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Sample records for nonspecific human immunoglobulin

  1. Scintigraphic detection of bone and joint infections with indium-111-labeled nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G

    SciTech Connect

    Oyen, W.J.; Claessens, R.A.; van Horn, J.R.; van der Meer, J.W.; Corstens, F.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The utility of indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) to detect infection of bone and adjacent tissues was investigated. Proof of infection was obtained by cultures taken at surgery. All 32 patients showed focally increased uptake on the technetium-99m- (99mTc) methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphies. Labeled immunoglobulin correctly identified presence, location, extent and soft-tissue involvement of the suspected inflammatory site. In these patients, focally increasing accumulation was noted over 48 hr. Discrimination between infection and sterile inflammatory lesions was not possible. Two fractures, 6-mo-old, and an aseptic loosening of a total-hip prosthesis were not visualized. Side effects after the immunoglobulin administration were not observed. Radiolabeled immunoglobulin is a new and safe radiopharmaceutical for the investigation of infectious bone and joint disease. The sensitivity of this agent appears at least as high as that of labeled leukocytes. However, labeled immunoglobulin can easily be prepared in every nuclear medicine department.

  2. Mannose-containing oligosaccharides of non-specific human secretory immunoglobulin A mediate inhibition of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ashlesh K; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Troutman, Ty; Guentzel, M Neal; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Ali, Syed Khalid; Lauriano, Crystal M; Chambers, James P; Klose, Karl E; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-02-09

    The role of antigen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) has been studied extensively, whereas there is a limited body of evidence regarding the contribution of non-specific SIgA to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the effects of non-specific SIgA against infection with Vibrio cholerae O139 strain MO10 and biofilm formation. Seven day old infant mice deficient in IgA (IgA(-/-) mice) displayed significantly greater intestinal MO10 burden at 24 hr post-challenge when compared to IgA(+/+) pups. Importantly, cross-fostering of IgA(-/-) pups with IgA(+/+) nursing dams reversed the greater susceptibility to MO10 infection, suggesting a role for non-specific SIgA in protection against the infection. Since biofilm formation is associated with virulence of MO10, we further examined the role of human non-specific SIgA on this virulence phenotype of the pathogen. Human non-specific SIgA, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly reduced the biofilm formation by MO10 without affecting the viability of the bacterium. Such an inhibitory effect was not induced by human serum IgA, IgG, or IgM, suggesting a role for the oligosaccharide-rich secretory component (SC) of SIgA. This was supported by the demonstration that SIgA treated with endoglycosidase H, to cleave the high-mannose containing terminal chitobiose residues, did not induce a reduction in biofilm formation by MO10. Furthermore, the addition of free mannose per se, across a wide dose range, induced significant reduction in MO10 biofilm formation. Collectively, these results suggest that mannose containing oligosaccharides within human non-specific secretory IgA can alter important virulence phenotypes of Vibrio cholerae such as biofilm formation, without affecting viability of the microorganism. Such effects may contribute significantly to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Radiolabeled, nonspecific, polyclonal human immunoglobulin in the detection of focal inflammation by scintigraphy: Comparison with gallium-67 citrate and technetium-99m-labeled albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Needleman, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Hansen, W.P.; Kramer, P.B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-03-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG) radiolabeled with /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In was compared to that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate and (/sup 99m/Tc)albumin in rats with deep thigh inflammation due to Escherichia coli infection. Serial scintigrams were acquired at 1, 3, 24, and in some cases, 48 hr after injection. As early as 3 hr postinjection, (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation at the lesion than (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). Both (/sup 125/I)IgG and (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation than (/sup 67/Ga)citrate (p less than 0.01). At 24 hr, IgG image definition increased, while HSA image definition decreased, and the intensity of accumulation of both IgG preparations was greater than that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate or (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). At all imaging times, (/sup 67/Ga)citrate accumulation was surprisingly low. In inflammation produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, or turpentine, (/sup 111/In)IgG accumulation was similar to the results obtained with Escherichia coli. These studies suggest that focal sites of inflammation can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific human polyclonal IgG.

  4. Immunoglobulins in human aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    The immunoglobulin concentrations in human aqueous humour from 44 patients aged 35 to 85 years with cataracts were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. IgG was found in all the samples (mean level 7-0 mg/100 ml. IgD, IgA or IgM could not be detected. There was no significant difference in IgG levels in aqueous humour between the two sexes, in different age groups, and in the different types of cataracts. PMID:403928

  5. Use of cellulose derivatives on gold surfaces for reduced nonspecific adsorption of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Volden, Sondre; Zhu, Kaizheng; Nyström, Bo; Glomm, Wilhelm R

    2009-09-01

    This study addresses the design of protein-repellent gold surfaces using hydroxyethyl- and ethyl(hydroxyethyl) cellulose (HEC and EHEC) and hydrophobically modified analogues of these polymers (HM-HEC and HM-EHEC). Adsorption behavior of the protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) onto pure gold and gold surfaces coated with cellulose polymers was investigated and described by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements (CAM). Surfaces coated with the hydrophobically modified cellulose derivatives were found to significantly outperform a reference poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating, which in turn prevented 90% of non-specific protein adsorption as compared to adsorption onto pure gold. HEC and EHEC prevented around 30% and 60% of the IgG adsorption observed on pure gold, while HM-HEC and HM-EHEC were both found to completely hinder biofouling when deposited on the gold substrates. Adsorption behavior of IgG has been discussed in terms of polymer surface coverage and roughness of the applied surfaces, together with hydrophobic interactions between protein and gold, and also polymer-protein interactions.

  6. Collaborative study to establish human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2006-11-01

    A study was carried out by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) as part of the joint Biological Standardisation Programme of the Council of Europe and the European Commission with the aim to establish replacement batches of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) human immunoglobulin Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 2. Twenty-eight laboratories participated in this study. The suitability of the candidate reference preparations to serve as working references in the tests for distribution of the molecular size, anticomplementary activity and Fc function, in accordance with the specifications of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918), Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Anti-T lymphocyte immunoglobulin for human use, animal (1928) was demonstrated. The candidates were therefore established as human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and Human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1. The prescribed use of the latter BRP is limited to the test for distribution of molecular size.

  7. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  8. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M. E.; Buchan, A.; Skinner, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6803822

  9. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects.

  10. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  11. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  12. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-05-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level.

  13. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-01-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level. PMID:465402

  14. Enhancer Complexes Located Downstream of Both Human Immunoglobulin Cα Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frederick C.; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Mitchell, Mary; Max, Edward E.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate regulation of human immunoglobulin heavy chain expression, we have cloned DNA downstream from the two human Cα genes, corresponding to the position in the mouse IgH cluster of a locus control region (LCR) that includes an enhancer which regulates isotype switching. Within 25 kb downstream of both the human immunoglobulin Cα1 and Cα2 genes we identified several segments of DNA which display B lymphoid–specific DNase I hypersensitivity as well as enhancer activity in transient transfections. The corresponding sequences downstream from each of the two human Cα genes are nearly identical to each other. These enhancers are also homologous to three regions which lie in similar positions downstream from the murine Cα gene and form the murine LCR. The strongest enhancers in both mouse and human have been designated HS12. Within a 135-bp core homology region, the human HS12 enhancers are ∼90% identical to the murine homolog and include several motifs previously demonstrated to be important for function of the murine enhancer; additional segments of high sequence conservation suggest the possibility of previously unrecognized functional motifs. On the other hand, certain functional elements in the murine enhancer, including a B cell–specific activator protein site, do not appear to be conserved in human HS12. The human homologs of the murine enhancers designated HS3 and HS4 show lower overall sequence conservation, but for at least two of the functional motifs in the murine HS4 (a κB site and an octamer motif  ) the human HS4 homologs are exactly conserved. An additional hypersensitivity site between human HS3 and HS12 in each human locus displays no enhancer activity on its own, but includes a region of high sequence conservation with mouse, suggesting the possibility of another novel functional element. PMID:9294139

  15. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  16. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  17. Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of human lymphocytes in immunologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Isabelle; Girard, J. P.; Cruchaud, A.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for γ, α, μ, κ and λ chains in healthy subjects and patients with immunologic disease. In healthy subjects, heavy chains were found on 30·7% of lymphocytes (γ 15·3%, α 7·2% and μ 8·2%) and light chains on 32·8% of cells (κ 20·4% and λ 12·4%). Patients with humoral immune deficiencies had fewer immunoglobulin-bearing cells; sarcoidosis or thymectomy patients had normal or decreased immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes; cells with light chains were fewer than those with heavy chains on their lymphocytes. In some cases, normal levels of serum immunoglobulins were found in the absence of the corresponding immunoglobulin-bearing cells, and in others normal immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes were present in the absence of the corresponding serum immunoglobulins. These data suggest that (1) immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes in blood do not reflect the condition of immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues, and (2) in certain immunologic disorders, either some B-lymphocytes do not synthesize immunoglobulins, or immunoglobulins are in such a situation that the whole molecule or part of the molecule is not visualized by current methods. PMID:4587505

  18. Human immunoglobulin 10 % with recombinant human hyaluronidase: replacement therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Human immunoglobulin is an established replacement therapy for patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) is a spreading factor that temporarily digests hyaluronan in the skin interstitium enabling large volumes of fluid or drug solutions to be infused and absorbed subcutaneously. HyQvia® (IGHy) is a new combination product whereby rHuPH20 is injected subcutaneously, followed by human immunoglobulin 10 % infused through the same needle. Thus, IGHy can be administered at a reduced frequency compared with non-facilitated subcutaneous injection of human immunoglobulin, and with a lower frequency of infusion reactions than with intravenous administration. Home-based administration of IGHy is also feasible for adequately trained patients. IGHy was compared with intravenous human immunoglobulin 10 % in a non-randomized, open-label, phase 3 study in patients aged ≥2 years with PIDs who were receiving human immunoglobulin replacement therapy (n = 87). In this study, trough IgG concentrations, acute serious bacterial infection rates (primary endpoint) and occurrences of adverse events during the IGHy treatment period were generally similar to those observed during an intravenous treatment period. IGHy was associated with a numerically lower rate of systemic adverse events and a numerically higher rate of localized adverse events than those observed with intravenous treatment. Compared with intravenous administration, IGHy was administered at a significantly higher maximum flow rate and at a similar frequency. Most patients preferred IGHy over intravenous administration. IGHy offers a new method for subcutaneous delivery of human immunoglobulin replacement therapy in patients with PIDs.

  19. Immunological Studies of the Human Placenta CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS ON TROPHOBLASTIC BASEMENT MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W. Page; Jeannet, M.; Creighton, W. D.; Carbonara, A.

    1974-01-01

    Immunohistological and elution studies of the human placenta revealed the presence of IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) which demonstrated specificity for placental but not lung, thyroid, or kidney basement membranes, suggesting the presence of a placenta-specific antigen in TBM. IgG comprised the bulk of immunoglobulin in eluates, and small amounts of IgA, trace amounts of IgM, but no IgE or IgD were identified in eluates. The distribution of IgG subclasses in eluate was not unusual as compared to maternal and neonatal sera, and Gm and Inv typing of eluates indicated that it was of maternal origin. Small amounts of eluate-IgG effectively inhibited the blastogenic response of unrelated lymphocytes to old tuberculin, phytohemagglutinin, and in one- or two-way mixed lymphocyte culture reactions. The inhibition was distinct from nonspecific inhibitors, and dose-response analysis indicated that eluate was very much more potent as an inhibitor than were the nonspecific inhibitors. Inhibition was shown to not be due to anti-HL-A activity, and was probably not due to aggregated IgG or immune complexes. Binding of eluate to lymphocytes was very loose as shown by washing experiments, and no binding could be shown by immunofluorescence. The capacity of eluate IgG to inhibit MLC was retained after pepsin digestion to F(ab′)2, suggesting that the inhibition reactions were immunological. It is suggested that eluate-IgG is maternal blocking antibody to a hitherto uncharacterized trophoblast antigen, and it is speculated that either abnormal antigen or aberrant responses to antigen could result in fetal wastage. Images PMID:4278853

  20. Immunoglobulin patterns in humans over 95 years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Radl, J; Sepers, J M; Skvaril, F; Morell, A; Hijmans, W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin patterns were investigated in seventy-three volunteers older than 95 years. An idiopathic paraproteinaemia was found in 19% of the cases. A restriction of heterogeneity and an imbalance in the kappa/lambda ratio of the immunoglobulins was seen in a number of other sera. Determinations of immunoglobulin levels in sera of individuals without paraproteinaemia showed an increase in IgA and IgG. The quantitations of the IgG subclasses demonstrated that an increase in the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses is responsible for the elevated level of the IgG. The variation in the immunoglobulin levels increased significantly with age of IgM and for the three major IgG subclasses. No abnormalities were found in the urine or in the mixed saliva. These results indicate that selective changes in the extent of the antibody-immunoglobulin repertoire characterize the immunoglobulin pattern of ageing man. PMID:1212818

  1. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for the fast and selective detection of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The non-specific binding of proteins and the effects of other interferences are avoided by covering the non-adsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The selectivity of the sensor has been tested against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the most abundant protein in plasma. HIgG in aqueous solution with concentrations from 1.25 mg L(-1) (8 nM) can be readily detected with response times of about 10 min. The SWCNT networks that form the basis of the sensor are easily grown by chemical vapour deposition. Silver screen-printed electrodes make the sensor quick to build. The sensitivity obtained with this sensor is similar to other FET devices based on SWCNTs built using much more complicated lithography processes. Moreover, the sensor is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  2. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  3. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  4. [The use of human immunoglobulins--adverse reactions].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2010-09-01

    The primary immunodeficiency, mainly humoral immunity, secondary immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases are the indications for immunoglobulins substitution. The prolonged substitution in primary immunodeficiency includes regular intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in 0.4-0.6 g/kg of body weight every 21-28 days. The purpose of such substitution is decrease of frequency and diminishes the clinical course of infections. The high-dose use of immunoglobulins (1-2 g/kg body weight) is preferred in autoimmune diseases based on suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins. The subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins is an alternative to intravenous way, but the singular dose (0.1 g/kg body weight) is too low for suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins, so this substitution is indicated in primary immunodeficiency only. The adverse events of immunoglobulins differentiate because of time of occurrence and clinical character. The rapid symptoms occurred just after beginning of infusion and often present the clinical features of anaphylactoid reaction. During the infusion the occurring adverse symptoms are mild and the life-threatening situations are very rare. The next periods of typical adverse reaction are 24-48 hrs after infusion, 72 hrs and later. The mechanisms leading to adverse reaction to immunoglobulins are based on presence of IgG dimmers, stimulating high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immunocompetent cells. High level of cytokines is associated with high fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, feeling malaise and sick. The reaction of anti-IgA antibodies present in patient serum with IgA in immunoglobulins preparation is responsible for moderate and severe adverse clinical symptoms. The late adverse events present the symptoms of aseptic meningo-encephalitis. In case of adverse events the stopping of infusion, additions saline/ glucose infusion, anti-histaminic drugs of I and II generation and steroids

  5. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  6. Supercritical fluid precipitation of recombinant human immunoglobulin from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nesta, D P; Elliott, J S; Warr, J P

    2000-02-20

    Supercritical carbon dioxide was used as an antisolvent for producing recombinant human immunoglobulin G (rIgG) particulate powders. Liquid carbon dioxide (CO(2)) was premixed with ethanol to create a single-phase, modified supercritical fluid (SCF). The modified SCF was then vigorously mixed with a pharmaceutically acceptable, aqueous formulation of rIgG, and the mixture was immediately atomized into a pressurized vessel where rapid expansion of the modified SCF extracted the aqueous phase, resulting in precipitation of the protein powder. The process was reproducible, and resulting powder products were characterized by their aqueous solubilities, and the spectroscopic profile, molecular integrity, and antigen binding activity of the individual soluble fractions. Molecular integrity was assessed via size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SEC), whereas antigen binding activity was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Attempts to characterize particle size and morphology were confounded due to the extremely deliquescent nature of the powders, causing them to absorb moisture rapidly and become gummy. Operational conditions were optimized to a point which yielded powders that were completely soluble, and had ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic and SEC profiles indistinguishable from those of the reference standard starting solution from which the powders were derived. Antigen binding activities of the powders, however, were

  7. Primary response to GAT in F344 rats: anti-GAT antibodies, nonspecific immunoglobulins, and expression of the GAT-13 idiotype.

    PubMed

    Petit, C; Gilbert, M

    1983-08-01

    It has been reported that antigen induces differentiation of two populations of Ig-containing cells: the first one to appear, IgCC, synthesizes nonspecific Ig and the second, AbCC, synthesizes antibodies. Along with other arguments, the observation that nonspecific Ig bear idiotypic determinants, which cross-react with those of antibodies, had led to the hypothesis that IgCC are precursors of AbCC. However, the synthesis of such idiotype-positive nonspecific Ig before the appearance of the antibodies has not yet been proven. This problem was investigated by analyzing the primary response to poly(Glu60-Ala30-Tyr10) (GAT) in F344 rats. Kinetics studies of cells synthesizing Ig expressing a major idiotype (GAT-13), and of cells synthesizing Ig not expressing GAT-13 idiotype, revealed that these two cell populations were undetectable before the appearance of the anti-GAT antibodies. This demonstrates that IgCC differentiation is not a necessary condition for the development of all antibody responses.

  8. The Nonspecific Binding of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kushari; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Mackenzie, Peter I; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-12-01

    Drugs and other chemicals frequently bind nonspecifically to the constituents of an in vitro incubation mixture, particularly the enzyme source [e.g., human liver microsomes (HLM)]. Correction for nonspecific binding (NSB) is essential for the accurate calculation of the kinetic parameters Km, Clint, and Ki. Many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are lipophilic organic bases that are nonionized at physiologic pH. Attempts to measure the NSB of several TKIs to HLM by equilibrium dialysis proved unsuccessful, presumably due to the limited aqueous solubility of these compounds. Thus, the addition of detergents to equilibrium dialysis samples was investigated as an approach to measure the NSB of TKIs. The binding of six validation set nonionized lipophilic bases (felodipine, isradipine, loratidine, midazolam, nifedipine, and pazopanib) to HLM (0.25 mg/ml) was shown to be unaffected by the addition of CHAPS (6 mM) to the dialysis medium. This approach was subsequently applied to measurement of the binding of axitinib, dabrafenib, erlotinib, gefitinib, ibrutinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, nintedanib, regorafenib, sorafenib, and trametinib to HLM (0.25 mg/ml). As with the validation set drugs, attainment of equilibrium was demonstrated in HLM-HLM and buffer-buffer control dialysis experiments. Values of the fraction unbound to HLM ranged from 0.14 (regorafenib and sorafenib) to 0.93 (nintedanib), and were generally consistent with the known physicochemical determinants of drug NSB. The extensive NSB of many TKIs to HLM underscores the importance of correction for TKI binding to HLM and, presumably, other enzyme sources present in in vitro incubation mixtures.

  9. IPA3 non-specifically enhances phosphorylation of several proteins in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    PAK (p21-Activation kinase), a serine-threonine protein kinase contains an autoinhibitory domain that suppresses the catalytic activity of its kinase domain. This autoregulatory domain found within PAK kinase provides a unique target for chemical inhibitors. IPA3, a small molecule allosteric inhibitor of PAK activation, binds covalently to the PAK regulatory domain and prevents binding to its upstream activators. IPA3 has been used in various cells including platelets to evaluate the role of PAK in signaling. In a recent study, PAK functions in platelet aggregation and lamellipodia formation were evaluated using IPA3 as the PAK inhibitor. Herein, we investigated the specificity and selectivity of IPA3 as a PAK inhibitor in the human platelets. Stimulation of platelets pretreated with IPA3 using a PAR-4 or GPV1 agonist resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of aggregation, as was suggested by earlier studies. Interestingly, we found that incubation of washed human platelets with IPA3 lead to a non-specific increase in phosphorylation of several proteins in absence of any agonist. However, this phosphorylation is not sufficient for aggregation of platelets by IPA3. In summary, we demonstrate that IPA3 by itself can phosphorylate several proteins in human platelets and thus its use is not an appropriate strategy for investigating PAK function in platelets.

  10. [10 years' of production and use of human rabies immunoglobulin in Yugoslavia].

    PubMed

    Romić, M; Tomović, O; Medić, P; Pelević, S; Sindić, M; Popović, M; Gligorović, V; Bogdanović, G; Mitrović, M; Petrović, M; Stankov, S; Lazarević-Ivanc, L; Lalosević, V; Lalosević, D

    2001-01-01

    Application of the rabies immunoglobuline is a compulsory part of the prophylaxis of rabies in all severe, transdermal lesions caused by rabies infected animals. Sylvatic rabies has spread in the past few years throughout the whole Yugoslavia, and human cases of rabies have also been reported in other East European countries. In order to achieve the highest level of rabies prophylaxis, apart from postinfective rabies vaccination, it is necessary to provide passive immunization using specific antibodies against rabies. After successful immunization of the young, healthy volunteers in 1990, National Blood Transfusion Institute, in cooperation with the Pasteur Institute from Novi Sad, prepared the first quantities of immunized plasma by plasmapheresis procedure and human rabies immunoglobuline. Without national production, sufficient quantities of human rabies immunoglobuline could not be provided, since the price on the world market is rather high (over $1000 per patient).

  11. Opsonization of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites with nonspecific immunoglobulins promotes their phagocytosis by macrophages and inhibits their proliferation in nonphagocytic cells in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, M; Scorza, T; El Bouhdidi, A; Van Beeck, K; Carlier, Y; Dubremetz, J F; Verschueren, H

    1999-11-01

    We have recently shown that Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites grown in in vitro culture can bind unspecific immunoglobulin (Ig) through their Fc moiety. We show now that Fc receptors are also present on T. gondii within the host animal, and that intraperitoneal parasites in immunocompetent mice are saturated with unspecific Ig. We have also investigated the effect of the parasite's Fc receptor on the interaction of tachyzoites with mammalian cells, using the Vero cell line as a model for nonphagocytic host cells and murine peritoneal macrophages in primary culture as a model for phagocytic cells. Coating of tachyzoites with parasite-unrelated Ig did not enhance their invasive capacity in either target cell type, but slightly decreased the parasite proliferation. Moreover, phagocytosis by macrophages was increased by approximately 50% when parasites were coated with unspecific Ig. These results indicate that the Fc receptor on T. gondii affects the balance between invasion and phagocytosis in a way that is detrimental to the parasites.

  12. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  13. Human immunoglobulin G levels of viruses and associated glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Sara; Hjalmars, Ulf; Juto, Per; Wadell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Tjönneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Manjer, Jonas; Almquist, Martin; Melin, Beatrice S

    2011-09-01

    Few consistent etiological factors have been identified for primary brain tumors. Inverse associations to asthma and low levels of varicella-zoster virus, immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in prevalent cases have indicted a role for the immune system in the development of glioma. Because samples from prevalent cases of glioma could be influenced by treatments such as steroids and chemotherapy, we investigated pre-diagnostic samples from three large Scandinavian cohorts. To test the hypothesis that immune response levels to these viruses are associated etiologically with glioma risk, we investigated pre-diagnostic immunoglobulin levels for cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus (Ad), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) including the nuclear antigen (EBNA1) using plasma samples from 197 cases of adult glioma and 394 controls collected from population-based cohorts in Sweden and Denmark. Low VZV IgG levels were marginally significantly more common in glioma cases than the controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.13) for the fourth compared with the first quartile (p = 0.06 for trend). These results were more prominent when analyzing cases with blood sampling at least 2 years before diagnosis (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.37-1.08) (p = 0.03). No association with glioma risk was observed for CMV, EBV, and adenovirus.

  14. Clinical evaluation of a chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin g avidity to human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Gorini, Giovanna; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2004-07-01

    Clinical evaluation of a novel fully automated chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin G avidity to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) showed 92.8% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity in detecting a recent (< or =90 days) primary HCMV infection. The assay appears useful for accurately diagnosing recent primary HCMV infections.

  15. Effect of water on the temperatures of human immunoglobulin conformation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur'yash, V. F.; Kokurina, N. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    A differential thermal analysis of native and denaturated human immunoglobulin (G isotype) and mixtures of the native protein with water over the temperature range of 80-570 K is conducted. Temperatures of the protein conformational transitions and the effect of water on them are investigated. The limit of water solubility in the native protein is determined calorimetrically from the enthalpy of excess water phase melting. A physical state diagram of the immunoglobulin-water system over a wide range of temperatures and component concentrations is built and analyzed.

  16. Potato lectin activates basophils and mast cells of atopic subjects by its interaction with core chitobiose of cell-bound non-specific immunoglobulin E

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, S N; Venkatesh, Y P; Mahesh, P A

    2007-01-01

    A major factor in non-allergic food hypersensitivity could be the interaction of dietary lectins with mast cells and basophils. Because immunoglobulin E (IgE) contains 10–12% carbohydrates, lectins can activate and degranulate these cells by cross-linking the glycans of cell-bound IgE. The present objective focuses on the effect of potato lectin (Solanum tuberosum agglutinin; STA) for its ability to release histamine from basophils in vitro and mast cells in vivo from non-atopic and atopic subjects. In this study, subjects were selected randomly based on case history and skin prick test responses with food, pollen and house dust mite extracts. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with STA at 100 µg/ml concentration. Histamine release was performed using leucocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects and rat peritoneal exudate cells. SPT on 110 atopic subjects using STA showed 39 subjects positive (35%); however, none showed STA-specific IgE; among 20 non-atopic subjects, none were positive by SPT. Maximal histamine release was found to be 65% in atopic subjects (n = 7) compared to 28% in non-atopic subjects (n = 5); the release was inhibited specifically by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine and correlates well with serum total IgE levels (R2 = 0·923). Binding of STA to N-linked glycoproteins (horseradish peroxidase, avidin and IgG) was positive by dot blot and binding assay. As potato lectin activates and degranulates both mast cells and basophils by interacting with the chitobiose core of IgE glycans, higher intake of potato may increase the clinical symptoms as a result of non-allergic food hypersensitivity in atopic subjects. PMID:17362264

  17. Binding analysis of carbon nanoparticles to human immunoglobulin G: Elucidation of the cytotoxicity of CNPs and perturbation of immunoglobulin conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengrui; Yang, Haitao; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The chemical compositions, sizes and fluorescent properties of synthesized carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were characterized. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were used as a model to study the cytotoxicity of CNPs, and the results of the cellular uptake of CNPs yielded excellent results: the CNPs demonstrated good biocompatibility and were non-toxic to the growth of the E. coli cells. Moreover, to assess the potential toxicity of CNPs to human health, the binding behavior of CNPs with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) was examined by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching constants and parameters for the interaction at different temperatures had been calculated according to Scatchard. The thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and free energy change (ΔG), were calculated, and the results indicated strong static quenching and showed that van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the CNP-HIgG complex. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra provided information regarding the conformational alteration of HIgG in the presence of CNPs. These findings help to characterize the interactions between CNPs and HIgG, which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of CNPs, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  18. Multi-scale modeling of the phase diagram of Human Immunoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchman, Mark; Buldyrev, Sergey; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George B.

    2014-03-01

    Human Immunoglobulin antibodies IGg is a Y-shape trimer consisting of three folded protein globules, connected by two polypeptide hinges in random conformations linked by disulfide bonds. The solubility and crystallization phase diagrams of immunoglobulin are crucial in understanding various pathological conditions. It is experimentally known that the critical volume fraction of immunoglobulin is three times smaller than for typical globular proteins. In order to explain this phenomenon, we perform a multi-scale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. First we produce all atom simulations of the hinges and compute the distribution of their end-to-end distances. Using these results we construct a simple effective bond potential and study a phase diagram of a system of three sticky hard-spheres linked by these bonds by discrete MD simulations. The results are in good agreement with the experiment.

  19. An Fc receptor for human immunoglobulin G is located within the tegument of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, L M; Hardie, D R

    1991-01-01

    Immunogold electron microscopy has demonstrated that human immunoglobulin G (IgG) can bind to the tegument of human cytomegalovirus virions by the Fc portion of the molecule. This binding was inhibited by preincubation of the Fc probes with protein A. Treatment of AD169 virions with Triton X-100 allowed release of the Fc-binding proteins, which were precipitated and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Polypeptides of approximately 69 and 33 kDa were recovered and shown by immunoblotting to retain their capacity to bind Fc-gold after separation under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. The combined results of blocking experiments, PAGE of precipitates, and Western blots (immunoblots) indicate that the tegument proteins which bind IgG-Fc are identical to those which bind beta 2 microglobulin. Images PMID:1851889

  20. Characterization of a soluble suppressor of human B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis produced by a continuous human suppressor T cell line

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A human suppressor T cell maintained in long-term culture with conditioned medium containing interleukin 2 elaborates a suppressor factor(s) that specifically inhibits human polyclonal B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis. This soluble immune suppressor supernate of immunoglobulin production (CTC-SISS-B) shares a number of features with the previously described suppressive mediator elaborated by concanavalin A-activated human peripheral T cells (SISS-B) including: (a) the inhibition by a noncytotoxic mechanism, (b) the suppression of immunoglobulin biosynthesis either through direct action on the B cell or indirect action via the monocyte, (c) the loss of inhibition in the presence of the monosaccharide L-rhamnose, (d) the elaboration by cells irradiated with 500 ro 2,000 rad, and (e) molecular weights of 60,000-- 90,000. Furthermore, the suppression by this mediator appears to be specific for B cell immunoglobulin production in that CTC-SISS B has no effect on T cell proliferation to mitogens, antigens, an allogeneic cells or on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicate that one possible mechanism of suppressor T cell inhibition of human immunoglobulin production is via the generation of a lectinlike suppressor lymphokine that interacts with defined saccharide determinants on the cell surface of either the B cell or monocyte. PMID:6454754

  1. Neutralizing activities against seasonal influenza viruses in human intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Hiroyuki; Urayama, Takeru; Hirota, Kazue; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Yunoki, Mikihiro

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B are known seasonal viruses that undergo annual mutation. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-seasonal influenza virus globulins. Although the virus-neutralizing (VN) titer is an indicator of protective antibodies, changes in this titer over extended time periods have yet to be examined. In this study, variations in hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and VN titers against seasonal influenza viruses in IVIG lots over extended time periods were examined. In addition, the importance of monitoring the reactivity of IVIG against seasonal influenza viruses with varying antigenicity was evaluated. A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B influenza virus strains and IVIG lots manufactured from 1999 to 2014 were examined. The HI titer was measured by standard methods. The VN titer was measured using a micro-focus method. IVIG exhibited significant HI and VN titers against all investigated strains. Our results suggest that the donor population maintains both specific and cross-reactive antibodies against seasonal influenza viruses, except in cases of pandemic viruses, despite major antigen changes. The titers against seasonal influenza vaccine strains, including past strains, were stable over short time periods but increased slowly over time. PMID:28331286

  2. Immunogenic and antigenic epitopes of immunoglobulins I. Cross-reactivity of murine monoclonal antibodies to human IgG with the immunoglobulins of certain animal species.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; Porter, P; Senior, S

    1982-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma clones have been isolated following immunization of mice with human IgG. Twenty-five monoclonal antibodies (nine anti-C gamma 3, fourteen anti-C gamma 2, one anit-kappa and one anti-lambda) were selected for study of their cross-reactivity with the IgG of fifteen mammalian species and chicken immunoglobulin. Each antibody exhibited a unique reaction profile suggesting that human IgG expresses a very large repertoire of immunogenic epitopes. Whilst some antibodies showed a very restricted cross-reactivity profile for others a very wide reactivity profile was observed-including two clones producing autoantibodies. Antibodies demonstrating cross-reactivity between human Fc gamma and 7S chicken immunoglobulin allow its definitive assignment as a homologue of human IgG. Four clones demonstrated specificity for bovine IgG subclass gamma 1 and gamma 2 and the degree of reactivity allows their application to qualitative and quantitative assay systems. These studies suggest new perspectives for the characterization of immunoglobulins and the standardization of anti-immunoglobulin reagents. PMID:6173313

  3. The physiological effects of human immunoglobulin on severe bronchiolitis patients before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Dong; Li, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xi-Mei; Luo, Song-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to explore the physiological effects of injected human immunoglobulin on patients with severe bronchiolitis before and after treatment. 86 young children with severe bronchiolitis were randomly divided into the observation group (43 cases) and the treatment group (43 cases). On the basis of conventional therapy, the children in the treatment group were given human immunoglobulin (400 mg/kg, 1-3 times) via intravenous injection. 60 healthy young children, as determined by a physical examination given at the Zhumadian Central Hospital, were enrolled as the control group. The T lymphocytes, cytokines, IgA, IgG, and IgM immunoglobulins in the peripheral blood of all 3 groups were measured. The clinical efficacy of the immunoglobulins to mitigate the effects of bronchiolitis and the amount of time for the reduction of symptoms to occur were observed. The serum Ca, Fe, and Zn levels of children with severe bronchiolitis were significantly lower than those of the healthy control group (p < 0.05). As such, the CD8, IgA, IgG, IgM and IFN-γ levels were also significantly lower in the children with severe bronchiolitis than in the children in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CD4, IgE, IL-4, and IL-4/IFN-γ levels and CD4/CD8 ratio were dramatically higher than in the healthy control group (p < 0.05). Serum levels of the aforementioned indicators either increased or decreased after IVIG treatment. The amount of time required for coughing, wheezing, and pulmonary rales to seize, and the duration of illness for the children with the severe bronchiolitis children was significantly shorter for those in the treatment group than for those in the observation group. Human immunoglobulin via intravenous injection showed active therapeutical effects on trace elements, T lymphocytes, and cytokines in patients with severe bronchiolitis.

  4. Specific absorption of human serum albumin, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G with selected strains of group A and G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Simmons, A; Myhre, E B; Jonsson, S

    1979-01-01

    Five gram-positive bacterial strains were selected for absorption studies of human serum samples. Strain AR1 (group A, M-type 1) and G148 (group G), with strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding capacities, and strain AW43 (group A, M-type 60), binding both IgA1 and IgA2, were compared with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and with Staphylococcus epidermidis L603. Both AR1 and G148 were capable of completely absorbing out serum IgG. In contrast, S. aureus Cowan I left a fraction unabsorbed, as expected from its known lack of IgG3 binding. Strain AW43 absorbed out all serum IgA, using a 10-microliter bacterial pellet for 20 microliter of serum. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced by S. aureus Cowan I absorption. On the basis of the experiments, a bacterial mixture was designed consisting of S. aureus Cowan I and group A streptococcus strains AR1 and AW43, with absorption characteristics suitable for use in discriminating between early IgM and late IgG and IgA immune responses in routine serological work. A new type of bacteria-mammalian protein binding was discovered. Human serum albumin was completely absorbed out by strain G148 and to a lesser extent by strain AR1 and AW43. S. aureus Cowan I and S. epidermidis were negative. The binding capacity of G148 for albumin equalled that of Cowan I for IgG. The binding pattern of albumin to the strains was different from those of IgG, IgA, IgM, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, or aggregated beta 2-microglobulin and therefore seems to represent another type of bacterial-mammalian interaction with a specific albumin receptor on the surface of streptococci. Images PMID:383609

  5. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  6. Human immunoglobulin D in colostrum, saliva and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, H F; Matthews, J B; Flack, V; Jefferis, R

    1979-01-01

    An antiserum raised to a partially purified preparation of secretory IgA isolated from human colostrum was shown to contain antibodies directed against human IgD. The inferred presence of IgD in the human colostrum was confirmed and also its association with antibody activity, as demonstrated by the presence of anti-E. coli antibodies. IgD was also shown to be present in whole saliva, parotid saliva and amniotic fluid, but could not be detected in jejunal juice. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:111882

  7. Plasmonic Enhancement of Luminescence of Fluorscein Isothiocyanate and Human Immunoglobulin Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanenka, A. A.; Vaschenko, S. V.; Stankevich, V. V.; Lunevich, A. Ya.; Glukhov, Yu. F.; Gaponenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    Plasmonic enhancement of the luminescence of fl uorescein isothiocyanate and human immunoglobulin conjugates near silver nanoparticles was investigated as functions of the nanoparticle-conjugate distance and the excitation polarization. The maximum luminescence enhancement of 7.4 was achieved for p-polarized excitation and nanoparticle-conjugate distance 3.3 nm. The luminescence enhancement factor increased experimentally for p-polarized excitation and decreased for s-polarized excitation as compared with unpolarized excitation.

  8. Increased detection of human cardiac troponin I by a decrease of nonspecific adsorption in diluted self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J.; Shankar, Karthik

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity for detecting and measuring disease biomarkers (such as human cardiac troponin I, cTnI) by a decrease of nonspecific adsorption in diluted self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on planar sputtered gold films. Combining grazing angle Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and antibody-antigen-antibody (sandwich) fluorescence-based immunoassay, we examined the relationship of sensitivity, specificity of detection of cTnI and the level of nonspecific protein adsorption in the following SAMs: pure MHA (16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid, 1 mM, with head COO-, x = 1.0), a mixed SAM comprising MHA (0.1 mM) and UDT (1-undecane thiol, 0.9 mM, with hydrophobic head CH3, x = 0.1UDT), and a mixed SAM comprising MHA (0.1 mM) and MUD (11-mercapto-1-undecanol, 0.9 mM, with hydrophilic head OH, x = 0.1MUD). Our data revealed that nonspecific binding to SAMs is favored in the following order: CH3 > COO- > OH, consistent with previous studies. Compared with pure SAMs, diluting MHA SAMs with MUD increases the sensitivity of cTnI, whereas diluted MHA SAMs with UDT has the same sensitivity of detection of cTnI, suggesting it is the nature of the second diluting thiol that plays an important role on the amount of adsorbed protein on the surface. We obtained a 10-fold increase in the limit of detection of cTnI to 10 ng/ml using x = 0.1MUD due to a decrease of nonspecific binding. Further, specific binding between the antigen cTnI and its antibody is unaltered on pure and diluted SAMs.

  9. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  10. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  11. Immunization by blood-type antigen in human immunoglobulin products before ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Sato, Sumihiko; Kubota, Keiichi; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Teraoka, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    A 29-year-old man wanted to receive an ABO-incompatible kidney transplant. His blood type was O, and the donor, his father, was A1. After endoscopic splenectomy performed before kidney transplantation, the recipient developed a high fever and leukocytosis, and he was treated with antibiotics and 5 g of human immunoglobulin products by intravenous infusion for 3 d. Soon after the infusions, his anti-blood type A antibody titer (anti-A titer) rose, and several sessions of plasma-exchange (PEX) and double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) failed to lower it. Three courses of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody were administered to suppress the antibody production more specifically, and the rituximab infusions and repeated PEX and DFPP session lowered the anti-A titer and enabled kidney transplantation. Mild humoral rejection was observed 16 d after transplantation, but the recipient's serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL when discharged from the hospital. The increased anti-A titer may have been due to immunization by blood-type A antigen, with the human immunoglobulin products given to the patient being the source of the antigen. Administration of human immunoglobulin products to recipients of ABO-incompatible kidney transplants should be avoided, because it may cause an unexpected increase in anti-blood-type antibody titer.

  12. Immunological studies of human placentae: the distribution and character of immunoglobulins in chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P M; Natvig, J B; Ystehede, U A; Faulk, W P

    1977-01-01

    All four human IgG subclasses, and both kappa and lambda light chains, were detected by immunofluorescence in similar distributions in chorionic villi of human placentae. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant subclasses. No evidence was obtained for local enzymatic digestion of IgG during placental transfer. Most of the IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) was loosely bound and could be removed by prolonged washing, although some appeared to be more tightly bound to small segments of the TBM. IgM, but not IgA, was present in small amounts in placental villous structures. Immunoglobulin was never observed within the syncytiotrophoblast. Antisera to IgG genetic (Gm) markers were used to locate IgG thought to be of foetal or maternal origin. The presence of paternal Gm markers not carried by the mother was taken as evidence for foetal IgG. Foetal (paternal) Gm markers were observed in placentae, although maternal IgG was the major immunoglobulin present in placental villi. Both maternal and foetal IgG were demonstrated in fibrinoid deposits, vessel walls and the cytoplasm of some stromal cells. Only foetal IgG was definitively observed in the immunoglobulin that is tightly bound to the TBM. PMID:342151

  13. Sheep, rabbit and chicken antisera against a human VH fragment: reactivity with immunoglobulins and lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen, T E; Lea, T

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against a human VH fragment obtained from an IgG3, VH II, kappa protein (KUP) were raised in rabbits, sheep and chicken. The three types of anti-VH antisera reacted equally well with both intact immunoglobulin molecules and isolated heavy chains. The antisera did not detect any free heavy chain specific antigens by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests although they reacted with some antigens which were more or less hidden on intact immunoglobulin molecules but well expressed on isolated heavy chains. The antisera reacted with more than 90% of IgG, IgA and IgM present in normal pooled serum. Experiments with T cells from normal peripheral blood indicated that the sheep and rabbit anti-VH antisera reacted with a 70,000 mol.wt T-cell surface antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6802746

  14. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  15. Immune suppression induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: effects on immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Vitale, L A; Welham, D A

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces an immunosuppressive factor (ISF) which has been shown to suppress mitogen- and antigen-induced DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes. In this study, we examined purified A. actinomycetemcomitans ISF for its ability to alter immunoglobulin production by human B cells. The ISF caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM production. Preexposure to ISF was not required to achieve maximal inhibition of immunoglobulin synthesis, as previously observed for its effect on T-cell activation. Nevertheless, the ISF appeared to act by irreversibly affecting the early stages of cell activation. While PWM-induced immunoglobulin production is under the influence of T-regulatory circuits, it appears that the ISF interacts directly with B cells. First, ISF failed to alter either the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or the expression of IL-2 receptors on T cells. Second, experiments in which individual purified populations of cells were exposed to ISF, washed, and placed back into tissue culture indicated that when all cells (i.e., T cells, B cells, and monocytes) were exposed to ISF, significant suppression was observed. However, when only one cell population was treated with ISF, suppression of both IgG and IgM synthesis was observed only when the B-cell-enriched population was exposed to ISF. These results in conjunction with our earlier findings suggest that the ISF functions via the activation of a regulatory subpopulation of B lymphocytes, which in turn either directly or indirectly (via suppressor T cells) downregulate both B- and T-cell responsiveness. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. This suppression may enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:2254014

  16. Purification of human immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor using affinity chromatography and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, S V; Golikova, E A; Kireev, F D; Lopatnikova, J A

    2013-04-30

    Autoantibodies to cytokines are important biological effector molecules that can regulate cytokine activities. The aim of the study was to develop a protocol to purify autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor from human serum, for use as a calibration material to determine the absolute content of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proposed protocol includes a set of affinity chromatography methods, namely, Bio-Gel P6DG sorbent to remove albumin from serum, Protein G Sepharose 4 Fast Flow to obtain a total immunoglobulin G fraction of serum immunoglobulins, and Affi-Gel 15 to obtain specifically antibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The addition of a magnetic separation procedure to the protocol eliminated contaminant tumor necrosis factor from the fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The protocol generated a pure fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor, and enabled us to determine the absolute concentrations of different subclasses of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor in apparently healthy donors.

  17. Heterogeneity of nonimmune immunoglobulin Fc reactivity among gram-positive cocci: description of three major types of receptors for human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Myhre, E B; Kronvall, G

    1977-09-01

    Two hundred and thirty strains of various gram-positive cocci were tested for quantitative, nonimmune binding of radiolabeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). The majority of coagulase-positive staphylococci and streptococci belonging to serogroups C and G showed a high uptake of IgG. The binding of immunoglobulin to group A streptococci was considerably less, with a number of strains completely negative. None of the pneumococcal or the group B or D streptococcal strains displayed any binding capacity. Heterogeneity of the IgG reactivity of various reactive strains was studied in an inhibition assay using 10 different animal serum pools. Three different inhibition patterns were seen, each of them revealing a striking degree of homogeneity within single bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, respectively, constituted two homogeneous groups which differed markedly from each other and from C and G streptococci. No differences were observed between group C and G streptococci. Based on the profound differences between these homogeneous groups, three major types of Fc receptors could be defined. Type I and II Fc receptors were found on S. aureus and on group A streptococci, respectively. Fc receptor type III represented the immunoglobulin-binding structure of both group C and G streptococci.

  18. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy biosensor with interdigitated electrode for detection of human immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ryuzo; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Wang, Huihui; Yokoyama, Takuya; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daiju; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-02-15

    Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) that have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together were utilized in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to build a label-free human immunoglobulin A (IgA) immunosensor. Anti-human IgA (anti-IgA) was employed as an IgA receptor and was covalently immobilized on the IDE surface through a self-assembled monolayer, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. EIS measurements revealed that the specific adsorption of IgA onto the immobilized anti-IgA gave rise to a clear increase in the value of interfacial charge transfer resistance (R(ct)). A linear relationship between ΔR(ct) and the logarithm of IgA concentration was found for the concentration range of 0.01-100 ng/mL. No modulation of R(ct) was detected by immersing the sensor in solutions of other proteins such as human immunoglobulin G or bovine serum albumin, which confirmed a high selectivity of this immunosensor for IgA. These results demonstrated that the anti-IgA receptor simply immobilized on the IDE surface can provide a sensitive biosensor.

  19. Variations in riboflavin binding by human plasma: identification of immunoglobulins as the major proteins responsible

    SciTech Connect

    Innis, W.S.; McCormick, D.B.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    Riboflavin binding by plasma proteins from healthy human subjects was examined by equilibrium dialysis using a physiological concentration of (2-14C)riboflavin (0.04 microM). Binding ranged from 0.080 to 0.917 pmole of riboflavin/mg of protein (with a mean +/- SD of 0.274 +/- 0.206), which corresponded to 4.14 to 49.4 pmole/ml of plasma (15.5 +/- 11.0) (N = 34). Males and females yielded similar results. Upon fractionation of plasma by gel filtration, the major riboflavin-binding components eluted with albumin and gamma-globulins. Albumin was purified and found to bind riboflavin only very weakly (Kd = 3.8 to 10.4 mM), although FMN and photochemical degradation products (e.g., lumiflavine and lumichrome) were more tightly bound. Binding in the gamma-globulin fraction was attributed to IgG and IGA because the binding protein(s) and immunoglobulins copurified using various methods were removed by treatment of plasma with protein A-agarose, and were coincident upon immunoelectrophoresis followed by autoradiography to detect (2-14C)riboflavin. Differences among the plasma samples correlated with the binding recovered with the immunoglobulins. Binding was not directly related to the total IgG or IgA levels of subjects. Hence, it appears that the binding is due to a subfraction of these proteins. These findings suggest that riboflavin-binding immunoglobulins are a major cause of variations in riboflavin binding in human circulation, and may therefore affect the utilization of this micronutrient.

  20. Depletion of albumin and immunoglobulin G from human serum using epitope-imprinted polymers as artificial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Lu, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Yee-Fung; Tsai, Sheng-Hung; Chakraborty, Subrata; Zhai, Wei-Jun; Tai, Dar-Fu

    2013-07-01

    Serum is a readily available source for noninvasive studies in clinical research, but it contains abundant proteins such as albumin and immunoglobulin G that can hinder the presence of low-abundant proteins as well as decrease sample loading capacity of analytical methods. Therefore, depletion of these two proteins is required to observe low-abundance serum proteins. Molecularly imprinted polymers are template-induced artificial antibodies with the ability to recognize and selectively bind the target molecule. In this study, artificial albumin and immunoglobulin G antibodies were developed by using two epitopes of human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G as templates. Acrylic acid, acrylamide, and N-acryl tyramine were the corresponding monomers; N,N'-ethylene bisacrylamide served as a cross-linker, and cellulosic fibers were used as a supporting matrix. The adsorption capacity of these artificial antibodies was 15.2 mg, 10 mg, and 15 μL per gram for human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, and human serum, respectively. The dissociation constant (Kd ) of these artificial antibodies toward the human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G was 1 μM and 0.6 μM, respectively. The biomimetic properties of these artificial antibodies, coupled with their economical and rapid production, high specificity and their reusability, make them attractive for protein separation and analysis.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS FACTOR AND ITS INTERACTION WITH HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN

    PubMed Central

    Danes, B. Shannon; Litwin, Stephen D.; Hütteroth, Thomas H.; Cleve, Hartwig; Bearn, Alexander G.

    1973-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis factor activity (CFFA), assayed as the ability to stop oyster ciliary movement, was present in serum-free medium from actively growing cystic fibrosis skin fibroblast cultures. CFFA was associated with a low molecular weight, negatively charged molecule that contained no uronic acid and was heat and pH labile. When CFFA-positive media were mixed with human IgG1, the CFFA was chromatographically displaced and emerged with the IgG1 fraction on column chromatography. Experiments in which various immunoglobulins were added to CFFA-positive culture media and then incubated with specific anti-immunoglobulins suggested that CFFA binding was class specific for human IgG, subclass specific for IgG1 and IgG2, and occurred with intact unaggregated heavy chains but not with κ- and λ-light chains, or Fab, Fc, and F(ab')2 fragments. The serum protein β2-microglobulin, which has structural homology to IgG, also bound CFFA. PMID:4709272

  2. Complementarity-determining region 2 is implicated in the binding of staphylococcal protein A to human immunoglobulin VHIII variable regions.

    PubMed

    Randen, I; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Thompson, K M; Pascual, V; Førre, O; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    1993-10-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) has two distinct binding sites on human immunoglobulins. In addition to binding to the Fc region of most IgG molecules, an "alternative" binding site has been localized to the Fab region of human immunoglobulins encoded by heavy chain variable gene segments belonging to the VHIII family. Comparison of amino acid sequences of closely related SPA-binding and -non-binding proteins suggested that VHIII-specific residues in the second complementarity-determining region (CDR2) were likely responsible for SPA binding activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single amino acid residue in CDR2 converted an IgM rheumatoid factor which did not bind SPA to an SPA binder. These findings, therefore, locate a critical site involved in SPA binding to the CDR2 of human immunoglobulins encoded by VHIII family gene segments.

  3. Analysis of human immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1995-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes a widely distributed sexually transmitted disease (STD). Since immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to specific trichomonad immunogens are found in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) from patients with trichomoniasis, a potential mechanism of immune evasion by this parasite might be the ability of T. vaginalis proteinases to degrade human immunoglobulins (Igs). Incubation of human IgG with lysates of T. vaginalis organisms resulted in time- and concentration-dependent degradation of the heavy chain. Secretory IgA was degraded similarly. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, when added to trichomonal lysates, abolished IgG and IgA degradation, while EDTA, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, did not. Substrate-gel electrophoresis with human IgG, IgM, or IgA copolymerized with acrylamide revealed several distinct cysteine proteinases in both lysates and culture supernatants from logarithmically growing parasites that degraded all classes of human antibodies. Trichomonal lysates and supernatants of numerous isolates tested all had Ig-degrading activity. Finally, proteolytic activity against IgG was detected in most (26 of 33; 78%) VWs from patients with trichomoniasis. In contrast, 18 of 28 (65%) VWs from women without trichomoniasis or from patients infected with other STDs had no detectable proteinases when tested in an identical manner. The other 10 of these 28 VWs (35%) had smaller amounts of detectable Ig-degrading proteinases. These differences in Ig-degrading proteinase activity between patients with and without trichomoniasis, regardless of coinfecting STDs, were statistically significant (P = 0.001). These results illustrate that T. vaginalis is capable of degrading human Igs. PMID:7642267

  4. Generation and targeting of human tumor-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells transduced with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Gyobu, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takemasa; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Chamoto, Kenji; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Kawarada, You; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Nishimura, Takashi

    2004-02-15

    CD4+ Th cells, in particular IFN-gamma-producing Th1 cells, play a critical role in the activation and maintenance of Tc1 cells that are essential for tumor eradication. Here, we report the generation of artificial tumor-specific Th1 and Tc1 cells from nonspecifically activated T cells using a lentiviral transduction system. Anti-CD3-activated T cells from healthy human donors were transduced with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor gene composed of single-chain variable fragments derived from an anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific monoclonal antibody fused to an intracellular signaling domain derived from the cytoplasmic portions of membrane-bound CD28 and CD3zeta. These artificial tumor-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells, termed Tc1- and Th1-T bodies, respectively, could be targeted to CEA+ tumor cells independently of MHC restriction. Specifically, Tc1-T bodies demonstrated high cytotoxicity and produced IFN-gamma in response to CEA+ tumor cell lines but not CEA- tumors. Although Th1-T bodies exhibited low cytotoxicity, they secreted high levels of IFN-gamma and interleukin-2 in response to CEA+ tumor cells. Such CEA+ tumor-specific activation was not observed in mock gene-transduced nonspecific Tc1 and Th1 cells. Moreover, Tc1- and Th1-T bodies exhibited strong antitumor activities against CEA+ human lung cancer cells implanted into RAG2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, combined therapy with Tc1- and Th1-T bodies resulted in enhanced antitumor activities in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Tc1- and Th1-T bodies represent a promising alternative to current methods for the development of effective adoptive immunotherapies.

  5. Detection of orchitis and sacroiliitis due to brucellosis by 99mTc polyclonal human immunoglobulin scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kadanali, Ayten; Uslu, Hatice; Bayraktar, Rezan; Varoglu, Erhan

    2012-07-01

    Here, we report 1 case of Brucella orchitis detected by 99mTc human immunoglobulin scintigraphy and confirmed by testicular ultrasound. A 29-year-old farmer was admitted to our hospital with fever, fatigue, arthralgia, and painful scrotal swelling that had appeared 12 days before admission. Clinically, right sacroiliitis was recorded through the Fabere test Unilateral sacroiliitis and orchitis were detected by 99mTc human immunoglobulin scintigraphy. Hypoechoic left testicular lesions and swelling of the concurrent epididymis were seen on a testicular ultrasound examination. Wright agglutination test and blood specimen culture for Brucella species were positive.

  6. Purification of human immunoglobulins by sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Perosa, F; Carbone, R; Ferrone, S; Dammacco, F

    1990-03-27

    We have tested the usefulness of sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulfate to purify human monoclonal and polyclonal immunoglobulins from sera of 11 patients with monoclonal gammapathy (4 IgG kappa, 2 IgG lambda, 2 IgM kappa, 1 IgA kappa, 2 IgA lambda), four patients with autoimmune diseases and four healthy donors. In terms of purity and activity of Ig as well as execution time and cost, this two-step non-chromatographic procedure is highly efficient for the purification of IgG, IgA and IgM, thus offering several advantages over other methods of purification. Therefore, this procedure may have useful application in the preparation of human Ig for structural studies and therapeutic purposes.

  7. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  8. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu Ogi,; Hironao Nagai,; Yuji Fukunishi,; Taiji Yanagida,; Masahiko Hirao,; Masayoshi Nishiyama,

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-μm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  9. Immunoglobulins in Nasal Secretions of Healthy Humans: Structural Integrity of Secretory Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and Occurrence of Neutralizing Antibodies to IgA1 Proteases of Nasal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Line; Rasmussen, Trine Tang; Reinholdt, Jesper; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro. Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11 healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and, subsequently, concentrations in undiluted secretions could thereby be calculated. IgA, mainly in the secretory form, was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be the dominant isotype in all subjects, and the vast majority of IgA (median, 91%) was of the A1 subclass, corroborating results of previous analyses at the level of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Levels of serum-type immunoglobulins were low, except for four subjects in whom levels of IgG corresponded to 20 to 66% of total IgA. Cumulative levels of IgA, IgG, and IgM in undiluted secretions ranged from 260 to 2,494 (median, 777) μg ml−1. IgA1 protease-producing bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Streptococcus mitis biovar 1) were isolated from the nasal cavities of seven subjects at 2.1 × 103 to 7.2 × 106 CFU per ml of undiluted secretion, corresponding to 0.2 to 99.6% of the flora. Nevertheless, α-chain fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity were not detected in secretions from any subject by immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of autologous

  10. Pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin in persons with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C V; Goodroad, B K; Cummins, L M; Henry, K; Balfour, H H; Rhame, F S

    1997-01-01

    Hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is an intravenous immunoglobulin prepared from HIV-infected asymptomatic donors with a CD4 cell count greater than 400 cells/microl and a high titer of antibody to HIV-1 p24 protein. Twelve persons with AIDS received four doses of HMG (two at 50 mg/kg of body weight and then two at 200 mg/kg) every 28 days. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated by measurement of anti-p24 antibody. HIVIG was well tolerated, and all participants completed the study. Three subjects who were not receiving Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis developed PCP. The mean value for HIVIG clearance was 3.02 ml/kg/day at 50 mg/kg and 3.65 ml/kg/day at 200 mg/kg (P = 0.027); the mean trough antibody titers (reciprocal units) were 1,442 and 4,428, respectively. This study indicates that high titers of anti-p24 antibody can be maintained with a monthly administration schedule of HIVIG and that short-term safety is acceptable. Comparisons to evaluate the therapeutic potential of HIVIG are justified. PMID:9210687

  11. Evaluation of unintended effects in the composition of tomatoes expressing a human immunoglobulin A against rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paloma; Fernandez-del-Carmen, Asun; Rambla, Jose L; Presa, Silvia; Mico, Amparo; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2014-08-13

    The production of neutralizing immunoglobulin A (IgA) in edible fruits as a means of oral passive immunization is a promising strategy for the inexpensive treatment of mucosal diseases. This approach is based on the assumption that the edible status remains unaltered in the immunoglobulin-expressing fruit, and therefore extensive purification is not required for mucosal delivery. However, unintended effects associated with IgA expression such as toxic secondary metabolites and protein allergens cannot be dismissed a priori and need to be investigated. This paper describes a collection of independent transgenic tomato lines expressing a neutralizing human IgA against rotavirus, a mucosal pathogen producing severe diarrhea episodes. This collection was used to evaluate possible unintended effects associated with recombinant IgA expression. A comparative analysis of protein and secondary metabolite profiles using wild type lines and other commercial varieties failed to find unsafe features significantly associated with IgA expression. Preliminary, the data indicate that formulations derived from IgA tomatoes are as safe for consumption as equivalent formulations derived from wild type tomatoes.

  12. Specific immobilization of human immunoglobulin G on gold-coated silicon microcantilever array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Tewari, Rupinder; Bajpai, Ram Prakash; Bharadwaj, Lalit Mohan; Raiteri, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a procedure for immobilizing human immunoglobulin G (IgG) on an array of gold-coated silicon microcantilevers. The procedure employed protein A for the specific immobilization of human IgG on the gold surface. Protein A bound specifically to the gold-coated upper surface of the silicon microcantilever and had no interaction with the silicon surface. It binds to the constant F c regions of human IgG keeping the antigen binding sites on the variable F ab region free to bind to antigens. Fluorescent microscopy was done to analyze qualitatively the biomolecular binding of human IgG using FITC labeled goat anti-human IgG. The immobilization densities of protein A and human IgG were 112+/-19 ng/cm2 and 629+/-23ng/cm2, as determined employing horse radish peroxidase (HRP) labeled biomolecules by 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetramethyl benzidine (TMB) substrate assay. The uniformness of the biomolecular coatings was further determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to cross-validate the immobilization density of functional human IgG molecules immobilized on the gold surface w.r.t. that obtained by TMB substrate assay.

  13. Membrane-bound immunoglobulins on human leukemic cells. Evidence for humoral immune responses of patients to leukemia-associated antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Metzgar, R S; Mohanakumar, T; Miller, D S

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulins were detected on the membranes of human leukemic cells by a microcytotoxicity technique. A significant percentage of lymphocytes from normal donors failed to react with goat antisera to human heavy chain determinants or to lambda-light chains. Lymphocytes from some normal donors, however, did react with antisera to k-light chains. A high percentage (50-90) of cells from some leukemia patients were killed by antisera to light chains and by one or more antisera to heavy chain determinants. Trypsin treatment of leukemic cells resulted in a loss of cytotoxic activity with all immunoglobulin antisera. Reactivity with the k-light chain antiserum was detectable 2 h after trypsinization of chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells and 8 h after treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemic (ALL) cells. Reactivity with the antisera to heavy chain determinants and lambda-light chains could not be detected 8 and 48 h after trypsinization of CML and ALL cells, respectively. The cytotoxic activity of the immunoglobulin antisera to heavy chains was abolished by absorption with the specific immunoglobulin used to define the antisera by precipitation. Eluates (pH 3.2) prepared from leukemic cells which reacted by cytotoxicity with the immunoglobulin antisera were shown to contain immunoglobulins of different heavy chain classes. In addition, some of the eluates had cytotoxic antibody activity to human leukemia cells. The specificity of the eluted antibodies is similar to the specificity previously described for cytophilic antibodies from leukemic patients and nonhuman primate antisera to human leukemia cells. The possible in vitro detection and in vivo significance of the eluted non-complement-fixing antibodies is considered. PMID:807598

  14. Overexpression of immunoglobulin G prompts cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in human urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei-Yu; Li, Hao-Yong; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Jin, Ying-Xia; Wang, Sheng-Xing; Peng, Xiao-Hui; Ou, Shan-Ji

    2013-06-01

    Only B lymphocytes can express immunoglobulins according to the traditional immunological theories, and the expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein was found in certain human cancer cells recently. However, the expression pattern of IgG and its possible role in human urothelial carcinoma are still elusive. In this study, we investigated the expression of IgG in two human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, T24 and BIU-87, and in 56 cases of clinical urothelial carcinoma tissues. The mRNA of IgG was positively detected by in situ hybridization and reverse transcription PCR; furthermore, IgG protein was also positively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, blockade of tumor-derived IgG by either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides increased cell apoptosis and inhibited cell growth in bladder cancer cell lines in vitro, and antihuman IgG antibody could suppress the growth of xenotransplant tumor in vivo. In addition, either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides enhanced the sensitivity to mitomycin C in bladder cancer cell line T24. Furthermore, blockade of IgG in bladder cancer cell T24 resulted in upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results indicated that bladder cancer cells were capable of expressing IgG, and blockade of IgG expression induced cell apoptosis through activation of caspase-dependent pathway. A novel potential targeted therapy for bladder cancer will be possibly developed based on these data.

  15. Phagocytosis of virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes requires specific immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, C W; Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1991-01-01

    No studies to date clearly define the interactions between Porphyromonas gingivalis and human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), nor has a protective role for antibody to P. gingivalis been defined. Using a fluorochrome phagocytosis microassay, we investigated PMN phagocytosis and killing of P. gingivalis as a function of P. gingivalis-specific antibody. Sera from a nonimmune rabbit and a healthy human subject were not opsonic for virulent P. gingivalis A7436, W83, and HG405; phagocytosis of these strains (but not 33277) required opsonization with hyperimmune antiserum (RaPg). Diluting RaPg with a constant complement source decreased proportionally the number of P. gingivalis A7436 cells phagocytosed per phagocytic PMN. Enriching for the immunoglobulin G fraction of RAPg A7436 enriched for opsonic activity toward A7436. An opsonic evaluation of 18 serum samples from adult periodontitis patients revealed that only 3 adult periodontitis sera of 17 with elevated immunoglobulin G to P. gingivalis A7436 were opsonic for A7436 and, moreover, that the serum sample with the highest enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titer was most opsonic (patient 1). However, the opsonic activity of serum from patient 1 was qualitatively and not just quantitatively different from that of the nonopsonic human sera (but was less effective opsonin than RaPg). Strain variability was observed in resistance of P. gingivalis to phagocytosis, and opsonization was strain specific for some, but not all, strains tested. An evaluation of killing of A7436 revealed that serum killing and extracellular killing of P. gingivalis were less effective alone when compared with intracellular PMN killing alone. PMID:2037370

  16. Rationale for the development of IMC-3G3, a fully human immunoglobulin G subclass 1 monoclonal antibody targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav D; Loizos, Nick; Youssoufian, Hagop; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2010-02-15

    A large body of evidence suggests that the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family and associated receptors are potential targets in oncology therapeutic development because of their critical roles in the proliferation and survival of various cancers and in the regulation and growth of the tumor stroma and blood vessels. Several small molecules that nonspecifically target the PDGF signaling axis are in current use or development as anticancer therapies. However, for the majority of these agents, PDGF and its receptors are neither the primary targets nor the principal mediators of anticancer activity. IMC-3G3, a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1, specifically binds to the human PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) with high affinity and blocks PDGF ligand binding and PDGFRalpha activation. The results of preclinical studies and the frequent expression of PDGFRalpha in many types of cancer and in cancer-associated stroma support a rationale for the clinical development of IMC-3G3. Currently, IMC-3G3 is being evaluated in early clinical development for patients with several types of solid malignancies.

  17. Multiple protein extract microarray for profiling human food-specific immunoglobulins A, M, G and E.

    PubMed

    Renault, N K; Gaddipati, S R; Wulfert, F; Falcone, F H; Mirotti, L; Tighe, P J; Wright, V; Alcocer, M J C

    2011-02-01

    Existing food immunoglobulin (Ig) tests require large volumes of serum, are limited to one immunoglobulin class, are not amenable to high throughput analysis and only give a limited picture of the immunological response to food antigens. Conversely a new generation of Component Resolved Diagnostic systems using pure proteins is highly specific and totally dependent on the availability of the protein in its recombinant or natural origin form. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-concept of a microarray test based on protein extracts of food components. Our approach relies on innovations on three different fronts: the novelty of using arrayed food samples sequentially extracted with detergent and chaotropic agents, the ability to measure four different Ig classes simultaneously and the ability to analyse the generated data via a suitable bioinformatics/statistical analysis interface. This approach combines high numerical power of microarrays with automation, high throughput analysis and enables detailed investigation of the Ig profiles to food antigens. The prototype shown contains extracts of approximately 350 food ingredients that cover most of the food products found in the UK. Here we showed that the use of a sequential extraction technique to solubilise and then denature food samples has its benefits in the assessment of variations in antigenicity when tested with human sera. A patient dependent degree of class specificity was observed with human sera (IgG specificity correlates well with IgA>IgM>IgE). Besides generating a simultaneous profile for IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE the array system has shown good discrimination between challenge responders in atopic and non-atopic individuals. Poly- and mono-specific IgE responders were easily identified. The mathematical modelling of specific IgE content showed good correlations when compared with established IgE antibody testing assay (UniCAP). Although in its proof-of-principle stages, the immune profiling technique described

  18. Simple way to determine nonspecific effects of plasma and serum components in radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.V.; Hussa, R.O.

    1982-01-15

    A simple approach is validated for the determination of nonspecific effects of human plasma and serum in the radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The approach is based on the findings that, despite differences in the degree of inhibition of /sup 125/I-hCG binding to its receptors and antibodies by nonhormonal components in different dilutions of pool plasma and serum, the standard curves (plotted as the percentage of control for each serum or plasma dilution) are superimposable. The approach consists of (1) running a single standard curve with no pool plasma or serum, (2) including a set of ''correction'' tubes which contain pool plasma or serum diluted correspondingly to the dilution of the unknown samples in the assay, (3) dividing the counts per minute found in the correction tubes into the counts per minute of the unknown samples and multiplying by 100, and (4) using this value to obtain the amount of hCG in the unknown samples by comparison with the no pool plasma or serum standard curve.

  19. Simple way to determine nonspecific effects of plasma and serum components in radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.V.; Hussa, R.O.

    1982-01-15

    A simple approach is validated for the determination of nonspecific effects of human plasma and serum in the radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The approach is based on the findings that, despite differences in the degree of inhibition of /sup 125/I-hCG binding to its receptors and antibodies by nonhormonal components in different dilutions of pool plasma and serum, the standard curves (plotted as the percentage of control for each serum or plasma dilution) are superimposable. The approach consists of (1) running a single standard curve with no pool plasma or serum, (2) including a set of correction tubes which contain pool plasma or serum diluted correspondingly to the dilution of the unknown samples in the assay, (3) dividing the counts per minute found in the correction tubes into the counts per minute of the unknown samples and multiplying by 100, and (4) using this value to obtain the amount of hCG in the unknown samples by comparison with the no pool plasma or serum standard curve.

  20. Immunoglobulin-sulfated polysaccharide interactions. Binding of agaropectin and heparin by human IgG proteins

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of immunoglobulins with certain acidic polysaccharides was demonstrated by the binding of the sulfated glycans agaropectin and heparin by certain human IgG proteins. Heparin-binding IgG proteins can distinguish between the molecular forms of heparin derived from porcine intestine, bovine lung, and rat skin. The major specificity of these proteins is for native and certain high molecular weight subunit components of rat skin heparin. The interactions with multi-chain and single chain rat skin heparin are stable under physiological conditions and involve the Fab and, more specifically, the Fv region of the IgG molecule. These reactions occur as a result of an electrostatic interaction between cationic sites on certain IgG proteins and anionic sulfate resides of agaropectin or heparin. The characteristics of heparin-IgG interaction resemble those of heparin with other plasma proteins, the interactions of which have biological significance. PMID:7252414

  1. Protein-G-based human immunoglobulin G biosensing by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugimura, Kaiki; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daijyu; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was developed for the determination of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Protein G, which specifically binds to IgG, was employed as the molecular receptor. Protein G was covalently immobilized on interdigitated electrodes through a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) composed of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 6-mercaptohexanol. It was found that the mixing ratio of the SAM markedly affected the sensor performance. The sample prepared on 25% MUA SAM exhibited a linear behavior in the concentration range of 0.01-10 ng/mL, which is a record low detection for EIS-based IgG sensors. On the other hand, the sample on 100% MUA SAM showed no IgG-sensing action. A possible mechanism of the mixing ratio that affects the sensing performance was proposed.

  2. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of human immunoglobulin epsilon chain cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Seno, M; Kurokawa, T; Ono, Y; Onda, H; Sasada, R; Igarashi, K; Kikuchi, M; Sugino, Y; Nishida, Y; Honjo, T

    1983-01-01

    DNA complementary to mRNA of human immunoglobulin E heavy chain (epsilon chain) isolated and purified from U266 cells has been synthesized and inserted into the PstI site of pBR322 by G-C tailing. This recombinant plasmid was used to transform E. coli chi 1776 to screen 1445 tetracycline resistant colonies. Nine clones (pGETI - 9) containing cDNA coding for the human epsilon chain were recognized by colony hybridization and Southern blotting analysis with a nick-translated human IgE genome fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the longest cDNA contained in pGET2 was determined. The results indicate that the sequence of 1657 nucleotides codes for 494 amino acids covering a part of the variable region and all of the constant region of the human epsilon chain. Most of the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence is in substantial agreement with that reported. Furthermore a termination codon after the -COOH terminal amino acid marks the beginning of a 3' untranslated region of 125 nucleotides with a poly A tail. Taking this into account, the structure of the human epsilon chain mRNA, except a part of the 5' end, is conserved fairly well in the cDNA insert in pGET2. Images PMID:6300763

  3. Sequences of human immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for recombination and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, F C; Brooker, J S; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced the entire human S mu and S gamma 4 immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch regions, and have also completed the sequence of human S epsilon. S mu is composed predominantly of GAGCT and GGGCT pentameric repeats, with these units also being found in S epsilon at a much lower density. S mu-S gamma 4 matches are infrequent, but S gamma 4 contains a cluster of repeated sequences similar to units in mouse gamma switch sites and unrelated to the S mu repeats, suggesting that S mu-S gamma homology is not important in mu-gamma switching. We examined our epsilon and gamma 4 sequences for features that could regulate production of 'sterile' transcripts preceding switch recombination. There is an Evolutionarily Conserved Sequence (ECS) upstream from the human and mouse S epsilon regions that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for human and mouse epsilon sterile transcripts. Similarly, an ECS upstream from S gamma 4 is homologous to a mouse sequence that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for mouse gamma 2b sterile transcripts. The epsilon and gamma 4 conserved segments contain potential Interferon Stimulable Response Elements (ISRE's) that are identical between human epsilon and gamma 4. PMID:2124350

  4. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handen, Benjamin L.; Melmed, Raun D.; Hansen, Robin L.; Aman, Michael G.; Burnham, David L.; Bruss, Jon B.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI…

  5. Opsonic effect of jacalin and human immunoglobulin A on type II group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, N R; Concepcion, N F; Anthony, B F

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effect of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the IgA-binding lectin jacalin on the phagocytosis of type II group B streptococci (GBS). Strains possessing the trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-resistant components of the c protein (II/c) and type II GBS lacking the c protein (II) were examined by radiolabeled bacterial uptake, bactericidal assays, and electron microscopy. Type II/c GBS resisted phagocytosis by monocytes (4.9% +/- 0.8% uptake, mean +/- SE, n = 25) compared with type II GBS (8.5% +/- 1.4% uptake, n = 14, P = 0.03). Phagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was also less for the type II/c strain 78-471 than for the type II strain 79-176 (68% +/- 5% versus 86% +/- 4% reduction in CFU at 45 min, P = 0.03). IgA binding did not explain the resistance of type II/c GBS to phagocytosis. The uptake of type II/c GBS was not significantly different after opsonization in cord sera lacking endogenous IgA (5.93% +/- 1.4%) than in the same cord sera after addition of exogenous IgA (5.48% +/- 1.4%, P = 0.69, n = 9). Attempts to remove serum IgA with the IgA-binding lectin jacalin resulted in the binding of IgA-jacalin complexes to II/c GBS. This combination of nonspecific IgA and jacalin increased uptake of II/c GBS from 4.9% +/- 0.8% to 11.8% +/- 1.9% (P = 0.002). Jacalin also combined with specific, immune, monoclonal IgA bound to the surface of Haemophilus influenzae and promoted the uptake of these bacteria. Jacalin and IgA mediated phagocytosis of II/c GBS via receptors that were not dependent on divalent cations and that were not modulated by plating monocytes on antigen-antibody complexes. Images PMID:2228238

  6. Natural polyreactive secretory immunoglobulin A autoantibodies as a possible barrier to infection in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Quan, C P; Berneman, A; Pires, R; Avrameas, S; Bouvet, J P

    1997-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was investigated in human secretions for the presence of natural antibodies (Abs) acting as the first "immune barrier" to infection before induction or boosting of specific responses. These molecules could be the secretory counterpart of the natural Abs in serum that were previously shown by our laboratory to be polyreactive to autoantigens. Significant levels of S-IgA Abs to human actin, myosin, tubulin, and spectrin were detected in 10 saliva and 8 colostrum samples from normal subjects. Computer-assisted analysis of immunoblots of extracts from human muscles showed these Abs to react with a large number of autoantigens. Their polyreactivity was confirmed by cross-inhibition and by immunoblotting studies of affinity-purified natural Abs, assayed against a large variety of surface or secreted antigens from Streptococcus pyogenes. The thiocyanate elution method showed that functional affinities of some natural Abs can be of the same order of magnitude as those of tetanus vaccine antitoxins. Moreover, nonimmune binding of these natural Abs to the gut protein Fv (Fv-fragment binding protein) can enhance their effector functions. This demonstrates that human secretions contain polyreactive auto-Abs which can also react with pathogens. These secretory Abs of "skeleton key" specificities are possibly produced by a primordial B-1-cell-associated immune system and can be involved in a plurispecific mucosal protection against pathogens, irrespective of the conventional immune response. PMID:9316998

  7. Anti-Fab antibodies in humans. Predominance of minor immunoglobulin G subclasses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Persselin, J E; Stevens, R H

    1985-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing analyses of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) demonstrate two populations of antibodies directed against the Fab portion of pooled human IgG. One population is composed of polyclonal alkaline anti-Fab antibodies (alpha FABA) and the other, acidic alpha FABA which are more clonally restricted. In this study we have identified the immunoglobulin classes and subclasses of these antibodies in RA sera. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) demonstrated alpha FABA in RA sera to be predominantly IgG. A large portion of IgG alpha FABA existed as immune complexes, inasmuch as dialysis of RA sera against 6 M urea before ELISA analysis was necessary for maximal detection of alpha FABA activity. Chromatofocusing of RA sera isolated alpha FABA of different charges and revealed the acidic clonally restricted alpha FABA to be IgG4 and IgG3, whereas the polyclonal alkaline group contained IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3. Overall, acidic IgG3 and IgG4 comprised 70% of IgG alpha FABA, and high levels of IgG4 were seen in most RA sera. When alpha FABA were elevated in normal sera, they were primarily of the IgG4 subclass, and also existed as immune complexes. Serum anti-Fab activity was removed by adsorption of sera with Fab fragments. Anti-Fab antibodies of both kappa and lambda light-chain types were present in RA sera, and F(ab')2 fragments of RA serum immunoglobulin were found to possess anti-Fab activity. These studies indicate that alpha FABA in RA sera are limited to the IgG class, and that most of these antibodies exist as immune complexes and display clonal and minor IgG subclass restriction. Images PMID:3928684

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulin products contain specific antibodies to recombinant human tau protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lynnae M; Coffey, Mary P; Klaver, Andrea C; Loeffler, David A

    2013-08-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products are prepared from plasma immunoglobulins from healthy donors. Pilot studies suggest that IVIG may stabilize cognitive functioning in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. This study measured antibodies to recombinant human tau protein in the IVIG products Gammagard (Baxter), Gamunex (Talecris), and Flebogamma (Grifols). Anti-tau antibodies were measured by ELISA, subtracting IVIG's polyvalent binding from its binding to tau-coated wells to calculate specific anti-tau antibody levels. Because polyvalent binding of IVIG products may interfere with ELISA measurement of their specific antibody levels, the percentage of binding of each IVIG product to tau-coated wells that was specific for tau was also determined. Specific anti-tau antibodies were detected in all three IVIG products, with significant differences between these products (p<0.001) even when Flebogamma's anti-tau antibodies were doubled to account for its preparation as a 5% solution vs. 10% solutions for Gammagard and Gamunex (means: Gammagard, 3.1 μg/ml; Gamunex, 2.5 μg/ml; Flebogamma, 1.2 μg/ml). The percentages of each IVIG product's specific binding to tau-coated wells also varied between the various products (p<0.001) and between all pairs of IVIG products (means: Gammagard, 73.1%; Flebogamma, 54.5%; Gamunex, 37.4%; p<0.01 for all pairwise comparisons). These findings indicate that IVIG products contain specific anti-tau antibodies. The concentrations of these antibodies and the percentages of specific binding of IVIG to tau-coated wells vary between IVIG products. Further studies are indicated to determine if IVIG also contains antibodies to pathologic forms of tau.

  9. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM+ mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab′ fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  10. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  11. Analysis and comparison of the mouse and human immunoglobulin heavy chain JH-Cmu-Cdelta locus.

    PubMed

    Koop, B F; Richards, J E; Durfee, T D; Bansberg, J; Wells, J; Gilliam, A C; Chen, H L; Clausell, A; Tucker, P W; Blattner, F R

    1996-02-01

    We report here 23,686 bases of contiguous DNA sequences from the mouse germline immunoglobulin heavy chain (H) constant (C) mu delta region. The sequence spans the joining (JH) regions, the mu constant region (C mu), the delta constant region (C delta) coding regions, a domain relic, the mu switch region (S mu), seven blocks of simple sequence repeats, a large unique sequence inverted repeat, a large unique sequence forward repeat, and all of the intervening material. A comparison of this 23.7-kb region with the corresponding human C mu/C delta region reveals clear homology in the coding and introns of C mu but not in the 5' flanking J gene segments nor in the intergenic and C delta regions. This mixed pattern of similarity between the human and the mouse sequences contrasts with high levels of similarity found in the T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region and alpha and beta myosin genes and the very low levels found in the gamma-crystallin, XRCC1, and beta-globin gene clusters. The human and mouse comparison further suggests the incorporation of novel sequences into expressed genes of IgD.

  12. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  13. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients.

  14. Evaluation of capillary zone electrophoresis for the determination of protein composition in therapeutic immunoglobulins and human albumins.

    PubMed

    Christians, Stefan; van Treel, Nadine Denise; Bieniara, Gabriele; Eulig-Wien, Annika; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Giess, Siegfried

    2016-07-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) provides an alternative means of separating native proteins on the basis of their inherent electrophoretic mobilities. The major advantage of CZE is the quantification by UV detection, circumventing the drawbacks of staining and densitometry in the case of gel electrophoresis methods. The data of this validation study showed that CZE is a reliable assay for the determination of protein composition in therapeutic preparations of human albumin and human polyclonal immunoglobulins. Data obtained by CZE are in line with "historical" data obtained by the compendial method, provided that peak integration is performed without time correction. The focus here was to establish a rapid and reliable test to substitute the current gel based zone electrophoresis techniques for the control of protein composition of human immunoglobulins or albumins in the European Pharmacopoeia. We believe that the more advanced and modern CZE method described here is a very good alternative to the procedures currently described in the relevant monographs.

  15. Solid-phase immune electron microscopy with human immunoglobulin M for serotyping of Norwalk-like viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D C; Lightfoot, N F; Pether, J V

    1988-01-01

    A solid-phase immune electron microscopy method that uses protein A, goat anti-human immunoglobulin M (IgM), and human serum is described. Evaluation of the method with different immunoglobulin fractions showed that human IgM constituted the major virus capture antibody. The method appeared to distinguish between two Norwalk-like virus serotypes and demonstrated specific IgM responses to these serotypes in infected individuals. Further work is being carried out to define the relationship of these two serotypes to the previously described Norwalk agent (A. Z. Kapikian, R. G. Wyatt, R. Dolin, T. S. Thornhill, A. R. Kalica, and R. M. Chanock, J. Virol. 10:1075-1081, 1972), and four subsequent hospital outbreaks are being studied. PMID:2838506

  16. Global gene regulation during activation of immunoglobulin class switching in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Fear, David J.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) to IgE is a tightly regulated process central to atopic disease. To profile the B-cell transcriptional responses underlying the activation of the germinal centre activities leading to the generation of IgE, naïve human B-cells were stimulated with IL-4 and anti-CD40. Gene expression and alternative splicing were profiled over 12 days using the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A total of 1,399 genes, forming 13 temporal profiles were differentially expressed. CCL22 and CCL17 were dramatically induced but followed a temporal trajectory distinct from classical mediators of isotype switching. AICDA, NFIL3, IRF4, XBP1 and BATF3 shared a profile with several genes involved in innate immunity, but with no recognised role in CSR. A transcription factor BHLHE40 was identified at the core of this profile. B-cell activation was also accompanied by variation in exon retention affecting >200 genes including CCL17. The data indicate a circadian component and central roles for the Th2 chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in the activation of CSR. PMID:27897229

  17. Three transposed elements in the intron of a human VK immunoglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Osterholzer, E; Zachau, H G

    1987-11-25

    Two gene segments coding for the variable region of human immunoglobulin light chains of the kappa type (VK genes, ref. 2) were found to have unusual structures. The two genes which are called A6 and A22 are located in duplicated gene clusters. Their restriction maps are very similar. About 4 kb of the A22 gene region were sequenced. It turned out that the intron contains an insert with the characteristics of a transposed element. The inserted DNA of 1.2 kb length contains imperfect direct and inverted repeats at its ends; at the insertion site a duplication of five nucleotides was found. Within the inserted DNA one copy each of an Alu element and of the simple sequence motif (T-G)17 were identified. Also these two repetitive sequences are themselves flanked by short direct repeats. The major inserted DNA has no significant homology to published human nucleic acid sequences. The whole structure is interpreted best by assuming a sequential insertion of the three elements. The coding region of the VK gene itself has several mutations which by themselves would render it a pseudogene; we assume that the insertion event(s) occurred prior to the mutations. According to mapping and hybridization data A6 is very similar to A22.

  18. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  19. Notes on individual sequence variation in humans: Immunoglobulin kappa light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, J.H. ); Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Little is known concerning the magnitude of variability in the nucleic acid sequence of DNA at the individual level. The authors have collected a large set of sequence data from the human immunoglobulin kappa light-chain-locus constant region (10,444 bp) and subgroup IV variable region (18,580 bp). For the constant region, absolute conservation of sequence was observed, even in intron and coding-region silent sites, with the exception of one previously defined polymorphic site. For the variable region, 12 heterozygous positions were identified, giving a heterozygosity of 6 x 10[sup [minus]4] per nucleotide site. The amount of nucleic acid sequence variation differs significantly ([chi][sup 2] = 4.88) between these two regions, and the observed variation is two orders of magnitude lower than that reported for two Drosophila melanogaster loci. These data suggest that, for at least some regions of the human genome, nucleic acid sequence may be less variable than previously estimated. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Catherine L; Laffy, Julie M J; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O'Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  1. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  2. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  3. Elimination of soluble 123I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in humans; the effect of splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Halma, C; Daha, M R; van Furth, R; Camps, J A; Evers-Schouten, J H; Pauwels, E K; Lobatto, S; Van Es, L A

    1989-07-01

    To study the role of the spleen in the elimination of immune complexes we examined mononuclear phagocyte system function in eight healthy controls and eight splenectomized patients, with soluble 123I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G (AIgG). No differences were found between the two groups in elimination and degradation of AIgG. The loss of splenic function was compensated for by increased uptake of AIgG by the liver. With the dose of 123I-AIgG used in this study (10 micrograms/kg body weight), significant generation of C3a was observed. No correlation was found between erythrocyte CR1 number and the fraction of aggregates that bound to erythrocytes.

  4. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  5. The human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor binds to Streptococcus pneumoniae via domains 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Lamm, Michael E; Li, Hongmin; Corthesy, Blaise; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2003-11-28

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a major cause of bacterial pneumonia, middle ear infection (otitis media), sepsis, and meningitis. Our previous study demonstrated that the choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of S. pneumoniae binds to the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and enhances pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we sought to determine the CbpA-binding motif on pIgR by deletional analysis. The extra-cellular portion of pIgR consists of five Ig-like domains (D1-D5), each of which contains 104-114 amino acids and two disulfide bonds. Deletional analysis of human pIgR revealed that the lack of either D3 or D4 resulted in the loss of CbpA binding, whereas complete deletions of domains D1, D2, and D5 had undetectable impacts. Subsequent analysis showed that domains D3 and D4 together were necessary and sufficient for the ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, CbpA binding of pIgR did not appear to require Ca2+ or Mg2+. Finally, treating pIgR with a reducing agent abolished CbpA binding, suggesting that disulfide bonding is required for the formation of CbpA-binding motif(s). These results strongly suggest a conformational CbpA-binding motif(s) in the D3/D4 region of human pIgR, which is functionally separated from the IgA-binding site(s).

  6. Clinical significance of leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expression in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xueshan; Miao, Fang; Cao, Yanning; Xue, Jiangnan; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is broadly expressed on the majority of immune cells; however, the biological role of LAIR in solid tumors has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, using immunohistochemical staining analysis, the expression of LAIR-1 in human cervical cancer (HCC) and nontumor-adjacent tissue specimens was determined, and the results indicated that the expression of LAIR-1 in HCC tissue was higher compared with that in noncancerous tissue. The χ2 test was used to analyze the correlation between the expression of LAIR-1 in tumor tissues with clinicopathological parameters. The results showed that the expression of LAIR-1 in the cancer cell nucleus was significantly associated with tumor size, pathological differentiation, T classification and clinical stage. In addition, the expression in the cytoplasm was evidently associated with the number of positive lymph nodes. The HCC cell line, ME-180, which does not express LAIR-1, was stably transfected using LAIR-1 cDNA. Cell Counting Kit-8 and an annexin V assay showed that the overexpression of LAIR-1 in ME-180 cells suppressed the proliferation and anti-apoptosis capacity of the cells. These findings demonstrated that LAIR-1 is markedly overexpressed in HCC tissue, and that its expression status is associated with tumor progression. LAIR-1 may be a biomarker and target in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:28105100

  7. Diminished clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Westedt, M L; Pauwels, E K; Evers-Schouten, J H; Voetman, A A; Cats, A; van Es, L A

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of the capacity of the mononuclear phagocyte system to remove immune complexes from the circulation was performed by the administration of 125I-labelled aggregates of human immunoglobulin G (AIgG) to patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and healthy volunteers. It was found that the rate at which AIgG disappeared from the circulation was significantly prolonged in patients with RA, t1/2 61 +/- 49 min, versus 26 +/- 8 min in healthy volunteers (p less than 0.01). We were not able to establish a correlation between the t1/2 of AIgG and immune complex levels in the circulation, or between t1/2 and articular disease activity (Ritchie index). The sites of removal of AIgG from the circulation were analysed by determining radioactivity levels detectable over liver, spleen and heart. No correlation was found between t1/2 and liver/spleen uptake ratios. We have demonstrated that the removal of AIgG from the circulation of patients with RA is abnormal, though the biological significance of this finding remains to be determined.

  8. Affinity purification of egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) using a human mycoplasma protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuemei; Diraviyam, Thirumalai; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-02-15

    Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) is a superior functional equivalent to mammalian IgG. However, the preparation of refined and highly purified IgY is still attributed as difficult task. Protein M (a transmembrane protein from human mycoplasma) has been newly demonstrated as an ideal affinity regent for mammalian antibody purification. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between protein M and IgY. The results showed protein M could be a superior affinity reagent for IgY, scFv as well as IgYΔFc, based on pull down and western blot investigations; in addition, it was found that ∼125 times increase of effective IgY in the elutent was obtained using protein M affinity chromatography column compared with traditional IgY extraction methods. This indicates, the purification strategy of protein M is entirely different to traditional IBPs and the salient purification feature of protein M would be a breakthrough for purifying not only non-mammalian antibodies, but also monoclonal antibodies and engineered antibodies based on variable region.

  9. The human VK locus. Characterization of a duplicated region encoding 28 different immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Huber, E; Lorenz, W; Osterholzer, E; Pargent, W; Pech, M; Pohlenz, H D; Zimmer, F J; Zachau, H G

    1988-01-05

    Two large regions of the human multigene family coding for the variable parts of the immunoglobulin light chains of the K type (VK) have been characterized on cosmid clones. The two germline regions, called Aa and Ab, span together 250,000 base-pairs and comprise 28 different VK gene segments, nine of which have been sequenced. There is a preponderance of VKII genes but genes belonging to subgroups I and III, and genes that cannot be easily assigned to one of the known subgroups, are interspersed within the VKII gene clusters. A number of pseudogenes have been identified. Within the Aa and Ab regions, all gene segments are organized in the same transcriptional orientation. The regions Aa and Ab, whose restriction maps are highly homologous, were shown not to be allelic structures; they must have arisen by a duplication event. Taken together with previous results, one can conclude that the major part of the VK locus exists in duplicated form. One individual has been found who has only one copy of some of the duplicated regions. By chromosomal walking, the A regions could be linked to the O regions, an analysis of which has been reported. The A regions contribute about one-third of the VK genes so far identified.

  10. Clinical course of acute canine polyradiculoneuritis following treatment with human IV immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hirschvogel, Katrin; Jurina, Konrad; Steinberg, Tanja A; Matiasek, Lara A; Matiasek, Kaspar; Beltrán, Elsa; Fischer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of dogs with acute canine polyradiculoneuritis (ACP) is restricted to physical rehabilitation and supportive care. In humans with Guillain-Barré syndrome, the counterpart of ACP, randomized trials show that IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) speeds recovery. The authors of the current study hypothesized that dogs with ACP would tolerate IVIg well and recover faster than dogs managed with supportive treatment only. Sixteen client-owned dogs with ACP were treated with IVIg, and 14 client-owned dogs served as a retrospective control group. Diagnosis was confirmed using clinical features, electrodiagnostics, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and muscle/nerve biopsies. The duration of the initial progressive phase, the time from IVIg administration until the dogs were ambulating without assistance, and the duration of the complete episode were evaluated. Adverse reactions (anaphylaxis, mild hematuria) were observed in two dogs. Dogs treated with IVIg were ambulating without assistance after a median of 27.5 days (range, 15-127 days) from onset of clinical signs. The control group was ambulatory without assistance at a median of 75.5 days (range, 5-220 days). Even though this result is not statistically significant, there is a clear trend toward faster recovery in dogs treated with IVIg.

  11. Pooled human immunoglobulins reduce adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, K A; van der Mei, H C; Gottenbos, B; Grainger, D W; van Horn, J R; Busscher, H J

    2000-08-01

    The influence of pooled polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) interactions with both bacteria and model substrates in altering Pseudomonas aeruginosa surface adhesion is reported. Opsonization of this pathogen by polyclonal human IgG and preadsorption of IgG to glass surfaces both effectively reduce initial deposition rates and surface growth of P. aeruginosa IFO3455 from dilute nutrient broth in a parallel plate flow chamber. Polyclonal IgG depleted of P. aeruginosa-specific antibodies reduces the initial deposition rate or surface growth to levels intermediate between exposed and nonexposed IgG conditions. Bacterial surface properties are changed in the presence of opsonizing IgG. Plateau contact angle analysis via sessile drop technique shows a drop in P. aeruginosa surface hydrophobicity after IgG exposure consistent with a more hydrophilic IgG surface coat. Zeta potential values for opsonized versus nonopsonized bacteria exhibit little change. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements provide surface compositional evidence for IgG attachment to bacterial surfaces. Surface elemental ratios attributed to IgG protein signals versus those attributed primarily to bacterial polysaccharide surface or lipid membrane change with IgG opsonization. Direct evidence for antibody-modified P. aeruginosa surface properties correlates both with reduction of bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces under flow in nutrient medium reported and previous reports of IgG efficacy against P. aeruginosa motility in vitro and infection in vivo.

  12. Binding site on human immunoglobulin G for the affinity ligand HWRGWV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Williams, D. Keith; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Cavanagh, John; Muddiman, David C.; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383–Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. PMID:20049844

  13. A baboon syndrome induced by intravenous human immunoglobulins: report of a case and immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, A; Tréchot, P; Granel, F; Lonchamp, P; Faure, G; Schmutz, J L; Béné, M C

    1999-01-01

    Following the second series of intravenous human immunoglobulins (IVIg; 0.4 g/kg) prescribed to treat a sensorimotor polyneuritis, a 28-year-old woman developed pompholyx that recurred after each of the following monthly treatments with IVIg. During the administration of the 10th series, the patient developed a typical baboon syndrome. Immunohistochemical studies of a skin biopsy revealed an unexpected epidermal expression of P-selectin, usually expressed by endothelial cells. Patch, prick and intradermal tests performed with IVIg on the back, arms and buttocks gave negative results on immediate and delayed readings. IVIg were re-administered, with the informed consent of the patient, and induced a generalized maculopapular rash. This is the first reported case of baboon syndrome induced by IVIg. Although extensive skin testing was performed, all test sites remained negative. We wonder whether IVIg could reproduce immunological mechanisms involved in the 3 types of systemic contact dermatitis (pompholyx, baboon syndrome and maculopapular rash), including the epidermal expression of P-selectin.

  14. Behavior of human immunoglobulin G adsorption onto immobilized Cu(II) affinity hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Borsoi-Ribeiro, Mariana; Bresolin, Igor Tadeu Lazzarotto; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves

    2013-10-01

    Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) chelating ligands were immobilized on poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) (PEVA) hollow-fiber membranes after activation with epichlorohydrin or butanediol diglycidyl ether (bisoxirane). The affinity membranes complexed with Cu(II) were evaluated for adsorption of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). The effects of matrix activation and buffer system on adsorption of IgG were studied. Isotherms of batch IgG adsorption onto finely cut membranes showed that neither of the chelates, IDA-Cu(II) or TREN-Cu(II), had a Langmuirean behavior with negative cooperativity for IgG binding. A comparison of equilibrium and dynamic maximum capacities showed that the dynamic capacity for a mini-cartridge in a cross-flow filtration mode (52.5 and 298.4 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively) was somewhat higher than the equilibrium capacity (9.2 and 73.3 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively). When mini-cartridges were used, the dynamic adsorption capacity of IDA-Cu(II) was the same for both mini-cartridge and agarose gel.

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of human immunoglobulins and lysozyme in epoxy-embedded lymph nodes: effect of different fixatives and of proteolytic digestion.

    PubMed

    Dell'Orto, P; Viale, G; Colombi, R; Braidotti, P; Coggi, G

    1982-07-01

    The postembedding immunoperoxidase staining technique for the localization of immunoglobulins (light and heavy chains) and of lysozyme has been successfully applied to epoxy-embedded human lymph nodes, after removal of the resin. Glutaraldehyde-containing fixatives appear to be suitable for the immunohistochemical localization of human immunoglobulins and lysozyme, provided that the masked antigenicity of these proteins is recovered by proteolytic digestion of the tissue sections using 0.4% pepsin or 0.1% trypsin. Nonglutaraldehyde-containing fixatives allow the immunolocalization of human immunoglobulins without any enzymatic pretreatment. This study shows that tissues routinely fixed in glutaraldehyde and embedded for ultrastructural investigations are actually suitable for immunohistochemical studies on human immunoglobulins and lysozyme.

  16. Human recombinant antimannan immunoglobulin G1 antibody confers resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mason X; Bohlman, M Charlotte; Itatani, Carol; Burton, Dennis R; Parren, Paul W H I; St Jeor, Stephen C; Kozel, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Mannan is a major cell wall component found in Candida species. Natural antimannan antibody is present in sera from most normal adults, but its role in host resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop recombinant human antimannan antibody and to study its protective function. A phage Fab display combinatorial library containing Fab genes from bone marrow lymphocytes was screened with Candida albicans yeast cells and chemically purified mannan. One antimannan Fab, termed M1, was converted to a full-length immunoglobulin G1 antibody, M1g1, and M1g1 was produced in CHO cells. The M1g1 epitope was found in C. albicans serotypes A and B, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. Its expression was active at both 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C and uniform over the cell surface. BALB/c mice passively immunized with M1g1 were more resistant than control mice to a lethal hematogenous infection by C. albicans, as evidenced by extension of survival in an M1g1 dose-dependent manner (P, 0.08 to <0.001) and by reduction in number of infection foci and their size in the kidney. In vitro studies found that M1g1 promoted phagocytosis and phagocytic killing of C. albicans yeast cells by mouse peritoneal macrophages and was required for activation of the mouse complement cascade. Thus, human antimannan antibody may have a protective role in host resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  17. Excretion of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 through Polarized Epithelium by Immunoglobulin A▿

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Alison; Lamm, Michael E.; Huang, Yung T.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is transmitted primarily sexually across mucosal surfaces. After infection, HIV propagates initially in the lamina propria below the polarized epithelium and causes extensive destruction of mucosal T cells. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies, produced in the lamina propria and then transcytosed across the mucosal epithelium into the lumen, can be the first line of immune defense against HIV. Here, we used IgA monoclonal antibodies against HIV envelope proteins to investigate the abilities of polarized primate and human epithelial cells to excrete HIV virions from the basolateral to the apical surface via polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR)-mediated binding and the internalization of HIV-IgA immune complexes. African green monkey kidney cells expressing pIgR demonstrated HIV excretion that was dependent on the IgA concentration and the exposure time. Matched IgG antibodies with the same variable regions as the IgA antibodies and IgA antibodies to non-HIV antigens had no HIV excretory function. A mixture of two IgA anti-bodies against gp120 and gp41 showed a synergistic increase in the level of HIV excreted. The capacity for HIV excretion correlated with the ability of IgA antibodies to bind HIV and of the resulting immune complexes to bind pIgR. Consistent with the epithelial transcytosis of HIV-IgA immune complexes, the colocalization of HIV proteins and HIV-specific IgA was detected intracellularly by confocal microscopy. Our results suggest the potential of IgA antibodies to excrete HIV from mucosal lamina propria, thereby decreasing the viral burden, access to susceptible cells, and the chronic activation of the immune system. PMID:18829757

  18. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important.

  19. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes.

  20. Mass Value Assignment of Total and Subclass Immunoglobulin G in a Human Standard Anthrax Reference Serum

    PubMed Central

    Semenova, V. A.; Steward-Clark, E.; Stamey, K. L.; Taylor, T. H.; Schmidt, D. S.; Martin, S. K.; Marano, N.; Quinn, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    An anti-Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (anti-AVA) standard human reference serum pool, AVR414, has been prepared, and the total and protective antigen (PA)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were quantified. AVR414 was prepared by plasmapheresis of healthy adults who had received a minimum of four subcutaneous injections of AVA. Mass values (in milligrams per milliliter) for total IgG and IgG subclasses 1 to 4 were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Anti-PA-specific IgG assignment (in micrograms per milliliter) was done by consensus of two complementary approaches: homologous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with affinity-purified anti-PA IgG as a calibrator and summation of mean PA-specific IgG subclass concentrations determined by IgG subclass-specific ELISA using the United States National Reference Preparation for Human Serum Proteins as a standard. The total IgG concentration assigned to AVR414 reference serum was 8.33 mg/ml. IgG subclass concentrations were the following: for IgG1, 4.48 mg/ml; for IgG2, 3.35 mg/ml; for IgG3, 0.37 mg/ml; and for IgG4, 0.30 mg/ml. The assigned mass value for total anti-PA-specific IgG was 141.2 μg/ml. Anti-PA-specific IgG subclass concentrations were the following: for IgG1, 79.6 μg/ml; for IgG2, 35.3 μg/ml; for IgG3, 3.2 μg/ml; and for IgG4, 25.3 μg/ml. Human reference serum pool AVR414 will have direct application in the standardization of anthrax serological assays, in reagent qualification, and as a standard for quantification of PA-specific IgG in humans who have been vaccinated with or otherwise exposed to Bacillus anthracis PA. PMID:15358653

  1. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun; Bartish, Margarita; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Børglum, Anders D; Gatti, Richard A; Törngren, Therese; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-02-17

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism underlying BRCA1's function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  2. The impact of glycosylation on the biological function and structure of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Arnold, James N; Wormald, Mark R; Sim, Robert B; Rudd, Pauline M; Dwek, Raymond A

    2007-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are the major secretory products of the adaptive immune system. Each is characterized by a distinctive set of glycoforms that reflects the wide variation in the number, type, and location of their oligosaccharides. In a given physiological state, glycoform populations are reproducible; therefore, disease-associated alterations provide diagnostic biomarkers (e.g., for rheumatoid arthritis) and contribute to disease pathogenesis. The oligosaccharides provide important recognition epitopes that engage with lectins, endowing the immunoglobulins with an expanded functional repertoire. The sugars play specific structural roles, maintaining and modulating effector functions that are physiologically relevant and can be manipulated to optimize the properties of therapeutic antibodies. New molecular models of all the immunoglobulins are included to provide a basis for informed and critical discussion. The models were constructed by combining glycan sequencing data with oligosaccharide linkage and dynamics information from the Glycobiology Institute experimental database and protein structural data from "The Protein Data Bank."

  3. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  4. Immunogenicity and efficacy of Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan peptide mimotope-protein conjugates in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Lees, Andrew; Belouski, Shelley Sims; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2004-01-01

    Peptide mimotopes of capsular polysaccharides have been proposed as antigens for vaccines against encapsulated pathogens. In this study, we determined the antibody response to and efficacy of P13, a peptide mimetic of the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), in mice that produce human antibodies. P13 was conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and administered subcutaneously in Alhydrogel with or without CpG to mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin loci (XenoMouse mice) and expressing either immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) (G2 mice) or IgG4 (G4 mice). Mice were vaccinated and revaccinated two or three times. The serum antibody responses of the mice to GXM and P13 and antibody idiotype expression were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that both P13-TT and P13-DT were antigenic, inducing a mimetic response to P13 in both G2 and G4 mice, and immunogenic, inducing a mimotope response including VH3 (idiotype)-positive antibodies to GXM in G2 but not G4 mice. CpG led to higher titers of IgG to P13 and GXM in P13-TT-vaccinated G2 mice. C. neoformans challenge of P13-protein conjugate-vaccinated and control G2 mice induced anamnestic IgG- and VH3-positive responses to GXM and was associated with a significantly decreased risk of death and a prolongation of survival in P13-DT-vaccinated mice compared to phosphate-buffered saline-treated or protein carrier-vaccinated mice. These findings reveal that P13 elicited a human antibody response with VH3 expression in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice that has been observed for human antibodies to GXM and support the concept that peptide mimotope-based vaccines may hold promise for the treatment of C. neoformans infections.

  5. Expression and secretion of immunoglobulin alpha heavy chain with diverse VDJ recombinations by human epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Li, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zeng, Liang; Liu, Hai-dan; Hu, Duosha; Deng, Xiyun; Tang, Min; Shi, Ying; Gong, Jianping; Cao, Ya

    2007-03-01

    Generally, only B lymphocytes express immunoglobulin. Recently, we found the expression of Ig alpha heavy chain in human epithelial cancer cells unexpectedly. We first detected Ig VDJ-Calpha and Ialpha-Calpha transcripts in multiple cancer cell lines. Further, the configuration of the Ig heavy chain genomic locus was analyzed in human cancer cells. We found that cancer cells have the recombination VDJ region, but bear Ig Salpha region in germline configuration, which is different from Ig expression pattern in B cells. And human epithelial cancers possess the essential effectors including RAG-1 and RAG-2, but not activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein. These provide further proofs for Ig alpha expression. In addition, we found that human cancer cells not only express the protein of Ig alpha chain, but also secrete the protein in secretory IgA (SIgA) pattern. Importantly, diverse CDR3 recombinations were found in human cancer cells of different epithelial origin. Since IgA is the key immunoglobulin which contributes to local immunity of mucous membrane, the aberrant expression of Ig alpha heavy chain might increase our further comprehension to development and immunity of cancers.

  6. An Organic Field-effect Transistor with an Extended-gate Electrode Capable of Detecting Human Immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Minamiki, Tsukuru; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Yui; Kurita, Ryoji; Niwa, Osamu; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report on the development of an extended-gate type organic field-effect transistor (OFET)-based immunosensor for the detection of human immunoglobulin A (IgA). The titration results of IgA exhibited shifts in the transfer characteristics of the OFET sensor device with increasing IgA concentration. A linear detection range from 0 to 10 μg/mL was realized with a detection limit of 2.1 μg/mL, indicating that the OFET-based immunosensor can be potentially applied to the monitoring of infectious diseases and psychological stress in daily life.

  7. Separation of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and immunoglobulin G by a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongmo; Chae, Junseok

    2009-04-01

    This report describes a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column that effectively preseparates raw samples for medical point-of-care testing (POCT) devices. The minicolumn is constructed of polydimethylsiloxane fabricated on a glass slide. The minicolumn separates 300 ng/ml of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) from an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-rich solution (100 μg/ml) in 7.7 min, with 2.23 resolution and 0.018 mm plate height. The complete analyte discrimination shows potential for the sample preparation stage of POCT devices for cancer screening, prognosis, and monitoring.

  8. Molecular Basis of Passive Stress Relaxation in Human Soleus Fibers: Assessment of the Role of Immunoglobulin-Like Domain Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Trombitás, K.; Wu, Y.; McNabb, M.; Greaser, M.; Kellermayer, M. S. Z.; Labeit, S.; Granzier, H.

    2003-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as “spacers” that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (>∼20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation. PMID:14581214

  9. Molecular basis of passive stress relaxation in human soleus fibers: assessment of the role of immunoglobulin-like domain unfolding.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Wu, Y; McNabb, M; Greaser, M; Kellermayer, M S Z; Labeit, S; Granzier, H

    2003-11-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as "spacers" that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (> approximately 20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation.

  10. Efficacy of Polyvalent Human Immunoglobulins in an Animal Model of Neuromyelitis Optica Evoked by Intrathecal Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Toyka, Klaus V.; Sommer, Claudia; Geis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders (NMOSD) are associated with autoantibodies (ABs) targeting the astrocytic aquaporin-4 water channels (AQP4-ABs). These ABs have a direct pathogenic role by initiating a variety of immunological and inflammatory processes in the course of disease. In a recently-established animal model, chronic intrathecal passive-transfer of immunoglobulin G from NMOSD patients (NMO-IgG), or of recombinant human AQP4-ABs (rAB-AQP4), provided evidence for complementary and immune-cell independent effects of AQP4-ABs. Utilizing this animal model, we here tested the effects of systemically and intrathecally applied pooled human immunoglobulins (IVIg) using a preventive and a therapeutic paradigm. In NMO-IgG animals, prophylactic application of systemic IVIg led to a reduced median disease score of 2.4 on a 0–10 scale, in comparison to 4.1 with sham treatment. Therapeutic IVIg, applied systemically after the 10th intrathecal NMO-IgG injection, significantly reduced the disease score by 0.8. Intrathecal IVIg application induced a beneficial effect in animals with NMO-IgG (median score IVIg 1.6 vs. sham 3.7) or with rAB-AQP4 (median score IVIg 2.0 vs. sham 3.7). We here provide evidence that treatment with IVIg ameliorates disease symptoms in this passive-transfer model, in analogy to former studies investigating passive-transfer animal models of other antibody-mediated disorders. PMID:27571069

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Studies of the Specific Interactions of Hexamer Peptide Ligands with Human Immunoglobulin G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nafisa

    This study characterizes the human immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding on peptides grafted onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and the binding events are studied primarily using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The dissertation also seeks to determine the optimum surface preparation and surface chemistry approaches for grafting the peptide so that the sensor surfaces demonstrate enhanced selectivity and sensitivity in both laboratory and industrial settings. Peptide covalent grafting was performed on pure and mixed SAMs, the surfaces were characterized and the peptide densities were quantified. Theoretical models were developed and implemented to describe the binding mechanism of IgG with grafted ligands. Protein A was grafted onto SPR sensors and subsequent IgG binding characteristics were compared side-by-side to those of peptide-IgG binding. It was found that Protein A-based sensors showed much higher selectivities and higher binding capacities than their peptides based counterparts. Oligo(ethylene glycol) alkanethiol-based pure and mixed SAMs were grafted with peptides in order to determine the optimal surface among these, for enhanced selectivity. Among the mixed SAMs formed from different precursor solutions, a surface with peptides grafted onto mixed SAMs formulated from 10% amine-terminated/90% hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols showed optimum selectivity. Studies were carried out to increase the peptide density via grafting of branched amines onto surfaces. The branched amine-based peptide surfaces displayed improved sensitivities and similar selectivities to the surfaces based on un-branched amine termini. Kinetic analyses were carried out to determine the characteristics of IgG binding to ligands grafted in the abovementioned methods. Kinetic analysis of binding indicated that Protein A-IgG interactions have concentrationdependent affinity properties that could be attributed to the allosteric effects of the interaction. The lack of tertiary

  12. Calibration of the human immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size (batch 1) and for Fc function and molecular size (batches 1 & 2).

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Costanzo, A; Daas, A; Buchheit, K-H

    2012-04-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation batch 3 (BRP3) for Human Immunoglobulin was established in 2005. Stocks of this BRP are dwindling and a replacement batch is needed to serve as working standard in the tests for distribution of molecular size by HPLC, anticomplementary activity (ACA) and Fc function, in accordance with the requirements of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) carried out a project (BSP099) to establish replacement batches for this BRP. The project was run in 2 phases, a prequalification phase (Phase 1) and an international collaborative study (Phase 2) involving 19 laboratories. Three batches of candidate materials of various sizes, Samples A, B and C, were procured from 2 different manufacturers on the European market. Based on the results of the study, Sample A was shown to be suitable as a reference standard for the ACA test and for molecular size determination by HPLC, whereas Samples B and C were demonstrated to be suitable for the Fc function test and for the molecular size determination by HPLC. All 3 BRPs are to be used in conjunction with the monographs Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918). The BRPs were adopted by the Ph. Eur. Commission at its 141st session in November 2011 as official Ph. Eur. Human Immunoglobulin BRPs for ACA and molecular size Batch 1 (Sample A) and Fc function and molecular size Batch 1 and Batch 2 (Samples B and C respectively).

  13. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful.

  14. Method for Extracting Viral Hemagglutination-Inhibiting Antibodies from the Nonspecific Inhibitors of Serum

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, William A.; Mundon, Francis K.; Top, Franklin H.; Russell, Philip K.

    1970-01-01

    Various methods are used to remove nonspecific inhibitors from sera before titering viral hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. These methods have several undesirable features; some are tedious and time-consuming, some remove antibody along with nonspecific inhibitors, and different techniques are usually required to remove the nonspecific inhibitors for different viruses. This communication describes a single method that uses diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex to extract the immunoglobulin G antibodies for several viruses from nonspecific inhibitors. The procedure is fast, simple to perform, and removed the nonspecific inhibitors for influenza, Western equine encephalitis, dengue-2, and rubella viruses. Images PMID:5463576

  15. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  16. Rapid infusions of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l are safe and well tolerated in immunodeficiencies and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Alberto Bosi, A; Reichert, Dietmar; Janssen, Jan; Lamacchia, Donatella; Nappi, Liliana; Pecoraro, Antonio; Milito, Cinzia; Ferraro, Andrea; Matucci, Andrea; Bacchiarri, Francesca; Carrai, Valentina; Hibbeler, Azra; Speckman, Elisabet; Guarnieri, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Serena; Quinti, Isabella

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is accepted as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for primary and secondary immunodeficiencies (ID) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Adverse reactions of IVIg are usually mild, comprising transient flu-like symptoms, change in blood pressure and tachycardia. However IVIg therapy can be burdensome for both patients and healthcare facilities, since the infusion may take up to 4h to administer. The objective of our multicentre, prospective, open-label phase III trial was to evaluate the tolerability and safety of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l (Ig VENA) at high intravenous infusion rates in adult patients with ID and ITP who had previously tolerated IVIg treatment, by progressively increasing infusion rate up to 8ml/kg/hr. 39 ID patients received three infusions, 5 ITP patients received up to a maximum of 5 infusions for a maximum of 5days. Overall 55 adverse events were reported in 18 patients, and all were mild and self-limiting. Two serious adverse events occurred in ID patients and 1 in an ITP patient; none was fatal or treatment-related. No clinically significant changes or abnormalities were observed in vital signs, laboratory results and HRQoL. In summary, in this study, more rapid IVIg infusions were well tolerated by ID and ITP patients, while maintaining their quality of life, helping to minimise the time spent in outpatient hospital visiting to potentially optimise adherence to treatment.

  17. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin V(H)6 genes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-10-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated V(H)6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of V(H)6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T-B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old.

  18. Quantitation of biotin-binding immunoglobulins G, A, and M in Human Sera Using F(ab')2anti-human immunoglobulin-coated microplates.

    PubMed

    Muratsugu, Makoto; Yazawa, Ayaka; Fujiwara, Sami; Nishida, Satsuki; Fukui, Toru

    2008-03-01

    Biotin-binding IgG (B-IgG) in human sera was quantified using previously developed F(ab')(2)anti-human IgG-coated multiwell microplates (Muratsugu M. et al., 2003, Biol. Pharm. Bull., 26, 1605--1608). The levels of B-IgG in sera, however, were higher than those we predicted. In this study, we modified the assay using F(ab')2anti-human IgG-coated multiwell microplates and successfully quantified the levels of B-IgG in sera. The cause of the unpredicted results was discussed in the text. In addition, the levels of biotin-binding IgA (B-IgA) and IgM (B-IgM) in sera could be measured using F(ab')2anti-human IgA- or IgM-coated multiwell microplates. We quantified B-IgG, B-IgA, and B-IgM in sera from healthy specimens and patients with bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, epilepsy, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Fish Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  20. Disordered salivary immunoglobulin secretion and sodium transport in human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, K T; Sullivan, K M; Schubert, M M; Truelove, E L; Shulman, H M; Sale, G E; Morton, T H; Rice, J C; Witherspoon, R P; Storb, R; Thomas, E D

    1983-05-01

    Whole saliva samples and lip biopsies were collected from 12 allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients who developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and from 10 healthy allogeneic and syngeneic recipients without GVHD. Six of ten biopsies from patients with chronic GVHD had lichenoid stomatitis or sialadenitis, or both, with sialodochitis. Seven of nine biopsies from patients free of chronic GVHD were entirely normal, and two had either mild glandular or mucosal changes. Salivary gland involvement in chronic GVHD was associated with decreased or absent levels of salivary IgA and inorganic phosphate, decreased salivary flow rates, and increased concentrations of salivary sodium, albumin, and IgG. The most striking abnormalities were found in patients with histologic evidence of sialadenitis. In contrast, marrow transplant recipients without chronic GVHD had normal salivary immunoglobulin and electrolyte levels. Secretory IgA deficiency may contribute to the frequent sinobronchial infections observed in patients with chronic GVHD.

  1. Biological variation of immunoglobulin concentrations in normal human tears related to age and sex.

    PubMed

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S; Mathur, G P; Saha, K

    1978-06-01

    Single radial immunodiffusion method was used to measure the concentration of IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD in tears of 220 healthy individuals aged from 2 to 86 years. Relation of the values to age and sex has been evaluated statistically by regression analysis method. Mean IgA level was 30.7 mg/100 ml. IgG could be detected in 200 samples and the level was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgM was detected in only 7 samples and the value was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgD could not be detected in any of the sample. The IgA level in males and that in females differs significantly, the females having a higher mean value. The IgA level appears to increase in both sexes with age. No relationship with age and sex could be established in other types of immunoglobulins.

  2. Two ultrastructural distribution patterns of immunoglobulin G in human placenta and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Korteweg, Christine; Qiu, Yamei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Zhengshan; Huang, Guowei; Li, Weiqiu; Gu, Jiang

    2014-11-01

    The placenta is known to protect the fetus from infection and maternal rejection. In a previous study, we demonstrated that placental trophoblasts can synthesize immunoglobulin G (IgG). In this study, we investigated the distribution of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, and IgA), IgG receptors (FcRn and FcgammaRIII), and complement proteins in placental trophoblasts at the ultrastructural level. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of IgG1 heavy chain (IGHG1), recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1), RAG2, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) with nested RT-PCR in primary cultured trophoblasts. The mRNA transcripts of IGHG1, RAG1, RAG2, and AID were all identified in primary trophoblasts, further establishing the IgG-producing capacity of trophoblasts. At the ultrastructural level with colloidal gold-labeled antibodies, IgG was found to be distributed in two distinct locations in syncytiotrophoblasts. For one, it was colocalized with FcRn in endosome displaying low electron density, and for the other it was colocalized with complement C1q in medium-electron density irregular structures that have not been reported previously. This characteristic distribution suggests that IgG is likely processed through two molecular mechanisms in syncytiotrophoblasts: receptor-bound transportation across the syncytiotrophoblast and formation of immune complexes with locally produced IgG. The latter mechanism is probably aimed at neutralizing detrimental maternal anti-paternal major histocompatibility complex antibodies. Our findings support the hypothesis that placenta-produced IgG can selectively react with maternal anti-fetus antibodies and provide a mechanism of fetomaternal tolerance to protect the fetus from maternal immune rejection.

  3. Anti-Human Platelet Antigen-1a Immunoglobulin G Preparation Intended to Prevent Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ying-Jan; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Björn; Kjaer, Mette; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a severe disease that is caused by maternal alloantibodies generated during pregnancy or at delivery as a result of incompatibility between maternal and fetal human platelet antigens (HPAs) inherited from the father. Antibody-mediated immune suppression using anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulins is thought to be able to prevent FNAIT caused by HPA-1a. A fractionation process to prepare anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) from human plasma was therefore developed. Anti-HPA-1a plasma was obtained from volunteer mothers who underwent alloimmunization against HPA-1a during a previous pregnancy. Plasma was cryoprecipitated and the supernatant treated with caprylic acid and solvent/detergent (S/D), purified by chromatography, nanofiltered, concentrated, and sterile-filtered. The anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin fraction was characterized for purity and safety. PAK12 and quantitative monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assays were used to detect anti-HPA-1a IgG. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) removal during nanofiltration was assessed by spiking experiments, using cell culture-derived reporter HCV and luciferase analysis. The caprylic acid treatment precipitated non-Ig proteins yielding a 90% pure Ig supernatant. S-HyperCel chromatography of the S/D-treated supernatant followed by HyperCel STAR AX provided high IgG recovery (>80%) and purity (>99.5%), and efficient IgA and IgM removal. Concentrations of complement factors C3 and C4 were < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/dL, respectively. The final IgG could be nanofiltered on Planova 20N under conditions removing more than 3 log HCV infectivity to baseline mock infection level, and concentrated to ca. 30 g/L. Proteolytic activity and thrombin generation were low in the final fraction. The Pak12 and MAIPA assays showed good recovery of anti-HPA-1a throughout the process. Clinical-grade HPA-1a IgG can be prepared using a process compliant with current quality requirements

  4. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral human immunoglobulin for gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Handen, Benjamin L; Melmed, Raun D; Hansen, Robin L; Aman, Michael G; Burnham, David L; Bruss, Jon B; McDougle, Christopher J

    2009-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI symptoms. Endpoint analysis revealed no significant differences across treatment groups on a modified global improvement scale (validated in irritable bowel syndrome studies), number of daily bowel movements, days of constipation, or severity of problem behaviors. IGOH was well-tolerated; there were no serious adverse events. This study demonstrates the importance of conducting rigorous trials in children with autism and casts doubt on one GI mechanism presumed to exert etiological and/or symptomatic effects in this population.

  5. Successful clearance of human parainfluenza virus type 2 viraemia with intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulin in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kalimuddin, Shirin; Sessions, October M; Hou, Yan'An; Ooi, Eng Eong; Sim, David; Cumaraswamy, Sivathasan; Tan, Teing Ee; Lai, Siang Hui; Low, Chian Yong

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) infection as an aetiology of acute viral myocarditis is rare, with only few cases reported in the literature to date. Here we report a case of fulminant HPIV-2 myocarditis in a 47 year-old man with viraemia who was successfully treated with intravenous ribavirin and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). There are currently no recommendations on the treatment of HPIV myocarditis. We are, to our knowledge, the first to report a patient with a documented HPIV-2 viraemia that subsequently cleared after the initiation of antiviral therapy. Although it is difficult to definitively attribute the patient's clinical improvement to ribavirin or IVIG alone, our case does suggest that clinicians may wish to consider initiating ribavirin and IVIG in patients with HPIV myocarditis and persistent viraemia not responding to supportive measures alone.

  6. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  7. Defensins, Lectins, Mucins and Secretory Immunoglobulin A: Microbe-Binding Biomolecules that Contribute to Mucosal Immunity in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors – enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A – that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes. PMID:27841019

  8. Cloning of size-selected human immunoglobulin heavy-chain rearrangements from third complementarity-determining region fingerprint profiles.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, F M; Tami, J; Sanz, I E

    1996-01-01

    Methods have been developed to rapidly visualize the size distribution of third complementarity-determining regions (CDR3) in immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) molecules. DNA fragments spanning the Ig or TCR CDR3 are generated by PCR using primers at fixed positions in the variable and constant segments. These fragments differ in length due to size variation of the CDR3s. Visualization of the amplification products in polyacrylamide gels as a "CDR3 fingerprint profile" is a rough measure for the complexity of the Ig and TCR antigen-binding specificities. We report an adaptation of this method for the analysis of human Ig heavy-chain genes that incorporates silver staining, which allows for the fine analysis of specific regions of the profiles. This is especially useful for the study of low-abundant transcripts.

  9. Suppressant effect of human or equine rabies immunoglobulins on the immunogenicity of post-exposure rabies vaccination under the 2-1-1 regimen: a field trial in Indonesia. MAS054 Clinical Investigator Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.; Simanjuntak, G. H.; Soerjosembodo, S.; Koesharyono, C.

    1998-01-01

    WHO's reference protocol for post-exposure rabies vaccination advises five intramuscular injections on days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 30; in addition, rabies immunoglobulins (RIG) must be given to serious cases of exposure (grade III severity). Some studies indicate that these immunoglobulins suppress the immunogenicity of rabies vaccine when administered according to an alternative protocol of four injections (2-1-1) on days 0, 7, and 21, which was therefore not recommended for grade III exposures. To test this effect, we conducted a multicentre study in Indonesia using three groups of subjects. One group received only the Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV, Verorab, usual commercial lot) according to the 2-1-1 schedule. The second and third groups received the same schedule of PVRV, plus either equine rabies immunoglobulins (ERIG, 40 IU/kg body weight) or human rabies immunoglobulins (HRIG, 20 IU/kg body weight). Our results confirmed the immunoglobulin suppressant effect, which was more pronounced with human than equine immunoglobulins. In both groups receiving immunoglobulins, the seroconversion rates did not reach 100% on day 28 and the geometric mean antibody titre was lower. Thus, WHO's recommendation in 1992 of the reference protocol plus immunoglobulins for severe cases is substantiated by these results in Indonesian subjects. If the 2-1-1 regimen is chosen by the treating physician and immunoglobulins are indicated, preference should be given to purified equine RIG, which also costs less than human RIG. PMID:9868840

  10. Human-specific evolution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Guethlein, Lisbeth A

    2012-03-19

    In placental mammals, natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphocytes that make unique contributions to immune defence and reproduction, functions essential for survival of individuals, populations and species. Modulating these functions are conserved and variable NK-cell receptors that recognize epitopes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In humans, for example, recognition of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the CD94:NKG2A receptor is conserved, whereas recognition of HLA-A, B and C by the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is diversified. Competing demands of the immune and reproductive systems, and of T-cell and NK-cell immunity-combined with the segregation on different chromosomes of variable NK-cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands-drive an unusually rapid evolution that has resulted in unprecedented levels of species specificity, as first appreciated from comparison of mice and humans. Counterparts to human KIR are present only in simian primates. Observed in these species is the coevolution of KIR and the four MHC class I epitopes to which human KIR recognition is restricted. Unique to hominids is the emergence of the MHC-C locus as a supplier of specialized and superior ligands for KIR. This evolutionary trend is most highly elaborated in the chimpanzee. Unique to the human KIR locus are two groups of KIR haplotypes that are present in all human populations and subject to balancing selection. Group A KIR haplotypes resemble chimpanzee KIR haplotypes and are enriched for genes encoding KIR that bind HLA class I, whereas group B KIR haplotypes are enriched for genes encoding receptors with diminished capacity to bind HLA class I. Correlating with their balance in human populations, B haplotypes favour reproductive success, whereas A haplotypes favour successful immune defence. Evolution of the B KIR haplotypes is thus unique to the human species.

  11. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-08

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  12. A study of immunoglobulin classes present on the membrane and in the cytoplasm of human tonsil plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M; Viale, G; Risso, A; Pernis, B

    1976-08-01

    The problem of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing plasma cells expressed membrane Ig has been investigated using cells from human tonsils. In tonsils, IgG-containing cells are predominant, but a certain number of IgM, IgA and IgD-containing cells are also present. By using a double staining immunofluorescent technique for the simultaneous detection of membrane and intracytoplasmic Ig, it has been possible to ascertain that the large majority of IgA, IgM and IgD-containing cells had membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) of a class coincident with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. In addition a noticeable proportion of IgM-containing cells expressed membrane IgD, thus indicating that a certain number of these cells bore both membrane IgM and IgD. About 60% of IgG-containing cells had membrane IgG, while the remaining cells did not express mIg. Furthermore the surface staining of these cells was generally fainter than that of the cells containing other Ig classes. Experiments on the surface light chain type expressed by the single Ig-containing cells (IgCC) as compared to that found in the cytoplasm have shown that in the large majority of IgCC the light chain type of mIg coincided with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. Discordant light chain types of membrane and cytoplasmic Ig were found on about 12% of IgCC only. These values can be taken as a measure of how many IgCC had passively acquired mIg.

  13. Human malignant T cells capable of inducing an immunoglobulin class switch

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the existence of a "switch" T cell derived from a patient with mycosis fungoides/Sezary's syndrome. The serum immunoglobulin profile in this patient revealed high IgG and IgA but no detectable IgM. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from this patient secreted only IgG and IgA in the presence of pokeweed mitogen. T cells (Trac) co-cultured with normal allogeneic non-T cells and pokeweed mitogen resulted in only IgG and IgA PFC, with little or no IgM secretion. There was no evidence of active suppression of IgM. Rather, these T cells appeared to induce an Ig class switch from IgM to IgG and IgA, when co-cultured with mu+ tonsillar B cells. Further evidence was obtained using mononuclear cells derived from a patient with immunodeficiency and hyper-IgM, a syndrome characterized by a lack of IgG and IgA secretion. The addition of Trac cells to either peripheral blood mononuclear cells or non-T cells from a patient with hyper-IgM syndrome resulted in new secretion of IgG, with a concomitant decrease in IgM secretion, whereas control T cells were not effective in inducing secretion of any isotype other than IgM. Isolated Tac+ T cells from Trac appear to be responsible for this effect. PMID:2981951

  14. Identification of Candida albicans antigens reactive with immunoglobulin E antibody of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, A; Homma, M; Torii, S; Tanaka, K

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans antigens which reacted with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies of 57 allergic patients were detected by immunoblotting. Of the various antigens, the 175-, 125-, 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigenic components reacted most frequently with the patient sera. To purify the major antigens, C. albicans cells were fractionated. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, but the 175- and 125-kDa antigens were not recovered in any fraction. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were purified from cytoplasmic fractions by DEAE and P11 ion-exchange chromatography. Antigens were isolated by cutting bands out of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The purified components confirmed by immunoblotting were next processed for amino acid sequencing. Parts of the sequences of the 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens had significant levels of homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolytic enzyme enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and aldolase, respectively. Rabbit IgG antibodies prepared against the 46- and 43-kDa antigens strongly cross-reacted with the homologous proteins of S. cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase did not cross-react with IgE of patient sera. This result suggests that IgE antibodies against only small parts of their epitopes are elevated in the allergic patients. Since enolase is reported to be a major antigen for systemic candidiasis, this enzyme may be the immunodominant protein in both allergies and fungal infections. Images PMID:1548078

  15. Highly sensitive detection of cancer antigen human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 using novel chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Yang, Yiheng; Wang, Lifen; Lv, Li; Zhu, Jie; Han, Wenqi; Wang, Enxia; Guo, Xin; Zhen, Yuhong

    2015-05-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an important biomarker that plays a crucial role in therapeutic decision-making for breast cancer patients. Ensuring the accuracy and reproducibility of HER2 assays by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) requires high sensitive and specific antibodies. Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is a kind of avian antibody usually isolated from chicken egg yolks. Generation and use of IgY is of increasing interest in a wide variety of applications within the life sciences. In this study, IgY antibodies against two different truncated proteins of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human HER2 were produced, their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Specific IgYs were produced by hens immunized with the ECD proteins of human HER2 in long-standing immunization response and were isolated from yolks with a purity of 90% by water dilution, salt precipitations and ultrafiltration. The anti-HER2 IgYs were analytically validated for specificity by ELISA, western blot, immunocytochemistry and IHC. The IgYs bound desired targets in cells and fixed tissues and showed high affinity to HER2. The results demonstrated the viability of detection of HER2 with IgYs and showed promise for the using of IgYs in strict clinical validation.

  16. Survival and digestibility of orally-administered immunoglobulin preparations containing IgG through the gastrointestinal tract in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasion, Victoria S; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-03-07

    Oral immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations are prime examples of medicinal nutrition from natural sources. Plasma products containing Ig have been used for decades in animal feed for intestinal disorders to mitigate the damaging effects of early weaning. These preparations reduce overall mortality and increase feed utilization in various animal species leading to improved growth. Oral administration of Ig preparations from human serum as well as bovine colostrum and serum have been tested and proven to be safe as well as effective in human clinical trials for a variety of enteric microbial infections and other conditions which cause diarrhea. In infants, children, and adults, the amount of intact IgG recovered in stool ranges from trace amounts up to 25% of the original amount ingested. It is generally understood that IgG can only bind to antigens within the GI tract if the Fab structure is intact and has not been completely denatured through acidic pH or digestive proteolytic enzymes. This is a comprehensive review of human studies regarding the survivability of orally-administered Ig preparations, with a focus on IgG. This review also highlights various biochemical studies on IgG which potentially explain which structural elements are responsible for increased stability against digestion.

  17. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  18. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  19. Effect of age on immunoglobulin content and volume of human labial gland saliva.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Joshipura, K; Kent, R; Taubman, M A

    1992-12-01

    Stimulated lower labial (LLGF) and parotid salivary volumes and IgG, IgA, and IgM concentrations were measured in 264 subjects whose ages ranged from 17 to 76 years. A significant (p < 0.001) age-related decline in LLGF output was observed for subjects over this age range. Sixty-three percent of the subjects in the 18-20-year-old group (n = 46) secreted at least 10 microL of labial saliva in a 7-10-minute period, while approximately 70% of the subjects in the two oldest groups (61-70 and 71-76 years old) secreted less than 1 microL of LLGF during this time period (n = 64). No significant gender-based differences occurred in the volumes of labial saliva secreted. Stimulated parotid salivary flow showed no age-related trend in these subjects. Lower labial gland salivary IgA concentrations in an older population (mean age +/- SD = 55.6 yr +/- 1.3) were significantly lower (p < 0.025) than IgA concentrations in a younger population (20.7 yr +/- 0.8), when IgA was expressed as microgram/mL LLGF collected. Immunoglobulin A concentrations in parotid saliva and IgG and IgM concentrations in labial and parotid saliva were not significantly different when the two age populations were compared. These data suggest that the physiological and immunological potential of labial gland saliva may decrease with age.

  20. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), and adults (20-60 years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age.

  1. Antigen Detection in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Using Secretory Immunoglobulin A Antibodies Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, H. A.; Gavilanes-Parra, S.; Chavez-Berrocal, E.; Navarro-Ocaña, A.; Cravioto, A.

    2000-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produces a characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion in the small intestines of infected children. The immune response to EPEC infection remains poorly characterized. The molecular targets that elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease are unknown. In this study protein antigens from EPEC were identified using secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) antibodies isolated from milk from Mexican women by Western blot analysis. Purified sIgA antibodies, which inhibit the adherence of EPEC to cells, reacted to many EPEC proteins, the most prominent of which were intimin (a 94-kDa outer membrane protein) and two unknown proteins with apparent molecular masses of 80 and 70 kDa. A culture supernatant protein of 110 kDa also reacted strongly with the sIgA antibodies. The molecular size of this protein and its reactivity with specific anti-EspC antiserum suggest that it is EPEC-secreted protein C (EspC). These EPEC surface protein antigens were consistently recognized by all the different sIgA samples obtained from 15 women. Screening of clinical isolates of various O serogroups from cases of severe infantile diarrhea revealed that all EPEC strains able to produce the A/E lesion showed expression of intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins. Such proteins reacted strongly with the purified sIgA pool. Moreover, nonvirulent E. coli strains were unable to generate a sIgA response. The immunogenic capacities of the 80- and 70-kDa proteins as virulence antigens have not been previously reported. The strong sIgA response to intimin and the 80- and 70-kDa proteins obtained in this study indicates that such antigens stimulate intestinal immune responses and may elicit protective immunity against EPEC disease. PMID:10948121

  2. Use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin in HIV type 1-infected children (Pediatric AIDS clinical trials group protocol 273).

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Fletcher, C V; Mofenson, L M; Palumbo, P E; Kang, M; Fenton, T; Sapan, C V; Meyer, W A; Shearer, W T; Hawkins, E; Fowler, M G; Bouquin, P; Purdue, L; Sloand, E M; Nemo, G J; Wara, D; Bryson, Y J; Starr, S E; Petru, A; Burchett, S

    2000-02-01

    The clinical, immunologic, and virologic effects and the pharmacokinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were assessed in 30 HIV-infected children aged 2-11 years. All had moderately advanced disease with an immune complex-dissociated (ICD) p24 antigen >70 pg/mL and were on stable antiviral therapy. Three groups of 10 children received 6 monthly infusions of 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg of HIVIG, and serial immunologic and virologic assays were performed. HIVIG doses as high as 800 mg/kg were safe and well tolerated. The half-life of HIVIG, determined by serial p24 antibody titers, was 13-16 days, the volume of distribution was 102-113 mL/kg, and clearance was 5.6-6.0 mL/kg/day. Plasma ICD p24 decreased during the infusions, but CD4 cell levels, plasma RNA copy number, cellular virus, immunoglobulin levels, and neutralizing antibody titers were minimally affected by the infusions. Clinical status did not change during the 6-month infusion and 3-month follow-up periods.

  3. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  4. Association of respiratory complications and elevated serum immunoglobulins with drinking water arsenic toxicity in human.

    PubMed

    Islam, Laila N; Nabi, A H M Nurun; Rahman, M Mahfuzur; Zahid, M Shamim H

    2007-10-01

    We assessed the relationship between chronic arsenic exposure through drinking water with respiratory complications and humoral immune response by measuring serum immunoglobulin profiles in the affected subjects (arsenicosis patients) living in the arsenic endemic rural villages of Bangladesh. The duration of exposure was determined through detailed history of the patients (n=125) and the levels of arsenic in the drinking water and urine samples were determined. The mean duration of exposure in the patients was 7.4+/-5.3 y, and the levels of arsenic in the drinking water and urine samples were 216+/-211 and 223+/-302 micro g/L, respectively, compared to 11+/-20 and 29+/-19 microg/L, respectively, in the unexposed subjects. There was high prevalence of respiratory complications like breathing problems including chest sound, asthma, bronchitis and cough associated with drinking water arsenic toxicity. Arsenicosis patients had significantly elevated levels of IgG (P<0.001) and IgE (P<0.001) while the levels of IgA were also significantly higher (P<0.005) but IgM were similar to that of the control subjects. Analysis of the clinical symptoms based on skin manifestations showed the levels of both IgG and IgE were significantly elevated during the initial stages while IgE were further elevated with the duration of arsenic exposure. Arsenicosis patients with respiratory complications had mean serum IgE levels of 706+/-211 IU/mL compared to 542+/-241 IU/mL in patients without apparent involvement with the respiratory system (P<0.01). The eosinophil counts in the patients did not differ significantly from the unexposed subjects indicating that elevated levels of serum IgE might not be due to allergic diseases, rather it could be due to direct effects of arsenic. We found significant linear relationships between the levels of serum IgE and inorganic phosphorus (P<0.05), and serum IgA levels with urinary excretion of arsenic (P<0.001). These observations suggested that

  5. A phagocytosis assay for oxidized low-density lipoprotein versus immunoglobulin G-coated microbeads in human U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vance, David T; Dufresne, Jaimie; Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Tucholska, Monika; Trimble, William; Grinstein, Sergio; Marshall, John G

    2016-05-01

    The human monocyte cell line U937 was differentiated into an adherent macrophage phenotype using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to assay the phagocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) that may play a role in atherosclerosis. Microbeads were coated with the inflammatory ligand oxLDL to create a novel phagocytosis assay that models the binding of macrophages to oxLDL in the solid phase such as found in the fatty streaks of the arteries. The oxLDL was prepared with LDL from human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma oxidized with an excess (5 mM) of the strong oxidizing agent CuSO4 and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blot. The binding of the oxLDL to the beads was confirmed by DilC18-oxLDL staining and confocal microscopy in addition to trypsin digestion of the microbeads for liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry. Phagocytosis of the oxLDL versus human bulk immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1)-coated microbeads was assayed over time, in the presence and absence of serum factors, by pulse chase and with enzyme inhibitor treatments. The ligand beads were then stained with specific antibodies to oxLDL versus human IgG to differentially stain external versus engulfed ligand microbeads. The phagocytosis of oxLDL and IgG ligand microbeads was abolished by the actin polymerization inhibitors cytochalasin D and latrunculin. Pharmacological inhibitors of the receptor enzymes JAK, SRC, and PLC prevented both IgG and oxLDL receptor function. In contrast, the function of the oxLDL phagocytic receptor complex was more sensitive to inhibition of PTK2, PKC, and SYK activity.

  6. Non-specific pinocytosis by human endothelial cells cultured as multicellular aggregates: uptake of lucifer yellow and horse radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Catizone, A; Chiantore, M V; Andreola, F; Coletti, D; Medolago Albani, L; Alescio, T

    1996-12-01

    We have analyzed the pattern of time-dependent and concentration-dependent incorporation of Lucifer Yellow CH (LY) and Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured on a non-adhesive substratum, where they they become organized into stable, multicellular aggregates. The data were compared with those previously obtained from low-density cultures of non-growing endothelial cells adherent to plastic. While the linear trend of the incorporation kinetics is preserved, the rate of uptake with both time and concentrations is highly dependent on the culture conditions, namely typology of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. An at least two-fold increase of the rate of uptake was observed with both markers in the aggregated cells. The extracellular concentration of LY required to saturate the binding capacity of the cell surface shifts from approximately 0.25 mg/ml, with the adherent cells, to approximately 0.5 mg/ml in the aggregated cells; the rate of uptake of three different forms of HRP shows, besides a sharp quantitative increase, also qualitative variations, testified by differential changes of their incorporation rates. These results are entirely consistent with the assumption that the association of the endothelial cells into multicellular aggregates increases the rate of pinocytic uptake by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, thereby increasing its differential affinity for the extracellular markers.

  7. [Characterization of a nonspecific inhibitor found in human sera raised against the 2006/07 influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Morikawa, Saeko; Kase, Tetsuo; Irie, Sin; Hirota, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    The serology of influenza viruses typically uses hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or the neutralization test (NT). However, the sera of many humans and animals contain nonspecific inhibitors of hemagglutinin that must be inactivated or removed from the serum before use in the HI assay. Any nonspecific inhibitor in human serum is typically inactivated by pre-treatment with receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE). However, during the 2006/07 influenza circulating season, we observed that influenza vaccine strain A/Hiroshima/52/ 2005 (H3N2) exhibited susceptibility to an RDE-resistant inhibitor in human serum. We report herein on a preliminary characterization of this inhibitor, including the development of a novel inhibitor-inactivating technique for pre-treatment of human serum to be used for HI with the A/Hiroshima/52/2005 (H3N2) virus.

  8. The Commercial Antibodies Widely Used to Measure H3 K56 Acetylation Are Non-Specific in Human and Drosophila Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sangita; Graves, Hillary; Ohsawa, Ryosuke; Huang, Ting-hsiang; Wang, Pingping; Harmacek, Laura; Tyler, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the function of histone post-translational modifications in metazoans is inferred from their genomic localization and / or extrapolated from yeast studies. For example, acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3 K56Ac) is assumed to be important for transcriptional regulation in metazoan cells based on its occurrence at promoters and its function in yeast. Here we directly assess the function of H3 K56Ac during chromatin disassembly from gene regulatory regions during transcriptional induction in human cells by using mutations that either mimic or prevent H3 K56Ac. Although there is rapid histone H3 disassembly during induction of some estrogen receptor responsive genes, depletion of the histone chaperone ASF1A/B, which is required for H3 K56 acetylation, has no effect on chromatin disassembly at these regions. During the course of this work, we found that all the commercially available antibodies to H3 K56Ac are non-specific in human cells and in Drosophila. We used H3-YFP fusions to show that the H3 K56Q mutation can promote chromatin disassembly from regulatory regions of some estrogen responsive genes in the context of transcriptional induction. However, neither the H3 K56R nor K56Q mutation significantly altered chromatin disassembly dynamics by FRAP analysis. These results indicate that unlike the situation in yeast, human cells do not use H3 K56Ac to promote chromatin disassembly from regulatory regions or from the genome in general. Furthermore, our work highlights the need for rigorous characterization of the specificity of antibodies to histone post-translational modifications in vivo. PMID:27187594

  9. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  10. Immunoglobulin M-enriched human intravenous immunoglobulins reduce leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and attenuate microvascular perfusion failure in normotensive endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Johannes N; Fertmann, Jan M; Vollmar, Brigitte; Laschke, Matthias W; Jauch, Karl W; Menger, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate potential differences in the efficacy of immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations in patients with sepsis. A recent meta-analysis showed improved survival rates with IgM-enriched Igs. It was the objective of the present study to characterize microcirculatory actions of different clinically used Ig preparations in a rodent endotoxin model by intravital microscopy. Male Syrian golden hamsters 6 to 8 weeks old with a body weight of 60 to 80 g were investigated by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Endotoxemia was induced by administration of 2 mg/kg (i.v.) endotoxin (LPS, Escherichia coli). Two different Ig preparations containing IgM, IgA, and IgG (intravenous IgM group; n = 6; 5 mL Pentaglobin/kg body weight, i.v.) or exclusively IgG (intravenous IgG group; n = 5; 5 mL Flebogamma/kg body weight, i.v.) were applied 5 min before LPS. Saline-treated endotoxemic animals served as controls (control; n = 8). In controls, LPS induced massive leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, pronounced microvascular leakage, a decrease of systemic platelet count, and distinct capillary perfusion failure (P < 0.05). Both intravenous IgM and IgG reduced venular leakage (P< 0.05) and ameliorated the decrease in platelet count (P < 0.05). Of interest, intravenous IgM was capable of significantly (P< 0.05) reducing leukocyte adhesion in venules. This was associated with normalization of capillary perfusion at 24 h of endotoxemia, whereas intravenous IgG could not prevent LPS-mediated microvascular perfusion failure. We demonstrate that IgM-enriched Igs are superior to IgG alone in attenuating LPS-induced leukocytic inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction. Our findings can explain better efficacy of IgM-enriched Igs in patients with severe sepsis.

  11. Immunoglobulins from Animal Models of Motor Neuron Disease and from Human Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients Passively Transfer Physiological Abnormalities to the Neuromuscular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Stanley H.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Garcia, Jesus; Stefani, Enrico

    1991-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating human disease of upper and lower motoneurons of unknown etiology. In support of the potential role of autoimmunity in ALS, two immune-mediated animal models of motoneuron disease have been developed that resemble ALS with respect to the loss of motoneurons, the presence of IgG within motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction, and with respect to altered physiology of the motor nerve terminal. To provide direct evidence for the primary role of humoral immunity, passive transfer with immunoglobulins from the two animal models and human ALS was carried out. Mice injected with serum or immunoglobulins from the animal disease models and human ALS but not controls demonstrated IgG in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. The mice also demonstrated an increase in miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency, with normal amplitude and time course and normal resting membrane potential, indicating an increased resting quantal release of acetylcholine from the nerve terminal. The ability to transfer motoneuron dysfunction with serum immunoglobulins provides evidence for autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both the animal models and human ALS.

  12. Cloning and partial nucleotide sequence of human immunoglobulin mu chain cDNA from B cells and mouse-human hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, T W; Devuono, J; Croce, C M

    1980-01-01

    Purified mRNAs coding for mu and kappa human immunoglobulin polypeptides were translated in vitro and their products were characterized. The mu-specific mRNAs, derived from both human lymphoblastoid cells (GM607) and from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid secreting human mu chains (alpha D5-H11-BC11), were copied into cDNAs and inserted into the plasmid pBR322. Several recombinant cDNAs that were obtained were identified by a combination of colony hybridization with labeled probes, in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mu mRNAs, and DNA nucleotide sequence determination. One recombinant DNA, for which the sequence has been partially determined, contains the codons for part of the C3 constant region domain through the carboxy-terminal piece (155 amino acids total) as well as the entire 3' noncoding sequence up to the poly(A) site of the human mu mRNA. The sequence A-A-U-A-A occurs 12 nucleotides prior to the poly(A) addition site in the human mu mRNA. Considerable sequence homology is observed in the mouse and human mu mRNA 3' coding and noncoding sequences. Images PMID:6777778

  13. Exploration of attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration to measure immunoglobulin G in human sera.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; Riley, Christopher B; Mitchell, Cynthia A; Shaw, R Anthony; Bryanton, Janet; Bigsby, Kathryn; McClure, J Trenton

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is crucial for the protection of the host from invasive pathogens. Due to its importance for human health, tools that enable the monitoring of IgG levels are highly desired. Consequently there is a need for methods to determine the IgG concentration that are simple, rapid, and inexpensive. This work explored the potential of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy as a method to determine IgG concentrations in human serum samples. Venous blood samples were collected from adults and children, and from the umbilical cord of newborns. The serum was harvested and tested using ATR infrared spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS) regression provided the basis to develop the new analytical methods. Three PLS calibrations were determined: one for the combined set of the venous and umbilical cord serum samples, the second for only the umbilical cord samples, and the third for only the venous samples. The number of PLS factors was chosen by critical evaluation of Monte Carlo-based cross validation results. The predictive performance for each PLS calibration was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient, scatter plot and Bland-Altman plot, and percent deviations for independent prediction sets. The repeatability was evaluated by standard deviation and relative standard deviation. The results showed that ATR infrared spectroscopy is potentially a simple, quick, and inexpensive method to measure IgG concentrations in human serum samples. The results also showed that it is possible to build a united calibration curve for the umbilical cord and the venous samples.

  14. Selectivity evaluation and separation of human immunoglobulin G, Fab and Fc fragments with mixed-mode resins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying-Di; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Shi, Wei; Yao, Shan-Jing; Lin, Dong-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption selectivity is critical important for mixed-mode chromatography with specially-designed ligands. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), Fc and Fab fragments were used in the present work to evaluate adsorption behavior and binding selectivity of four mixed-mode resins with the ligands of 4-mercatoethyl-pyridine (MEP), 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI), 5-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) and tryptophan-5-aminobenzimidazole (W-ABI), respectively. The resins showed an obvious pH-dependent adsorption behavior. High adsorption capacities were found at neutral pH for hIgG, Fc and Fab, and almost no adsorption happened under acidic conditions. An adsorption selectivity index was proposed to evaluate separation efficiency. High specificity of hIgG/Fc was found at pH 8.9 for MEP resin, and for W-ABI resin at pH 8.0 and 8.9. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to evaluate ligand-protein interactions. Finally, the separation of hIgG and Fc (1:1) was optimized with mixed-mode resins, and the best separation performance was obtained with W-ABI-based resin. Loading at pH 8.0 resulted in the flow through of Fc with purity of 90.4% and recovery of 98.8%, while elution at pH 3.6 provided hIgG with purity of 99.7% and recovery of 86.5%.

  15. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  16. The nanoscale spatial organization of B-cell receptors on immunoglobulin M- and G-expressing human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinmin; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Brzostowski, Joseph; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Pierce, Susan K

    2017-02-15

    B-cell activation is initiated by the binding of antigen to the B-cell receptor (BCR). Here we used dSTORM superresolution imaging to characterize the nanoscale spatial organization of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG BCRs on the surfaces of resting and antigen--activated human peripheral blood B-cells. We provide insights into both the fundamental process of antigen-driven BCR clustering and differences in the spatial organization of IgM and IgG BCRs that may contribute to the characteristic differences in the responses of naive and memory B-cells to antigen. We provide evidence that although both IgM and IgG BCRs reside in highly heterogeneous protein islands that vary in size and number of BCR single-molecule localizations, both resting and activated B-cells intrinsically maintain a high -frequency of single isolated BCR localizations, which likely represent BCR monomers. IgG BCRs are more clustered than IgM BCRs on resting cells and form larger protein islands after antigen activation. Small, dense BCR clusters likely formed via protein-protein interactions are present on the surface of resting cells, and antigen activation induces these to come together to form less dense, larger islands, a process likely governed, at least in part, by protein-lipid interactions.

  17. Characterization of the binding of shikonin to human immunoglobulin using scanning electron microscope, molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    He, Wenying; Ye, Xinyu; Yao, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiuli; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Guolei; Hua, Yingjie; Hui, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Shikonin, one of the active components isolated from the root of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnst, have anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used clinically in phlebitis and vascular purpura. In the present work, the interaction of human immunoglobulin (HIg) with shikonin has been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling techniques under physiological conditions with drug concentrations of 3.33-36.67 μM. The results of SEM exhibited visually the special effect on aggregation behavior of the complex formed between HIg and shikonin. The fluorescence polarization values indicated that shikonin molecules were found in a motionally unrestricted environment introduced by HIg. Molecular docking showed the shikonin moiety bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HIg, and there are four hydrogen-bonding interactions between shikonin and the residues of protein. The synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectra confirmed that shikonin could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HIg and has an effect on the microenvironment around HIg in aqueous solution. The changes in the secondary structure of HIg were estimated by qualitative and quantitative FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters for shikonin-HIg systems were obtained under different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K). The above results revealed the binding mechanism of shikonin and HIg at the ultrastructure and molecular level.

  18. Molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic approaches to study the interaction between antibacterial drug and human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Min, Suotian; Liu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Shengrui

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) were performed by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods. The interaction mechanism was firstly predicted through molecular modeling that confirmed the interaction between SMX and HIgG. The binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures had been calculated according to the Stern-Volmer, Scatchard, Sips and Van 't Hoff equations, respectively. Experimental results showed that the fluorescence intensity of HIgG was quenched by the gradual addition of SMX. The binding constants of SMX with HIgG decreased with the increase of temperature, which meant that the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. Meanwhile, the results also confirmed that there was one independent class of binding site on HIgG for SMX during their interaction. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, namely standard enthalpy ΔH(0) and entropy ΔS(0), had been calculated to be -14.69 kJ·mol(-1) and 22.99 J·mol(-1) ·K(-1), respectively, which suggested that the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the SMX-HIgG complex. Furthermore, experimental results obtained from three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirmed that the conformational structure of HIgG was altered in the presence of SMX.

  19. Characterization of upFc, a fragment of human immunoglobulin G1 produced by pepsin in urea.

    PubMed

    Parr, D M; Hofmann, T; Connell, G E

    1976-09-01

    The digestion of human IgG1/K myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments that differ from those produced by aqueous peptic digestion, and from other characteristic immunoglobulin fragments. Fb'2, the larger urea/pepsin fragment, was previously shown to consist of the constant regions of the light chains, and the CH1 domains and hinge regions of the heavy chains. The smaller fragment, upFc, has now been characterized. After reduction, three peptides were released from fragment upFc. Amino acid sequencing, N- and C-terminal determinations and amino acid compositions have enabled these peptides to be identified as residues Ile-253 to Leu-306, residues Thr-307 to Asp-376 and residues Thr-411 to Gly-446 of the heavy chain. Fragment upFc therefore contains the entire Fc region, beginning at residue Ile-253, except for a 34-residue section from within the CH3-domain disulphide loop. Peptic digestion of IgG1/K proteins in 8M-urea therefore provides a method for isolating from gamma1 heavy chains five homogeneous peptides in good yield, which account for almost the entire constant region. Characterization of fragments Fb'2 and upFc has shown that the action of pepsin in urea is entirely different from that of aqueous pepsin. Two gamma1 heavy chains have been shown to differ in sequence at three positions from the sequence reported for protein Eu.

  20. Characterization of upFc, a fragment of human immunoglobulin G1 produced by pepsin in urea.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, D M; Hofmann, T; Connell, G E

    1976-01-01

    The digestion of human IgG1/K myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments that differ from those produced by aqueous peptic digestion, and from other characteristic immunoglobulin fragments. Fb'2, the larger urea/pepsin fragment, was previously shown to consist of the constant regions of the light chains, and the CH1 domains and hinge regions of the heavy chains. The smaller fragment, upFc, has now been characterized. After reduction, three peptides were released from fragment upFc. Amino acid sequencing, N- and C-terminal determinations and amino acid compositions have enabled these peptides to be identified as residues Ile-253 to Leu-306, residues Thr-307 to Asp-376 and residues Thr-411 to Gly-446 of the heavy chain. Fragment upFc therefore contains the entire Fc region, beginning at residue Ile-253, except for a 34-residue section from within the CH3-domain disulphide loop. Peptic digestion of IgG1/K proteins in 8M-urea therefore provides a method for isolating from gamma1 heavy chains five homogeneous peptides in good yield, which account for almost the entire constant region. Characterization of fragments Fb'2 and upFc has shown that the action of pepsin in urea is entirely different from that of aqueous pepsin. Two gamma1 heavy chains have been shown to differ in sequence at three positions from the sequence reported for protein Eu. PMID:791267

  1. A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on the biotin- streptavidin-biotin structure for detection of human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueyun; Zhang, Yihe; Jiang, Liping; Chu, Paul K.; Dong, Yunhui; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A sandwich-type immunosensor is designed and fabricated to detect the human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) using polyaniline and tin dioxide functionalized graphene (GS-SnO2-PAN) as the platform and biotin-functionalized amination magnetic nanoparticles composite (B-Fe3O4@APTES) as the label. GS-SnO2-PAN is used as the sensing agent to capture the primary anti-HIgG (Ab1) and SnO2 reduces the stack of GS. The B-Fe3O4@APTES with a large surface area and excellent biocompatibility captures second antibody (Ab2) efficiently based on the highly selective recognition of streptavidin to biotinylated antibody. The B-Fe3O4@APTES has better electro-catalytic activity in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the “biotin-streptavidin-biotin” (B-SA-B) strategy leads to signal amplification. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor has a wide sensitivity range from 1 pg/L to 10 ng/L and low detection limit of 0.33 pg/L (S/N = 3) for HIgG. The immunosensor has high sensitivity, fast assay rate, as well as good reproducibility, specificity, and stability especially in the quantitative detection of biomolecules in serum samples. PMID:26948273

  2. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  3. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  4. Transport of recombinant human CD4-immunoglobulin G across the human placenta: pharmacokinetics and safety in six mother-infant pairs in AIDS clinical trial group protocol 146.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, W T; Duliege, A M; Kline, M W; Hammill, H; Minkoff, H; Ammann, A J; Chen, S; Izu, A; Mordenti, J

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant CD4-immunoglobulin G (rCD4-IgG) is a 98-kDa human immunoglobulin-like protein that is produced by fusing the gp120 binding domain of CD4 to the Fc portion of the human IgG1 heavy chain. This hybrid molecule was given to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women at the onset of labor by intravenous bolus at 1 mg/kg of body weight (group A; n = 3) and 1 week prior to and at the onset of labor by the same route and at the same dose (group B; n = 3). In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, safety in the mothers and infants was determined through routine chemistries, hematology, and urinalysis; immunologic and HIV infection statuses in the infants were assessed through lymphocyte cultures, p24 antigen level determination, culture of HIV from plasma, PCR, lymphocyte subset enumeration, quantitative immunoglobulin analysis, and lymphocyte proliferation. Thirty minutes after the rCD4-IgG injection, concentrations in maternal serum were 12 to 23 micrograms/ml. These concentrations declined slowly, with initial and terminal half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) of 9.95 +/- 3.23 and 47.6 +/- 22.3 h, respectively. Infants were born 2.6 to 46.5 h after rCD4-IgG administration; concentrations of rCD4-IgG in cord blood ranged from 28 to 107 ng/ml. The half-life of rCD4-IgG in infants ranged from 5 to 29 h. These data demonstrate that the transfer of rCD4-IgG from the mother to the fetus is rapid and that newborns do not appear to have any difficulty eliminating rCD4-IgG. No safety concerns in mothers or infants were encountered. Although the study did not address the question of efficacy, none of the infants was HIV type 1 infected 36 months later. In summary, these findings document that bifunctional immune molecules can be transported across the placenta, and this general approach may be used in the future to block vertical transmission of HIV type 1. PMID:7664172

  5. The effects of chemical modification on the antigenicity of human and rabbit immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Hunneyball, I M; Stanworth, D R

    1976-01-01

    In order to characterize the precise structure within human and rabbit IgG molecules against which 'general' rheumatoid factors are directed, an immunochemical comparison has been made of the effects of the selective substitution of specific amino acid side-chains on various types of antigenicity exhibited by human and rabbit IgG. The epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues have been substituted by citraconylation and carbamylation; whilst tyrosine residues have been substituted by nitration with tetranitromethane. In this manner, evidence has been obtained which indicates that the autoantigenic determinants of human IgG are structurally distinct from species-specific ones and from certain Fc-located allotypic markers (Gm(a) and Gm(x)). It is also concluded that lysine residues are probably not involved in the site of IgG reactivity with 'general' rheumatoid factors, in contrast to tyrosine residues which appear to be implicated in the activity of human but not rabbit IgG. Images Figure 4 PMID:68918

  6. Production and application of high quality stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Amsler; Thierry, Wolf; Christian, Lanshoeft; Anja, Bettighofer; Jochen, Eisfeld; Thomas, Moenius; Claudia, Probst; Coralie, Etter; Olivier, Heudi

    2016-12-12

    Here, we describe the production of stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 ([(13) C]-hIgG1) using [(13) C]-L-lysine/arginine-labeled hIgG1. The fermentation process was run in shake flasks containing labeled arginine and lysinethat were incorporated into the produced recombinant hIgG1. The [(13) C]-hIgG1 was purified, and label incorporation was determined to be >99% at all lysine and arginine moieties. Sequence coverage was confirmed by peptide mapping. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was then used as an internal standard (IS) for the development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method applicable to the quantitative analysis of all human types of hIgG1 in rat serum. Four conserved peptides, namely, GPSVFPLAPSSK, TTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSK, VVSVLTVLHQDWLNGK, and FNWYVDGVEVHNAK, originating from different parts of the fraction crystallizable region of hIgG1, were used for quantitation of hIgG1 in rat serum. The calibration curves with a coefficient of determination (r(2) ) between 0.9950 and 0.9962 resulting from the peak area ratio of each peptide to its respective labeled IS were reproducible. A mean bias within ±20.0% of the nominal values and a precision of ≤20.0 % were obtained for the calibration standards and quality control samples for each peptide. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was shown as a suitable IS for quantitative hIgG1 analysis in preclinical species by LC-MS/MS.

  7. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  8. [Study of the antigenic structure of human immunoglobulin lambda-chain using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Arsen'eva, E L; Bogacheva, G T; Solomon, A; Weiss, D; Ibragimov, A R; Rokhlin, O V

    1990-01-01

    Nine monoclonals against human Ig lambda chains were produced, 4 antibodies react with C-domain, 5--with V-domain of the lambda chain. Anti-C lambda domain antibodies recognize not less than 3 epitopes and one of them is expressed only on the isolated chain. Anti-V lambda antibodies bind both isolated lambda chain and intact IgG, IgM, IgA. Four epitopes are expressed by few lambda Bence Jones proteins of the III subgroup, the immunogen possessing the same isotype. The 4 mentioned epitopes represent private idiotypic determinants. The epitope 3E10 is characteristic of 50% Bence Jones proteins of the II and III V lambda-subgroups thus representing a common idiotypic determinant. Using anti-V lambda antibodies germ line variability of V lambda III proteins was analysed and the similarity of antigenic structure of normal and myeloma human Ig lambda chains was demonstrated.

  9. Digestion of human immunoglobulin G by the major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1990-08-01

    The major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi was able to digest human IgG, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, and by gel filtration on a Superose 12 column, in a FPLC system. The Fab fragment of IgG was only slightly degraded, but Fc was extensively hydrolyzed to small peptides. The results suggest that cruzipain might be involved in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against the immune response of the host.

  10. Clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in healthy volunteers and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Voetman, A A; Evers-Schouten, J H; Van Es, A A; Pauwels, E K; Van Es, L A

    1987-07-01

    Using aggregates of IgG (AIgG) obtained by heat aggregation of a 16 g% human IgG solution, we sought a method for measuring the function of the mononuclear phagocyte system with a probe that bears more resemblance to soluble immune complexes than erythrocytes coated with anti-rhesus IgG (EIgG). It was found that intravenous administration of 10 micrograms AIgG/kg body weight did not cause any detectable side effects in chimpanzees. In nine healthy volunteers, a dose of 10 micrograms AIgG/kg body weight was used without any adverse reactions. AIgG is cleared from the human circulation with a t1/2 of 26 +/- 8 min (mean +/- SD). The site of clearance is predominantly the liver, as shown by an average liver spleen uptake ratio of 230:100. In whole blood obtained from the volunteers, it was found that erythrocytes bound significant amounts of AIgG, suggesting that CR1 on erythrocytes is involved in the clearance of complement activating immune complexes in humans. In five of the volunteers, clearance studies with EIgG had been done in a previous study. EIgG was cleared from the circulation with a t1/2 of 30 +/- 6.2 min (mean +/- SD). The predominant site of clearance of EIgG was the spleen. These data indicate that sensitized red blood cells are cleared from the circulation differently from soluble IgG aggregates.

  11. Efficacy of immune sera from human immunoglobulin transgenic mice immunized with a peptide mimotope of Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2004-09-28

    The efficacy of antibody mediated immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established experimentally for human antibodies. Our group has previously shown that immunization with a conjugate consisting of a peptide mimotope of the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), P13, and diphtheria toxoid (P13-DT) prolonged survival of transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin loci, XenoMouse mice, which were challenged with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. In the study reported herein, we determined the efficacy of human antibodies in the sera of immunized XenoMouse mice against C. neoformans in passive transfer experiments in naïve BALB/c mice. Survival studies were performed with sera from XenoMouse mice expressing human IgG2/kappa (G2/k mice) or IgG4/kappa (G4/k mice) that had been immunized with P13-tetanus toxoid (TT)/Alhydrogel with or without CpG, and G2/k mice that had been immunized with P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG or Alhydrogel/CpG, obtained on day 7 (early sera) and days 30 or 35-59 (late sera) after primary immunization. Compared to mice receiving sera from G2/k-PBS-treated mice, the survival of naïve mice was prolonged by both early and late sera from G2/k-P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice, but only late sera from G2/k-P13-TT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice. Late, but not early sera from G2/k-Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice also prolonged survival. For all sera, prolongation of survival was associated with GXM-specific serum IgM. Sera from G2/k mice that received P13-TT without CpG, and all groups of G4/k mice had low to undetectable levels of antibody to GXM and were not protective. Our findings suggest that GXM-specific human IgM may be a functional mediator of protection against C. neoformans.

  12. Production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by various human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Koga, Y; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-05-01

    The production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in various human tumor cell lines were studied. By radioimmunoassay (RIA), five CEA-producing tumor cell lines tested--2 derived from colonic (M7609 and CCK-81), one from pancreatic (QGP-1) and 2 from lung (HLC-1 and KNS-62) carcinomas--were found to produce NCA simultaneously. The cellular contents of CEA and NCA and the amounts of both antigens released into the culture medium were highly variable among the cell lines. It was a distinct contrast that one cell line (CCK-81) released very large amounts of CEA and NCA into the medium while having the smallest amounts of both antigens in the cells, whereas the others contained much larger amounts of the antigens in the cells as compared with the amounts released into the medium. For most of the cell lines, the production of both CEA and NCA increased in the stationary phase of growth as compared with the exponential phase. The production kinetics of both CEA and NCA appeared to be parallel with each other in all the cell lines, though the amount ratio of CEA to NCA produced was variable. By means of a double immunodiffusion test with polyclonal antibodies, antigenic uniformity with no unique organ-specificity was confirmed for all the CEA preparations from spent media of the cell lines, though some differences in the sugar moiety of CEA were detected by RIA using monoclonal antibodies. No antigenic differences among NCA preparations were observed. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular heterogeneity was observed among CEA or NCA preparations isolated from cell lysates.

  13. Dose-dependent biphasic leptin-induced proliferation is caused by non-specific IL-6/NF-κB pathway activation in human myometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrichon, Marina; Hadi, Tarik; Wendremaire, Maeva; Ptasinski, Clémentine; Seigneuric, Renaud; Marcion, Guillaume; Delignette, Marc; Marchet, Jacques; Dumas, Monique; Sagot, Paul; Bardou, Marc; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Leptin, an adipokine synthesized by the placenta during pregnancy, has been proposed for the management of preterm labour (PTL), as it is able to prevent in vitro uterine contractility and remodelling associated with labour onset. Another common feature of labour onset is the phenotypic switch of myometrial smooth muscle cells from a proliferative to a hypertrophic state. As proliferative effects have been demonstrated for leptin in other tissues, we aimed to investigate its ability to induce myometrial proliferation and thus to maintain uterine quiescence. Experimental Approach We stimulated human primary myometrial smooth muscle cells with leptin in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists or signalling pathway inhibitors. Key Results Leptin induced myometrial cell proliferation in a biphasic manner. At 6.25 ng·mL−1, leptin-induced proliferation was mediated by the leptin receptor and required the early activation of ERK1/2. At a concentration above 25 ng·mL−1, leptin induced direct non-specific stimulation of the IL-6 receptor, leading to NF-κB activation, and exerted anti-proliferative effects. However, at 50 ng·mL−1, leptin re-induces proliferation via IL-6 receptor stimulation that requires STAT3 and delayed ERK1/2 activation. Conclusions and Implications These data bring new insights into leptin signalling-induced myometrial proliferation and its interrelationship with the IL-6/IL-6 receptor axis. In the light of our previous work, the present study emphasizes the potential value of leptin in the pharmacological management of PTL and it also strengthens the hypothesis that leptin might be a contributory factor in the parturition-related disorders observed in obese women. PMID:25653112

  14. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN β2-MICROGLOBULIN AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN IN CULTURED HUMAN LYMPHOID CELL LINES

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T. H.; Cleve, H.; Litwin, S. D.; Poulik, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    β2-microglobulin was detected on the cell surface and in the medium of human lymphoid cells established in long-term culture. The secretion of β2-microglobulin was relatively uniform when different cell lines were compared, whereas IgG production varied widely. κ- and µ-membrane antigens were modulated by specific antibody; β2-microglobulin was not modulated. Anti-κ and anti-µ antisera had no effect on the expression of membrane β2-microglobulin, nor had anti-β2-microglobulin antiserum any effect on the expression of κ- and µ-membrane antigens. PMID:4120289

  15. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  16. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF THE CLEAVAGE PRODUCT OF HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN G WITH CYANOGEN BROMIDE

    PubMed Central

    Lahav, Mira; Arnon, Ruth; Sela, Michael

    1967-01-01

    Treatment of human IgG with cyanogen bromide in 0.05 M HCl under specified conditions resulted in the cleavage of about half of its methionyl peptide bonds. A major fragment of about 5S was isolated from the reaction mixture by gel filtration in quantitative yield. The CNBr fragment reacted fully with goat antiserum against human light chain, but its reaction with anti-heavy chain was markedly decreased. The treatment with CNBr caused a drastic decrease in the following biological activities of IgG: complement fixing, skin binding, reaction with antiglobulin factors, and reaction with specific anti-Gm(12) serum. On the other hand, the reaction with serum of anti-Gm(1) or anti-Gm(4) specificity was not impaired and antibody activity, namely antistreptolysin and isohemagglutinin, was retained after the treatment with CNBr. It is concluded that the CNBr cleaves preferentially the methionyl bonds in the Fc portion of IgG, and that the major fragment obtained, denoted F(ab'')2, has still the combining properties of a divalent antibody. The possible therapeutic uses of F(ab'')2 are discussed. PMID:4164692

  17. Metal ions bound to the human milk immunoglobulin A: metalloproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Carla Mariane Costa; Braga, Camila Pereira; Vieira, José Cavalcante Souza; Cavecci, Bruna; Vitor de Queiroz, João; de Souza Barbosa, Herbert; Arruda, Marco Aurelio Zezzi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Padilha, Pedro de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    The presence of calcium, iron, and zinc bound to human milk secretory IgA (sIgA) was investigated. The sIgA components were first separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then identified by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI MS MS). The metal ions were detected by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after acid mineralization of the spots. The results showed eight protein spots corresponding to the IgA heavy chain constant region. Another spot was identified as the transmembrane secretory component. Calcium was bound to both the transmembrane component and the heavy chain constant region, while zinc was bound to the heavy chain constant region and iron was not bound with the identified proteins. The association of a metal ion with a protein is important for a number of reasons, and therefore, the findings of the present study may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action and of additional roles that sIgA and its components play in human milk.

  18. Linking of the human immunoglobulin VK and JKCK regions by chromosomal walking.

    PubMed

    Klobeck, H G; Zimmer, F J; Combriato, G; Zachau, H G

    1987-12-10

    The linking of the human VK and JKCK gene regions (abbreviations in ref. 1) by chromosomal walking is reported. Hybridization experiments with the DNA of a somatic cell hybrid containing the region between JKCK and the telomer show that none of the major VK gene clusters is located downstream of CK. The distance between the VK and JK genes was found to be 23 kb. The JK proximal VK gene is the B3 gene which is the only representative of subgroup IV in the genome. This gene and the neighbouring B2 gene (accompanying paper) are arranged in opposite orientation to JKCK and can therefore rearrange only by an inversion mechanism. This finding is used, together with previous data, to delineate the rearrangement processes in the Burkitt lymphoma derived cell line BL21 as comprising an inversion in the first and a deletion in the second step.

  19. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-01-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of < or = 14, 22, 26-28, 30, 46, 60, 70-80, and > 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection. Images PMID:1469104

  20. Receptor-binding properties of the peptides corresponding to the beta-endorphin-like sequence of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zaitseva, O R; Navolotskaya, E V; Abramov, V M; Volodina EYu; Mitin, Y V

    1996-01-01

    The decapeptide H2N-Ser-Leu-Thr-Cys-Leu-Val-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (termed immunorphin) corresponding to the sequence 364-373 of the CH3 domain of the human immunoglobulin G1 Eu heavy chain and displaying a 43% identity with the antigenic determinant of beta-endorphin was synthesized. Immunorphin was found to compete with 125I-beta-endorphin for high-affinity receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages (K = 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10(-9) M) and with 3H-morphin for receptors on murine thymocytes (Ki = 2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M) and murine macrophages (Ki = 5.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(-9) M). In particular two types of receptors to 125I-beta-endorphin with Kd1 = 6.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M and Kd2 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-8) M were revealed on macrophages. The second type of receptors interacted with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-Met-enkephalin, 3H-Leu-enkephalin and 3H-morphin; the first displayed reactivity with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-morphin and immunorphin. The first type receptors are not present on murine brain cells nor are inhibited by naloxone. A minimum fragment of immunorphin practically completely retaining its inhibitory activity in the competition tests with 125I-beta-endorphin for common receptors on thymocytes was found to correspond to the tetrapeptide H2N-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (Ki = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M).

  1. Effects of human intravenous immunoglobulin on amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) preparation is indicated for treating primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with impaired humoral immunity. hIVIG is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and a decent safety profile. Therefore, by virtue of its constituent natural anti-amyloid beta antibodies and anti-inflammatory effects, hIVIG is deemed to mediate beneficial effects to patients of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we set out to explore the effects of hIVIG in a mouse model of AD. Methods We treated APP/PS1dE9 transgenic and wild-type mice with weekly injections of a high hIVIG dose (1 g/kg) or saline for 3 or 8 months. Treatment effect on brain amyloid pathology and microglial reactivity was assessed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and confocal microscopy. Results We found no evidence for reduction in Aβ pathology; instead 8 months of hIVIG treatment significantly increased soluble levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42. In addition, we noticed a significant reduction in CD45 and elevation of Iba-1 markers in specific sub-populations of microglial cells. Long-term hIVIG treatment also resulted in significant suppression of TNF-α and increase in doublecortin positive adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Conclusions Our data indicate limited ability of hIVIG to impact amyloid burden but shows changes in microglia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and neurogenic effects. Immunomodulation by hIVIG may account for its beneficial effect in AD patients. PMID:22642812

  2. Human milk secretory immunoglobulin a and lactoferrin N-glycans are altered in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Totten, Sarah M; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J Bruce

    2013-12-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24-28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36-72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32-43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk.

  3. Human Siglec-5 Inhibitory Receptor and Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Have Separate Binding Sites in Streptococcal β Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Therése; Movert, Elin; Olin, Anders I.; Ali, Syed R.; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit; Areschoug, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are receptors believed to be important for regulation of cellular activation and inflammation. Several pathogenic microbes bind specific Siglecs via sialic acid-containing structures at the microbial surface, interactions that may result in modulation of host responses. Recently, it was shown that the group B Streptococcus (GBS) binds to human Siglec-5 (hSiglec-5), an inhibitory receptor expressed on macrophages and neutrophils, via the IgA-binding surface β protein, providing the first example of a protein/protein interaction between a pathogenic microbe and a Siglec. Here we show that the hSiglec-5-binding part of β resides in the N-terminal half of the protein, which also harbors the previously determined IgA-binding region. We constructed bacterial mutants expressing variants of the β protein with non-overlapping deletions in the N-terminal half of the protein. Using these mutants and recombinant β fragments, we showed that the hSiglec-5-binding site is located in the most N-terminal part of β (B6N region; amino acids 1–152) and that the hSiglec-5- and IgA-binding domains in β are completely separate. We showed with BIAcoreTM analysis that tandem variants of the hSiglec-5- and IgA-binding domains bind to their respective ligands with high affinity. Finally, we showed that the B6N region, but not the IgA-binding region of β, triggers recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 to hSiglec-5 in U937 monocytes. Taken together, we have identified and isolated the first microbial non-sialic acid Siglec-binding region that can be used as a tool in studies of the β/hSiglec-5 interaction. PMID:21795693

  4. High-throughput sequencing of the paired human immunoglobulin heavy and light chain repertoire.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Brandon J; Ippolito, Gregory C; Deschner, Ryan P; Lavinder, Jason J; Wine, Yariv; Rawlings, Brandon M; Varadarajan, Navin; Giesecke, Claudia; Dörner, Thomas; Andrews, Sarah F; Wilson, Patrick C; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Willson, C Grant; Ellington, Andrew D; Georgiou, George

    2013-02-01

    Each B-cell receptor consists of a pair of heavy and light chains. High-throughput sequencing can identify large numbers of heavy- and light-chain variable regions (V(H) and V(L)) in a given B-cell repertoire, but information about endogenous pairing of heavy and light chains is lost after bulk lysis of B-cell populations. Here we describe a way to retain this pairing information. In our approach, single B cells (>5 × 10(4) capacity per experiment) are deposited in a high-density microwell plate (125 pl/well) and lysed in situ. mRNA is then captured on magnetic beads, reverse transcribed and amplified by emulsion V(H):V(L) linkage PCR. The linked transcripts are analyzed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. We validated the fidelity of V(H):V(L) pairs identified by this approach and used the method to sequence the repertoire of three human cell subsets-peripheral blood IgG(+) B cells, peripheral plasmablasts isolated after tetanus toxoid immunization and memory B cells isolated after seasonal influenza vaccination.

  5. Human anti-immunoglobulin antibodies with specificity for native and pepsin-digested IgD

    PubMed Central

    Mellbye, O. J.; Høyeraal, H. M.; Michaelsen, T.; Natvig, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    When human sera were tested against red cells coated with IgD by the CrCl3 technique, agglutinating activity was found in a high proportion of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, while sera from normals and patients with non-rheumatoid diseases contained only trace activity. Haemagglutination inhibition experiments indicated that the activity was directed against the Fc part of IgD, and reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and absorption experiments all indicated that the agglutinating activity was due to IgM antibodies. In some sera a very weak activity was also found against antigens revealed by pepsin digestion of IgD. After density gradient ultracentrifugation of sera at pH 3·0, the 19S fractions showed higher antibody activity against IgD than fractions obtained at pH 7·2, indicating that the sera contained complexes of IgD and anti-IgD. Agglutination inhibition experiments with different IgD myeloma proteins or whole myeloma sera did not give evidence for subclasses or genetic polymorphism of IgD.

  6. Fragments produced by digestion of human immunoglobulin G subclasses with pepsin in urea.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, D M

    1977-01-01

    It was previously shown that digestion of human IgG1/kappa myeloma proteins with pepsin in the presence of 8 M-urea produces fragments which differ from other proteolytic fragments of IgG, including those produced by peptic digestion in aqueous buffers. The two large urea/pepsin fragments each consist of three peptides, and together account for all of the constant region of the light chains and most of the constant region of the heavy chains. Myeloma proteins of subclasses IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 with kappa light chains were digested with pepsin in 8 M-urea, and the resulting fragments compared with those produced from IgG1/kappa proteins. Gel filtration, starch- and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis have shown that the peptides from each subclass are analogous with those from IgG1. A brief investigation of the products of urea/pepsin digestion of myeloma proteins with lambda light chains has shown that in these proteins light-chain cleavage occurs at residue leucine-182, instead of or as well as at residue 117, where cleavage takes place in kappa chains. Comparison of sequences around sites of urea/pepsin cleavage has shown that pepsin has quite restricted specificity under these conditions. Images PLATE 1 PMID:411484

  7. Abnormal clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C; Pauwels, E K; Evers-Schouten, J H; Voetman, A A; Cats, A; Van Es, L A

    1988-04-01

    In the present study, we tested mononuclear phagocyte system function in nine healthy controls and 15 SLE patients with complement activating 123I-labelled aggregates of human IgG (AIgG). Clearance half-time of AIgG was 26 +/- 8 min in controls, compared to 58 +/- 27 min in patients (P less than 0.005). Binding of AIgG to erythrocytes was significantly lower in patients, 9.3 +/- 8.1 vs 24 +/- 20% (P less than 0.05). The increase of C3a-levels in plasma was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P less than 0.05 at 3 and 8 min), suggesting less complement activation. Liver and spleen uptake of 123I-AIgG was measured with a gamma camera and expressed as liver/spleen uptake ratios. In patients, the liver/spleen uptake ratios were significantly higher than in controls at 15 min, 3.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.31 +/- 0.7 (P less than 0.05), due to less splenic uptake of AIgG. Correlations between clearance half-time or liver/spleen uptake ratios and immune complex levels or disease activity were not found. This study indicates that clearance of soluble AIgG is abnormal in patients with SLE, due to decreased splenic uptake of AIgG.

  8. Induction of maturation of human B-cell lymphomas in vitro. Morphologic changes in relation to immunoglobulin and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Beiske, K.; Ruud, E.; Drack, A.; Marton, P. F.; Godal, T.

    1984-01-01

    In vitro stimulation of cells from 8 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas comprising several histologic types with a tumor promotor (TPA) and with or without anti-immunoglobulins directed against the surface immunoglobulin of the tumor cells is reported. Morphologic transformation to immunoblastic and plasmablastic cells, but not to plasma cells, and induction of Ig and DNA synthesis were observed. A comparative analysis, including flow cytofluorometry, light microscopy combined with immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy, suggests that the three events may not always be associated phenomena at the single-cell level even in monoclonal cell populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6375389

  9. Ultrastructural localization of intracellular immunoglobulins in Epon-embedded human lymph nodes. An immunoelectron microscopic investigation using the immunogold staining (IGS) and the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) methods.

    PubMed

    Viale, G; Dell'Orto, P; Braidotti, P; Coggi, G

    1985-05-01

    The ultrastructural localization of intracellular immunoglobulins on ultrathin sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed, postosmicated, and Epon-embedded human lymph nodes has been achieved using such highly sensitive immunocytochemical techniques as immunogold staining and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. These immunoelectron microscopic techniques allow the identification of intracellular immunoglobulins without affecting the ultrastructural morphology of the tissue, since they do not require any pretreatment of the sections with proteolytic enzymes or deresinating agents. Therefore, immunoglobulins can be precisely localized in the cell organelles; structures whose morphology is well preserved. The availability of a reliable postembedding staining procedure for the ultrastructural localization of immunoglobulins is of definite value for investigations on human lymphoid tissue, both normal and pathological.

  10. Affinity composite cryogel discs functionalized with Reactive Red 120 and Green HE 4BD dye ligands: application on the separation of human immunoglobulin G subclasses.

    PubMed

    Huseynli, Sabina; Baydemir, Gözde; Sarı, Esma; Elkak, Assem; Denizli, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Naturally produced by the human immune system, immunoglobulin nowadays is widely used for in vivo and in vitro purposes. The increased needs for pure immunoglobulin have prompted researchers to find new immunoglobulin chromatographic separation processes. Cryogels as chromatographic adsorbents, congregate several mechanical features including good compatibility, large pore structure, flexibility, short diffusion pathway and stability. These different characteristics make them a good alternative to conventional chromatographic methods and allowing their potential use in separation technology. In the present study, two sets of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) based beads were prepared and functionalized with Reactive Red 120 (RR) and Reactive Green HE 4BD (RG) dyes, and then embedded into supermacroporous cryogels. The morphology, physical and chemical features of the prepared bead embedded composite cryogel discs (CCDs) were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling test, elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results showed that the embedded composite cryogel discs have a specific surface area of 192.0 m(2)/g with maximum adsorption capacity of HIgG 239.8 mg/g for the RR functionalized CCD and 170 mg/g for RG functionalized CCD columns, both at pH 6.2.

  11. Interpretation of size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-size distribution of human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-size distribution by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle size or pore size, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-size distribution profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard size-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle size of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the distribution of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-size distribution test in the relevant monographs

  12. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum immunoglobulin G response to human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Sloots, T P; Kapeleris, J P; Mackay, I M; Batham, M; Devine, P L

    1996-01-01

    A rapid (60-min) commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibodies to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) was evaluated. The specificity of the ELISA for HHV-6 was confirmed by absorption studies, with the reactivities of HHV-6-positive sera being unaffected by other herpesviruses (cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and varicella-zoster virus) or the HSB2 cell line used to culture HHV-6. HHV-6 IgG antibody levels in a panel of 502 serum samples were determined by ELISA and an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Results obtained by the two methods were in close agreement, suggesting that the ELISA provides a suitable test method for the determination of HHV-6 IgG antibodies in a routine clinical laboratory. Both tests were positive in 398 cases (79%), and both were negative in 71 cases (14%), with a different result obtained by IFA and ELISA in only 33 cases (7%). Furthermore, absorption of sera with HHV-6 prior to assay revealed that the majority of these results were false positive (n = 8) or false negative (n = 23) in the IFA (true positives or negatives in the ELISA). Subsequently, the ELISA showed a sensitivity of 99.76% and a specificity of 98.75%. HHV-6-specific IgG levels were also determined in paired serum samples collected from 49 donors--14 with exanthem subitum (ES), 15 with ES which was complicated with central nervous system involvement, and 20 undergoing bone marrow transplantation--in whom HHV-6 infection had been demonstrated by virus isolation and/or PCR. All patients with ES or central nervous system complications showed an increase in HHV-6-specific IgG, indicating that this ELISA may be a useful aid in the diagnosis of these conditions. Furthermore, 14 of 20 patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation showed an increase in HHV-6-specific IgG levels, possibly reflecting a reactivation of HHV-6 in these patients. PMID:8904436

  13. A novel anti-Vpre-B antibody identifies immunoglobulin-surrogate receptors on the surface of human pro-B cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Vpre-B and lambda 5 genes, respectively, encode V-like and C-like domains of a surrogate immunoglobulin light chain (psi L). Such psi L complex is expressed in early progenitor B (pro-B) cells, before conventional immunoglobulin heavy (microH) and light (L) chains are produced. We raised a wide panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against soluble recombinant Vpre-B proteins to study early events in human B cell development. One of these antibodies, B-MAD688, labeled surrogate Ig-complexes on the surface of microH- pro-B cell lines and normal bone marrow cells in immunofluorescence assays. Immunoprecipitations using surface-labeled pro-B cells and B-MAD688 mAb indicated that human psi L is associated with high molecular weight components homologous to the surrogate heavy (psi H) chains described in mouse. Using B-MAD688 and SLC2 mAbs, we were able to distinguish between psi H psi L and microH psi L complexes on the surface of human pro-B and later precursor, pre-B, cells. The finding of psi H psi L complexes in mouse and man lead us to hypothesize a role for psi H- containing receptors in B cell development. PMID:8676092

  14. Human milk polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids and secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies and early childhood allergy.

    PubMed

    Duchén, K; Casas, R; Fagerås-Böttcher, M; Yu, G; Björkstén, B

    2000-02-01

    The possible protective effect of breast milk against atopic manifestations in infancy, i.e. atopic eczema and food allergy, has been controversial for the last decades. Besides the methodological problems, differences in the composition of human milk could explain these controversies. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) levels to food proteins (ovalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin) and an inhalant allergen (cat) in milk from mothers of allergic and non-allergic children. Blood samples were obtained at birth and at 3 months from 120 children. Skin prick tests were performed at 6, 12 and 18 months, and the development of atopic diseases was assessed in the children. Breast milk samples were collected from their mothers at birth and monthly during the lactation period. Milk PUFA composition was measured by gas chromatography, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure total S-IgA, anti-cat S-IgA, anti-ovalbumin S-IgA, and anti-beta-lactoglobulin S-IgA. Allergic disease developed in 44/120 children (22/63 children of allergic mothers and 22/57 children of non-allergic mothers). Lower levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, C20:5 n-3 (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid C22:5 n-3 (DPA), and docosatetraenoic acid C22:4 n-6 (DHA) (p < 0.05 for all) were found in mature milk from mothers of allergic as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The total n-6:total n-3 and the arachidonic acid, C20:4 n-6 (AA):EPA ratios were significantly lower in transitional and mature milk from mothers of allergic children, as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The PUFA levels in serum of allergic and non-allergic children were largely similar, except for higher levels of C22:4 n-6 and C22:5 n-6 (p < 0.05 for both) and a higher AA:EPA ratio in serum phospholipids in the former group (p < 0.05). Changes in the levels of milk PUFA were reflected in

  15. Characterization of cDNAs of the human pregnancy-specific beta1-glycoprotein family, a new subfamily of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.X.; Tease, L.A.; Shupert, W.L.; Chan, W.Y. )

    1990-03-20

    Three highly homologous cDNAs encoding human pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein (SP1) were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. These cDNAs share >90% nucleotide homology in their coding sequences, and >79% of the encoded amino acids are homologous. Proteins encoded by these cDNAs are very similar to members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family and contain repeating domains, conserved disulfided bridges, and {beta}-sheet structure typical of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. However, the high degree of sequence homology and relatively lesser degree of glycosylation among the SP1 proteins suggest that they exist as a unique family instead of being members of the CEA family. Both soluble and potentially membrane-bound forms of SP1 proteins were present in the placenta. Northern blot analysis using specific probes confirmed the expression of multiple mRNA species in human term placenta.

  16. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections. PMID:22196482

  17. Suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol of the primary immunoglobulin M response by human peripheral blood B cells is associated with impaired STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Carney, Stephen; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-08-09

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the mechanism for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-mediated suppression of primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses in humans. An in vitro activation model, which employs cell surface-expressed CD40 ligand (CD40L) and recombinant cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, -6, and -10), was used to differentiate human peripheral blood (HPB) naïve B cells into IgM secreting cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC significantly decreased the number of IgM secreting cells as determined by ELISPOT. The attenuation of IgM secretion by Δ(9)-THC involved, at least in part, the impairment of plasma cell differentiation as evidenced by suppression of immunoglobulin joining chain (IgJ) mRNA expression. The analysis at each of two different stages critically involved in plasma cell differentiation indicates that Δ(9)-THC impaired both the primary activation stage and proliferation of B cells. Interestingly, Δ(9)-THC selectively suppressed the surface expression of CD80, but not other measured B-cell activation markers (CD69, CD86, and ICAM1). Furthermore, pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC was accompanied by a robust decrease of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas the phosphorylation of the p65 NFκB subunit was not affected. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the mechanisms for impaired B cell function by Δ(9)-THC.

  18. Suppression of immunoglobulin production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by monocytes via secretion of heavy-chain ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Harada, Gakuro; Matsumoto, Shin-ei; Aiba, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Akira; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kabayama, Shigeru; Yoshida, Tadashi; Zhang, Pingbo; Fujii, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    In vitro antigen stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) does not induce immunoglobulin (Ig) production. However, pretreatment of PBMCs with l-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester (LLME) prior to in vitro stimulation removes the suppression of Ig production. In the present study, we attempted to identify the target cells of LLME and determine the mechanisms by which Ig production in PBMCs is suppressed. We found that CD14(+) monocytes are involved in the suppression of Ig production in PBMCs. Furthermore, we confirmed that heavy-chain ferritin derived from CD14(+) monocytes suppresses Ig production in PBMCs, possibly through iron sequestration.

  19. Immunomodulatory properties of human serum immunoglobulin A: anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory activities in human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olas, K; Butterweck, H; Teschner, W; Schwarz, H P; Reipert, B M

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigated the immunomodulatory activities of human plasma-derived serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Previous findings seem contradictory indicating either pro- or anti-inflammatory activities. We used serum IgA purified from large plasma pools and studied the modulation of the release of cytokines and chemokines from resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-stimulated human adherent monocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results indicate that IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated PBMC and the release of MCP1, MIP1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated monocytes. Furthermore, we confirmed previous reports that plasma-derived serum IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC, and up-regulates the release of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) from resting and LPS-stimulated monocytes and resting PBMC. This IgA-mediated up-regulation of IL-1RA is independent of the simultaneous up-regulation of IL-1β release, as shown by blocking the biological activity of IL-1β with a neutralizing antibody. On the other hand, we also found an IgA-induced pro-inflammatory activity, namely IgA-mediated up-regutation of the release of pro-inflammatory IL-1β as well as down-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-12p40 from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC and a down-regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β from resting and LPS-stimulated PBMC. We conclude that human serum IgA has both an anti-inflammatory and a pro-inflammatory capacity and this dual capacity might contribute to the feedback mechanisms maintaining a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:15932509

  20. Development of antihuman IgG antibodies and hematologic deficits but not clinical abnormalities in C57BL/6 mice after repeated administration of human intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Smith, Lynnae M; Klaver, Andrea C; Brzezinski, Heather A; Morrison, Essie I; Coffey, Mary P; Steficek, Barbara A; Cook, Susan S

    2012-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) preparations consist of purified human immunoglobulins collected from large numbers of healthy persons and are used to treat autoimmune, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory disorders. Studying the effects of IvIg effects in experimental animal models might clarify its mechanisms of action in these disorders, but whether 'serum sickness' or other abnormalities occur after repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent animals is unknown. In the current study, male C57BL/6 mice (8 to 10 wk old; n = 27) received IvIg (1 g/kg IP) weekly for 6 wk. They were observed for clinical abnormalities, and body weight, temperature, renal function, hematologic parameters, and serum antihuman IgG antibodies were measured before and during treatment. Postmortem evaluations were performed on kidney, spleen, liver, and heart. No clinical or histologic abnormalities were noted despite a transient increase in BUN. Mean antibody levels to human IgG on days 21 and 43 after IvIg administration were increased by 23-fold compared with pretreatment levels. 88% and 89% of the mice were antibody responders on those days. Unexpectedly, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and RBC, WBC, lymphocyte, and platelet counts decreased after IvIg administration. These findings suggest that although it does not produce serum sickness, repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent mice induces a strong humoral immune response and hematologic deficits of unknown etiology. These factors could cause the effects of IvIg preparations in mouse models of human disease to differ from their effects in the human disorders.

  1. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  2. An electrochemical quartz crystal impedance study on anti-human immunoglobulin G immobilization in the polymer grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2005-09-15

    The polymeric film grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode was studied as a novel matrix for immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) via the electrochemical quartz crystal impedance analysis (EQCIA) method. The growth of the polymeric films at Au electrodes during dopamine oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and the immobilization of anti-human IgG into the polymeric films during their growth have been traced at real time. Lysozyme control experiments suggested that anti-human IgG was electrostatically incorporated into the polymeric film. Also, the porosity of the polymeric films has been discussed by measuring the "wet" and "dry" frequency shifts. Compared with a polypyrrole film immobilized with anti-human IgG, the proposed matrix possessed a larger amount of specific binding sites for human IgG by subsequent immunoreaction tests. The association constant of the anti-human IgG immunoreaction was obtained with satisfactory results.

  3. Quantitative immunoglobulins in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Howard C; Quinn, James M

    2009-01-01

    Although age-related changes in serum immunoglobulins are well described in childhood, alterations in immunoglobulins in the elderly are less well described and published. This study was designed to better define expected immunoglobulin ranges and differences in adults of differing decades of life. Sera from 404 patients, aged 20-89 years old were analyzed for quantitative immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA). The patients with diagnoses or medications known to affect immunoglobulin levels were identified while blinded to their immunoglobulin levels. A two-factor ANOVA was performed using decade of life and gender on both the entire sample population as well as the subset without any disease or medication expected to alter immunoglobulin levels. A literature review was also performed on all English language articles evaluating quantitative immunoglobulin levels in adults >60 years old. For the entire population, IgM was found to be higher in women when compared with men (p < 0.001) and lower in the oldest sample population compared with the youngest population (p < 0.001). For the population without diseases known to affect immunoglobulin levels, the differences in IgM with gender and age were maintained (p < or = 0.001) and IgA levels were generally higher in the older population when compared with the younger population (p = 0.009). Elderly patients without disease known to affect immunoglobulin levels have higher serum IgA levels and lower serum IgM levels. Women have higher IgM levels than men throughout life. IgG levels are not significantly altered in an older population.

  4. Poliomyelitis: immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of the human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M

    1980-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase method has been used to demonstrate the presence of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of poliomyelitis. These cells were found in considerable numbers in the areas of damage during the acute phase, and persisted at the same sites, though in smaller numbers, during the convalescent phase for at least 8 months. Most of the positively stained cells were plasma cells. IgA was the commonest heavy chain type demonstrated, with lesser amounts also of IgG and, during the acute phase, IgM. In the acute phase more lambda than kappa light chain was demonstrated but in the convalescent phase this ratio was reversed. More light chain than heavy chain was demonstrable during the acute phase. The significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6771081

  5. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  6. Comparison of three immunosensor methods (surface plasmon resonance, screen-printed and classical amperometric immunosensors) for immunoglobulin G determination in human serum and animal or powdered milks.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Mauro; Martini, Elisabetta; Campanella, Luigi; Favero, Gabriele; Carlucci, Luciano; Mazzei, Franco

    2013-01-25

    Within the framework of research carried out by our team aimed at developing new immunological methods to determine proteins such as immunoglobulins G in different biological matrixes, for instance, serum and milk, tests were performed on several immunosensors based on different transducer types, i.e. amperometric (classical or screen-printed) electrodes for hydrogen peroxide. Lastly the feasibility of constructing immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was investigated. "Competitive" immunological procedures were used in the first two cases. Conversely, the surface plasmon resonance transduction technique allowed a "direct" measurement. Applications were performed on human serum, powdered milks for babies and particularly on several animal milks, in the case of buffalo milk seeking a routine control method to identify possible inflammatory affections in the animals.

  7. Introduction of a CD40L genomic fragment via a human artificial chromosome vector permits cell-type-specific gene expression and induces immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Li, Yanze C; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using cDNA driven by an exogenous promoter is not suited for genetic disorders that require intrinsic expression of a transgene, such as hyperimmunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (HIGM), which is caused by mutations in the CD40L gene. The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector has the potential to solve this problem, because it can be used to transfer large genomic fragments containing their own regulatory elements. In this study, we examined whether introduction of a genomic fragment of CD40L via the HAC vector permits intrinsic expression of the transgene and has an effect on immunoglobulin secretion. We constructed an HAC vector carrying the mouse CD40L genomic fragment (mCD40L-HAC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and transferred the mCD40L-HAC vector into a human CD4-positive active T-cell line (Jurkat) and a human myeloid cell line (U937) via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). The mCD40L-HAC vector permits mCD40L expression in human active T cells but not in human myeloid cells. The mCD40L-HAC also functions to stimulate mouse B cells derived from CD40L(-/-) mice, inducing secretion of IgG. This study may be an initial step toward the therapeutic application of HAC vectors for intrinsic expression of genes, a potential new direction for genome-based gene therapy.

  8. Monomeric Immunoglobulin A from Plasma Inhibits Human Th17 Responses In Vitro Independent of FcαRI and DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Das, Mrinmoy; Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Meenu; Wymann, Sandra; Jordi, Monika; Vonarburg, Cédric; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2017-01-01

    Circulating immunoglobulins including immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM play a critical role in the immune homeostasis by modulating functions of immune cells. These functions are mediated in part by natural antibodies. However, despite being second most abundant antibody in the circulation, the immunoregulatory function of IgA is relatively unexplored. As Th17 cells are the key mediators of a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, we investigated the ability of monomeric IgA (mIgA) isolated from pooled plasma of healthy donors to modulate human Th17 cells. We show that mIgA inhibits differentiation and amplification of human Th17 cells and the production of their effector cytokine IL-17A. mIgA also suppresses IFN-γ responses under these experimental conditions. Suppressive effect of mIgA on Th17 responses is associated with reciprocal expansion of FoxP3-positive regulatory T cells. The effect of mIgA on Th17 cells is dependent on F(ab′)2 fragments and independent of FcαRI (CD89) and DC-SIGN. Mechanistically, the modulatory effect of mIgA on Th17 cells implicates suppression of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, mIgA binds to CD4+ T cells and recognizes in a dose-dependent manner the receptors for cytokines (IL-6Rα and IL-1RI) that mediate Th17 responses. Our findings thus reveal novel anti-inflammatory functions of IgA and suggest potential therapeutic utility of mIgA in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that implicate Th17 cells. PMID:28352269

  9. [Indirect hemagglutination inhibition reactions as a method of titrating immune serums. V. Application of the reaction to the quantitative determination of immunoglobulins A, M and G in human blood sera].

    PubMed

    Konikova, R E; Semenova, B N; Noskov, F S; Shakhanina, K L; Malkina, L A

    1975-01-01

    The authors present the results of using the indirect hemagglutination inhibition test (IHIT) for quantitative determination of A, M and G immunoglobulins in the blood sera of humans in comparison with the method of radial immunodiffusion in agar (RID) after Mancini. The results of IHIT were no less precise and reproducible than those of RID. The significance of the correlation coefficient of grades after Spirman constituted greater than 99.9% for both tests. On this basis a conclusion was made that, having a number of advantages over RID, IHIT could be recommended for quantitative titration of immunoglobulins of various classes.

  10. Racially restricted contribution of immunoglobulin Fcγ and Fcγ receptor genotypes to humoral immunity to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Namboodiri, A M; Kistner-Griffin, E; Iwasaki, M; Kasuga, Y; Hamada, G S; Tsugane, S

    2013-03-01

    Tumour-associated antigen human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is over-expressed in 25-30% of breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Naturally occurring anti-HER2 antibody responses have been described in patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. There is significant interindividual variability in antibody responsiveness, but the host genetic factors responsible for this variability are poorly understood. The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether immunoglobulin genetic markers [GM (genetic determinants of γ chains)] and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) alleles contribute to the magnitude of natural antibody responsiveness to HER2 in patients with breast cancer. A total of 855 breast cancer patients from Japan and Brazil were genotyped for several GM and FcγR alleles. They were also characterized for immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies to HER2. In white subjects (n = 263), GM 23-carriers had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than non-carriers of this allele (p = 0·004). At the GM 5/21 locus, the homozygotes for the GM 5 allele had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than the other two genotypes (P = 0·0067). In black subjects (n = 42), FcγRIIa-histidine/histidine homozygotes and FcγRIIIa-phenylalanine/valine heterozygotes were associated with high antibody responses (P = 0·0071 and 0·0275, respectively). FcγR genotypes in white subjects and GM genotypes in black subjects were not associated with anti-HER2 antibody responses. No significant associations were found in other study groups. These racially restricted contributions of GM and FcγR genotypes to humoral immunity to HER2 have potential implications for immunotherapy of breast cancer.

  11. Circulating human CD27-IgA+ memory-B cells recognize bacteria with polyreactive immunoglobulins1

    PubMed Central

    Berkowska, Magdalena A.; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; de Ridder, Dick; Ng, Yen Shing; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.; Meffre, Eric; van Zelm, Menno C.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of immunoglobulin (Ig)A production occurs in mucosal tissue following T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antigen responses. To study the nature of each of these responses, we analyzed the gene expression and Ig reactivity profiles of T-cell dependent CD27+IgA+ and T-cell independent CD27−IgA+ circulating memory-B cells. Gene expression profiles of IgA+ subsets were highly similar to each other and to IgG+ memory-B-cell subsets with typical upregulation of activation markers and downregulation of inhibitory receptors. However, we identified the mucosa-associated CCR9 and RUNX2 genes to be specifically upregulated in CD27−IgA+ B cells. We also found that CD27−IgA+ B cells expressed antibodies with distinct Ig repertoire and reactivity than those from CD27+IgA+ B cells. Indeed, antibodies from CD27−IgA+ B cells were weakly mutated, often utilized Igλ chain and were enriched in polyreactive clones recognizing various bacterial species. Hence, T-cell independent IgA responses are likely involved in the maintenance of gut homeostasis through the production of polyreactive mutated IgA antibodies with crossreactive anti-commensal reactivity. PMID:26150533

  12. Comparison of the indirect immunobead, radiolabeled, and immunofluorescence assays for immunoglobulin G serum antibodies to human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, G.G. Jr.; D'Cruz, O.J.; DeBault, L.E. )

    1991-02-01

    The relative sensitivities of the indirect immunobead test, the indirect flo cytometric immunofluorescence assay, and an indirect radiolabeled antiglobulin assay were compared. Eighteen immunobead test positive sera and 18 negative sera were used as the standard for the other two assays. Of the 18 positive sera, 14 (77%) and 5 (27%) were positive in the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay, respectively. Four (22%) of the low titer immunobead test positive sera were negative by both the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay. However, there was a significant positive correlation between the results of the immunofluorescence assay and the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay (r = 0.73) and between the results of the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the titer of the immunobead test (r = 0.82). The use of an unselected sperm population in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the classical indirect immunofluorescence method using methanol-fixed sperm gave false-positive results in the radiolabeled antiglobulin assay and the immunofluorescence assay. These results suggested that immunoglobulin G antisperm antibody positive sera may be reactive both to sperm surface and internalized sperm antigens.

  13. In this issue: Nef, a lingering problem; are there better immunoglobulins for human use; and Takayasu arteritis, still a mystery.

    PubMed

    Bot, Adrian

    2012-12-01

    The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology brings the latest in three different areas of basic and clinical immunology. First, there is the lingering question of residual HIV-related pathology in patients on chronic antiretroviral therapy. The specific role of Nef in the macrophage-mediated disease manifested through lymphoma, metabolic disease and neurological disorder, is extensively discussed. A second topic is a clinical immunology one, a critical perspective on the efficacy and safety profile of various preparations of immunoglobulin products currently prescribed for a range of immunodeficiencies. Surprisingly, the authors showed that while the available preparations are equivalent from efficacy standpoint, they differ from the standpoint of toxicity. The third subject is again, in the arena of clinical immunology and deals with a relatively rare yet extremely puzzling disease -Takayasu arteritis -with a pathogenesis that needs elucidation and a dire need for better treatments. The authors provide a state of the art in terms of genetic association, other factors possibly involved in the onset and progression of this unusual inflammatory disease of large arteries, and provide a perspective on current standard of care and potential usefulness of TNF-α blockade as therapy for Takayasu arteritis.

  14. The interactions of calreticulin with immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Møllegaard, Karen Mai; Duus, Karen; Træholt, Sofie Dietz; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S; Feizi, Ten; Hansen, Paul R; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2011-07-01

    Calreticulin is a chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) assisting proteins in achieving the correctly folded structure. Details of the binding specificity of calreticulin are still a matter of debate. Calreticulin has been described as an oligosaccharide-binding chaperone but data are also accumulating in support of calreticulin as a polypeptide binding chaperone. In contrast to mammalian immunoglobulin G (IgG), which has complex type N-glycans, chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) possesses a monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked glycan, which is a ligand for calreticulin. Here, we have used solid and solution-phase assays to analyze the in vitro binding of calreticulin, purified from human placenta, to human IgG and chicken IgY in order to compare the interactions. In addition, peptides from the respective immunoglobulins were included to further probe the binding specificity of calreticulin. The experiments demonstrate the ability of calreticulin to bind to denatured forms of both IgG and IgY regardless of the glycosylation state of the proteins. Furthermore, calreticulin exhibits binding to peptides (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) derived from trypsin digestion of both immunoglobulins. Additionally, calreticulin peptide binding was examined with synthetic peptides covering the IgG Cγ2 domain demonstrating interaction with approximately half the peptides. Our results show that the dominant binding activity of calreticulin in vitro is toward the polypeptide moieties of IgG and IgY even in the presence of the monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide on IgY.

  15. Human immunoglobulin repertoires against tetanus toxoid contain a large and diverse fraction of high-affinity promiscuous V(H) genes.

    PubMed

    de Kruif, John; Kramer, Arjen; Visser, Therèse; Clements, Carina; Nijhuis, Roy; Cox, Freek; van der Zande, Vanessa; Smit, Renate; Pinto, Daniel; Throsby, Mark; Logtenberg, Ton

    2009-04-03

    To study the contribution of antibody light (L) chains to the diversity and binding properties of immune repertoires, a phage display repertoire was constructed from a single human antibody L chain and a large collection of antibody heavy (H) chains harvested from the blood of two human donors immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine. After selection for binding to TT, 129 unique antibodies representing 53 variable immunoglobulin H chain (V(H)) gene rearrangements were isolated. This panel of anti-TT antibodies restricted to a single variable immunoglobulin L chain (V(L)) could be organized into 17 groups binding non-competing epitopes on the TT molecule. Comparison of the V(H) regions in this V(L)-restricted panel with a previously published repertoire of anti-TT V(H) regions with cognate V(H)-V(L) pairing showed a very similar distribution of V(H), D(H) and J(H) gene segment utilization and length of the complementarity-determining region 3 of the H chain. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the single-V(L) anti-TT repertoire unveiled a range of affinities, with a median monovalent affinity of 2 nM. When the single-V(L) anti-TT V(H) repertoire was combined with a collection of naïve V(L) regions and again selected for binding to TT, many of the V(H) genes were recovered in combination with a diversity of V(L) regions. The affinities of a panel of antibodies consisting of a single promiscuous anti-TT V(H) combined with 15 diverse V(L) chains were determined and found to be identical to each other and to the original isolate restricted to a single-V(L) chain. Based on previous estimates of the clonal size of the human anti-TT repertoire, we conclude that up to 25% of human anti-TT-encoding V(H) regions from an immunized repertoire have promiscuous features. These V(H) regions readily combine with a single antibody L chain to result in a large panel of anti-TT antibodies that conserve the expected epitope diversity, V(H) region diversity and affinity of a

  16. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) improves the PCR-based isolation of immunoglobulin variable region genes from murine and human lymphoma cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Doenecke, A; Winnacker, E L; Hallek, M

    1997-10-01

    The isolation of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes is usually performed by PCR with consensus primers binding to conserved regions within the V sequences. However, the isolation of Ig genes by this method is hampered in 15-35% by technical difficulties, mostly mismatches of oligonucleotide primers to V sequences. In order to obtain DNA sequences from V heavy chain (VH) genes which could not be amplified with consensus primers, we used a modified PCR technique, the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR in combination with new heavy chain constant region primers for the isolation of human and murine VH genes. In comparison, consensus primer PCR with different sets of previously published oligonucleotide primers was used. Both methods were applied to isolate VH genes from murine B cell lymphoma (A20 and BCL1), myeloma (NS1) and hybridoma (SP6) cell lines and from freshly isolated human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma cells. RACE PCR allowed the amplification and subsequent cloning of the complete VH gene in all cases. In contrast, consensus primer PCR failed to isolate the VH sequence of the murine A20 cell line; this was explained by a mismatch of consensus primers with VH sequences. When both PCR methods amplified VH sequences, the DNA sequences obtained were identical. Taken together, RACE PCR represents a reliable and versatile method for the isolation of VH genes from human and murine lymphoma cells, in particular if consensus primer PCR fails.

  17. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  18. Evidence that human immunoglobulin M rheumatoid factors can Be derived from the natural autoantibody pool and undergo an antigen driven immune response in which somatically mutated rheumatoid factors have lower affinities for immunoglobulin G Fc than their germline counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carayannopoulos, M O; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    2000-04-01

    The question of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)M rheumatoid factors (RF) arise as the result of an abnormal expansion of already existing clones producing natural autoantibodies or emerge as new clones that are somatically mutated owing to an antigen driven immune response has never been conclusively answered. In this study, an inhibition ELISA was utilized to measure the affinities of recombinant antibodies using VH segments reverted back to their closest germline counterparts (germline revertants). In all cases, the somatically mutated parental RFs had a decreased affinity for immunoglobulin (Ig)G Fc compared to the germline revertant, indicating that the antibodies in the germline configuration had the higher affinities. This demonstrates that somatic mutation is not a prerequisite to generate disease associated antibodies. The presence of mutations in the parental IgM RFS suggests that these cells had been involved in a germinal centre reaction. As the germinal centre is the conventional site of the acquisition of mutations during an antigen driven response, these data suggest a role for germinal centres in the generation of the antibody diversity in addition to the selection of higher affinity antibodies. Assuming that only antigen selected cells survive deletion, these data support the hypothesis that IgM RFS can be derived from the natural autoantibody repertoire and result from an antigen driven response. Mechanisms controlling the survival of B cells based on the affinity/avidity of the immunoglobulin receptor are shown to be functional in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Atypical Antigen Recognition Mode of a Shark Immunoglobulin New Antigen Receptor (IgNAR) Variable Domain Characterized by Humanization and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R.; Barelle, Caroline J.; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S.; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  20. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  1. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Side Effects Treatment Types Immunotherapy Non-specific cancer immunotherapies and adjuvants Non-specific immunotherapies don’t target ... This makes BCG useful as a form of cancer immunotherapy. BCG was one of the earliest immunotherapies used ...

  2. The human fibroblast growth factor receptor genes: a common structural arrangement underlies the mechanisms for generating receptor forms that differ in their third immunoglobulin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D E; Lu, J; Chen, H; Werner, S; Williams, L T

    1991-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms by which multiple forms of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are generated, we have mapped the arrangement of exons and introns in the human FGF receptor 1 (FGFR 1) gene (flg). We found three alternative exons encoding a portion of the third immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain of the receptor. One of these alternatives encodes a sequence that is part of a secreted form of FGFR 1. The other two encode sequences that are likely part of transmembrane forms of FGFR 1. One of these forms has not been previously reported in published cDNAs. Also, we have determined the structural organization of a portion of the human FGFR 2 gene (bek) and found a similar arrangement of alternative exons for the third Ig-like domain. The arrangement of these genes suggests that there are conserved mechanisms governing the expression of secreted FGF receptors as well as the expression of at least two distinct membrane-spanning forms of the FGF receptors. The diverse forms appear to be generated by alternative splicing of mRNA and selective use of polyadenylation signals. Images PMID:1652059

  3. Pulmonary administration of interferon Beta-1a-fc fusion protein in non-human primates using an immunoglobulin transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Vallee, Sebastien; Rakhe, Swapnil; Reidy, Thomas; Walker, Sandra; Lu, Qi; Sakorafas, Paul; Low, Susan; Bitonti, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Currently, products containing interferon beta (IFNβ) are injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously. To avoid the necessity of injection, we developed a novel monomeric Fc fusion protein of IFNβ (IFNβFc) that is absorbed via an immunoglobulin transport system present in the upper and central airways upon administration of the drug as an inhaled aerosol. The systemic absorption of IFNβFc through the lung in non-human primates, at deposited doses of 1, 3, and 10 μg/kg, was compared to the absorption of a single 3 μg/kg dose of IFNβ-1a (Avonex®) subcutaneously administered. IFNβFc was well absorbed through the lung, displaying dose proportional increases in serum concentrations, and was biologically active, as shown by increases in plasma neopterin levels. The circulating half-life of IFNβFc was ∼3 times longer (∼30 h) than that of IFNβ-1a, (8-9 h). At approximately equimolar doses of IFNβFc (10 μg/kg) and IFNβ-1a (3 μg/kg), the stimulation of neopterin over background levels was approximately equivalent, demonstrating that the longer half-life of IFNβFc compensated for the lower relative specific antiviral activity of IFNβFc measured in vitro. In conclusion, IFNβFc was efficiently absorbed after pulmonary delivery in non-human primates, retained its biological activity, and may offer a convenient alternative to injectable IFNβ.

  4. Human NK cells maintain licensing status and are subject to killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and KIR-ligand inhibition following ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Alderson, Kory A; Phillips, Emily; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Gan, Jacek; Campana, Dario; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Infusion of allogeneic NK cells is a potential immunotherapy for both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) on human NK cells and KIR-ligands on tumor cells influence the magnitude of NK function. To obtain sufficient numbers of activated NK cells for infusion, one potent method uses cells from the K562 human erythroleukemia line that have been transfected to express activating 41BB ligand (41BBL) and membrane-bound interleukin 15 (mbIL15). The functional importance of KIRs on ex vivo expanded NK cells has not been studied in detail. We found that after a 12-day co-culture with K562-mbIL15-41BBL cells, expanded NK cells maintained inhibition specificity and prior in vivo licensing status determined by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions. Addition of an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) induced NK-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and augmented killing of CD20+ target cells. However, partial inhibition induced by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions persisted. Finally, we found that extended co-cultures of NK cells with stimulatory cells transduced to express various KIR-ligands modified both the inhibitory and activating KIR repertoires of the expanded NK cell product. These studies demonstrate that the licensing interactions known to occur during NK ontogeny also influence NK cell function following NK expansion ex vivo with HLA-null stimulatory cells.

  5. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Fully Human Immunoglobulin G1 Monoclonal Antibody to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alginate in Murine Keratitis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Tanweer; Pier, Gerald B.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of ulcerative keratitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult, time-consuming, and uncomfortable owing to the need for the frequent application of antibiotic drops to the infected corneal surface. We examined here whether a fully human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to the conserved alginate surface polysaccharide of P. aeruginosa could mediate protective immunity against typically nonmucoid strains isolated from human cases of keratitis. MAb F429 effectively opsonized alginate-positive, but not alginate-negative, nonmucoid strains in conjunction with phagocytes and complement. Prophylactic administration of MAb F429 18 h prior to infection with two clinical isolates significantly reduced bacterial levels in the eye and the associated corneal pathology. Along similar lines, systemic intraperitoneal injection, as well as topical application of the MAb onto the infected eye, starting 8 h postinfection in both experimental protocols resulted in significant reductions in bacteria in the eye, as well as minimizing pathological damage to the cornea. These findings indicate that MAb F429 could be useful as an additional therapeutic component for the treatment of P. aeruginosa keratitis. PMID:18644881

  6. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  7. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  8. Detection of specific immunoglobulin E in patients with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinon, J M; Toubas, D; Marx, C; Mougeot, G; Bonnin, A; Bonhomme, A; Villaume, M; Foudrinier, F; Lepan, H

    1990-01-01

    An immunocapture assay was developed to detect Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in sera from adults with acute acquired infection or reactivation and from babies with congenital toxoplasmosis. The components of this assay were monoclonal antibody to human IgE, samples from patients, and T. gondii tachyzoites treated with Formalin. When T. gondii-specific IgE antibodies were present, visually detectable agglutination occurred. Sera, umbilical cord blood, fetal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and amniotic fluid were tested by this method. Specific IgE antibodies were detected in sera from 25 (86%) of 29 adults who developed specific IgG antibody during pregnancy or had specific IgA and IgM antibodies. Specific IgE was present early during infection, at the time that IgM antibodies were present, and slightly preceding the presence of specific IgA antibodies. In 23 patients tested serially, IgE antibodies never persisted for longer than 4 months. No nonspecific anti-T. gondii IgE was detected in sera from uninfected individuals. Maternal IgE antibodies did not cross the placenta. In sera of patients with congenital toxoplasmosis, specific IgE antibodies were found at birth, during the first year of life, and during immunologic recrudescence following discontinuation of pyrimethamine-sulfonamide therapy. The IgE immunocapture assay is simple to perform. It is especially useful for determining when T. gondii was acquired by recently infected pregnant women. PMID:2203811

  9. Crystal structure of the soluble form of the human fcgamma-receptor IIb: a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Sondermann, P; Huber, R; Jacob, U

    1999-01-01

    Fcgamma-receptors (FcgammaRs) represent the link between the humoral and cellular immune responses. Via the binding to FcgammaR-positive cells, immunocomplexes trigger several functions such as endocytosis, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxity (ADCC) and the release of mediators, making them a valuable target for the modulation of the immune system. We solved the crystal structure of the soluble human Fcgamma-receptor IIb (sFcgammaRIIb) to 1.7 A resolution. The structure reveals two typical immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains enclosing an angle of approximately 70 degrees, leading to a heart-shaped overall structure. In contrast to the observed flexible arrangement of the domains in other members of the Ig superfamily, the two domains are anchored by several hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals that the residues relevant for IgG binding, which were already partially characterized by mutagenesis studies, are located within the BC, C'E and FG loops between the beta-strands of the second domain. Moreover, we discuss a model for the sFcgammaRIIb:IgG complex. In this model, two FcgammaR molecules bind one IgG molecule with their second domains, while the first domain points away from the complex and is therefore available for binding other cell surface molecules, by which potential immunosuppressing functions could be mediated. PMID:10064577

  10. Polyclonal activation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes by formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B. I. Immunoglobulin production without DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A "new" polyclonal activator of human peripheral blood B cells, formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B, is described. This bacterium does not stimulate cell proliferation as measured by incorporation of tritiated thymidine but does stimulate a subpopulation of B cells to secrete large amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA in 7-day cell cultures. The immunoglobulins (Ig) produced by cells responding to S. paratyphi B are not specific antibodies against the bacterial antigens. In comparison with other B cell activators (pokeweed mitogen, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, and lipopolysaccharide), S. paratyphi B stimulation produced greater amounts of IgM but less IgG than pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or S. aureus Cowan I; lipopolysaccharide failed to stimulate significant Ig production on day 7 in most cases. In addition, the response to S. paratyphi apparently did not require T cell collaboration. These results suggest that the B cell subpopulation(s) responding to S. paratyphi B may be more differentiated B cells than those responding to either PWM or S. aureus Cowan I. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five patients with common variable immunodeficiency without evidence of abnormal suppressor T cells or monocytes failed to respond to S. paratyphi B, whereas cells from two of the same patients responded well to S. aureus Cowan I and partially to PWM. Thus, S. paratyphi B appears to be superior to other B cell activators for studies of B cell function in normal and abnormal states. PMID:6972434

  11. Homogenous electrogenerated chemiluminescence immunoassay for human immunoglobulin G using N-(aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol as luminescence label at gold nanoparticles modified paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Yage; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2008-05-15

    A homogeneous electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) has been developed using a N-(aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI) as luminescence label at gold nanoparticles modified paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE). ECL emission was electrochemically generated from the ABEI-labeled anti-hIgG antibody and markedly increased in the presence of hIgG antigen due to forming a more rigid structure of the ABEI moiety. The concentration of hIgG antigen was determined by the increase of ECL intensity at a gold nanoparticles modified PIGE. It was found that the ECL intensity of ABEI in presence of hydrogen peroxide was dramatically enhanced at gold nanoparticles modified PIGE in neutral aqueous solution and the detection limit of ABEI was 2 x 10(-14)mol/L (S/N=3). The integral ECL intensity was linearly related to the concentration of hIgG antigen from 3.0 x 10(-11) to 1.0 x 10(-9)g/mL with a detection limit of 1 x 10(-11)g/mL (S/N=3). The relative standard deviation was 3.1% at 1.0 x 10(-10)g/mL (n=11). This work demonstrates that the enhancement of the sensitivity of ECL and ECL immunoassay at a nanoparticles modified electrode is a promising strategy.

  12. Stabilization of Human Immunoglobulin G Encapsulated within Biodegradable Poly (Cyclohexane-1, 4-diyl Acetone Dimethylene Ketal) (PCADK)/ Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Blend Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Yu, Changhui; Liu, Jiaxin; Sun, Fengying; Teng, Lesheng; Li, Youxin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare PCADK/PLGA-blend microspheres for improving the stability of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). The short half-life of antibodies limit their development as therapeutic agents, thus PLGA microspheres were prepared to sustained release antibodies and prolong their half-life. However, the acidic intra-microsphere environment causes the loss of antibody stability and activity. In this study, the effect of PCADK or PLGA degradation products on IgG was investigated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and antigenicity detection. The degradation products of PCADK exerted a larger influence on IgG than that of PLGA. Then PCADK/PLGA microspheres were prepared by the emulsionsolvent evaporation method and systematically characterized and 20% PCADK were selected as the optimal proportion. In addition, the release profile of microspheres and the stability of the released IgG were investigated. The stability of the IgG released from the PCADK/PLGA microspheres was better than that of IgG released from the PLGA microspheres. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to determine the pH inside the microspheres. The IgG-loaded PCADK/PLGA microspheres have important advantages over the PLGA microspheres in terms of IgG stability and could be a good carrier to deliver antibodies for the treatment of disease.

  13. Sera of patients with high titers of immunoglobulin G against Toxoplasma gondii induce secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pelloux, H; Chumpitazi, B F; Santoro, F; Polack, B; Vuillez, J P; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1992-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii alone does not induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion by human monocytes and macrophages. Nevertheless, sera from infected patients with high titers of specific immunoglobulin G antibodies against T. gondii induce TNF-alpha secretion, which is significantly higher than the corresponding induction by negative sera (P less than 0.05). After incubation with the positive serum, parasites also induce secretion of this cytokine, but TNF-alpha levels are lower (11.4 to 71.8%) than those obtained with positive serum alone. Therefore, this secretion seems to be elicited in part by antibody-T. gondii complexes and/or another unidentified factor(s), probably different from lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1, TNF-alpha, and gamma interferon. In this study, monocytes secreted more TNF-alpha into the culture fluid than macrophages did (P less than 0.05), and no correlation was observed between secretion of this cytokine by the monocytes and the intracellular multiplication of the parasites, evaluated by [3H]uracil incorporation. Sera from patients with other infections diseases did not induce secretion of TNF-alpha; however, serum free of antibodies to T. gondii, obtained from patients with leishmaniosis, also stimulated secretion of the cytokine. PMID:1612737

  14. Early, anti-immunoglobulin induced events prior to Na+-K+ pump activation: an analysis in a monoclonal human B-lymphoma cell population.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, R; Iversen, J G; Godal, T

    1983-10-01

    Events following F(ab)2 anti-delta immunoglobulin stimulation of monoclonal (leukemic) human B cells prior to Na+-K+ pump activation were investigated in vitro. This pump activation, measured by ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, appeared susceptible to the phospholipid-interacting drugs tetracaine and quinacrine, to the antioxydant nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), and to the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, while much less susceptible to the methylation inhibitor-3-deazaadenosine. The Ca++ ionophore A 23187 appeared to induce pump activation in a way similar to anti-delta, as it was susceptible to the same drugs and as anti-delta had no additional stimulating effect on A 23187-stimulated cells. However, whereas the anti-delta-induced activations appeared independent of the extracellular Ca++ activity, [Ca++]e, the activation by A 23187 was potentiated by addition of the Ca++ chelator ethyleneglycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N'-tetracetic acid (EGTA). Estimations by fluorescent chelator method (quin 2) showed anti-delta to increase the intracellular Ca++ activity, [Ca++]i both in the absence and presence of EGTA. A 23187 increased [Ca++]i strongly in Ca++ medium, but was weaker, more similar to the anti-delta response, in EGTA medium. It is suggested that Na+-K+ pump activation after anti-Ig stimulation in B cells may follow Ca++ mobilization from internal stores. The trifluoperazine susceptibility suggests that calmodulin regulation is involved.

  15. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3/sup /minus// lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection.

  16. Expression of E-selectin, integrin β1 and immunoglobulin superfamily member in human gastric carcinoma cells and its clinicopathologic significance

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jin-Jing; Shao, Qin-Shu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression levels of E- selectin, integrin β1 and immunoglobulin supperfamily member-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in human gastric carcinoma cells, and to explore the relationship between these three kinds of cell adhesion molecules and gastric carcinoma. METHODS: The serum contents of E-selectin, integrin β1 and ICAM-1 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in 47 healthy individuals (control group) and in 57 patients with gastric carcinoma (gastric carcinoma group) respectively prior to operation and 7 d after operation. RESULTS: The serum E-selectin, ECAM-1 and integrin β1 were found to be expressed in both control and gastric carcinoma groups. However, they were highly expressed in patients with gastric carcinoma patients before operation or with unresectable tumours. The expression levels of ICAM-1 and integrin β1 were significantly higher in gastric carcinoma patients than in controls (P < 0.01). A comparison of the E-selectin levels between the two groups showed statistically insignificant difference (P = 0.64). In addition, the expression levels were all decreased substantially in the postoperative patients subjected to radical resection of the tumours, indicating that the high level expressions of these compounds might be the important factor for predicting the prognosis of these patients. CONCLUSION: Serum E-selectin, ICAM-1 and integrin β1 expression levels are probably related to the metastasis and relapse of gastric cancer. PMID:16773720

  17. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  18. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  19. Characterization of Human and Murine T-Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 4 (TIM-4) IgV Domain Residues Critical for Ebola Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Schaack, Grace A.; Chiorini, John A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors that are responsible for the clearance of dying cells have recently been found to mediate enveloped virus entry. Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family of viruses, utilizes PtdSer receptors for entry into target cells. The PtdSer receptors human and murine T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins TIM-1 and TIM-4 mediate filovirus entry by binding to PtdSer on the virion surface via a conserved PtdSer binding pocket within the amino-terminal IgV domain. While the residues within the TIM-1 IgV domain that are important for EBOV entry are characterized, the molecular details of virion–TIM-4 interactions have yet to be investigated. As sequences and structural alignments of the TIM proteins suggest distinct differences in the TIM-1 and TIM-4 IgV domain structures, we sought to characterize TIM-4 IgV domain residues required for EBOV entry. Using vesicular stomatitis virus pseudovirions bearing EBOV glycoprotein (EBOV GP/VSVΔG), we evaluated virus binding and entry into cells expressing TIM-4 molecules mutated within the IgV domain, allowing us to identify residues important for entry. Similar to TIM-1, residues in the PtdSer binding pocket of murine and human TIM-4 (mTIM-4 and hTIM-4) were found to be important for EBOV entry. However, additional TIM-4-specific residues were also found to impact EBOV entry, with a total of 8 mTIM-4 and 14 hTIM-4 IgV domain residues being critical for virion binding and internalization. Together, these findings provide a greater understanding of the interaction of TIM-4 with EBOV virions. IMPORTANCE With more than 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths during the largest and most recent Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak, there has been increased emphasis on the development of therapeutics against filoviruses. Many therapies under investigation target EBOV cell entry. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins are cell surface factors important for the entry of many

  20. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  1. Molecular evolution of the human immunoglobulin E response: high incidence of shared mutations and clonal relatedness among epsilon VH5 transcripts from three unrelated patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequences of 19 epsilon VH5 transcripts derived from in vivo isotype switched peripheral blood B cells of three patients with atopic dermatitis. Comparison with the patients' own germline VH5 gene segments revealed that the epsilon transcripts were derived from both functional members of the human VH5 gene family and harbored numerous somatic mutations (range 5-36 per VH5 gene). In two patients, we detected clonally related but diverged transcripts, permitting the construction of a genealogical tree in one patient. We observed a high proportion of shared silent (S) and replacement (R) mutations among epsilon VH5 sequences derived from all three individuals, even among transcripts descending from the two different germline VH5 gene segments. A remarkably high number of these mutations is shared with previously reported VH5 genes encoding antibodies with defined specificities. The shared S mutations, and likely a fraction of the R mutations, appear to mark preferential sites ("hot spots") of somatic hypermutations in human VH5 genes. The distribution of R and S mutations over complementarity determining region and framework regions in the majority of VH regions deviated from that characteristic of antigen-driven immune response. We hypothesize that the V regions of immunoglobulin E-bearing B cells have accumulated "selectively neutral" mutations over extended periods of clonal expansion, resulting in unusual R/S ratios. We propose that the molecular characteristics of the epsilon VH regions in atopic dermatitis may be representative of antigens that recurrently or chronically stimulate the immune system. PMID:8418213

  2. A New Ligand-Based Method for Purifying Active Human Plasma-Derived Ficolin-3 Complexes Supports the Phenomenon of Crosstalk between Pattern-Recognition Molecules and Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Michalski, Mateusz; Maciejewska, Anna; Swierzko, Anna S.; Cedzynski, Maciej; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Despite recombinant protein technology development, proteins isolated from natural sources remain important for structure and activity determination. Ficolins represent a class of proteins that are difficult to isolate. To date, three methods for purifying ficolin-3 from plasma/serum have been proposed, defined by most critical step: (i) hydroxyapatite absorption chromatography (ii) N-acetylated human serum albumin affinity chromatography and (iii) anti-ficolin-3 monoclonal antibody-based affinity chromatography. We present a new protocol for purifying ficolin-3 complexes from human plasma that is based on an exclusive ligand: the O-specific polysaccharide of Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 LPS (O-PS 1200). The protocol includes (i) poly(ethylene glycol) precipitation; (ii) yeast and l-fucose incubation, for depletion of mannose-binding lectin; (iii) affinity chromatography using O-PS 1200-Sepharose; (iv) size-exclusion chromatography. Application of this protocol yielded average 2.2 mg of ficolin-3 preparation free of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1 and -2 from 500 ml of plasma. The protein was complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and was able to activate the complement in vitro. In-process monitoring of MBL, ficolins, and total protein content revealed the presence of difficult-to-remove immunoglobulin G, M and A, in some extent in agreement with recent findings suggesting crosstalk between IgG and ficolin-3. We demonstrated that recombinant ficolin-3 interacts with IgG and IgM in a concentration-dependent manner. Although this association does not appear to influence ficolin-3-ligand interactions in vitro, it may have numerous consequences in vivo. Thus our purification procedure provides Ig-ficolin-3/MASP complexes that might be useful for gaining further insight into the crosstalk and biological activity of ficolin-3. PMID:27232184

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging-based sensing for anti-bovine immunoglobulins detection in human milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Scarano, S; Scuffi, C; Mascini, M; Minunni, M

    2011-11-30

    Only few papers deal with Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) direct detection on complex matrices, limiting the biosensor application to real analytical problems. In this work a SPRi biosensor for anti-bovine IgG detection in untreated human bodily fluids, i.e. diluted human serum and milk, was developed. Enhanced levels of cow's milk antibodies in children's serum are suspected for their possible correlation with Type 1 diabetes during childhood and their detection in real samples was up to now performed by classical immunoassays based on indirect detection. The biosensor was optimised in standard samples and then in untreated human milk for anti-bovine IgG direct detection. The key novelty of the work is the evaluation of matrix effect by applying to real samples an experimental and ex ante method previously developed for SPRi signal sampling in standard solutions, called "Data Analyzer"; it punctually visualises and analyses the behaviour of receptor spots of the array, to select only spot areas with the best specific vs. unspecific signal values. In this way, benefits provide by SPRi image analysis are exploited here to quantify and minimise drawbacks due to the matrix effect, allowing to by-pass every matrix pre-treatment except dilution.

  4. Transgenic expression of human cytoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) by porcine skin for xenogeneic skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua-Qiang; Jiang, Wen; Fan, Na-Na; Zhao, Ben-Tian; Ou-Yang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao-Ming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Dong-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Lu-Lu; Xiang, Peng-Ying; Ge, Liang-Peng; Wei, Hong; Lai, Liang-Xue

    2015-04-01

    Porcine skin is frequently used as a substitute of human skin to cover large wounds in clinic practice of wound care. In our previous work, we found that transgenic expression of human cytoxicT-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) in murine skin graft remarkably prolonged its survival in xenogeneic wounds without extensive immunosuppression in recipients, suggesting that transgenic hCTLA4Ig expression in skin graft may be an effective and safe method to prolong xenogeneic skin graft survival. In this work, using a transgene construct containing hCTLA4Ig coding sequence under the drive of human Keratine 14 (k14) promoter, hCTLA4Ig transgenic pigs were generated by somatic nuclear transfer. The derived transgenic pigs were healthy and exhibited no signs of susceptibility to infection. The hCTLA4Ig transgene was stably transmitted through germline over generations, and thereby a transgenic pig colony was established. In the derived transgenic pigs, hCTLA4Ig expression in skin was shown to be genetically stable over generations, and detected in heart, kidney and corneal as well as in skin. Transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein in pigs exhibited expected biological activity as it suppressed human lymphocyte proliferation in human mixed lymphocyte culture to extents comparable to those of commercially purchased purified hCTLA4Ig protein. In skin grafting from pigs to rats, transgenic porcine skin grafts exhibited remarkably prolonged survival compared to the wild-type skin grafts derived from the same pig strain (13.33 ± 3.64 vs. 6.25 ± 2.49 days, P < 0.01), further indicating that the transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein was biologically active and capable of extending porcine skin graft survival in xenogeneic wounds. The transgenic pigs generated in this work can be used as a reproducible resource to provide porcine skin grafts with extended survival for wound coverage, and also as donors to investigate the impacts of hCTLA4Ig on xenotransplantation of other organs

  5. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care.

  6. Identification of a macromolecule containing an anticarcinoembryonic antigen-reactive substance and immunoglobulin M in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S R; Van Dusen, L R; Douglass, H O; Holyoke, E D; Chu, T M

    1978-11-01

    Ascitic fluid from a patient with carcinoma of the pancreas was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The fraction precipitated between 25 and 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate was sequentially chromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and Sepharose 6B. A macromolecular fraction (greater than 10(6) daltons) obtained was found to react with both antihuman IgM and antiserum to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This fraction was further purified by adsorption with protein A-Sepharose CL-4B and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The purified macromolecular fraction had a sedimentation value of 28S as determined by ultracentrifugation. Upon dissociation of the purified macromolecule at pH 2.3 and purification of the dissociated components on Sepharose CL-2B and BioGel A 1.5M, a 19S protein and a 5S protein were recovered. The 19S protein showed a complete line of identity with a reference human IgM when reacted with antihuman IgM in gel diffusion, whereas the 5S protein showed a partial immunologic identity with colon CEA against anti-CEA. These results indicated the existence of an IgM-containing macromolecular complex with an anti-CEA cross-reactive substance in the extracellular fluid of human pancreatic cancer.

  7. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  8. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  9. Membrane isoforms of human immunoglobulins of the A1 and A2 isotypes: structural and functional study.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, I; Drouet, M; Bodinier, M C; Helal, A; Cogné, M

    1997-01-01

    As for IgM, human IgA occurs either as soluble molecules in plasma and various other body fluids, or as membrane-bound molecules on differentiated B cells, where they are part of the B-cell receptor for antigen (BCR). We studied the structure of transcripts encoding the membrane-anchored alpha-chain of the human BCR alpha, which may be present in two different forms resulting from alternate splicing of the alpha-chain mRNA (type I or type II). The ratio of type I versus type II did not vary upon stimulation of a B-cell line with various cytokines. Rather, it differed strikingly in cells expressing either the IgA1 or IgA2 isotype of the BCR alpha, with virtually no type II alpha-chain in the latter. Co-modulation experiments also yielded different results for both isotypes, since they demonstrated a physical association of both membrane (m)IgA1 and mIgA2 with CD79b, the beta component of the BCR Ig alpha/Ig beta heterodimer, but only of mIgA1 with CD19. Whatever the isotype, the BCR of the IgA class was able to carry out signal transduction upon cross-linking by specific monoclonal antibodies but, in contrast to mIgM, it relied mainly on the entry of extracellular Ca2+ rather than on the release of intracellular stocks. Images Figure 2 PMID:9155637

  10. IgM-Enriched Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin-Based Treatment of Patients With Early Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ius, Fabio; Sommer, Wiebke; Kieneke, Daniela; Tudorache, Igor; Kühn, Christian; Avsar, Murat; Siemeni, Thierry; Salman, Jawad; Erdfelder, Carolin; Verboom, Murielle; Kielstein, Jan; Tecklenburg, Andreas; Greer, Mark; Hallensleben, Michael; Blasczyk, Rainer; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Gottlieb, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Background At our institution, until April 2013, patients who showed early donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) after lung transplantation were preemptively treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (tPE) and a single dose of Rituximab. In April 2013, we moved to a therapy based on IgM-enriched human immunoglobulins (IVIG), repeated every 4 weeks, and a single dose of Rituximab. Methods This observational study was designed to evaluate the short-term patient and graft survival in patients who underwent IVIG-based DSA treatment (group A, n = 57) versus contemporary patients transplanted between April 2013 and January 2015 without DSA (group C, n = 180), as well as to evaluate DSA clearance in IVIG-treated patients versus historic patients who had undergone tPE-based treatment (group B, n = 56). Patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up ended on April 1, 2015. Results At 6 months and 1 year of follow-up, group A had a survival similar to group C (P = 0.81) but better than group B (P = 0.008). Group A showed statistically nonsignificant trends toward improved freedom from pulsed-steroid therapy and biopsy-confirmed rejection over groups B and C. The DSA clearance was better in group A than group B at treatment end (92% vs 64%; P = 0.002) and last DSA control (90% vs 75%; P = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with new early DSA but without graft dysfunction that are treated with IVIG and Rituximab have similarly good early survival as contemporary lung transplant recipients without early DSA. The IVIG yielded increased DSA clearance compared with historic tPE-based treatment, yet spontaneous clearance of new DSA also remains common. PMID:26714123

  11. Conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin light chain variable domain by relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: implications for protein misfolding and amyloid assembly.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Pondaven, Simon P; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2011-07-05

    The conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin κIV light-chain variable domain, LEN, which can undergo conversion to amyloid under destabilizing conditions, was investigated at physiological and acidic pH on a residue-specific basis by multidimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Measurements of backbone chemical shifts and amide (15)N longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates and steady-state nuclear Overhauser enhancements indicate that, on the whole, LEN retains its native three-dimensional fold and dimeric state at pH 2 and that the protein backbone exhibits limited fast motions on the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. On the other hand, (15)N Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR data show that LEN experiences considerable slower, millisecond time scale dynamics, confined primarily to three contiguous segments of about 5-20 residues and encompassing the N-terminal β-strand and complementarity determining loop regions 2 and 3 in the vicinity of the dimer interface. Quantitative analysis of the CPMG relaxation dispersion data reveals that at physiological pH these slow backbone motions are associated with relatively low excited-state protein conformer populations, in the ~2-4% range. Upon acidification, the minor conformer populations increase significantly, to ~10-15%, with most residues involved in stabilizing interactions across the dimer interface displaying increased flexibility. These findings provide molecular-level insights about partial protein unfolding at low pH and point to the LEN dimer dissociation, initiated by increased conformational flexibility in several well-defined regions, as being one of the important early events leading to amyloid assembly.

  12. Expression of Immunoglobulin Receptors with Distinctive Features Indicating Antigen Selection by Marginal Zone B Cells from Human Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Reverberi, Daniele; Bruno, Silvia; Ghiotto, Fabio; Tenca, Claudya; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Ceccarelli, Jenny; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Calevo, Maria Grazia; De Santanna, Amleto; Truini, Mauro; Fais, Franco; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, identified as surface (s)IgMhighsIgDlowCD23low/−CD21+CD38− B cells, were purified from human spleens, and the features of their V(D)J gene rearrangements were investigated and compared with those of germinal center (GC), follicular mantle (FM) and switched memory (SM) B cells. Most MZ B cells were CD27+ and exhibited somatic hypermutations (SHM), although to a lower extent than SM B cells. Moreover, among MZ B-cell rearrangements, recurrent sequences were observed, some of which displayed intraclonal diversification. The same diversifying sequences were detected in very low numbers in GC and FM B cells and only when a highly sensitive, gene-specific polymerase chain reaction was used. This result indicates that MZ B cells could expand and diversify in situ and also suggested the presence of a number of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-expressing B cells in the MZ. The notion of antigen-driven expansion/selection in situ is further supported by the VH CDR3 features of MZ B cells with highly conserved amino acids at specific positions and by the finding of shared (“stereotyped”) sequences in two different spleens. Collectively, the data are consistent with the notion that MZ B cells are a special subset selected by in situ antigenic stimuli. PMID:23877718

  13. [Cloning and expression of a single human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable domain with vascular endothelial growth factor binding activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Siguo; Wu, Yi; Zili, M; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Aimin; Chen, Jianquan; Cheng, Guoxiang

    2010-11-01

    In the application of therapeutic antibodies, large molecular weight of antibodies is always a problem that prevents them from penetrating into tissues or binding to antigenic determinants. To overcome this problem, we investigated the function of the heavy chain variable domain of a monoclonal anti-VEGF human IgM antibody derived from the Five-Feature Translocus Mice. We cloned the cDNA of the heavy chain variable domain, which was then inserted into pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification and renaturation of the denatured recombinant protein, we obtained a 16 kDa antibody fragment, which is named as rhVVH. By immunoassaying its VEGF-binding capability in vitro, we proved that rhVVH retains this activity as the complete IgM. Importantly, rhVVH is shown to inhibit the HUVEC cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results indicate that the single heavy chain variable domain might inherit part of the biological function of the complete IgM antibody, which provided a valuable potential in further research on antibody miniaturisation.

  14. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  15. Structural repertoire in human V{sub L} pseudogenes of immunoglobulins: Comparison with functional germline genes and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Almagro, J.C.; Lara-Ochoa, F.; Dominguez-Martinez, V.

    1996-06-01

    Antibody molecules are highly antigen-specific receptors of the immune system. Antigen-antibody interaction involves the antibody V{sub L} and V{sub H} domains, each composed of a framework whose structure is well conserved. The antigen-binding site is composed of six hypervariable loops, three from the V{sub L} domain and three from the V{sub H} domain: L1, L2, L3, and H1, H2, H3, respectively. Genetically, L1 and L2 are encoded by the V{sub L} gene, while L3 is produced by the recombination of an additional gene segment, A. In a similar way, H1 and H2 are encoded by the V{sub H} gene, and H3 is a result of the recombination of two additional gene segments, D and J{sub H}. Analysis of antibodies of known atomic structure has revealed a small number of main-chain conformations or canonical structures for L1, L2, and L3, as well as for H1 and H2. Canonical structures in five of six hypervariable loops imply that only a few main-chain conformations are present in a large set of antibody molecules with different loop sequences. Examination of the known human IGHV, IGKV, and IGLV functional germline genes indicates that most of these sequences have canonical structures. This finding provides evidence concerning structural restrictions at work in the process of antigen recognition. 28 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Safety and pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoglobulin administered to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 185 Pharmacokinetic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Fletcher, C V; Moye, J; Stiehm, E R; Meyer, W A; Nemo, G J; Mathieson, B J; Hirsch, G; Sapan, C V; Cummins, L M; Jimenez, E; O'Neill, E; Kovacs, A; Stek, A

    1997-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were evaluated in the first 28 maternal-infant pairs enrolled in a randomized, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-controlled trial of HIVIG maternal-infant HIV transmission prophylaxis. Using 200 mg/kg, mean half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) in women were 15 days and 72 mL/kg, respectively, after one and 32 days and 154 mL/kg after three monthly infusions, with stable 4 mL/kg/day clearance. Transplacental passage occurred. Newborn single-dose half-life, Vd, and clearance were 30 days, 143 mL/kg, and 4 mL/kg/day, respectively. HIVIG rapidly cleared maternal serum immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were stable. Mild to moderate adverse clinical effects occurred in 2 of 103 maternal and 2 of 25 infant infusions. No adverse hematologic, blood chemistry, or immunologic effects were seen. HIVIG is well-tolerated in HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns, clears antigenemia, crosses the placenta, and exhibits pharmacokinetics similar to those of other immunoglobulin preparations.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  18. The discovery of immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) was a breakthrough in the field of allergy and immunology. Our understanding of mechanisms of allergic reactions and the role of IgE in these disorders has paralleled to the discovery of treatment modalities for patients with allergy. The first clue to the existence of a substance responsible for hypersensitivity reactions was demonstrated in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, and after four decades it was identified as an immunoglobulin subclass by Ishizakas and co-workers. In 1968, the WHO International Reference Centre for Immunoglobulins announced the presence of a fifth immunoglobulin isotype, IgE.

  19. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  20. [Blood serum immunoglobulins in thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Epishin, A V

    1978-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin content was determined in 85 patients with thyrotoxicosis and in 80 healthy persons by radial immunodiffusion in agar after Mancini by means of monospecific antisera (made at the N. F. Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology immunoglobulins of classes G and M. The most pronounced increase was noted in patients with severe and moderate thyrotoxicosis.

  1. Nonspecific interactions of chromatin with immunoglobulin G and protein A, and their impact on purification performance.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Pete; Nian, Rui; Lee, Jeremy; Tan, Lihan; Latiff, Sarah Maria Abdul; Lim, Chiew Ling; Chuah, Cindy; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng; Zhang, Wei; Gan, Hui Theng

    2014-05-02

    Chromatin released from dead host cells during in vitro production of IgG monoclonal antibodies exists mostly in complex hetero-aggregates consisting of nucleosomal arrays (DNA+histone proteins), non-histone proteins, and aberrant forms of IgG. They bind immobilized protein A more aggressively than IgG, through their nucleosomal histone components, and hinder access of IgG to Fc-specific binding sites, thereby reducing dynamic binding capacity. The majority of host cell contaminants in eluted IgG are leachates from chromatin hetero-aggregates that remain bound to protein A. Formation of turbidity in eluted IgG during pH titration is caused by neutral-pH insolubility of chromatin hetero-aggregates. NaOH is required at 500 mM to remove accumulated chromatin. A chromatin-directed clarification method removed 99% of histones, 90% of non-histone proteins, achieved a 6 log reduction of DNA, 4 log reduction of lipid-enveloped virus, and 5 log reduction of non-enveloped retrovirus, while conserving 98% of the native IgG. This suspended most of performance compromises imposed on protein A. IgG binding capacity increased ~20%. Host protein contamination was reduced about 100-fold compared to protein A loaded with harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration. Aggregates were reduced to less than 0.05%. Turbidity of eluted IgG upon pH neutralization was nearly eliminated. Column cleaning was facilitated by minimizing the accumulation of chromatin.

  2. Efficacy of zidovudine and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin for reducing perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected women with advanced disease: results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Bethel, J; Whitehouse, J; Nugent, R; Moye, J; Glenn Fowler, M; Mathieson, B J; Reichelderfer, P; Nemo, G J; Korelitz, J; Meyer, W A; Sapan, C V; Jimenez, E; Gandia, J; Scott, G; O'Sullivan, M J; Kovacs, A; Stek, A; Shearer, W T; Hammill, H

    1999-03-01

    Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated whether zidovudine combined with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) infusions administered monthly during pregnancy and to the neonate at birth would significantly lower perinatal HIV transmission compared with treatment with zidovudine and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) without HIV antibody. Subjects had baseline CD4 cell counts /=200/microL) but not with time of zidovudine initiation (5.6% vs. 4.8% if started before vs. during pregnancy; P=. 75). The Kaplan-Meier transmission rate for HIVIG recipients was 4. 1% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-6.7%) and for IVIG recipients was 6.0% (2.8%-9.1%) (P=.36). The unexpectedly low transmission confirmed that zidovudine prophylaxis is highly effective, even for women with advanced HIV disease and prior zidovudine therapy, although it limited the study's ability to address whether passive immunization diminishes perinatal transmission.

  3. Developing therapeutic immunoglobulins: European regulatory perspectives and implications.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Prepared from pooled human blood/plasma, therapeutic immunoglobulins contain the natural antibody spectrum of the entire donor population and mediate a range of therapeutic effects when administered to patients. They are particularly indicated for the prevention of serious and life-threatening infections in patients with immune systems failing to produce functional antibodies. Other than treatment of such rare primary immunodeficiencies (primary antibody deficiencies), therapeutic immunoglobulins are also used in certain inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, and Kawasaki disease. The conditions for licensure of therapeutic immunoglobulins in the EU and the associated regulatory issues and procedures are reviewed. Regulatory expectations about the manufacture and control of immunoglobulins are highlighted and safety and efficacy requirements described. Although the main focus is on European pharmaceutical legislation, other applicable public information is considered.

  4. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis.

  5. Control of polyclonal immunoglobulin production from human lymphocytes by leukotrienes; leukotriene B4 induces an OKT8(+), radiosensitive suppressor cell from resting, human OKT8(-) T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atluru, D.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-10-01

    We report that leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid, is a potent suppressor of polyclonal Ig production in pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, while LTC4 and LTD4 have little activity in this system. Preincubation of T cells with LTB4 in nanomolar to picomolar concentrations rendered these cells suppressive of Ig production in subsequent PWM-stimulated cultures of fresh, autologous B + T cells. This LTB4-induced suppressor cell was radiosensitive, and its generation could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. The LTB4-induced suppressor cell was OKT8(+), while the precursor for the cell could be OKT8(-). The incubation of OKT8(-) T cells with LTB4 for 18 h resulted in the appearance of the OKT8(+) on 10-20% of the cells, and this could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. Thus, LTB4 in very low concentrations induces a radiosensitive OKT8(+) suppressor cell from OKT8(-) cells. In this regard, LTB4 is three to six orders of magnitude more potent than any endogenous hormonal inducer of suppressor cells previously described. Glucocorticosteroids, which block suppressor cell induction in many systems, may act by inhibiting endogenous production of LTB4.

  6. Non-specific ileojejunitis in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Perea, V D; Fernan-Zegarra, L; Cruz, V M; Ballon, R; Picoaga, J L

    1978-09-09

    Non-specific ileojejunitis, characterised by mild to moderate structural changes in the intestinal mucosa and often associated with asymptomatic malabsorption, is known to occur in the tropics and in countries with hot climates. This acquired condition is probably related to environmental factors, and some consider it to be a subclinical form of tropical sprue. Changes in the intestinal mucosa typical of non-specific ileojejunitis were found in 10 indigenous Indians as well as 5 people of Latin stock living in the Southern Peruvian sierra, where tropical sprue has not as yet been demonstrated and which has a temperate climate.

  7. A new high molecular weight immunoglobulin class from the carcharhine shark: implications for the properties of the primordial immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, R M; Schluter, S F; Shen, S; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    All immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors throughout phylogeny share regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence. To identify possible primitive immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-like molecules, we utilized 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and a highly conserved constant region consensus amino acid sequence to isolate a new immunoglobulin class from the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus. The immunoglobulin, termed IgW, in its secreted form consists of 782 amino acids and is expressed in both the thymus and the spleen. The molecule overall most closely resembles mu chains of the skate and human and a new putative antigen binding molecule isolated from the nurse shark (NAR). The full-length IgW chain has a variable region resembling human and shark heavy-chain (VH) sequences and a novel joining segment containing the WGXGT motif characteristic of H chains. However, unlike any other H-chain-type molecule, it contains six constant (C) domains. The first C domain contains the cysteine residue characteristic of C mu1 that would allow dimerization with a light (L) chain. The fourth and sixth domains also contain comparable cysteines that would enable dimerization with other H chains or homodimerization. Comparison of the sequences of IgW V and C domains shows homology greater than that found in comparisons among VH and C mu or VL, or CL thereby suggesting that IgW may retain features of the primordial immunoglobulin in evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8622930

  8. Immunoglobulin systems of human tonsils. I. Control subjects of various ages: qualification of Ig-producing cells, tonsillar morphometry and serum Ig concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, P.; Surjan, L.; Berdal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Specimens of clinically normal palatine tonsils were studied by morphometry and immunohistochemistry, with regard to the relative tissue contribution and the content of Ig-producing immunocytes of four morphological compartments: the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles, their mantle zones, the extrafollicular area and the reticular parts of the crypt epithelium. Ig-producing cells occurred in all compartments; most of them were located in the extrafollicular area, although their density was highest in the reticular epithelium. There was a general predominance of IgG cells—including the blasts present in germinal centres. In subjects 4–25 years old, the tonsillar immunocyte population showed overall IgG:IgA:IgM:IgD class ratios of 65·2:30·1:3·5:1·2. IgE-producing cells were virtually absent. A reticular distribution of non-diffusible immunoglobulins, especially IgM, was observed in the germinal centres—apparently bound to dendritic reticular cells. The mantle zones commonly contained numerous lymphocytes with membrane-related immunofluorescence, particularly prominent for IgD and less distinct for IgM. These B-cells were probably derived from local clonal expansion processes. There was no indication of active immunoglobulin transport through the tonsillar epithelium, which was devoid of `secretory component'. In subjects 30–81 years old, lymphoid elements of the tonsils were reduced, especially the follicular mantles and the reticular crypt epithelium, as well as their content of Ig-producing immunocytes. Such cells were also fewer in the germinal centres and in the extrafollicular area. Moreover, some shifts in the immunocyte class ratios had occurred in the various tissue compartments. In this age group, the number of tonsillar IgA cells showed a significant negative correlation with the rate of synthesis of serum IgA. Imagesp374-a PMID:350457

  9. Comparative removal of solvent and detergent viral inactivating agents from human intravenous immunoglobulin G preparations using SDR HyperD and C18 sorbents.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Sayed, Makram A; Radosevich, Miryana; El-Ekiaby, Magdy

    2009-06-01

    The capacity of hydrophobic octadecyl (C18) and SDR HyperD materials to remove the combination of 1% (v/v) solvent (tri-n-butyl phosphate, TnBP) with 1% (v/v) nonionic detergents (Triton X-100 and Triton X-45) used for viral inactivation of plasma-derived polyvalent intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) preparation has been evaluated. Efficient removal of TnBP (<10 ppm in IVIG preparation) was found at ratios of 0.5 g of C18/7 ml of IVIG and 0.22 g of dry SDR HyperD/7 ml of IVIG. Binding capacities of TnBP were greater than 140 mg/g of C18 and greater than 318 mg/g of dry SDR HyperD. Complete removal of Triton X-45 (<2 ppm) was obtained at ratios of 1g of C18/7 ml of IVIG and 0.44 g of dry SDR HyperD/7 ml of IVIG or above, corresponding to binding capacities in excess of 70 mg/g of C18 and in excess of 159 mg/g of dry SDR HyperD. Residual Triton X-100 was less than 30 ppm at a ratio of 4 g/14 ml of immunoglobulin G (IgG) for the C18 sorbent. Triton X-100 was less than 10 ppm when using SDR HyperD at a ratio of 0.66 g/7 ml of IgG, corresponding to a binding capacity of approximately 106 mg of Triton X-100/g of dry SDR HyperD. Good recoveries of IVIG were achieved in the effluent from both sorbents.

  10. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  11. Human B cell function in normal individuals of various ages. 1. In vitro enumeration of pokeweed-induced peripheral blood lymphocyte immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells and the comparison of the results with numbers of peripheral B and T cells, mitogen responses, and levels of serum immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, J E; Crest, F J; Adler, W H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of age on the in vitro generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells in pokeweed mitogen-stimulated cultures was examined using a staphylococcal protein A plaque assay. Although there was no statistically significant decrease with age in the numbers of plaque-forming cells, subjects whose cells failed to produce immunoglobulin were four times more common amongst individuals over 55 years of age. Simultaneously-measured T and B lymphocyte numbers. 3H-thymidine incorporation by mitogen-stimulated cultures, and serum immunoglobulins were comparable in both the young and the aged. PMID:7035035

  12. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  13. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  14. Rapid method to detect rubella immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Shimizu, H; Kampa, D; Doerr, H W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G was removed from serum specimens by precipitation with gamma chain-specific anti-human IgG of rabbit origin. The remaining rubella virus-specific IgM (and IgA) antibodies were then detected by the rubella hemagglutination-inhibition test. This procedure has proven to be as reliable as estimations carried out with IgM fractions separated on a sucrose density gradient. PMID:1176596

  15. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  16. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-24

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum.

  17. [Secretory immunoglobulin A in amniotic fluid].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Lorenz, U

    1983-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was estimated in amniotic fluid samples by means of the single radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. A monospecific antiserum against human secretory component was used. 163 amniotic fluid samples from normal pregnancies and risk pregnancies respectively were investigated. Within the 3rd trimenon the S-IgA content in amniotic fluid increased significantly. With respect to literature and examinations performed previously a connection between S-IgA content in amniotic fluid and fetal lung maturity seems to be possible.

  18. Binding of CLL Subset 4 B Cell Receptor Immunoglobulins to Viable Human Memory B Lymphocytes Requires a Distinctive IGKV Somatic Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) stereotyped B cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously, and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found that IGs from both subset 4 and non–subset 4 IGHV4-34–expressing CLL cases bound naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs reacted with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs did not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens that are common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases. PMID:28097289

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen-C Genotype and Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor-Ligand Matching in Korean Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Ki Hyun; Park, Hye Sun; Ryu, Ji Hyeong; Lim, Jihyang; Kim, Yonggoo; Na, Gun Hyung; Kim, Dong Goo

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and HLA class I regulates natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and function. The impact of NK cell alloreactivity through KIR in liver transplantation remains unelucidated. Since the frequency of HLA-C and KIR genotypes show ethnic differences, we assessed the impact of HLA-C, KIR genotype, or KIR-ligand mismatch on the allograft outcome of Korean liver allografts. Methods One hundred eighty-two living donor liver transplant patients were studied. Thirty-five patients (19.2%) had biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR), and eighteen (9.9%) had graft failure. The HLA-C compatibility, KIR genotypes, ligand-ligand, and KIR-ligand matching was retrospectively investigated for association with allograft outcomes. Results Homozygous C1 ligands were predominant in both patients and donors, and frequency of the HLA-C2 allele in Koreans was lower than that in other ethnic groups. Despite the significantly lower frequency of the HLA-C2 genotype in Koreans, donors with at least one HLA-C2 allele showed higher rates of AR than donors with no HLA-C2 alleles (29.2% vs 15.7%, P=0.0423). Although KIR genotypes also showed ethnic differences, KIR genotypes and the number of activating KIR/inhibitory KIR were not associated with the allograft outcome. KIR-ligand mismatch was expected in 31.6% of Korean liver transplants and had no impact on AR or graft survival. Conclusions This study could not confirm the clinical impact of KIR genotypes and KIR-ligand mismatch. However, we demonstrated that the presence of HLA-C2 allele in the donor influenced AR of Korean liver allografts. PMID:27834065

  20. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, James J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. Methods. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). Conclusions. KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. PMID:26268853

  1. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin M antibody in diagnosis of human leptospiral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, W E; Merry, D J; Pirc, M L; Devine, P L

    1997-01-01

    The PanBio Leptospira immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a commercially available screening test for the diagnosis of acute leptospiral infection. The ability of the test to diagnose early or recent Leptospira interrogans infection was assessed by testing sera with known microagglutination test (MAT) titers to serovars pomona, hardjo, copenhageni, and australis. The IgM ELISA detected all 41 cases of early or recent leptospiral infection (sensitivity, 100%), with a positive ELISA result seen in many cases before MAT antibody titers reached 1:50. Thirty-eight of 41 patients showed seroconversion (fourfold or greater increase in titer by MAT, 2 of 41 patients had a single sample with elevated titer, and 1 patient from whom leptospires were isolated from a blood sample failed to show MAT titers, despite a seroconversion (negative to positive result) in the ELISA. Follow-up sera obtained from 8 of 12 patients (67%) for 3 to 48 months after the acute stage of illness showed persisting IgM antibody. However, the range of levels detected in these samples (maximum ELISA ratio, 2.0) was lower than the range seen when infection was recent. Reactivity in the IgM ELISA was observed for only 1 of 59 serum samples from asymptomatic donors (specificity, 98%) and 16 of 233 serum samples from patients with Ross River virus, brucella, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, mycoplasma, Q-fever, toxoplasma, hepatitis A virus, Treponema pallidum, or Borrelia burgdorferi infection (specificity, 93%), with the majority of these patients showing lower levels of IgM in comparison to those in patients with leptospiral infection. We conclude that this ELISA is sufficiently sensitive for use as an initial screen for leptospiral infections, with subsequent confirmation of positive test results by MAT. PMID:9230359

  2. Thrombocytopenia in common variable immunodeficiency patients - clinical course, management, and effect of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Szaflarska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency of humoral immunity with heterogeneous clinical features. Diagnosis of CVID is based on hypogammaglobulinaemia, low production of specific antibodies, and disorders of cellular immunity. The standard therapy includes replacement of specific antibodies with human immunoglobulin, prophylaxis, and symptomatic therapy of infections. High prevalence of autoimmunity is characteristic for CVID, most commonly: thrombocytopaenia and neutropaenia, celiac disease, and systemic autoimmune diseases. The study included seven children diagnosed with CVID and treated with immunoglobulin substitution from 2 to 12 years. Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed prior to CVID in four children, developed during immunoglobulin substitution in three children. In one boy with CVID and thrombocytopaenia, haemolytic anaemia occurred, so a diagnosis of Evans syndrome was established. Therapy of thrombocytopaenia previous to CVID included steroids and/or immunoglobulins in high dose, and azathioprine. In children with CVID on regular immunoglobulin substitution, episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia were associated with infections and were treated with high doses of immunoglobulins and steroids. In two patients only chronic thrombocytopaenia was noted. Splenectomy was necessary in one patient because of severe course of thrombocytopaenia. The results of the study indicated a supportive role of regular immunoglobulin substitution in patients with CVID and chronic thrombocytopaenia. However, regular substitution of immunoglobulins in CVID patients did not prevent the occurrence of autoimmune thrombocytopaenia episodes or exacerbations of chronic form. In episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia or exacerbations of chronic thrombocytopaenia, infusions of immunoglobulins in high dose are effective, despite previous regular substitution in the replacing dose.

  3. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin substitution and therapy].

    PubMed

    Gulácsy, Vera; Maródi, László

    2011-01-09

    Patients with combined primary immunodeficiency or B-cell deficiency with low serum concentration of immunoglobulin G can be efficiently treated with immunoglobulin G concentrates. From the 1950s IgG was used intramuscularly, and from the 1980s intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement has become widely available for replacement therapy. Among the potential side effects of IVIG (including anaphylaxis), further disadvantages of IVIG are hospitalization during treatment and varying concentrations of IgG. Over the past ten years, subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have become reasonable alternatives to IVIG. SCIG given weekly assures a more balanced serum IgG level, side affects are mostly local and temporary; systemic, severe adverse events have not been observed. In addition, SCIG can be used for home treatment of patients which improves their quality of life remarkably.

  4. Serum immunoglobulins in Nigerian neonates.

    PubMed

    Akinwolere, O A; Akinkugbe, F M; Oyewole, A I; Salimonu, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins G, M and A levels were studied in 187 Nigerian neonates. Estimations were done by the radial immunodifusion method of Mancini. Immunoglobulin G shows a fall in value in the first few days of life to about 62% of the value in the last days of the neonatal period. There is however a gradual increase in the level of IgM to about double at the end of the neonatal period. IgA level remained relatively constantly low throughout this period. The effect of maternal education on the levels of immunoglobulins of their neonates was also investigated. This had a positive influence at the secondary educational level, affecting only the IgG and IgA.

  5. Identifying nonspecific SAGE tags by context of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Wang, San Ming

    2008-01-01

    Many serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags can be matched to multiple genes, leading to difficulty in SAGE data interpretation and analysis. As only a subset of genes in the human genome are transcribed in a certain type of tissue/cell, we used microarray expression data from different tissue types to define contexts of gene expression and to annotate SAGE tags collected from the same or similar tissue sources. To predict the original transcript contributing a nonspecific SAGE tag collected from a particular tissue, we ranked the corresponding genes by their expression levels determined by microarray. We developed a tissue-specific SAGE tag annotation database based on microarray data collected from 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The database can be queried online at: http://www.basic.northwestern.edu/SAGE/. The accuracy of this database was confirmed by experimental data.

  6. Targeting microbial biofilms using Ficin, a nonspecific plant protease

    PubMed Central

    Baidamshina, Diana R.; Trizna, Elena Y.; Holyavka, Marina G.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Artyukhov, Valeriy G.; Akhatova, Farida S.; Rozhina, Elvira V.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Kayumov, Airat R.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, the communities of surface-attached bacteria embedded into extracellular matrix, are ubiquitous microbial consortia securing the effective resistance of constituent cells to environmental impacts and host immune responses. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are generally inaccessible for antimicrobials, therefore the disruption of biofilm matrix is the potent approach to eradicate microbial biofilms. We demonstrate here the destruction of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms with Ficin, a nonspecific plant protease. The biofilm thickness decreased two-fold after 24 hours treatment with Ficin at 10 μg/ml and six-fold at 1000 μg/ml concentration. We confirmed the successful destruction of biofilm structures and the significant decrease of non-specific bacterial adhesion to the surfaces after Ficin treatment using confocal laser scanning and atomic force microscopy. Importantly, Ficin treatment enhanced the effects of antibiotics on biofilms-embedded cells via disruption of biofilm matrices. Pre-treatment with Ficin (1000 μg/ml) considerably reduced the concentrations of ciprofloxacin and bezalkonium chloride required to suppress the viable Staphylococci by 3 orders of magnitude. We also demonstrated that Ficin is not cytotoxic towards human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) and dog adipose derived stem cells. Overall, Ficin is a potent tool for staphylococcal biofilm treatment and fabrication of novel antimicrobial therapeutics for medical and veterinary applications. PMID:28387349

  7. Expression of human T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin-3 (TIM-3) and TIM-3 ligands in peripheral blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingqing; Qian, Qihong; Zhao, Zuotao; Fang, Fumin; Hu, Xiaohan; An, Jingnan; Wu, Jian; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) family is associated with autoimmune diseases, but its level of expression in the immune cells of patients with SLE is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine whether TIM-3 and Galectin-9 (Gal-9) contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. In total, 30 patients with SLE and 30 healthy controls were recruited, and their levels of TIM-3 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were examined via flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the levels of Gal-9 expression in serum and in PBMCs were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The relation between the level of TIM-3 or Gal-9 expression and the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was also studied. Finally, the function of the TIM-3 and Gal-9 pathway in the pathogenesis of SLE was explored. Our results showed that the levels of expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 on CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD56(+) T cells and in serum in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. We found that the level of Gal-9 expression was significantly higher in both serum and PMBCs of patients with SLE than in healthy controls. The up-regulation of TIM-3 and Gal-9 expression in patients with SLE was closely related to the SLEDAI scores. In addition, Gal-9 blocking antibody significantly inhibited CD3-stimulated PBMC proliferation and Th1-derived cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α), Th2-derived cytokines (IL-4, IL-10), a Th17-derived cytokine (IL-17A), and release of a pro-inflammatory factor (IL-6) in patients with SLE. The results suggest that increased expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 may be a biomarker for SLE diagnosis and that the TIM-3 pathway may be a target for SLE treatment.

  8. Epitope specificity of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) elicited by pneumococcal type 23F synthetic oligosaccharide- and native polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines: comparison with human anti-polysaccharide 23F IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso de Velasco, E; Verheul, A F; van Steijn, A M; Dekker, H A; Feldman, R G; Fernández, I M; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1994-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae type 23F capsular polysaccharide (PS23F) consitss of a repeating glycerol-phosphorylated branched tetrasaccharide. The immunogenicities of the following related antigens were investigated: (i) a synthetic trisaccharide comprising the backbone of one repeating unit, (ii) a synthetic tetrasaccharide comprising the complete repeating unit, and (iii) native PS23F (all three conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]) and (iv) formalin-killed S. pneumoniae 23F. All antigens except the trisaccharide-KLH conjugate induced relatively high anti-PS23F antibody levels in rabbits. The epitope specificity of such antibodies was then studied by means of an inhibition immunoassay. The alpha(1-->2)-linked L-rhamnose branch was shown to be immunodominant for immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH, PS23F-KLH, and killed S. pneumoniae 23F: in most sera L-rhamnose totally inhibited the binding of IgG to PS23F. Thus, there appears to be no major difference in epitope specificity between IgG induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH and that induced by antigens containing the polymeric form of PS23F. Human anti-PS23F IgG (either vaccine induced or naturally acquired) had a different epitope specificity: none of the inhibitors used, including L-rhamnose and tetrasaccharide-KLH, exhibited substantial inhibition. These observations suggest that the epitope recognized by human IgG on PS23F is larger than the epitope recognized by rabbit IgG. Both human and rabbit antisera efficiently opsonized type 23F pneumococci, as measured in a phagocytosis assay using human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:7509318

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the peptide recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment of human immunoglobulin G: the energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M; Bouzida, Djamal; Gehlhaar, Daniel K; Rejto, Paul A; Freer, Stephan T; Rose, Peter W

    2002-08-15

    Monte Carlo simulations of molecular recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment (Fc) of human immunoglobulin G (Ig) protein have been performed to analyze structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding for the 13-residue cyclic peptide DCAWHLGELVWCT. The energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface using alanine scanning and equilibrium-simulated tempering dynamics with the simplified, knowledge-based energy function has enabled the role of the protein hot spot residues in providing the thermodynamic stability of the native structure to be determined. We have found that hydrophobic interactions between the peptide and the Met-252, Ile-253, His-433, and His-435 protein residues are critical to guarantee the thermodynamic stability of the crystallographic binding mode of the complex. Binding free energy calculations, using a molecular mechanics force field and a solvation energy model, combined with alanine scanning have been conducted to determine the energetic contribution of the protein hot spot residues in binding affinity. The conserved Asn-434, Ser-254, and Tyr-436 protein residues contribute significantly to the binding affinity of the peptide-protein complex, serving as an energetic hot spot at the intermolecular interface. The results suggest that evolutionary conserved hot spot protein residues at the intermolecular interface may be partitioned in fulfilling thermodynamic stability of the native binding mode and contributing to the binding affinity of the complex.

  10. Typing of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and their cognate human leukocyte antigen class I ligands predicts survival of Chinese Han patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Fang; Sansas, Benoit; Kang, Bin; Preville, Xavier; Wu, Xianghua; Chang, Jianhua; Micol, Romain; Wang, Jialei; Meng, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may establish an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that is conducive to tumor growth. Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in immunological surveillance. Activation of NK cells partially depends on the interactions between killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands. We herein investigated the association of KIRs and HLA ligands with survival in metastatic NSCLC (mNSCLC) patients treated with chemotherapy in a Chinese Han population. Polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers was used to type 15 KIRs at the DNA and mRNA level and 6 HLA ligands in 70 mNSCLC patients. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression model was applied for multivariate survival analysis, with the stepwise selection, to determine independent predictors of survival. It was observed that patients with KIR2DS4del gene expression at the mRNA level or HLA-Bw4T80 exhibited poor overall survival (OS). The multivariate analysis revealed that HLA-Bw4T80 and KIR2DS4del expression were independent predictors of OS. This observation indicated that the KIR/HLA ligand is a promising predictor of survival in mNSCLC and may also provide a strategy for treatment stratification and patient management.

  11. Stage determination and therapeutic decision in human African trypanosomiasis: value of polymerase chain reaction and immunoglobulin M quantification on the cerebrospinal fluid of sleeping sickness patients in Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Jamonneau, V; Solano, P; Garcia, A; Lejon, V; Djé, N; Miezan, T W; N'Guessan, P; Cuny, G; Büscher, P

    2003-07-01

    In human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), two disease stages are defined: the first, or haemo-lymphatic stage, and the second, or meningo-encephalitic stage. Stage determination forms the basis of therapeutic decision and is of prime importance, as the drug used to cure second-stage patients has considerable side-effects. However, the tests currently used for stage determination have low sensitivity or specificity. Two new tests for stage determination in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were evaluated on 73 patients diagnosed with HAT in Côte d'Ivoire. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detecting trypanosome DNA (PCR/CSF) is an indirect test for trypanosome detection whereas the latex agglutination test detecting immunoglobulin M (LATEX/IgM) is an indicator for neuro-inflammation. Both tests were compared with classically used tests, double centrifugation and white blood cell count of the CSF. PCR/CSF appeared to be the most sensitive test (96%), and may be of use to improve stage determination. However, its value for therapeutic decision appears limited, as patients whose CSF was positive with PCR were successfully treated with pentamidine. This result confirms those of previous works that showed that some patients with trypanosomes in the CSF could be treated successfully with pentamidine. LATEX/IgM, which depending on the cut-off, showed lower sensitivity of 76% and 88%, but higher specificity of 83% and 71% for LATEX/IgM 16 and LATEX/IgM 8 respectively, appears more appropriate for therapeutic decision making.

  12. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  14. Yoga to treat nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Carter, Catherine; Stratton, Carol; Mallory, Debra

    2011-08-01

    Low back pain is common and poses a challenge for clinicians to find effective treatment to prevent it from becoming chronic. Chronic low back pain can have a significant impact on an employee's ability to remain an active and productive member of the work force due to increased absenteeism, duty restrictions, or physical limitations from pain. Low back pain is the most common cause of work-related disability among employees younger than 46 years. Advancing technology and less invasive surgical procedures have not improved outcomes for employees who suffer from low back pain. Most continue to experience some pain and dysfunction after conventional treatments such as injections and surgery. An alternative treatment that could reduce nonspecific chronic low back pain would benefit both employees and employers. Exercising and remaining active are part of most guidelines' routine care recommendations but are not well defined.

  15. Selective staining of CdS on ZnO biolabel for ultrasensitive sandwich-type amperometric immunoassay of human heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein and immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Liu, Ling; Sui, Yuyun; Li, Yunlong; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2017-05-15

    We report on an ultrasensitive metal-labeled amperometric immunoassay of proteins, which is based on the selective staining of nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) on ZnO nanocrystals and in-situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) detection on the immunoelectrode. Briefly, antibody 1 (Ab1), bovine serum albumin (BSA), antigen and ZnO-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) labeled antibody 2 (Ab2-ZnO-MWCNTs) were successively anchored on a β-cyclodextrin-graphene sheets (CD-GS) nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), forming a sandwich-type immunoelectrode (Ab2-ZnO-MWCNTs/antigen/BSA/Ab1/CD-GS/GCE). CdS was selectively grown on the catalytic ZnO surfaces through chemical reaction of Cd(NO3)2 and thioacetamide (ZnO-label/CdS-staining), due to the presence of an activated cadmium hydroxide complex on ZnO surfaces that can decompose thioacetamide. A beforehand cathodic "potential control" in air and then injection of 7μL of 0.1M aqueous HNO3 on the immunoelectrode allow dissolution of the stained CdS and simultaneous cathodic preconcentration of atomic Cd onto the electrode surface, thus the following in-situ ASV detection can be used for immunoassay with enhanced sensitivity. Under optimized conditions, human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) are analyzed by this method with ultrahigh sensitivity, excellent selectivity and small reagent-consumption, and the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) are 0.4fgmL(-1) for IgG and 0.3fgmL(-1) for FABP (equivalent to 73 FABP molecules in the 6μL sample employed).

  16. Fusion of Na-ASP-2 with human immunoglobulin Fcγ abrogates histamine release from basophils sensitized with anti-Na-ASP-2 IgE.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Bin; Santiago, H; Keegan, B; Gillespie, P; Xue, J; Bethony, J; de Oliveira, L M; Jiang, D; Diemert, D; Xiao, S-H; Jones, K; Feng, X; Hotez, P J; Bottazzi, M E

    2012-01-01

    Na-ASP-2 is a major protein secreted by infective third-stage larvae (L3) of the human hookworm Necator americanus upon host entry. It was chosen as a lead vaccine candidate for its ability to elicit protective immune responses. However, clinical development of this antigen as a recombinant vaccine was halted because it caused allergic reactions among some of human volunteers previously infected with N. americanus. To prevent IgE-mediated allergic reactions induced by Na-ASP-2 but keep its immunogenicity as a vaccine antigen, we designed and tested a genetically engineered fusion protein, Fcγ/Na-ASP-2, composed of full-length Na-ASP-2 and truncated human IgG Fcγ1 that targets the negative signalling receptor FcγRIIb expressed on pro-allergic cells. The chimeric recombinant Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and shared the similar antigenicity as native Na-ASP-2. Compared to Na-ASP-2, the chimeric fusion protein efficiently reduced the release of histamine in human basophils sensitized with anti-Na-ASP-2 IgE obtained from individuals living in a hookworm-endemic area. In dogs infected with canine hookworm, Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 resulted in significantly reduced immediate-type skin reactivity when injected intradermally compared with Na-ASP-2. Hamsters vaccinated with Fcγ/Na-ASP-2 formulated with Alhydrogel(®) produced specific IgG that recognized Na-ASP-2 and elicited similar protection level against N. americanus L3 challenge as native Na-ASP-2.

  17. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains.

    PubMed

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo; Cirillo, Davide; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition.

  18. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, M G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease that is usually treated aggressively to slow the rate of joint destruction. The therapeutic strategy used at the French centre, described here, is to use the non-biological disease-modifying drug, methotrexate, as first-line therapy and to add biological agents as second-line treatment. The two other autoimmune diseases discussed in this session were immunobullous skin diseases, and secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM). In the former conditions, low levels of pathogenic autoantibodies can be achieved with adjuvant intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy, usually in combination with an immunosuppressant. Secondary RM has an autoimmune basis, as shown by high tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels and specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphisms. Although the mechanism is not yet known, IVIg may also be an effective treatment, despite the generally low doses used in published studies. PMID:25546788

  19. Half molecular exchange of IgGs in the blood of healthy humans: chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins containing HL fragments of antibodies of different subclasses (IgG1-IgG4).

    PubMed

    Sedykh, Sergey E; Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Prince, Viktor V; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-10-20

    In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins represent products of clonal B cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen (monospecific). There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monospecific molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. But the issue concerning the possibility of exchange by HL-fragments between the antibody molecules in human blood is still unexplored. Different physico-chemical and immunological methods for analysis of half-molecule exchange between human blood IgGs were used. Using eighteen blood samples of healthy humans we have shown unexpected results for the first time: blood antibodies undergo extensive post-transcriptional half-molecule exchange and IgG pools on average consist of 62.4 ± 6.5% IgGs containing kappa light chains (kappa-kappa-IgGs), 29.8.6 ± 5.4% lambda light chains (lambda-lambda-IgGs), and 8.8 ± 2.7% (range 2.6-16.8%) IgGs containing both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained on average (%): IgG1 (36.0 and 32.3), IgG2 (50.9 and 51.4), IgG3 (9.7 and 9.9), and IgG4 (6.5 and 5.7), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 25.5 ± 4.2 IgG1, 50.8 ± 3.9 IgG2, 9.1 ± 2.1 IgG3, and 14.5 ± 2.2 IgG4. Our unexpected data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between blood IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens. The existence of blood chimeric bifunctional IgGs with different binding sites destroys the classic paradigm. Due to the phenomenon of polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of bifunctional IgGs containing HL-fragments of different types to different antigens, such IgGs may be important in human blood for widening their different biological functions.

  20. The vectorial release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, Michael J.

    1971-01-01

    A microsomal preparation from a mouse plasmacytoma, MOPC 47A, that secretes immunoglobulin A was used to study the release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides in vitro. Nascent chains were released with puromycin and characterized with specific antiserum against the immunoglobulin product of the tumour. When the tissue had been prelabelled with [3H]leucine the experiments were complicated by the large background of completed radioactive polypeptides in the microsomal preparation. Up to one-third of the released radioactivity in the microsomal preparation could be recognized as immunoglobulin. With [3H]-puromycin as the radioactive label, however, the results are much easier to interpret, although the proportion of released radioactivity that can be identified as immunoglobulin is lower (up to one-tenth). Both types of experiment demonstrate that all of the recognizable nascent immunoglobulin chains remain in association with the microsomal vesicles after release from the ribosomes. PMID:5124814

  1. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  2. A comparative study showing the potency of anti-C3d and anti-immunoglobulin G in polyspecific anti-human globulin using fresh and cryopreserved red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Kanchan; Satapathy, Ranjan Kumar; Gulati, Garima; Singh, Surinder

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The antiglobulin test is used to determine red blood cells (RBCs) having surface-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or complement (C3b, C3d, C4b, and C4d) free in serum or attached to antigens on RBCs. In such circumstances, the quality of the anti-human globulin (AHG) which is used in routine cross-match/indirect agglutination test plays a vital role in blood transfusion medicine. For potency testing of polyspecific AHG, it is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration and the Centre for Biologics Evaluation and Research to use fresh O +ve RBCs within 1 hr of collection for sensitization with anti-C3d. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: Freshly collected red cells were cryopreserved and stored at a temperature of −70°C for 30 days. These cells were then sensitized with C3d and IgG after deglycerolization. Their viability was checked by potency testing using polyspecific AHG-containing anti-C3d and anti-IgG. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anonymous left over fresh whole blood samples were collected from the Indian Red Cross Society, New Delhi, with CPDA as an anticoagulant, and the samples were treated within 1 h of collection. ABO and Rh (D) phenotyping was performed by test tube method. RBCs and plasma from the same donor were used throughout the study. RESULTS: In this comparative study, fresh RBCs (O +ve) maintained their viability after cryopreservation and were also found to be suitable for sensitization with C3d and IgG. The potency of polyclonal AHG did not differ significantly with fresh RBCs and cryopreserved RBCs for 30 days. CONCLUSION: This result suggests that the sensitization of fresh RBCs with IgG and C3d is not affected by using cryopreserved cells for 30 days. PMID:28316437

  3. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  4. Influence of experimental alcohol administration on serum immunoglobulin levels: contrasting effects on IgE and other immunoglobulin classes.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Gomez-Rial, J; Gude, F; Vidal, C; Gonzalez-Quintela, A

    2012-01-01

    In humans, alcoholic liver disease is associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, particularly with high serum concentrations of IgA. Furthermore, alcohol consumption is associated with high concentrations of IgE and low concentrations of IgG. However, there is little experimental evidence to corroborate these observational findings. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential short-term effects of alcohol administration on serum immunoglobulin concentrations in mice, and the potential influence of sex and strain on these effects. Eight mouse groups were defined by strain (Swiss vs C57BL/6), sex (male vs female), and experimental procedure (alcohol administration vs control diet). Alcohol was administered in a semi-liquid diet (6.5%v/v); control animals received an isocaloric semi-liquid diet. Immunoglobulin concentrations (IgE, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured at baseline and weekly thereafter for 4 weeks. Serum Th1 (interferon-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-13) cytokines were measured at week 4. We found significant variations in baseline immunoglobulin concentrations depending upon mouse sex and strain. Alcohol administration was quickly followed by an increase in serum IgE concentrations in all experimental groups. IgE increase was correlated with serum IL-13 increase. In contrast, alcohol administration was not associated with significant changes in serum IgA and IgM concentration, and appeared to decrease IgG subclass concentrations. Alcohol effects on immunoglobulin concentrations were independent of mouse strain and sex. In conclusion, alcohol administration in mice had contrasting effects on IgE and other immunoglobulin classes. This experimental evidence confirms observational results in humans.

  5. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs.

  6. Production and Characterization of a Set of Mouse-Human Chimeric Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Subclass and IgA Monoclonal Antibodies with Identical Variable Regions Specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serogroup O6 Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Michael J.; Gerçeker, A. Alev; Reff, Mitchell E.; Pier, Gerald B.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy- and light-chain variable regions from a murine monoclonal antibody that recognize Pseudomonas aeruginosa serogroup O6 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used to generate a series of chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies with identical variable regions. The murine variable-region gene segments were cloned into an immunoglobulin (Ig) cDNA expression vector that contained the human kappa light-chain and IgG1 constant regions. The IgG1 heavy-chain constant region was then replaced with the human IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, or IgA1 heavy-chain constant region. The five different expression vectors were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibodies exhibited immunoreactivity and affinity similar to that of the parental murine IgG antibody toward whole cells of a serogroup O6 strain. In vitro complement deposition assays demonstrated that the chimeric IgG4 and IgA antibodies did not mediate the deposition of complement component C3 onto the surface of either purified LPS or whole bacteria. The chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies were similar in their ability to deposit C3 onto the surface of both bacteria and LPS, while IgG2 antibody was more effective at depositing C3 onto the surface of bacteria than onto purified LPS. The pattern of opsonophagocytic activity of the chimeric monoclonal antibodies was similar to that of complement deposition onto bacterial cells in that the chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 had the highest opsonic activity. Although IgG2 deposited more C3 onto the bacterial surface than did IgG4 or IgA, all three of these isotypes had low opsonic activity against the serogroup O6 target strain. This series of related antibodies will help reveal functional differences in efficacy among protective antibodies to P. aeruginosa and will be critical for defining the optimal formulation of either a vaccine for active immunization or a polyclonal intravenous IgG or monoclonal antibody cocktail for passive immunotherapy. PMID

  7. Molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of protein A-immunoglobulin G1 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex.

  8. Expression cloning of a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor: a structural mosaic of hematopoietin receptor, immunoglobulin, and fibronectin domains

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation from a placental library, of two cDNAs that can encode high affinity receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNAs are predicted to encode integral membrane proteins of 759 and 812 amino acids in length. The predicted extracellular and membrane spanning sequences of the two clones are identical, as are the first 96 amino acids of their respective cytoplasmic regions. Different COOH termini of 34 or 87 residues are predicted for the two cDNAs, due apparently to alternate splicing. The receptor with the longer cytoplasmic domain is the closest human homologue of the murine G-CSF receptor recently described by Fukunaga et al. (Fukunaga, R., E. Ishizaka-Ikeda, Y. Seto, and S. Nagata. 1990. Cell. 61:341). A hybridization probe derived from the placental G-CSF receptor cDNA detects a approximately 3-kb transcript in RNAs isolated from placenta and a number of lymphoid and myeloid cells. The extracellular region of the G-CSF receptors is composed of four distinct types of structural domains, previously recognized in other cell surface proteins. In addition to the two domains of the HP receptor family-defining region (Patthy, L. 1990. Cell. 61:13) it incorporates one NH2-terminal Ig-like domain, and three additional repeats of fibronectin type III-like domains. The presence of both an NH2-terminal Ig-like domain and multiple membrane-proximal FN3-like domains suggests that the G-CSF receptor may be derived from an ancestral NCAM-like molecule and that the G-CSF receptor may function in some adhesion or recognition events at the cell surface in addition to the binding of G-CSF. PMID:2147944

  9. The Fab Conformations in the Solution Structure of Human Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) Restrict Access to Its Fc Region

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Lucy E.; Hui, Gar Kay; Gor, Jayesh; Heenan, Richard K.; Dalby, Paul A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Human IgG4 antibody shows therapeutically useful properties compared with the IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 subclasses. Thus IgG4 does not activate complement and shows conformational variability. These properties are attributable to its hinge region, which is the shortest of the four IgG subclasses. Using high throughput scattering methods, we studied the solution structure of wild-type IgG4(Ser222) and a hinge mutant IgG4(Pro222) in different buffers and temperatures where the proline substitution suppresses the formation of half-antibody. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that both IgG4 forms were principally monomeric with sedimentation coefficients s20,w0 of 6.6–6.8 S. A monomer-dimer equilibrium was observed in heavy water buffer at low temperature. Scattering showed that the x-ray radius of gyration Rg was unchanged with concentration in 50–250 mm NaCl buffers, whereas the neutron Rg values showed a concentration-dependent increase as the temperature decreased in heavy water buffers. The distance distribution curves (P(r)) revealed two peaks, M1 and M2, that shifted below 2 mg/ml to indicate concentration-dependent IgG4 structures in addition to IgG4 dimer formation at high concentration in heavy water. Constrained x-ray and neutron scattering modeling revealed asymmetric solution structures for IgG4(Ser222) with extended hinge structures. The IgG4(Pro222) structure was similar. Both IgG4 structures showed that their Fab regions were positioned close enough to the Fc region to restrict C1q binding. Our new molecular models for IgG4 explain its inability to activate complement and clarify aspects of its stability and function for therapeutic applications. PMID:24876381

  10. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunoglobulin in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Borte, M

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins (IVIg and SCIg, respectively) are increasingly used in clinical practice, not only as replacement therapy but also for immunomodulation. Physicians have learned that primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients are susceptible to recurrent respiratory tract infections even when appropriately treated with immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy. Further investigation will establish whether a combined therapeutic approach including Ig dose optimization will prevent progressive lung disease in PID. The wear-off effects observed with IVIg can be minimized by adjusting the dosing regimen. It is also possible to avoid the cyclic wear-off following transition to SCIg administration. Consideration of benefit versus risk with Ig therapy includes evaluating the potential occurrence of thromboembolic and haemolytic events, which may be more frequent when Ig is administered in high doses and in the presence of pre-existing risk factors. The ability to select an administration method from IVIg, SCIg or hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg infusions provides patient choice and alternatives if one or other administration route is not suitable for a patient. The evolution in indications, applications, and understanding of Ig therapy described here has reinforced the need for robust methods to prioritize Ig use.

  11. γδTCR immunoglobulin constant region domain exchange in human αβTCRs improves TCR pairing without altering TCR gene-modified T cell function.

    PubMed

    Tao, Changli; Shao, Hongwei; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wu, Fenglin; Shen, Han; Huang, Shulin

    2017-02-15

    The adoptive genetic transfer of T cell receptors (TCRs) has been shown to be overall feasible and offer clinical potential as a treatment for different types of cancer. However, this promising clinical approach is limited by the serious potential consequence that exogenous TCR mispairing with endogenous TCR chains may lead to the risk of self-reactivity. In the present study, domain‑exchange and three‑dimensional modeling strategies were used to create a set of chimeric TCR variants, which were used to exchange the partial or complete constant region of αβTCR with corresponding γδTCR domains. The expression, assembly and function of the chimeric TCR variants were examined in Jurkat T cells and peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Genetically‑encoded chimeras were fused with a pair of fluorescent proteins (ECFP/EYFP) to monitor expression and the pairing between chimeric TCRα chains and TCRβ chains. The fluorescence energy transfer based on confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the introduction of γδTCR constant sequences into the αβTCR did not result in a global reduction of mispairing with endogenous TCR. However, the TCR harboring the immunoglobulin‑like domain of the γδTCR constant region (i.e., TCR∆IgC), showed a higher expression and preferential pairing, compared with wild‑type (wt)TCR. The function analysis showed that TCR∆IgC exhibited the same levels of interferon-γ production and cytotoxic activity, compared with wtTCR. Furthermore, these modified TCR-transduced T cells retained the classic human leukocyte antigen restriction of the original TCR. The other two chimeric TCRs, had either exchange of the cp+tm+ic domain or exchange of the whole C domain (Fig. 1). Ultimately, exchange of these domains demonstrated defective function in the transduced T cells. Taken together, these findings may provide further understanding of the γδTCR constant domain with implications for the improvement of TCR gene transfer

  12. Inhibitory potential of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) colostrum immunoglobulin G on Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    L S, Mamatha Bhanu; Nishimura, S-I; H S, Aparna

    2016-07-01

    The unique components of colostrum like free oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates are known to offer resistance to enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract and have the ability to inhibit the localized adherence of enteropathogens to the digestive tract of the neonates. In this context, we have evaluated the in vitro effect of buffalo colostrum immunoglobulin G on human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, a predominant multidrug resistant pathogen associated with nasocomial infections. The investigation revealed growth inhibitory potential of immunoglobulin G in a dose dependent manner supported by scanning electron microscopic studies. The N-glycan enriched fraction of immunoglobulin G after PNGase treatment was found more effective, comparable to ampicillin than native immunoglobulin G supporting the fact that colostrum derived oligosaccharides is crucial and act as ideal substrates for undesirable and pathogenic bacteria. The MALDI TOF/TOF analysis confirmed the glycostructures of abundant N-glycans of immunoglobulin G exerting antibacterial activity. The proteomic analysis revealed variations between control and treated cells and expression of chemotaxis-CheY protein (14kDa) was evidenced in response to immunoglobulin G treatment. Hence, it would be interesting to investigate the mode of inhibition of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae by buffalo colostrum immunoglobulin G with the identification of a newly expressed signalling protein.

  13. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-01-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression. Images PMID:2304473

  14. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  15. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  16. Expression of immunoglobulin-cross-reactive molecules by neoplastic human T cells. I. Surface detection and isolation of molecules reactive with chicken anti-F(ab')2, anti-alpha and anti-mu antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Haegert, D G; Timm, M

    1983-01-01

    There is evidence that the T-cell antigen receptor is immunoglobulin-related and that normal human T cells express surface determinants which cross-react with chicken anti-F(ab')2, anti-alpha and anti-mu antibodies. Surface marker study of six neoplastic human T cell lines suggested that F(ab')2- and mu-cross-reactive determinants may be expressed independently of alpha-cross-reactive determinants. F(ab')2-cross-reactive materials--F(ab')2-CRMs--were then isolated from several T-cell lines and analysed by reverse passive haemagglutination and in immunoprecipitation experiments by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis in buffers containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions. It was shown that MOLT-4- and CCRF-CEM-derived F(ab')2-CRMs differ serologically and that alpha- are indeed expressed independently of F(ab')2- and mu-cross-reactive determinants. The F(ab')2-CRMs were shown to be T cell-derived, to express determinants similar to or identical with F(ab')2-cross-reactive determinants expressed in normal T-cell membranes and to correspond closely to T-cell antigen binding molecules. Evidence was also obtained that the two F(ab')2-CRMs differ from one another in molecular weight. SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions of MOLT-4- and CCRF-CEM-derived F(ab')2-CRMs identified major components of mol. wt. 135,000 and mol. wt. 330,000 respectively. Immunoprecipitation of 125I-labelled F(ab')2-CRMs by chicken anti-F(ab')2 followed by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions identified major components of mol. wt. 80,000 and mol. wt. of 51,000 from CCRF-CEM-derived F(ab')2-CRMs and tentatively identified components of mol. wt. 52,000 and mol. wt. 23,000 from MOLT-4-derived F(ab')2-CRMs. Images Figure 1 PMID:6195097

  17. A double signal electrochemical human immunoglobulin G immunosensor based on gold nanoparticles-polydopamine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as a sensor platform and AgNPs/carbon nanocomposite as signal probe and catalytic substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Huang, Na; Lu, Qiujun; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, a double signal electrochemical Human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) immunosensor based on AgNPs/carbon nanocomposite (Ag/C NC) as the signal probe and catalytic substrate was developed for fast and sensitive detection of HIgG. The as-prepared AuNPs-PDA-rGO nanocomposite and Ag/C NC were confirmed by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to investigate the electrochemical properties of the proposed immunosensor. The AuNPs-PDA-rGO nanocomposite can improve the electron transfer rate and capture more Ab1. In the sandwich-type immunoassay process, the Ag/C NC functionalized bioconjugates were captured on HIgG/Ab1/AuNPs-PDA-rGO surface and the electrochemical double-signal strategy was employed. These double electrochemical detection signals were directly monitored the oxidation current originated from Ag/C NC and indirectly detected the reduction current of benzoquinone which was produced from the reaction of H2O2 and HQ by catalysis of Ag/C NC in electrochemical detection of HIgG. Under the optimized conditions, the current responses were changed with the concentrations of HIgG for the proposed immunosensor with wide linear ranges of 0.1 to 100 ngmL(-1) and 0.01-100 ngmL(-1) with the lowest detection concentration of 0.001 ng mL(-1) in the absence and presence of H2O2 and HQ. The double-signal strategy is used for detection of HIgG, and the results came from the two signals were well consistent with each other. The proposed immunosensor was successfully applied in analysis of human IgG in real samples and this strategy may provide a relative simple and effective method for construction of other immunsensors in detection of other biomarkers in clinical medicine.

  18. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP.

  19. Comparison of techniques of detecting immunoglobulin-binding protein reactivity to immunoglobulin produced by different avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Justiz-Vaillant, A A; Akpaka, P E; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Smikle, M F

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of this study was to use several immunological assays to investigate the reactivity of immunoglobulin binding protein (IBP) to immunoglobulins from various avian and mammalian species. The IBP studied were Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), Streptococcal protein G (SpG), Peptostreptococcal protein L (SpL) and recombinant protein LA (SpLA). The various immunological techniques used were double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony technique) that tested positive high protein reactivities, direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that tested moderate and low positive protein binding capacities, respectively. In addition to sandwich ELISAs, immunoblot analyses and Ig-purification by SpA-affinity chromatography, which were sensitive tests and helpful in the screening and confirmatory tests were also used. The Ouchterlony technique showed that compared to the other proteins, SpLA had the highest range of reactivity with animal sera and purified immunoglobulins while SpL was least reactive. With the direct ELISA, SpL reacted with the raccoon sera, rabbit IgG and with IgY from bantam hens and pigeons. While with the direct ELISA, SpA reacted with sera from skunk, coyote, raccoon, mule, donkey and human. The sandwich ELISA revealed high reactivity of both SpG and SpLA with mammalian sera titres ranging from 1:32 (raccoon serum) to 1:1024 (mule and donkey sera). These results suggest that IBP can be used for the detection of immunoglobulin using various immunological assays and this is important for the diagnosis of infectious diseases in animal and bird populations studied and in the purification of immunoglobulins.

  20. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Print A A A What's in this article? ... Questions en español Análisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina A (IgA) What It Is An IgA test measures the ...

  1. Pharmacoeconomics of immunoglobulins in primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2009-08-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders are associated with increased patient susceptibility to recurrent infections. Since the 1950s, intramuscular, intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin products have been used to replace functionally deficient or absent immunoglobulins, reduce the incidence of infections and prevent organ damage caused by infections. This article aims to review the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency by focusing on costs, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, supply and off-label use. To date, the economic burden of primary immunodeficiency is unknown. Past studies have supported minimal differences in effectiveness between intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins. Subcutaneous therapy may be considered for patients who prefer treatment at home. The small number of economic evaluations and their methodological limitations precludes the recommendation of a specific product for use in primary immunodeficiency on pharmacoeconomic grounds. Demand for immunoglobulins has increased over time, leading to periodic shortages and emphasizing the importance of its appropriate use.

  2. [Serum immunoglobulin E level in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Denchev, K; Radkov, M; Lipcheva, N

    1976-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin E level was determined in 50 patients with bronchial asthma, treated in the out-patients department and clinical conditions at the Faculty Hospital--Varna. The quantitative determination of immunoglobulin E was carried out by radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini with monospecific anti-IgE globulin serum from Behringswerke (GFR). A considerable elevation of immunoglobulin E in the patients' sera was found, at an average of 394 IU (control 124 IU). A discrepancy in serum immunoglobulin E level was established with the different clinical forms of asthma. The highest are the values with infectious-allergic astmha-424 IU. High are the values both in the treated and not-treated with corticosteroids, without an essential difference between the two patient groups. Some of the rest immunoglobulins showed also an elevationppIgG 2620 mg% and IgA 366 mg%.

  3. Immunoglobulin-E reactivity to wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Gomez-Rial, Jose; Valcarcel, Catalina; Campos, Joaquin; Sanz, Maria-Luisa; Linneberg, Allan; Gude, Francisco; Vidal, Carmen

    2011-03-01

    N-glycans from plant and invertebrate allergens can induce extensive immunoglobulin-E (IgE) cross-reactivity in vitro. IgE antibodies against these N-glycans, also termed cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants or CCDs, are prevalent in alcohol drinkers. This study investigated the prevalence and biological significance of IgE antibodies to N-glycans from wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers. A structured questionnaire, skin prick tests, serum IgE levels, IgE-immunoblotting to wine extracts, and basophil activation tests were used to characterize 20 heavy drinkers and 10 control subjects. Eleven heavy drinkers (55%) showed IgE binding to proteins in wine extracts. The proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as grape-derived vacuolar invertase and thaumatin-like protein. Immunoblot reactivity was closely associated with the presence of IgE to CCDs and was inhibited by preincubation with a glycoconjugate containing bromelain-type N-glycans. The same conjugate, CCD-bearing allergens, and wine extracts activated basophils in patients with high-titer CCD-specific IgE but not in healthy controls. There was no relationship between immunoblot reactivity and consumption of any specific type of wine. No patient reported symptoms of hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera venom, food, or wine. In conclusion, heavy drinkers frequently show IgE reactivity to the N-glycans of wine glycoproteins. Glycans and wine glycoprotein extracts can induce basophil activation in sensitized alcoholics. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be elucidated.

  4. Induction of non-specific suppression in chicks by specific combination of maternal antibody and related antigen.

    PubMed

    Abou Elazab, Mohamed Fahmy; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    Specific immune suppression in newly hatched chicks induced by specific maternal antibodies has been reported. Laying hens were immunized with dinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH). Purified maternal anti-DNP and non-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) Y antibodies were transferred by yolk sac inoculation to newly hatched chicks, and then, they were immunized with an optimum immunogenic dose of DNP-KLH at 1 and 4 weeks of age. Concentrations of anti-DNP antibodies in serum samples of these chicks were measured by using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Proportions of T-cell subsets in peripheral blood of these chicks were also measured by flow cytometric analysis at 5 weeks of age (one week after the second immunization). Suppression of anti-DNP antibody response and down-regulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were observed in the chicks received high dose of maternal anti-DNP antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH. On the other hand, normal anti-DNP antibody response and normal proportion of CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were observed in the chicks received high dose of non-specific IgY antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH. Furthermore, when chicks received high dose of maternal anti-DNP antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH at 1 and 4 weeks of age and then with rabbit serum albumin (RSA) at 5 and 8 weeks of age, their primary anti-RSA response was also significantly suppressed. We indicate here that specific maternal antibodies can affect both B and T cell responses and induce non-specific suppression against different antigens. However, this non-specific suppression does not continue for a long time.

  5. Immunoglobulins A, G, and M in serum and in some secretions of monkeys (Macaca fascicularis syn. irus).

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M F; Bowen, W H

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the distribution and levels of the following immunoglobulins, IgA, IgG, and IgM ,in sera and in some secretions of monkeys (M. fascicularis). IgG, IgA, and IgM were isolated from monkey serum and secretory IgA was separated from monkey milk by combined gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. These pure preparations served as standards to quantitate immunoglobulins in sera and secretions by single radial immunodiffusion. Antisera were raised in the rabbit against the pure immunoglobulins and also against the whole secretions to identify the immunoglobulins in immunoelectrophoresis. In common with humans, the major immunoglobulin in serum and amniotic fluid is IgG and the IgG/IgA ratio is greater than unity. In secretions IgA is the dominant immunoglobulin and the IgG/IgA ratio is less than 1. In general, the levels of immunoglobulins in the sera and secretions of monkeys paralleled the levels found in humans. No age-related increase in immunoglobulin levels was detected in the sera of monkeys. PMID:818024

  6. Serum immunoglobulin E and hyaluronate levels in children living along major roads

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Masayuki; Adachi, Motoaki

    1996-11-01

    To assess the effects of automobile exhaust on human health, we determined serum concentrations of total immunoglobulin E and hyaluronate in 185 schoolchildren who lived in a district that contained major roads. Serum immunoglobulin E levels were elevated in children who had asthma or wheezing, but levels did no t differ with respect to distance of their homes from the major roads. Serum hyaluronate levels were higher in children who lived less than 50 m from the roadside, compared with children who resided a greater distance from roads. The difference, however, was significant only in a subgroup of children in whom immunoglobulin E levels exceeded 250 IU/ml. Our results suggest that serum hyaluronate levels in children reflect the effects of traffic-related air pollution. Children with high immunoglobulin E levels appeared to be particularly susceptible to the effects of automobile exhaust. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Multivalent Interactions of Human Primary Amine Oxidase with the V and C22 Domains of Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-Like Lectin-9 Regulate Its Binding and Amine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fair-Mäkelä, Ruth; Salo-Ahen, Outi M. H.; Guédez, Gabriela; Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Grönholm, Janne; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-9 (Siglec-9) on leukocyte surface is a counter-receptor for endothelial cell surface adhesin, human primary amine oxidase (hAOC3), a target protein for anti-inflammatory agents. This interaction can be used to detect inflammation and cancer in vivo, since the labeled peptides derived from the second C2 domain (C22) of Siglec-9 specifically bind to the inflammation-inducible hAOC3. As limited knowledge on the interaction between Siglec-9 and hAOC3 has hampered both hAOC3-targeted drug design and in vivo imaging applications, we have now produced and purified the extracellular region of Siglec-9 (Siglec-9-EC) consisting of the V, C21 and C22 domains, modeled its 3D structure and characterized the hAOC3–Siglec-9 interactions using biophysical methods and activity/inhibition assays. Our results assign individual, previously unknown roles for the V and C22 domains. The V domain is responsible for the unusually tight Siglec-9–hAOC3 interactions whereas the intact C22 domain of Siglec-9 is required for modulating the enzymatic activity of hAOC3, crucial for the hAOC3-mediated leukocyte trafficking. By characterizing the Siglec-9-EC mutants, we could conclude that R120 in the V domain likely interacts with the terminal sialic acids of hAOC3 attached glycans whereas residues R284 and R290 in C22 are involved in the interactions with the active site channel of hAOC3. Furthermore, the C22 domain binding enhances the enzymatic activity of hAOC3 although the sialic acid-binding capacity of the V domain of Siglec-9 is abolished by the R120S mutation. To conclude, our results prove that the V and C22 domains of Siglec-9-EC interact with hAOC3 in a multifaceted and unique way, forming both glycan-mediated and direct protein-protein interactions, respectively. The reported results on the mechanism of the Siglec-9–hAOC3 interaction are valuable for the development of hAOC3-targeted therapeutics and diagnostic tools. PMID:27893774

  8. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  9. Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Giulio; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2012-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis, also known as linear IgA disease, is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disorder characterized by subepithelial bullae, with IgA autoantibodies directed against several different antigens in the basement membrane zone. Its immunopathologic characteristic resides in the presence of a continuous linear IgA deposit along the basement membrane zone, which is clearly visible on direct immunofluorescence. This disorder shows different clinical features and distribution when adult-onset of linear IgA disease is compared with childhood-onset. Diagnosis is achieved via clinical, histopathologic, and immunopathologic examinations. Two common therapies are dapsone and sulfapyridine, which reduce the inflammatory response and achieve disease remission in a variable period of time.

  10. Atypical immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Xinxin; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Primary immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is a plasma cell disorder which mainly affects heart, kidneys, liver, and peripheral nervous system. Cases of atypical AL amyloidosis presented as spontaneous vertebral compression fractures have been rarely reported, and data about the management and clinical outcomes of the patients are scarce. Methods: Herein, we present 3 new cases of AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture and review 13 cases retrieved from the literature. Results: Moreover, we observed overrepresentations of liver involvement and bone marrow involvement in AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture. Conclusion: We believe that better awareness of the rare clinical presentation as spontaneous vertebral compression fracture of AL amyloidosis can facilitate earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment. PMID:27603350

  11. Establishment of a reference material for standardization of the anti-complementary activity test in intravenous immunoglobulin products used in Japan: A collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Kiyoko; Okuma, Kazu; Ochiai, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Tezuka, Kenta; Ishii, Mieko; Ueda, Sadao; Miyamoto, Takashi; Kamimura, Koichiro; Kou, Enki; Uchida, Sanae; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Okada, Yoshiaki; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Aggregates of human plasma-derived intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) carries a risk of severe adverse events after nonspecific complement activation induced in humans administrated. Therefore, the anti-complementary activity (ACA) test is legally required in every batch of IVIGs in Japan. However, due to the intrinsic nature of this bioassay, there might be large differences in the results of ACA tests from laboratories, even when the same batch of IVIGs was measured. Our six laboratories evaluated whether there were such differences and argued for establishment of a reference material (RM) for standardization of the ACA test. Our results revealed inter-laboratory differences in ACA values, indicating a need to establish an RM. Therefore, after ACA values in candidate RMs were measured collaboratively, one RM was selected from two candidates and unit value-assigned. The RM in fact normalized the ACA test values for samples measured in parallel at almost all the laboratories, when the values were calculated relative to the assigned unit value of the RM. Thus, we established a first RM to standardize the ACA test in Japan, which enabled each laboratory to normalize ACA values constantly for IVIGs. This indicates that the establishment of an RM can contribute to quality control of IVIGs.

  12. Intestinal immunoglobulins in children with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Savilahti, E.

    1972-01-01

    The numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells in jejunal biopsy specimens of 19 children with active coeliac disease aged 0·5 to 16·5 years were studied by direct immunofluorescence. Intestinal juice immunoglobulins were measured in 14 of these patients. The number of IgA-containing cells was twice and the number of IgM-containing cells 2·5 times that of age-matched controls. There were also more IgG-, IgE-, and IgD-containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients, but the absolute numbers of these cells were low. The immunoglobulin content of the intestinal juice was not altered in coeliacs. A follow-up biopsy specimen was available from seven patients kept on a strict gluten-free diet for one to four months. A significant fall in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells was seen, and they did not differ at that time from the controls. Two patients were followed until full normalization of the jejunal structure and they had normal numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells. In children with coeliac disease in contrast to adult coeliacs, the study shows that the IgA-producing system is quantitatively stimulated during gluten challenge. The rapid drop in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells after gluten withdrawal suggests that there is no quantitative abnormality in the local immunoglobulin-producing system of the gut in coeliac disease. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:4568803

  13. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  14. Use of Sodium Polyanetholesulfonate-CaCl2 for Removal of Serum Nonspecific Inhibitors of Rubella Hemagglutination: Comparison with Other Polyanion-Divalent Cation Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Ellins, Mary L.; Campbell, James B.

    1977-01-01

    By using trypsin-treated human type O cells as indicators, we compared the abilities of four polyanion-divalent cation combinations (heparin-MnCl2; high-and low-molecular-weight dextran sulfate-CaCl2; and sodium polyanetholesulfonate [SPS]-CaCl2) for removal of serum non-immunoglobulin (lipoprotein) inhibitors of rubella hemagglutination. The combination of SPS-CaCl2 was found to be the most effective, precipitating completely the pre-β and β-lipoproteins and reducing the α-lipoprotein levels by more than 50%. Hemagglutination patterns after this treatment were clear and stable, and, when normal sera were tested, hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titers were comparable to those obtained after standard heparin-MnCl2 treatment. High-molecular-weight dextran sulfate-CaCl2 removed serum lipoproteins almost as effectively as SPS-CaCl2. However, problems of nonspecific agglutination and the heavy hemagglutination patterns resulting made this combination unacceptable for routine purposes. Neither low-molecular-weight dextran sulfate-CaCl2 nor heparin-MnCl2 removed the pre-β lipoproteins completely, and occasionally traces of β-lipoprotein also remained after treatment. The presence of pre-β lipoproteins in normal sera after treatment may be of no consequence in the HI test since we have found that the very-low-density lipoprotein fractions obtained by ultracentrifugal methods from normal sera (those corresponding to the pre-β fractions obtained by electrophoresis) had no HI activity. However, very-low-density lipoprotein fractions from all hyperlipemic sera tested had HI activity (titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:1,024) which, in the majority of cases, was not eliminated after heparin-MnCl2 treatment. In every case, treatment with SPS-CaCl2 removed this nonspecific activity completely. Since hyperlipemic sera may occasionally be encountered in routine rubella HI antibody testing, we recommend the use of SPS-CaCl2 rather than heparin-MnCl2 for pretreatment of sera. PMID

  15. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration.

  16. Immunoglobulin G4-related ophthalmic disease presenting as uveitis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    This report documents a 47-year-old man who presented with back pain, uveitis and an elevated Westergren sedimentation rate. On biopsy, a paraspinal lesion showed a nonspecific chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate. The eye symptoms, after initially responding to immunosuppressive therapy, worsened and progressed to pain, resulting in an extirpation of the right eye. The histopathology of the excised eye showed an inflammatory pseudotumor marked by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, areas of fibrosis, rare evidence of obliterative phlebitis and, focally, over 20 Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive staining cells per high power microscopic field. IgG4-related ophthalmic disease is a relatively rare inflammatory lesion involving the eye and periorbital region. It is defined by a marked lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltrate, fibrosis obliterative phlebitis and increased IgG4 immunostaining (at least 10 cells per high power microscopic field in excised tissue). The entity is not unique to the eye, and has been described in other organs including the brain, endocrine organs, liver and kidney. The clinical presentation is often related to the location of the inflammatory infiltrates, and treatment involves the use of corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents. It is important to recognize IgG4-related ophthalmic disease because the condition appears to put patients at increased risk of developing lymphoma.

  17. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  18. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    The pan-European survey provides useful information on the accessibility and trends of intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IVIg/SCIg) therapy, which is used to treat primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Although immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the first-line treatment for PIDs, the mechanisms of action of Ig therapy may differ according to the condition it is used to treat. Moreover, intriguing presentations suggest that further investigation is required to understand more clearly both the haematological and immunoregulatory effects of therapeutic immunoglobulin. This can ultimately provide more information on optimizing Ig therapy efficacy, and establish whether individualized dosing regimens for patients will be conducive to better clinical outcomes. In addition to treating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, there is evidence to suggest that immunoglobulins can potentially play a role in transplantation, which warrants further investigation for future use.

  19. Thermodynamic stability contributes to immunoglobulin specificity.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-binding specificity of immunoglobulins is important for their function in immune defense. However, immune repertoires contain a considerable fraction of immunoglobulins with promiscuous binding behavior, the physicochemical basis of which is not well understood. Evolution of immunoglobulin specificity occurs through iterative processes of mutation and selection, referred to as affinity maturation. Recent studies reveal that some somatic mutations could compromise the thermodynamic stability of the variable regions of immunoglobulins. By integrating this observation with the wealth of data on the evolution of novel enzyme activities, we propose that antibody specificity is linked to the thermodynamic stability of the antigen-binding regions, which provides a quantitative distinction between highly specific and promiscuous antibodies.

  20. Reactions of immunoglobulin G-binding ligands with platelets and platelet-associated immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, W F; Devine, D V; Ware, R

    1984-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) bound to platelets is usually detected by one of two general methods: binding of labeled anti-IgG or consumption of anti-IgG. The latter method gives, in general, values 5-10-fold greater than the former under the same conditions. To investigate these discrepancies, we have compared the detection of platelet-bound IgG by a labeled anti-IgG binding assay and by a quantitative antiglobulin consumption test using the same antibodies. The interaction of 125I-labeled monoclonal anti-IgG or polyclonal anti-IgG with washed and IgG-coated platelets was studied. The binding of these ligands to washed normal platelets was largely (50-80%) nonspecific; the binding was not saturable and was only partially inhibitable by excess unlabeled anti-IgG. The binding of anti-IgG to platelets coated with anti-PIA1, a platelet-specific IgG antibody, appeared to be saturable and inhibitable; the dissociation constant (KD) of this IgG-anti-IgG reaction was 4.9 X 10(-9) for monoclonal and 1.4 X 10(-7) for polyclonal anti-IgG. The ratio of sites present on the membrane (determined by 131I-labeled anti-PIA1) to the number of binding sites for anti-IgG determined by Scatchard analysis was 0.53 for monoclonal anti-IgG and 1.3 for polyclonal anti-IgG. The binding of monoclonal anti-IgG to platelet-bound immune complexes or IgG aggregates appeared to be complex. 131I-Labeled IgG was affixed to platelets and was detected by three tests: direct binding of radiolabeled monoclonal anti-IgG and quantitative antiglobulin consumption (QAC) tests, which were quantitated either by measuring directly the amount of radiolabeled anti-IgG consumed from fluid phase (direct QAC), or indirectly by reference to a calibration curve relating the consumption of anti-IgG by known amounts of fluid-phase, non-immune IgG (indirect QAC). The amount of platelet-bound IgG detected by the direct binding of 125I-labeled monoclonal anti-IgG and by the direct QAC approximated that known to be bound to

  1. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  2. Immunological studies of an atypical (myeloma) immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, S. G. O.; Bennich, H.

    1967-01-01

    An 8S myeloma component, isolated from serum of a patient with myelomatosis is described, which appears to have no antigenic determinants in common with human, α-, δ-, γ- or μ-polypeptide chains as revealed by immuno-electrophoresis and Ouchterlony gel diffusion analysis. The myeloma protein migrates in the fast γ-region on electrophoresis at pH 8.6 and has an elution volume on Sephadex G-200 similar to that of 6.5S IgA. The isolated myeloma component has an approximate molecular weight of 200,000 and a total carbohydrate content of 10.7 per cent. Reduction with β-mercaptoethanol and acid dissociation yields light polypeptide chains of Type L and a carbohydrate-rich component, in the ratio of 1:4. Antisera specific to determinants on the heavy chains of the myeloma protein showed no reaction with the immunoglobulins A, D, G or M. Instead unique determinants were found on the heavy polypeptide chains. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 1FIG. 7FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4168094

  3. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  4. Prevention of nonspecific reactions on reversed passive latex agglutination assay (RPLA) for detecting low amounts of staphylococcal enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M L; Heneine, L G; Santos, E J; Carmo, L S; Pereira, J L; Bergdoll, M S

    1997-01-01

    The SET-RPLA, from Denka Seiken Co. Ltd., Tokio, a commercial reversed passive latex agglutination test kit, has been recommended to establish the enterotoxicity capacity of some staphylococcal strains, implicated in food poisoning outbreaks that produce low levels of enterotoxins (SE). Despite the RPLA specificity, the occurrence of nonspecific reactions when testing low-SE-producing is common. In order to control these nonspecific reactions the addition of purified normal rabbit IgG purified was applied on approximately 350 staphylococcal isolates from human milk and anatomic sites of healthy dental student carriers. The results indicated that addition of 5% (v/v) of purified normal rabbit IgG (0.74 mg/mL) to the culture supernatant fluid is a simple and reliable tool for the controlling of nonspecific reactions in the RPLA assay.

  5. A methacrylate-based polymeric imidazole ligand yields quantum dots with low cytotoxicity and low nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Colin M.; Pate, Kayla M.; Shen, Yi; Viswanath, Anand; Tan, Rui; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Moss, Melissa A.; Greytak, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper assesses the biocompatibility for fluorescence imaging of colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) coated with a recently-developed multiply-binding methacrylate-based polymeric imidazole ligand. The QD samples were purified prior to ligand exchange via a highly repeatable gel permeation chromatography (GPC) method. A multi-well plate based protocol was used to characterize nonspecific binding and toxicity of the QDs toward human endothelial cells. Nonspecific binding in 1% fetal bovine serum was negligible compared to anionically-stabilized QD controls, and no significant toxicity was detected on 24 h exposure. The nonspecific binding results were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. This study is the first evaluation of biocompatibility in QDs initially purified by GPC and represents a scalable approach to comparison among nanocrystal-based bioimaging scaffolds. PMID:26247382

  6. Immunoglobulin treatment in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L J; Hoepelman, I M; Ellerbroek, P M

    2011-05-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are characterised by recurrent respiratory tract infections and the inability to produce effective immunoglobulin (Ig) responses. The best-known primary antibody deficiencies are common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency, and selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins (SADNI). Therapy in these patients consists of prophylactic antibiotics and/or Ig replacement therapy. Diagnostic delay remains common owing to limited awareness of the presenting features and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. Replacement therapy with immunoglobulins increases life expectancy and reduces the frequency and severity of infections, but the effect on end-organ damage is still unknown. Both intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) treatment appear to be safe, with comparable efficacy. A starting dose of 300-400 mg/kg/month in IVIg and 100 mg/week for SCIg is recommended. IgG trough levels should be >5 g/L for patients with agammaglobulinaemia and 3 g/L greater than the initial IgG level for patients with CVID; however, the clinical response should be foremost in choosing the dose and trough level. Infusion-related adverse reactions are generally mild owing to improved manufacturing processes. In this paper, aspects of Ig replacement therapy in primary antibody-deficient patients will be addressed.

  7. Nonspecific toxicites in the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Segner, W P; Schmidt, C F

    1968-08-01

    In inoculated pack experiments on Clostridium botulinum type E, unirradiated and 0.1-Mrad irradiated haddock fillets often gave nonspecific toxicities by the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. Samples given 0.2-Mrad radiation failed to produce nonspecific reactions. Nonspecific deaths sometimes occurred within 24 hr after injection, although deaths between 24 and 48 hr were more common. The symptoms and the pattern of these deaths suggested a septicemia. Heart-blood cultured from mice showing nonspecific symptoms indicated an infectious process. Among 23 isolates from the blood, eight were identified as Proteus vulgaris, two P. morganii, one P. rettgeri, one Providence subgroup B, two Aerobacter aerogenes, one Actinobacillus, three enterococci, one Alcaligenes marshalli, and four Erysipelothrix insidiosa. The E. insidiosa, Aerobacter, Providence group, and most of the Proteus isolates were infectious for mice when injected by the intraperitoneal route. But the enterococci, Alcaligenes, and Actinobacillus isolates were not infectious and probably represent secondary invaders. The cultural characteristics of the E. insidiosa isolates conform to those described in the literature, with the exception that the four strains grew in the temperature range 50 F (10 C) to 40 F (4.4 C). Nonspecific toxicities were avoided in assays for botulinum toxin by the protection of mice with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline.

  8. Structure and function of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Harry W; Cavacini, Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Immunoglobulins are heterodimeric proteins composed of 2 heavy and 2 light chains. They can be separated functionally into variable domains that bind antigens and constant domains that specify effector functions, such as activation of complement or binding to Fc receptors. The variable domains are created by means of a complex series of gene rearrangement events and can then be subjected to somatic hypermutation after exposure to antigen to allow affinity maturation. Each variable domain can be split into 3 regions of sequence variability termed the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) and 4 regions of relatively constant sequence termed the framework regions. The 3 CDRs of the heavy chain are paired with the 3 CDRs of the light chain to form the antigen-binding site, as classically defined. The constant domains of the heavy chain can be switched to allow altered effector function while maintaining antigen specificity. There are 5 main classes of heavy chain constant domains. Each class defines the IgM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and IgE isotypes. IgG can be split into 4 subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, each with its own biologic properties, and IgA can similarly be split into IgA1 and IgA2.

  9. [Effect of Neowetadina and Polyvaccinum on serum levels of immunoglobulins and total proteins in calves during the industrial fattening process].

    PubMed

    Rzedzicki, J; Gliński, Z; Kaźmir, Z; Mikucki, J

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of nonspecific stimulating preparations-Neowetadina (Biowet) and Poliwakcyna (Polfa) for stimulation of the serum level of immunoglobulins of the classes IgG, IgA and IgM and total protein was determined in calves of the black and white breed at the age of 9-10 weeks (average body weight 75-80 kg) over 8 weeks from the onset of industrial fattening in technological groups. The stimulants were given in single intramuscular injections at the following doses: 0.08 and 0.4 ml of Neowetadina per 1 kg of body weight, 0.4 ml of Poliwakcyna forte per 1 kg of body weight. The level of the particular classes of immunoglobulins in the calf sera was determined by radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini et al., modified by Fahey and McKelvey, and that of total protein by the biuret method. The serum of the IgG class immunoglobulins increased statistically significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05), starting from the 4th week after the administration of the preparations and reached its maximal value in the 5th week. However, the serum level of IgA increased in the 8th week of observation. Poliwakcyna and Neowetadina effected only slightly the increase of the serum level of IgM immunoglobulins. The preparations also stimulated the increase of total protein level in the blood serum of the calves.

  10. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  11. Hydrophilic diol monolith for the preparation of immuno-sorbents at reduced nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunasena, Dilani N; El Rassi, Ziad

    2011-08-01

    A polar organic polymer monolith (M1) was introduced for performing immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC) at reduced nonspecific interactions. The M1 monolith was prepared by the in situ polymerization of glyceryl methacrylate (GMM) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA). Through its surface diol groups, M1 provided the functionalities to immobilize antibodies. Anti-haptoglobin antibody was used as the model antibody to study the overall behavior of the immuno monolith M1 in terms of its binding to the antigen and to evaluate its nonspecific binding with other proteins, especially the high-abundance human serum proteins. To better assess the suitability of M1 for IAC, other immuno monoliths were prepared and compared with the immuno monolith M1. Two monoliths were of the traditional ones: copolymers of (i) glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) and (ii) GMM and EDMA, referred to as M2 and M3, respectively. A fourth monolith involving the copolymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride and EDMA (M4) was introduced to allow the site-directed immobilization of antibodies. Owing to its hydroxyl groups, the M1 exhibited negligible nonspecific hydrophobic interactions with proteins. On the other hand, M4 exhibited extensive electrostatic interactions, while the M2 and to a lesser extent M3 exhibited hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Leukotriene C/sub 4/ (LTC/sub 4/) produced by a human T-T hybridoma suppresses pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced immunoglobulin (Ig) production by human mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, C.H.; Ambrus, J.L. Jr.; Witzel, N.; Lewis, R.A.; Butler, J.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human T lymphocytes are capable of secreting many different lymphokines which regulate Ig production. The authors produced a human T-T fusion between T cells from a normal donor and the T lymphoma line CEM-6. From this fusion 3 of 180 clones produced a factor which suppressed polyclonal Ig production by PWM-stimulated mononuclear cells. All 3 clones expressed both T4 and T8 surface markers; CEM-6 is T4/sup +//T8/sup +/. Suppression of Ig production did not involve cytotoxicity and was most effective when the hybridoma supernatant was added during the first 3 d of culture. Production of the suppressive factor could be inhibited by corticosteroids but not indomethacin. Analysis of the hybridoma supernatant by reverse phase chromatography revealed a peak of suppressive activity in the fraction where purified LTC/sub 4/ could be eluted. Crude hybridoma supernatant contained 10-50 ng/ml of LTC/sub 4/, but no LTB/sub 4/ by radioimmunoassay (RIA). In addition, LTC/sub 4/ produced by the hybridomas co-eluted with purified LTC/sub 4/ as assessed by RIA. No LTC/sub 4/ was found in nonsuppressive hybridoma supernatants. Furthermore, antibody to LTC/sub 4/ could absorb suppressive activity from hybridoma supernatants. Thus, human T lymphocytes produce LTC/sub 4/ which suppresses polyclonal Ig production by human mononuclear cells.

  13. Secretory immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G in horse saliva.

    PubMed

    Palm, Anna-Karin E; Wattle, Ove; Lundström, Torbjörn; Wattrang, Eva

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to increase the knowledge on salivary antibodies in the horse since these constitute an important part of the immune defence of the oral cavity. For that purpose assays to detect horse immunoglobulin A (IgA) including secretory IgA (SIgA) were set up and the molecular weights of different components of the horse IgA system were estimated. Moreover, samples from 51 clinically healthy horses were tested for total SIgA and IgG amounts in saliva and relative IgG3/5 (IgG(T)) and IgG4/7 (IgGb) content were tested in serum and saliva. Results showed a mean concentration of 74μg SIgA/ml horse saliva and that there was a large inter-individual variation in salivary SIgA concentration. For total IgG the mean concentration was approx. 5 times lower than that of SIgA, i.e. 20μg IgG/ml saliva and the inter-individual variation was lower than that observed for SIgA. The saliva-serum ratio for IgG isotypes IgG3/5 and IgG4/7 was also assessed in the sampled horses and this analysis showed that the saliva-serum ratio of IgG4/7 was in general approximately 4 times higher than that of IgG3/5. The large inter-individual variation in salivary SIgA levels observed for the normal healthy horses in the present study emphasises the need for a large number of observations when studying this parameter especially in a clinical setting. Moreover, our results also indicated that some of the salivary IgG does not originate from serum but may be produced locally. Thus, these results provide novel insight, and a base for further research, into salivary antibody responses of horses.

  14. Immunoglobulin classes of Aleutian disease virus antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D D; Porter, H G; Suffin, S C; Larsen, A E

    1984-01-01

    Aleutian disease virus (ADV) persistently infects mink and causes marked hypergammaglobulinemia. Immunoglobulin class-specific antisera were used to define the total immunoglobulin of each class by radial immunodiffusion and the immunoglobulin class of ADV-specific antibody by immunofluorescence in experimentally and naturally infected mink. Electrophoretic gamma globulin closely reflects the immunoglobulin G (IgG) level in mink, and the majority of the increased immunoglobulin and ADV antibody in infected mink is IgG. IgM becomes elevated within 6 days after infection, reaches peak levels by 15 to 18 days, and returns to normal by 60 days after infection. The first ADV antibody demonstrable is IgM, and most mink have virus-specific IgM antibody for at least 85 days postinfection. Serum IgA levels in normal mink are not normally distributed, and ADV infection causes a marked elevation of IgA. Low levels of ADV-specific IgA antibody can be shown throughout the course of infection. Failure of large amounts of virus-specific IgG antibody to inhibit the reaction of virus-specific IgM and IgA antibodies suggests that the various classes of antibodies are directed against spatially different antigenic determinants. The IgM and IgA were shown not to be rheumatoid factors. PMID:6319283

  15. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PUBLIC INFORMATION Procedures and Fees § 20.50 Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. The Food and... impact that this diversion will have upon the agency's consumer protection activities, and the public policy reasons justifying the requests. A decision on the processing of such a request for...

  16. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PUBLIC INFORMATION Procedures and Fees § 20.50 Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. The Food and... impact that this diversion will have upon the agency's consumer protection activities, and the public policy reasons justifying the requests. A decision on the processing of such a request for...

  17. Intracranial hypotension: the nonspecific nature of MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Bruera, O C; Bonamico, L; Giglio, J A; Sinay, V; Leston, J A; Figuerola, M L

    2000-01-01

    We present three patients who complained of postural headache related to different types of intracranial hypotension: spontaneous or primary, and secondary, but presenting the same findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement supports the belief that the enhancement is a nonspecific meningeal reaction to low pressure.

  18. New insights into genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals with different level of general non-specific reactivity of an organism.

    PubMed

    Mulik, Alexander; Novochadov, Valery; Bondarev, Alexander; Lipnitskaya, Sofya; Ulesikova, Irina; Shatyr, Yulia

    2016-12-18

    The objective of the study was to investigate the genetic basis of general non-specific reactivity of an organism. Systematic search in PubMedCentral, PDB, KEGG and SNP databases identified a set of genes and their polymorphisms that can determine pain sensitivity and therefore the level of general non-specific reactivity of the human organism. Six SNPs were selected for genotyping kit design; 230 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. It was revealed that very high pain threshold was associated with allele A in rs1851048 and allele C in rs6777055. High level of general non-specific reactivity of an organism was associated with allele G in rs2562456 (OR=1.804, CI=1.139-2.857, p=0.011) and allele C in rs6923492 (OR=1.582, CI=1.071-2.335, p=0.021). Low level of general non-specific reactivity of an organism was associated with allele T in rs6923492 (OR=0.351, CI=0.154-0.799, p=0.010). A set of genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with the pain sensitivity and indirectly with the level of general non-specific reactivity of human organism were determined. The identified correlations reveal some molecular mechanisms of general non-specific reactivity of an organism variability and can guide further research in this area.

  19. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-09-07

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy.

  20. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  1. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  2. Hyaluronidase facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg) or subcutaneously (SCIg). While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20) has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg) infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis. PMID:27471693

  3. Discrete Pathophysiology is Uncommon in Patients with Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kortlever, Joost T.P.; Janssen, Stein J.; Molleman, Jeroen; Hageman, Michiel G.J.S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific symptoms are common in all areas of medicine. Patients and caregivers can be frustrated when an illness cannot be reduced to a discrete pathophysiological process that corresponds with the symptoms. We therefore asked the following questions: 1) Which demographic factors and psychological comorbidities are associated with change from an initial diagnosis of nonspecific arm pain to eventual identification of discrete pathophysiology that corresponds with symptoms? 2) What is the percentage of patients eventually diagnosed with discrete pathophysiology, what are those pathologies, and do they account for the symptoms? Methods: We evaluated 634 patients with an isolated diagnosis of nonspecific upper extremity pain to see if discrete pathophysiology was diagnosed on subsequent visits to the same hand surgeon, a different hand surgeon, or any physician within our health system for the same pain. Results: There were too few patients with discrete pathophysiology at follow-up to address the primary study question. Definite discrete pathophysiology that corresponded with the symptoms was identified in subsequent evaluations by the index surgeon in one patient (0.16% of all patients) and cured with surgery (nodular fasciitis). Subsequent doctors identified possible discrete pathophysiology in one patient and speculative pathophysiology in four patients and the index surgeon identified possible discrete pathophysiology in four patients, but the five discrete diagnoses accounted for only a fraction of the symptoms. Conclusion: Nonspecific diagnoses are not harmful. Prospective randomized research is merited to determine if nonspecific, descriptive diagnoses are better for patients than specific diagnoses that imply pathophysiology in the absence of discrete verifiable pathophysiology. PMID:27517064

  4. Feasibility of reducing rabies immunoglobulin dosage for passive immunization against rabies: results of In vitro and In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ashwin, Belludi Yajaman; Sudarshan, Sampada

    2013-09-01

    Passive immunization is a crucial parameter for prevention of human rabies. Presently as World Health Organization (WHO) strongly advocates local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulin in and around the bite wound, we feel that there is no basis for calculating the dose of immunoglobulin based on body weight. Keeping this in view we conducted both in vitro and in vivo studies to know whether the dose of immunoglobulin can be reduced and still obtain complete neutralization of the virus. In vitro neutralization studies were conducted using CVS strain of virus and BHK 21 cells. In vivo experiments were conducted in 4 weeks old Swiss albino mice by initial challenge with CVS followed by infiltration with increasing dilutions of either human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG) and equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIG). In vitro studies showed that a dose of 100 FFD 50 of CVS was neutralized by increasing dilution of both HRIG and ERIG and 100% neutralization was observed with HRIG and ERIG in as low quantities as 0.025 IU. In mice studies there was 100% survival of mice infiltrated with 0.025 IU of both HRIG and ERIG compared with 100% mortality in mice infiltrated with normal saline. These results suggest that it is possible to reduce the dose of rabies immunoglobulins by at least 16 times the presently advocated dose. These findings needs to be further evaluated using larger animal models and street viruses prevalent in nature but cannot serve as recommendations for use of RIG for passive immunization in humans.

  5. [Secretory immunoglobulin A in the amniotic fluid of healthy pregnant females].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Stark, K H; Lorenz, U

    1983-01-01

    Amniotic fluid levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-AgA) were measured by simple radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini using a monospecific antiserum against the human secretory component. 256 samples from healthy pregnant women were examined. Amniotic fluid S-IgA concentration increases significantly during normal pregnancy and shows a loose correlation to the phospholipid level.

  6. Teaching the Structure of Immunoglobulins by Molecular Visualization and SDS-PAGE Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory class combines molecular visualization and laboratory experimentation to teach the structure of the immunoglobulins (Ig). In the first part of the class, the three-dimensional structures of the human IgG and IgM molecules available through the RCSB PDB database are visualized using freely available software. In the second part, IgG…

  7. The effect of chronic ammonia exposure on acute phase proteins, immunoglobulin and cytokines in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia is a potential health hazard to both humans and animals, causing systemic low-grade inflammation based on its levels and durations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of 45 weeks of exposure to 30 ppm NH3 on the concentrations of acute phase proteins, immunoglobulins and c...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... test system. 866.5510 Section 866.5510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5510 Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) immunological test system. 866.5520 Section 866.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system....

  10. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) immunological test system. 866.5520 Section 866.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system....

  11. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... test system. 866.5510 Section 866.5510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5510 Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system. (a)...

  12. A preliminary analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-02-25

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 V(H) gene segments, 87 D(H) gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six J(H) gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 V(κ) gene segments, three J(κ) segments, and a single C(κ) gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these V(κ) gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 V(λ) gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream J(λ)-C(λ) cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals.

  13. A Preliminary Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Genes in the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 VH gene segments, 87 DH gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six JH gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 Vκ gene segments, three Jκ segments, and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 Vλ gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals. PMID:21364892

  14. Identification of an immunoglobulin Fc receptor of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses proteins that bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin Fc receptors on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected by the binding of biotinylated human or murine Fc molecules to strain SUNY 465 adsorbed to the bottom of microtiter wells. Biotinylated Fc binding was inhibited by unlabeled Fc molecules and human plasma. Fc receptors were identified by the binding of biotinylated Fc molecules to bacterial membrane proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Multiple bands were identified, and the major Fc-binding protein was determined to be a heat-modifiable protein. This protein migrated with approximate molecular weights of 25,000 and 32,000 (unheated and heated, respectively). Amino-terminal sequence analysis of this protein revealed a sequence identical to the heat-modifiable protein described for A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. This protein sequence exhibits significant homology with the N termini of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli and related OmpA-like proteins from other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:7927715

  15. Characterization of antibodies against ferret immunoglobulins, cytokines and CD markers.

    PubMed

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2009-12-15

    Ferret IgG and IgM were purified from normal serum, while ferret IgA was purified from bile. The estimated molecular weights of the immunoglobulin gamma, alpha and mu heavy chains were found to be 54kDa, 69kDa and 83kDa, respectively. For immunological (ELISA) quantification of ferret immunoglobulins, we identified and characterized polyclonal antibodies towards ferret IgG, IgM and IgA. We also identified 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised mostly against human CD markers which cross-reacted with ferret leukocytes. These antibodies were originally specific against human CD8, CD9, CD14, CD18, CD25, CD29, CD32, CD44, CD61, CD71, CD79b, CD88, CD104, CD172a and mink CD3. Finally, we identified 4 cross-reacting mAbs with specificities against ferret interferon-gamma, TNF-alpha, interleukin-4 and interleukin-8.

  16. Intravenous immunoglobulin transfusion in colostrum-deprived dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, A; Belloli, A; Biffani, S; Locatelli, V; Dall'Ara, P; Filipe, J; Restelli, I; Proverbio, D; Pravettoni, D

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin transfusion is employed in the management of the failure of passive transfer (FPT). The aim of this study was to investigate the dose of immunoglobulin G (IgG) needed to reach a protective concentration (>10 g/L) in colostrum-deprived dairy calves. Twenty-eight Holstein Friesian newborn male calves were randomly assigned to either a control group (CG) or a treatment group (PG). Calves in the CG received 4 L of high quality colostrum within 12 h of birth. Calves in the PG received 62.7 ± 3.1 g of IgG IV in 2.6 ± 0.3 L of plasma within 6 h after birth. Serum immunoglobulin G (sIgG) and serum total protein (sTP) concentrations were assayed before and after (24 h, 72 h and 1 week after birth) plasma transfusion or colostrum ingestion. Serum (s) IgG and sTP concentrations increased in both groups throughout the period of observation. Mean sIgG and sTP concentrations after colostrum ingestion or plasma transfusion were higher in the CG than in the PG (P <0.01). Nine treated calves developed diarrhoea during the study and four were humanely euthanased due to progressive clinical deterioration. None of the calves in the CG showed signs of disease or died during the study. The dose of IgG used in this trial effectively provided an adequate sIgG concentration in colostrum-deprived calves (>10 g/L). Calves in the CG had significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates compared to those in the PG, suggesting that plasma transfusion alone is ineffective in providing complete protection against neonatal disease.

  17. Immunomodulatory activity accompanying chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Polanowski, A; Zabłocka, A; Sosnowska, A; Janusz, M; Trziszka, T

    2012-12-01

    Immunity transfer from a mother to the newborn does not depend exclusively on immunoglobulins. Peptides, which are characterized by immunoregulatory properties that accompany IgG(2), known as proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP), have been discovered for the first time in ovine colostrum. In this report we present new data showing that some immunoregulatory peptides associated with the main immunoglobulin class, IgY, are also present in the avian immune system. Cytokine-inducing activity of particular fractions obtained from ovine colostrum, IgG+ (IgG(2) containing PRP), IgG- (IgG(2) free of PRP), and purified PRP, was compared with that of crude egg yolk IgY (IgY+), additionally purified egg yolk IgY (IgY-), and polypeptides accompanying IgY named Yolkin (Y), using an ex vivo model of whole human blood cells. It was shown that both IgG+ fraction and PRP, but not IgG-, stimulated the whole blood cells to release tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines. Similar experiments performed with hen's egg IgY preparations showed that IgY+ and Y samples showed higher cytokine-inducing activity than samples additionally purified with the use of size exclusion chromatography (IgY-). The IgY+ at a dose of 100 μg was even more active than the positive lipopolysaccharide control. It was also found that Y is able to stimulate macrophage cell line J774.2 to release nitric oxide. The results obtained suggest that IgY, the main chicken immunoglobulin fraction, is accompanied by additional polypeptides and plays a role of a transporter of biologically active substances, which was observed in the case of colostral IgG.

  18. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin (fSCIg) therapy--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponsford, M; Carne, E; Kingdon, C; Joyce, C; Price, C; Williams, C; El-Shanawany, T; Williams, P; Jolles, S

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing range of therapeutic options for primary antibody-deficient patients who require replacement immunoglobulin. These include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg), rapid push SCIg and most recently recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg (fSCIg). Advantages of fSCIg include fewer needle punctures, longer infusion intervals and an improved adverse effect profile relative to IVIg. Limited real-life experience exists concerning the practical aspects of switching or starting patients on fSCIg. We describe the first 14 patients who have been treated with fSCIg at the Immunodeficiency Centre for Wales (ICW), representing more than 6 patient-years of experience. The regimen was well tolerated, with high levels of satisfaction and no increase in training requirement, including for a treatment-naive patient. Two patients discontinued fSCIg due to pain and swelling at the infusion site, and one paused therapy following post-infusion migraines. Ultrasound imaging of paired conventional and facilitated SCIg demonstrated clear differences in subcutaneous space distribution associated with a 10-fold increase in rate and volume delivery with fSCIg. Patient profiles for those choosing fSCIg fell into two main categories: those experiencing clinical problems with their current treatment and those seeking greater convenience and flexibility. When introducing fSCIg, consideration of the type and programming of infusion pump, needle gauge and length, infusion site, up-dosing schedule, home training and patient information are important, as these may differ from conventional SCIg. This paper provides guidance on practical aspects of the administration, training and outcomes to help inform decision-making for this new treatment modality.

  19. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  20. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shibani S; Lam, Alice D; Wilson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins.

  1. Immunoglobulins in tears of normal Indian people.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Mani, K.; Saha, K.

    1976-01-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in tears from 50 healthy Indians aged from 14 to 50 years were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. The levels of IgA were substantial; those of IgG were very low; and IgD and IgM were not present. The mean IgA level was 24-6 mg/100 ml. PMID:1276121

  2. Linear immunoglobulin A/immunoglobulin G bullous dermatosis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Shigeto; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Naruse, Akiko; Tateishi, Chiharu; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ishii, Masamitsu

    2011-08-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease is characterized by marked bilateral uveitis associated with symmetric vitiligo, alopecia, poliosis and dysacousia. Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A bullous dermatosis (LABD) is characterized by small, tense, subepidermal bullae caused by IgA type autoantibody targeting the basal lamina. LABD patients sometimes show coexistence of IgG type autoantibody, termed linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis (LAGBD). We reported a 35-year-old Japanese male case of combined LAGBD and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. His human leukocyte antigen typing was -A24, B52, C*1202, DR*1502, DQ*0601. Immunoblot revealed that patient sera reacted to both 180- and 230-kDa proteins at the IgA and IgG level. Because Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and LABD are reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases, it is probable that Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and LAGBD in our case may be associated with each other in the pathomechanism. However, we cannot exclude the possibility of this being mere coincidence.

  3. Nonspecific Interaction of Streptavidin with Urease-Conjugated Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    Mouse immunoglobulin G, biotinylated anti-mlgG ( goat ), urease-conjugated anti-mlgG ( goat ), bovine serum albumin (BSA), sodium chloride, sodium...are not limited to the polyclonal ( goat ) anti-mIgG system. In Figure 6 the concentration of SA which correspoa’ded to maximum signal was...similarity of the titrations of urease-conjugated polyclonal ( goat ) anti-mlgG and monoclonal anti-NDV suggests that these results with SA were not due to

  4. Purification and partial characterization of nonspecific lipase from rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Albron, P W; Corbett, B J; Latimer, A D

    1976-03-26

    Nonspecific lipase (also referred to as micelle lipase and secondary ester hydrolase) has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity starting from acetone powder of rat pancreas. The purified enzyme is found to have a molecular weight (gel filtration) of 64 000 +/- 2000, and an equivalent weight (titration with E-600) of 65 000. Nonspecific lipase is seen to be very sensitive to inhibition by organophosphates but resistant to quinine. Evidence for the presence of sulfhydryl and imidazole groups essential for activity is presented, and some observations on substrate specificity are made. The purified enzyme appears to lack phosphate groups and lipids, and is unstable under conditions of low ionic strength and/or exposure to 2-mercaptoethanol.

  5. A small jab - a big effect: nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines.

    PubMed

    Benn, Christine S; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K; Aaby, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease.

  6. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  7. Controllable Nonspecific Protein Adsorption by Charged Hyperbranched Polyglycerol Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaming; Frey, Holger

    2015-12-08

    Antifouling thin films derived from charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (hbPG) layers were fabricated and evaluated. The anionic hbPG (a-hbPG) monolayers and cationic hbPG/anionic hbPG (c/a-hbPG) bilayers were adsorbed on the underlying self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of cysteamine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) by electrostatic interaction, respectively, and their procession was monitored by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen on the premade a-hbPG and c/a-hbPG thin films was measured and the capability of these thin films to resist nonspecific protein adsorption was evaluated by SPR as well. It is observed that the c/a-hbPG bilayer films possessed good antifouling properties. With c/a-hbPG bilayers consisting of higher molecular weight a-hbPG, the adsorption of BSA and fibrinogen were as low as 0.015 ng/mm(-2) and 0.0076 ng/mm(-2), respectively, comparable to the traditionally ultralow antifouling surfaces (<0.05 ng/mm(-2) of nonspecific protein adsorption). This work proved that the charged hbPG thin films can strongly reduce the nonspecific protein adsorption and have the promise for the antifouling coatings with improved performance.

  8. Phase separation in solutions with specific and nonspecific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, William M.; Frenkel, Daan; Oxtoby, David W.

    2014-05-28

    Protein solutions, which tend to be thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions, can demix into protein-enriched and protein-depleted phases when stressed. Using a lattice-gas model of proteins with both isotropic and specific, directional interactions, we calculate the critical conditions for phase separation for model proteins with up to four patches via Monte Carlo simulations and statistical associating fluid theory. Given a fixed specific interaction strength, the critical value of the isotropic energy, which accounts for dispersion forces and nonspecific interactions, measures the stability of the solution with respect to nonspecific interactions. Phase separation is suppressed by the formation of protein complexes, which effectively passivate the strongly associating sites on the monomers. Nevertheless, we find that protein models with three or more patches can form extended aggregates that phase separate despite the assembly of passivated complexes, even in the absence of nonspecific interactions. We present a unified view of the critical behavior of model fluids with anisotropic interactions, and we discuss the implications of these results for the thermodynamic stability of protein solutions.

  9. Effect of 60Co gamma-irradiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y; Hu, L; Wu, D

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of radiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of rat alveolar macrophages (AM). AM (effector cells) of bacille Calmette-Guerin-activated Wistar rats were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in vitro to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy. Three hours after irradiation, the AM were cultured with human lung adenocarcinoma AGZY83-a and HeLa target cells in 125I-deoxyuridine-containing media for 6 hr and the cytotoxicity indexes determined. The results indicated that the cytotoxicity indexes of AM against human lung adenocarcinoma cells and HeLa cells were 94.3 +/- 0.3% and 81.3 +/- 1.9%, respectively. The cytotoxicity indexes using an effector/target cell ratio (E/T) of 10 seemed to be greater than with ratios of 20 and 30. The cytotoxicity indexes of AM (7 rats), irradiated to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy, against adenocarcinoma cells at an E/T ratio of 10 were 87.9 +/- 8.4%, 65.4 +/- 14.1%, 47.5 +/- 17.5%, and 36.7 +/- 9.7%, respectively. The significance of the nonspecific cytotoxicity of AM in the immunological elimination of tumors and the inhibitory effect of radiation on AM cytotoxicity are discussed. PMID:1396453

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-06

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays.

  11. Immunoglobulin A in Bovine Milk: A Potential Functional Food?

    PubMed

    Cakebread, Julie A; Humphrey, Rex; Hodgkinson, Alison J

    2015-08-26

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an anti-inflammatory antibody that plays a critical role in mucosal immunity. It is found in large quantities in human milk, but there are lower amounts in bovine milk. In humans, IgA plays a significant role in providing protection from environmental pathogens at mucosal surfaces and is a key component for the establishment and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis via innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To date, many of the dairy-based functional foods are derived from bovine colostrum, targeting the benefits of IgG. IgA has a higher pathogenic binding capacity and greater stability against proteolytic degradation when ingested compared with IgG. This provides IgA-based products greater potential in the functional food market that has yet to be realized.

  12. Compartmentalized intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis during HIV infection - a model of chronic CNS inflammation?

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Mickael; Barroso, Bruno; Demasles, Stéphanie; Krim, Elsa; Marasescu, Raluca; Miquel, Marie

    2015-08-15

    HIV infects the central nervous system (CNS) during primary infection and persists in resident macrophages. CNS infection initiates a strong local immune response that fails to control the virus but is responsible for by-stander lesions involved in neurocognitive disorders. Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy now offers an almost complete control of CNS viral proliferation, low-grade CNS inflammation persists. This review focuses on HIV-induced intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis. Intrathecal Ig synthesis early occurs in more than three-quarters of patients in response to viral infection of the CNS and persists throughout the course of the disease. Viral antigens are targeted but this specific response accounts for <5% of the whole intrathecal synthesis. Although the nature and mechanisms leading to non-specific synthesis are unknown, this prominent proportion is comparable to that observed in various CNS viral infections. Cerebrospinal fluid-floating antibody-secreting cells account for a minority of the whole synthesis, which mainly takes place in perivascular inflammatory infiltrates of the CNS parenchyma. B-cell traffic and lineage across the blood-brain-barrier have not yet been described. We review common technical pitfalls and update the pending questions in the field. Moreover, since HIV infection is associated with an intrathecal chronic oligoclonal (and mostly non-specific) Ig synthesis and associates with low-grade axonal lesions, this could be an interesting model of the chronic intrathecal synthesis occurring during multiple sclerosis.

  13. Specific and Nonspecific Interactions in Ultraweak Protein–Protein Associations Revealed by Solvent Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Weak and transient protein–protein interactions underlie numerous biological processes. However, the location of the interaction sites of the specific complexes and the effect of transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions often remain elusive. We have investigated the weak self-association of human growth hormone (hGH, KD = 0.90 ± 0.03 mM) at neutral pH by the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of the amide protons induced by the soluble paramagnetic relaxation agent, gadodiamide (Gd(DTPA-BMA)). Primarily, it was found that the PREs are in agreement with the general Hwang-Freed model for relaxation by translational diffusion (J. Chem. Phys.1975, 63, 4017–4025), only if crowding effects on the diffusion in the protein solution are taken into account. Second, by measuring the PREs of the amide protons at increasing hGH concentrations and a constant concentration of the relaxation agent, it is shown that a distinction can be made between residues that are affected only by transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions and residues that are involved in specific protein–protein associations. Thus, the PREs of the former residues increase linearly with the hGH concentration in the entire concentration range because of a reduction of the diffusion caused by the transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions, while the PREs of the latter residues increase only at the lower hGH concentrations but decrease at the higher concentrations because of specific protein–protein associations that impede the access of gadodiamide to the residues of the interaction surface. Finally, it is found that the ultraweak aggregation of hGH involves several interaction sites that are located in patches covering a large part of the protein surface. PMID:24969589

  14. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-12-01

    The Interlaken Leadership Awards (ILAs), established in 2010, are monetary grants pledged annually by CSL Behring to fund research into the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy, especially into its use in neurological disorders. Five recipients of the 2011/2012 Awards were invited to present their research at the 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference. Dr Honnorat reports on paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). His multi-centre Phase II trial, currently under way, will assess the efficacy of IVIg therapy in treating PNS in the first 3 months of treatment. Dr Geis shows improved disease scores after IVIg treatment in a mouse model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). It is hoped that these promising results will translate well into human NMO. Dr Schmidt studied IVIg therapy in an mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). He reports that motor function improved and myopathic changes in skeletal muscles and creatine kinase release were decreased. Dr Gamez presents the design and rationale for a Phase II clinical trial investigating the preoperative use of IVIg therapy in myasthenia gravis patients to prevent post-operative myasthenic crisis. Dr Goebel reports results from studies elucidating the immune-mediated pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the successful IVIg therapy in a proportion of CRPS patients, and the development of a model for predicting which patients are more likely to respond to Ig therapy.

  15. Nonspecific provocation of target organs in allergic diseases: EAACI-GA(2)LEN consensus report.

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Brusasco, V; Carlsen, K-H; Crimi, E; Popov, T; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Gramiccioni, C; Bonini, M; Passali, D; Bachert, C; van Cauwenberge, P B; Bresciani, M; Bonini, S; Calonge, M; Montan, P G; Serapiao Dos Santos, M; Belfort, R; Lambiase, A; Sacchetti, M

    2007-06-01

    It is widely accepted that nonspecific tissue reactivity is a distinct pathophysiological hallmark of allergic diseases, influenced by genetic and environmental factors different from those involved in causing sensitization and allergen response of target organs. This consensus document aims at reviewing procedures currently used for nonspecific provocation of the bronchi, nose and eye and for measuring their responsiveness to nonspecific stimuli.

  16. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  17. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  18. Non-specific immunological effects of selected routine childhood immunisations: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Voysey, Merryn; McQuaid, Fiona; de Nie, Karlijn; Ryan, Rebecca; Orr, Olivia; Uhlig, Ulrike; Sande, Charles; O’Connor, Daniel; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and characterise non-specific immunological effects after routine childhood vaccines against BCG, measles, diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies. Data sources Embase, PubMed, Cochrane library, and Trip searched between 1947 and January 2014. Publications submitted by a panel of experts in the specialty were also included. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies All human studies reporting non-specific immunological effects after vaccination with standard childhood immunisations. Studies using recombinant vaccines, no vaccine at all, or reporting only vaccine specific outcomes were excluded. The primary aim was to systematically identify, assemble, and review all available studies and data on the possible non-specific or heterologous immunological effects of BCG; measles; mumps, measles, and rubella (MMR); diphtheria; tetanus; and pertussis vaccines. Results The initial search yielded 11 168 references; 77 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria for data analysis. In most included studies (48%) BCG was the vaccine intervention. The final time point of outcome measurement was primarily performed (70%) between one and 12 months after vaccination. There was a high risk of bias in the included studies, with no single study rated low risk across all assessment criteria. A total of 143 different immunological variables were reported, which, in conjunction with differences in measurement units and summary statistics, created a high number of combinations thus precluding any meta-analysis. Studies that compared BCG vaccinated with unvaccinated groups showed a trend towards increased IFN-γ production in vitro in the vaccinated groups. Increases were also observed for IFN-γ measured after BCG vaccination in response to in vitro stimulation with microbial antigens from Candida albicans, tetanus toxoid, Staphylococcus aureas, lipopolysaccharide, and

  19. Lymphoplasmacytic hypophysitis associated with immunoglobulin G4.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peter; Enno, Alar; Darwish, Balsam

    2014-02-01

    We present the unusual case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with a 2 year history of amenorrhoea and an expanding sellar lesion. Initial MRI revealed a lesion in the pituitary fossa, thought to be a pituitary adenoma. One year later, the lesion had enlarged by 5mm, with associated enhancement of the dura of the planum sphenoidale and pituitary stalk. Histopathology revealed a lymphocytic and plasma cell inflammatory infiltrate suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic hypophysitis associated with immunoglobulin G4.

  20. Nonspecific cytotoxic cells in fish (Ictalurus punctatus). V. Metabolic requirements of lysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R L; Evans, D L; Graves, S S

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms of lysis of nonspecific cytotoxic cells (NCC) from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were studied by determining the effects of various inhibitors of cellular metabolism on cytolysis of NC-37 human lymphoma target cells. Inhibition of NCC-mediated lysis by dinitrophenol (DNP) and sodium azide (NaN3) indicated a requirement for cellular energy metabolism. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of microfilaments, and monensin, an inhibitor of cellular secretion, both prevented lysis by NCC. Three microtubule inhibitors, vinblastine sulfate, colchicine, and demecolcine, all inhibited target cell lysis. Two divalent cation chelators, EDTA and EGTA, blocked NCC activity. Elimination of both Ca2+ and Mg2+ by EDTA prevented target cell binding and killing. Selective removal of Ca2+ by EGTA prevented killing but did not block target cell binding. These results indicated that nonspecific cytotoxicity in fish is an active process which requires cell movement and an intact secretory apparatus. The mechanisms of cytolysis by NCC were found (except for the requirement of microtubules) to be analogous to those of mammalian NK cells. Combined with morphological studies, these data strongly suggest that a phylogenetic relationship exists between these effector cells.

  1. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid.

  2. Immunoglobulin therapy in idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Heise, Alexander; Rostasy, Kevin; Huppke, Brenda; Gärtner, Jutta

    2009-09-01

    Idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction is a rare disorder presenting at age 3-7 years. Severe hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunction leads to death in 25% of patients. The disease is presumed to be autoimmune, or in some cases paraneoplastic. No successful treatment has been reported. Patient V. developed hyperphagia, hypersomnia, and extreme aggression at age 7 years, accompanied by episodes of hyperthermia, hypothermia, sinus bradycardia, hypernatremia, hyponatremia, persistent hyperprolactinemia, hypothyroidism, and growth-hormone deficiency. At age 9 years, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction was rendered, and immunoglobulin therapy was commenced. Nine courses of immunoglobulins, at a dose of 2 g/kg every 4 weeks, were administered. Reproducible improvements in behavior and no further episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia and sinus bradycardia were evident. The endocrinologic abnormalities and poor thermoregulation remained. Administration of immunoglobulins during late stages of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction led to improvement in some but not all signs. Assuming an autoimmune basis for this disorder, treatment during early stages of disease should be more effective. To facilitate such early treatment, increased awareness of this disorder is necessary, to allow for early diagnosis.

  3. Antarctic teleost immunoglobulins: more extreme, more interesting.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Oreste, Umberto

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the immunoglobulin molecule and the genes encoding it in teleosts living in the Antarctic seas at the constant temperature of -1.86 °C. The majority of Antarctic teleosts belong to the suborder Notothenioidei (Perciformes), which includes only a few non-Antarctic species. Twenty-one Antarctic and two non-Antarctic Notothenioid species were included in our studies. We sequenced immunoglobulin light chains in two species and μ heavy chains, partially or totally, in twenty species. In the case of heavy chain, genomic DNA and the cDNA encoding the secreted and the membrane form were analyzed. From one species, Trematomus bernacchii, a spleen cDNA library was constructed to evaluate the diversity of VH gene segments. T. bernacchii IgM, purified from the serum and bile, was characterized. Homology Modelling and Molecular Dynamics were used to determine the molecular structure of T. bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus immunoglobulin domains. This paper sums up the previous results and broadens them with the addition of unpublished data.

  4. [Serum and secretory immunoglobulins in allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Atovmian, O I; German, G P; Chernokhvostova, E V

    1985-07-01

    A total of 158 patients with pollinosis, bronchial asthma, urticaria and Quincke's edema were examined. The immunoglobulin and C3 levels in sera and the immunoglobulin and albumin levels in saliva were determined by the method of single radial immunodiffusion with the corresponding monospecific antisera. In all the groups of patients subjected to examination the presence of polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia was detected, which was manifested by a rise in the levels of IgG, IgA and especially IgM; the level of IgD was low. A decrease in the level of C3 was detected in pollinosis patients in the absence of the exacerbation of the disease. No circulating immune complexes were detected. An essential increase in the level of IgG in saliva was revealed, which was due to the local synthesis of this immunoglobulin. In winter the level of salivary IgA in pollinosis patients was found to be essentially below normal, but at the period of exacerbation it increased twofold, probably in response to local stimulation with antigen-allergen. Patients with bronchial asthma and pollinosis were found to have a high level of free secretory component (SC); in pollinosis the level of free SC sharply increased during the stage of exacerbation, which was due to the increase of its synthesis and secretion by the epithelial cells of the mucous membranes. The importance of these data for the pathogenesis of allergic diseases are discussed.

  5. [Immunoglobulins in patients with Nocardia brasiliensis actinomycetoma].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tovar, L J; Mondragón-González, R; Manzano-Gayosso, P; López-Martínez, R; Hernández-Hernández, F; Bonifaz, A; Anides Fonseca, A; Araiza, J; Vega-López, F

    2004-01-01

    Considering that some authors have reported an increasing of some immunoglobulins in actinomycetoma patients, in this study we propose to determine differential production of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgGM in 25 patients with actinomycetoma and 25 healthy individuals from a mycetoma endemic area. Immunoglobulins were determined by ELISA technique. To sensibilize the plates, six Nocardia brasiliensis antigens were used: a crude antigen denominated NB and five derivatives (NB2, NB4, NB6, NB8 and NB10) obtained by their isoelectric point. Results showed that all IgG subclasses were higher in the patients' sera than in control sera, with a maximal difference to IgG3 and IgG4. To the latter subclass, six antigens were highly reactives. IgM levels were similar in both groups. As it occurs in other infections, in the actinomycetoma pathogenesis probably participate the increase or deficiency of a determined immunoglobulin class, as well as the relationship between different subclasses.

  6. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    Immunoglobulins (Ig), also referred to as antibodies, act as protective agents against pathogens trying to invade an organism. Human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), as the most prominent immunoglobulin presented in serum and other human fluids, has broad applications in fields like immunotherapy and clinical diagnostics. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A and Streptococcus Protein G are the most common affinity ligands for IgG purifaction and detection. However, drawbacks associated with these two protein ligands have motivated searches for alternative affinity ligands. The hexamer peptide ligand HWRGWV identified from a one-bead-one-peptide combinatorial library synthesized on chromatography resins has demonstrated high affinity and specificity to the Fc fragment of hIgG. A chromatography resin with HWRGWV can purify human IgG (hIgG) from complete minimum essential medium (cMEM) with purities and yields as high as 95%, which are comparable to using Protein A as affinity ligand (4). As a short peptide ligand, HWRGWV can be produced at relatively low costs under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions, it is highly robust, less immunogenic and allows for milder elution conditions for the bound antibody (3, 5). Although this short peptide ligand has exhibited promising properties for IgG capture and purification, limited information is available on the intrinsic mechanisms of affinity interaction between the peptide ligand and target protein. In this study, the affinity interaction between hIgG and peptide ligand immobilized on solid surfaces was studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Compared with previous methods employed for the peptide characterization, QCM and SPR can provide direct measurements of equilibrium adsorption isotherms and rates of adsorption, allowing a complete kinetic and thermodynamics analyses of the ligand-target interactions. New methods were developed to modify gold and silica surfaces of QCM and SPR

  7. Epidemiology of chronic non-specific respiratory diseases*

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The current state of research into the epidemiology of chronic non-specific respiratory diseases (CNSRD) is reviewed. Recommendations are made on the definitions of CNSRD for use in epidemiological studies, and various aspects of the etiology and natural history of CNSRD are identified as requiring further investigation. The need for standardization of investigative methods is emphasized. Since smoking is such an important factor in the etiology of CNSRD, it is recommended that efforts be made to discourage children from taking up the habit. PMID:1084795

  8. Symptomatic Primary Selective Immunoglobulin M Deficiency with Nonprotective Pneumococcal Titers Responsive to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shiven S; Fergeson, Jennifer E; Glaum, Mark C; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin M deficiency (SIgMD) is a rare disorder with varying clinical features. The prevalence of SIgMD is 0.03-3%. Patients may be asymptomatic or else present with recurrent infection, autoimmunity, atopic disease and/or malignancy. About 50% of patients with symptomatic SIgMD also have impaired antibody responses to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. We report on an adult who presented with symptomatic SIgMD with impaired pneumococcal polysaccharide antibody responses and lymphopenia, who experienced a significant clinical improvement in the frequency of infections after subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy.

  9. The determination of the rate of conjugation immunoglobuline with bifunctional chelator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Málek, Z.; Miler, V.; Budský, F.

    2006-01-01

    The work was performed under the GACR project: "Technology of preparation of radionuclides and their labelled compounds for nuclear medicine and pharmacy with the use of the reactor LVR-15" reg. no. 104/03/0499. Imaging of cell’s antigens with the use of labelled immunoglobulines allows imaging of specific receptors on cell membrane and specific tumours. It is necessary to carry out the labelling of the immunoglobulines with radionuclides of suitable physical properties, which form cations (e.g., 111In, 90Y, 177Lu) that form very strong chelates of sufficiently high stability constant preventing the dissociation of complexes or the radionuclide under “in-vivo” conditions. The immunoglobuline must be conjugated with the bifunctional chelator (BCH), which contains both chelating unit and reactive group for binding to the immunoglobuline. In our laboratory we have conjugated human IgG and monoclonal antibody CD20 with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid dianhydride (cDTPAA). Radionuclides 90Y and 177Lu prepared on the LVR-15 reactor in NRI Rez were used for labelling. After conjugation and labelling the yields in relation to the amount of isotopic carrier have been determined.

  10. [Development and study of properties of immunoglobulins against Lassa fever].

    PubMed

    Krasnianskiĭ, V P; Gradoboev, V N; Borisevich, I V; Potryvaeva, N V; Lebedinskaia, E V; Chernikova, N K; Timan'kova, G D

    1997-01-01

    A horse may serve the producer of immune antiserum to Lassa virus. Specific immunoglobulin with at least 1:512 titer of virus-neutralizing antibodies to Lassa fever was obtained by alcohol sedimentation after Cohn from the blood serum of immunized horses. The preparation does not differ from heterologous commercial immunoglobulins. Preclinical studies of immunoglobulin to Lassa fever demonstrated its safety and a high specific activity. The agent can be injected both alone and in combination with virasole.

  11. Importance of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Danilo Santana Alessio; de Souza, Cármino Antonio; Aranha, Francisco José Penteado; Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma, bone marrow aplasia and leukemia. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is an important tool to prevent post-transplant complications such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease, but the high rates of relapse limit the survival of transplant patients. Natural Killer cells, a type of lymphocyte that is a key element in the defense against tumor cells, cells infected with viruses and intracellular microbes, have different receptors on their surfaces that regulate their cytotoxicity. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are the most important, interacting consistently with human leukocyte antigen class I molecules present in other cells and thus controlling the activation of natural killer cells. Several studies have shown that certain combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens (in both donors and recipients) can affect the chances of survival of transplant patients, particularly in relation to the graft-versusleukemia effect, which may be associated to decreased relapse rates in certain groups. This review aims to shed light on the mechanisms and effects of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors - human leukocyte antigen associations and their implications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to critically analyze the results obtained by the studies presented herein. PMID:23284260

  12. Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia in Waldmann's disease treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, G; Tinazzi, E; Micheletti, M; Puccetti, A; Lunardi, C

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is rare disorder characterized by congenital malformation or obstruction of intestinal lymphatic drainage; it is responsible for protein losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL management. The administration of intravenous immunoglobulins does not always lead to satisfactory plasma levels and therefore the replacement therapy with immunoglobulins is controversial. We describe here the case of a patient with PIL and severe hypogammaglobulinemia treated with immunoglobulins. The striking aspect of this case is the clinical and serological benefit obtained with the subcutaneous compared to the intravenous immunoglobulins administration.

  13. Hydrometer test for estimation of immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1980-06-01

    A practical field method for measuring immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum has been developed from the linear relationship between colostral specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Fourteen colostrums were collected within 24 h postpartum from nursed and unnursed cows and were assayed for specific gravity and major colostral constituents. Additionally, 15 colostrums were collected immediately postpartum prior to suckling and assayed for specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Regression analysis provided an equation to estimate colostral immunoglobulin concentration from the specific gravity of fresh whole colostrum. From this, a colostrometer was developed for practical field use.

  14. Single radial immunodiffusion analysis for quantitation of colostral immunoglobulin concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1981-05-01

    Relative accuracy of the single radial immunodiffusion technique to measure immunoglobulin concentrations of colostral preparations (whey, whole, or fat-free) has been assessed. Fresh colostrum samples were analyzed for major constituents. Gammaglobulin as a standard was compared to total immunoglobulin concentration derived from single radial immunodiffusion analysis of colostral preparations with no differences except between standard and whey. Differences were in part from either enhancement or interference of immunoglobulin diffusion by colostral constituents. Removal of casein and fat during whey preparations caused a concentrating effect upon immunoglobulin constituents resulting in exaggerated precipitin rings. Whey has produced unreliable results: therefore, whole colostrum is recommended for single radial immunodiffusion analysis.

  15. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. [Dermatomyositis and Panniculitis: the function of immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Panniculitis is an inflammatory disease of subcutaneous adipose tissue which is rarely associated with dermatomyositis. It can occur before, after or simultaneously with muscle damage. In most cases, the evolution of panniculitis and of other dermatomyositis affections is favorable with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient who developed panniculitis lesions 2 months before having muscular signs. Skin involvement was resistant to corticosteroid treatment associated with immunosuppressants drugs. This led to the use of polyvalent immunoglobulin treatment improving both skin and muscle damage.

  17. Amniotic fluid secretory immunoglobulin A in normal pregnancy and in pregnancy complicated by rhesus isoimmunization.

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Stark, K H; Lorenz, U

    1982-01-01

    Amniotic fluid levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) were measured by simple radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini using a monospecific antiserum against the human secretory component. We examined 256 samples from healthy pregnant women and 149 samples from mothers suffering from rhesus isoimmunization. During normal pregnancy amniotic fluid S-IgA increased significantly and showed a loose correlation with the phospholipid levels. This was not observed in pregnancies complicated by rhesus isoimmunization.

  18. Nonspecific low back pain and return to work.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang H; Randolph, David C

    2007-11-15

    As many as 90 percent of persons with occupational nonspecific low back pain are able to return to work in a relatively short period of time. As long as no "red flags" exist, the patient should be encouraged to remain as active as possible, minimize bed rest, use ice or heat compresses, take anti-inflammatory or analgesic medications if desired, participate in home exercises, and return to work as soon as possible. Medical and surgical intervention should be minimized when abnormalities on physical examination are lacking and the patient is having difficulty returning to work after four to six weeks. Personal and occupational psychosocial factors should be addressed thoroughly, and a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program should be strongly considered to prevent delayed recovery and chronic disability. Patient advocacy should include preventing unnecessary and ineffective medical and surgical interventions, prolonged work loss, joblessness, and chronic disability.

  19. Improvement in idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia after smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Kadota, Naoki; Hino, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Keishi; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of several interstitial lung diseases, the relationship between smoking and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) has not yet been fully elucidated. We here present a case of fibrotic NSIP with mild emphysema in an elderly male with normal pulmonary function, whose symptoms, serum KL-6 level, and high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial changes markedly improved without medication following the cessation of smoking. Our case suggests that smoking may be an etiological factor in some patients with NSIP and that early smoking cessation before a clinically detectable decline in pulmonary function may be critical for smokers with idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26029566

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Secreted Immunoglobulin Binding Protein from Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Peter K.; Reinscheid, Dieter; Gottschalk, Birgit; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2001-01-01

    Immunoglobulin binding proteins are one of several pathogenicity factors which have been associated with invasive disease caused by group A streptococci. The surface-bound M and M-like proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes are the most characterized of these immunoglobulin binding proteins, and in most cases they bind only a single antibody class. Here we report the identification of a novel non-M-type secreted protein, designated SibA (for secreted immunoglobulin binding protein from group A streptococcus), which binds all immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses, the Fc and Fab fragments, and also IgA and IgM. SibA has no significant sequence homology to any M-related proteins, is not found in the vir regulon, and contains none of the characteristic M-protein regions, such as the A or C repeats. Like M proteins, however, SibA does have relatively high levels of alanine, lysine, glutamic acid, leucine, and glycine. SibA and M proteins also share an alpha-helical N-terminal secondary structure which has been previously implicated in immunoglobulin binding in M proteins. Evidence presented here indicates that this is also the case for SibA. SibA also has regions of local similarity with other coiled-coil proteins such as Listeria monocytogenes P45 autolysin, human myosin heavy chain, macrogolgin, and Schistoma mansoni paramyosin, some of which are of potential significance since cross-reactive antibodies between myosin proteins and M proteins have been implicated in the development of the autoimmune sequelae of streptococcal disease. PMID:11447160

  1. Efficacy and safety of home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy in paediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Borte, M; Bernatowska, E; Ochs, H D; Roifman, C M

    2011-06-01

    Subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusions are effective, safe and well tolerated in the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies, but only limited data on the treatment of children are available. We investigated the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of home therapy with a 16% liquid human immunoglobulin G preparation (Vivaglobin®) when administered subcutaneously in children with primary immunodeficiencies. Data were analysed from 22 children (2-<12 years) who participated in two prospective, open-label studies (one in Europe/Brazil, one in North America). All children had previously received intravenous immunoglobulins. They started weekly subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusions with an approximately 3-month wash-in/wash-out period, followed by a 6-month (Europe/Brazil) or 12-month (North America) efficacy evaluation period. In Europe/Brazil, subcutaneous doses generally equalled the previous weekly equivalent intravenous doses. In North America, subcutaneous doses during the efficacy evaluation period were 126% (median) of the previous weekly equivalent intravenous doses. Efficacy end-points in both studies included the occurrence of serious bacterial infections and any infections, and serum immunoglobulin G trough levels. Median serum immunoglobulin G trough levels exceeded those during previous intravenous therapy by 13% (North America) and 16% (Europe/Brazil). During the efficacy evaluation period of both studies, none of the children had a serious bacterial infection; the mean overall infection rate/patient year was 4·7 in Europe/Brazil and 5·6 in North America, concurring with previous reports in adults. The adverse event profile was comparable to previous reports in adults. Both studies confirmed the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy with Vivaglobin in children with primary immunodeficiencies.

  2. Specific and nonspecific mediation of protective immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, L; Frenkel, J K

    1987-01-01

    We studied the specificity of protection conferred by Toxoplasma gondii immune lymphocytes and their supernatants on infected hamster kidney cells, using Besnoitia jellisoni immune lymphocytes as a nonspecific control. The intracellular growth of the organisms was measured by [3H]uracil incorporation, and inhibition of multiplication was used as a measurement of immunity. Although the immune lymphocytes restricted principally the multiplication of homologous organisms, partial protection, expressed against the heterologous organism, was found. This was true for either parasite with intact lymphocytes or their supernatants. Exposure of immune lymphocytes to antigen for 18 to 24 h and treatment of kidney cells with supernatant fluids for 18 to 24 h were required for maximal protection. The specific protective mediator in supernatants of immune lymphocytes was characterized by dialysis as having a molecular weight between 3,000 and 12,000 and was found in the 3,000 to 5,000 peak after Sephadex G-50 chromatography. Nonspecific protective activity was greater than 12,000 by dialysis; it chromatographed in the excluded peak, measuring over 43,000, and was destroyed by exposure to pH 2. In vitro production of lymphokines from toxoplasma immune lymphocytes was first detected 7 to 10 days after vaccination of hamsters. At about the same time, hamsters began to resist challenge infection with the pathogenic RH strain of T. gondii and were able to prevent its multiplication in lungs, liver, spleen, and the subcutaneous infection site. The expression of tissue immunity and the production of toxoplasma-immune lymphokines appear to be time-related events. PMID:3557619

  3. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunoglobulin G (resulting from breakdown of immunoglobulin G antibodies) in urine, serum, and other body fluids. Measurement of immunoglobulin G Fc fragments aids in the diagnosis of plasma cell...

  4. Dietary requirement for serum-derived bovine immunoglobulins in the clinical management of patients with enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Burnett, Bruce P; Shaw, Audrey L; Weaver, Eric M; Klein, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    A variety of human disease conditions are associated with chronic intestinal disorders or enteropathies that are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Such disruptions in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can lead to symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function, and malabsorption of nutrients. While significant advances have been made in understanding the factors that influence the complex and fragile balance between the gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial cell integrity, and the underlying immune system, effective therapies for restoring intestinal balance during enteropathy are still not available. Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of oral immunoglobulins to improve weight gain, support gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animals. More recently, studies in humans provide evidence that serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate is safe and improves nutritional status and GI symptoms in patients with enteropathy associated with irritable bowel syndrome or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. This review summarizes studies showing the impact of enteropathy on nutritional status and how specially formulated bovine immunoglobulins may help restore intestinal homeostasis and nutritional status in patients with specific enteropathies. Such protein preparations may provide distinct nutritional support required for the dietary management of patients who, because of therapeutic or chronic medical needs, have limited or impaired capacity to digest, absorb, or metabolize ordinary foodstuffs or certain nutrients, or other special medically determined nutrient requirements that cannot be satisfied by changes to the normal diet alone.

  5. Calculating the Dose of Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin for Primary Immunodeficiency Disease in Patients Switched From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Without the Use of a Dose-Adjustment Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Fadeyi, Michael; Tran, Tin

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) is an inherited disorder characterized by an inadequate immune system. The most common type of PIDD is antibody deficiency. Patients with this disorder lack the ability to make functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and require lifelong IgG replacement therapy to prevent serious bacterial infections. The current standard therapy for PIDD is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, but IVIG might not be appropriate for all patients. For this reason, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) has emerged as an alternative to IVIG. A concern for physicians is the precise SCIG dose that should be prescribed, because there are pharmacokinetic differences between IVIG and SCIG. Manufacturers of SCIG 10% and 20% liquid (immune globulin subcutaneous [human]) recommend a dose-adjustment coefficient (DAC). Both strengths are currently approved by the FDA. This DAC is to be used when patients are switched from IVIG to SCIG. In this article, we propose another dosing method that uses a higher ratio of IVIG to SCIG and an incremental adjustment based on clinical status, body weight, and the presence of concurrent diseases. PMID:24391400

  6. Differential Effects of Deep Sedation with Propofol on the Specific and Nonspecific Thalamocortical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K.; Ward, Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current state of knowledge suggests that disruption of neuronal information integration may be a unitary mechanism of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A neural system central for information integration is the thalamocortical system whose specific and nonspecific divisions may play the roles for representing and integrating information; respectively. How anesthetics affect the function of these systems individually is not completely understood. We studied the effect of propofol on thalamocortical functional connectivity in the specific and nonspecific systems using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Eight healthy volunteers were instructed to listen to and encode 40 English words during wakeful baseline, light sedation, deep sedation, and recovery in the scanner. Functional connectivity was determined as the temporal correlation of blood oxygen level-dependent signals with seed regions defined within the specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei. Results Thalamocortical connectivity at baseline was dominantly medial and bilateral frontal and temporal for the specific system and medial frontal and medial parietal for the nonspecific system. During deep sedation, propofol reduced functional connectivity by 43% (specific) and 79% (nonspecific), a significantly greater reduction of connections in the nonspecific than in the specific system and in the left hemisphere than in the right. Upon regaining consciousness, functional connectivity increased by 58% (specific) and 123% (nonspecific) during recovery, exceeding their values at baseline. Conclusions Propofol conferred differential changes in functional connectivity of the specific and nonspecific thalamocortical systems. The changes in nonspecific thalamocortical connectivity may correlate with loss and return of consciousness. PMID:23221862

  7. Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in calves.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D M; Tyler, J W; VanMetre, D C; Hostetler, D E; Barrington, G M

    2000-01-01

    Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins has long been accepted as imperative to optimal calf health. Many factors, including timing of colostrum ingestion, the method and volume of colostrum administration, the immunoglobulin concentration of the colostrum ingested, and the age of the dam have been implicated in affecting the optimization of absorption. The practice of colostrum pooling, the breed and presence of the dam, and the presence of respiratory acidosis in the calf also may affect passive transfer. Various tests have been reported to accurately measure passive transfer status in neonatal calves. The radial immunodiffusion and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are the only tests that directly measure serum IgG concentration. All other available tests including serum total solids by refractometry, sodium sulfite turbidity test, zinc sulfate turbidity test, serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, and whole blood glutaraldehyde gelation estimate serum IgG concentration based on concentration of total globulins or other proteins whose passive transfer is statistically associated with that of IgG. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the literature of passive transfer in calves including factors that affect passive transfer status, testing modalities, effects of failure of passive transfer on baseline mortality, consequences of failure of passive transfer, and some treatment options. Many previously accepted truisms regarding passive transfer in calves should be rejected based on the results of recent research.

  8. The immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-11-24

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more "conventional" mammalian species.

  9. The Immunoglobulins of Cold-Blooded Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more “conventional” mammalian species. PMID:25427250

  10. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain.

  11. Increased immunoglobulin production in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to agrichemicals

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, L.C.; Pavan, T.R.; Alves, A.G.; Correia, A.G.; Barriquel, B.; dos Santos, E.D.; Barcellos, L.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Fish vaccination has been increasingly exploited as a tool to control pathogen infection. The production of immunoglobulin following vaccination might be affected by several factors such as management procedures, water temperature, and the presence of xenobiotics. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the kinetics of immunoglobulin production in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) inoculated with inactivated Aeromonas hydrophila and kept at two different water temperatures (17.4±0.4° or 21.3±0.3°C). The effect of a second antigen inoculation and exposure of fish to sublethal concentrations of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate at 10% of the lethal concentration (LC50-96h) on specific serum antibodies were also investigated. Antibodies to A. hydrophila were detected as early as 7 days post-inoculation and increased steadily up to 35 days. The kinetics of antibody production were similar in fish kept at 17.4±0.4° and 21.3±0.3°C, and reinoculation of antigen at 21 days after priming failed to increase specific antibody levels. Intriguingly, we found that, in fish exposed to atrazine and glyphosate, the secretion of specific antibodies was higher than in non-exposed inoculated fish. These findings are important for the design of vaccines and vaccination strategies in Neotropical fish species. However, because atrazine and glyphosate are widespread contaminants of soil and water, their immune-stimulating effect could be harmful, in that fish living in herbicide-contaminated water might have increased concentrations of nonspecific antibodies that could mediate tissue injury. PMID:25009838

  12. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  13. Efficacy of subcutaneous immunoglobulins in primary immunodeficiency with Crohn's-like phenotype: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sanges, M; Spadaro, G; Miniero, M; Mattera, D; Sollazzo, R; D'Armiento, F P; De Palma, G D; Pecoraro, A; Borrelli, F; Genovese, A; D'Arienzo, A

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency in adults. In CVID, the prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations ranges between 2 and 50% with a complication-related morbidity second only to that of the respiratory tract. In some cases, clinical and endoscopic features are undistinguishable from those of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We describe the case of a 28-year-old man in which a diagnosis of Crohn's disease was firstly suspected. Subsequently, a diagnosis of Crohn's-like disease in a patient with CVID was made and a replacement therapy with human normal immunoglobulin intravenously was started. Unfortunately, serum IgG levels remained below 2.0 g/l in pre-infusional controls with persistence of gastrointestinal symptoms and malnutrition despite anti-inflammatory therapy (mesalazine, corticosteroids). Then, the patient began treatment with human normal immunoglobulins administered subcutaneously. The follow-up visits showed a progressive increase in serum IgG. Moreover, the patient reported improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms with reduction of diarrhoea, and laboratory tests showed a progressive and significant improvement. We confirm that therapy with subcutaneously administered immunoglobulins is safe and effective. In addition, our observations indicate that, for patients with CVID and enteropathic complications, replacement therapy with subcutaneous IgG may be the treatment of choice.

  14. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A.A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool. PMID:27995928

  15. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. )

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  16. Anti-tumor activities of peptides corresponding to conserved complementary determining regions from different immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Carlos R; Matsuo, Alisson L; Massaoka, Mariana H; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R

    2014-09-01

    Short synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) from different immunoglobulin families have been shown to induce antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities regardless of the specificity of the original monoclonal antibody (mAb). Presently, we studied the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of synthetic peptides derived from conserved CDR sequences of different immunoglobulins against human tumor cell lines and murine B16F10-Nex2 melanoma aiming at the discovery of candidate molecules for cancer therapy. Four light- and heavy-chain CDR peptide sequences from different antibodies (C36-L1, HA9-H2, 1-H2 and Mg16-H2) showed cytotoxic activity against murine melanoma and a panel of human tumor cell lineages in vitro. Importantly, they also exerted anti-metastatic activity using a syngeneic melanoma model in mice. Other peptides (D07-H3, MN20v1, MS2-H3) were also protective against metastatic melanoma, without showing significant cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. In this case, we suggest that these peptides may act as immune adjuvants in vivo. As observed, peptides induced nitric oxide production in bone-marrow macrophages showing that innate immune cells can also be modulated by these CDR peptides. The present screening supports the search in immunoglobulins of rather frequent CDR sequences that are endowed with specific antitumor properties and may be candidates to be developed as anti-cancer drugs.

  17. Normative values of serum immunoglobulins by single radial immunodiffusion: a review.

    PubMed

    Maddison, S E; Reimer, C B

    1976-05-01

    Many previous studies of normative values in adults have suggested that race, age, sex, and environment all have significant effects on the mean values for IgG, IgA, IgM, and IgE in various groups of individuals. Single radial immunodiffusion is the technique most widely used to quantitate immunoglobulins of the three major classes (IgG, IgM, and IgA) in sera. Measurements have been expressed in terms of mass concentration, as percentages of the mean normal adult value, and in arbitrary international units. To improve agreement among laboratories, the WHO has supported the distribution of an International Reference Preparation for the Human Immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, and IgM, and similar (separate) preparations for IgD and IgE.

  18. Two immunofluorescent methods compared with a radial immunodiffusion method for measurement of serum immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, G C; Gardner, R

    1978-05-01

    We found high correlations when the values for immunoglobulins G, A, and M, obtained from the analysis of a group of 50 or more human sera by a measured-time radial immunodiffusion method, were compared to values found by two new commercial immunofluorescent methods. The Fiax and the Immuno-Fluor systems make use of fluorescently labeled antibodies and solid-phase immunoadsorbents and offer simple, precise, and objective methods for immunoglobulin quantitation. The Fiax procedure is less time consuming than is the Immuno-Fluor and gives IgG and IgA concentrations that are in close agreement with those found by radial immunodiffusion and IgM values that are significantly lower than the radial immunodiffusion values. The IgG results determined by the Immuno-Fluor method compare well with the radial immunodiffusion results, uhile the IgA values are significantly higher and IgM values significantly lower than those obtained by radial immunodiffusion.

  19. Single-mode tapered optical fiber loop immunosensor II: assay of anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Robert S.; Hale, Zoe M.; Levine, Myron M.; Lowe, C. R.; Payne, Frank P.

    1994-07-01

    An evanescent wave immunoassay for cholera antitoxin immunoglobulins was performed using a single mode tapered optical fiber loop sensor. The transducer was silanized with 3- glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and chemically modified to link covalently either cholera toxin B subunit or a synthetic peptide derived from it, CTP3. The sensor was exposed to seral fluids, obtained from human volunteers having been exposed to live virulent Vibrio cholerae 01 and shown to produce rice-water stools. Other toxins of interest, such as Clostridium botulinum toxin A, have been tested on similar systems. The bound unlabelled immunoglobulins were then exposed to a mixture of FITC-anti-IgG and TRITC-anti-IgA, without requirement for a separation step. The emanating fluorescent emissions of fluorescein and rhodamine, excited by the input laser light, were coupled back into the guided mode of the tapered fiber, and used to determine the concentrations of the complementary antigens.

  20. Immunoglobulins: 25 years of immunoinformatics and IMGT-ONTOLOGY.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-12-16

    IMGT®, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® (CNRS and Montpellier University) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989, IMGT® marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT® is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH), and IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT® has been built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences and three-dimensional (3D) structures. The concepts include the IMGT® standardized keywords (identification), IMGT® standardized labels (description), IMGT® standardized nomenclature (classification), IMGT unique numbering and IMGT Colliers de Perles (numerotation). IMGT® comprises seven databases, 15,000 pages of web resources and 17 tools. IMGT® tools and databases provide a high-quality analysis of the IG from fish to humans, for basic, veterinary and medical research, and for antibody engineering and humanization. They include, as examples: IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for nucleotide sequence analysis and their high-throughput version IMGT/HighV-QUEST for next generation sequencing, IMGT/DomainGapAlign for amino acid sequence analysis of IG domains, IMGT/3Dstructure-DB for 3D structures, contact analysis and paratope/epitope interactions of IG/antigen complexes, and the IMGT/mAb-DB interface for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immunological applications (FPIA).

  1. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  2. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  3. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  4. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  5. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  6. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  7. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R E; Ochs, H D

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of the challenges involved in diagnosing and treating a heterogeneous group of immunodeficiency disorders is growing. The improvements in neonatal screening offer new methods to ensure that primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are diagnosed as early as possible, enabling accurate treatment and the prevention of life-threatening infections and other complications. Additionally, the need to individualize patient therapy in order to optimize both clinical outcomes and quality-of-life is obvious and is exemplified by the ability to switch between intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration offering flexible treatment regimens. However, further research is crucial in order to determine the optimal treatment for secondary immunodeficiencies, and to gain greater understanding of the underlying causes of PIDs, including common variable immunodeficiency. The information relating to the growth of patient registries is encouraging, with approximately 25 000 patients with PIDs included in the two registries discussed. Registries such as this are vital for future research, as well as providing an educational resource. PMID:25546748

  8. Serum immunoglobulin profile in normal Kashmiri adults.

    PubMed

    Bhat, G A; Mubarik, M; Bhat, M Y

    1995-01-01

    Serum levels of the immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM were estimated in 102 apparently healthy Kashmiri adults in the age group of 16-60 years, using single radial immunodiffusion method of Mancini et al. The mean serum levels of IgG, IgA and IgM were observed to be 1289.19 +/- 234.9, 216.18 +/- 50.70 and 118.97 +/- 41.88 respectively. No significant difference in the mean serum levels was observed between the two sexes as such, but IgM showed a significant increase in females in the age group of 16-30 years. IgA showed a significant increase with age, with no such increase in case of IgG and IgM.

  9. Immunoglobulins in tear in trachoma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    Tear immunoglobulin concentrations have been measured in 100 healthy people and 62 patients in different stages of trachoma. In healthy people the average IgA level was 27-8 mg/100 ml. There was no significant difference in the IgA level in various age groups and between the sexes. IgG was detected in 92 samples, and it was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgM in tears was detected in only one sample. IgD was not detected in any specimen. In tracoma cases, the mean IgA level was found to be significantly lower (22-0 mg/100 ml) than in healthy people. There was no significant difference in IgA level between different stages of trachoma, IgG, IgD, and IgM could not be detected in any sample from the trachoma cases. PMID:856248

  10. 7(th) International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  11. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  12. SUPPRESSION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN CLASS SYNTHESIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Alexander R.; Asofsky, Richard; Hylton, Martha B.; Cooper, Max D.

    1972-01-01

    Germfree BALB/c mice have been treated from birth with intraperitoneal injections of purified goat antibodies to mouse IgM. The treated mice, and controls which had received an equivalent amount of goat γ-globulin, were sacrificed at 8 or 13 wk of age. Compared to controls, mice given anti-µ (a) had very few germinal centers in spleen and lymph node, (b) had decreased numbers of mature plasma cells synthesizing IgM and IgG1 in spleen, and virtual absence of IgA-synthesizing plasma cells in the gut, (c) had greatly diminished numbers of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound immunoglobulins of the IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA classes in spleen, (d) had reduced synthesis of IgM, IgG2, and IgA by in vitro spleen cultures, and (e) had significant decreases in serum levels of IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA. The treated animals failed to make antibodies to ferritin after hyperimmunization, and lacked natural antibodies to sheep erythrocytes. These results indicate that cells ultimately committed to synthesis of IgG1, IgG2, and IgA immunoglobulins are derived from cells which have expressed IgM determinants at an earlier stage of differentiation. They are consistent with a proposed two-stage model for plasma cell differentiation. The first stage is antigen independent, involves sequential activation of Cµ, Cγ, and Cα genes by progeny of a single stem cell, and results in the formation of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound recognition antibodies of each class. The second, antigen-dependent, stage results in formation of mature plasmacytes and memory cells. PMID:4551216

  13. Soluble CD4 antigen reactivity in intravenous immunoglobulin preparations: is it specific?

    PubMed Central

    Perosa, F; Rizzi, R; Pulpito, V; Dammacco, F

    1995-01-01

    Soluble CD4 antigen (sCD4) was measured in seven commercially available intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIg) by means of a double determinant immunoassay (DDIA), whereby two MoAbs recognizing two distinct and spatially distant epitopes on CD4 were used to capture and detect the antigen, respectively. Preincubation of six out of seven IVIg, which were found to be apparently positive for sCD4, with mouse- and bovine-derived serum or purified immunoglobulins completely neutralized DDIA reactivity for sCD4. The inhibition was specific since it was not or only partially observed when IVIg were mixed with whole serum or purified IgG from rabbit. Extensive absorption of six IVIg on insolubilized mouse IgG (mIgG) resulted in a complete loss of reactivity. Eluted human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) from any of the IVIg displayed a dose-dependent binding in a DDIA, though its extent varied from one preparation to another. Western blot analysis showed that HAMA from all IVIg contained no component with a molecular weight identical with or close to that of recombinant CD4. Purified mIgG markedly influenced the sCD4 reactivity of two IVIg (Sandoglobulin and Globuman I.V.) when sCD4 was measured with a purchased 'CD4-specific Test Kit', thus suggesting that HAMA can exceed the absorbing capacity of the sample diluent. Taken as a whole, these data indicate that sCD4-based DDIA signal is mostly, if not completely, generated by the presence of human immunoglobulin with anti-mouse immunoglobulin reactivity, thus casting doubts on the actual occurrence of sCD4 in IVIg. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7813106

  14. Unexpected small urinary bladder pheochromocytoma: a nonspecific presentation.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Slama, Adel; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare tumor that typically presents with a hypertensive crisis during micturition. Preoperatively, it may be misdiagnosed due to nonspecific symptomatology, physical, and radiologic findings. Method. We report a case of unsuspected small pheochromocytoma which was incidentally found by CT scan and confirmed by the histological aspects after transurethral resection in a 63-year-old woman. Here, we have described the clinical presentation, physical findings, laboratory investigations, and treatment provided in our case. We have also included radiological images and histopathology slides with input from both radiologists and pathologists. Surgical management and postoperative follow-up are discussed, as are details of previous published data. Results. After undergoing surgical treatment (transurethral resection), our patient is asymptomatic, with complete resolution of her pathology. Conclusion. Diagnosis is difficult before histopathological examination and should be considered in patients with no risk factors for usual bladder tumor. Our purpose is to raise clinician's awareness for this condition so that they will be more likely to diagnose it. This will facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment and especially prevent complications due to pheochromocytoma which may be severe.

  15. [LIFE CONDITIONS: NON-SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATORS AND DENTOALVEOLAR PATHOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Mosticone, Romina; Pescucci, Lisa; Porreca, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma, diseases, diet, daily work and environmental factors shape bodies. From birth to death, these processes leave on the skeleton markers that can be recognized and studied, thus providing an overview of the health conditions of past populations. The present work analyzes data collected in seven necropolises. During our study, we exploited nonspecific stress and dental pathologies as key indicators of health conditions. In particula; we analyzed the three most common indicators of stress: porotic hyperostosis; enamel hypoplasia; and Harris lines on shins. Additionally, we examined the most important dental alveolar pathologies, including carious lesions, periodontal diseases, antemortem tooth loss, abscesses, and calculi. The data we analyzed suggest that, despite the different urban and suburban origins, all the samples belong to a middle-range or low social class, whose living conditions were modest. The only necropolis which stands out is Casal Bertone Mausoleo, where the samples present the lowest frequencies with respect to both the stress indicators and the oral pathologies, suggesting better living conditions.

  16. Nonspecific uptake and homeostasis drive the oceanic cadmium cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Tristan J.; Lee, Renee B. Y.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2013-02-01

    The global marine distributions of Cd and phosphate are closely correlated, which has led to Cd being considered as a marine micronutrient, despite its toxicity to life. The explanation for this nutrient-like behavior is unknown because there is only one identified biochemical function for Cd, an unusual Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase. Recent developments in Cd isotope mass spectrometry have revealed that Cd uptake by phytoplankton causes isotopic fractionation in the open ocean and in culture. Here we investigate the physiochemical pathways that fractionate Cd isotopes by performing subcellular Cd isotope analysis on genetically modified microorganisms. We find that expression of the Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase makes no difference to the Cd isotope composition of whole cells. Instead, a large proportion of the Cd is partitioned into cell membranes with a similar direction and magnitude of Cd isotopic fractionation to that seen in surface seawater. This observation is well explained if Cd is mistakenly imported with other divalent metals and subsequently managed by binding within the cell to avoid toxicity. This process may apply to other divalent metals, whereby nonspecific uptake and subsequent homeostasis may contribute to elemental and isotopic distributions in seawater, even for elements commonly considered as micronutrients.

  17. Characterization of Non-Specific Crossover in SPLITT Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Hoyos, Mauricio; Kurowski, Pascal; Salhi, Dorra; Moore, Lee R.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Split-flow thin channel (SPLITT) fractionation is a technique for continuous separation of particles or macromolecules in a fluid stream into fractions according to the lateral migration induced by application of a field perpendicular to the direction of flow. Typical applications have involved isolation of different fractions from a polydisperse sample. Some specialized applications involve the separation of the fraction influenced by the transverse field from the fraction that is not. For example, immuno-magnetically labeled biological cells may be separated from non-labeled cells with the application of a transverse magnetic field gradient. In such cases, it may be critically important to minimize contamination of the labeled cells with non-labeled cells while at the same time maximizing the throughput. Such contamination is known as non-specific crossover (NSC) and refers to the real or apparent migration of non-mobile particles or cells across streamlines with the mobile material. The possible mechanisms for NSC are discussed, and experimental results interpreted in terms of shear-induced diffusion (SID) caused by viscous interactions between particles in a sheared flow. It is concluded that SID may contribute to NSC, but that further experiments and mathematical modeling are necessary to more fully explore the phenomenon. PMID:18698797

  18. [Non-specific facilitating influences on the responses of rabbit visual cortex neurons].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of neuronal responses in the rabbit visual cortex to patterned visual stimuli and their change during non-specific activation reaction. Non-specific activation while only slightly affecting the background neuronal activity, enhances the responses of most units to patterned visual stimuli. A comparison of responses with a different degree of inhibition participation shows that the depression of inhibitory processes may act as a mechanism of facilitation of the responses during non-specific activation. After facilitated responses evoked by the action of the stimulus during non-specific activation, the neurones retain a state of enhanced excitability. Repetition of stimuli not attended with non-specific activation leads to the diminution of excitability. The possible connection of the indicated effects with extinction processes is discussed.

  19. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease.

  20. Surface immunoglobulin of guinea-pig leukaemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, G T; Eady, R P; Hough, D W; Jurd, R D; Stevenson, F K

    1975-01-01

    The surface immunoglobulin of the transplantable L2C leukaemia of strain 2 guinea-pigs has been investigated. The immunoglobulin is seen to be synthesized when the cells are maintained in culture, indicating its intrinsic origin. Immunolabelling of the cell surface and immunochemical study of the Fab released by limited surface proteolysis indicate the presence of immunoglobulin of class IgM. IgG and free light chains were not detected, and there is unlikely to be an appreciable amount of immunoglobulin of any other class. The amount of immunoglobulin present, in terms of 4-chain monomers, is approximately 100,000 molecules per cell. Its half-life, calculated from the rate of reappearance in vitro of surface Fab after proteolytic clearing, is approximately 5 hours. Immunoglobulin secreted into the envir