antibody usually isolated from chicken egg yolks. Generation and use of IgY is of increasing interest in a wide variety of applications within the life sciences. In this study, IgY antibodies against two different truncated proteins of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human HER2 were produced, their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Specific IgYs were produced by hens immunized with the ECD proteins of human HER2 in long-standing immunization response and were isolated from yolks with a purity of 90% by water dilution, salt precipitations and ultrafiltration. The anti-HER2 IgYs were analytically validated for specificity by ELISA, western blot, immunocytochemistry and IHC. The IgYs bound desired targets in cells and fixed tissues and showed high affinity to HER2. The results demonstrated the viability of detection of HER2 with IgYs and showed promise for the using of IgYs in strict clinical validation.

  4. Human immunoglobulin inhibits liver transduction by AAV vectors at low AAV2 neutralizing titers in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Ciaran D; Jiang, Haiyan; Liu, Tongyao; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Sommer, Jurg M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2006-03-01

    Long-term cures of hemophilia B have been achieved using AAV2 delivering the factor IX gene to the liver of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-naive hemophilic animals. However, the clinical success of this approach requires overcoming pre-existing AAV neutralizing antibodies prevalent in humans. To better define the inhibition of neutralizing antibodies on AAV2-mediated liver transduction, we developed an in vivo passive immunity model. SCID mice were first reconstituted to a defined neutralizing titer with pooled plasma-derived human immunoglobulin. AAV2-FIX vectors then were administered to the liver, and the transduction efficiency was measured by plasma FIX levels. Unexpectedly, AAV2 neutralizing titers lower than 1:10 were sufficient to neutralize 4 to 20 x 10(12) vg/kg of AAV2 vectors in vivo, a capacity that was underestimated by in vitro neutralizing assays. We also evaluated strategies to evade neutralization, including the use of alternative delivery routes, infusion parameters, empty capsids, and alternative AAV serotypes 6 and 8. The results indicate that low AAV2 neutralizing titers can be inhibitory to the tested human and primate AAV vectors delivered into the circulatory system. Therefore, novel nonprimate AAV vectors or compartmentalized delivery may offer more consistent therapeutic effects in the presence of pre-existing AAV neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Application of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate to the measurement of the nonspecific binding of drugs to human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    McLure, James A; Birkett, Donald J; Elliot, David J; Williams, J Andrew; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2011-09-01

    The fluorescence of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) in the presence of human liver microsomes (HLMs) is altered by drugs that bind nonspecifically to the lipid bilayer. The present study characterized the relationship between the nonspecific binding (NSB) of drugs to HLMs as measured by equilibrium dialysis and the magnitude of the change in baseline ANS fluorescence. Fraction unbound in incubations of HLMs (f(u(mic))) was determined for 16 drugs (12 bases, 3 acids, and 1 neutral) with log P values in the range 0.1 to 6.7 at three concentrations (100, 200, and 500 μM). Changes in ANS fluorescence induced by each of the drugs in the presence of HLMs were measured by spectrofluorometry. Values of f(u(mic)) determined by equilibrium dialysis ranged from 0.08 to 1.0. Although NSB of the basic drugs tended to increase with increasing log P, exceptions occurred. Basic drugs generally caused an increase in ANS fluorescence, whereas the acidic and neutral drugs resulted in a decrease in ANS fluorescence. There were highly significant (p < 0.001) linear relationships between the modulus (absolute value) of the increment/decrement in ANS fluorescence and both f(u(mic)) (r = 0.90 to 0.96) and log(1 - f(u(mic))/f(u(mic))) (r = 0.85 to 0.92) at the three drug concentrations. Agreement between measured f(u(mic)) and that predicted by ANS fluorescence was very good (<10% variance) for a validation set of six compounds. The ANS fluorescence method provides an accurate measure of the NSB of drugs to HLMs. Physicochemical determinants other than log P and charge type influence the NSB of drugs to HLMs.

  6. Antigen Detection in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Using Secretory Immunoglobulin A Antibodies Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, H. A.; Gavilanes-Parra, S.; Chavez-Berrocal, E.; Navarro-Ocaña, A.; Cravioto, A.

    2000-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produces a characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion in the small intestines of infected children. The immune response to EPEC infection remains poorly characterized. The molecular targets that elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease are unknown. In this study protein antigens from EPEC were identified using secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) antibodies isolated from milk from Mexican women by Western blot analysis. Purified sIgA antibodies, which inhibit the adherence of EPEC to cells, reacted to many EPEC proteins, the most prominent of which were intimin (a 94-kDa outer membrane protein) and two unknown proteins with apparent molecular masses of 80 and 70 kDa. A culture supernatant protein of 110 kDa also reacted strongly with the sIgA antibodies. The molecular size of this protein and its reactivity with specific anti-EspC antiserum suggest that it is EPEC-secreted protein C (EspC). These EPEC surface protein antigens were consistently recognized by all the different sIgA samples obtained from 15 women. Screening of clinical isolates of various O serogroups from cases of severe infantile diarrhea revealed that all EPEC strains able to produce the A/E lesion showed expression of intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins. Such proteins reacted strongly with the purified sIgA pool. Moreover, nonvirulent E. coli strains were unable to generate a sIgA response. The immunogenic capacities of the 80- and 70-kDa proteins as virulence antigens have not been previously reported. The strong sIgA response to intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins obtained in this study indicates that such antigens stimulate intestinal immune responses and may elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease. PMID:10948121

  7. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), and adults (20-60 years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age.

  8. Effect of age on immunoglobulin content and volume of human labial gland saliva.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Joshipura, K; Kent, R; Taubman, M A

    1992-12-01

    Stimulated lower labial (LLGF) and parotid salivary volumes and IgG, IgA, and IgM concentrations were measured in 264 subjects whose ages ranged from 17 to 76 years. A significant (p < 0.001) age-related decline in LLGF output was observed for subjects over this age range. Sixty-three percent of the subjects in the 18-20-year-old group (n = 46) secreted at least 10 microL of labial saliva in a 7-10-minute period, while approximately 70% of the subjects in the two oldest groups (61-70 and 71-76 years old) secreted less than 1 microL of LLGF during this time period (n = 64). No significant gender-based differences occurred in the volumes of labial saliva secreted. Stimulated parotid salivary flow showed no age-related trend in these subjects. Lower labial gland salivary IgA concentrations in an older population (mean age +/- SD = 55.6 yr +/- 1.3) were significantly lower (p < 0.025) than IgA concentrations in a younger population (20.7 yr +/- 0.8), when IgA was expressed as microgram/mL LLGF collected. Immunoglobulin A concentrations in parotid saliva and IgG and IgM concentrations in labial and parotid saliva were not significantly different when the two age populations were compared. These data suggest that the physiological and immunological potential of labial gland saliva may decrease with age.

  9. Use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin in HIV type 1-infected children (Pediatric AIDS clinical trials group protocol 273).

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Fletcher, C V; Mofenson, L M; Palumbo, P E; Kang, M; Fenton, T; Sapan, C V; Meyer, W A; Shearer, W T; Hawkins, E; Fowler, M G; Bouquin, P; Purdue, L; Sloand, E M; Nemo, G J; Wara, D; Bryson, Y J; Starr, S E; Petru, A; Burchett, S

    2000-02-01

    The clinical, immunologic, and virologic effects and the pharmacokinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were assessed in 30 HIV-infected children aged 2-11 years. All had moderately advanced disease with an immune complex-dissociated (ICD) p24 antigen >70 pg/mL and were on stable antiviral therapy. Three groups of 10 children received 6 monthly infusions of 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg of HIVIG, and serial immunologic and virologic assays were performed. HIVIG doses as high as 800 mg/kg were safe and well tolerated. The half-life of HIVIG, determined by serial p24 antibody titers, was 13-16 days, the volume of distribution was 102-113 mL/kg, and clearance was 5.6-6.0 mL/kg/day. Plasma ICD p24 decreased during the infusions, but CD4 cell levels, plasma RNA copy number, cellular virus, immunoglobulin levels, and neutralizing antibody titers were minimally affected by the infusions. Clinical status did not change during the 6-month infusion and 3-month follow-up periods.

  10. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew J; Macdonald, Lynn E; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T; Poueymirou, William T; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D

    2014-04-08

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials.

  11. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Macdonald, Lynn E.; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T.; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T.; Poueymirou, William T.; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M.; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials. PMID:24706856

  12. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins interact with human complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, FHR-1, and C4BP.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Silva, Ludmila Bezerra da; Monaris, Denize; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima; Strobel, Stefanie; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2012-03-15

    Leptospira, the causative agent of leptospirosis, interacts with several host molecules, including extracellular matrix components, coagulation cascade proteins, and human complement regulators. Here we demonstrate that acquisition of factor H (FH) on the Leptospira surface is crucial for bacterial survival in the serum and that these spirochetes, besides interacting with FH, FH related-1, and C4b binding protein (C4BP), also acquire FH like-1 from human serum. We also demonstrate that binding to these complement regulators is mediated by leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins, previously shown to interact with fibronectin, laminin, collagen, elastin, tropoelastin, and fibrinogen. Factor H binds to Lig proteins via short consensus repeat domains 5 and 20. Competition assays suggest that FH and C4BP have distinct binding sites on Lig proteins. Moreover, FH and C4BP bound to immobilized Ligs display cofactor activity, mediating C3b and C4b degradation by factor I. In conclusion, Lig proteins are multifunctional molecules, contributing to leptospiral adhesion and immune evasion.

  13. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  14. Precise determination of the diversity of a combinatorial antibody library gives insight into the human immunoglobulin repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Jacob; Zhai, Wenwu; Berka, Jan; Telman, Dilduz; Huerta, Gabriella; Mehta, Gautam R.; Ni, Irene; Mei, Li; Sundar, Purnima D.; Day, Giles M. R.; Cox, David; Rajpal, Arvind; Pons, Jaume

    2009-01-01

    Antibody repertoire diversity, potentially as high as 1011 unique molecules in a single individual, confounds characterization by conventional sequence analyses. In this study, we present a general method for assessing human antibody sequence diversity displayed on phage using massively parallel pyrosequencing, a novel application of Kabat column-labeled profile Hidden Markov Models, and translated complementarity determining region (CDR) capture-recapture analysis. Pyrosequencing of domain amplicon and RCA PCR products generated 1.5 × 106 reads, including more than 1.9 × 105 high quality, full-length sequences of antibody variable fragment (Fv) variable domains. Novel methods for germline and CDR classification and fine characterization of sequence diversity in the 6 CDRs are presented. Diverse germline contributions to the repertoire with random heavy and light chain pairing are observed. All germline families were found to be represented in 1.7 × 104 sequences obtained from repeated panning of the library. While the most variable CDR (CDR-H3) presents significant length and sequence variability, we find a substantial contribution to total diversity from somatically mutated germline encoded CDRs 1 and 2. Using a capture-recapture method, the total diversity of the antibody library obtained from a human donor Immunoglobulin M (IgM) pool was determined to be at least 3.5 × 1010. The results provide insights into the role of IgM diversification, display library construction, and productive germline usages in antibody libraries and the humoral repertoire. PMID:19875695

  15. Capture of flowing human neutrophils by immobilised immunoglobulin: roles of Fc-receptors CD16 and CD32.

    PubMed

    Skilbeck, Christopher A; Lu, Xiaomei; Sheikh, Sajila; Savage, Caroline O S; Nash, Gerard B

    2006-05-01

    We investigated capture and activation of flowing human neutrophils through their Fc-receptors, FcRgammaIIIB (CD16) and FcRgammaIIA (CD32). Immobilised platelets bearing murine monoclonal antibody against glycoprotein IIbIIIA were able to capture and activate flowing neutrophils. The activation response was inhibited by antibody blockade of neutrophil CD32. However, capture only occurred efficiently at wall shear stress below 0.1 Pa if platelet P-selectin was blocked. If neutrophils were perfused over immobilised human IgG, many adhered at 0.025 or 0.05 Pa, but not at 0.1 Pa. Adhesion was reduced by blockade of CD16 or CD32, but blockade of CD16 had the greater effect. When neutrophils were perfused over a combination of purified P-selectin and IgG, blockade of CD16 and CD32 inhibited activation of captured cells. Immunoglobulin deposited in tissue could capture and activate slow-flowing neutrophils. It might also potentiate inflammatory responses at higher stress if presented along with selectins. The dominant FcR for capture of neutrophils was CD16, but with murine antibody, CD32 played a greater role.

  16. A radiolabeled antiglobulin assay to identify human cervical mucus immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG antisperm antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, G.G. Jr.; D'Cruz, O.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Antisperm immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG antibodies in human cervical mucus (CM) were identified by a radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. Cervical mucus samples from fertile and infertile women were exposed to a 1:3,200 dilution of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), and 5 micrograms of the solubilized CM protein were assayed for the presence of IgA and IgG antisperm and anti-Candida activity by the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. Purified human secretory IgA and IgG exposed to 2-ME retained the molecular integrity and functional activity of the untreated antibody molecules. CM aliquots collected after high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation were assessed for antisperm antibody activity; antisperm antibody activity was retained in the appropriate IgA or IgG CM fractions. The incidence of CM antisperm antibodies was minimally affected when the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay was performed with a motile sperm population. Approximately 70% of the CM IgA antisperm antibodies were of the IgA1 subclass; CM IgG was primarily of the IgG4 subclass. When Candida antigen was substituted for sperm in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay, the CM antisperm antibodies were found to be exclusively sperm-specific. These data indicate that the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay using 2-ME to extract CM antibodies is a specific method for the assay of antisperm antibodies in CM.

  17. Association of respiratory complications and elevated serum immunoglobulins with drinking water arsenic toxicity in human.

    PubMed

    Islam, Laila N; Nabi, A H M Nurun; Rahman, M Mahfuzur; Zahid, M Shamim H

    2007-10-01

    We assessed the relationship between chronic arsenic exposure through drinking water with respiratory complications and humoral immune response by measuring serum immunoglobulin profiles in the affected subjects (arsenicosis patients) living in the arsenic endemic rural villages of Bangladesh. The duration of exposure was determined through detailed history of the patients (n=125) and the levels of arsenic in the drinking water and urine samples were determined. The mean duration of exposure in the patients was 7.4+/-5.3 y, and the levels of arsenic in the drinking water and urine samples were 216+/-211 and 223+/-302 micro g/L, respectively, compared to 11+/-20 and 29+/-19 microg/L, respectively, in the unexposed subjects. There was high prevalence of respiratory complications like breathing problems including chest sound, asthma, bronchitis and cough associated with drinking water arsenic toxicity. Arsenicosis patients had significantly elevated levels of IgG (P<0.001) and IgE (P<0.001) while the levels of IgA were also significantly higher (P<0.005) but IgM were similar to that of the control subjects. Analysis of the clinical symptoms based on skin manifestations showed the levels of both IgG and IgE were significantly elevated during the initial stages while IgE were further elevated with the duration of arsenic exposure. Arsenicosis patients with respiratory complications had mean serum IgE levels of 706+/-211 IU/mL compared to 542+/-241 IU/mL in patients without apparent involvement with the respiratory system (P<0.01). The eosinophil counts in the patients did not differ significantly from the unexposed subjects indicating that elevated levels of serum IgE might not be due to allergic diseases, rather it could be due to direct effects of arsenic. We found significant linear relationships between the levels of serum IgE and inorganic phosphorus (P<0.05), and serum IgA levels with urinary excretion of arsenic (P<0.001). These observations suggested that

  18. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  19. A phagocytosis assay for oxidized low-density lipoprotein versus immunoglobulin G-coated microbeads in human U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vance, David T; Dufresne, Jaimie; Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Tucholska, Monika; Trimble, William; Grinstein, Sergio; Marshall, John G

    2016-05-01

    The human monocyte cell line U937 was differentiated into an adherent macrophage phenotype using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to assay the phagocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) that may play a role in atherosclerosis. Microbeads were coated with the inflammatory ligand oxLDL to create a novel phagocytosis assay that models the binding of macrophages to oxLDL in the solid phase such as found in the fatty streaks of the arteries. The oxLDL was prepared with LDL from human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma oxidized with an excess (5 mM) of the strong oxidizing agent CuSO4 and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blot. The binding of the oxLDL to the beads was confirmed by DilC18-oxLDL staining and confocal microscopy in addition to trypsin digestion of the microbeads for liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry. Phagocytosis of the oxLDL versus human bulk immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1)-coated microbeads was assayed over time, in the presence and absence of serum factors, by pulse chase and with enzyme inhibitor treatments. The ligand beads were then stained with specific antibodies to oxLDL versus human IgG to differentially stain external versus engulfed ligand microbeads. The phagocytosis of oxLDL and IgG ligand microbeads was abolished by the actin polymerization inhibitors cytochalasin D and latrunculin. Pharmacological inhibitors of the receptor enzymes JAK, SRC, and PLC prevented both IgG and oxLDL receptor function. In contrast, the function of the oxLDL phagocytic receptor complex was more sensitive to inhibition of PTK2, PKC, and SYK activity.

  20. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  1. Immunoglobulin M-enriched human intravenous immunoglobulins reduce leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and attenuate microvascular perfusion failure in normotensive endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Johannes N; Fertmann, Jan M; Vollmar, Brigitte; Laschke, Matthias W; Jauch, Karl W; Menger, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate potential differences in the efficacy of immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations in patients with sepsis. A recent meta-analysis showed improved survival rates with IgM-enriched Igs. It was the objective of the present study to characterize microcirculatory actions of different clinically used Ig preparations in a rodent endotoxin model by intravital microscopy. Male Syrian golden hamsters 6 to 8 weeks old with a body weight of 60 to 80 g were investigated by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Endotoxemia was induced by administration of 2 mg/kg (i.v.) endotoxin (LPS, Escherichia coli). Two different Ig preparations containing IgM, IgA, and IgG (intravenous IgM group; n = 6; 5 mL Pentaglobin/kg body weight, i.v.) or exclusively IgG (intravenous IgG group; n = 5; 5 mL Flebogamma/kg body weight, i.v.) were applied 5 min before LPS. Saline-treated endotoxemic animals served as controls (control; n = 8). In controls, LPS induced massive leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, pronounced microvascular leakage, a decrease of systemic platelet count, and distinct capillary perfusion failure (P < 0.05). Both intravenous IgM and IgG reduced venular leakage (P< 0.05) and ameliorated the decrease in platelet count (P < 0.05). Of interest, intravenous IgM was capable of significantly (P< 0.05) reducing leukocyte adhesion in venules. This was associated with normalization of capillary perfusion at 24 h of endotoxemia, whereas intravenous IgG could not prevent LPS-mediated microvascular perfusion failure. We demonstrate that IgM-enriched Igs are superior to IgG alone in attenuating LPS-induced leukocytic inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction. Our findings can explain better efficacy of IgM-enriched Igs in patients with severe sepsis.

  2. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia can inhibit the binding of HPA-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Matthew; Lucas, Geoff; Calvert, Anthony; Bendukidze, Nina; Green, Frances; Kotecha, Krishna; Poles, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    A term baby with unexplained thrombocytopenia and a platelet (PLT) count of 14 × 10(9) /L (maternal PLT count was 200 × 10(9) /L) was investigated for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Serologic investigations were performed using the PLT immunofluorescence test (PIFT), monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA), and a bead-based assay (BBA) with maternal sera taken up to 56 days postdelivery. One serum sample was also separated into "immunoglobulin (Ig)M-rich" and "IgM-depleted" fractions and tested for PLT-specific antibodies. The family was genotyped for HPA. HPA-3a-specific IgM antibodies were detected in the PIFT and confirmed in the BBA. PLT-specific IgG HPA-3a antibodies were not detected in the MAIPA assay and BBA in the initial sample but were detected in both techniques in subsequent serum samples. Testing of IgM-rich and IgM-depleted fractions in the MAIPA assay revealed that IgG antibody binding of the IgM-depleted fraction was inhibited by approximately 50% when it was reconstituted with the IgM-rich fraction suggesting that the IgM antibodies blocked the binding of the IgG antibodies. This effect was not observed when the IgM-depleted fraction or untreated serum was diluted with elution buffer. Incompatibility for HPA-3 was identified between the mother and the infant. The infant received one HPA-1a, -5b negative neonatal PLT transfusion, and one random PLT transfusion, with satisfactory outcomes. Both units were later found to be HPA-3b3b. HPA-3a IgM antibodies can inhibit PLT-specific HPA-3a IgG antibodies in the MAIPA assay. © 2017 AABB.

  3. Immunoglobulins from Animal Models of Motor Neuron Disease and from Human Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients Passively Transfer Physiological Abnormalities to the Neuromuscular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Stanley H.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Garcia, Jesus; Stefani, Enrico

    1991-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating human disease of upper and lower motoneurons of unknown etiology. In support of the potential role of autoimmunity in ALS, two immune-mediated animal models of motoneuron disease have been developed that resemble ALS with respect to the loss of motoneurons, the presence of IgG within motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction, and with respect to altered physiology of the motor nerve terminal. To provide direct evidence for the primary role of humoral immunity, passive transfer with immunoglobulins from the two animal models and human ALS was carried out. Mice injected with serum or immunoglobulins from the animal disease models and human ALS but not controls demonstrated IgG in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. The mice also demonstrated an increase in miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency, with normal amplitude and time course and normal resting membrane potential, indicating an increased resting quantal release of acetylcholine from the nerve terminal. The ability to transfer motoneuron dysfunction with serum immunoglobulins provides evidence for autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both the animal models and human ALS.

  4. Cloning and partial nucleotide sequence of human immunoglobulin mu chain cDNA from B cells and mouse-human hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, T W; Devuono, J; Croce, C M

    1980-01-01

    Purified mRNAs coding for mu and kappa human immunoglobulin polypeptides were translated in vitro and their products were characterized. The mu-specific mRNAs, derived from both human lymphoblastoid cells (GM607) and from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid secreting human mu chains (alpha D5-H11-BC11), were copied into cDNAs and inserted into the plasmid pBR322. Several recombinant cDNAs that were obtained were identified by a combination of colony hybridization with labeled probes, in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mu mRNAs, and DNA nucleotide sequence determination. One recombinant DNA, for which the sequence has been partially determined, contains the codons for part of the C3 constant region domain through the carboxy-terminal piece (155 amino acids total) as well as the entire 3' noncoding sequence up to the poly(A) site of the human mu mRNA. The sequence A-A-U-A-A occurs 12 nucleotides prior to the poly(A) addition site in the human mu mRNA. Considerable sequence homology is observed in the mouse and human mu mRNA 3' coding and noncoding sequences. Images PMID:6777778

  5. Exploration of attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration to measure immunoglobulin G in human sera.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; Riley, Christopher B; Mitchell, Cynthia A; Shaw, R Anthony; Bryanton, Janet; Bigsby, Kathryn; McClure, J Trenton

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is crucial for the protection of the host from invasive pathogens. Due to its importance for human health, tools that enable the monitoring of IgG levels are highly desired. Consequently there is a need for methods to determine the IgG concentration that are simple, rapid, and inexpensive. This work explored the potential of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy as a method to determine IgG concentrations in human serum samples. Venous blood samples were collected from adults and children, and from the umbilical cord of newborns. The serum was harvested and tested using ATR infrared spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS) regression provided the basis to develop the new analytical methods. Three PLS calibrations were determined: one for the combined set of the venous and umbilical cord serum samples, the second for only the umbilical cord samples, and the third for only the venous samples. The number of PLS factors was chosen by critical evaluation of Monte Carlo-based cross validation results. The predictive performance for each PLS calibration was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient, scatter plot and Bland-Altman plot, and percent deviations for independent prediction sets. The repeatability was evaluated by standard deviation and relative standard deviation. The results showed that ATR infrared spectroscopy is potentially a simple, quick, and inexpensive method to measure IgG concentrations in human serum samples. The results also showed that it is possible to build a united calibration curve for the umbilical cord and the venous samples.

  6. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  7. A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on the biotin- streptavidin-biotin structure for detection of human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueyun; Zhang, Yihe; Jiang, Liping; Chu, Paul K.; Dong, Yunhui; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A sandwich-type immunosensor is designed and fabricated to detect the human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) using polyaniline and tin dioxide functionalized graphene (GS-SnO2-PAN) as the platform and biotin-functionalized amination magnetic nanoparticles composite (B-Fe3O4@APTES) as the label. GS-SnO2-PAN is used as the sensing agent to capture the primary anti-HIgG (Ab1) and SnO2 reduces the stack of GS. The B-Fe3O4@APTES with a large surface area and excellent biocompatibility captures second antibody (Ab2) efficiently based on the highly selective recognition of streptavidin to biotinylated antibody. The B-Fe3O4@APTES has better electro-catalytic activity in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the “biotin-streptavidin-biotin” (B-SA-B) strategy leads to signal amplification. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor has a wide sensitivity range from 1 pg/L to 10 ng/L and low detection limit of 0.33 pg/L (S/N = 3) for HIgG. The immunosensor has high sensitivity, fast assay rate, as well as good reproducibility, specificity, and stability especially in the quantitative detection of biomolecules in serum samples. PMID:26948273

  8. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  9. The nanoscale spatial organization of B-cell receptors on immunoglobulin M- and G-expressing human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinmin; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Brzostowski, Joseph; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Pierce, Susan K

    2017-02-15

    B-cell activation is initiated by the binding of antigen to the B-cell receptor (BCR). Here we used dSTORM superresolution imaging to characterize the nanoscale spatial organization of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG BCRs on the surfaces of resting and antigen--activated human peripheral blood B-cells. We provide insights into both the fundamental process of antigen-driven BCR clustering and differences in the spatial organization of IgM and IgG BCRs that may contribute to the characteristic differences in the responses of naive and memory B-cells to antigen. We provide evidence that although both IgM and IgG BCRs reside in highly heterogeneous protein islands that vary in size and number of BCR single-molecule localizations, both resting and activated B-cells intrinsically maintain a high -frequency of single isolated BCR localizations, which likely represent BCR monomers. IgG BCRs are more clustered than IgM BCRs on resting cells and form larger protein islands after antigen activation. Small, dense BCR clusters likely formed via protein-protein interactions are present on the surface of resting cells, and antigen activation induces these to come together to form less dense, larger islands, a process likely governed, at least in part, by protein-lipid interactions.

  10. Selectivity evaluation and separation of human immunoglobulin G, Fab and Fc fragments with mixed-mode resins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying-Di; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Shi, Wei; Yao, Shan-Jing; Lin, Dong-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption selectivity is critical important for mixed-mode chromatography with specially-designed ligands. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), Fc and Fab fragments were used in the present work to evaluate adsorption behavior and binding selectivity of four mixed-mode resins with the ligands of 4-mercatoethyl-pyridine (MEP), 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI), 5-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) and tryptophan-5-aminobenzimidazole (W-ABI), respectively. The resins showed an obvious pH-dependent adsorption behavior. High adsorption capacities were found at neutral pH for hIgG, Fc and Fab, and almost no adsorption happened under acidic conditions. An adsorption selectivity index was proposed to evaluate separation efficiency. High specificity of hIgG/Fc was found at pH 8.9 for MEP resin, and for W-ABI resin at pH 8.0 and 8.9. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to evaluate ligand-protein interactions. Finally, the separation of hIgG and Fc (1:1) was optimized with mixed-mode resins, and the best separation performance was obtained with W-ABI-based resin. Loading at pH 8.0 resulted in the flow through of Fc with purity of 90.4% and recovery of 98.8%, while elution at pH 3.6 provided hIgG with purity of 99.7% and recovery of 86.5%.

  11. The nanoscale spatial organization of B-cell receptors on immunoglobulin M– and G–expressing human B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinmin; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Brzostowski, Joseph; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Pierce, Susan K.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell activation is initiated by the binding of antigen to the B-cell receptor (BCR). Here we used dSTORM superresolution imaging to characterize the nanoscale spatial organization of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG BCRs on the surfaces of resting and antigen-­activated human peripheral blood B-cells. We provide insights into both the fundamental process of antigen-driven BCR clustering and differences in the spatial organization of IgM and IgG BCRs that may contribute to the characteristic differences in the responses of naive and memory B-cells to antigen. We provide evidence that although both IgM and IgG BCRs reside in highly heterogeneous protein islands that vary in size and number of BCR single-molecule localizations, both resting and activated B-cells intrinsically maintain a high ­frequency of single isolated BCR localizations, which likely represent BCR monomers. IgG BCRs are more clustered than IgM BCRs on resting cells and form larger protein islands after antigen activation. Small, dense BCR clusters likely formed via protein–protein interactions are present on the surface of resting cells, and antigen activation induces these to come together to form less dense, larger islands, a process likely governed, at least in part, by protein–lipid interactions. PMID:27974642

  12. Molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic approaches to study the interaction between antibacterial drug and human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Min, Suotian; Liu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Shengrui

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) were performed by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods. The interaction mechanism was firstly predicted through molecular modeling that confirmed the interaction between SMX and HIgG. The binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures had been calculated according to the Stern-Volmer, Scatchard, Sips and Van 't Hoff equations, respectively. Experimental results showed that the fluorescence intensity of HIgG was quenched by the gradual addition of SMX. The binding constants of SMX with HIgG decreased with the increase of temperature, which meant that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. Meanwhile, the results also confirmed that there was one independent class of binding site on HIgG for SMX during their interaction. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, namely standard enthalpy ΔH(0) and entropy ΔS(0), had been calculated to be -14.69 kJ·mol(-1) and 22.99 J·mol(-1) ·K(-1), respectively, which suggested that the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the SMX-HIgG complex. Furthermore, experimental results obtained from three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirmed that the conformational structure of HIgG was altered in the presence of SMX.

  13. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  14. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen-C genes in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ozgur; Musabak, Ugur; Yesillik, Sait; Sagkan, Rahsan I; Pekel, Aysel; Demirel, Fevzi; Baysan, Abdullah; Selçuk, Ali; Güleç, Mustafa; Şener, Osman

    2016-11-01

    We aimed herein to investigate the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C alleles in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and to reveal their differences from those in healthy population. In all, 18 patients who have been diagnosed with CVID and 15 living donors of kidney transplant recipients were enrolled in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing method was used in molecular genetic analysis. The frequencies of the genes in the study groups were statistically compared with each other using chi-square or Fisher exact tests, whichever were appropriate. Although there was no significant difference between both study groups with respect to distribution of KIR and HLA-C2 group genes, HLA-Cw7 allele frequency in patients with CVID was significantly lower than that in healthy population (P = 0.008). This present study results support that HLA-Cw7 allele, an inhibitor of KIR ligand, may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVID.

  15. Characterization of upFc, a fragment of human immunoglobulin G1 produced by pepsin in urea.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, D M; Hofmann, T; Connell, G E

    1976-01-01

    The digestion of human IgG1/K myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments that differ from those produced by aqueous peptic digestion, and from other characteristic immunoglobulin fragments. Fb'2, the larger urea/pepsin fragment, was previously shown to consist of the constant regions of the light chains, and the CH1 domains and hinge regions of the heavy chains. The smaller fragment, upFc, has now been characterized. After reduction, three peptides were released from fragment upFc. Amino acid sequencing, N- and C-terminal determinations and amino acid compositions have enabled these peptides to be identified as residues Ile-253 to Leu-306, residues Thr-307 to Asp-376 and residues Thr-411 to Gly-446 of the heavy chain. Fragment upFc therefore contains the entire Fc region, beginning at residue Ile-253, except for a 34-residue section from within the CH3-domain disulphide loop. Peptic digestion of IgG1/K proteins in 8M-urea therefore provides a method for isolating from gamma1 heavy chains five homogeneous peptides in good yield, which account for almost the entire constant region. Characterization of fragments Fb'2 and upFc has shown that the action of pepsin in urea is entirely different from that of aqueous pepsin. Two gamma1 heavy chains have been shown to differ in sequence at three positions from the sequence reported for protein Eu. PMID:791267

  16. Characterization of upFc, a fragment of human immunoglobulin G1 produced by pepsin in urea.

    PubMed

    Parr, D M; Hofmann, T; Connell, G E

    1976-09-01

    The digestion of human IgG1/K myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments that differ from those produced by aqueous peptic digestion, and from other characteristic immunoglobulin fragments. Fb'2, the larger urea/pepsin fragment, was previously shown to consist of the constant regions of the light chains, and the CH1 domains and hinge regions of the heavy chains. The smaller fragment, upFc, has now been characterized. After reduction, three peptides were released from fragment upFc. Amino acid sequencing, N- and C-terminal determinations and amino acid compositions have enabled these peptides to be identified as residues Ile-253 to Leu-306, residues Thr-307 to Asp-376 and residues Thr-411 to Gly-446 of the heavy chain. Fragment upFc therefore contains the entire Fc region, beginning at residue Ile-253, except for a 34-residue section from within the CH3-domain disulphide loop. Peptic digestion of IgG1/K proteins in 8M-urea therefore provides a method for isolating from gamma1 heavy chains five homogeneous peptides in good yield, which account for almost the entire constant region. Characterization of fragments Fb'2 and upFc has shown that the action of pepsin in urea is entirely different from that of aqueous pepsin. Two gamma1 heavy chains have been shown to differ in sequence at three positions from the sequence reported for protein Eu.

  17. Transport of recombinant human CD4-immunoglobulin G across the human placenta: pharmacokinetics and safety in six mother-infant pairs in AIDS clinical trial group protocol 146.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, W T; Duliege, A M; Kline, M W; Hammill, H; Minkoff, H; Ammann, A J; Chen, S; Izu, A; Mordenti, J

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant CD4-immunoglobulin G (rCD4-IgG) is a 98-kDa human immunoglobulin-like protein that is produced by fusing the gp120 binding domain of CD4 to the Fc portion of the human IgG1 heavy chain. This hybrid molecule was given to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women at the onset of labor by intravenous bolus at 1 mg/kg of body weight (group A; n = 3) and 1 week prior to and at the onset of labor by the same route and at the same dose (group B; n = 3). In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, safety in the mothers and infants was determined through routine chemistries, hematology, and urinalysis; immunologic and HIV infection statuses in the infants were assessed through lymphocyte cultures, p24 antigen level determination, culture of HIV from plasma, PCR, lymphocyte subset enumeration, quantitative immunoglobulin analysis, and lymphocyte proliferation. Thirty minutes after the rCD4-IgG injection, concentrations in maternal serum were 12 to 23 micrograms/ml. These concentrations declined slowly, with initial and terminal half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) of 9.95 +/- 3.23 and 47.6 +/- 22.3 h, respectively. Infants were born 2.6 to 46.5 h after rCD4-IgG administration; concentrations of rCD4-IgG in cord blood ranged from 28 to 107 ng/ml. The half-life of rCD4-IgG in infants ranged from 5 to 29 h. These data demonstrate that the transfer of rCD4-IgG from the mother to the fetus is rapid and that newborns do not appear to have any difficulty eliminating rCD4-IgG. No safety concerns in mothers or infants were encountered. Although the study did not address the question of efficacy, none of the infants was HIV type 1 infected 36 months later. In summary, these findings document that bifunctional immune molecules can be transported across the placenta, and this general approach may be used in the future to block vertical transmission of HIV type 1. PMID:7664172

  18. [Characterization of a nonspecific inhibitor found in human sera raised against the 2006/07 influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Morikawa, Saeko; Kase, Tetsuo; Irie, Sin; Hirota, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    The serology of influenza viruses typically uses hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or the neutralization test (NT). However, the sera of many humans and animals contain nonspecific inhibitors of hemagglutinin that must be inactivated or removed from the serum before use in the HI assay. Any nonspecific inhibitor in human serum is typically inactivated by pre-treatment with receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE). However, during the 2006/07 influenza circulating season, we observed that influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/ 2005 (H3N2) exhibited susceptibility to an RDE-resistant inhibitor in human serum. We report herein on a preliminary characterization of this inhibitor, including the development of a novel inhibitor-inactivating technique for pre-treatment of human serum to be used for HI with the A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus.

  19. Non-specific pinocytosis by human endothelial cells cultured as multicellular aggregates: uptake of lucifer yellow and horse radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Catizone, A; Chiantore, M V; Andreola, F; Coletti, D; Medolago Albani, L; Alescio, T

    1996-12-01

    We have analyzed the pattern of time-dependent and concentration-dependent incorporation of Lucifer Yellow CH (LY) and Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured on a non-adhesive substratum, where they they become organized into stable, multicellular aggregates. The data were compared with those previously obtained from low-density cultures of non-growing endothelial cells adherent to plastic. While the linear trend of the incorporation kinetics is preserved, the rate of uptake with both time and concentrations is highly dependent on the culture conditions, namely typology of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. An at least two-fold increase of the rate of uptake was observed with both markers in the aggregated cells. The extracellular concentration of LY required to saturate the binding capacity of the cell surface shifts from approximately 0.25 mg/ml, with the adherent cells, to approximately 0.5 mg/ml in the aggregated cells; the rate of uptake of three different forms of HRP shows, besides a sharp quantitative increase, also qualitative variations, testified by differential changes of their incorporation rates. These results are entirely consistent with the assumption that the association of the endothelial cells into multicellular aggregates increases the rate of pinocytic uptake by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, thereby increasing its differential affinity for the extracellular markers.

  20. The Commercial Antibodies Widely Used to Measure H3 K56 Acetylation Are Non-Specific in Human and Drosophila Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sangita; Graves, Hillary; Ohsawa, Ryosuke; Huang, Ting-hsiang; Wang, Pingping; Harmacek, Laura; Tyler, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the function of histone post-translational modifications in metazoans is inferred from their genomic localization and / or extrapolated from yeast studies. For example, acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3 K56Ac) is assumed to be important for transcriptional regulation in metazoan cells based on its occurrence at promoters and its function in yeast. Here we directly assess the function of H3 K56Ac during chromatin disassembly from gene regulatory regions during transcriptional induction in human cells by using mutations that either mimic or prevent H3 K56Ac. Although there is rapid histone H3 disassembly during induction of some estrogen receptor responsive genes, depletion of the histone chaperone ASF1A/B, which is required for H3 K56 acetylation, has no effect on chromatin disassembly at these regions. During the course of this work, we found that all the commercially available antibodies to H3 K56Ac are non-specific in human cells and in Drosophila. We used H3-YFP fusions to show that the H3 K56Q mutation can promote chromatin disassembly from regulatory regions of some estrogen responsive genes in the context of transcriptional induction. However, neither the H3 K56R nor K56Q mutation significantly altered chromatin disassembly dynamics by FRAP analysis. These results indicate that unlike the situation in yeast, human cells do not use H3 K56Ac to promote chromatin disassembly from regulatory regions or from the genome in general. Furthermore, our work highlights the need for rigorous characterization of the specificity of antibodies to histone post-translational modifications in vivo. PMID:27187594

  1. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte- rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection. PMID:7276828

  2. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon.

    PubMed

    Casali, P; Sissons, J G; Buchmeier, M J; Oldstone, M B

    1981-09-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte-rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection.

  3. The effects of chemical modification on the antigenicity of human and rabbit immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Hunneyball, I M; Stanworth, D R

    1976-01-01

    In order to characterize the precise structure within human and rabbit IgG molecules against which 'general' rheumatoid factors are directed, an immunochemical comparison has been made of the effects of the selective substitution of specific amino acid side-chains on various types of antigenicity exhibited by human and rabbit IgG. The epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues have been substituted by citraconylation and carbamylation; whilst tyrosine residues have been substituted by nitration with tetranitromethane. In this manner, evidence has been obtained which indicates that the autoantigenic determinants of human IgG are structurally distinct from species-specific ones and from certain Fc-located allotypic markers (Gm(a) and Gm(x)). It is also concluded that lysine residues are probably not involved in the site of IgG reactivity with 'general' rheumatoid factors, in contrast to tyrosine residues which appear to be implicated in the activity of human but not rabbit IgG. Images Figure 4 PMID:68918

  4. Feline immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R D; Scott, F W; Duncan, J R; Gillespie, J H

    1974-02-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) in feline sera and secretions were identified by immuno-electrophoresis and immunodiffusion with rabbit antisera prepared to feline IgG, IgA, IgM, and whole serum. Adult cat sera, colostral whey, postcolostral sera, tears, and nasal secretions contained IgG, IgA, and IgM. IgG was the only Ig identified in precolostral sera and cerebrospinal fluid. Milk, intestinal contents, pooled allantoic and amniotic fluids, and saliva from adult cats and urine from suckling kittens contained IgG and IgA. Ig were not detected in urine from adult cats. Bile was unique in that IgA and IgM were the predominant Ig.

  5. Production and application of high quality stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Amsler; Thierry, Wolf; Christian, Lanshoeft; Anja, Bettighofer; Jochen, Eisfeld; Thomas, Moenius; Claudia, Probst; Coralie, Etter; Olivier, Heudi

    2017-03-01

    Here, we describe the production of stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 ([(13) C]-hIgG1) using [(13) C]-L-lysine/arginine-labeled hIgG1. The fermentation process was run in shake flasks containing labeled arginine and lysinethat were incorporated into the produced recombinant hIgG1. The [(13) C]-hIgG1 was purified, and label incorporation was determined to be >99% at all lysine and arginine moieties. Sequence coverage was confirmed by peptide mapping. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was then used as an internal standard (IS) for the development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method applicable to the quantitative analysis of all human types of hIgG1 in rat serum. Four conserved peptides, namely, GPSVFPLAPSSK, TTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSK, VVSVLTVLHQDWLNGK, and FNWYVDGVEVHNAK, originating from different parts of the fraction crystallizable region of hIgG1, were used for quantitation of hIgG1 in rat serum. The calibration curves with a coefficient of determination (r(2) ) between 0.9950 and 0.9962 resulting from the peak area ratio of each peptide to its respective labeled IS were reproducible. A mean bias within ±20.0% of the nominal values and a precision of ≤20.0 % were obtained for the calibration standards and quality control samples for each peptide. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was shown as a suitable IS for quantitative hIgG1 analysis in preclinical species by LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Cold pepsin digestion: a novel method to produce the Fv fragment from human immunoglobulin M.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L C; Putnam, F W

    1978-01-01

    A strategy for the proteolytic fragmentation of human IgM has been developed. This method is called "cold pepsin digestion" because of its unique feature of achieving restricted peptic cleavages at 4 degrees and pH 4.0. Cold pepsin digestion has been applied successfully to produce an Fv fragment from 14 human IgM proteins. The Fv fragment consists of the heavy chain variable domain (VH) and the light chain variable domain (VL) held together by strong noncovalent interaction. Thus, each Fv fragment contains one intact antigen-binding site and represents the minimal active fragment derivable from an antibody molecule. A series of other structurally and functionally important fragments were also isolated and characterized. Two basic digestion pathways were recognized; these mainly reflect the relative accessibility of five sets of major interdomain cleavage sites. PMID:351613

  7. [Study of the antigenic structure of human immunoglobulin lambda-chain using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Arsen'eva, E L; Bogacheva, G T; Solomon, A; Weiss, D; Ibragimov, A R; Rokhlin, O V

    1990-01-01

    Nine monoclonals against human Ig lambda chains were produced, 4 antibodies react with C-domain, 5--with V-domain of the lambda chain. Anti-C lambda domain antibodies recognize not less than 3 epitopes and one of them is expressed only on the isolated chain. Anti-V lambda antibodies bind both isolated lambda chain and intact IgG, IgM, IgA. Four epitopes are expressed by few lambda Bence Jones proteins of the III subgroup, the immunogen possessing the same isotype. The 4 mentioned epitopes represent private idiotypic determinants. The epitope 3E10 is characteristic of 50% Bence Jones proteins of the II and III V lambda-subgroups thus representing a common idiotypic determinant. Using anti-V lambda antibodies germ line variability of V lambda III proteins was analysed and the similarity of antigenic structure of normal and myeloma human Ig lambda chains was demonstrated.

  8. Digestion of human immunoglobulin G by the major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1990-08-01

    The major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi was able to digest human IgG, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, and by gel filtration on a Superose 12 column, in a FPLC system. The Fab fragment of IgG was only slightly degraded, but Fc was extensively hydrolyzed to small peptides. The results suggest that cruzipain might be involved in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against the immune response of the host.

  9. Immunoglobulin M antibodies are not specific for serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2017-08-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is established by detecting serum anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies, but there is little knowledge regarding the reactivity of human IgM antibodies against the Toxocara antigens. In this study, we have evaluated the reactivity of IgM antibodies in sera from patients with toxocariasis, patients with other helminth infections, and healthy individuals, against Toxocara larval excretory-secretory (TES) antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (WB). Anti-Toxocara IgM were detected in 91.4% of sera from patients with toxocariasis, 76% of sera from patients with other helminth infections, and 45.3% of sera from healthy individuals when ELISA was used. Likewise, IgM antibodies were detected in 94.8% of sera from patients with toxocariasis, 65.3% of sera from patients with other helminth infections, and 41% of sera from healthy individuals when WB was used. This reactivity exhibited only a slight decrease when the TES antigens were deglycosylated, showing that not only glycosidic epitopes, but also peptide epitopes are involved in the recognition and binding of IgM antibodies during the immune response against the parasite. The results shown that IgM antibodies are not specific for serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in healthy volunteers and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Voetman, A A; Evers-Schouten, J H; Van Es, A A; Pauwels, E K; Van Es, L A

    1987-07-01

    Using aggregates of IgG (AIgG) obtained by heat aggregation of a 16 g% human IgG solution, we sought a method for measuring the function of the mononuclear phagocyte system with a probe that bears more resemblance to soluble immune complexes than erythrocytes coated with anti-rhesus IgG (EIgG). It was found that intravenous administration of 10 micrograms AIgG/kg body weight did not cause any detectable side effects in chimpanzees. In nine healthy volunteers, a dose of 10 micrograms AIgG/kg body weight was used without any adverse reactions. AIgG is cleared from the human circulation with a t1/2 of 26 +/- 8 min (mean +/- SD). The site of clearance is predominantly the liver, as shown by an average liver spleen uptake ratio of 230:100. In whole blood obtained from the volunteers, it was found that erythrocytes bound significant amounts of AIgG, suggesting that CR1 on erythrocytes is involved in the clearance of complement activating immune complexes in humans. In five of the volunteers, clearance studies with EIgG had been done in a previous study. EIgG was cleared from the circulation with a t1/2 of 30 +/- 6.2 min (mean +/- SD). The predominant site of clearance of EIgG was the spleen. These data indicate that sensitized red blood cells are cleared from the circulation differently from soluble IgG aggregates.

  11. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  12. Efficacy of immune sera from human immunoglobulin transgenic mice immunized with a peptide mimotope of Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2004-09-28

    The efficacy of antibody mediated immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established experimentally for human antibodies. Our group has previously shown that immunization with a conjugate consisting of a peptide mimotope of the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), P13, and diphtheria toxoid (P13-DT) prolonged survival of transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin loci, XenoMouse mice, which were challenged with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. In the study reported herein, we determined the efficacy of human antibodies in the sera of immunized XenoMouse mice against C. neoformans in passive transfer experiments in naïve BALB/c mice. Survival studies were performed with sera from XenoMouse mice expressing human IgG2/kappa (G2/k mice) or IgG4/kappa (G4/k mice) that had been immunized with P13-tetanus toxoid (TT)/Alhydrogel with or without CpG, and G2/k mice that had been immunized with P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG or Alhydrogel/CpG, obtained on day 7 (early sera) and days 30 or 35-59 (late sera) after primary immunization. Compared to mice receiving sera from G2/k-PBS-treated mice, the survival of naïve mice was prolonged by both early and late sera from G2/k-P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice, but only late sera from G2/k-P13-TT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice. Late, but not early sera from G2/k-Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice also prolonged survival. For all sera, prolongation of survival was associated with GXM-specific serum IgM. Sera from G2/k mice that received P13-TT without CpG, and all groups of G4/k mice had low to undetectable levels of antibody to GXM and were not protective. Our findings suggest that GXM-specific human IgM may be a functional mediator of protection against C. neoformans.

  13. Octapeptide-based affinity chromatography of human immunoglobulin G: comparisons of three different ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Fu-Feng; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-09-12

    In an earlier work, we have developed a biomimetic design strategy based on the human IgG (hIgG)-Protein A interactions and identified an affinity ligand for hIgG, FYWHCLDE, which ranked top one in a pool of 14 potential candidates. Herein, two more octapeptides, FYCHWALE and FYCHTIDE, were identified, and the binding and purification of hIgG on the affinity columns packed with the three octapeptide-modified Sepharose gels were extensively studied and compared to find more effective octapeptide-based affinity ligands. It was found that all the three ligands bound hIgG and Fc fragment but barely bound Fab fragment, and the binding to hIgG and Fc was mainly by electrostatic interactions. The optimum binding pH values for the three ligands were different from each other, but kept in the range of 5.0-6.0. Ligand binding competition revealed that the binding sites on hIgG for the three octapeptides were similar to those for Protein A. Adsorption isotherms revealed that hIgG binding capacity was in the range of 64-104mg/mL drained gel in the order of FYWHCLDE>FYCHWALE>FYCHTIDE. Then, purifications of hIgG and human monoclonal antibody from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved with the three affinity columns at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the molecular basis for the binding affinity of the peptides for the Fc fragment of hIgG was elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Helper activity by human large granular lymphocytes in in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M A; Blanca, I; Baroja, M L; Arama, S; Leon-Ponte, M; Abadi, I; Bianco, N E

    1987-09-01

    In the present study we have examined the effect of human large granular lymphocytes (LGL) from healthy donors on Ig synthesis by autologous B lymphocytes. The results showed that this cell population has a consistent helper activity in pokeweed mitogen-activated cultures even when added at very low numbers. LGL can mediate their effect by secreting soluble helper factors capable of modulating B-cell responses as evidenced by the enhancement of IgG and IgM production by supernatants obtained from LGL cultures. Preincubation with interferon gamma further potentiated the helper activity by LGL.

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN β2-MICROGLOBULIN AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN IN CULTURED HUMAN LYMPHOID CELL LINES

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T. H.; Cleve, H.; Litwin, S. D.; Poulik, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    β2-microglobulin was detected on the cell surface and in the medium of human lymphoid cells established in long-term culture. The secretion of β2-microglobulin was relatively uniform when different cell lines were compared, whereas IgG production varied widely. κ- and µ-membrane antigens were modulated by specific antibody; β2-microglobulin was not modulated. Anti-κ and anti-µ antisera had no effect on the expression of membrane β2-microglobulin, nor had anti-β2-microglobulin antiserum any effect on the expression of κ- and µ-membrane antigens. PMID:4120289

  16. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF THE CLEAVAGE PRODUCT OF HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN G WITH CYANOGEN BROMIDE

    PubMed Central

    Lahav, Mira; Arnon, Ruth; Sela, Michael

    1967-01-01

    Treatment of human IgG with cyanogen bromide in 0.05 M HCl under specified conditions resulted in the cleavage of about half of its methionyl peptide bonds. A major fragment of about 5S was isolated from the reaction mixture by gel filtration in quantitative yield. The CNBr fragment reacted fully with goat antiserum against human light chain, but its reaction with anti-heavy chain was markedly decreased. The treatment with CNBr caused a drastic decrease in the following biological activities of IgG: complement fixing, skin binding, reaction with antiglobulin factors, and reaction with specific anti-Gm(12) serum. On the other hand, the reaction with serum of anti-Gm(1) or anti-Gm(4) specificity was not impaired and antibody activity, namely antistreptolysin and isohemagglutinin, was retained after the treatment with CNBr. It is concluded that the CNBr cleaves preferentially the methionyl bonds in the Fc portion of IgG, and that the major fragment obtained, denoted F(ab'')2, has still the combining properties of a divalent antibody. The possible therapeutic uses of F(ab'')2 are discussed. PMID:4164692

  17. Metal ions bound to the human milk immunoglobulin A: metalloproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Carla Mariane Costa; Braga, Camila Pereira; Vieira, José Cavalcante Souza; Cavecci, Bruna; Vitor de Queiroz, João; de Souza Barbosa, Herbert; Arruda, Marco Aurelio Zezzi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Padilha, Pedro de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    The presence of calcium, iron, and zinc bound to human milk secretory IgA (sIgA) was investigated. The sIgA components were first separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then identified by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI MS MS). The metal ions were detected by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after acid mineralization of the spots. The results showed eight protein spots corresponding to the IgA heavy chain constant region. Another spot was identified as the transmembrane secretory component. Calcium was bound to both the transmembrane component and the heavy chain constant region, while zinc was bound to the heavy chain constant region and iron was not bound with the identified proteins. The association of a metal ion with a protein is important for a number of reasons, and therefore, the findings of the present study may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action and of additional roles that sIgA and its components play in human milk.

  18. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-12-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection.

  19. Tandem repeats 3{prime} of the IGHA genes in the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.K.; Cox, D.W. |

    1996-07-01

    The human IGH constant region spans 350 kb and includes nine genes and two pseudogenes. All of the constant region gene cluster has been cloned except for sequences between the IGHD and IGHG3 genes, between the IGHA1 and IGHA2 gene. The regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes, which are not cloned, are of interest since transcriptional control elements were found downstream of the IGHA genes in the rat and the mouse IGH loci. In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis mapping, CpG islands were identified approximately 30 kb downstream of each IGHA gene, within the uncloned portion of the human IGH. These findings indicate that the regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes to be unclonable by standard cloning methods. Therefore, we applied the Inverse-PCR technique to amplify the sequences flanking the IGHA1 gene. The new sequence included tandem repeats of 20 bp, which we propose is the cause of the unclonability of this region. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Linking of the human immunoglobulin VK and JKCK regions by chromosomal walking.

    PubMed

    Klobeck, H G; Zimmer, F J; Combriato, G; Zachau, H G

    1987-12-10

    The linking of the human VK and JKCK gene regions (abbreviations in ref. 1) by chromosomal walking is reported. Hybridization experiments with the DNA of a somatic cell hybrid containing the region between JKCK and the telomer show that none of the major VK gene clusters is located downstream of CK. The distance between the VK and JK genes was found to be 23 kb. The JK proximal VK gene is the B3 gene which is the only representative of subgroup IV in the genome. This gene and the neighbouring B2 gene (accompanying paper) are arranged in opposite orientation to JKCK and can therefore rearrange only by an inversion mechanism. This finding is used, together with previous data, to delineate the rearrangement processes in the Burkitt lymphoma derived cell line BL21 as comprising an inversion in the first and a deletion in the second step.

  1. A Diverse Repertoire of Human Immunoglobulin Variable Genes in a Chicken B Cell Line is Generated by Both Gene Conversion and Somatic Hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Philip A.; Schusser, Benjamin; Yi, Henry; Glanville, Jacob; Harriman, William

    2015-01-01

    Chicken immune responses to human proteins are often more robust than rodent responses because of the phylogenetic relationship between the different species. For discovery of a diverse panel of unique therapeutic antibody candidates, chickens therefore represent an attractive host for human-derived targets. Recent advances in monoclonal antibody technology, specifically new methods for the molecular cloning of antibody genes directly from primary B cells, has ushered in a new era of generating monoclonal antibodies from non-traditional host animals that were previously inaccessible through hybridoma technology. However, such monoclonals still require post-discovery humanization in order to be developed as therapeutics. To obviate the need for humanization, a modified strain of chickens could be engineered to express a human-sequence immunoglobulin variable region repertoire. Here, human variable genes introduced into the chicken immunoglobulin loci through gene targeting were evaluated for their ability to be recognized and diversified by the native chicken recombination machinery that is present in the B-lineage cell line DT40. After expansion in culture the DT40 population accumulated genetic mutants that were detected via deep sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the human targeted constructs are performing as expected in the cell culture system, and provide a measure of confidence that they will be functional in transgenic animals. PMID:25852694

  2. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-01-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection. Images PMID:1469104

  3. Human Siglec-5 Inhibitory Receptor and Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Have Separate Binding Sites in Streptococcal β Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Therése; Movert, Elin; Olin, Anders I.; Ali, Syed R.; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit; Areschoug, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are receptors believed to be important for regulation of cellular activation and inflammation. Several pathogenic microbes bind specific Siglecs via sialic acid-containing structures at the microbial surface, interactions that may result in modulation of host responses. Recently, it was shown that the group B Streptococcus (GBS) binds to human Siglec-5 (hSiglec-5), an inhibitory receptor expressed on macrophages and neutrophils, via the IgA-binding surface β protein, providing the first example of a protein/protein interaction between a pathogenic microbe and a Siglec. Here we show that the hSiglec-5-binding part of β resides in the N-terminal half of the protein, which also harbors the previously determined IgA-binding region. We constructed bacterial mutants expressing variants of the β protein with non-overlapping deletions in the N-terminal half of the protein. Using these mutants and recombinant β fragments, we showed that the hSiglec-5-binding site is located in the most N-terminal part of β (B6N region; amino acids 1–152) and that the hSiglec-5- and IgA-binding domains in β are completely separate. We showed with BIAcoreTM analysis that tandem variants of the hSiglec-5- and IgA-binding domains bind to their respective ligands with high affinity. Finally, we showed that the B6N region, but not the IgA-binding region of β, triggers recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 to hSiglec-5 in U937 monocytes. Taken together, we have identified and isolated the first microbial non-sialic acid Siglec-binding region that can be used as a tool in studies of the β/hSiglec-5 interaction. PMID:21795693

  4. Human milk secretory immunoglobulin a and lactoferrin N-glycans are altered in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Totten, Sarah M; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J Bruce

    2013-12-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24-28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36-72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32-43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk.

  5. Why natural killer cells are not enough: a further understanding of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen.

    PubMed

    Alecsandru, Diana; García-Velasco, Juan A

    2017-06-01

    The immune system's role in recurrent reproductive failure is a controversial issue in assisted reproduction. Most studies into immune system implication in reproduction have focused on finding markers of peripheral blood and less on the uterine environment. Peripheral blood natural killer cells have become an "immune study core" for women with recurrent miscarriage or recurrent implantation failure, based on the mistaken notion that they cause reproductive failure by killing or "rejecting" the embryo. Maternal-fetal tolerance begins at the uterine level, so successful adaptation to the fetus occurs after a complicated process. Insufficient uterine lining invasion by an invading extravillous trophoblast is the primary defect in pregnancy disorders such as recurrent miscarriage. This process is regulated by the interaction between maternal killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), expressed by uterine natural killer cells (uNK), and their ligand human leukocyte antigen (HLA) C, expressed by the extravillous trophoblast. Pregnancies are an increased risk of disorders in mothers with KIR AA when the fetus has paternal HLA-C2. A recent report has indicated that the expression of more than one paternal HLA-C by the extravillous trophoblast in assisted reproduction may affect placentation in mothers with KIR AA. This review provides insight into the immune system's role in assisted reproductive treatments. These insights can have an impact on the selection of single-embryo transfer and/or oocyte/sperm donor according to HLA-C in patients with recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage depending on their KIR haplotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Milk Secretory Immunoglobulin A and Lactoferrin N-Glycans Are Altered in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus123

    PubMed Central

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Totten, Sarah M.; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A.; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J.; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24–28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36–72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32–43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk. PMID:24047700

  7. Effects of human intravenous immunoglobulin on amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) preparation is indicated for treating primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with impaired humoral immunity. hIVIG is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and a decent safety profile. Therefore, by virtue of its constituent natural anti-amyloid beta antibodies and anti-inflammatory effects, hIVIG is deemed to mediate beneficial effects to patients of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we set out to explore the effects of hIVIG in a mouse model of AD. Methods We treated APP/PS1dE9 transgenic and wild-type mice with weekly injections of a high hIVIG dose (1 g/kg) or saline for 3 or 8 months. Treatment effect on brain amyloid pathology and microglial reactivity was assessed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and confocal microscopy. Results We found no evidence for reduction in Aβ pathology; instead 8 months of hIVIG treatment significantly increased soluble levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42. In addition, we noticed a significant reduction in CD45 and elevation of Iba-1 markers in specific sub-populations of microglial cells. Long-term hIVIG treatment also resulted in significant suppression of TNF-α and increase in doublecortin positive adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Conclusions Our data indicate limited ability of hIVIG to impact amyloid burden but shows changes in microglia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and neurogenic effects. Immunomodulation by hIVIG may account for its beneficial effect in AD patients. PMID:22642812

  8. Characterization of the binding of shikonin to human immunoglobulin using scanning electron microscope, molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    He, Wenying; Ye, Xinyu; Yao, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiuli; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Guolei; Hua, Yingjie; Hui, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Shikonin, one of the active components isolated from the root of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnst, have anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used clinically in phlebitis and vascular purpura. In the present work, the interaction of human immunoglobulin (HIg) with shikonin has been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling techniques under physiological conditions with drug concentrations of 3.33-36.67 μM. The results of SEM exhibited visually the special effect on aggregation behavior of the complex formed between HIg and shikonin. The fluorescence polarization values indicated that shikonin molecules were found in a motionally unrestricted environment introduced by HIg. Molecular docking showed the shikonin moiety bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HIg, and there are four hydrogen-bonding interactions between shikonin and the residues of protein. The synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectra confirmed that shikonin could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HIg and has an effect on the microenvironment around HIg in aqueous solution. The changes in the secondary structure of HIg were estimated by qualitative and quantitative FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters for shikonin-HIg systems were obtained under different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K). The above results revealed the binding mechanism of shikonin and HIg at the ultrastructure and molecular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Receptor-binding properties of the peptides corresponding to the beta-endorphin-like sequence of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zaitseva, O R; Navolotskaya, E V; Abramov, V M; Volodina EYu; Mitin, Y V

    1996-01-01

    The decapeptide H2N-Ser-Leu-Thr-Cys-Leu-Val-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (termed immunorphin) corresponding to the sequence 364-373 of the CH3 domain of the human immunoglobulin G1 Eu heavy chain and displaying a 43% identity with the antigenic determinant of beta-endorphin was synthesized. Immunorphin was found to compete with 125I-beta-endorphin for high-affinity receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages (K = 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10(-9) M) and with 3H-morphin for receptors on murine thymocytes (Ki = 2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M) and murine macrophages (Ki = 5.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(-9) M). In particular two types of receptors to 125I-beta-endorphin with Kd1 = 6.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M and Kd2 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-8) M were revealed on macrophages. The second type of receptors interacted with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-Met-enkephalin, 3H-Leu-enkephalin and 3H-morphin; the first displayed reactivity with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-morphin and immunorphin. The first type receptors are not present on murine brain cells nor are inhibited by naloxone. A minimum fragment of immunorphin practically completely retaining its inhibitory activity in the competition tests with 125I-beta-endorphin for common receptors on thymocytes was found to correspond to the tetrapeptide H2N-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (Ki = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M).

  10. Human anti-immunoglobulin antibodies with specificity for native and pepsin-digested IgD

    PubMed Central

    Mellbye, O. J.; Høyeraal, H. M.; Michaelsen, T.; Natvig, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    When human sera were tested against red cells coated with IgD by the CrCl3 technique, agglutinating activity was found in a high proportion of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, while sera from normals and patients with non-rheumatoid diseases contained only trace activity. Haemagglutination inhibition experiments indicated that the activity was directed against the Fc part of IgD, and reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and absorption experiments all indicated that the agglutinating activity was due to IgM antibodies. In some sera a very weak activity was also found against antigens revealed by pepsin digestion of IgD. After density gradient ultracentrifugation of sera at pH 3·0, the 19S fractions showed higher antibody activity against IgD than fractions obtained at pH 7·2, indicating that the sera contained complexes of IgD and anti-IgD. Agglutination inhibition experiments with different IgD myeloma proteins or whole myeloma sera did not give evidence for subclasses or genetic polymorphism of IgD.

  11. High-throughput sequencing of the paired human immunoglobulin heavy and light chain repertoire.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Brandon J; Ippolito, Gregory C; Deschner, Ryan P; Lavinder, Jason J; Wine, Yariv; Rawlings, Brandon M; Varadarajan, Navin; Giesecke, Claudia; Dörner, Thomas; Andrews, Sarah F; Wilson, Patrick C; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Willson, C Grant; Ellington, Andrew D; Georgiou, George

    2013-02-01

    Each B-cell receptor consists of a pair of heavy and light chains. High-throughput sequencing can identify large numbers of heavy- and light-chain variable regions (V(H) and V(L)) in a given B-cell repertoire, but information about endogenous pairing of heavy and light chains is lost after bulk lysis of B-cell populations. Here we describe a way to retain this pairing information. In our approach, single B cells (>5 × 10(4) capacity per experiment) are deposited in a high-density microwell plate (125 pl/well) and lysed in situ. mRNA is then captured on magnetic beads, reverse transcribed and amplified by emulsion V(H):V(L) linkage PCR. The linked transcripts are analyzed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. We validated the fidelity of V(H):V(L) pairs identified by this approach and used the method to sequence the repertoire of three human cell subsets-peripheral blood IgG(+) B cells, peripheral plasmablasts isolated after tetanus toxoid immunization and memory B cells isolated after seasonal influenza vaccination.

  12. Abnormal clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C; Pauwels, E K; Evers-Schouten, J H; Voetman, A A; Cats, A; Van Es, L A

    1988-04-01

    In the present study, we tested mononuclear phagocyte system function in nine healthy controls and 15 SLE patients with complement activating 123I-labelled aggregates of human IgG (AIgG). Clearance half-time of AIgG was 26 +/- 8 min in controls, compared to 58 +/- 27 min in patients (P less than 0.005). Binding of AIgG to erythrocytes was significantly lower in patients, 9.3 +/- 8.1 vs 24 +/- 20% (P less than 0.05). The increase of C3a-levels in plasma was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P less than 0.05 at 3 and 8 min), suggesting less complement activation. Liver and spleen uptake of 123I-AIgG was measured with a gamma camera and expressed as liver/spleen uptake ratios. In patients, the liver/spleen uptake ratios were significantly higher than in controls at 15 min, 3.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.31 +/- 0.7 (P less than 0.05), due to less splenic uptake of AIgG. Correlations between clearance half-time or liver/spleen uptake ratios and immune complex levels or disease activity were not found. This study indicates that clearance of soluble AIgG is abnormal in patients with SLE, due to decreased splenic uptake of AIgG.

  13. Fragments produced by digestion of human immunoglobulin G subclasses with pepsin in urea.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, D M

    1977-01-01

    It was previously shown that digestion of human IgG1/kappa myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments which differ from other proteolytic fragments of IgG, including those produced by peptic digestion in aqueous buffers. The two large urea/pepsin fragments each consist of three peptides, and together account for all of the constant region of the light chains and most of the constant region of the heavy chains. Myeloma proteins of subclasses IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 with kappa light chains were digested with pepsin in 8 M-urea, and the resulting fragments compared with those produced from IgG1/kappa proteins. Gel filtration, starch- and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis have shown that the peptides from each subclass are analogous with those from IgG1. A brief investigation of the products of urea/pepsin digestion of myeloma proteins with lambda light chains has shown that in these proteins light-chain cleavage occurs at residue leucine-182, instead of or as well as at residue 117, where cleavage takes place in kappa chains. Comparison of sequences around sites of urea/pepsin cleavage has shown that pepsin has quite restricted specificity under these conditions. Images PLATE 1 PMID:411484

  14. Influence of nucleic acids and polysaccharides on phosphotransferase activity of preparations of secretory immunoglobulin A from human milk.

    PubMed

    Kit, Y Y; Semenov, D V; Kuligina, E V; Richter, V A

    2000-02-01

    The influence of nucleic acids (DNA, tRNA), synthetic oligonucleotides, and polysaccharides (lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli, heparin) on protein kinase and lipid kinase activities of preparations of human secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) has been studied. The preparations of sIgA were isolated from human milk by chromatography on the column with Protein A-Sepharose and DEAE-sorbent (sIgA1), by affinity chromatography of sIgA1 on DNA-cellulose (sIgA2), and by gel-filtration of sIgA1 in buffer containing 5% dioxane (sIgA3). Two 32P-labeled products with high and low electrophoretic mobility in polyacrylamide gel containing SDS were found after incubation of sIgA1 and sIgA2 with [gamma-32P]ATP. The product with low electrophoretic mobility was degraded in 10% trichloroacetic acid giving a radioactive background in lanes of the polyacrylamide gel. 32P-Labeled phospholipids were found among the phosphorylation products. Soluble and immobilized DNA increase lipid kinase activity of preparations of sIgA. In this case the secretory component and H-chains of sIgA were degraded. Fractions possessing lipid kinase activity were precipitated in the presence of heparin (1 mg/ml), and lipid kinase activity was separated from sIgA by gel-filtration in buffer containing 5% dioxane. 32P-Labeled products were formed in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP as well as [32P]ortho-phosphoric acid. The influence of heparin and synthetic deoxy- and ribooligonucleotides on casein kinase activity of sIgA3 was studied. It was observed that deoxyribooligonucleotides in micromolar concentrations increased the rate of casein phosphorylation in the presence of sIgA3 and [gamma-32P]ATP. It has been proposed that catalytically active sIgA have an affinity to DNA (anti-DNA sIgA) and can be present in human milk as a part of lipoprotein complexes.

  15. High-throughput sequencing of human immunoglobulin variable regions with subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Merle; Liechti, Thomas; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Miho, Enkelejda; Reddy, Sai T; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The humoral immune response plays a critical role in controlling infection, and the rapid adaptation to a broad range of pathogens depends on a highly diverse antibody repertoire. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies in the past decade has enabled insights into this immense diversity. However, not only the variable, but also the constant region of antibodies determines their in vivo activity. Antibody isotypes differ in effector functions and are thought to play a defining role in elicitation of immune responses, both in natural infection and in vaccination. We have developed an Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing protocol that allows determination of the human IgG subtype alongside sequencing full-length antibody variable heavy chain regions. We thereby took advantage of the Illumina procedure containing two additional short reads as identifiers. By performing paired-end sequencing of the variable regions and customizing one of the identifier sequences to distinguish IgG subtypes, IgG transcripts with linked information of variable regions and IgG subtype can be retrieved. We applied our new method to the analysis of the IgG variable region repertoire from PBMC of an HIV-1 infected individual confirmed to have serum antibody reactivity to the Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) of gp41. We found that IgG3 subtype frequencies in the memory B cell compartment increased after halted treatment and coincided with increased plasma antibody reactivity against the MPER domain. The sequencing strategy we developed is not restricted to analysis of IgG. It can be adopted for any Ig subtyping and beyond that for any research question where phasing of distant regions on the same amplicon is needed.

  16. Production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by various human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Koga, Y; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-05-01

    The production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in various human tumor cell lines were studied. By radioimmunoassay (RIA), five CEA-producing tumor cell lines tested--2 derived from colonic (M7609 and CCK-81), one from pancreatic (QGP-1) and 2 from lung (HLC-1 and KNS-62) carcinomas--were found to produce NCA simultaneously. The cellular contents of CEA and NCA and the amounts of both antigens released into the culture medium were highly variable among the cell lines. It was a distinct contrast that one cell line (CCK-81) released very large amounts of CEA and NCA into the medium while having the smallest amounts of both antigens in the cells, whereas the others contained much larger amounts of the antigens in the cells as compared with the amounts released into the medium. For most of the cell lines, the production of both CEA and NCA increased in the stationary phase of growth as compared with the exponential phase. The production kinetics of both CEA and NCA appeared to be parallel with each other in all the cell lines, though the amount ratio of CEA to NCA produced was variable. By means of a double immunodiffusion test with polyclonal antibodies, antigenic uniformity with no unique organ-specificity was confirmed for all the CEA preparations from spent media of the cell lines, though some differences in the sugar moiety of CEA were detected by RIA using monoclonal antibodies. No antigenic differences among NCA preparations were observed. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular heterogeneity was observed among CEA or NCA preparations isolated from cell lysates.

  17. Dose-dependent biphasic leptin-induced proliferation is caused by non-specific IL-6/NF-κB pathway activation in human myometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrichon, Marina; Hadi, Tarik; Wendremaire, Maeva; Ptasinski, Clémentine; Seigneuric, Renaud; Marcion, Guillaume; Delignette, Marc; Marchet, Jacques; Dumas, Monique; Sagot, Paul; Bardou, Marc; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Leptin, an adipokine synthesized by the placenta during pregnancy, has been proposed for the management of preterm labour (PTL), as it is able to prevent in vitro uterine contractility and remodelling associated with labour onset. Another common feature of labour onset is the phenotypic switch of myometrial smooth muscle cells from a proliferative to a hypertrophic state. As proliferative effects have been demonstrated for leptin in other tissues, we aimed to investigate its ability to induce myometrial proliferation and thus to maintain uterine quiescence. Experimental Approach We stimulated human primary myometrial smooth muscle cells with leptin in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists or signalling pathway inhibitors. Key Results Leptin induced myometrial cell proliferation in a biphasic manner. At 6.25 ng·mL−1, leptin-induced proliferation was mediated by the leptin receptor and required the early activation of ERK1/2. At a concentration above 25 ng·mL−1, leptin induced direct non-specific stimulation of the IL-6 receptor, leading to NF-κB activation, and exerted anti-proliferative effects. However, at 50 ng·mL−1, leptin re-induces proliferation via IL-6 receptor stimulation that requires STAT3 and delayed ERK1/2 activation. Conclusions and Implications These data bring new insights into leptin signalling-induced myometrial proliferation and its interrelationship with the IL-6/IL-6 receptor axis. In the light of our previous work, the present study emphasizes the potential value of leptin in the pharmacological management of PTL and it also strengthens the hypothesis that leptin might be a contributory factor in the parturition-related disorders observed in obese women. PMID:25653112

  18. Induction of maturation of human B-cell lymphomas in vitro. Morphologic changes in relation to immunoglobulin and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Beiske, K.; Ruud, E.; Drack, A.; Marton, P. F.; Godal, T.

    1984-01-01

    In vitro stimulation of cells from 8 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas comprising several histologic types with a tumor promotor (TPA) and with or without anti-immunoglobulins directed against the surface immunoglobulin of the tumor cells is reported. Morphologic transformation to immunoblastic and plasmablastic cells, but not to plasma cells, and induction of Ig and DNA synthesis were observed. A comparative analysis, including flow cytofluorometry, light microscopy combined with immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy, suggests that the three events may not always be associated phenomena at the single-cell level even in monoclonal cell populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6375389

  19. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  20. Dynamics of predominant microbiota in the human gastrointestinal tract and change in luminal enzymes and immunoglobulin profile during high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Maity, Chiranjit; Ghosh, Kuntal; Pati, Bikas Ranjan; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2013-11-01

    High-altitude (HA) visitors like pilgrims, trackers, scientists and military personnel face a group of nonspecific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia. In order to investigate the alteration of indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota in the development of such GI symptoms, an experiment was conducted for the enumeration of dominant cultivable faecal microbiota of 15 soldiers at base level (Delhi) and during their 15-day acclimatization at 3,505 m HA (Leh). At HA, faecal microbiota analysis revealed that total aerobes decreased significantly with increase of total and facultative anaerobes. The strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroidetes sp. and Lactobacillus sp. exhibited positive growth direction index (GDI) like other predominant obligate anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. Different enzymes like amylase, proteinase and polyphenol hydrolase produced by different bacterial populations showed positive GDI, whereas phosphatase producers exhibited negative GDI. The levels of microbe-originated enzymes like amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucuronidase were also elevated during HA acclimatization. In addition, in vitro gas production ability was enhanced with increase of faecal immunoglobulins IgA and IgG. We demonstrated that hypoxic environment at HA had the potential to alter the gut microbial composition and its activities that may cause GI dysfunctions.

  1. Ultrastructural localization of intracellular immunoglobulins in Epon-embedded human lymph nodes. An immunoelectron microscopic investigation using the immunogold staining (IGS) and the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) methods.

    PubMed

    Viale, G; Dell'Orto, P; Braidotti, P; Coggi, G

    1985-05-01

    The ultrastructural localization of intracellular immunoglobulins on ultrathin sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed, postosmicated, and Epon-embedded human lymph nodes has been achieved using such highly sensitive immunocytochemical techniques as immunogold staining and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. These immunoelectron microscopic techniques allow the identification of intracellular immunoglobulins without affecting the ultrastructural morphology of the tissue, since they do not require any pretreatment of the sections with proteolytic enzymes or deresinating agents. Therefore, immunoglobulins can be precisely localized in the cell organelles; structures whose morphology is well preserved. The availability of a reliable postembedding staining procedure for the ultrastructural localization of immunoglobulins is of definite value for investigations on human lymphoid tissue, both normal and pathological.

  2. Affinity composite cryogel discs functionalized with Reactive Red 120 and Green HE 4BD dye ligands: application on the separation of human immunoglobulin G subclasses.

    PubMed

    Huseynli, Sabina; Baydemir, Gözde; Sarı, Esma; Elkak, Assem; Denizli, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Naturally produced by the human immune system, immunoglobulin nowadays is widely used for in vivo and in vitro purposes. The increased needs for pure immunoglobulin have prompted researchers to find new immunoglobulin chromatographic separation processes. Cryogels as chromatographic adsorbents, congregate several mechanical features including good compatibility, large pore structure, flexibility, short diffusion pathway and stability. These different characteristics make them a good alternative to conventional chromatographic methods and allowing their potential use in separation technology. In the present study, two sets of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) based beads were prepared and functionalized with Reactive Red 120 (RR) and Reactive Green HE 4BD (RG) dyes, and then embedded into supermacroporous cryogels. The morphology, physical and chemical features of the prepared bead embedded composite cryogel discs (CCDs) were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling test, elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results showed that the embedded composite cryogel discs have a specific surface area of 192.0 m(2)/g with maximum adsorption capacity of HIgG 239.8 mg/g for the RR functionalized CCD and 170 mg/g for RG functionalized CCD columns, both at pH 6.2.

  3. Human intravenous immunoglobulin provides protection against Aβ toxicity by multiple mechanisms in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Purified intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) obtained from the plasma of healthy humans is indicated for the treatment of primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with defects in humoral immunity. IVIG contains naturally occurring auto-antibodies, including antibodies (Abs) against β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides accumulating in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. IVIG has been shown to alleviate AD pathology when studied with mildly affected AD patients. Although its mechanisms-of-action have been broadly studied, it remains unresolved how IVIG affects the removal of natively formed brain Aβ deposits by primary astrocytes and microglia, two major cell types involved in the neuroinflammatory responses. Methods We first determined the effect of IVIG on Aβ toxicity in primary neuronal cell culture. The mechanisms-of-action of IVIG in reduction of Aβ burden was analyzed with ex vivo assay. We studied whether IVIG solubilizes natively formed Aβ deposits from brain sections of APP/PS1 mice or promotes Aβ removal by primary glial cells. We determined the role of lysosomal degradation pathway and Aβ Abs in the IVIG-promoted reduction of Aβ. Finally, we studied the penetration of IVIG into the brain parenchyma and interaction with brain deposits of human Aβ in a mouse model of AD in vivo. Results IVIG was protective against Aβ toxicity in a primary mouse hippocampal neuron culture. IVIG modestly inhibited the fibrillization of synthetic Aβ1-42 but did not solubilize natively formed brain Aβ deposits ex vivo. IVIG enhanced microglia-mediated Aβ clearance ex vivo, with a mechanism linked to Aβ Abs and lysosomal degradation. The IVIG-enhanced Aβ clearance appears specific for microglia since IVIG did not affect Aβ clearance by astrocytes. The cellular mechanisms of Aβ clearance we observed have potential relevance in vivo since after peripheral administration IVIG penetrated to mouse brain tissue reaching highest concentrations in the

  4. Interpretation of size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-size distribution of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-size distribution by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle size or pore size, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-size distribution profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard size-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle size of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the distribution of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-size distribution test in the relevant monographs

  5. Serum immunoglobulin A response to human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and high-risk HIV-negative women.

    PubMed

    Viscidi, Raphael P; Ahdieh-Grant, Linda; Schneider, Michael F; Clayman, Barbara; Massad, L Stewart; Anastos, Kathryn M; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Palefsky, Joel; Levine, Alexandra; Strickler, Howard

    2003-12-15

    Serum samples from 2008 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 551 HIV-negative women were tested for immunoglobulin A (IgA) to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 capsids. IgA seropositivity was lower than previously reported IgG seropositivity (7% vs. 51%), but, like IgG antibodies, HPV 16 IgA was associated with sexual behavior, cervicovaginal HPV 16 DNA, and cytological abnormalities. IgA seropositivity was higher in HIV-positive women than in HIV-negative women (7.7% vs. 4.9%; P=.02), but the association was lost after adjustment for HPV 16 cervicovaginal infection. IgA, but not IgG, seropositivity was associated with progression to high-grade cytological abnormalities (relative hazard [RH], 2.2 [95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.2]), raising the possibility that an IgA response to HPV 16, as described for other DNA viruses, may be a marker of persistent viral replication. The risk of incident infection with non-16-related HPV types was increased in IgA seropositive women (RH, 1.8 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.6]), compared with seronegative women (RH, 2.2 [95% confidence interval, 0.9-5.4]), but there was no difference in the risk of incident HPV 16 or HPV 16-related infections. This may be evidence of partial type-specific or clade-specific immunity conferred by seropositivity to HPV 16 capsids.

  6. The antigen-binding fragment of human gamma immunoglobulin prevents amyloid β-peptide folding into β-sheet to form oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Guivernau, Biuse; Bonet, Jaume; Puig, Marta; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palomer, Ernest; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Altafaj, Xavier; Tajes, Marta; Puig-Pijoan, Albert; Vicente, Rubén; Oliva, Baldomero; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) plays a leading role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) physiopathology. Even though monomeric forms of Aβ are harmless to cells, Aβ can aggregate into β-sheet oligomers and fibrils, which are both neurotoxic. Therefore, one of the main therapeutic approaches to cure or delay AD onset and progression is targeting Aβ aggregation. In the present study, we show that a pool of human gamma immunoglobulins (IgG) protected cortical neurons from the challenge with Aβ oligomers, as assayed by MTT reduction, caspase-3 activation and cytoskeleton integrity. In addition, we report the inhibitory effect of IgG on Aβ aggregation, as shown by Thioflavin T assay, size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy. Similar results were obtained with Palivizumab, a human anti-sincitial virus antibody. In order to dissect the important domains, we cleaved the pool of human IgG with papain to obtain Fab and Fc fragments. Using these cleaved fragments, we functionally identified Fab as the immunoglobulin fragment inhibiting Aβ aggregation, a result that was further confirmed by an in silico structural model. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools show a highly conserved structure able to bind amyloid in the Fab region. Overall, our data strongly support the inhibitory effect of human IgG on Aβ aggregation and its neuroprotective role. PMID:28467807

  7. Enhanced opsonisation of Rhesus D-positive human red blood cells by recombinant polymeric immunoglobulin G anti-G antibodies.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Solano, Dylana; Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montaño, Ramon F

    2017-05-30

    Anti-RhD antibodies (anti-D) are important in the prophylaxis of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn (HDFN) due to RhD incompatibility. Current preparations of anti-D are sourced from hyperimmune human plasma, so its production carries a risk of disease and is dependent on donor availability. Despite the efforts to develop a monoclonal preparation with similar prophylactic properties to the plasma-derived anti-D, no such antibody is yet available. Here we studied the agglutinating, opsonic and haemolytic activities of two recombinant polymeric immunoglobulins (Ig) against the G antigen of the Rh complex. Recombinant polymeric anti-G IgG1 (IgG1μtp) and IgG3 (IgG3μtp) were produced in vitro, purified by protein G-affinity chromatography, and analysed by gel electrophoresis. Their agglutinating, opsonic and haemolytic activities were evaluated using haemagglutination, erythrophagocytosis, and complement activation assays. The recombinant IgG1μtp and IgG3μtp anti-G antibodies ranged from 150,000 to 1,000,000 Da in molecular weight, indicating the formation of polymeric IgG. No complement activation or haemolytic activity was detected upon incubation of RhD-positive red-blood cells with the polymeric anti-G IgG. Both polymers were better opsonins than a prophylactic preparation of plasma-derived anti-D. The enhanced opsonic properties of the polymeric anti-G IgG1μtp and IgG3μtp could allow them to mediate the clearance of RhD-positive red blood cells from circulation more efficiently than natural or other synthetic prophylactic anti-D options. Their inability to induce complement-mediated haemolysis would be prophylactically convenient and is comparable in vitro to that of the available plasma-derived polyclonal anti-D preparations. The described properties suggest that polymeric antibodies like these (but with anti-D specificity) may be testable candidates for prophylaxis of HDFN caused by anti-D.

  8. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum immunoglobulin G response to human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Sloots, T P; Kapeleris, J P; Mackay, I M; Batham, M; Devine, P L

    1996-01-01

    A rapid (60-min) commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibodies to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) was evaluated. The specificity of the ELISA for HHV-6 was confirmed by absorption studies, with the reactivities of HHV-6-positive sera being unaffected by other herpesviruses (cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and varicella-zoster virus) or the HSB2 cell line used to culture HHV-6. HHV-6 IgG antibody levels in a panel of 502 serum samples were determined by ELISA and an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Results obtained by the two methods were in close agreement, suggesting that the ELISA provides a suitable test method for the determination of HHV-6 IgG antibodies in a routine clinical laboratory. Both tests were positive in 398 cases (79%), and both were negative in 71 cases (14%), with a different result obtained by IFA and ELISA in only 33 cases (7%). Furthermore, absorption of sera with HHV-6 prior to assay revealed that the majority of these results were false positive (n = 8) or false negative (n = 23) in the IFA (true positives or negatives in the ELISA). Subsequently, the ELISA showed a sensitivity of 99.76% and a specificity of 98.75%. HHV-6-specific IgG levels were also determined in paired serum samples collected from 49 donors--14 with exanthem subitum (ES), 15 with ES which was complicated with central nervous system involvement, and 20 undergoing bone marrow transplantation--in whom HHV-6 infection had been demonstrated by virus isolation and/or PCR. All patients with ES or central nervous system complications showed an increase in HHV-6-specific IgG, indicating that this ELISA may be a useful aid in the diagnosis of these conditions. Furthermore, 14 of 20 patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation showed an increase in HHV-6-specific IgG levels, possibly reflecting a reactivation of HHV-6 in these patients. PMID:8904436

  9. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoji; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Furue, Motoki; Gojobori, Takashi; Akiyama, Yasuto

    2010-07-27

    Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody) and the T-cell receptor (TR) are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]). This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I) and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II). Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting annotation on IG, TR, and their epitopes. This database

  10. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody) and the T-cell receptor (TR) are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]). Description This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I) and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II). Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. Conclusions The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting annotation on IG, TR, and

  11. Passively Administered Pooled Human Immunoglobulins Exert IL-10 Dependent Anti-Inflammatory Effects that Protect against Fatal HSV Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Newo, Alain N. S.; Shen, Yueh-Wei; Cantin, Edouard

    2011-01-01

    HSV-1 is the leading cause of sporadic encephalitis in humans. HSV infection of susceptible 129S6 mice results in fatal encephalitis (HSE) caused by massive inflammatory brainstem lesions comprising monocytes and neutrophils. During infection with pathogenic microorganisms or autoimmune disease, IgGs induce proinflammatory responses and recruit innate effector cells. In contrast, high dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are an effective treatment for various autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of potent anti-inflammatory effects stemming in part from sialylated IgGs (sIgG) present at 1–3% in IVIG. We investigated the ability of IVIG to prevent fatal HSE when given 24 h post infection. We discovered a novel anti-inflammatory pathway mediated by low-dose IVIG that protected 129S6 mice from fatal HSE by modulating CNS inflammation independently of HSV specific antibodies or sIgG. IVIG suppressed CNS infiltration by pathogenic CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytes and inhibited their spontaneous degranulation in vitro. FcγRIIb expression was required for IVIG mediated suppression of CNS infiltration by CD45+ Ly6Clow monocytes but not for inhibiting development of Ly6Chigh monocytes. IVIG increased accumulation of T cells in the CNS, and the non-sIgG fraction induced a dramatic expansion of FoxP3+ CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) and FoxP3− ICOS+ CD4+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid organs. Tregs purified from HSV infected IVIG treated, but not control, mice protected adoptively transferred mice from fatal HSE. IL-10, produced by the ICOS+ CD4+ T cells that accumulated in the CNS of IVIG treated, but not control mice, was essential for induction of protective anti-inflammatory responses. Our results significantly enhance understanding of IVIG's anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory capabilities by revealing a novel sIgG independent anti-inflammatory pathway responsible for induction of regulatory T cells that secrete the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and further

  12. A human serum immunoglobulin with specificity for certain homologous target cells, which induces target cell damage by normal human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, I. C. M.; Loewi, G.; Howard, A.

    1969-01-01

    A factor has been found in a number of human sera which renders a polyploid strain of human liver cells, Chang cells, susceptible to damage by non-immune human lymphocytes. Sera possessing this factor are referred to as Factor Containing Sera (FCS). Such damage is assessed quantitatively by release of radioactive chromium from target cells. This factor has the chemical properties of IgG and can be absorbed out on Chang cells. Its specificity has been shown to be for Chang cells and not for human lymphocytes. Other homologous and heterologous target cells tested were not affected by this factor. The factor has not been shown to have any effect on Chang cell viability by itself, even in the presence of complement. Factors which inhibit target cell damage are shown to coexist with the factor which induces non-immune lymphocyte damage of Chang cells. The possible origin of this factor is discussed as is the role in immune reactions of target cell specific antibody which renders such cells susceptible to damage by non-immune lymphocytes. PMID:5394186

  13. [Design of experimental approaches on the base of standard proteins for testing blood biopreparations and immunoperoxidase conjugates specific to human and animal immunoglobulines G].

    PubMed

    Barsukov, A K; Barmin, A V; Kuznetsov, A I; Nesterova, O Iu; Ushnurtseva, S A; Panin, A N; Smolenskiĭ, V I; Ulasov, V I; Sviderskiĭ, V L; Khovanskikh, A E

    2009-01-01

    Using standard forms of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and albumin, we have studied electrophoretic and chromatographic profiles of samples of pharmaceutical blood biopreparation batches. The usability of standard proteins was also demonstrated by testing analytical characteristics of immunoperoxidase conjugates specific to human and animal IgG (anti-IgG IPC). In particular, we suggest an additional estimation of analytical characteristics of anti-IgG IPC by the enzyme reaction kinetics with the standard dilution which is calculated by the direct enzyme-liked immunoassay on the homologous IgG-antigen.

  14. A novel anti-Vpre-B antibody identifies immunoglobulin-surrogate receptors on the surface of human pro-B cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Vpre-B and lambda 5 genes, respectively, encode V-like and C-like domains of a surrogate immunoglobulin light chain (psi L). Such psi L complex is expressed in early progenitor B (pro-B) cells, before conventional immunoglobulin heavy (microH) and light (L) chains are produced. We raised a wide panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against soluble recombinant Vpre-B proteins to study early events in human B cell development. One of these antibodies, B-MAD688, labeled surrogate Ig-complexes on the surface of microH- pro-B cell lines and normal bone marrow cells in immunofluorescence assays. Immunoprecipitations using surface-labeled pro-B cells and B-MAD688 mAb indicated that human psi L is associated with high molecular weight components homologous to the surrogate heavy (psi H) chains described in mouse. Using B-MAD688 and SLC2 mAbs, we were able to distinguish between psi H psi L and microH psi L complexes on the surface of human pro-B and later precursor, pre-B, cells. The finding of psi H psi L complexes in mouse and man lead us to hypothesize a role for psi H- containing receptors in B cell development. PMID:8676092

  15. Nonspecific Bronchoprovocation Test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Kyu; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Sei Won; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Seoung Ju; Lee, Young Min

    2017-10-01

    Bronchial asthma is a disease characterized by the condition of airway hyper-responsiveness, which serves to produce narrowing of the airway secondary to airway inflammation and/or various spasm-inducing stimulus. Nonspecific bronchoprovocation testing is an important method implemented for the purpose of diagnosing asthma; this test measures the actual degree of airway hyper-responsiveness and utilizes direct and indirect bronchoprovocation testing. Direct bronchoprovocation testing using methacholine or histamine may have superior sensitivity as these substances directly stimulate the airway smooth muscle cells. On the other hand, this method also engenders the specific disadvantage of relatively low specificity. Indirect bronchoprovocation testing using mannitol, exercise, hypertonic saline, adenosine and hyperventilation serves to produce reactions in the airway smooth muscle cells by liberating mediators with stimulation of airway inflammatory cells. Therefore, this method has the advantage of high specificity and also demonstrates relatively low sensitivity. Direct and indirect testing both call for very precise descriptions of very specific measurement conditions. In addition, it has become evident that challenge testing utilizing each of the various bronchoconstrictor stimuli requires distinct and specific protocols. It is therefore important that the clinician understand the mechanism by which the most commonly used bronchoprovocation testing works. It is important that the clinician understand the mechanism of action in the testing, whether direct stimuli (methacholine) or indirect stimuli (mannitol, exercise) is implemented, when the testing is performed and the results interpreted. Copyright©2017. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  16. The interplay of non-specific binding, target-mediated clearance and FcRn interactions on the pharmacokinetics of humanized antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Lu, Jirong; Witcher, Derrick R; Leung, Donmienne; Tang, Ying; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2015-01-01

    The application of protein engineering technologies toward successfully improving antibody pharmacokinetics has been challenging due to the multiplicity of biochemical factors that influence monoclonal antibody (mAb) disposition in vivo. Physiological factors including interactions with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and specific antigen binding properties of mAbs, along with biophysical properties of the mAbs themselves play a critical role. It has become evident that applying an integrated approach to understand the relative contribution of these factors is critical to rationally guide and apply engineering strategies to optimize mAb pharmacokinetics. The study presented here evaluated the influence of unintended non-specific interactions on the disposition of mAbs whose clearance rates are governed predominantly by either non-specific (FcRn) or target-mediated processes. The pharmacokinetics of 8 mAbs representing a diverse range of these properties was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys. Results revealed complementarity-determining region (CDR) charge patch engineering to decrease charge-related non-specific binding can have a significant impact on improving the clearance. In contrast, the influence of enhanced in vitro FcRn binding was mixed, and related to both the strength of charge interaction and the general mechanism predominant in governing the clearance of the particular mAb. Overall, improved pharmacokinetics through enhanced FcRn interactions were apparent for a CDR charge-patch normalized mAb which was affected by non-specific clearance. The findings in this report are an important demonstration that mAb pharmacokinetics requires optimization on a case-by-case basis to improve the design of molecules with increased therapeutic application. PMID:26337808

  17. Human milk polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids and secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies and early childhood allergy.

    PubMed

    Duchén, K; Casas, R; Fagerås-Böttcher, M; Yu, G; Björkstén, B

    2000-02-01

    The possible protective effect of breast milk against atopic manifestations in infancy, i.e. atopic eczema and food allergy, has been controversial for the last decades. Besides the methodological problems, differences in the composition of human milk could explain these controversies. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) levels to food proteins (ovalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin) and an inhalant allergen (cat) in milk from mothers of allergic and non-allergic children. Blood samples were obtained at birth and at 3 months from 120 children. Skin prick tests were performed at 6, 12 and 18 months, and the development of atopic diseases was assessed in the children. Breast milk samples were collected from their mothers at birth and monthly during the lactation period. Milk PUFA composition was measured by gas chromatography, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure total S-IgA, anti-cat S-IgA, anti-ovalbumin S-IgA, and anti-beta-lactoglobulin S-IgA. Allergic disease developed in 44/120 children (22/63 children of allergic mothers and 22/57 children of non-allergic mothers). Lower levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, C20:5 n-3 (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid C22:5 n-3 (DPA), and docosatetraenoic acid C22:4 n-6 (DHA) (p < 0.05 for all) were found in mature milk from mothers of allergic as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The total n-6:total n-3 and the arachidonic acid, C20:4 n-6 (AA):EPA ratios were significantly lower in transitional and mature milk from mothers of allergic children, as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The PUFA levels in serum of allergic and non-allergic children were largely similar, except for higher levels of C22:4 n-6 and C22:5 n-6 (p < 0.05 for both) and a higher AA:EPA ratio in serum phospholipids in the former group (p < 0.05). Changes in the levels of milk PUFA were reflected in

  18. Characterization of cDNAs of the human pregnancy-specific beta1-glycoprotein family, a new subfamily of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.X.; Tease, L.A.; Shupert, W.L.; Chan, W.Y. )

    1990-03-20

    Three highly homologous cDNAs encoding human pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein (SP1) were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. These cDNAs share >90% nucleotide homology in their coding sequences, and >79% of the encoded amino acids are homologous. Proteins encoded by these cDNAs are very similar to members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family and contain repeating domains, conserved disulfided bridges, and {beta}-sheet structure typical of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. However, the high degree of sequence homology and relatively lesser degree of glycosylation among the SP1 proteins suggest that they exist as a unique family instead of being members of the CEA family. Both soluble and potentially membrane-bound forms of SP1 proteins were present in the placenta. Northern blot analysis using specific probes confirmed the expression of multiple mRNA species in human term placenta.

  19. Suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol of the primary immunoglobulin M response by human peripheral blood B cells is associated with impaired STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Carney, Stephen; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-08-09

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the mechanism for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-mediated suppression of primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses in humans. An in vitro activation model, which employs cell surface-expressed CD40 ligand (CD40L) and recombinant cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, -6, and -10), was used to differentiate human peripheral blood (HPB) naïve B cells into IgM secreting cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC significantly decreased the number of IgM secreting cells as determined by ELISPOT. The attenuation of IgM secretion by Δ(9)-THC involved, at least in part, the impairment of plasma cell differentiation as evidenced by suppression of immunoglobulin joining chain (IgJ) mRNA expression. The analysis at each of two different stages critically involved in plasma cell differentiation indicates that Δ(9)-THC impaired both the primary activation stage and proliferation of B cells. Interestingly, Δ(9)-THC selectively suppressed the surface expression of CD80, but not other measured B-cell activation markers (CD69, CD86, and ICAM1). Furthermore, pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC was accompanied by a robust decrease of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas the phosphorylation of the p65 NFκB subunit was not affected. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the mechanisms for impaired B cell function by Δ(9)-THC.

  20. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Devi, R Shobana; Mary, R Regina; Prabhavathi, D; Vidya, R; Mechenro, John; Mahendri, N V; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2011-12-23

    Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (10⁹ in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  1. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections. PMID:22196482

  2. Effective posttransplant antitumor immunity is associated with TLR-stimulating nucleic acid–immunoglobulin complexes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun; Zhang, Li; Cai, Ann X.; Lee, Mark; Zhang, Wandi; Neuberg, Donna; Canning, Christine M.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Ritz, Jerome; Hacohen, Nir; Means, Terry K.; Wu, Catherine J.

    2011-01-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), whereby donor mononuclear cells are infused into patients, is one of the few effective immunotherapeutic strategies that generate long-lasting tumor remissions. We previously demonstrated that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients treated with DLI develop high-titer plasma antibodies specific for CML-associated antigens, the majority of which have been reported to bind nucleic acids These observations led us to predict that circulating antibody-antigen complexes in DLI-responsive patients carry nucleic acids that can engage innate immune sensors. Consistent with this, we report here that post-DLI plasma from 5 CML patients that responded to DLI treatment induced massive upregulation of MIP-1α, IP-10, and IFN-α in normal blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, this was not observed with plasma obtained before DLI and from DLI nonresponders and imatinib-treated patients. This endogenous immunostimulatory activity required nucleic acid and protein for its adjuvant effect and activated antigen-presenting cells through the RNA and DNA sensors TLR8 and TLR9. Presence of the immunoglobulin Fc receptor CD32 enhanced cellular responses, suggesting that immunoglobulins associate with this activity. Finally, a TLR-induced expression signature was detectable in post-DLI but not pre-DLI blood, consistent with an active circulating TLR8/9-stimulating factor. We have therefore demonstrated that effective tumor immunity correlates with the presence of endogenous nucleic acid–immunoglobulin complexes in patient plasma, thus providing a putative mechanism for the induction of potent antigen-specific immunity against malignant cells. PMID:21403403

  3. Suppression of immunoglobulin production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by monocytes via secretion of heavy-chain ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Harada, Gakuro; Matsumoto, Shin-ei; Aiba, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Akira; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kabayama, Shigeru; Yoshida, Tadashi; Zhang, Pingbo; Fujii, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    In vitro antigen stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) does not induce immunoglobulin (Ig) production. However, pretreatment of PBMCs with l-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester (LLME) prior to in vitro stimulation removes the suppression of Ig production. In the present study, we attempted to identify the target cells of LLME and determine the mechanisms by which Ig production in PBMCs is suppressed. We found that CD14(+) monocytes are involved in the suppression of Ig production in PBMCs. Furthermore, we confirmed that heavy-chain ferritin derived from CD14(+) monocytes suppresses Ig production in PBMCs, possibly through iron sequestration.

  4. Immunomodulatory properties of human serum immunoglobulin A: anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory activities in human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olas, K; Butterweck, H; Teschner, W; Schwarz, H P; Reipert, B M

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigated the immunomodulatory activities of human plasma-derived serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Previous findings seem contradictory indicating either pro- or anti-inflammatory activities. We used serum IgA purified from large plasma pools and studied the modulation of the release of cytokines and chemokines from resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-stimulated human adherent monocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results indicate that IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated PBMC and the release of MCP1, MIP1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated monocytes. Furthermore, we confirmed previous reports that plasma-derived serum IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC, and up-regulates the release of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) from resting and LPS-stimulated monocytes and resting PBMC. This IgA-mediated up-regulation of IL-1RA is independent of the simultaneous up-regulation of IL-1β release, as shown by blocking the biological activity of IL-1β with a neutralizing antibody. On the other hand, we also found an IgA-induced pro-inflammatory activity, namely IgA-mediated up-regutation of the release of pro-inflammatory IL-1β as well as down-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-12p40 from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC and a down-regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β from resting and LPS-stimulated PBMC. We conclude that human serum IgA has both an anti-inflammatory and a pro-inflammatory capacity and this dual capacity might contribute to the feedback mechanisms maintaining a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:15932509

  5. Development of Antihuman IgG Antibodies and Hematologic Deficits but Not Clinical Abnormalities in C57BL/6 Mice after Repeated Administration of Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, David A; Smith, Lynnae M; Klaver, Andrea C; Brzezinski, Heather A; Morrison, Essie I; Coffey, Mary P; Steficek, Barbara A; Cook, Susan S

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) preparations consist of purified human immunoglobulins collected from large numbers of healthy persons and are used to treat autoimmune, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory disorders. Studying the effects of IvIg effects in experimental animal models might clarify its mechanisms of action in these disorders, but whether ‘serum sickness’ or other abnormalities occur after repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent animals is unknown. In the current study, male C57BL/6 mice (8 to 10 wk old; n = 27) received IvIg (1 g/kg IP) weekly for 6 wk. They were observed for clinical abnormalities, and body weight, temperature, renal function, hematologic parameters, and serum antihuman IgG antibodies were measured before and during treatment. Postmortem evaluations were performed on kidney, spleen, liver, and heart. No clinical or histologic abnormalities were noted despite a transient increase in BUN. Mean antibody levels to human IgG on days 21 and 43 after IvIg administration were increased by 23-fold compared with pretreatment levels. 88% and 89% of the mice were antibody responders on those days. Unexpectedly, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and RBC, WBC, lymphocyte, and platelet counts decreased after IvIg administration. These findings suggest that although it does not produce serum sickness, repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent mice induces a strong humoral immune response and hematologic deficits of unknown etiology. These factors could cause the effects of IvIg preparations in mouse models of human disease to differ from their effects in the human disorders. PMID:22330649

  6. Development of antihuman IgG antibodies and hematologic deficits but not clinical abnormalities in C57BL/6 mice after repeated administration of human intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Smith, Lynnae M; Klaver, Andrea C; Brzezinski, Heather A; Morrison, Essie I; Coffey, Mary P; Steficek, Barbara A; Cook, Susan S

    2012-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) preparations consist of purified human immunoglobulins collected from large numbers of healthy persons and are used to treat autoimmune, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory disorders. Studying the effects of IvIg effects in experimental animal models might clarify its mechanisms of action in these disorders, but whether 'serum sickness' or other abnormalities occur after repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent animals is unknown. In the current study, male C57BL/6 mice (8 to 10 wk old; n = 27) received IvIg (1 g/kg IP) weekly for 6 wk. They were observed for clinical abnormalities, and body weight, temperature, renal function, hematologic parameters, and serum antihuman IgG antibodies were measured before and during treatment. Postmortem evaluations were performed on kidney, spleen, liver, and heart. No clinical or histologic abnormalities were noted despite a transient increase in BUN. Mean antibody levels to human IgG on days 21 and 43 after IvIg administration were increased by 23-fold compared with pretreatment levels. 88% and 89% of the mice were antibody responders on those days. Unexpectedly, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and RBC, WBC, lymphocyte, and platelet counts decreased after IvIg administration. These findings suggest that although it does not produce serum sickness, repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent mice induces a strong humoral immune response and hematologic deficits of unknown etiology. These factors could cause the effects of IvIg preparations in mouse models of human disease to differ from their effects in the human disorders.

  7. The murine homolog of human Nectin1δ serves as a species nonspecific mediator for entry of human and animal αherpesviruses in a pathway independent of a detectable binding to gD

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Laura; Lopez, Marc; Avitabile, Elisa; Stefan, Alessandra; Cocchi, Francesca; Adelaide, Jose; Lecocq, Eric; Dubreuil, Patrice; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2000-01-01

    The full-length cDNA of the murine homolog of human nectin1δ (mNectin1δ), also known as human poliovirus receptor related 1 (PRR1) or herpesvirus entry mediator C, was cloned and showed a >90% identity with its human counterpart. mNectin1δ is expressed in some murine cell lines, exemplified by NIH 3T3 and L cells, and in murine tissues. It mediates entry of an extended range of herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains, porcine pseudorabies virus (PrV), and bovine herpesvirus 1. A soluble form of the mediator blocked infectivity in mNectin1δ and human nectin1δ (hNectin1δ)-expressing cells, suggesting a physical interaction of the mediator with virions. The higher concentrations of soluble mNectin1 required to block infectivity relative to soluble hNectin1 suggest that the target of the two molecules is not identical. Entry of HSV, but not PrV, was blocked by soluble mNectin1δ in NIH 3T3 and L cells. Two features were unexpected. First, soluble mNectin1δ failed to physically interact with HSV glycoprotein D (gD) at a detectable level, although it interacted physically with virions. Second, coexpression of mNectin1δ and HSV gD did not restrict HSV or PrV infection, whereas coexpression of hNectin and gD did restrict infection, suggesting that mNectin1δ fails to be sequestered by HSV gD. We conclude that mNectin1δ serves as a species-nonspecific mediator for entry of the human and animal αherpesviruses. This activity, at least for HSV, is independent of a detectable binding to gD. PMID:10781093

  8. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  9. An electrochemical quartz crystal impedance study on anti-human immunoglobulin G immobilization in the polymer grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2005-09-15

    The polymeric film grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode was studied as a novel matrix for immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) via the electrochemical quartz crystal impedance analysis (EQCIA) method. The growth of the polymeric films at Au electrodes during dopamine oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and the immobilization of anti-human IgG into the polymeric films during their growth have been traced at real time. Lysozyme control experiments suggested that anti-human IgG was electrostatically incorporated into the polymeric film. Also, the porosity of the polymeric films has been discussed by measuring the "wet" and "dry" frequency shifts. Compared with a polypyrrole film immobilized with anti-human IgG, the proposed matrix possessed a larger amount of specific binding sites for human IgG by subsequent immunoreaction tests. The association constant of the anti-human IgG immunoreaction was obtained with satisfactory results.

  10. Quantitative immunoglobulins in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Howard C; Quinn, James M

    2009-01-01

    Although age-related changes in serum immunoglobulins are well described in childhood, alterations in immunoglobulins in the elderly are less well described and published. This study was designed to better define expected immunoglobulin ranges and differences in adults of differing decades of life. Sera from 404 patients, aged 20-89 years old were analyzed for quantitative immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA). The patients with diagnoses or medications known to affect immunoglobulin levels were identified while blinded to their immunoglobulin levels. A two-factor ANOVA was performed using decade of life and gender on both the entire sample population as well as the subset without any disease or medication expected to alter immunoglobulin levels. A literature review was also performed on all English language articles evaluating quantitative immunoglobulin levels in adults >60 years old. For the entire population, IgM was found to be higher in women when compared with men (p < 0.001) and lower in the oldest sample population compared with the youngest population (p < 0.001). For the population without diseases known to affect immunoglobulin levels, the differences in IgM with gender and age were maintained (p < or = 0.001) and IgA levels were generally higher in the older population when compared with the younger population (p = 0.009). Elderly patients without disease known to affect immunoglobulin levels have higher serum IgA levels and lower serum IgM levels. Women have higher IgM levels than men throughout life. IgG levels are not significantly altered in an older population.

  11. Poliomyelitis: immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of the human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M

    1980-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase method has been used to demonstrate the presence of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of poliomyelitis. These cells were found in considerable numbers in the areas of damage during the acute phase, and persisted at the same sites, though in smaller numbers, during the convalescent phase for at least 8 months. Most of the positively stained cells were plasma cells. IgA was the commonest heavy chain type demonstrated, with lesser amounts also of IgG and, during the acute phase, IgM. In the acute phase more lambda than kappa light chain was demonstrated but in the convalescent phase this ratio was reversed. More light chain than heavy chain was demonstrable during the acute phase. The significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6771081

  12. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  13. Synthesis of maleimide-functionalyzed HPMA-copolymers and in vitro characterization of the aRAGE- and human immunoglobulin (huIgG)-polymer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tappertzhofen, Kristof; Metz, Verena V; Hubo, Mario; Barz, Matthias; Postina, Rolf; Jonuleit, Helmut; Zentel, Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    Herein the synthesis of antibody-polymer conjugates, with a quite narrow dispersity based on the polymer HPMA, are reported. These conjugates are synthesized by coupling antibodies to maleimide-functionalized poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-methacrylamide) (poly-HPMA) copolymers derived through reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate via the intermediate step of an activated ester polymer. We develop a protocol that allows the attachment of two different model antibodies, monoclonal anti-RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products) antibody, and polyclonal human immunoglobulin (huIgG). Modification of the antibody and conjugation is monitored by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Preserved affinity is demonstrated by Western Blott and cell-uptake analysis, for example, to cells of the immune system. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparison of three immunosensor methods (surface plasmon resonance, screen-printed and classical amperometric immunosensors) for immunoglobulin G determination in human serum and animal or powdered milks.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Mauro; Martini, Elisabetta; Campanella, Luigi; Favero, Gabriele; Carlucci, Luciano; Mazzei, Franco

    2013-01-25

    Within the framework of research carried out by our team aimed at developing new immunological methods to determine proteins such as immunoglobulins G in different biological matrixes, for instance, serum and milk, tests were performed on several immunosensors based on different transducer types, i.e. amperometric (classical or screen-printed) electrodes for hydrogen peroxide. Lastly the feasibility of constructing immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was investigated. "Competitive" immunological procedures were used in the first two cases. Conversely, the surface plasmon resonance transduction technique allowed a "direct" measurement. Applications were performed on human serum, powdered milks for babies and particularly on several animal milks, in the case of buffalo milk seeking a routine control method to identify possible inflammatory affections in the animals.

  15. Introduction of a CD40L genomic fragment via a human artificial chromosome vector permits cell-type-specific gene expression and induces immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Li, Yanze C; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using cDNA driven by an exogenous promoter is not suited for genetic disorders that require intrinsic expression of a transgene, such as hyperimmunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (HIGM), which is caused by mutations in the CD40L gene. The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector has the potential to solve this problem, because it can be used to transfer large genomic fragments containing their own regulatory elements. In this study, we examined whether introduction of a genomic fragment of CD40L via the HAC vector permits intrinsic expression of the transgene and has an effect on immunoglobulin secretion. We constructed an HAC vector carrying the mouse CD40L genomic fragment (mCD40L-HAC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and transferred the mCD40L-HAC vector into a human CD4-positive active T-cell line (Jurkat) and a human myeloid cell line (U937) via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). The mCD40L-HAC vector permits mCD40L expression in human active T cells but not in human myeloid cells. The mCD40L-HAC also functions to stimulate mouse B cells derived from CD40L(-/-) mice, inducing secretion of IgG. This study may be an initial step toward the therapeutic application of HAC vectors for intrinsic expression of genes, a potential new direction for genome-based gene therapy.

  16. Monomeric Immunoglobulin A from Plasma Inhibits Human Th17 Responses In Vitro Independent of FcαRI and DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Das, Mrinmoy; Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Meenu; Wymann, Sandra; Jordi, Monika; Vonarburg, Cédric; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2017-01-01

    Circulating immunoglobulins including immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM play a critical role in the immune homeostasis by modulating functions of immune cells. These functions are mediated in part by natural antibodies. However, despite being second most abundant antibody in the circulation, the immunoregulatory function of IgA is relatively unexplored. As Th17 cells are the key mediators of a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, we investigated the ability of monomeric IgA (mIgA) isolated from pooled plasma of healthy donors to modulate human Th17 cells. We show that mIgA inhibits differentiation and amplification of human Th17 cells and the production of their effector cytokine IL-17A. mIgA also suppresses IFN-γ responses under these experimental conditions. Suppressive effect of mIgA on Th17 responses is associated with reciprocal expansion of FoxP3-positive regulatory T cells. The effect of mIgA on Th17 cells is dependent on F(ab′)2 fragments and independent of FcαRI (CD89) and DC-SIGN. Mechanistically, the modulatory effect of mIgA on Th17 cells implicates suppression of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, mIgA binds to CD4+ T cells and recognizes in a dose-dependent manner the receptors for cytokines (IL-6Rα and IL-1RI) that mediate Th17 responses. Our findings thus reveal novel anti-inflammatory functions of IgA and suggest potential therapeutic utility of mIgA in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that implicate Th17 cells. PMID:28352269

  17. A significant effect of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand human leucocyte antigen-C on fibrosis progression in chronic C hepatitis with or without liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buhler, Stéphane; Giostra, Emiliano; Gbame, Corinne; de Rham, Casimir; Mullhaupt, Beat; Dufour, Jean-François; Majno, Pietro; Negro, Francesco; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Villard, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors with their human leucocyte antigen ligands drives the activation and inhibition of natural killer cells. Natural killer cells could be implicated in the development of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C. We analysed 206 non-transplanted and 53 liver transplanted patients, selected according to their Metavir fibrosis stage. Several variables such as the number of activator killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors or the human leucocyte antigen ligands were considered in multinomial and logistic regression models. Possible confounding variables were also investigated. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors were not significant predictors of the fibrosis stage. Conversely, a significant reduction of the human leucocyte antigen-C1C2 genotype was observed in the most advanced fibrosis stage group (F4) in both cohorts. Furthermore, the progression rate of fibrosis was almost 10 times faster in the subgroup of patients after liver transplantation, and human leucocyte antigen-C1C2 was significantly reduced in this cohort compared with non-transplanted patients. This study suggests a possible role of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and their ligands in the development of liver damage. The absence of C1 and C2 ligands heterozygosity could lead to less inhibition of natural killer cells and a quicker progression to a high level of fibrosis in patients infected with hepatitis C virus, especially following liver transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Indirect hemagglutination inhibition reactions as a method of titrating immune serums. V. Application of the reaction to the quantitative determination of immunoglobulins A, M and G in human blood sera].

    PubMed

    Konikova, R E; Semenova, B N; Noskov, F S; Shakhanina, K L; Malkina, L A

    1975-01-01

    The authors present the results of using the indirect hemagglutination inhibition test (IHIT) for quantitative determination of A, M and G immunoglobulins in the blood sera of humans in comparison with the method of radial immunodiffusion in agar (RID) after Mancini. The results of IHIT were no less precise and reproducible than those of RID. The significance of the correlation coefficient of grades after Spirman constituted greater than 99.9% for both tests. On this basis a conclusion was made that, having a number of advantages over RID, IHIT could be recommended for quantitative titration of immunoglobulins of various classes.

  19. Effects of functional water on heart rate, heart rate variability, and salivary immunoglobulin a in healthy humans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Benny

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of drinking an average dietary volume of functional water on blood pressure, short-term cardiovascular variables, and salivary immunoglobulin A. Subjects were studied in a randomized pre-post crossover design the morning after an overnight fast. Fifteen (15) healthy nonsmoking subjects, 8 males and 7 females, aged between 15 and 49 years, participated in the study. Short-term (10 minute) electrocardiography was measured in the participants before and after drinking either control mineral or functional water. The measurements were randomized, double blinded, and held two weeks apart. Saliva was collected for 4 minutes before the start of each electrocardiograph measurement. Blood pressure was monitored at 5 minute intervals for one hour as the mean of triplicate consecutive measurements. Drinking 100 mL of control mineral or functional water did not alter arterial blood pressure in the 60 minutes post-drinking. Drinking control mineral water led to a significant fall in the heart rate, although all time domain and power density parameters remained unaffected. Consumption of functional water resulted in a significant difference in all time domain measures and in three of the power density parameters. The heart rate fell, while RR interbeat intervals, standard deviation of the normal-to-normal heartbeats (SDNN), and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals (RMSSD) increased. A large rise in low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power had a significant effect on total power, indicating homeodynamic balance. Elevated LF power indicated intensified spectral power at frequencies in the range of 0.1 Hz, thus improving autonomic stability. The effect on the heart rate may confirm changes in cellular metabolism. Parasympathetic pathway activation stimulated secretory immunoglobulin A on mucosal surfaces, which protects against pathogenic invasion. The drinking of functional water in healthy subjects

  20. Circulating human CD27-IgA+ memory-B cells recognize bacteria with polyreactive immunoglobulins1

    PubMed Central

    Berkowska, Magdalena A.; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; de Ridder, Dick; Ng, Yen Shing; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.; Meffre, Eric; van Zelm, Menno C.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of immunoglobulin (Ig)A production occurs in mucosal tissue following T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antigen responses. To study the nature of each of these responses, we analyzed the gene expression and Ig reactivity profiles of T-cell dependent CD27+IgA+ and T-cell independent CD27−IgA+ circulating memory-B cells. Gene expression profiles of IgA+ subsets were highly similar to each other and to IgG+ memory-B-cell subsets with typical upregulation of activation markers and downregulation of inhibitory receptors. However, we identified the mucosa-associated CCR9 and RUNX2 genes to be specifically upregulated in CD27−IgA+ B cells. We also found that CD27−IgA+ B cells expressed antibodies with distinct Ig repertoire and reactivity than those from CD27+IgA+ B cells. Indeed, antibodies from CD27−IgA+ B cells were weakly mutated, often utilized Igλ chain and were enriched in polyreactive clones recognizing various bacterial species. Hence, T-cell independent IgA responses are likely involved in the maintenance of gut homeostasis through the production of polyreactive mutated IgA antibodies with crossreactive anti-commensal reactivity. PMID:26150533

  1. Comparison of the indirect immunobead, radiolabeled, and immunofluorescence assays for immunoglobulin G serum antibodies to human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, G.G. Jr.; D'Cruz, O.J.; DeBault, L.E. )

    1991-02-01

    The relative sensitivities of the indirect immunobead test, the indirect flo cytometric immunofluorescence assay, and an indirect radiolabeled antiglobulin assay were compared. Eighteen immunobead test positive sera and 18 negative sera were used as the standard for the other two assays. Of the 18 positive sera, 14 (77%) and 5 (27%) were positive in the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay, respectively. Four (22%) of the low titer immunobead test positive sera were negative by both the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. However, there was a significant positive correlation between the results of the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay (r = 0.73) and between the results of the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the titer of the immunobead test (r = 0.82). The use of an unselected sperm population in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the classical indirect immunofluorescence method using methanol-fixed sperm gave false-positive results in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the immunofluorescence assay. These results suggested that immunoglobulin G antisperm antibody positive sera may be reactive both to sperm surface and internalized sperm antigens.

  2. A comparison of electrochemiluminescence and flow cytometry for the detection of natural latex-specific human immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Kobrynski, L; Tanimune, L; Pawlowski, N A; Douglas, S D; Campbell, D E

    1996-01-01

    In vitro correlates of type 1 hypersensitivity to natural latex (NL) proteins continue to be limited by both sensitivity and specificity. Methods which have detection limits in the picogram range, namely, radioallergosorbent assays (RAST) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), are inadequate for the identification of NL hypersensitivity in certain at-risk groups, such as health care workers. A flow cytometry assay (FCA), previously shown to be comparable to RAST and ELISA in the identification of NL-sensitized pediatric patients with spina bifida, was compared with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) in the evaluation of pediatric patients with spina bifida and NL-sensitized adult health care workers. As with RAST and ELISA, ECL is capable of detecting picogram amounts of specific analyte. The ECL assay detected NL-specific immunoglobulin E (NL-IgE) in three of six health care workers with strong histories of NL hypersensitivity. All six patients were negative by FCA. Further, 2 of 11 spina bifida patients found to be NL-IgE negative by FCA were NL-IgE positive by ECL. These findings suggest that in sensitivity the ECL assay is an improvement over the FCA for the identification of NL-sensitive individuals. PMID:8770502

  3. In this issue: Nef, a lingering problem; are there better immunoglobulins for human use; and Takayasu arteritis, still a mystery.

    PubMed

    Bot, Adrian

    2012-12-01

    The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology brings the latest in three different areas of basic and clinical immunology. First, there is the lingering question of residual HIV-related pathology in patients on chronic antiretroviral therapy. The specific role of Nef in the macrophage-mediated disease manifested through lymphoma, metabolic disease and neurological disorder, is extensively discussed. A second topic is a clinical immunology one, a critical perspective on the efficacy and safety profile of various preparations of immunoglobulin products currently prescribed for a range of immunodeficiencies. Surprisingly, the authors showed that while the available preparations are equivalent from efficacy standpoint, they differ from the standpoint of toxicity. The third subject is again, in the arena of clinical immunology and deals with a relatively rare yet extremely puzzling disease -Takayasu arteritis -with a pathogenesis that needs elucidation and a dire need for better treatments. The authors provide a state of the art in terms of genetic association, other factors possibly involved in the onset and progression of this unusual inflammatory disease of large arteries, and provide a perspective on current standard of care and potential usefulness of TNF-α blockade as therapy for Takayasu arteritis.

  4. Racially restricted contribution of immunoglobulin Fcγ and Fcγ receptor genotypes to humoral immunity to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Namboodiri, A M; Kistner-Griffin, E; Iwasaki, M; Kasuga, Y; Hamada, G S; Tsugane, S

    2013-03-01

    Tumour-associated antigen human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is over-expressed in 25-30% of breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Naturally occurring anti-HER2 antibody responses have been described in patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. There is significant interindividual variability in antibody responsiveness, but the host genetic factors responsible for this variability are poorly understood. The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether immunoglobulin genetic markers [GM (genetic determinants of γ chains)] and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) alleles contribute to the magnitude of natural antibody responsiveness to HER2 in patients with breast cancer. A total of 855 breast cancer patients from Japan and Brazil were genotyped for several GM and FcγR alleles. They were also characterized for immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies to HER2. In white subjects (n = 263), GM 23-carriers had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than non-carriers of this allele (p = 0·004). At the GM 5/21 locus, the homozygotes for the GM 5 allele had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than the other two genotypes (P = 0·0067). In black subjects (n = 42), FcγRIIa-histidine/histidine homozygotes and FcγRIIIa-phenylalanine/valine heterozygotes were associated with high antibody responses (P = 0·0071 and 0·0275, respectively). FcγR genotypes in white subjects and GM genotypes in black subjects were not associated with anti-HER2 antibody responses. No significant associations were found in other study groups. These racially restricted contributions of GM and FcγR genotypes to humoral immunity to HER2 have potential implications for immunotherapy of breast cancer.

  5. The interactions of calreticulin with immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Møllegaard, Karen Mai; Duus, Karen; Træholt, Sofie Dietz; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S; Feizi, Ten; Hansen, Paul R; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2011-07-01

    Calreticulin is a chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) assisting proteins in achieving the correctly folded structure. Details of the binding specificity of calreticulin are still a matter of debate. Calreticulin has been described as an oligosaccharide-binding chaperone but data are also accumulating in support of calreticulin as a polypeptide binding chaperone. In contrast to mammalian immunoglobulin G (IgG), which has complex type N-glycans, chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) possesses a monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked glycan, which is a ligand for calreticulin. Here, we have used solid and solution-phase assays to analyze the in vitro binding of calreticulin, purified from human placenta, to human IgG and chicken IgY in order to compare the interactions. In addition, peptides from the respective immunoglobulins were included to further probe the binding specificity of calreticulin. The experiments demonstrate the ability of calreticulin to bind to denatured forms of both IgG and IgY regardless of the glycosylation state of the proteins. Furthermore, calreticulin exhibits binding to peptides (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) derived from trypsin digestion of both immunoglobulins. Additionally, calreticulin peptide binding was examined with synthetic peptides covering the IgG Cγ2 domain demonstrating interaction with approximately half the peptides. Our results show that the dominant binding activity of calreticulin in vitro is toward the polypeptide moieties of IgG and IgY even in the presence of the monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide on IgY.

  6. Antigen-specific T8/sup +/ human clone of cells with a nonspecific augmenting function on the T4 cell-B cell helper interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brines, R.D.; Sia, D.Y.; Lehner, T.

    1987-11-15

    The authors isolated a T8/sup +/ T3/sup +/ Ia/sup +/ clone of cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy subject. The clone was expanded and maintained with autologous feed cells, interleukin 2, and a streptococcal antigen. The T8/sup +/ clone of cells responded specifically to the streptococcal antigen, in the absence of accessory cells,and released a soluble factor. Both the cloned cells and the corresponding soluble factor expressed augmenting helper but not suppressor activity. The augmenting helper activity for B cell antibody synthesis was demonstrable only in the presence of autologous T 4 cells. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure antibodies. Although stimulation of the T8/sup +/ cloned cells was antigen-specific, the resulting soluble factor elicited nonspecific antibody synthesis in the presence of T4 and B cells. The T8/sup +/ cloned cell-derived factor was adsorbed by B cells but not by T4 cells. Preliminary studies suggest that the factor has the properties of a B cell growth factor. They suggest that the T8/sup +/ population consists of functionally heterogeneous cell subsets, some that have suppressor function and others that augment the T4/sup +/ helper-inducer activity in B cell antibody synthesis.

  7. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) inhibits anti-CD32 antibody binding to canine DH82 cells and canine monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Taryn A; Miller, Michelle M; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2013-02-15

    The IgG receptors CD16 and CD32 (Fc(γ)RIII and Fc(γ)RII) link the humoral immune response to effector cell immune responses by binding immune complexes. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) consisting of immunoglobulin from pooled donors is reported to block Fc(γ)Rs and has been used to treat a variety of canine autoimmune disorders. Fc(γ)Rs have been poorly described for canine monocytes; therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (1) identify canine monocyte/macrophage Fc(γ)R (CD16 and CD32) expression and (2) demonstrate in vitro hIVIG binding to these receptors. The canine monocyte/macrophage-like cell line (DH82) and monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy dogs were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) for CD16 and CD32 expression using commercially available anti-CD16 and anti-CD32 antibodies directed against the human isoforms. The mean percentage of cells expressing CD16 was 55% of DH82 cells and 13% of blood monocytes and the mean percentage of cells expressing CD32 was 85% of DH82 cells and 73% of blood monocytes. Immunoprecipitation of canine DH82 cells lysate using the same anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies suggested that these anti-human antibodies recognize the canine homologues. To demonstrate Fc(γ)R blockade, cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of hIVIG and then incubated with anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies. The percentage of CD32 expression decreased in a concentration dependent fashion in DH82 cells and blood monocytes after incubation with increasing concentrations of IVIG, suggesting that hIVIG was binding to CD32 and inhibiting anti-CD32 antibody binding. The same results were not demonstrated with anti-CD16 antibody. We believe this is the first report to demonstrate Fc(γ) receptors CD16 and CD32 expression on canine monocytes and in vitro CD32 binding by human IgG, which may represent one of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of hIVIG.

  8. Human immunoglobulin repertoires against tetanus toxoid contain a large and diverse fraction of high-affinity promiscuous V(H) genes.

    PubMed

    de Kruif, John; Kramer, Arjen; Visser, Therèse; Clements, Carina; Nijhuis, Roy; Cox, Freek; van der Zande, Vanessa; Smit, Renate; Pinto, Daniel; Throsby, Mark; Logtenberg, Ton

    2009-04-03

    To study the contribution of antibody light (L) chains to the diversity and binding properties of immune repertoires, a phage display repertoire was constructed from a single human antibody L chain and a large collection of antibody heavy (H) chains harvested from the blood of two human donors immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine. After selection for binding to TT, 129 unique antibodies representing 53 variable immunoglobulin H chain (V(H)) gene rearrangements were isolated. This panel of anti-TT antibodies restricted to a single variable immunoglobulin L chain (V(L)) could be organized into 17 groups binding non-competing epitopes on the TT molecule. Comparison of the V(H) regions in this V(L)-restricted panel with a previously published repertoire of anti-TT V(H) regions with cognate V(H)-V(L) pairing showed a very similar distribution of V(H), D(H) and J(H) gene segment utilization and length of the complementarity-determining region 3 of the H chain. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the single-V(L) anti-TT repertoire unveiled a range of affinities, with a median monovalent affinity of 2 nM. When the single-V(L) anti-TT V(H) repertoire was combined with a collection of naïve V(L) regions and again selected for binding to TT, many of the V(H) genes were recovered in combination with a diversity of V(L) regions. The affinities of a panel of antibodies consisting of a single promiscuous anti-TT V(H) combined with 15 diverse V(L) chains were determined and found to be identical to each other and to the original isolate restricted to a single-V(L) chain. Based on previous estimates of the clonal size of the human anti-TT repertoire, we conclude that up to 25% of human anti-TT-encoding V(H) regions from an immunized repertoire have promiscuous features. These V(H) regions readily combine with a single antibody L chain to result in a large panel of anti-TT antibodies that conserve the expected epitope diversity, V(H) region diversity and affinity of a

  9. Use of human immunoglobulins as an anti-infective treatment: the experience so far and their possible re-emerging role.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Jordi; Jorquera, Juan I

    2017-06-01

    Pooled human immunoglobulins (IGs) are prepared from plasma obtained from healthy donors as a concentrated antibody-containing solution. In addition, high-titer IGs (hyperimmune) against a specific pathogen can be obtained from vaccinated or convalescing donors. Currently, IGs can be used for the treatment of a variety of infections for which no specific therapy exists or that remain difficult to treat. Moreover, the recent pathogen outbreaks for which there is no approved treatment have renewed attention to the role of convalescent plasma and IGs. Areas covered: In this review, a historical perspective of the use of sera and IGs in humans as anti-infective agents (any viral, bacterial, parasitic infection), excluding immunodeficient patients, is presented from early development to the latest clinical studies. A Medline search was conducted to examine the peer-reviewed literature, with no date limits. Expert commentary: Human pooled plasma-derived IG products benefit from the polyclonal response of every individual donor and from the interindividual variability in such response. The trend to increased availability of vaccines for infectious diseases also opens new potential applications of hyperimmune IGs for emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases (e.g.: Ebola, Zika, Dengue), for the prevention and treatment in the general population, healthcare personnel and caregivers.

  10. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) improves the PCR-based isolation of immunoglobulin variable region genes from murine and human lymphoma cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Doenecke, A; Winnacker, E L; Hallek, M

    1997-10-01

    The isolation of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes is usually performed by PCR with consensus primers binding to conserved regions within the V sequences. However, the isolation of Ig genes by this method is hampered in 15-35% by technical difficulties, mostly mismatches of oligonucleotide primers to V sequences. In order to obtain DNA sequences from V heavy chain (VH) genes which could not be amplified with consensus primers, we used a modified PCR technique, the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR in combination with new heavy chain constant region primers for the isolation of human and murine VH genes. In comparison, consensus primer PCR with different sets of previously published oligonucleotide primers was used. Both methods were applied to isolate VH genes from murine B cell lymphoma (A20 and BCL1), myeloma (NS1) and hybridoma (SP6) cell lines and from freshly isolated human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma cells. RACE PCR allowed the amplification and subsequent cloning of the complete VH gene in all cases. In contrast, consensus primer PCR failed to isolate the VH sequence of the murine A20 cell line; this was explained by a mismatch of consensus primers with VH sequences. When both PCR methods amplified VH sequences, the DNA sequences obtained were identical. Taken together, RACE PCR represents a reliable and versatile method for the isolation of VH genes from human and murine lymphoma cells, in particular if consensus primer PCR fails.

  11. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  12. Evidence that human immunoglobulin M rheumatoid factors can Be derived from the natural autoantibody pool and undergo an antigen driven immune response in which somatically mutated rheumatoid factors have lower affinities for immunoglobulin G Fc than their germline counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carayannopoulos, M O; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    2000-04-01

    The question of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)M rheumatoid factors (RF) arise as the result of an abnormal expansion of already existing clones producing natural autoantibodies or emerge as new clones that are somatically mutated owing to an antigen driven immune response has never been conclusively answered. In this study, an inhibition ELISA was utilized to measure the affinities of recombinant antibodies using VH segments reverted back to their closest germline counterparts (germline revertants). In all cases, the somatically mutated parental RFs had a decreased affinity for immunoglobulin (Ig)G Fc compared to the germline revertant, indicating that the antibodies in the germline configuration had the higher affinities. This demonstrates that somatic mutation is not a prerequisite to generate disease associated antibodies. The presence of mutations in the parental IgM RFS suggests that these cells had been involved in a germinal centre reaction. As the germinal centre is the conventional site of the acquisition of mutations during an antigen driven response, these data suggest a role for germinal centres in the generation of the antibody diversity in addition to the selection of higher affinity antibodies. Assuming that only antigen selected cells survive deletion, these data support the hypothesis that IgM RFS can be derived from the natural autoantibody repertoire and result from an antigen driven response. Mechanisms controlling the survival of B cells based on the affinity/avidity of the immunoglobulin receptor are shown to be functional in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Atypical Antigen Recognition Mode of a Shark Immunoglobulin New Antigen Receptor (IgNAR) Variable Domain Characterized by Humanization and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R.; Barelle, Caroline J.; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S.; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  14. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  15. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Immunoglobulin G1 Can Be a Useful Tool for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Human Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Flávia Drumond; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Da Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Romanha, Alvaro José

    2001-01-01

    Two functionally distinct antibodies, categorized as conventional serology antibodies (CSA) and lytic antibodies (LA) have been described in Chagas' disease, based on their ability to bind to fixed epimastigotes (EPI) or live trypomastigotes (TRYPO), respectively. In this study, the profile of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses of CSA and LA were analyzed by flow cytometry using serum samples from chronic chagasic patients with the indeterminate (IND), cardiac (CARD), and digestive (DIG) clinical forms of the disease. The results were expressed as percentage of positive fluorescent parasites (PPFP) for each sample. CSA showed a higher PPFP than LA for all samples. At serum dilutions between 1:256 and 1:2,048, IgG1 anti-EPI was able to distinguish chagasic from nonchagasic individuals. Different profiles of IgG subclasses were observed for CSA and LA. IgG1 and IgG2 were the main subclasses in CSA, whereas IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant ones in LA. The reactivity of IgG2 anti-EPI was greater in IND and CARD than in DIG patients. Furthermore, a low level of IgG1 and IgG3 LA was associated with most of the CARD patients. On the other hand, a high level of IgG1 LA was associated with most of the IND patients. In summary, our findings indicate the potential of IgG1 anti-EPI for serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease, providing further evidence for a protective role of LA, and show that IgG1 anti-live Trypanosoma cruzi TRYPO may be used to predict the risk of cardiac damage in Chagas' disease. PMID:11139203

  16. Immunoglobulin secretion in the human autologous mixed leukocyte reaction. Definition of a suppressor-amplifier circuit using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, P A; Kotzin, B L; Kansas, G S; Engleman, E G

    1982-07-01

    The induction of immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis in the autologous MLR has an absolute requirement for helper/inducer (Leu-3) T cells, whereas an excess of suppressor/cytotoxic (leu-2) cells suppresses the response. The current study was an effort to assess the immunoregulatory potential to T cells activated in the autologous mixed-leukocyte response (MLR). T cells were cultured with autologous non-T cells for 8-9 d, after which the activated T cells were fractionated into subsets with monoclonal antibodies to T cell markers and HLA-DR antigen. Each population was co-cultured in fresh autologous MLR, and on the 8th day of culture, Ig-secreting cells were measured in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. The results show that activated Leu-2, DR+ T cells, but neither Leu-2, DR- nor Leu-3 T cells, were at least 50 times more potent as suppressors of IgM and IgG synthesis than fresh Leu-2 cells alone. The activation of this Leu-2, DR+ subpopulation required Leu-3 cells in the primary culture. Furthermore, in the absence of Leu-2 cells in the second culture, little or no suppression was observed, suggesting that the Leu-2, DR+ cells act to amplify or induce suppressor effects of fresh Leu-2 cells. This indicates that at least two distinct subpopulations of Leu-2 cells are required for maximal suppression of an immune response, and that immunoregulatory circuits analogous to those described in the mouse exist in man.

  17. Human NK cells maintain licensing status and are subject to killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and KIR-ligand inhibition following ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Alderson, Kory A; Phillips, Emily; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Gan, Jacek; Campana, Dario; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Infusion of allogeneic NK cells is a potential immunotherapy for both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) on human NK cells and KIR-ligands on tumor cells influence the magnitude of NK function. To obtain sufficient numbers of activated NK cells for infusion, one potent method uses cells from the K562 human erythroleukemia line that have been transfected to express activating 41BB ligand (41BBL) and membrane-bound interleukin 15 (mbIL15). The functional importance of KIRs on ex vivo expanded NK cells has not been studied in detail. We found that after a 12-day co-culture with K562-mbIL15-41BBL cells, expanded NK cells maintained inhibition specificity and prior in vivo licensing status determined by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions. Addition of an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) induced NK-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and augmented killing of CD20+ target cells. However, partial inhibition induced by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions persisted. Finally, we found that extended co-cultures of NK cells with stimulatory cells transduced to express various KIR-ligands modified both the inhibitory and activating KIR repertoires of the expanded NK cell product. These studies demonstrate that the licensing interactions known to occur during NK ontogeny also influence NK cell function following NK expansion ex vivo with HLA-null stimulatory cells.

  18. Pulmonary administration of interferon Beta-1a-fc fusion protein in non-human primates using an immunoglobulin transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Vallee, Sebastien; Rakhe, Swapnil; Reidy, Thomas; Walker, Sandra; Lu, Qi; Sakorafas, Paul; Low, Susan; Bitonti, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Currently, products containing interferon beta (IFNβ) are injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously. To avoid the necessity of injection, we developed a novel monomeric Fc fusion protein of IFNβ (IFNβFc) that is absorbed via an immunoglobulin transport system present in the upper and central airways upon administration of the drug as an inhaled aerosol. The systemic absorption of IFNβFc through the lung in non-human primates, at deposited doses of 1, 3, and 10 μg/kg, was compared to the absorption of a single 3 μg/kg dose of IFNβ-1a (Avonex®) subcutaneously administered. IFNβFc was well absorbed through the lung, displaying dose proportional increases in serum concentrations, and was biologically active, as shown by increases in plasma neopterin levels. The circulating half-life of IFNβFc was ∼3 times longer (∼30 h) than that of IFNβ-1a, (8-9 h). At approximately equimolar doses of IFNβFc (10 μg/kg) and IFNβ-1a (3 μg/kg), the stimulation of neopterin over background levels was approximately equivalent, demonstrating that the longer half-life of IFNβFc compensated for the lower relative specific antiviral activity of IFNβFc measured in vitro. In conclusion, IFNβFc was efficiently absorbed after pulmonary delivery in non-human primates, retained its biological activity, and may offer a convenient alternative to injectable IFNβ.

  19. The human fibroblast growth factor receptor genes: a common structural arrangement underlies the mechanisms for generating receptor forms that differ in their third immunoglobulin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D E; Lu, J; Chen, H; Werner, S; Williams, L T

    1991-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms by which multiple forms of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are generated, we have mapped the arrangement of exons and introns in the human FGF receptor 1 (FGFR 1) gene (flg). We found three alternative exons encoding a portion of the third immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain of the receptor. One of these alternatives encodes a sequence that is part of a secreted form of FGFR 1. The other two encode sequences that are likely part of transmembrane forms of FGFR 1. One of these forms has not been previously reported in published cDNAs. Also, we have determined the structural organization of a portion of the human FGFR 2 gene (bek) and found a similar arrangement of alternative exons for the third Ig-like domain. The arrangement of these genes suggests that there are conserved mechanisms governing the expression of secreted FGF receptors as well as the expression of at least two distinct membrane-spanning forms of the FGF receptors. The diverse forms appear to be generated by alternative splicing of mRNA and selective use of polyadenylation signals. Images PMID:1652059

  20. Existence of an immunoglobulin G component of naturally occurring HLA class I antibodies that are not directed against self-antigens in human serum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; Saito, S; Nakazawa, Y; Kobayashi, N; Matsuda, M; Matsumoto, Y; Hosoyama, T; Koike, K

    2008-08-01

    We compared the frequency of immunoglobulin G (IgG) type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antibodies between patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and healthy controls using a highly sensitive FlowPRA method. Sixteen of 130 normal healthy males and 2 of 10 normal females without a history of pregnancy (none had ever been transfused) possessed HLA class I antibodies. In SLE, male, but not female patients, showed a significant increase in the frequency of the antibodies compared with the corresponding controls. The antibodies did not appear to be involved in the development of SLE because of no substantial relationship to the incidence of cytopenia or SLE disease activity index score. Each individual had 1-31 types of HLA class I antibodies. Interestingly, HLA class I antibodies did not correspond to the individual's own HLA antigens. Eight of 32 types of HLA class I antigens detected were rare in the Japanese population. These results suggest that an IgG component of naturally occurring HLA class I antibodies exists in human serum and that these antibodies are not antibodies against self-antigens.

  1. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Fully Human Immunoglobulin G1 Monoclonal Antibody to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alginate in Murine Keratitis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Tanweer; Pier, Gerald B.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of ulcerative keratitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult, time-consuming, and uncomfortable owing to the need for the frequent application of antibiotic drops to the infected corneal surface. We examined here whether a fully human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to the conserved alginate surface polysaccharide of P. aeruginosa could mediate protective immunity against typically nonmucoid strains isolated from human cases of keratitis. MAb F429 effectively opsonized alginate-positive, but not alginate-negative, nonmucoid strains in conjunction with phagocytes and complement. Prophylactic administration of MAb F429 18 h prior to infection with two clinical isolates significantly reduced bacterial levels in the eye and the associated corneal pathology. Along similar lines, systemic intraperitoneal injection, as well as topical application of the MAb onto the infected eye, starting 8 h postinfection in both experimental protocols resulted in significant reductions in bacteria in the eye, as well as minimizing pathological damage to the cornea. These findings indicate that MAb F429 could be useful as an additional therapeutic component for the treatment of P. aeruginosa keratitis. PMID:18644881

  2. Immunoglobulin E and Mast Cell Proteases Are Potential Risk Factors of Human Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Xu-Hui; Jin, Kui-Li; Ye, Guo-fen; Qian, Li; Li, Bo; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mast-cell activation and inflammation are important in obesity and diabetes. Plasma levels of mast cell proteases and the mast cell activator immunoglobulin E (IgE) may serve as novel inflammatory markers that associate with the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results A total of 340 subjects 55 to 75 years of age were grouped according to the American Diabetes Association 2003 criteria of normal glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes mellitus. The Kruskal-Wallis test demonstrated significant differences in plasma IgE levels (P = 0.008) among groups with different glucose tolerance status. Linear regression analysis revealed significant correlations between plasma levels of chymase (P = 0.030) or IgE (P = 0.022) and diabetes mellitus. Ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that IgE was a significant risk factor of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR]: 1.674, P = 0.034). After adjustment for common diabetes risk factors, including age, sex, hypertension, body-mass index, cholesterol, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and mast cell chymase and tryptase, IgE remained a significant risk factor (OR: 1.866, P = 0.015). Two-variable ordinal logistic analysis indicated that interactions between hs-CRP and IgE, or between IgE and chymase, increased further the risks of developing pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus before (OR: 2.204, P = 0.044; OR: 2.479, P = 0.033) and after (OR: 2.251, P = 0.040; OR: 2.594, P = 0.026) adjustment for common diabetes risk factors. Conclusions Both IgE and chymase associate with diabetes status. While IgE and hs-CRP are individual risk factors of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus, interactions of IgE with hs-CRP or with chymase further increased the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. PMID:22194960

  3. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  4. Enhancing the Affinity of Anti-Human α-Thrombin 15-mer DNA Aptamer and Anti-Immunoglobulin E Aptamer by PolyT Extension.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunlong; Li, Yapiao; Zhang, Dapeng; Wang, Hailin; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-09-05

    Aptamer affinity capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) for protein detection takes advantage of aptamers for their ease of synthesis and labeling, small size, and having many negative charges. Its success relies on the high binding affinity of aptamers. One 15-mer DNA aptamer (5'-GGT TGG TGT GGT TGG-3', Apt15) shows desirable specificity for human α-thrombin, an important enzyme with multiple functions in blood. However, Apt15 has weak binding affinity, and the use of Apt15 in affinity CE-LIF analysis remains challenging. Here we reported that extension of Apt15 at the 3'-end with a polyT tail having length of 18 T or longer significantly enhanced its affinity and enabled a well-isolated and stable peak for thrombin-aptamer complex in affinity CE. It was likely that the improvement of binding affinity resulted from double binding, an additional interaction of the polyT tail with thrombin in addition to the Apt15 section binding to thrombin. With dye-labeled Apt15 having a T25 tail, we achieved detection of thrombin at concentrations as low as 0.1 nM by affinity CE-LIF. This aptamer probe specifically bound to human α-thrombin, showing negligible affinity for human β- and γ-thrombin, which are proteolyzed derivatives of human alpha α-thrombin and share similar structure. This strategy of adding a polyT extension also enhanced the binding affinity of anti-immunoglobulin E aptamer in CE-LIF analysis, showing that the affinity enhancement approach is not limited to the thrombin-binding aptamer and has potential for more applications in bioanalysis.

  5. A comparison of human and macaque (Macaca mulatta) immunoglobulin germline V regions and its implications for antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chahboun, Siham; Pelat, Thibaut

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five V regions encoded by the sequenced genome of one Macaca mulatta specimen have been identified by homology and paired with similar human counterparts. When the human V region of each pair presented no allelic polymorphism, it was directly compared with its homolog. This was the case for 37 pairs and percents of identity ranged between 84–97%. When the human V region presented allelic polymorphism, this polymorphism was found to be significantly smaller (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.03 for IGHV, IGLV, IGKV regions respectively), 4.2-fold on average, than the differences observed between human and macaque V regions. Similar results were obtained when analyzing framework regions (FRs) only. These results, in agreement with others, demonstrate the existence of differences between human and macaque V regions, confirm the need for the humanization of macaque V regions intended for therapeutic use and call into question the validity of patents relying on the “undistinguishable” character of human and macaque V regions or FRs. PMID:20562531

  6. A comparison of human and macaque (Macaca mulatta) immunoglobulin germline V regions and its implications for antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Chahboun, Siham; Pelat, Thibaut

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five V regions encoded by the sequenced genome of one Macaca mulatta specimen have been identified by homology, and paired with similar human counterparts. When the human V region of each pair presented no allelic polymorphism, it was directly compared with its homolog. This was the case for 37 pairs, and percents of identity ranged between 84 to 97%. When the human V region presented allelic polymorphism, this polymorphism was found to be significantly smaller (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p = 0.03 for IGHV, IGLV, IGKV regions respectively), 4.2-fold on average, than the differences observed between human and macaque V regions. Similar results were obtained when analysing framework regions (FRs) only. These results, in agreement with others, demonstrate the existence of differences between human and macaque V regions, confirm the need for the humanization of macaque V regions intended for therapeutic use and call into question the validity of patents relying on the "undistinguishable" character of human and macaque V regions or FRs.

  7. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  8. Polyclonal immunoglobulins from a chronic hepatitis C virus patient protect human liver-chimeric mice from infection with a homologous hepatitis C virus strain.

    PubMed

    Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip; Desombere, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Alter, Harvey; Purcell, Robert H; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-06-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is widely debated. Most chronically infected patients have immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies capable of neutralizing HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) in vitro. It is, however, not clear whether these IgG can prevent a de novo HCV infection in vivo and contribute to the control of viremia in infected individuals. We addressed this question with homologous in vivo protection studies in human liver-urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+) severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. Chimeric mice were loaded with chronic phase polyclonal IgG and challenged 3 days later with a 100% infectious dose of the acute phase H77C virus, both originating from patient H. Passive immunization induced sterilizing immunity in five of eight challenged animals. In the three nonprotected animals, the HCV infection was attenuated, as evidenced by altered viral kinetics in comparison with five control IgG-treated animals. Plasma samples obtained from the mice at viral challenge neutralized H77C-HCVpp at dilutions as high as 1/400. Infection was completely prevented when, before administration to naïve chimeric mice, the inoculum was pre-incubated in vitro at an IgG concentration normally observed in humans. Polyclonal IgG from a patient with a long-standing HCV infection not only displays neutralizing activity in vitro using the HCVpp system, but also conveys sterilizing immunity toward the ancestral HCV strain in vivo, using the human liver-chimeric mouse model. Both experimental systems will be useful tools to identify neutralizing antibodies for future clinical use.

  9. Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin a secretion increases after 4-weeks ingestion of chlorella-derived multicomponent supplement in humans: a randomized cross over study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chlorella, a unicellular green alga that grows in fresh water, contains high levels of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fibers. Some studies have reported favorable immune function-related effects on biological secretions such as blood and breast milk in humans who have ingested a chlorella-derived multicomponent supplement. However, the effects of chlorella-derived supplement on mucosal immune functions remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether chlorella ingestion increases the salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) secretion in humans using a blind, randomized, crossover study design. Methods Fifteen men took 30 placebo and 30 chlorella tablets per day for 4 weeks separated by a 12-week washout period. Before and after each trial, saliva samples were collected from a sterile cotton ball that was chewed after overnight fasting. Salivary SIgA concentrations were measured using ELISA. Results Compliance rates for placebo and chlorella ingestions were 97.0 ± 1.0% and 95.3 ± 1.6%, respectively. No difference was observed in salivary SIgA concentrations before and after placebo ingestion (P = 0.38). However, salivary SIgA concentrations were significantly elevated after chlorella ingestion compared to baseline (P < 0.01). No trial × period interaction was identified for the saliva flow rates. Although the SIgA secretion rate was not affected by placebo ingestion (P = 0.36), it significantly increased after 4-week chlorella ingestion than before intake (P < 0.01). Conclusions These results suggest 4-week ingestion of a chlorella-derived multicomponent supplement increases salivary SIgA secretion and possibly improves mucosal immune function in humans. PMID:21906314

  10. Structure of the glycopeptides of a human gamma 1-immunoglobulin G (Tem) myeloma protein as determined by 360-megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grey, A A; Narasimhan, S; Brisson, J R; Schachter, H; Carver, J P

    1982-12-01

    High field magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized to deduce the primary structure of the glycopeptides from a human myeloma gamma 1-immunoglobulin G (Tem). The major structures found belong to the biantennary complex class of glycopeptides, with a minor (5%) fraction belonging to the bisected biantennary complex class. In the biantennary class, three structures were present with different residues at the termini of the alpha Man(1-6) and alpha Man(1-3) arms: (i) with beta Gal(1-4) and alpha NeuNAc(2-6), respectively (33%); (ii) with beta Gal(1-4) and beta Gal(1-4), respectively (45%); and (iii) beta Gal(1-4) and beta GlcNAc(1-2), respectively (17%). In the bisected biantennary class only the latter termini were found for the two arms. These results suggest that the galactosyl transferase in these cells has a preference for the beta GlcNAc(1-2) of the alpha Man(1-6) arm and that the sialyltransferase has a preference for the beta Gal(1-4) of the alpha Man(1-3) arm.

  11. Sera of patients with high titers of immunoglobulin G against Toxoplasma gondii induce secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pelloux, H; Chumpitazi, B F; Santoro, F; Polack, B; Vuillez, J P; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1992-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii alone does not induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion by human monocytes and macrophages. Nevertheless, sera from infected patients with high titers of specific immunoglobulin G antibodies against T. gondii induce TNF-alpha secretion, which is significantly higher than the corresponding induction by negative sera (P less than 0.05). After incubation with the positive serum, parasites also induce secretion of this cytokine, but TNF-alpha levels are lower (11.4 to 71.8%) than those obtained with positive serum alone. Therefore, this secretion seems to be elicited in part by antibody-T. gondii complexes and/or another unidentified factor(s), probably different from lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1, TNF-alpha, and gamma interferon. In this study, monocytes secreted more TNF-alpha into the culture fluid than macrophages did (P less than 0.05), and no correlation was observed between secretion of this cytokine by the monocytes and the intracellular multiplication of the parasites, evaluated by [3H]uracil incorporation. Sera from patients with other infections diseases did not induce secretion of TNF-alpha; however, serum free of antibodies to T. gondii, obtained from patients with leishmaniosis, also stimulated secretion of the cytokine. PMID:1612737

  12. Early, anti-immunoglobulin induced events prior to Na+-K+ pump activation: an analysis in a monoclonal human B-lymphoma cell population.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, R; Iversen, J G; Godal, T

    1983-10-01

    Events following F(ab)2 anti-delta immunoglobulin stimulation of monoclonal (leukemic) human B cells prior to Na+-K+ pump activation were investigated in vitro. This pump activation, measured by ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, appeared susceptible to the phospholipid-interacting drugs tetracaine and quinacrine, to the antioxydant nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), and to the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, while much less susceptible to the methylation inhibitor-3-deazaadenosine. The Ca++ ionophore A 23187 appeared to induce pump activation in a way similar to anti-delta, as it was susceptible to the same drugs and as anti-delta had no additional stimulating effect on A 23187-stimulated cells. However, whereas the anti-delta-induced activations appeared independent of the extracellular Ca++ activity, [Ca++]e, the activation by A 23187 was potentiated by addition of the Ca++ chelator ethyleneglycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N'-tetracetic acid (EGTA). Estimations by fluorescent chelator method (quin 2) showed anti-delta to increase the intracellular Ca++ activity, [Ca++]i both in the absence and presence of EGTA. A 23187 increased [Ca++]i strongly in Ca++ medium, but was weaker, more similar to the anti-delta response, in EGTA medium. It is suggested that Na+-K+ pump activation after anti-Ig stimulation in B cells may follow Ca++ mobilization from internal stores. The trifluoperazine susceptibility suggests that calmodulin regulation is involved.

  13. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Subclass Distribution and IgG1 Avidity of Antibodies in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals after Revaccination with Tetanus Toxoid

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, F. P.; van Tol, M. J. D.; Jol-van der Zijde, C. M.; van Furth, R.; van Dissel, J. T.

    1999-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals the amount of antibodies formed after vaccination with T-cell-dependent recall antigens such as tetanus toxoid is proportional to the peripheral blood CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts. To investigate whether the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass distribution and avidity of the antibodies produced after vaccination are affected as well, we gave 13 HIV-infected adults with low CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts (<200 × 106/liter; group I), 11 HIV-infected adults with intermediate CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts (≥200 × 106/liter; group II), and 5 healthy controls booster immunizations with tetanus toxoid. The prevaccination antibody concentrations against tetanus toxoid were similar in the HIV-infected and healthy adults. After vaccination the total IgG and the IgG1 anti-tetanus toxoid antibody concentrations were significantly lower in group I than in group II and the controls. The avidity of the IgG1 anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies formed by HIV-infected adults was within the range for healthy controls, irrespective of their CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts. PMID:10225835

  14. Stabilization of Human Immunoglobulin G Encapsulated within Biodegradable Poly (Cyclohexane-1, 4-diyl Acetone Dimethylene Ketal) (PCADK)/ Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Blend Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Yu, Changhui; Liu, Jiaxin; Sun, Fengying; Teng, Lesheng; Li, Youxin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare PCADK/PLGA-blend microspheres for improving the stability of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). The short half-life of antibodies limit their development as therapeutic agents, thus PLGA microspheres were prepared to sustained release antibodies and prolong their half-life. However, the acidic intra-microsphere environment causes the loss of antibody stability and activity. In this study, the effect of PCADK or PLGA degradation products on IgG was investigated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and antigenicity detection. The degradation products of PCADK exerted a larger influence on IgG than that of PLGA. Then PCADK/PLGA microspheres were prepared by the emulsionsolvent evaporation method and systematically characterized and 20% PCADK were selected as the optimal proportion. In addition, the release profile of microspheres and the stability of the released IgG were investigated. The stability of the IgG released from the PCADK/PLGA microspheres was better than that of IgG released from the PLGA microspheres. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to determine the pH inside the microspheres. The IgG-loaded PCADK/PLGA microspheres have important advantages over the PLGA microspheres in terms of IgG stability and could be a good carrier to deliver antibodies for the treatment of disease.

  15. E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin from human papilloma virus 16 induces dendritic cell maturation and antigen specific activation of T helper 1 response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Hur, Yu Jin; Lee, Suk Jun; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu; Oh, Yu-Koung; Jung, Woon-Won; Seo, Jong Bok; Nam, Myung Hee; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2011-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 causes cervical cancer. Induction of oncogenesis by HPV 16 is primarily dependent on the function of E6 and E7 proteins, which inactivate the function of p53 and pRB, respectively. Thus, blocking the activity of the E6 and E7 proteins from HPV 16 is critical to inhibiting oncogenesis during infection. We have expressed and purified soluble HPV 16 E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin (Ig), which were combined with the constant region of an Ig heavy chain, in a mammalian system. To assess whether soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs induce effective cellular immune responses, immature dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with these fusion proteins. Soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs effectively induced maturation of DCs. Furthermore, immunization with soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs in mice resulted in antigen-specific activation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells. This is the first comprehensive study to show the molecular basis of how soluble HPV 16 E6 or E7 fusion Igs induces Th1 responses through the maturation of DCs. In addition, we show that DC therapy using soluble HPV E6 and E7 fusion Igs may be a valuable tool for controlling the progress of cervical cancer.

  16. Polyclonal activation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes by formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B. I. Immunoglobulin production without DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A "new" polyclonal activator of human peripheral blood B cells, formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B, is described. This bacterium does not stimulate cell proliferation as measured by incorporation of tritiated thymidine but does stimulate a subpopulation of B cells to secrete large amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA in 7-day cell cultures. The immunoglobulins (Ig) produced by cells responding to S. paratyphi B are not specific antibodies against the bacterial antigens. In comparison with other B cell activators (pokeweed mitogen, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, and lipopolysaccharide), S. paratyphi B stimulation produced greater amounts of IgM but less IgG than pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or S. aureus Cowan I; lipopolysaccharide failed to stimulate significant Ig production on day 7 in most cases. In addition, the response to S. paratyphi apparently did not require T cell collaboration. These results suggest that the B cell subpopulation(s) responding to S. paratyphi B may be more differentiated B cells than those responding to either PWM or S. aureus Cowan I. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five patients with common variable immunodeficiency without evidence of abnormal suppressor T cells or monocytes failed to respond to S. paratyphi B, whereas cells from two of the same patients responded well to S. aureus Cowan I and partially to PWM. Thus, S. paratyphi B appears to be superior to other B cell activators for studies of B cell function in normal and abnormal states. PMID:6972434

  17. Crystal structure of the soluble form of the human fcgamma-receptor IIb: a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Sondermann, P; Huber, R; Jacob, U

    1999-01-01

    Fcgamma-receptors (FcgammaRs) represent the link between the humoral and cellular immune responses. Via the binding to FcgammaR-positive cells, immunocomplexes trigger several functions such as endocytosis, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxity (ADCC) and the release of mediators, making them a valuable target for the modulation of the immune system. We solved the crystal structure of the soluble human Fcgamma-receptor IIb (sFcgammaRIIb) to 1.7 A resolution. The structure reveals two typical immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains enclosing an angle of approximately 70 degrees, leading to a heart-shaped overall structure. In contrast to the observed flexible arrangement of the domains in other members of the Ig superfamily, the two domains are anchored by several hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals that the residues relevant for IgG binding, which were already partially characterized by mutagenesis studies, are located within the BC, C'E and FG loops between the beta-strands of the second domain. Moreover, we discuss a model for the sFcgammaRIIb:IgG complex. In this model, two FcgammaR molecules bind one IgG molecule with their second domains, while the first domain points away from the complex and is therefore available for binding other cell surface molecules, by which potential immunosuppressing functions could be mediated. PMID:10064577

  18. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific antibodies in commercial human immunoglobulin preparations: superior antibody content of an IgM-enriched product

    PubMed Central

    Trautmann, M; Held, T K; Susa, M; Karajan, M A; Wulf, A; Cross, A S; Marre, R

    1998-01-01

    The anti-LPS antibody content of commercial intravenous immunoglobulins was examined by quantitative ELISA using LPS preparations from Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa O serotypes occurring most frequently in Gram-negative septicaemia. Three IgG products from different manufacturers and one IgM-enriched product were tested. Mean antibody levels were significantly higher in the IgM fraction of the IgM-enriched product compared with ‘pure’ IgG products, indicating that natural antibodies against bacterial LPS belong primarily to the IgM class. Immunoblotting studies showed that antibody specificities were directed mainly against O side chain epitopes. Antibodies against rough mutant LPS representing various chemotypes were detected in IgG but not in IgM products. The virtual absence of antibodies against Vibrio cholerae LPS indicated that human anti-LPS antibodies result from continuous environmental exposure to Gram-negative pathogens. These data support the further development of IgM-enriched preparations for prophylaxis and treatment of Gram-negative nosocomial infections. PMID:9472665

  19. Homogenous electrogenerated chemiluminescence immunoassay for human immunoglobulin G using N-(aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol as luminescence label at gold nanoparticles modified paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Yage; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2008-05-15

    A homogeneous electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) has been developed using a N-(aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI) as luminescence label at gold nanoparticles modified paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE). ECL emission was electrochemically generated from the ABEI-labeled anti-hIgG antibody and markedly increased in the presence of hIgG antigen due to forming a more rigid structure of the ABEI moiety. The concentration of hIgG antigen was determined by the increase of ECL intensity at a gold nanoparticles modified PIGE. It was found that the ECL intensity of ABEI in presence of hydrogen peroxide was dramatically enhanced at gold nanoparticles modified PIGE in neutral aqueous solution and the detection limit of ABEI was 2 x 10(-14)mol/L (S/N=3). The integral ECL intensity was linearly related to the concentration of hIgG antigen from 3.0 x 10(-11) to 1.0 x 10(-9)g/mL with a detection limit of 1 x 10(-11)g/mL (S/N=3). The relative standard deviation was 3.1% at 1.0 x 10(-10)g/mL (n=11). This work demonstrates that the enhancement of the sensitivity of ECL and ECL immunoassay at a nanoparticles modified electrode is a promising strategy.

  20. Evaluation of dietary stevioside supplementation on anti-human serum albumin immunoglobulin G, Alpha-1-glycoprotein, body weight and thyroid hormones in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Daneshyar, M; Geuns, J M C; Willemsen, H; Ansari, Z; Darras, V M; Buyse, J G; Everaert, N

    2012-08-01

    Sixty male broiler chickens fed a diet supplemented with 130 mg/kg stevioside (S group) or an unsupplemented diet (C group) from day 1 of age onwards. On day 21 of age, ten birds from either the S (SH) or C (CH) group were injected subcutaneously with 100 μg human serum albumin (HSA) and ten others from either S (SP) or C (CP) group injected with 100 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) in the same way. There were no significant effect of supplementation nor interaction with age on average body weights, T(3) and T(4) concentrations of non-injected chickens. After the primary immunization, α(1) -glycoprotein concentrations increased in all treatment groups except the CP group, and were significantly higher in the CH group in relation to the other groups. Fourteen and 18 days after the primary immunization, HSA injected chickens of both dietary treatments had significantly higher anti-HSA immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels than their PBS injected controls. No effect of stevioside supplementation was observed for IgG level. In conclusion, dietary stevioside inclusion can attenuate the pro-inflammatory response after stimulation of the innate immune response in broiler chickens. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3/sup /minus// lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection.

  2. Expression of E-selectin, integrin β1 and immunoglobulin superfamily member in human gastric carcinoma cells and its clinicopathologic significance

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jin-Jing; Shao, Qin-Shu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression levels of E- selectin, integrin β1 and immunoglobulin supperfamily member-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in human gastric carcinoma cells, and to explore the relationship between these three kinds of cell adhesion molecules and gastric carcinoma. METHODS: The serum contents of E-selectin, integrin β1 and ICAM-1 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in 47 healthy individuals (control group) and in 57 patients with gastric carcinoma (gastric carcinoma group) respectively prior to operation and 7 d after operation. RESULTS: The serum E-selectin, ECAM-1 and integrin β1 were found to be expressed in both control and gastric carcinoma groups. However, they were highly expressed in patients with gastric carcinoma patients before operation or with unresectable tumours. The expression levels of ICAM-1 and integrin β1 were significantly higher in gastric carcinoma patients than in controls (P < 0.01). A comparison of the E-selectin levels between the two groups showed statistically insignificant difference (P = 0.64). In addition, the expression levels were all decreased substantially in the postoperative patients subjected to radical resection of the tumours, indicating that the high level expressions of these compounds might be the important factor for predicting the prognosis of these patients. CONCLUSION: Serum E-selectin, ICAM-1 and integrin β1 expression levels are probably related to the metastasis and relapse of gastric cancer. PMID:16773720

  3. Evaluation of the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, pasteurized, human tetanus immunoglobulin administered as sham, postexposure prophylaxis of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Forrat, R; Dumas, R; Seiberling, M; Merz, M; Lutsch, C; Lang, J

    1998-02-01

    In a monocentric, double-blind, randomized trial, we examined the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, pasteurized, human tetanus immunoglobulin (P-HTIG). As part of the purification process, P-HTIG has undergone a heat treatment step (10 h at 60 degrees C) and the removal of Merthiolate. Forty-eight adults with a history of tetanus vaccination were randomized into four groups (n = 12 per group) to receive one of two different batches of this P-HTIG simultaneously with either tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccine (sham, postexposure prophylaxis of tetanus) or placebo. Local reactions at the injection site were followed for the first 3 days after injection, and systemic reactions were followed during the entire study period, i.e., up to 42 days posttreatment. Blood samples for tetanus antibody titer determination (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method) were drawn prior to treatment on day 0 and on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. A normalization of tetanus antibody titers (subtraction of the day 0 value for each subject at each time period) was performed to assess the additive effect of P-HTIG on tetanus antibody titers. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by both a compartmental analysis (modelization) and a noncompartmental analysis. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The rate of local reactions at the P-HTIG injection site was 27%. All local reactions were mild and resolved within 2 days. In contrast, local reactions at the vaccine injection site were seen in 79% of the subjects. The rate of systemic reactions was similar in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group (33%) and in the P-HTIG plus placebo group (21%), and all these reactions were mild. In the P-HTIG plus placebo group, tetanus antibody titers rose to a maximum of 0.313+/-2.49 IU/ml after 4.4 days; in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group, a maximum concentration of 15.2+/-2.42 IU/ml was reached 19 days postinjection. In both groups, 100% of the patients had seroprotective levels of

  4. Detection of specific immunoglobulin E in patients with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinon, J M; Toubas, D; Marx, C; Mougeot, G; Bonnin, A; Bonhomme, A; Villaume, M; Foudrinier, F; Lepan, H

    1990-01-01

    An immunocapture assay was developed to detect Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in sera from adults with acute acquired infection or reactivation and from babies with congenital toxoplasmosis. The components of this assay were monoclonal antibody to human IgE, samples from patients, and T. gondii tachyzoites treated with Formalin. When T. gondii-specific IgE antibodies were present, visually detectable agglutination occurred. Sera, umbilical cord blood, fetal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and amniotic fluid were tested by this method. Specific IgE antibodies were detected in sera from 25 (86%) of 29 adults who developed specific IgG antibody during pregnancy or had specific IgA and IgM antibodies. Specific IgE was present early during infection, at the time that IgM antibodies were present, and slightly preceding the presence of specific IgA antibodies. In 23 patients tested serially, IgE antibodies never persisted for longer than 4 months. No nonspecific anti-T. gondii IgE was detected in sera from uninfected individuals. Maternal IgE antibodies did not cross the placenta. In sera of patients with congenital toxoplasmosis, specific IgE antibodies were found at birth, during the first year of life, and during immunologic recrudescence following discontinuation of pyrimethamine-sulfonamide therapy. The IgE immunocapture assay is simple to perform. It is especially useful for determining when T. gondii was acquired by recently infected pregnant women. PMID:2203811

  5. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  6. Characterization of Human and Murine T-Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 4 (TIM-4) IgV Domain Residues Critical for Ebola Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Schaack, Grace A.; Chiorini, John A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors that are responsible for the clearance of dying cells have recently been found to mediate enveloped virus entry. Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family of viruses, utilizes PtdSer receptors for entry into target cells. The PtdSer receptors human and murine T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins TIM-1 and TIM-4 mediate filovirus entry by binding to PtdSer on the virion surface via a conserved PtdSer binding pocket within the amino-terminal IgV domain. While the residues within the TIM-1 IgV domain that are important for EBOV entry are characterized, the molecular details of virion–TIM-4 interactions have yet to be investigated. As sequences and structural alignments of the TIM proteins suggest distinct differences in the TIM-1 and TIM-4 IgV domain structures, we sought to characterize TIM-4 IgV domain residues required for EBOV entry. Using vesicular stomatitis virus pseudovirions bearing EBOV glycoprotein (EBOV GP/VSVΔG), we evaluated virus binding and entry into cells expressing TIM-4 molecules mutated within the IgV domain, allowing us to identify residues important for entry. Similar to TIM-1, residues in the PtdSer binding pocket of murine and human TIM-4 (mTIM-4 and hTIM-4) were found to be important for EBOV entry. However, additional TIM-4-specific residues were also found to impact EBOV entry, with a total of 8 mTIM-4 and 14 hTIM-4 IgV domain residues being critical for virion binding and internalization. Together, these findings provide a greater understanding of the interaction of TIM-4 with EBOV virions. IMPORTANCE With more than 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths during the largest and most recent Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak, there has been increased emphasis on the development of therapeutics against filoviruses. Many therapies under investigation target EBOV cell entry. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins are cell surface factors important for the entry of many

  7. Characterization of Human and Murine T-Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 4 (TIM-4) IgV Domain Residues Critical for Ebola Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Bethany A; Brouillette, Rachel B; Schaack, Grace A; Chiorini, John A; Maury, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors that are responsible for the clearance of dying cells have recently been found to mediate enveloped virus entry. Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family of viruses, utilizes PtdSer receptors for entry into target cells. The PtdSer receptors human and murine T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins TIM-1 and TIM-4 mediate filovirus entry by binding to PtdSer on the virion surface via a conserved PtdSer binding pocket within the amino-terminal IgV domain. While the residues within the TIM-1 IgV domain that are important for EBOV entry are characterized, the molecular details of virion-TIM-4 interactions have yet to be investigated. As sequences and structural alignments of the TIM proteins suggest distinct differences in the TIM-1 and TIM-4 IgV domain structures, we sought to characterize TIM-4 IgV domain residues required for EBOV entry. Using vesicular stomatitis virus pseudovirions bearing EBOV glycoprotein (EBOV GP/VSVΔG), we evaluated virus binding and entry into cells expressing TIM-4 molecules mutated within the IgV domain, allowing us to identify residues important for entry. Similar to TIM-1, residues in the PtdSer binding pocket of murine and human TIM-4 (mTIM-4 and hTIM-4) were found to be important for EBOV entry. However, additional TIM-4-specific residues were also found to impact EBOV entry, with a total of 8 mTIM-4 and 14 hTIM-4 IgV domain residues being critical for virion binding and internalization. Together, these findings provide a greater understanding of the interaction of TIM-4 with EBOV virions. With more than 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths during the largest and most recent Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak, there has been increased emphasis on the development of therapeutics against filoviruses. Many therapies under investigation target EBOV cell entry. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins are cell surface factors important for the entry of many enveloped viruses

  8. A New Ligand-Based Method for Purifying Active Human Plasma-Derived Ficolin-3 Complexes Supports the Phenomenon of Crosstalk between Pattern-Recognition Molecules and Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Michalski, Mateusz; Maciejewska, Anna; Swierzko, Anna S.; Cedzynski, Maciej; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Despite recombinant protein technology development, proteins isolated from natural sources remain important for structure and activity determination. Ficolins represent a class of proteins that are difficult to isolate. To date, three methods for purifying ficolin-3 from plasma/serum have been proposed, defined by most critical step: (i) hydroxyapatite absorption chromatography (ii) N-acetylated human serum albumin affinity chromatography and (iii) anti-ficolin-3 monoclonal antibody-based affinity chromatography. We present a new protocol for purifying ficolin-3 complexes from human plasma that is based on an exclusive ligand: the O-specific polysaccharide of Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 LPS (O-PS 1200). The protocol includes (i) poly(ethylene glycol) precipitation; (ii) yeast and l-fucose incubation, for depletion of mannose-binding lectin; (iii) affinity chromatography using O-PS 1200-Sepharose; (iv) size-exclusion chromatography. Application of this protocol yielded average 2.2 mg of ficolin-3 preparation free of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1 and -2 from 500 ml of plasma. The protein was complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and was able to activate the complement in vitro. In-process monitoring of MBL, ficolins, and total protein content revealed the presence of difficult-to-remove immunoglobulin G, M and A, in some extent in agreement with recent findings suggesting crosstalk between IgG and ficolin-3. We demonstrated that recombinant ficolin-3 interacts with IgG and IgM in a concentration-dependent manner. Although this association does not appear to influence ficolin-3-ligand interactions in vitro, it may have numerous consequences in vivo. Thus our purification procedure provides Ig-ficolin-3/MASP complexes that might be useful for gaining further insight into the crosstalk and biological activity of ficolin-3. PMID:27232184

  9. Low pH inactivation for xenotropic gamma retrovirus in recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G and mechanism of inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Cui, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    CHO-derived recombinant proteins for human therapeutic are used commonly. There are noninfectious endogenous retroviruses in CHO cells. Validation study for inactivation process is required. Murine xenotropic gamma retrovirus (X-MulV) is a model virus in validation study. In our previous study, optimum conditions for X-MulV inactivation were sifted. In this study, we performed a further research on low pH inactivation for evaluation of X-MulV clearance in manufacturing of recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G fusion proteins (rhTNF-α) for injection. Cell-based infectivity assay was used for the evaluation of X-MulV clearance. RhTNF-α were spiked with X-MulV and were inactivated at pH 3.60 ∼ 3.90, 25 ± 2 °C, and 0 ∼ 240 min, respectively. Samples incubated at the conditions for 15 ∼ 180 min were not inactivated effectively. For 4 h incubation, log10 reductions were achieved 5.0 log10. Biological activity of rhTNF-α incubated at pH 3.60, 25 °C for 4 h, which was assayed on murine L929 fibroblasts cells, was not affected by low pH. Env gene of X-MulV, which was detected by conventional PCR method for the first time, was not detected after incubation at pH 3.60, and it may be the mechanism of low pH inactivation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for pure red cell aplasia related to human parvovirus b19 infection: a retrospective study of 10 patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Crabol, Yoann; Terrier, Benjamin; Rozenberg, Flore; Pestre, Vincent; Legendre, Christophe; Hermine, Olivier; Montagnier-Petrissans, Catherine; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) related to human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) infection. We retrospectively reviewed all HPV-B19 PRCA cases treated with IVIG between January 2000 and December 2005 in the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris hospitals and reviewed all cases of HPV-B19 PRCA cases treated with IVIG in the literature. Among our 36 patients, PRCA was confirmed in 22, including 10 with proven HPV-B19 infection. Nine patients were immunocompromised, including 4 who had undergone transplant. All patients had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin level, 5.0 ± 1.9 g/dL). Seven patients who underwent bone-marrow aspiration had positive HPV-B19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results at diagnosis. Patients received a mean of 2.7 ± 2.1 IVIG courses (1.3 ± 0.5 g/kg/course). Hemoglobin level was corrected in 9 of the 10 patients within a mean of 80 ± 54 days. The only nonresponsive patient had underlying myelodysplasia. Blood HPV-B19 PCR results were negative from 35 to 159 days after treatment. Four patients showed side effects of IVIG treatment: acute reversible renal failure (n = 2) and pulmonary edema (n = 2). Among 133 patients with HPV-B19 PRCA who received IVIG (our 10 patients and 123 from the literature), 63 had undergone solid-organ transplant and 39 had human immunodeficiency virus infection. Hemoglobin level was corrected after the first IVIG course in 124 patients (93%); disease relapsed in 42 (33.9%), at a mean of 4.3 months. IVIG therapy appears to be effective in the short term in immunocompromised patients with HPV-B19 PRCA.

  11. Optimization and Validation of a Multiplex, Electrochemiluminescence-Based Detection Assay for the Quantitation of Immunoglobulin G Serotype-Specific Antipneumococcal Antibodies in Human Serum▿

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Rocio D.; Puchalski, Derek; Miller, Pamela; Antonello, Joseph; Hammond, Olivia; Green, Tina; Rubinstein, Leonard J.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Sikkema, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Pneumovax 23 consists of a mixture of highly purified capsular polysaccharides (Ps) from 23 of the most prevalent serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Testing of vaccine immunogenicity has been historically performed on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) platform, validated to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to all 23 serotypes included in Pneumovax 23. In order to significantly improve the throughput of this form of testing, we have developed and validated a direct binding electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based multiplex assay that can measure the antibody response in human serum to eight serotypes within a single microtiter well. The pneumococcal (Pn) ECL assay is based on the Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) technology which utilizes a Sulfo-Tag-labeled anti-human IgG antibody that emits light upon electrochemical stimulation. The Pn ECL assay exhibits a wide dynamic range and provides the ability to read concentrations down to the minimum reported concentration in the Merck ELISA (0.1 μg/ml). Cross-reactivity assessment using type-specific monoclonal antibodies showed no cross talk between antigen spots within a well. By use of the WHO Pn sample reference panel, the results obtained with the Pn ECL assay were compared to the results obtained with the international Pn ELISA. The results for the Pn ECL assay satisfied the WHO-recommended acceptance criterion for concordance for all seven serotypes with published Pn ELISA values, and the overall correlation (r value) across the seven serotypes was 0.994. The MSD methodology has great potential to be extremely useful for simultaneously quantitating IgG responses to several Pn serotypes while conserving serum volumes and laboratory testing time. PMID:19158284

  12. Molecular evolution of the human immunoglobulin E response: high incidence of shared mutations and clonal relatedness among epsilon VH5 transcripts from three unrelated patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequences of 19 epsilon VH5 transcripts derived from in vivo isotype switched peripheral blood B cells of three patients with atopic dermatitis. Comparison with the patients' own germline VH5 gene segments revealed that the epsilon transcripts were derived from both functional members of the human VH5 gene family and harbored numerous somatic mutations (range 5-36 per VH5 gene). In two patients, we detected clonally related but diverged transcripts, permitting the construction of a genealogical tree in one patient. We observed a high proportion of shared silent (S) and replacement (R) mutations among epsilon VH5 sequences derived from all three individuals, even among transcripts descending from the two different germline VH5 gene segments. A remarkably high number of these mutations is shared with previously reported VH5 genes encoding antibodies with defined specificities. The shared S mutations, and likely a fraction of the R mutations, appear to mark preferential sites ("hot spots") of somatic hypermutations in human VH5 genes. The distribution of R and S mutations over complementarity determining region and framework regions in the majority of VH regions deviated from that characteristic of antigen-driven immune response. We hypothesize that the V regions of immunoglobulin E-bearing B cells have accumulated "selectively neutral" mutations over extended periods of clonal expansion, resulting in unusual R/S ratios. We propose that the molecular characteristics of the epsilon VH regions in atopic dermatitis may be representative of antigens that recurrently or chronically stimulate the immune system. PMID:8418213

  13. Preparation of commercial quantities of a hyperimmune human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation against an emerging infectious disease: the example of pandemic H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Kreil, Thomas R; Mc Vey, John K; Lei, Laura Shau-Ping; Camacho, Laureano; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Segura, Edy; Vandamme, Etienne; Gavit, Patrick; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Barrett, P Noel; Baker, Donald A

    2012-04-01

    The recent H1N1 pandemic provided an opportunity to conceptually assess the possibility of rapidly providing a "hyperimmune" human immunoglobulin (H-IVIG) to an emerging infectious disease, in useful quantities with respect to public health. Commercial-scale H-IVIG production from plasma collected from donors convalescent from or vaccinated against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus is described. A special protocol was implemented for the collection, processing, and shipment of plasma from previously qualified source plasma donors, self-identifying as convalescent from or vaccinated against H1N1 influenza. A licensed IVIG manufacturing process was utilized for the preparation of two commercial lots of approximately 50 kg 10% human IVIG preparation in total. The H1N1 hemagglutination inhibition and neutralization antibody titers of the resulting H-IVIG preparations were determined and compared with standard preparations. Twenty-six plasma collection centers participated in the protocol. Donor enrollment exceeded 300 donors per week and within 30 days of protocol deployment plasma was being collected at a rate of more than 2000 L/week. Manufacture of both H-IVIG lots was unremarkable and both lots met the requirements for commercial release and the bulk of the product was distributed in normal commercial channels. Examination of plasma pools and final IVIG product confirmed pandemic H1N1 antibody titers substantially higher than those collected before the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 virus. This work demonstrates the feasibility of producing a H-IVIG preparation at large scale relatively rapidly, with a significant enrichment in antibodies to the H1N1 influenza, achieved by donor self-identification. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging-based sensing for anti-bovine immunoglobulins detection in human milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Scarano, S; Scuffi, C; Mascini, M; Minunni, M

    2011-11-30

    Only few papers deal with Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) direct detection on complex matrices, limiting the biosensor application to real analytical problems. In this work a SPRi biosensor for anti-bovine IgG detection in untreated human bodily fluids, i.e. diluted human serum and milk, was developed. Enhanced levels of cow's milk antibodies in children's serum are suspected for their possible correlation with Type 1 diabetes during childhood and their detection in real samples was up to now performed by classical immunoassays based on indirect detection. The biosensor was optimised in standard samples and then in untreated human milk for anti-bovine IgG direct detection. The key novelty of the work is the evaluation of matrix effect by applying to real samples an experimental and ex ante method previously developed for SPRi signal sampling in standard solutions, called "Data Analyzer"; it punctually visualises and analyses the behaviour of receptor spots of the array, to select only spot areas with the best specific vs. unspecific signal values. In this way, benefits provide by SPRi image analysis are exploited here to quantify and minimise drawbacks due to the matrix effect, allowing to by-pass every matrix pre-treatment except dilution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Exchanging Murine and Human Immunoglobulin Constant Chains Affects the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Antigen Binding and Chimeric Antibody Autoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marcela; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, András; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V) and human (C) chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of CH glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch) and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by CH region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the CH domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids. PMID:18074033

  16. Transgenic expression of human cytoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) by porcine skin for xenogeneic skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua-Qiang; Jiang, Wen; Fan, Na-Na; Zhao, Ben-Tian; Ou-Yang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao-Ming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Dong-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Lu-Lu; Xiang, Peng-Ying; Ge, Liang-Peng; Wei, Hong; Lai, Liang-Xue

    2015-04-01

    Porcine skin is frequently used as a substitute of human skin to cover large wounds in clinic practice of wound care. In our previous work, we found that transgenic expression of human cytoxicT-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) in murine skin graft remarkably prolonged its survival in xenogeneic wounds without extensive immunosuppression in recipients, suggesting that transgenic hCTLA4Ig expression in skin graft may be an effective and safe method to prolong xenogeneic skin graft survival. In this work, using a transgene construct containing hCTLA4Ig coding sequence under the drive of human Keratine 14 (k14) promoter, hCTLA4Ig transgenic pigs were generated by somatic nuclear transfer. The derived transgenic pigs were healthy and exhibited no signs of susceptibility to infection. The hCTLA4Ig transgene was stably transmitted through germline over generations, and thereby a transgenic pig colony was established. In the derived transgenic pigs, hCTLA4Ig expression in skin was shown to be genetically stable over generations, and detected in heart, kidney and corneal as well as in skin. Transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein in pigs exhibited expected biological activity as it suppressed human lymphocyte proliferation in human mixed lymphocyte culture to extents comparable to those of commercially purchased purified hCTLA4Ig protein. In skin grafting from pigs to rats, transgenic porcine skin grafts exhibited remarkably prolonged survival compared to the wild-type skin grafts derived from the same pig strain (13.33 ± 3.64 vs. 6.25 ± 2.49 days, P < 0.01), further indicating that the transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein was biologically active and capable of extending porcine skin graft survival in xenogeneic wounds. The transgenic pigs generated in this work can be used as a reproducible resource to provide porcine skin grafts with extended survival for wound coverage, and also as donors to investigate the impacts of hCTLA4Ig on xenotransplantation of other organs

  17. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care.

  18. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  19. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  20. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  1. Identification of a macromolecule containing an anticarcinoembryonic antigen-reactive substance and immunoglobulin M in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S R; Van Dusen, L R; Douglass, H O; Holyoke, E D; Chu, T M

    1978-11-01

    Ascitic fluid from a patient with carcinoma of the pancreas was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The fraction precipitated between 25 and 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate was sequentially chromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and Sepharose 6B. A macromolecular fraction (greater than 10(6) daltons) obtained was found to react with both antihuman IgM and antiserum to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This fraction was further purified by adsorption with protein A-Sepharose CL-4B and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The purified macromolecular fraction had a sedimentation value of 28S as determined by ultracentrifugation. Upon dissociation of the purified macromolecule at pH 2.3 and purification of the dissociated components on Sepharose CL-2B and BioGel A 1.5M, a 19S protein and a 5S protein were recovered. The 19S protein showed a complete line of identity with a reference human IgM when reacted with antihuman IgM in gel diffusion, whereas the 5S protein showed a partial immunologic identity with colon CEA against anti-CEA. These results indicated the existence of an IgM-containing macromolecular complex with an anti-CEA cross-reactive substance in the extracellular fluid of human pancreatic cancer.

  2. The N-linked sugar chains of human immunoglobulin G: their unique pattern, and their functional roles.

    PubMed

    Kobata, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to other serum glycoproteins, the majority of the N-linked sugar chains of human serum IgG are not sialylated. In addition, extremely high micro-heterogeneity occurs in the serum IgG sugar chains. This micro-heterogeneity is mainly produced by the presence or absence of the two galactoses, the bisecting GlcNAc, and the fucose residue. Interesting evidence is that the molar ratio of each sugar chain of the serum IgG samples is quite constant in healthy individuals. By adding the information of the characteristic feature of the sugar patterns of myeloma IgG samples and glycosylated Bence Jones proteins, which are the products of monoclonal B-cells, it was proposed that B-cells in the human blood are a mixture of clones equipped with different sets and ratios of glycosyltransferases. It was also proposed that each glycoform of IgG might have a different function. This hypothesis was realized by the comparative studies of the function of IgG samples before and after removal of galactose residues, fucose residue, or sialic acid residues.

  3. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  4. Membrane isoforms of human immunoglobulins of the A1 and A2 isotypes: structural and functional study.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, I; Drouet, M; Bodinier, M C; Helal, A; Cogné, M

    1997-01-01

    As for IgM, human IgA occurs either as soluble molecules in plasma and various other body fluids, or as membrane-bound molecules on differentiated B cells, where they are part of the B-cell receptor for antigen (BCR). We studied the structure of transcripts encoding the membrane-anchored alpha-chain of the human BCR alpha, which may be present in two different forms resulting from alternate splicing of the alpha-chain mRNA (type I or type II). The ratio of type I versus type II did not vary upon stimulation of a B-cell line with various cytokines. Rather, it differed strikingly in cells expressing either the IgA1 or IgA2 isotype of the BCR alpha, with virtually no type II alpha-chain in the latter. Co-modulation experiments also yielded different results for both isotypes, since they demonstrated a physical association of both membrane (m)IgA1 and mIgA2 with CD79b, the beta component of the BCR Ig alpha/Ig beta heterodimer, but only of mIgA1 with CD19. Whatever the isotype, the BCR of the IgA class was able to carry out signal transduction upon cross-linking by specific monoclonal antibodies but, in contrast to mIgM, it relied mainly on the entry of extracellular Ca2+ rather than on the release of intracellular stocks. Images Figure 2 PMID:9155637

  5. Infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin fails to lower the strength of human leukocyte antigen antibodies in highly sensitized patients.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Nada; Lonze, Bonnie E; Zachary, Andrea A; Holechek, Mary J; Schillinger, Karl; Cameron, Andrew M; Desai, Niraj M; Dagher, Nabil N; Segev, Dorry L; Montgomery, Robert A; Singer, Andrew L

    2012-07-27

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) sensitization presents a major obstacle for patients awaiting renal transplantation. HLA antibody reduction and favorable transplantation rates have been reported after treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). We enrolled 27 patients whose median flow cytometric calculated panel reactive antibody (CPRA) was 100% and mean wait-list time exceeded 4 years in a protocol whereby high-dose IVIg was administered, HLA antibody profiles of sera obtained before and after treatment were characterized, and cross-match tests were performed with all blood group identical kidney offers. Whereas 12.8% of a similarly sensitized historic control cohort underwent transplantation in the course of a year, 41% of the IVIg-treated group underwent transplantation during the study period. Surprisingly, HLA antibody profiles, measured by CPRA, showed no significant change in response to IVIg treatment. In fact, retrospective cross-match testing using pretreatment sera of those receiving deceased-donor allografts showed that all patients would have been eligible for transplantation with their respective donors before IVIg infusions. This study does not corroborate previous reports of CPRA reduction leading to increased deceased-donor transplantation rates in broadly sensitized patients undergoing desensitization with high-dose IVIg. The increased rate of transplantation relative to historic controls is not related to improved cross-match eligibility and likely resulted from frequent crossmatching using a cytotoxic strength threshold, improved medical readiness for transplantation, and newly recognized options for live-donor transplantation, all of which could have been achieved without IVIg treatment.

  6. Conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin light chain variable domain by relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: implications for protein misfolding and amyloid assembly.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Pondaven, Simon P; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2011-07-05

    The conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin κIV light-chain variable domain, LEN, which can undergo conversion to amyloid under destabilizing conditions, was investigated at physiological and acidic pH on a residue-specific basis by multidimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Measurements of backbone chemical shifts and amide (15)N longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates and steady-state nuclear Overhauser enhancements indicate that, on the whole, LEN retains its native three-dimensional fold and dimeric state at pH 2 and that the protein backbone exhibits limited fast motions on the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. On the other hand, (15)N Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR data show that LEN experiences considerable slower, millisecond time scale dynamics, confined primarily to three contiguous segments of about 5-20 residues and encompassing the N-terminal β-strand and complementarity determining loop regions 2 and 3 in the vicinity of the dimer interface. Quantitative analysis of the CPMG relaxation dispersion data reveals that at physiological pH these slow backbone motions are associated with relatively low excited-state protein conformer populations, in the ~2-4% range. Upon acidification, the minor conformer populations increase significantly, to ~10-15%, with most residues involved in stabilizing interactions across the dimer interface displaying increased flexibility. These findings provide molecular-level insights about partial protein unfolding at low pH and point to the LEN dimer dissociation, initiated by increased conformational flexibility in several well-defined regions, as being one of the important early events leading to amyloid assembly.

  7. IgM-Enriched Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin-Based Treatment of Patients With Early Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ius, Fabio; Sommer, Wiebke; Kieneke, Daniela; Tudorache, Igor; Kühn, Christian; Avsar, Murat; Siemeni, Thierry; Salman, Jawad; Erdfelder, Carolin; Verboom, Murielle; Kielstein, Jan; Tecklenburg, Andreas; Greer, Mark; Hallensleben, Michael; Blasczyk, Rainer; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Gottlieb, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Background At our institution, until April 2013, patients who showed early donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) after lung transplantation were preemptively treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (tPE) and a single dose of Rituximab. In April 2013, we moved to a therapy based on IgM-enriched human immunoglobulins (IVIG), repeated every 4 weeks, and a single dose of Rituximab. Methods This observational study was designed to evaluate the short-term patient and graft survival in patients who underwent IVIG-based DSA treatment (group A, n = 57) versus contemporary patients transplanted between April 2013 and January 2015 without DSA (group C, n = 180), as well as to evaluate DSA clearance in IVIG-treated patients versus historic patients who had undergone tPE-based treatment (group B, n = 56). Patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up ended on April 1, 2015. Results At 6 months and 1 year of follow-up, group A had a survival similar to group C (P = 0.81) but better than group B (P = 0.008). Group A showed statistically nonsignificant trends toward improved freedom from pulsed-steroid therapy and biopsy-confirmed rejection over groups B and C. The DSA clearance was better in group A than group B at treatment end (92% vs 64%; P = 0.002) and last DSA control (90% vs 75%; P = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with new early DSA but without graft dysfunction that are treated with IVIG and Rituximab have similarly good early survival as contemporary lung transplant recipients without early DSA. The IVIG yielded increased DSA clearance compared with historic tPE-based treatment, yet spontaneous clearance of new DSA also remains common. PMID:26714123

  8. Expression of Immunoglobulin Receptors with Distinctive Features Indicating Antigen Selection by Marginal Zone B Cells from Human Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Reverberi, Daniele; Bruno, Silvia; Ghiotto, Fabio; Tenca, Claudya; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Ceccarelli, Jenny; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Calevo, Maria Grazia; De Santanna, Amleto; Truini, Mauro; Fais, Franco; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, identified as surface (s)IgMhighsIgDlowCD23low/−CD21+CD38− B cells, were purified from human spleens, and the features of their V(D)J gene rearrangements were investigated and compared with those of germinal center (GC), follicular mantle (FM) and switched memory (SM) B cells. Most MZ B cells were CD27+ and exhibited somatic hypermutations (SHM), although to a lower extent than SM B cells. Moreover, among MZ B-cell rearrangements, recurrent sequences were observed, some of which displayed intraclonal diversification. The same diversifying sequences were detected in very low numbers in GC and FM B cells and only when a highly sensitive, gene-specific polymerase chain reaction was used. This result indicates that MZ B cells could expand and diversify in situ and also suggested the presence of a number of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-expressing B cells in the MZ. The notion of antigen-driven expansion/selection in situ is further supported by the VH CDR3 features of MZ B cells with highly conserved amino acids at specific positions and by the finding of shared (“stereotyped”) sequences in two different spleens. Collectively, the data are consistent with the notion that MZ B cells are a special subset selected by in situ antigenic stimuli. PMID:23877718

  9. [Cloning and expression of a single human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable domain with vascular endothelial growth factor binding activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Siguo; Wu, Yi; Zili, M; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Aimin; Chen, Jianquan; Cheng, Guoxiang

    2010-11-01

    In the application of therapeutic antibodies, large molecular weight of antibodies is always a problem that prevents them from penetrating into tissues or binding to antigenic determinants. To overcome this problem, we investigated the function of the heavy chain variable domain of a monoclonal anti-VEGF human IgM antibody derived from the Five-Feature Translocus Mice. We cloned the cDNA of the heavy chain variable domain, which was then inserted into pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification and renaturation of the denatured recombinant protein, we obtained a 16 kDa antibody fragment, which is named as rhVVH. By immunoassaying its VEGF-binding capability in vitro, we proved that rhVVH retains this activity as the complete IgM. Importantly, rhVVH is shown to inhibit the HUVEC cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results indicate that the single heavy chain variable domain might inherit part of the biological function of the complete IgM antibody, which provided a valuable potential in further research on antibody miniaturisation.

  10. Structural repertoire in human V{sub L} pseudogenes of immunoglobulins: Comparison with functional germline genes and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Almagro, J.C.; Lara-Ochoa, F.; Dominguez-Martinez, V.

    1996-06-01

    Antibody molecules are highly antigen-specific receptors of the immune system. Antigen-antibody interaction involves the antibody V{sub L} and V{sub H} domains, each composed of a framework whose structure is well conserved. The antigen-binding site is composed of six hypervariable loops, three from the V{sub L} domain and three from the V{sub H} domain: L1, L2, L3, and H1, H2, H3, respectively. Genetically, L1 and L2 are encoded by the V{sub L} gene, while L3 is produced by the recombination of an additional gene segment, A. In a similar way, H1 and H2 are encoded by the V{sub H} gene, and H3 is a result of the recombination of two additional gene segments, D and J{sub H}. Analysis of antibodies of known atomic structure has revealed a small number of main-chain conformations or canonical structures for L1, L2, and L3, as well as for H1 and H2. Canonical structures in five of six hypervariable loops imply that only a few main-chain conformations are present in a large set of antibody molecules with different loop sequences. Examination of the known human IGHV, IGKV, and IGLV functional germline genes indicates that most of these sequences have canonical structures. This finding provides evidence concerning structural restrictions at work in the process of antigen recognition. 28 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Molecular characterization of a human immunoglobulin G4 antibody specific for the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1.

    PubMed

    Flicker, S; Steinberger, P; Eibensteiner, P B; Lebecque, S; Kraft, D; Valenta, R

    2008-02-01

    Allergen-specific IgG4 antibodies induced by specific immunotherapy are thought to represent a protective immune response. Objective Our aim was the molecular characterization of a human IgG4 antibody (BAB5) specific for the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 that was derived from an immunotherapy-treated patient. The cDNA coding for BAB5 was obtained by reverse transcriptase-PCR from the BAB5-producing cell line, compared with the germ line sequences and was expressed as a soluble antibody fragment in Escherichia coli. The epitope specificity and cross-reactivity of BAB5 were investigated with recombinant and synthetic Bet v 1 fragments and Bet v 1 homologous allergens from pollen. The ability of BAB5 to block allergic patients IgE was determined by competition experiments and sandwich ELISA. BAB5 is an affinity-matured Bet v 1-specific IgG4 antibody that reacts exclusively with Bet v 1 but not with Bet v 1-related allergens. Unlike an earlier-described monoclonal IgG1-blocking antibody, BAB1, which had been isolated from the same patient, BAB5 did not block allergic patients' IgE reactivity to Bet v 1. Our study demonstrates that not all allergen-specific IgG antibodies inhibit IgE recognition of allergens and can contribute to the success of immunotherapy. The epitope specificity and affinity of IgG antibodies but not their isotype are decisive for their protective activity.

  12. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  13. [Using the preparation "human immunoglobulin against herpes simplex virus type 1 for intramuscular injections" in the complex therapy of nervous system diseases].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, A O; Diachenko, N S; Nesterova, N V; Kurishchuk, K V; Berestova, T H; Zahorodnia, S D; Riads'ka, L S; Muravs'ka, L V; Andrieieva, O H; Baranova, H V

    2004-01-01

    The technology of obtaining of specific immunoglobulin for serotherapy of neuroinfection caused by virus herpes simplex 1 type was developed. The patients presented with the following diseases: arachnoencephalitis, encephalopolyradiculoneuritis, encephalomyelitis, encephalitis, arachnoiditis, polyneuropathy, encephalomyelopolyradiculoneuritis, meningoencephalitis. The study showed good tolerance and safety of the medicine, no adverse effects registered during the study. The assessed median score of the efficacy was 2.8 from 3. The obtained results suggest using the liquid form preparation for intramuscular injection "Immunoglobulin for treatment of neuroinfection caused by virus herpes simplex type 1". The Close corporation "Biofarma" located in Kyiv produces this medicine.

  14. Safety and pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoglobulin administered to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 185 Pharmacokinetic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Fletcher, C V; Moye, J; Stiehm, E R; Meyer, W A; Nemo, G J; Mathieson, B J; Hirsch, G; Sapan, C V; Cummins, L M; Jimenez, E; O'Neill, E; Kovacs, A; Stek, A

    1997-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were evaluated in the first 28 maternal-infant pairs enrolled in a randomized, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-controlled trial of HIVIG maternal-infant HIV transmission prophylaxis. Using 200 mg/kg, mean half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) in women were 15 days and 72 mL/kg, respectively, after one and 32 days and 154 mL/kg after three monthly infusions, with stable 4 mL/kg/day clearance. Transplacental passage occurred. Newborn single-dose half-life, Vd, and clearance were 30 days, 143 mL/kg, and 4 mL/kg/day, respectively. HIVIG rapidly cleared maternal serum immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were stable. Mild to moderate adverse clinical effects occurred in 2 of 103 maternal and 2 of 25 infant infusions. No adverse hematologic, blood chemistry, or immunologic effects were seen. HIVIG is well-tolerated in HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns, clears antigenemia, crosses the placenta, and exhibits pharmacokinetics similar to those of other immunoglobulin preparations.

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen C*12:02:02 and Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 2DL5 are Distinctly Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in the Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-Man; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Jan Wu, Yeong-Jian; Lin, Jing-Chi; Wu, Jianming; Chen, Ji-Yih

    2017-08-16

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands and Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and certain T cells. We examined their genetic predisposition to disease susceptibility and clinical phenotypes in Taiwanese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. KIR genotyping and Human Leucocyte Antigen C (HLA-C) sequencing were performed in 653 Taiwanese AS patients and 952 healthy controls. KIR genotype distributions and HLA-C allele frequencies were compared in patients and controls and among patients with and without HLA-B27 positivity, early age onset and spinal syndesmophytes. HLA-C alleles were functionally characterized using 3D structural modelling with peptide simulation. This study discovered that the HLA-C*12:02:02 allele (43.42% vs. 3.31%; p < 0.00001 odds ratio (OR), 16.88; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 11.27-25.28) confers a strong risk for Taiwanese AS development. The 3D modelling results identified four unique amino acid polymorphisms, Ala73, Trp156, Arg219 and Met304, that may affect the function of the HLA-C*12:02:02 allele. KIR2DL5 (p = 0.0047; pFDR = 0.0423) and the KIR Bx haplotype (p = 0.0000275) were protective against Taiwanese AS, while KIR 2DS4/1D (22 base pair truncated deletion; p = 0.0044; pFDR = 0.1998) appeared to be a risk factor for it. KIR2DL5 combined with the HLA-C1/C2 heterozygous genotype showed a protective effect (AS 5.97% vs. normal 11.66%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 0.48 95% CI: 0.33-0.70); in contrast, KIR 2DS4/1D combined with the HLA-C1C1 homozygous genotype (AS 45.33% vs. normal 35.92%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 1.48 95% CI: 1.21-1.81) represented a risk factor for AS development. Our data suggested that interactions between KIRs and their cognate HLA-C ligands may contribute to the pathogenesis of AS.

  16. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    PubMed

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  17. THE IMMUNOGLOBULINS OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, John L.; Wunderlich, John; Mishell, Robert

    1964-01-01

    Two classes of 7S γ-globulins are identified in normal mouse serum and are designated 7S γ2-globulins and 7S γ1-globulins. These two immunoglobulin classes are similar in size. They differ in range of electrophoretic mobility, in specific antigenic determinants, and in genetically determined isoantigens. Four classes of immunoglobulins in mouse serum, i.e. 7S γ2-, 7S γ1-, γ1A (β2A), and γM-globulins, were shown to have antibody activity. Each class was characterized and shown to have distinctive immunochemical and physicochemical properties. The genetically determined isoantigens, Iga-1 and Iga-2, were shown to be present only on 7S γ2-globulin molecules. PMID:14208249

  18. The flexibility of a generic LC-MS/MS method for the quantitative analysis of therapeutic proteins based on human immunoglobulin G and related constructs in animal studies.

    PubMed

    Lanshoeft, Christian; Wolf, Thierry; Walles, Markus; Barteau, Samuel; Picard, Franck; Kretz, Olivier; Cianférani, Sarah; Heudi, Olivier

    2016-11-30

    An increasing demand of new analytical methods is associated with the growing number of biotherapeutic programs being prosecuted in the pharmaceutical industry. Whilst immunoassay has been the standard method for decades, a great interest in assays based on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is evolving. In this present work, the development of a generic method for the quantitative analysis of therapeutic proteins based on human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) in rat serum is reported. The method is based on four generic peptides GPSVFPLAPSSK (GPS), TTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSK (TTP), VVSVLTVLHQDWLNGK (VVS) and FNWYVDGVEVHNAK (FNW) originating from different parts of the fraction crystallizable (Fc) region of a reference hIgG1 (hIgG1A). A tryptic pellet digestion of rat serum spiked with hIgG1A and a stable isotope labeled protein (hIgG1B) used as internal standard (ISTD) was applied prior LC-MS/MS analysis. The upper limit of quantification was at 1000μg/mL. The lower limit of quantitation was for GPS, TTP and VVS at 1.00μg/mL whereas for FNW at 5.00μg/mL. Accuracy and precision data met acceptance over three days. The presented method was further successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of other hIgG1s (hIgG1C and hIgG1D) and hIgG4-based therapeutic proteins on spiked quality control (QC) samples in monkey and rat serum using calibration standards (Cs) prepared with hIgG1A in rat serum. In order to extend the applicability of our generic approach, a bispecific-bivalent hIgG1 (bb-hIgG1) and two lysine conjugated antibody-drug conjugates (ADC1 and ADC2) were incorporated as well. The observed values on spiked QC samples in monkey serum were satisfactory with GPS for the determination of bb-hIgG1 whereas the FNW and TTP peptides were suitable for the ADCs. Moreover, comparable mean concentration-time profiles were obtained from monkeys previously dosed intravenously with ADC2 measured against Cs samples prepared either with hIgG1A in rat serum

  19. Comparison of a Multiplexed Fluorescent Covalent Microsphere Immunoassay and an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Measurement of Human Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to Anthrax Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Raymond E.; Sammons, Deborah L.; Smith, Jerome P.; MacKenzie, Barbara A.; Striley, Cynthia A. F.; Semenova, Vera; Steward-Clark, Evelen; Stamey, Karen; Freeman, Alison E.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Snawder, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported an accurate, sensitive, specific, reproducible, and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in human serum (C. P. Quinn, V. A. Semenova, C. M. Elie et al., Emerg. Infect. Dis. 8:1103-1110, 2002). The ELISA had a minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of 0.06 μg/ml, which, when dilution adjusted, yielded a whole-serum MDC of 3.0 μg of anti-PA IgG per ml. The reliable detection limit (RDL) was 0.09 μg/ml, while the dynamic range was 0.06 to 1.7 μg/ml. The diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was 97.6% and the diagnostic specificity was 94.2% for clinically verified cases of anthrax. A competitive inhibition anti-PA IgG ELISA was also developed to enhance the diagnostic specificity to 100%. We report a newly developed fluorescence covalent microbead immunosorbent assay (FCMIA) for B. anthracis PA which was Luminex xMap technology. The FCMIA MDC was 0.006 μg of anti-PA IgG per ml, the RDL was 0.016 μg/ml, and the whole-serum equivalent MDC was 1.5 μg/ml. The dynamic range was 0.006 to 6.8 μg/ml. Using this system, we analyzed 20 serum samples for anti-PA IgG and compared our results to those measured by ELISA in a double-masked analysis. The two methods had a high positive correlation (r2 = 0.852; P < 0.001). The FCMIA appears to have benefits over the ELISA for the measurement of anti-PA IgG, including greater sensitivity and speed, enhanced dynamic range and reagent stability, the use of smaller sample volumes, and the ability to be multiplexed (measurement of more than one analyte simultaneously), as evidenced by the multiplexed measurement in the present report of anti-PA and anti-lethal factor IgG in serum from a confirmed clinical anthrax infection. PMID:14715544

  20. Molecular Features of the Broadly Neutralizing Immunoglobulin G1 b12 Required for Recognition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Saphire, Erica O.; Church, Sarah; Wang, Meng; Scott, Jamie K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    IgG1 b12 is a broadly neutralizing antibody against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The epitope recognized by b12 overlaps the CD4 receptor-binding site (CD4bs) on gp120 and has been a target for vaccine design. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) b12 allowed modeling of the b12-gp120 interaction in which the protruding third complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the heavy chain (H3) was crucial for antibody binding. In the present study, extensive mutational analysis of the antigen-binding site of Fab b12 was carried out to investigate the validity of the model and to identify residues important for gp120 recognition and, by inference, key to the anti-HIV-1 activity of IgG1 b12. In all, 50 mutations were tested: 40 in H3, 4 each in H2 and L1, and 2 in L3. The results suggest that the interaction of gp120 with H3 of b12 is crucially dependent not only on a Trp residue at the apex of the H3 loop but also on a number of residues at the base of the loop. The arrangement of these residues, including aromatic side chains and side chains that hydrogen bond across the base of the loop, may rigidify H3 for penetration of the recessed CD4-binding cavity. The results further emphasize the importance to gp120 binding of a Tyr residue at the apex of the H2 loop that forms a second finger-like structure and a number of Arg residues in L1 that form a positively charged, shelf-like structure. In general, the data are consistent with the b12-gp120 interaction model previously proposed. At the gene level, somatic mutation is seen to be crucial for the generation of many of the structural features described. The Fab b12 mutants were also tested against the b12 epitope-mimic peptide B2.1, and the reactivity profile had many similarities but also significant differences from that observed for gp120. The paratope map of b12 may facilitate the design of molecules that are able to elicit b12-like activities. PMID:12719580

  1. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  2. Immunogenic targeting of recombinant peptide vaccines to human antigen-presenting cells by chimeric anti-HLA-DR and anti-surface immunoglobulin D antibody Fab fragments in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Baier, G; Baier-Bitterlich, G; Looney, D J; Altman, A

    1995-01-01

    To increase the inherently weak immunogenicity of synthetic peptide vaccines, we used recombinant DNA techniques to generate chimeras between immunogenic determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 and antibody Fab fragments reactive with surface structures displayed specifically on human antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including surface immunoglobulin D (sIgD) and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Hybridomas producing anti-human MHC class II (HLA-DR) or surface immunoglobulin D monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize nonpolymorphic determinants were used to clone chimeric Fab gene fragments by employing an established procedure to generate antigen-binding Fab libraries in phagemid vector pComb3. Molecular and immunochemical analysis indicated that the expected chimeric Fab fragments expressing the HIV-1 epitopes were correctly cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and retained the binding specificity of the native (hybridoma-derived) MAb. The chimeric Fab fragments targeted the linked HIV-1-derived antigenic determinants to the surface of human APCs in vitro, as evidenced by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Furthermore, such recombinant immunotargeted HIV-1 peptide antigens demonstrated improved immunogenicity over equivalent nonimmunotargeted control antigens, as shown by their ability to stimulate interleukin-2 production by CD4+ T-helper cells from human donors exposed to HIV-1 antigens. These data suggest that immunotargeting of recombinant peptide antigens via the attached Fab fragments facilitates uptake by human APCs with subsequent access to the MHC class II processing pathway, thereby validating the immunotargeting concept for such recombinant subunit vaccines in an in vitro human system. PMID:7533857

  3. The discovery of immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) was a breakthrough in the field of allergy and immunology. Our understanding of mechanisms of allergic reactions and the role of IgE in these disorders has paralleled to the discovery of treatment modalities for patients with allergy. The first clue to the existence of a substance responsible for hypersensitivity reactions was demonstrated in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, and after four decades it was identified as an immunoglobulin subclass by Ishizakas and co-workers. In 1968, the WHO International Reference Centre for Immunoglobulins announced the presence of a fifth immunoglobulin isotype, IgE.

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulins: evolution of commercial IVIG preparations.

    PubMed

    Hooper, John A

    2008-11-01

    Since its first use in 1952, human immunoglobulin has been used to treat people who have inherited antibody deficiencies. This article summarizes IVIG clinical development in primary immunodeficient patients and manufacturing improvements introduced over time. Manufacturing improvements include purification procedures that have reduced the incidence of adverse events and improved clinical efficacy, as well as virus inactivation and removal steps that have increased safety from blood-borne infections. Current manufacturing procedures, IVIG production trends, and recent clinical trial results are also reviewed.

  5. ABCG2/BCRP: Specific and Nonspecific Modulators.

    PubMed

    Peña-Solórzano, Diana; Stark, Simone Alexandra; König, Burkhard; Sierra, Cesar Augusto; Ochoa-Puentes, Cristian

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is the development of resistance to a variety of structurally and functionally nonrelated anticancer drugs. This phenomenon has become a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy seriously affecting the clinical outcome. MDR is associated with increased drug efflux from cells mediated by an energy-dependent mechanism involving the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, mainly P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), the MDR-associated protein-1 (ABCC1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). The first two transporters have been widely studied already and reviews summarized the results. The ABCG2 protein has been a subject of intense study since its discovery as its overexpression has been detected in resistant cell lines in numerous types of human cancers. To date, a long list of modulators of ABCG2 exists and continues to increase. However, little is known about the clinical consequences of ABCG2 modulation. This makes the design of novel, potent, and nontoxic inhibitors of this efflux protein a major challenge to reverse MDR and thereby increase the success of chemotherapy. The aim of the present review is to describe and highlight specific and nonspecific modulators of ABCG2 reported to date based on the selectivity of the compounds, as many of them are effective against one or more ABC transport proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Blood serum immunoglobulins in thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Epishin, A V

    1978-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin content was determined in 85 patients with thyrotoxicosis and in 80 healthy persons by radial immunodiffusion in agar after Mancini by means of monospecific antisera (made at the N. F. Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology immunoglobulins of classes G and M. The most pronounced increase was noted in patients with severe and moderate thyrotoxicosis.

  7. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  8. Efficacy of zidovudine and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin for reducing perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected women with advanced disease: results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Bethel, J; Whitehouse, J; Nugent, R; Moye, J; Glenn Fowler, M; Mathieson, B J; Reichelderfer, P; Nemo, G J; Korelitz, J; Meyer, W A; Sapan, C V; Jimenez, E; Gandia, J; Scott, G; O'Sullivan, M J; Kovacs, A; Stek, A; Shearer, W T; Hammill, H

    1999-03-01

    Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated whether zidovudine combined with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) infusions administered monthly during pregnancy and to the neonate at birth would significantly lower perinatal HIV transmission compared with treatment with zidovudine and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) without HIV antibody. Subjects had baseline CD4 cell counts /=200/microL) but not with time of zidovudine initiation (5.6% vs. 4.8% if started before vs. during pregnancy; P=. 75). The Kaplan-Meier transmission rate for HIVIG recipients was 4. 1% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-6.7%) and for IVIG recipients was 6.0% (2.8%-9.1%) (P=.36). The unexpectedly low transmission confirmed that zidovudine prophylaxis is highly effective, even for women with advanced HIV disease and prior zidovudine therapy, although it limited the study's ability to address whether passive immunization diminishes perinatal transmission.

  9. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis.

  10. Developing therapeutic immunoglobulins: European regulatory perspectives and implications.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Prepared from pooled human blood/plasma, therapeutic immunoglobulins contain the natural antibody spectrum of the entire donor population and mediate a range of therapeutic effects when administered to patients. They are particularly indicated for the prevention of serious and life-threatening infections in patients with immune systems failing to produce functional antibodies. Other than treatment of such rare primary immunodeficiencies (primary antibody deficiencies), therapeutic immunoglobulins are also used in certain inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, and Kawasaki disease. The conditions for licensure of therapeutic immunoglobulins in the EU and the associated regulatory issues and procedures are reviewed. Regulatory expectations about the manufacture and control of immunoglobulins are highlighted and safety and efficacy requirements described. Although the main focus is on European pharmaceutical legislation, other applicable public information is considered.

  11. Nonspecific-adsorption behavior of polyethylenglycol and bovine serum albumin studied by 55-MHz wireless-electrodeless quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Fukunishi, Yuji; Nagai, Hironao; Okamoto, Ken; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2009-06-15

    The nonspecific binding ability of polyethylenglycol (PEG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on modified and unmodified surfaces is quantitatively studied by a wireless-electrodeless quartz crystal microbalance (WE-QCM). PEG and BSA are important blocking materials in biosensors, but their affinities for proteins and uncoated substrates have not been known quantitatively. The WE-QCM allows quantitative analysis of the adsorption behavior of proteins on the electrodeless surfaces. Affinities of PEG, BSA, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), and Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) for alpha-SiO(2)(quartz), Au thin film, PEG, and BSA are systematically studied by the homebuilt flow-injection system. PEG shows low affinities for the SiO(2) surface (K(A)=4.2x10(4) M(-1)) and the Au surface (K(A)=6.6x10(4) M(-1)), but BSA shows higher affinity for the SiO(2) surface (K(A)=1.4x10(6) M(-1)). Both PEG and BSA show low affinities for hIgG (K(A) approximately 1.5x10(5) M(-1)). However, the number of binding sites of PEG to hIgG is significantly larger than that of BSA, indicating that blocking for hIgG is favorably achieved by BSA, rather than PEG.

  12. Nonspecific interactions of chromatin with immunoglobulin G and protein A, and their impact on purification performance.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Pete; Nian, Rui; Lee, Jeremy; Tan, Lihan; Latiff, Sarah Maria Abdul; Lim, Chiew Ling; Chuah, Cindy; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng; Zhang, Wei; Gan, Hui Theng

    2014-05-02

    Chromatin released from dead host cells during in vitro production of IgG monoclonal antibodies exists mostly in complex hetero-aggregates consisting of nucleosomal arrays (DNA+histone proteins), non-histone proteins, and aberrant forms of IgG. They bind immobilized protein A more aggressively than IgG, through their nucleosomal histone components, and hinder access of IgG to Fc-specific binding sites, thereby reducing dynamic binding capacity. The majority of host cell contaminants in eluted IgG are leachates from chromatin hetero-aggregates that remain bound to protein A. Formation of turbidity in eluted IgG during pH titration is caused by neutral-pH insolubility of chromatin hetero-aggregates. NaOH is required at 500 mM to remove accumulated chromatin. A chromatin-directed clarification method removed 99% of histones, 90% of non-histone proteins, achieved a 6 log reduction of DNA, 4 log reduction of lipid-enveloped virus, and 5 log reduction of non-enveloped retrovirus, while conserving 98% of the native IgG. This suspended most of performance compromises imposed on protein A. IgG binding capacity increased ~20%. Host protein contamination was reduced about 100-fold compared to protein A loaded with harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration. Aggregates were reduced to less than 0.05%. Turbidity of eluted IgG upon pH neutralization was nearly eliminated. Column cleaning was facilitated by minimizing the accumulation of chromatin.

  13. Control of polyclonal immunoglobulin production from human lymphocytes by leukotrienes; leukotriene B4 induces an OKT8(+), radiosensitive suppressor cell from resting, human OKT8(-) T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atluru, D.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-10-01

    We report that leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid, is a potent suppressor of polyclonal Ig production in pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, while LTC4 and LTD4 have little activity in this system. Preincubation of T cells with LTB4 in nanomolar to picomolar concentrations rendered these cells suppressive of Ig production in subsequent PWM-stimulated cultures of fresh, autologous B + T cells. This LTB4-induced suppressor cell was radiosensitive, and its generation could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. The LTB4-induced suppressor cell was OKT8(+), while the precursor for the cell could be OKT8(-). The incubation of OKT8(-) T cells with LTB4 for 18 h resulted in the appearance of the OKT8(+) on 10-20% of the cells, and this could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. Thus, LTB4 in very low concentrations induces a radiosensitive OKT8(+) suppressor cell from OKT8(-) cells. In this regard, LTB4 is three to six orders of magnitude more potent than any endogenous hormonal inducer of suppressor cells previously described. Glucocorticosteroids, which block suppressor cell induction in many systems, may act by inhibiting endogenous production of LTB4.

  14. THE IMMUNOGLOBULINS OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, John L.; Wunderlich, John; Mishell, Robert

    1964-01-01

    Two subclasses of mouse 7S γ2-globulins are identified, and are designated γ2a- and γ2b-globulins. They are distinguished from 7S γ1-globulins, γ1A (β2A)-globulins, and γ1M-globulins of mouse serum. Antibody activity was detected among the γ2a-globulins and γ2b-globulins of hyperimmune mouse serum. γ2a- and γ2b-myeloma proteins were identified. The genetically determined isoantigen, Iga-1, was present on γ2a-myeloma proteins, but not on γ2b-myeloma proteins. These findings indicate a complexity among the 7S γ2-globulins which must be taken into account in structural, functional, and genetic studies of immunoglobulins. PMID:14206439

  15. The specific immunoglobulin in hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Matossian, R. M.; Kane, G. J.; Chantler, S. M.; Batty, I.; Sarhadian, H.

    1972-01-01

    The variation in the serum level of specific IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies during different stages of hydatid disease has been demonstrated by a technique of fluorescent microscopy that uses monospecific anti-human immunoglobulin conjugates and freeze-dried antigens. The technique is easy to perform and our results suggest that the test is sensitive and specific. Specific IgG antibodies are present in patients with either current or past infections. IgM antibodies, detected during periods of antigenic activity, disappear soon after removal of the cyst. In many cases IgA antibodies also disappear soon after removal of the cyst. Cross-reactions between the antigens and antibodies of hydatid disease and schistosomiasis are shown to be present mainly in the IgG immunoglobulin and only to a much smaller extent in the IgA. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4554745

  16. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    PubMed

    del Fresno, M Rosa; Peralta, Julio E; Granados, Miguel Ángel; Enríquez, Eugenia; Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; de Inocencio, Jaime

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a troublesome complication of idiopathic acute pericarditis and occurs more frequently in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery (postpericardiotomy syndrome). Conventional treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and colchicine is not always effective or may cause serious adverse effects. There is no consensus, however, on how to proceed in those patients whose disease is refractory to conventional therapy. In such cases, human intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressive drugs, and biological agents have been used. In this report we describe 2 patients with refractory recurrent pericarditis after cardiac surgery who were successfully treated with 3 and 5 monthly high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin until resolution of the effusion. Our experience supports the effectiveness and safety of this therapy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Milk immunoglobulins and complement factors.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The importance of colostrum for the growth and health of newborn offspring is well known. In bovine colostrum, the antibody (immunoglobulin) complement system provides a major antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microbes and confers passive immunity until the calf's own immune system has matured. Bovine serum and lacteal secretions contain three major classes of immunoglobulins: IgG, IgM and IgA. The immunoglobulins are selectively transported from the serum into the mammary gland, as a result of which the first colostrum contains very high concentrations of immunoglobulins (40-200 mg/ml). IgG1 accounts for over 75 % of the immunoglobulins in colostral whey, followed by IgM, IgA and IgG2. All these immunoglobulins decrease within a few days to a total immunoglobulin concentration of 0.7-1.0 mg/ml, with IgG1 representing the major Ig class in milk throughout the lactation period. Together with the antibodies absorbed from colostrum after birth, the complement system plays a crucial role in the passive immunisation of the newborn calf. The occurrence of haemolytic or bactericidal complement activity in bovine colostrum and milk has been demonstrated in several studies. This review deals with the characteristics of bovine Igs and the complement system to be exploited as potential ingredients for health-promoting functional foods.

  18. A new high molecular weight immunoglobulin class from the carcharhine shark: implications for the properties of the primordial immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, R M; Schluter, S F; Shen, S; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    All immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors throughout phylogeny share regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence. To identify possible primitive immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-like molecules, we utilized 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and a highly conserved constant region consensus amino acid sequence to isolate a new immunoglobulin class from the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus. The immunoglobulin, termed IgW, in its secreted form consists of 782 amino acids and is expressed in both the thymus and the spleen. The molecule overall most closely resembles mu chains of the skate and human and a new putative antigen binding molecule isolated from the nurse shark (NAR). The full-length IgW chain has a variable region resembling human and shark heavy-chain (VH) sequences and a novel joining segment containing the WGXGT motif characteristic of H chains. However, unlike any other H-chain-type molecule, it contains six constant (C) domains. The first C domain contains the cysteine residue characteristic of C mu1 that would allow dimerization with a light (L) chain. The fourth and sixth domains also contain comparable cysteines that would enable dimerization with other H chains or homodimerization. Comparison of the sequences of IgW V and C domains shows homology greater than that found in comparisons among VH and C mu or VL, or CL thereby suggesting that IgW may retain features of the primordial immunoglobulin in evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8622930

  19. Comparative removal of solvent and detergent viral inactivating agents from human intravenous immunoglobulin G preparations using SDR HyperD and C18 sorbents.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Sayed, Makram A; Radosevich, Miryana; El-Ekiaby, Magdy

    2009-06-01

    The capacity of hydrophobic octadecyl (C18) and SDR HyperD materials to remove the combination of 1% (v/v) solvent (tri-n-butyl phosphate, TnBP) with 1% (v/v) nonionic detergents (Triton X-100 and Triton X-45) used for viral inactivation of plasma-derived polyvalent intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) preparation has been evaluated. Efficient removal of TnBP (<10 ppm in IVIG preparation) was found at ratios of 0.5 g of C18/7 ml of IVIG and 0.22 g of dry SDR HyperD/7 ml of IVIG. Binding capacities of TnBP were greater than 140 mg/g of C18 and greater than 318 mg/g of dry SDR HyperD. Complete removal of Triton X-45 (<2 ppm) was obtained at ratios of 1g of C18/7 ml of IVIG and 0.44 g of dry SDR HyperD/7 ml of IVIG or above, corresponding to binding capacities in excess of 70 mg/g of C18 and in excess of 159 mg/g of dry SDR HyperD. Residual Triton X-100 was less than 30 ppm at a ratio of 4 g/14 ml of immunoglobulin G (IgG) for the C18 sorbent. Triton X-100 was less than 10 ppm when using SDR HyperD at a ratio of 0.66 g/7 ml of IgG, corresponding to a binding capacity of approximately 106 mg of Triton X-100/g of dry SDR HyperD. Good recoveries of IVIG were achieved in the effluent from both sorbents.

  20. Immunoglobulin systems of human tonsils. I. Control subjects of various ages: qualification of Ig-producing cells, tonsillar morphometry and serum Ig concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, P.; Surjan, L.; Berdal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Specimens of clinically normal palatine tonsils were studied by morphometry and immunohistochemistry, with regard to the relative tissue contribution and the content of Ig-producing immunocytes of four morphological compartments: the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles, their mantle zones, the extrafollicular area and the reticular parts of the crypt epithelium. Ig-producing cells occurred in all compartments; most of them were located in the extrafollicular area, although their density was highest in the reticular epithelium. There was a general predominance of IgG cells—including the blasts present in germinal centres. In subjects 4–25 years old, the tonsillar immunocyte population showed overall IgG:IgA:IgM:IgD class ratios of 65·2:30·1:3·5:1·2. IgE-producing cells were virtually absent. A reticular distribution of non-diffusible immunoglobulins, especially IgM, was observed in the germinal centres—apparently bound to dendritic reticular cells. The mantle zones commonly contained numerous lymphocytes with membrane-related immunofluorescence, particularly prominent for IgD and less distinct for IgM. These B-cells were probably derived from local clonal expansion processes. There was no indication of active immunoglobulin transport through the tonsillar epithelium, which was devoid of `secretory component'. In subjects 30–81 years old, lymphoid elements of the tonsils were reduced, especially the follicular mantles and the reticular crypt epithelium, as well as their content of Ig-producing immunocytes. Such cells were also fewer in the germinal centres and in the extrafollicular area. Moreover, some shifts in the immunocyte class ratios had occurred in the various tissue compartments. In this age group, the number of tonsillar IgA cells showed a significant negative correlation with the rate of synthesis of serum IgA. Imagesp374-a PMID:350457

  1. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  2. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera – either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera – and serum IgG from a few donors – indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg. PMID:25196542

  3. Non-specific ileojejunitis in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Perea, V D; Fernan-Zegarra, L; Cruz, V M; Ballon, R; Picoaga, J L

    1978-09-09

    Non-specific ileojejunitis, characterised by mild to moderate structural changes in the intestinal mucosa and often associated with asymptomatic malabsorption, is known to occur in the tropics and in countries with hot climates. This acquired condition is probably related to environmental factors, and some consider it to be a subclinical form of tropical sprue. Changes in the intestinal mucosa typical of non-specific ileojejunitis were found in 10 indigenous Indians as well as 5 people of Latin stock living in the Southern Peruvian sierra, where tropical sprue has not as yet been demonstrated and which has a temperate climate.

  4. [Possibility of the species identification using blood stains located on the material evidences and bone fragments with the method of solid phase enzyme immunoassay with "IgG general-EIA-BEST" kit and human immunoglobulin G].

    PubMed

    Sidorov, V L; Shvetsova, I V; Isakova, I V

    2007-01-01

    The authors give the comparative analysis of Russian and foreign forensic medical methods of species character identification of the blood from the stains on the material evidences and bone fragments. It is shown that for this purpose it is feasible to apply human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and solid phase enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with the kit "IgG general-EIA-BEST". In comparison with the methods used in Russia this method is more sensitive, convenient for objective registration and computer processing. The results of experiments shown that it is possible to use the kit "IgG general-EIA-BEST" in forensic medicine for the species character identification of the blood from the stains on the material evidences and bone fragments.

  5. Human B cell function in normal individuals of various ages. 1. In vitro enumeration of pokeweed-induced peripheral blood lymphocyte immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells and the comparison of the results with numbers of peripheral B and T cells, mitogen responses, and levels of serum immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, J E; Crest, F J; Adler, W H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of age on the in vitro generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells in pokeweed mitogen-stimulated cultures was examined using a staphylococcal protein A plaque assay. Although there was no statistically significant decrease with age in the numbers of plaque-forming cells, subjects whose cells failed to produce immunoglobulin were four times more common amongst individuals over 55 years of age. Simultaneously-measured T and B lymphocyte numbers. 3H-thymidine incorporation by mitogen-stimulated cultures, and serum immunoglobulins were comparable in both the young and the aged. PMID:7035035

  6. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  7. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  8. Rapid method to detect rubella immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Shimizu, H; Kampa, D; Doerr, H W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G was removed from serum specimens by precipitation with gamma chain-specific anti-human IgG of rabbit origin. The remaining rubella virus-specific IgM (and IgA) antibodies were then detected by the rubella hemagglutination-inhibition test. This procedure has proven to be as reliable as estimations carried out with IgM fractions separated on a sucrose density gradient. PMID:1176596

  9. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and spinal cord. Other drugs that boost the immune system Some other drugs boost the immune system in a non-specific way, similar to cytokines. ... and CTLA-4, which normally help keep the immune system in check. While these checkpoint proteins are important ...

  10. Immunoglobulin systems of human tonsils. II. Patients with chronic tonsillitis or tonsillar hyperplasia: quantification of Ig-producing cells, tonsillar morphometry and serum Ig concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, L; Brandtzaeg, P; Berdal, P

    1978-01-01

    Patients suffering from recurrent tonsillitis (RT), hyperplastic tonsillitis (HT) or idiopathic tonsillar hyperplasia (ITH) were compared in immunological studies with subjects showing clinically normal palatine tonsils. Serum concentrations of immunoglobulins, particularly IgG, were increased in association with tonsillitis. Conversely, the number of IgG-, IgA- and IgM-producing immunocytes was reduced per tonsillar tissue unit. The density of such cells was decreased in the germinal centres of the lymphoid follicles, in the extrafollicular areas and in the reticular parts of the crypt epithelium. However, only small changes in immunocyte class ratios were observed, excepting a significantly raised proportion of IgD-producing cells. The immunohistochemical results indicated a defect in the tonsillar immunological function associated with disease, perhaps as a result of inadequate stimulatory signals for local maturation of B-cell clones. An influence of low age on this result in the HT and ITH groups could not be excluded. In the RT group there was a significant negative correlation between the tonsillar density of IgA-producing cells and the rate of synthesis of serum IgA. This may indicate that compensatory mechanisms are reflected in inversely related levels of local and systemic IgA synthesis. PMID:350458

  11. Long-range restriction map of human chromosome 22q11-22q12 between the lambda immunoglobulin locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint

    SciTech Connect

    McDermid, H.E. ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA )

    1993-11-01

    A long-range restriction map of the region between the immunoglobulin lambda locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint has been constructed using the rare-cutting enzymes NotI, NruI, AscI, and BsiWI. The map spans approximately 11,000 kb and represents about one-fifth of the long arm of chromosome 22. Thirty-nine markers, including seven NotI junction clones as well as numerous genes and anonymous sequences, were mapped to the region with a somatic cell hybrid panel. These probes were then used to produce the map. The seven NotI junction clones each identified a possible CpG island. The breakpoints of the RAJ5 hybrid and the Ewing sarcoma t(11;22) were also localized in the resulting map. This physical map will be useful in studying chromosomal rearrangements in the region, as well as providing the details to examine the fidelity of the YAC and cosmid contigs currently under construction. Comparisons of this physical map to genetic and radiation hybrid maps are discussed. 52 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Validation of the World Health Organization Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Quantitation of Immunoglobulin G Serotype-Specific Anti-Pneumococcal Antibodies in Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunju; Lim, Soo Young; Kim, Kyung Hyo

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) guideline is currently accepted as the gold standard for the evaluation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies specific to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. We conducted validation of the WHO ELISA for 7 pneumococcal serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) by evaluating its specificity, precision (reproducibility and intermediate precision), accuracy, spiking recovery test, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), and stability at the Ewha Center for Vaccine Evaluation and Study, Seoul, Korea. We found that the specificity, reproducibility, and intermediate precision were within acceptance ranges (reproducibility, coefficient of variability [CV] ≤ 15%; intermediate precision, CV ≤ 20%) for all serotypes. Comparisons between the provisional assignments of calibration sera and the results from this laboratory showed a high correlation > 94% for all 7 serotypes, supporting the accuracy of the ELISA. The spiking recovery test also fell within an acceptable range. The quantification limit, calculated using the LLOQ, for each of the serotypes was 0.05-0.093 μg/mL. The freeze-thaw stability and the short-term temperature stability were also within an acceptable range. In conclusion, we showed good performance using the standardized WHO ELISA for the evaluation of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal IgG antibodies; the WHO ELISA can evaluate the immune response against pneumococcal vaccines with consistency and accuracy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  13. Conformational and Colloidal Stabilities of Human Immunoglobulin G Fc and Its Cyclized Variant: Independent and Compensatory Participation of Domains in Aggregation of Multidomain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yageta, Seiki; Shibuya, Risa; Imamura, Hiroshi; Honda, Shinya

    2017-03-06

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a multidomain protein. It has been reported that the conformational and colloidal stabilities of each domain are different, and it is predicted that limited domains participate in IgG aggregation. In contrast, the influence of interdomain interactions on IgG aggregation remains unclear. The fragment crystallizable (Fc) region is also a multidomain protein consisting of two sets of CH2 and CH3 domains. Here, we have analyzed the conformational change and aggregate size of an aglycosylated Fc region induced by both acid and salt stresses and have elucidated the influence of interdomain interactions between CH2 and CH3 domains on the conformational and colloidal stabilities of the aglycosylated Fc region. Singular value decomposition analyses demonstrated that the CH2 and CH3 domains unfolded almost independently from each other in the aglycosylated Fc region. Meanwhile, the colloidal stabilities of the CH2 and CH3 domains affect the aggregation process of the unfolded aglycosylated Fc region in a compensatory way. Moreover, the influence of an additional interdomain disulfide bond, introduced at the C-terminal end of the CH3 domains to produce the Fc variant, cyclized Fc, was evaluated. This interdomain disulfide bond increased the conformational stability of the CH3 domain. The stabilization of the CH3 domain in the cyclized Fc successfully improved aggregation tolerance following acid stress, although the sizes of aggregates produced were comparable to those of the aglycosylated Fc region.

  14. Human plasma-derived immunoglobulin G fractionated by an aqueous two-phase system, caprylic acid precipitation, and membrane chromatography has a high purity level and is free of detectable in vitro thrombogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M; Segura, Á; Wu, Y-W; Herrera, M; Chou, M-L; Villalta, M; León, G; Burnouf, T

    2015-02-01

    Instituto Clodomiro Picado has developed an immunoglobulin G (IgG) plasma fractionation process combining a polyethylene glycol/phosphate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), caprylic acid precipitation and anion-exchange membrane chromatography. We evaluated the purity and in vitro thrombogenicity of such IgG, in line with current international requirements. Contributions of the different production steps to reduce thrombogenicity were assessed at 0·2 l-scale, and then the methodology was scaled-up to a 10 l-scale and final products (n = 3) were analysed. Purity, immunoglobulin composition, and subclass distribution were determined by electrophoretic and immunochemical methods. The in vitro thrombogenic potential was determined by a thrombin generation assay (TGA) using a Technothrombin fluorogenic substrate. Prekallikrein activator (PKA), plasmin, factor Xa, thrombin and thrombin-like activities were assessed using S-2302, S-2251, S-2222, S-2238 and S-2288 chromogenic substrates, respectively, and FXI by an ELISA. The thrombogenicity markers were reduced mostly during the ATPS step and were found to segregate mostly into the discarded liquid upper phase. The caprylic acid precipitation eliminated the residual procoagulant activity. The IgG preparations made from the 10 l-batches contained 100% gamma proteins, low residual IgA and undetectable IgM. The IgG subclass distribution was not substantially affected by the process. TGA and amidolytic activities revealed an undetectable in vitro thrombogenic risk and the absence of proteolytic enzymes in the final product. Fractionating human plasma by an ATPS combined with caprylic acid and membrane chromatography resulted in an IgG preparation of high purity and free of a detectable in vitro thrombogenic risk. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-24

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum.

  16. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  17. [Secretory immunoglobulin A in amniotic fluid].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Lorenz, U

    1983-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was estimated in amniotic fluid samples by means of the single radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. A monospecific antiserum against human secretory component was used. 163 amniotic fluid samples from normal pregnancies and risk pregnancies respectively were investigated. Within the 3rd trimenon the S-IgA content in amniotic fluid increased significantly. With respect to literature and examinations performed previously a connection between S-IgA content in amniotic fluid and fetal lung maturity seems to be possible.

  18. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, James J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. Methods. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). Conclusions. KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. PMID:26268853

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen-C Genotype and Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor-Ligand Matching in Korean Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Ki Hyun; Park, Hye Sun; Ryu, Ji Hyeong; Lim, Jihyang; Kim, Yonggoo; Na, Gun Hyung; Kim, Dong Goo

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and HLA class I regulates natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and function. The impact of NK cell alloreactivity through KIR in liver transplantation remains unelucidated. Since the frequency of HLA-C and KIR genotypes show ethnic differences, we assessed the impact of HLA-C, KIR genotype, or KIR-ligand mismatch on the allograft outcome of Korean liver allografts. Methods One hundred eighty-two living donor liver transplant patients were studied. Thirty-five patients (19.2%) had biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR), and eighteen (9.9%) had graft failure. The HLA-C compatibility, KIR genotypes, ligand-ligand, and KIR-ligand matching was retrospectively investigated for association with allograft outcomes. Results Homozygous C1 ligands were predominant in both patients and donors, and frequency of the HLA-C2 allele in Koreans was lower than that in other ethnic groups. Despite the significantly lower frequency of the HLA-C2 genotype in Koreans, donors with at least one HLA-C2 allele showed higher rates of AR than donors with no HLA-C2 alleles (29.2% vs 15.7%, P=0.0423). Although KIR genotypes also showed ethnic differences, KIR genotypes and the number of activating KIR/inhibitory KIR were not associated with the allograft outcome. KIR-ligand mismatch was expected in 31.6% of Korean liver transplants and had no impact on AR or graft survival. Conclusions This study could not confirm the clinical impact of KIR genotypes and KIR-ligand mismatch. However, we demonstrated that the presence of HLA-C2 allele in the donor influenced AR of Korean liver allografts. PMID:27834065

  20. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin M antibody in diagnosis of human leptospiral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, W E; Merry, D J; Pirc, M L; Devine, P L

    1997-01-01

    The PanBio Leptospira immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a commercially available screening test for the diagnosis of acute leptospiral infection. The ability of the test to diagnose early or recent Leptospira interrogans infection was assessed by testing sera with known microagglutination test (MAT) titers to serovars pomona, hardjo, copenhageni, and australis. The IgM ELISA detected all 41 cases of early or recent leptospiral infection (sensitivity, 100%), with a positive ELISA result seen in many cases before MAT antibody titers reached 1:50. Thirty-eight of 41 patients showed seroconversion (fourfold or greater increase in titer by MAT, 2 of 41 patients had a single sample with elevated titer, and 1 patient from whom leptospires were isolated from a blood sample failed to show MAT titers, despite a seroconversion (negative to positive result) in the ELISA. Follow-up sera obtained from 8 of 12 patients (67%) for 3 to 48 months after the acute stage of illness showed persisting IgM antibody. However, the range of levels detected in these samples (maximum ELISA ratio, 2.0) was lower than the range seen when infection was recent. Reactivity in the IgM ELISA was observed for only 1 of 59 serum samples from asymptomatic donors (specificity, 98%) and 16 of 233 serum samples from patients with Ross River virus, brucella, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, mycoplasma, Q-fever, toxoplasma, hepatitis A virus, Treponema pallidum, or Borrelia burgdorferi infection (specificity, 93%), with the majority of these patients showing lower levels of IgM in comparison to those in patients with leptospiral infection. We conclude that this ELISA is sufficiently sensitive for use as an initial screen for leptospiral infections, with subsequent confirmation of positive test results by MAT. PMID:9230359