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Sample records for nonspecific peptidases

  1. The plastid and mitochondrial peptidase network and a comprehensive peptidase compendium for Arabidopsis thaliana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant plastids and mitochondria have dynamic proteomes. To maintain their protein homeostasis, a proteostasis network containing protein chaperones, peptidases and their substrate recognition factors exists, but many peptidases, their functional connections and substrates are poorly characterized. T...

  2. Overview of pepsin-like aspartic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B M

    2001-11-01

    The aspartic peptidase family of enzymes has been implicated in a variety of disease states, from stomach ulcers, to breast cancer, and even Alzheimer's Disease. This unit describes the major characteristics of the aspartic peptidases, including mechanism of action, subcellular and tissue localization, and biological substrate specificity.

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 – an important digestive peptidase in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) is a proline specific serine peptidase that plays an important role in different regulatory processes in mammals. In this report, we isolated and characterized a unique secreted digestive DPP 4 from the anterior midgut of a stored product pest, Tenebrio molitor larvae ...

  4. Processing peptidases in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro Filipe; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-02-01

    Most of the mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins with N-terminal extensions called targeting peptides. Targeting peptides function as organellar import signals, they are recognized by the import receptors and route precursors through the protein translocons across the organellar membranes. After the fulfilled function, targeting peptides are proteolytically cleaved off inside the organelles by different processing peptidases. The processing of mitochondrial precursors is catalyzed in the matrix by the Mitochondrial Processing Peptidase, MPP, the Mitochondrial Intermediate Peptidase, MIP (recently called Octapeptidyl aminopeptidase 1, Oct1) and the Intermediate cleaving peptidase of 55kDa, Icp55. Furthermore, different inner membrane peptidases (Inner Membrane Proteases, IMPs, Atp23, rhomboids and AAA proteases) catalyze additional processing functions, resulting in intra-mitochondrial sorting of proteins, the targeting to the intermembrane space or in the assembly of proteins into inner membrane complexes. Chloroplast targeting peptides are cleaved off in the stroma by the Stromal Processing Peptidase, SPP. If the protein is further translocated to the thylakoid lumen, an additional thylakoid-transfer sequence is removed by the Thylakoidal Processing Peptidase, TPP. Proper function of the D1 protein of Photosystem II reaction center requires its C-terminal processing by Carboxy-terminal processing protease, CtpA. Both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts, the cleaved targeting peptides are finally degraded by the Presequence Protease, PreP. The organellar proteases involved in precursor processing and targeting peptide degradation constitute themselves a quality control system ensuring the correct maturation and localization of proteins as well as assembly of protein complexes, contributing to sustenance of organelle functions. Dysfunctions of several mitochondrial processing proteases have

  5. Peptidases and peptidase inhibitors in gut of caterpillars and in the latex of their host plants.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Márcio V; Pereira, Danielle A; Souza, Diego P; Silva, Maria-Lídia S; Alencar, Luciana M R; Sousa, Jeanlex S; Queiroz, Juliany-Fátima N; Freitas, Cleverson D T

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the resistance-susceptibility of crop insects to proteins found in latex fluids have been reported. However, latex-bearing plants also host insects. In this study, the gut proteolytic system of Pseudosphinx tetrio, which feeds on Plumeria rubra leaves, was characterized and further challenged against the latex proteolytic system of its own host plant and those of other latex-bearing plants. The gut proteolytic system of Danaus plexippus (monarch) and the latex proteolytic system of its host plant (Calotropis procera) were also studied. The latex proteins underwent extensive hydrolysis when mixed with the corresponding gut homogenates of the hosted insects. The gut homogenates partially digested the latex proteins of foreign plants. The fifth instar of D. plexippus that were fed diets containing foreign latex developed as well as those individuals who were fed diets containing latex proteins from their host plant. In vitro assays detected serine and cysteine peptidase inhibitors in both the gut homogenates and the latex fluids. Curiously, the peptidase inhibitors of caterpillars did not inhibit the latex peptidases of their host plants. However, the peptidase inhibitors of laticifer origin inhibited the proteolysis of gut homogenates. In vivo analyses of the peritrophic membrane proteins of D. plexippus demonstrate resistance against latex peptidases. Only discrete changes were observed when the peritrophic membrane was directly treated with purified latex peptidases in vitro. This study concludes that peptidase inhibitors are involved in the defensive systems of both caterpillars and their host plants. Although latex peptidase inhibitors inhibit gut peptidases (in vitro), the ability of gut peptidases to digest latex proteins (in vivo) regardless of their origin seems to be important in governing the resistance-susceptibility of caterpillars.

  6. Peptidase activity of beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Rhazi, N; Galleni, M; Page, M I; Frère, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although beta-lactamases have generally been considered as being devoid of peptidase activity, a low but significant hydrolysis of various N-acylated dipeptides was observed with representatives of each class of beta-lactamases. The kcat/Km values were below 0.1 M(-1). s(-1), but the enzyme rate enhancement factors were in the range 5000-20000 for the best substrates. Not unexpectedly, the best 'peptidase' was the class C beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99, but, more surprisingly, the activity was always higher with the phenylacetyl- and benzoyl-d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptides than with the diacetyl- and alpha-acetyl-l-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala tripeptides, which are the preferred substrates of the low-molecular-mass, soluble dd-peptidases. A comparison between the beta-lactamases and dd-peptidases showed that it might be as difficult for a dd-peptidase to open the beta-lactam ring as it is for the beta-lactamases to hydrolyse the peptides, an observation which can be explained by geometric and stereoelectronic considerations. PMID:10393100

  7. Aspartate-specific peptidases in Salmonella typhimurium: mutants deficient in peptidase E.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, T H; Miller, C G

    1984-01-01

    The only dipeptide found to serve as a leucine source for a Salmonella strain lacking peptidases N, A, B, D, P, and Q was alpha-L-aspartyl-L-leucine. A peptidase (peptidase E) that specifically hydrolyzes Asp-X peptides was identified and partially purified from cell extracts. The enzyme (molecular weight, 35,000) is inactive toward dipeptides with N-terminal asparagine or glutamic acid. Mutants (pepE) lacking this enzyme were isolated by screening extracts for loss of the activity. Genetic mapping placed the pepE locus at 91.5 map units and established the gene order metA pepE zja-861::Tn5 malB. Duplications of the pepE locus showed a gene dosage effect on levels of peptidase E, suggesting that pepE is the structural gene for this enzyme. Mutations in pepE resulted in the loss of the ability to grow on Asp-Pro as a proline source but did not affect utilization of other dipeptides with N-terminal aspartic acid. Loss of peptidase E did not cause a detectable impairment in protein degradation. Two other peptidases present in cell extracts of mutants lacking peptidases N, A, B, D, P, Q, and E also hydrolyze many Asp-X dipeptides. Images PMID:6086568

  8. Signal Peptidase Enzymology and Substrate Specificity Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dalbey, R E; Pei, D; Ekici, Ö D

    2017-01-01

    Signal peptidases are membrane proteases that play crucial roles in the protein transport pathway of bacteria. They cleave off the signal peptide from precursor proteins that are membrane inserted by the SecYEG or Tat translocons. Signal peptide cleavage releases the translocated protein from the inner membrane allowing the protein to be exported to the periplasm, outer membrane, or secreted into the medium. Signal peptidases are very important proteins to study. They are unique serine proteases with a Ser-Lys dyad, catalyze cleavage at the membrane surface, and are promising potential antibacterial drug targets. This chapter will focus on the isolation of signal peptidases and the preprotein substrates, as well as describe a peptide library approach for characterizing the substrate specificity.

  9. Nonspecific Bronchoprovocation Test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Kyu; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Sei Won; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Seoung Ju; Lee, Young Min

    2017-10-01

    Bronchial asthma is a disease characterized by the condition of airway hyper-responsiveness, which serves to produce narrowing of the airway secondary to airway inflammation and/or various spasm-inducing stimulus. Nonspecific bronchoprovocation testing is an important method implemented for the purpose of diagnosing asthma; this test measures the actual degree of airway hyper-responsiveness and utilizes direct and indirect bronchoprovocation testing. Direct bronchoprovocation testing using methacholine or histamine may have superior sensitivity as these substances directly stimulate the airway smooth muscle cells. On the other hand, this method also engenders the specific disadvantage of relatively low specificity. Indirect bronchoprovocation testing using mannitol, exercise, hypertonic saline, adenosine and hyperventilation serves to produce reactions in the airway smooth muscle cells by liberating mediators with stimulation of airway inflammatory cells. Therefore, this method has the advantage of high specificity and also demonstrates relatively low sensitivity. Direct and indirect testing both call for very precise descriptions of very specific measurement conditions. In addition, it has become evident that challenge testing utilizing each of the various bronchoconstrictor stimuli requires distinct and specific protocols. It is therefore important that the clinician understand the mechanism by which the most commonly used bronchoprovocation testing works. It is important that the clinician understand the mechanism of action in the testing, whether direct stimuli (methacholine) or indirect stimuli (mannitol, exercise) is implemented, when the testing is performed and the results interpreted. Copyright©2017. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  10. Leishmania metacaspase: an arginine-specific peptidase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Iveth; Fasel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to give insights into metacaspase of Leishmania protozoan parasites as arginine-specific cysteine peptidase. The physiological role of metacaspase in Leishmania is still a matter of debate, whereas its peptidase enzymatic activity has been well characterized. Among the different possible expression systems, metacaspase-deficient yeast cells (Δyca1) have been instrumental in studying the activity of Leishmania major metacaspase (LmjMCA). Here, we describe techniques for purification of LmjMCA and its activity measurement, providing a platform for further identification of LmjMCA substrates.

  11. Diversity and Phylogenetic Distribution of Extracellular Microbial Peptidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trang; Mueller, Ryan; Myrold, David

    2017-04-01

    Depolymerization of proteinaceous compounds by extracellular proteolytic enzymes is a bottleneck in the nitrogen cycle, limiting the rate of the nitrogen turnover in soils. Protein degradation is accomplished by a diverse range of extracellular (secreted) peptidases. Our objective was to better understand the evolution of these enzymes and how their functional diversity corresponds to known phylogenetic diversity. Peptidase subfamilies from 110 archaeal, 1,860 bacterial, and 97 fungal genomes were extracted from the MEROPS database along with corresponding SSU sequences for each genome from the SILVA database, resulting in 43,177 secreted peptidases belonging to 34 microbial phyla and 149 peptidase subfamilies. We compared the distribution of each peptidase subfamily across all taxa to the phylogenetic relationships of these organisms based on their SSU gene sequences. The occurrence and abundance of genes coding for secreted peptidases varied across microbial taxa, distinguishing the peptidase complement of the three microbial kingdoms. Bacteria had the highest frequency of secreted peptidase coding genes per 1,000 genes and contributed from 1% to 6% of the gene content. Fungi only had a slightly higher number of secreted peptidase gene content than archaea, standardized by the total genes. The relative abundance profiles of secreted peptidases in each microbial kingdom also varied, in which aspartic family was found to be the greatest in fungi (25%), whereas it was only 12% in archaea and 4% in bacteria. Serine, metallo, and cysteine families consistently contributed widely up to 75% of the secreted peptidase abundance across the three kingdoms. Overall, bacteria had a much wider collection of secreted peptidases, whereas fungi and archaea shared most of their secreted peptidase families. Principle coordinate analysis of the peptidase subfamily-based dissimilarities showed distinguishable clusters for different groups of microorganisms. The distribution of

  12. Salmonella typhimurium peptidase active on carnosine.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, M; Dembinski, D R; Hartman, P E; Miller, C G

    1978-01-01

    Wild-type Salmonella typhimurium can use carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) as a source of histidine, but carnosine utilization is blocked in particular mutants defective in the constitutive enzyme peptidase D, the product of the pepD gene. Biochemical evidence for assigning carnosinase activity to peptidase D (a broad-specificity dipeptidase) includes: (i) coelution of carnosinase and dipeptidase activity from diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Bio-Gel P-300 columns; (ii) coelectrophoresis of carnosinase and dipeptidase on polyacrylamide gels; and (iii) inactivation of carnosinase and dipeptidase activities at identical rates at both 4 and 42 degrees C. Genetic evidence indicates that mutations leading to loss of carnosinase activity map at pepD. Several independent pepD mutants have been isolated by different selection procedures, and the patterns of peptide utilization of strains carrying various pepD alleles have been studied. Many pepD mutations lead to the production of partially active peptidase D enzymes with substrate specificities that differ strikingly from those of the wild-type enzyme. The growth yields of carnosinase-deficient strains growing in Difco nutrient broth indicate that carnosine is the major utilizable source of histidine in this medium. PMID:26655

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 - An important digestive peptidase in Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenkova, Valeriia F; Goptar, Irina A; Kulemzina, Irina A; Zhuzhikov, Dmitry P; Serebryakova, Marina V; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Oppert, Brenda; Filippova, Irina Yu; Elpidina, Elena N

    2016-09-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) is a proline specific serine peptidase that plays an important role in different regulatory processes in mammals. In this report, we isolated and characterized a unique secreted digestive DPP 4 from the anterior midgut of a stored product pest, Tenebrio molitor larvae (TmDPP 4), with a biological function different than that of the well-studied mammalian DPP 4. The sequence of the purified enzyme was confirmed by mass-spectrometry, and was identical to the translated RNA sequence found in a gut EST database. The purified peptidase was characterized according to its localization in the midgut, and substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity were compared with those of human recombinant DPP 4 (rhDPP 4). The T. molitor enzyme was localized mainly in the anterior midgut of the larvae, and 81% of the activity was found in the fraction of soluble gut contents, while human DPP 4 is a membrane enzyme. TmDPP 4 was stable in the pH range 5.0-9.0, with an optimum activity at pH 7.9, similar to human DPP 4. Only specific inhibitors of serine peptidases, diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suppressed TmDPP 4 activity, and the specific dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor vildagliptin was most potent. The highest rate of TmDPP 4 hydrolysis was found for the synthetic substrate Arg-Pro-pNA, while Ala-Pro-pNA was a better substrate for rhDPP 4. Related to its function in the insect midgut, TmDPP 4 efficiently hydrolyzed the wheat storage proteins gliadins, which are major dietary proteins of T. molitor. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Salt Taste Enhancing l-Arginyl Dipeptides from Casein and Lysozyme Released by Peptidases of Basidiomycota.

    PubMed

    Harth, Lisa; Krah, Ulrike; Linke, Diana; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-08-24

    Some l-arginyl dipeptides were recently identified as salt taste enhancers, thus opening the possibility to reduce dietary sodium uptake without compromising palatability. A screening of 15 basidiomycete fungi resulted in the identification of 5 species secreting a high peptidolytic activity (>3 kAU/mL; azocasein assay). PFP-LC-MS/MS and HILIC-MS/MS confirmed that l-arginyl dipeptides were liberated when casein or lysozyme served as substrate. Much higher yields of dipeptides (42-75 μmol/g substrate) were released from lysozyme than from casein. The lysozyme hydrolysate generated by the complex set of peptidases of Trametes versicolor showed the highest l-arginyl dipeptide yields and a significant salt taste enhancing effect in a model cheese matrix and in a curd cheese. With a broad spectrum of novel specific and nonspecific peptidases active in the slightly acidic pH range, T. versicolor might be a suitable enzyme source for low-salt dairy products.

  15. Peptidase E, a Peptidase Specific for N-Terminal Aspartic Dipeptides, Is a Serine Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Lassy, Rachel A. L.; Miller, Charles G.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium peptidase E (PepE) is an N-terminal Asp-specific dipeptidase. PepE is not inhibited by any of the classical peptidase inhibitors, and its amino acid sequence does not place it in any of the known peptidase structural classes. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of PepE with a number of related sequences has allowed us to define the amino acid residues that are strongly conserved in this family. To ensure the validity of this comparison, we have expressed one of the most distantly related relatives (Xenopus) in Escherichia coli and have shown that it is indeed an Asp-specific dipeptidase with properties very similar to those of serovar Typhimurium PepE. The sequence comparison suggests that PepE is a serine hydrolase. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to change all of the conserved Ser, His, and Asp residues and have found that Ser120, His157, and Asp135 are all required for activity. Conversion of Ser120 to Cys leads to severely reduced (104-fold) but still detectable activity, and this activity but not that of the parent is inhibited by thiol reagents; these results confirm that this residue is likely to be the catalytic nucleophile. These results suggest that PepE is the prototype of a new family of serine peptidases. The phylogenetic distribution of the family is unusual, since representatives are found in eubacteria, an insect (Drosophila), and a vertebrate (Xenopus) but not in the Archaea or in any of the other eukaryotes for which genome sequences are available. PMID:10762256

  16. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Ane H.; Mingossi, Fabiana B.; Dias, Renata O.; Franco, Flávia P.; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O.; Moura, Daniel S.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane’s (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  17. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  18. Trichosporon asahii secretes a 30-kDa aspartic peptidase.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberta S; Ramos, Lívia S; Reis, Vanessa J; Ziccardi, Mariangela; Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Sodré, Cátia L; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2017-12-01

    Trichosporon asahii is a fungal opportunistic pathogen that causes superficial and deep-seated infections presenting high mortality. Very little is known about the virulence attributes produced by this fungus. Herein, aspartic peptidase production was identified in Brazilian clinical isolates of T. asahii by different methodologies. Initially, T. asahii strain 250 (from skin lesion) was inoculated in both liquid and solid culture media containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the sole nitrogenous source. A translucent halo around the fungal colony was observed from the 5th day of culture. The cell-free culture supernatant revealed that soluble BSA was hydrolyzed along the growth, generating low molecular mass polypeptides as observed by electrophoresis. Subsequently, the secretions from four clinical strains of T. asahii were analyzed by BSA-SDS-PAGE and a single proteolytic band of 30-kDa was detected under acidic pH at 37°C. The secreted aspartic peptidase of T. asahii efficiently cleaved the cathepsin D peptide substrate, but not the substrates with specificity to HIV-1 peptidase and rennin. The capability to cleave either cathepsin D substrate in a fluorogenic assay or BSA immobilized within a gel matrix varied according to the T. asahii isolate. T. asahii extracellular peptidase activity was strongly inhibited by pepstatin A and HIV peptidase inhibitors, classifying it as an aspartic-type peptidase. Human serum albumin, mucin, non-immune immunoglobulin G and gelatin induced, in different levels, the secretion of this aspartic peptidase. With these results, T. asahii must be included in the list of many human fungal opportunistic pathogens able to secrete an aspartic-type peptidase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Plastidic type I signal peptidase 1 is a redox-dependent thylakoidal processing peptidase.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Takafumi; Endow, Joshua K; Dufour, Jeremy; Zhu, Jieping; Inoue, Kentaro

    2014-11-01

    Thylakoids are the photosynthetic membranes in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. The aqueous phase inside the thylakoid known as the thylakoid lumen plays an essential role in the photosynthetic electron transport. The presence and significance of thiol-disulfide exchange in this compartment have been recognized but remain poorly understood. All proteins found free in the thylakoid lumen and some proteins associated to the thylakoid membrane require an N-terminal targeting signal, which is removed in the lumen by a membrane-bound serine protease called thylakoidal processing peptidase (TPP). TPP is homologous to Escherichia coli type I signal peptidase (SPI) called LepB. Genetic data indicate that plastidic SPI 1 (Plsp1) is the main TPP in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) although biochemical evidence had been lacking. Here we demonstrate catalytic activity of bacterially produced Arabidopsis Plsp1. Recombinant Plsp1 showed processing activity against various TPP substrates at a level comparable to that of LepB. Plsp1 and LepB were also similar in the pH optima, sensitivity to arylomycin variants and a preference for the residue at -3 to the cleavage site within a substrate. Plsp1 orthologs found in angiosperms contain two unique Cys residues located in the lumen. Results of processing assays suggested that these residues were redox active and formation of a disulfide bond between them was necessary for the activity of recombinant Arabidopsis Plsp1. Furthermore, Plsp1 in Arabidopsis and pea thylakoids migrated faster under non-reducing conditions than under reducing conditions on SDS-PAGE. These results underpin the notion that Plsp1 is a redox-dependent signal peptidase in the thylakoid lumen.

  20. Adipose Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Henrike; Blüher, Matthias; Klöting, Nora; Schlich, Raphaela; Willems, Miriam; Ruppe, Florian; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Dietrich, Arne; Fielding, Barbara A.; Arner, Peter; Frayn, Keith N.; Eckel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study expression of the recently identified adipokine dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of patients with various BMIs and insulin sensitivities, as well as to assess circulating DPP4 in relation to obesity and insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS DPP4 expression was measured in SAT and VAT from 196 subjects with a wide range of BMIs and insulin sensitivities. DPP4 release was measured ex vivo in paired biopsies from SAT and VAT as well as in vivo from SAT of lean and obese patients. Circulating DPP4 was measured in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant BMI-matched obese patients. RESULTS DPP4 expression was positively correlated with BMI in both SAT and VAT, with VAT consistently displaying higher expression than SAT. Ex vivo release of DPP4 from adipose tissue explants was higher in VAT than in SAT in both lean and obese patients, with obese patients displaying higher DPP4 release than lean controls. Net release of DPP4 from adipose tissue was also demonstrated in vivo with greater release in obese subjects than in lean subjects and in women than in men. Insulin-sensitive obese patients had significantly lower circulating DPP4 than did obesity-matched insulin-resistant patients. In this experiment, DPP4 positively correlated with the amount of VAT, adipocyte size, and adipose tissue inflammation. CONCLUSIONS DPP4, a novel adipokine, has a higher release from VAT that is particularly pronounced in obese and insulin-resistant patients. Our data suggest that DPP4 may be a marker for visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24130353

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors and diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S

    2008-01-01

    Current type 2 diabetes therapies are mainly targeted at stimulating pancreatic beta-cell secretion and reducing insulin resistance. A number of alternative therapies are currently being developed to take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP). These hormones are released from the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. One approach to potentiating their actions is based on inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DPP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific orally administered inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes. A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that DPP IV inhibitors are effective in improving glucose disposal and reducing hemoglobin A1c levels in type 2 diabetic patients and one inhibitor, sitagliptin, is now in therapeutic use, with others likely to receive FDA approval in the near future. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode of action of the inhibitors are still ongoing. Both enhancement of insulin secretion and reduction in glucagon secretion, resulting from the blockade of incretin degradation, are believed to play important roles in DPP IV inhibitor action. Preclinical studies indicate that increased levels of incretins improve beta-cell secretory function and exert effects on beta-cell mitogenesis and survival that can preserve beta-cell mass. Roles for other hormones, neuropeptides and cytokines in DPP IV inhibitor-medicated responses are also possible.

  2. Plasmodia express two threonine-peptidase complexes during asexual development.

    PubMed

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Fendel, Rolf; Kreidenweiss, Andrea; Gille, Christoph; Hurwitz, Robert; Metzger, Wolfram G; Kun, Jürgen F J; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Nordheim, Alfred; Kremsner, Peter G

    2006-07-01

    Threonine-peptidases of the T1-family are multi-subunit complexes with broad substrate specificity. In eukaryotes, at least 14 genes encode subunits of the prototypic T1 threonine-peptidase, the proteasome. The proteasome determines the turnover of most proteins and thereby plays a fundamental role in diverse processes such as protein quality control, signal transduction, and cell cycle regulation. While eukaryotes and archaea possess a proteasome, bacteria generally express a second member of the T1-family, the proteasomal predecessor ClpQ/hslV that has a similar structure but is encoded by only one gene. The plasmodial genome is an exception because it encodes proteasomal subunits as well as a ClpQ/hslV-orthologe (Plasmodium falciparum-hslV; PfhslV). Structure, expression, and function of both types of peptidase-complex in P. falciparum are presently unknown. Our aim was to analyze both the coding sequences and derived proteins of both peptidase-complexes because highly specific and potent inhibitors can be designed against this class of enzymes. The proteasome was found expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas PfhslV was detectable in schizonts and merozoites only. Treatment of P. falciparum with the threonine-peptidase inhibitor epoxomicin blocked two of three catalytically active proteasome subunits. This led to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and, finally, to parasite death. In conclusion, we provide the first functional analysis of plasmodial threonine-peptidase-complexes and identify a lead compound for the development of a novel class of antimalarial drugs.

  3. Structural Biology of Presenilins and Signal Peptide Peptidases*

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Taisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Presenilin and signal peptide peptidase are multispanning intramembrane-cleaving proteases with a conserved catalytic GxGD motif. Presenilin comprises the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase, a protease responsible for the generation of amyloid-β peptides causative of Alzheimer disease. Signal peptide peptidase proteins are implicated in the regulation of the immune system. Both protease family proteins have been recognized as druggable targets for several human diseases, but their detailed structure still remains unknown. Recently, the x-ray structures of some archaeal GxGD proteases have been determined. We review the recent progress in biochemical and biophysical probing of the structure of these atypical proteases. PMID:23585568

  4. Selective fluorescence probes for dipeptidyl peptidase activity-fibroblast activation protein and dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    PubMed

    Lai, Koon Siew; Ho, Nan-Hui; Cheng, Jonathan D; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2007-01-01

    Development of suitable tools to assess enzyme activity directly from their complex cellular environment has a dramatic impact on understanding the functional roles of proteins as well as on the discovery of new drugs. In this study, a novel fluorescence-based chemosensor strategy for the direct readout of dipeptidase activities within intact living cells is described. Selective activity-based probes were designed to sense two important type II transmembrane serine proteases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV). These serine proteases have been implicated in diverse cellular activities, including blood coagulation, digestion, immune responses, wound healing, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Here, we validated that Ac-GPGP-2SBPO and GPGP-2SBPO probes are excellent reporters of both proteolytic activities. Furthermore, the novel probes can differentiate between FAP and DPP-IV proteolytic activities in cellular assay. Potentially, this assay platform is immediately useful for novel drug discovery.

  5. Selective Fluorescence Probes for Dipeptidyl Peptidase Activity - Fibroblast Activation Protein and Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Koon Siew; Ho, Nan-Hui; Cheng, Jonathan D.; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2008-01-01

    Development of suitable tools to assess enzyme activity directly from their complex cellular environment has a dramatic impact on understanding the functional roles of proteins as well as on the discovery of new drugs. In this study, a novel fluorescence-based chemosensor strategy for the direct readout of dipeptidase activities within intact living cells is described. Selective activity-based probes were designed to sense two important type II transmembrane serine proteases, Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV). These serine proteases have been implicated in diverse cellular activities, including blood coagulation, digestion, immune responses, wound healing, tumor growth, tumor invasion and metastasis. We here validated that Ac-GPGP-2SBPO and GPGP-2SBPO probes are excellent reporters of both proteolytic activities. Furthermore, the novel probes can differentiate between FAP and DPP-IV proteolytic activities in cellular assay. Potentially, this assay platform is immediately useful for novel drug discovery. PMID:17489551

  6. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4: A key player in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Itou, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is a membrane-associated peptidase, also known as CD26. DPP-4 has widespread organ distribution throughout the body and exerts pleiotropic effects via its peptidase activity. A representative target peptide is glucagon-like peptide-1, and inactivation of glucagon-like peptide-1 results in the development of glucose intolerance/diabetes mellitus and hepatic steatosis. In addition to its peptidase activity, DPP-4 is known to be associated with immune stimulation, binding to and degradation of extracellular matrix, resistance to anti-cancer agents, and lipid accumulation. The liver expresses DPP-4 to a high degree, and recent accumulating data suggest that DPP-4 is involved in the development of various chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C virus infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, DPP-4 occurs in hepatic stem cells and plays a crucial role in hepatic regeneration. In this review, we described the tissue distribution and various biological effects of DPP-4. Then, we discussed the impact of DPP-4 in chronic liver disease and the possible therapeutic effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor. PMID:23613622

  7. TET peptidases: A family of tetrahedral complexes conserved in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Colombo, Matteo; Basbous, Hind; Gabel, Frank; Girard, E; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    The TET peptidases are large polypeptide destruction machines present among prokaryotes. They form 12-subunits hollow tetrahedral particles, and belong to the family of M42 metallo-peptidases. Structural characterization of various archaeal and bacterial complexes has revealed a unique mechanism of internal compartmentalization and peptide trafficking that distinguishes them from the other oligomeric peptidases. Different versions of the TET complex often co-exist in the cytosol of microorganisms. In depth enzymatic studies have revealed that they are non-processive cobalt-activated aminopeptidases and display contrasting substrate specificities based on the properties of the catalytic chambers. Recent studies have shed light on the assembly mechanism of homo and hetero-dodecameric TET complexes and shown that the activity of TET aminopeptidase towards polypeptides is coupled with its assembly process. These findings suggested a functional regulation based on oligomerization control in vivo. This review describes a current knowledge on M42 TET peptidases biochemistry and discuss their possible physiological roles. This article is a part of the Special Issue entitled: «A potpourri of proteases and inhibitors: from molecular toolboxes to signalling scissors».

  8. Altered Activity and Expression of Cytosolic Peptidases in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Itxaro; Blanco, Lorena; Sanz, Begoña; Errarte, Peio; Ariz, Usue; Beitia, Maider; Fernández, Ainhoa; Loizate, Alberto; Candenas, M Luz; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; López, José I.; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The role of peptidases in carcinogenic processes and their potential usefulness as tumor markers in colorectal cancer (CRC) have been classically attributed to cell-surface enzymes. The objective of the present study was to analyze the activity and mRNA expression of three cytosolic peptidases in the CRC and to correlate the obtained results with classic histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis and survival. Methods: The activity and mRNA levels of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA), aminopeptidase B (APB) and pyroglutamyl-peptidase I (PGI) were measured by fluorimetric and quantitative RT-PCR methods in colorectal mucosa and tumor tissues and plasma samples from CRC patients (n=81). Results: 1) PSA and APB activity was higher in adenomas and carcinomas than in the uninvolved mucosa. 2) mRNA levels of PSA and PGI was lower in tumors. 3) PGI activity in CRC tissue correlated negatively with histological grade, tumor size and 5-year overall suvival of CRC patients. 4) Higher plasmatic APB activity was independently associated with better 5-year overall survival. Conclusions: Data suggest that cytosolic peptidases may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis and point to the determination of this enzymes as a valuable method in the determination of CRC prognosis. PMID:26078706

  9. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  10. The first crystal structure of the peptidase domain of the U32 peptidase family.

    PubMed

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Montada, Angelika A M; Brunstein, Elena; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    The U32 family is a collection of over 2500 annotated peptidases in the MEROPS database with unknown catalytic mechanism. They mainly occur in bacteria and archaea, but a few representatives have also been identified in eukarya. Many of the U32 members have been linked to pathogenicity, such as proteins from Helicobacter and Salmonella. The first crystal structure analysis of a U32 catalytic domain from Methanopyrus kandleri (gene mk0906) reveals a modified (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold with some unique features. The connecting segment between strands β7 and β8 is extended and helix α7 is located on top of the C-terminal end of the barrel body. The protein exhibits a dimeric quaternary structure in which a zinc ion is symmetrically bound by histidine and cysteine side chains from both monomers. These residues reside in conserved sequence motifs. No typical proteolytic motifs are discernible in the three-dimensional structure, and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate proteolytic activity. A tunnel in which an acetate ion is bound is located in the C-terminal part of the β-barrel. Two hydrophobic grooves lead to a tunnel at the C-terminal end of the barrel in which an acetate ion is bound. One of the grooves binds to a Strep-Tag II of another dimer in the crystal lattice. Thus, these grooves may be binding sites for hydrophobic peptides or other ligands.

  11. Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus glycoprotein precursor is processed by cellular signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaohong; Botting, Catherine H.; Li, Ping; Niglas, Mark; Brennan, Benjamin; Shirran, Sally L.; Szemiel, Agnieszka M.; Elliott, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The M genome segment of Bunyamwera virus (BUNV)—the prototype of both the Bunyaviridae family and the Orthobunyavirus genus—encodes the glycoprotein precursor (GPC) that is proteolytically cleaved to yield two viral structural glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, and a nonstructural protein, NSm. The cleavage mechanism of orthobunyavirus GPCs and the host proteases involved have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the processing of BUNV GPC and found that both NSm and Gc proteins were cleaved at their own internal signal peptides (SPs), in which NSm domain I functions as SPNSm and NSm domain V as SPGc. Moreover, the domain I was further processed by a host intramembrane-cleaving protease, signal peptide peptidase, and is required for cell fusion activities. Meanwhile, the NSm domain V (SPGc) remains integral to NSm, rendering the NSm topology as a two-membrane-spanning integral membrane protein. We defined the cleavage sites and boundaries between the processed proteins as follows: Gn, from residue 17–312 or nearby residues; NSm, 332–477; and Gc, 478–1433. Our data clarified the mechanism of the precursor cleavage process, which is important for our understanding of viral glycoprotein biogenesis in the genus Orthobunyavirus and thus presents a useful target for intervention strategies. PMID:27439867

  12. Non-specific ileojejunitis in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Perea, V D; Fernan-Zegarra, L; Cruz, V M; Ballon, R; Picoaga, J L

    1978-09-09

    Non-specific ileojejunitis, characterised by mild to moderate structural changes in the intestinal mucosa and often associated with asymptomatic malabsorption, is known to occur in the tropics and in countries with hot climates. This acquired condition is probably related to environmental factors, and some consider it to be a subclinical form of tropical sprue. Changes in the intestinal mucosa typical of non-specific ileojejunitis were found in 10 indigenous Indians as well as 5 people of Latin stock living in the Southern Peruvian sierra, where tropical sprue has not as yet been demonstrated and which has a temperate climate.

  13. Role of inhibitors of serine peptidases in protecting Leishmania donovani against the hydrolytic peptidases of sand fly midgut.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sudha; Das, Sushmita; Mandal, Abhishek; Ansari, Md Yousuf; Kumari, Sujata; Mansuri, Rani; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Ruby; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Kumar, Vijay; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra; Das, Pradeep

    2017-06-23

    In vector-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis, the sand fly midgut is considered to be an important site for vector-parasite interaction. Digestive enzymes including serine peptidases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are secreted in the midgut are one of the obstacles for Leishmania in establishing a successful infection. The presence of some natural inhibitors of serine peptidases (ISPs) has recently been reported in Leishmania. In the present study, we deciphered the role of these ISPs in the survival of Leishmania donovani in the hostile sand fly midgut environment. In silico and co-immunoprecipitation studies were performed to observe the interaction of L. donovani ISPs with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Zymography and in vitro enzyme assays were carried out to observe the inhibitory effect of purified recombinant ISPs of L. donovani (rLdISPs) on trypsin, chymotrypsin and the sand fly midgut peptidases. The expression of ISPs in the amastigote to promastigote transition stages were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. The role of LdISP on the survival of ISP overexpressed (OE) and ISP knocked down (KD) Leishmania parasites inside the sand fly gut was investigated by in vitro and in vivo cell viability assays. We identified two ecotin-like genes in L. donovani, LdISP1 and LdISP2. In silico and co-immunoprecipitation results clearly suggest a strong interaction of LdISP molecules with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Zymography and in vitro enzyme assay confirmed the inhibitory effect of rLdISP on trypsin, chymotrypsin and the sand fly midgut peptidases. The expression of LdISP2 was found to be strongly associated with the amastigote to promastigote phase transition. The activities of the digestive enzymes were found to be significantly reduced in the infected sand flies when compared to uninfected. To our knowledge, our study is the first report showing the possible reduction of chymotrypsin activity in L. donovani infected sand flies compared to

  14. Integrated Activity and Genetic Profiling of Secreted Peptidases in Cryptococcus neoformans Reveals an Aspartyl Peptidase Required for Low pH Survival and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Starlynn C.; Dumesic, Phillip A.; Homer, Christina M.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; La Greca, Florencia; Pallova, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Madhani, Hiten D.; Craik, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromised individuals, resulting in more than 600,000 deaths per year. Many human fungal pathogens secrete peptidases that influence virulence, but in most cases the substrate specificity and regulation of these enzymes remains poorly understood. The paucity of such information is a roadblock to our understanding of the biological functions of peptidases and whether or not these enzymes are viable therapeutic targets. We report here an unbiased analysis of secreted peptidase activity and specificity in C. neoformans using a mass spectrometry-based substrate profiling strategy and subsequent functional investigations. Our initial studies revealed that global peptidase activity and specificity are dramatically altered by environmental conditions. To uncover the substrate preferences of individual enzymes and interrogate their biological functions, we constructed and profiled a ten-member gene deletion collection of candidate secreted peptidases. Through this deletion approach, we characterized the substrate specificity of three peptidases within the context of the C. neoformans secretome, including an enzyme known to be important for fungal entry into the brain. We selected a previously uncharacterized peptidase, which we term Major aspartyl peptidase 1 (May1), for detailed study due to its substantial contribution to extracellular proteolytic activity. Based on the preference of May1 for proteolysis between hydrophobic amino acids, we screened a focused library of aspartyl peptidase inhibitors and identified four high-affinity antagonists. Finally, we tested may1Δ strains in a mouse model of C. neoformans infection and found that strains lacking this enzyme are significantly attenuated for virulence. Our study reveals the secreted peptidase activity and specificity of an important human fungal pathogen, identifies responsible enzymes through genetic tests of their

  15. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and spinal cord. Other drugs that boost the immune system Some other drugs boost the immune system in a non-specific way, similar to cytokines. ... and CTLA-4, which normally help keep the immune system in check. While these checkpoint proteins are important ...

  16. Cysteine Peptidases as Schistosomiasis Vaccines with Inbuilt Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Selim, Sahar; Donnelly, Sheila; Cotton, Sophie; Gonzales Santana, Bibiana; Dalton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50%) against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant (P<0.0001) protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83%) when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP), without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines PMID:24465551

  17. Targeting Prolyl Peptidases in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    cell survival. We identified a protein called PRCP (prolylcarboxypeptidase) that promotes metastasis and survival in breast cancer cells . We found...PRCP/PREP inhibition reduces IRS1 and IRS2 protein levels, blocks proliferation, and induces death in multiple TNBC cell lines of different sub-types...SUBJECT TERMS Triple negative breast cancer, Prolyl peptidases, Breast cancer treatment, Animal model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  18. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and deletion of NAAG peptidase gene enhance memory in novel object recognition test

    PubMed Central

    Janczura, Karolina J.; Olszewski, Rafal T.; Bzdega, Tomasz; Bacich, Dean J.; Heston, Warren D.; Neale, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is inactivated by the extracellular enzyme glutamate carboxypeptidase II. Inhibitors of this enzyme reverse dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced impairment of short-term memory in the novel object recognition test. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that NAAG peptidase inhibition enhances the long-term (24 hr delay) memory of C57BL mice in this test. These mice and mice in which glutamate carboxypeptidase II had been knocked out were presented with two identical objects to explore for 10 minutes on day 1 and tested with one of these familiar objects and one novel object on day 2. Memory was assessed as the degree to which the mice recalled the familiar object and explored the novel object to a greater extent on day 2. Uninjected mice or mice injected with saline prior to the acquisition session on day 1 demonstrated a lack of memory of the acquisition experience by exploring the familiar and novel objects to the same extent on day 2. Mice treated with glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibitors ZJ43 or 2-PMPA prior to the acquisition trial explored the novel object significantly more time than the familiar object on day 2. Consistent with these results, mice in which glutamate carboxypeptidase II had been knocked out distinguished the novel from the familiar object on day 2 while their heterozygous colony mates did not. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II enhances recognition memory, a therapeutic action that might be useful in treatment of memory deficits related to age and neurological disorders. PMID:23200894

  19. Hen oviduct signal peptidase is an integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Lively, M O; Walsh, K A

    1983-08-10

    Membrane preparations from rough endoplasmic reticulum of hen oviduct resemble those of dog pancreas in their capacity to translocate nascent secretory proteins into membrane vesicles present during cell-free protein synthesis. As with the dog membranes, the precursor form of human placental lactogen is transported into the vesicles and processed to the native secretory form by an associated "signal peptidase." The oviduct microsomal membranes glycosylate nascent ovomucoid and ovalbumin in vitro. Attempts to extract the signal peptidase from these membrane vesicles revealed that it is one of the least easily solubilized proteins. A protocol for enrichment of signal peptidase was developed that took advantage of its tight association with these vesicles. These studies indicate that the enzyme has the characteristics of an integral membrane protein which remains active in membrane vesicles even after extraction with low concentrations of detergent that do not dissolve the lipid bilayer or after disruption of membrane vesicles in ice-cold 0.1 M Na2CO3, pH 11.5 (Fujiki, Y., Hubbard, A. L., Fowler, S., and Lazarow, P.B. (1982) J. Cell Biol. 93, 97-102), which releases the majority of membrane-associated proteins. Solubilization requires concentrations of nondenaturing detergents that totally dissolve the lipid bilayer. The detergent-solubilized enzyme retains the activity and the characteristic specificity of the membrane-bound form.

  20. Extracellular peptidases of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Rohan G. T.; McCorkelle, Owen; Bleackley, Mark; Collins, Christine; Faou, Pierre; Mathivanan, Suresh; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum (Fgr) creates economic and health risks in cereals agriculture. Fgr causes head blight (or scab) of wheat and stalk rot of corn, reducing yield, degrading grain quality, and polluting downstream food products with mycotoxins. Fungal plant pathogens must secrete proteases to access nutrition and to breakdown the structural protein component of the plant cell wall. Research into the proteolytic activity of Fgr is hindered by the complex nature of the suite of proteases secreted. We used a systems biology approach comprising genome analysis, transcriptomics and label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize the peptidases deployed by Fgr during growth. A combined analysis of published microarray transcriptome datasets revealed seven transcriptional groupings of peptidases based on in vitro growth, in planta growth, and sporulation behaviors. A high resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis defined the extracellular proteases secreted by F. graminearum. A meta-classification based on sequence characters and transcriptional/translational activity in planta and in vitro provides a platform to develop control strategies that target Fgr peptidases. PMID:26635820

  1. Study of Various Peptidases and Their Effects on Freshwater Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyeji Boerrigter, K.; Steen, A. D.; Rosalsky, J.; Ferriero, N.

    2016-12-01

    The breakdown of organic matter remains a major facet in the exploration of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, land, and fossil fuels. Currently it is still unclear how, and at what rates, these reactions are catalyzed. Student researchers in cooperation with University of Tennessee researchers conducted primary field studies from various water resources in the Pocono Valley each year from 2013-2016. Traditionally, only enzyme activities of five peptidases were measured, but this year the enzyme activities of seven different peptidases were measured. This is the fourth year of our studies collecting usable data about several different types of protein enzymes. In 2016, each sample was divided in half and one was strained to remove large microorganisms. Two other enzymes substrates were added—MUB-B-D-Glucopyrinoside and MUB Phosphatase—and more information, such as oxygen (O2) concentration, was recorded. Additionally, this fall an independent research project will be conducted in order to measure optimum pH levels of several peptidases. For the students, the firsthand collection of data and participation in a scientific experiment lets them witness how alteration in scientific methods is part of the dynamic process of field research. In some cases, different enzymes catalyzed at different rates in different samples. Currently it is unclear why this occurs. Further studies may reveal why this happens, so future efforts might focus on including additional independent variables.

  2. Studies on the peptidase activity of transthyretin (TTR).

    PubMed

    Gouvea, Iuri Estrada; Kondo, Marcia Yuri; Assis, Diego M; Alves, Fabiana Madureira; Liz, Márcia Almeida; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz

    2013-02-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a plasma protein transporter of thyroxine (T(4)) and retinol and also has peptidase activity. In order to characterize TTR peptidase activity we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides derived from Abz-KLRSSK-Q-EDDnp and from two portion-mixing libraries as substrates. Most of the susceptible FRET peptides were cleaved at more than one peptide bond, without particular substrate specificity. The more relevant observation was that the peptides containing E or D were cleaved at only one peptide bond and TTR was competitively inhibited by glutathione analog peptide γ-E-A-G-OH that contains two free carboxyl groups. The dependence on ionic interactions of TTR hydrolytic activity was confirmed by the large inhibitory effects of salt and ionic surfactants. TTR was not inhibited by any usual peptidase inhibitors, except by ortho-phenanthroline and EDTA. The mechanism of TTR catalysis was explored by the pH-profile of TTR hydrolytic activity in different temperatures and by proton inventory. The obtained pK and heat of ionization values suggest that a carboxylate and an ammonium group, possibly from a lysine side chain are involved. These results support the recently proposed inducible metalloprotease mechanism for TTR based on its 3D structure in presence of Zn(2+) and a series of point mutations [Liz et al., Biochem. J 443 (2012) 769-778]. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular peptidases of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rohan G T; McCorkelle, Owen; Bleackley, Mark; Collins, Christine; Faou, Pierre; Mathivanan, Suresh; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum (Fgr) creates economic and health risks in cereals agriculture. Fgr causes head blight (or scab) of wheat and stalk rot of corn, reducing yield, degrading grain quality, and polluting downstream food products with mycotoxins. Fungal plant pathogens must secrete proteases to access nutrition and to breakdown the structural protein component of the plant cell wall. Research into the proteolytic activity of Fgr is hindered by the complex nature of the suite of proteases secreted. We used a systems biology approach comprising genome analysis, transcriptomics and label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize the peptidases deployed by Fgr during growth. A combined analysis of published microarray transcriptome datasets revealed seven transcriptional groupings of peptidases based on in vitro growth, in planta growth, and sporulation behaviors. A high resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis defined the extracellular proteases secreted by F. graminearum. A meta-classification based on sequence characters and transcriptional/translational activity in planta and in vitro provides a platform to develop control strategies that target Fgr peptidases.

  4. PEPTIDASE INCREASE ACCOMPANYING GROWTH OF THE LARVAL SALIVARY GLAND OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Elizabeth K.; Dackerman, Marjorie E.; Schultz, Jack

    1949-01-01

    1. The larval salivary gland of Drosophila melanogaster offers an opportunity to study growth in a tissue in which no cell division occurs but in which the cells increase in size. 2. Measurements of alanylglycine (AG)-peptidase content have been made in three stocks of Drosophila melanogaster at different growth stages of the larval salivary gland, and have been correlated with its total nitrogen and volume. 3. During the prepupal instar, the AG-peptidase content of the gland increases parallel with total nitrogen but decreases when histolysis of the gland begins. Conversely, a benzoyl-l-arginineamide-hydrolyzing endopeptidase is not measurable until histolysis sets in. 4. In the final larval growth period of a giant mutant, there is a concomitant increase in peptidase, total nitrogen, and volume of the gland. 5. A similar association of peptidase content and total nitrogen is found in comparing glands of different sizes from the giant stock, at the time of maximal peptidase content in the prepupa. 6. The data are interpreted as evidence for an association of AG-peptidase with growth of the cells in the gland. This agrees with the earlier interpretation by Linderstrøm-Lang and Holter of data obtained from study of more complex tissues. 7. A survey of the available measurements of peptidase content in other organisms shows that wherever an increase of cell substance occurs, peptidase content increases. Conversely, peptidase remains constant where cell division is unaccompanied by an increase of cell substances. 8. The joint association of peptidases and pentosenucleic acids with protein synthesis is pointed out. 9. The possiblity is considered that peptidases may be essential parts of a unit in which coupled reactions necessary for protein synthesis occur. The rôle of the peptidases in this system is discussed. They may act either synthetically to form new peptide linkages (problematic), or hydrolytically to mobilize the necessary specific amino acids. PMID

  5. Potencies of phosphine peptide inhibitors of mammalian thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin on two bacterial pz peptidases.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yusuke; Kawasaki, Akio; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2007-02-01

    Pz peptidases A and B, from a thermophile Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1, recognize collagen-specific tripeptide units (Gly-Pro-Xaa). They share similarities in function but extremely low identities in primary sequence with mammalian thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and neurolysin. Three phosphine peptide inhibitors that selectively inhibit TOP and neurolysin on two bacterial Pz peptidases were investigated. They showed potent inhibition of both Pz peptidases in a range from 10 to 100 nM.

  6. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Karlyshev, A.V.; Thacker, G.; Jones, M.A.; Clements, M.O.; Wren, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection. PMID:24918062

  7. Nonspecific eating disorders - a subjective review.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Aneta; Szejko, Natalia; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Wojnar, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to characterise nonspecific eating disorders (other than anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa). The Medline database was searched for articles on nonspecific eating disorders. The following disorders were described: binge eating disorder (BED), pica, rumination disorder, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, night eating syndrome (NES), sleep-related eating disorder (SRED), bigorexia, orthorexia, focusing on diagnosis, symptoms, assessment, comorbidities, clinical implications and treatment. All of the included disorders may have dangerous consequences, both somatic and psychological. They are often comorbid with other psychiatric disorders. Approximately a few percent of general population can be diagnosed with each disorder, from 0.5-4.7% (SRED) to about 7% (orthorexia). With the growing literature on the subject and changes in DSM-5, clinicians recognise and treat those disorders more often. More studies have to be conducted in order to differentiate disorders and treat or prevent them appropriately.

  8. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  9. Altered dipeptidyl peptidase IV and prolyl endopeptidase activities in chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Larrinaga, Gorka; Pérez, Itxaro; Sanz, Begoña; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Casis, Luis; Anta, Jose Antonio; Martínez, Agustin; Santaolalla, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    To analyse peptidase activities in the removed tonsils and adenoids from patients with chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia. We have analyzed 48 tissue samples from patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia or adenoid hyperplasia. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy samples were collected and frozen for later enzyme analysis. The catalytic activity of a pool of peptidases (dipeptidyl peptidase IV, prolyl endopeptidase, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N, aspartyl aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase B, neutral endopeptidase, pyroglutamyl peptidase I, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase and cystinyl aminopeptidase) was measured fluorometrically. The activity of prolyl endopeptidase was higher in tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia than in chronic tonsillitis. On the contrary, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was higher in chronic tonsillitis than in hypertrophic tissues. When data were stratified by age and gender, dipeptidyl peptidase IV was also found to be more active in adult and male chronic tonsillitis tissues. Inversely, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was higher in tissues of females with tonsillar hyperplasia. These data indicate the involvement of dipeptidyl peptidase IV and prolyl endopeptidase in the mechanisms underlying chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cysteine peptidases are important in many biological processes. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family. The structure of the proposed substrates can be expressed by the general formula Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y, wh...

  11. Excretion/secretion products from Schistosoma mansoni adults, eggs and schistosomula have unique peptidase specificity profiles.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Jan; Fajtová, Pavla; Ulrychová, Lenka; Leontovyč, Adrian; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Suzuki, Brian M; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael; Craik, Charles S; Caffrey, Conor R; O'Donoghue, Anthony J

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of a number of chronic helminth diseases of poverty that severely impact personal and societal well-being and productivity. Peptidases (proteases) are vital to successful parasitism, and can modulate host physiology and immunology. Interference of peptidase action by specific drugs or vaccines can be therapeutically beneficial. To date, research on peptidases in the schistosome parasite has focused on either the functional characterization of individual peptidases or their annotation as part of global genome or transcriptome studies. We were interested in functionally characterizing the complexity of peptidase activity operating at the host-parasite interface, therefore the excretory-secretory products of key developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni that parasitize the human were examined. Using class specific peptidase inhibitors in combination with a multiplex substrate profiling assay, a number of unique activities derived from endo- and exo-peptidases were revealed in the excretory-secretory products of schistosomula (larval migratory worms), adults and eggs. The data highlight the complexity of the functional degradome for each developmental stage of this parasite and facilitate further enquiry to establish peptidase identity, physiological and immunological function, and utility as drug or vaccine candidates.

  12. Excretion/secretion products from Schistosoma mansoni adults, eggs and schistosomula have unique peptidase specificity profiles

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, Jan; Fajtová, Pavla; Ulrychová, Lenka; Leontovyč, Adrian; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Suzuki, Brian M.; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael; Craik, Charles S.; Caffrey, Conor R.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of a number of chronic helminth diseases of poverty that severely impact personal and societal well-being and productivity. Peptidases (proteases) are vital to successful parasitism, and can modulate host physiology and immunology. Interference of peptidase action by specific drugs or vaccines can be therapeutically beneficial. To date, research on peptidases in the schistosome parasite has focused on either the functional characterization of individual peptidases or their annotation as part of global genome or transcriptome studies. We were interested in functionally characterizing the complexity of peptidase activity operating at the host-parasite interface, therefore the excretory-secretory products of key developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni that parasitize the human were examined. Using class specific peptidase inhibitors in combination with a multiplex substrate profiling assay, a number of unique activities derived from endo- and exo-peptidases were revealed in the excretory-secretory products of schistosomula (larval migratory worms), adults and eggs. The data highlight the complexity of the functional degradome for each developmental stage of this parasite and facilitate further enquiry to establish peptidase identity, physiological and immunological function, and utility as drug or vaccine candidates. PMID:26409899

  13. Activity of soluble aminopeptidase A and dipeptidyl peptidase IV and membrane-bound aminopeptidase B and pyroglutamyl peptidase I in adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia and chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Larrinaga, Gorka; Perez, Itxaro; Sanz, Begoña; Irazusta, Amaya; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Sanchez, Clara Elena; Sanchez, Carmen Elena; Rey, Ana Sanchez Del; Zabala, Aitor; Santaolalla, Francisco

    2011-11-01

    To analyze soluble and membrane-bound peptidase activities in the tonsils and adenoids removed from patients with adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia and chronic tonsillitis. A total of 48 tissue samples from patients undergoing adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy for adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia or chronic tonsillitis were analyzed. The catalytic activity of a pool of peptidases in the soluble (dipeptidyl peptidase IV, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N and cystinyl aminopeptidase) and membrane-bound (prolyl endopeptidase, aspartyl aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase B and pyroglutamyl peptidase I) fractions was measured fluorometrically. The activity of membrane-bound aminopeptidase B was higher in cases of chronic tonsillitis and adenoid hyperplasia than in tonsillar hyperplasia, p=0.004. Soluble dipeptidyl peptidase IV and membrane-bound pyroglutamyl peptidase I were found to be more active in tissues from male chronic tonsillitis tissues, p<0.05, while membrane-bound aminopeptidase B activity was higher in tissues of females with tonsillar hyperplasia, p<0.001. In the case of chronic tonsillitis, soluble aminopeptidase A was found to have a higher level of activity in tissues from children than those from adults, p=0.005. Our results suggest a potential role of soluble aminopeptidase A, soluble dipeptidyl peptidase IV, membrane-bound aminopeptidase B and membrane-bound pyroglutamyl peptidase I in the pathobiology of adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia and chronic tonsillitis that is differently regulated as a function of gender. These finfings may modify in the future the clinical approach to these diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recognition of protein-linked glycans as a determinant of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Stuart, Christopher; Jenkins, Meredith L; Brochu, Denis; Buenbrazo, Nakita; Wakarchuk, Warren; Burke, John E; Gilbert, Michel; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2017-01-31

    The vast majority of proteins are posttranslationally altered, with the addition of covalently linked sugars (glycosylation) being one of the most abundant modifications. However, despite the hydrolysis of protein peptide bonds by peptidases being a process essential to all life on Earth, the fundamental details of how peptidases accommodate posttranslational modifications, including glycosylation, has not been addressed. Through biochemical analyses and X-ray crystallographic structures we show that to hydrolyze their substrates, three structurally related metallopeptidases require the specific recognition of O-linked glycan modifications via carbohydrate-specific subsites immediately adjacent to their peptidase catalytic machinery. The three peptidases showed selectivity for different glycans, revealing protein-specific adaptations to particular glycan modifications, yet always cleaved the peptide bond immediately preceding the glycosylated residue. This insight builds upon the paradigm of how peptidases recognize substrates and provides a molecular understanding of glycoprotein degradation.

  15. Specifying the nonspecific components of acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially nonspecific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred one patients who developed pain of ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0 to 10) after third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients' perception of the treatment (active or placebo) and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed before and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P=.240), but there was a large and significant nonspecific effect of placebo acupuncture (P<.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P<.001), indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings after both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%). This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions, nonspecific factors such as patients' perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment. To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice, it may therefore be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mast cell dipeptidyl peptidase I mediates survival from sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mallen–St. Clair, Jon; Pham, Christine T.N.; Villalta, S. Armando; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis is a common, life-threatening disease for which there is little treatment. The cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) activates granule-associated serine proteases, several of which play important roles in host responses to bacterial infection. To examine DPPI’s role in sepsis, we compared DPPI–/– and DPPI+/+ mice using the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of septic peritonitis, finding that DPPI–/– mice are far more likely to survive sepsis. Outcomes of CLP in mice lacking mast cell DPPI reveal that the absence of DPPI in mast cells, rather than in other cell types, is responsible for the survival advantage. Among several cytokines surveyed in peritoneal fluid and serum, IL-6 is highly and differentially expressed in DPPI–/– mice compared with DPPI+/+ mice. Remarkably, deleting IL-6 expression in DPPI–/– mice eliminates the survival advantage. The increase in IL-6 in septic DPPI–/– mice, which appears to protect these mice from death, may be related to reduced DPPI-mediated activation of mast cell tryptase and other peptidases, which we show cleave IL-6 in vitro. These results indicate that mast cell DPPI harms the septic host and that DPPI is a novel potential therapeutic target for treatment of sepsis. PMID:14966572

  17. Astacin Family Metallopeptidases and Serine Peptidase Inhibitors in Spider Digestive Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Foradori, Matthew J.; Tillinghast, Edward K.; Smith, J. Stephen; Townley, Mark A.; Mooney, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Digestive fluid of the araneid spider Argiope aurantia is known to contain zinc metallopeptidases. Using anion-exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and gel electrophoresis, we isolated two lower-molecular-mass peptidases, designated p16 and p18. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of p16 (37 residues) and p18 (20 residues) are 85% identical over the first 20 residues and are most similar to the N-terminal sequences of the fully active form of meprin (β subunits) from several vertebrates (47–52% and 50–60% identical, respectively). Meprin is a peptidase in the astacin (M12A) subfamily of the astacin (M12) family. Additionally, a 66-residue internal sequence obtained from p16 aligns with the conserved astacin subfamily domain. Thus, at least some spider digestive peptidases appear related to astacin of decapod crustaceans. However, important differences between spider and crustacean metallopeptidases with regard to isoelectric point and their susceptibility to hemolymph-borne inhibitors are demonstrated. Anomalous behavior of the lower-molecular-mass Argiope peptidases during certain fractionation procedures indicates that these peptidases may take part in reversible associations with each other or with other proteins. A. aurantia digestive fluid also contains inhibitory activity effective against insect digestive peptidases. Here we present evidence for at least thirteen, heat-stable serine peptidase inhibitors ranging in molecular mass from about 15 to 32 kDa. PMID:16458560

  18. Activity of a peptidase secreted by Phanerochaete chrysosporium depends on lysine to subsite S'1.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-01-01

    Peptidases are enzymes that catalyze the rupture of peptide bonds. Catalytic specificity studies of these enzymes have illuminated their modes of action and preferred hydrolysis targets. We describe the biochemical characteristics and catalytic specificity of a lysine-dependent peptidase secreted by the basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. We attained 5.7-fold purification of a ∼23-kDa neutral peptidase using size-exclusion (Sephadex G-50 resin) and ion-exchange (Source 15S resin) chromatography. Using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer substrate Abz-KLRSSKQ-EDDnp, we detected maximal activity at pH 7.0 and 45-55°C. The peptidase retained ∼80% of its enzymatic activity for a wide range of conditions (pH 4-9; temperatures up to 50°C for 1h). The peptidase activity was lowered by the ionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; the reducing agent, dithiothreitol; the chaotrope, guanidine; copper (II) ion; and the cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitors, iodoacetic acid and N-ethylmaleimide. The peptidase preferred the basic amino acids K and R and high selectivity on S'1 subsite, exhibiting a condition of lysine-dependence to catalysis on anchoring of this subsite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors in Tetranychus urticae: a comparative genomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cysteine peptidases in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae are involved in essential physiological processes, including proteolytic digestion. Cystatins and thyropins are inhibitors of cysteine peptidases that modulate their activity, although their function in this species has yet to be investigated. Comparative genomic analyses are powerful tools to obtain advanced knowledge into the presence and evolution of both, peptidases and their inhibitors, and could aid to elucidate issues concerning the function of these proteins. Results We have performed a genomic comparative analysis of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors in T. urticae and representative species of different arthropod taxonomic groups. The results indicate: i) clade-specific proliferations are common to C1A papain-like peptidases and for the I25B cystatin family of inhibitors, whereas the C1A inhibitors thyropins are evolutionarily more conserved among arthropod clades; ii) an unprecedented extensive expansion for C13 legumain-like peptidases is found in T. urticae; iii) a sequence-structure analysis of the spider mite cystatins suggests that diversification may be related to an expansion of their inhibitory range; and iv) an in silico transcriptomic analysis shows that most cathepsin B and L cysteine peptidases, legumains and several members of the cystatin family are expressed at a higher rate in T. urticae feeding stages than in embryos. Conclusion Comparative genomics has provided valuable insights on the spider mite cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors. Mite-specific proliferations of C1A and C13 peptidase and I25 cystatin families and their over-expression in feeding stages of mites fit with a putative role in mite’s feeding and could have a key role in its broad host feeding range. PMID:22784002

  20. Yoga to treat nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Carter, Catherine; Stratton, Carol; Mallory, Debra

    2011-08-01

    Low back pain is common and poses a challenge for clinicians to find effective treatment to prevent it from becoming chronic. Chronic low back pain can have a significant impact on an employee's ability to remain an active and productive member of the work force due to increased absenteeism, duty restrictions, or physical limitations from pain. Low back pain is the most common cause of work-related disability among employees younger than 46 years. Advancing technology and less invasive surgical procedures have not improved outcomes for employees who suffer from low back pain. Most continue to experience some pain and dysfunction after conventional treatments such as injections and surgery. An alternative treatment that could reduce nonspecific chronic low back pain would benefit both employees and employers. Exercising and remaining active are part of most guidelines' routine care recommendations but are not well defined.

  1. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota S; Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-08-01

    The kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent the largest family of serine proteases within the human genome and are expressed in various tissues. Although they regulate several important physiological functions, KLKs have also been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Growing evidence describing the deregulation of KLK expression and secretion, as well as activation in various malignancies, has uncovered their potential as mediators of cancer progression, biomarkers of disease and as candidate therapeutic targets. The diversity of signalling pathways and proteolytic cascades involving KLKs and their downstream targets appears to affect cancer biology through multiple mechanisms, including those related to the hallmarks of cancer. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the importance of KLK-driven molecular pathways in relation to cancer cell traits associated with the hallmarks of cancer and to highlight their potential in personalized therapeutics.

  2. Purification of microsomal signal peptidase as a complex.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E A; Gilmore, R; Blobel, G

    1986-01-01

    We report here the purification to near homogeneity of signal peptidase from canine pancreatic microsomes. Purification was monitored using an improved post-translational assay. A 42-fold enrichment over starting membranes was achieved by selective solubilization in nonionic detergent/high-salt buffer followed by gradient sievorptive anion and cation exchange chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, gel filtration, and sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. When examined by NaDodSO4/PAGE, the purified enzyme consisted of a complex of six polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 25, 23, 22, 21, 18, and 12 kDa. The 22- and 23-kDa subunits were shown to be glycoproteins based on their sensitivity to endoglycosidase H and their ability to bind concanavalin A. We suggest that only one subunit of this complex carries out signal peptide cleavage. The structural association of the other subunits in stoichiometric amounts may reflect their requirement in chain translocation across the microsomal membrane. Images PMID:3511473

  3. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and their potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Neale, Joseph H; Pomper, Martin G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-01

    Modulation of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate peptidase activity with small-molecule inhibitors holds promise for a wide variety of diseases that involve glutamatergic transmission, and has implications for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. This new class of compounds, of which at least one has entered clinical trials and proven to be well tolerated, has demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of pain, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and, when appropriately functionalized, can image prostate cancer. Further investigation of these promising drug candidates will be needed to bring them to the marketplace. The recent publication of the X-ray crystal structure for the enzymatic target of these compounds should facilitate the development of other new agents with enhanced activity that could improve both the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders.

  4. Crystal structure of a bacterial signal Peptide peptidase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Apollos C; Oliver, David C; Paetzel, Mark

    2008-02-15

    Signal peptide peptidase (Spp) is the enzyme responsible for cleaving the remnant signal peptides left behind in the membrane following Sec-dependent protein secretion. Spp activity appears to be present in all cell types, eukaryotic, prokaryotic and archaeal. Here we report the first structure of a signal peptide peptidase, that of the Escherichia coli SppA (SppA(EC)). SppA(EC) forms a tetrameric assembly with a novel bowl-shaped architecture. The bowl has a dramatically hydrophobic interior and contains four separate active sites that utilize a Ser/Lys catalytic dyad mechanism. Our structural analysis of SppA reveals that while in many Gram-negative bacteria as well as characterized plant variants, a tandem duplication in the protein fold creates an intact active site at the interface between the repeated domains, other species, particularly Gram-positive and archaeal organisms, encode half-size, unduplicated SppA variants that could form similar oligomers to their duplicated counterparts, but using an octamer arrangement and with the catalytic residues provided by neighboring monomers. The structure reveals a similarity in the protein fold between the domains in the periplasmic Ser/Lys protease SppA and the monomers seen in the cytoplasmic Ser/His/Asp protease ClpP. We propose that SppA may, in addition to its role in signal peptide hydrolysis, have a role in the quality assurance of periplasmic and membrane-bound proteins, similar to the role that ClpP plays for cytoplasmic proteins.

  5. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Signal Peptide Peptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,A.; Oliver, D.; Paetzel, M.

    2008-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (Spp) is the enzyme responsible for cleaving the remnant signal peptides left behind in the membrane following Sec-dependent protein secretion. Spp activity appears to be present in all cell types, eukaryotic, prokaryotic and archaeal. Here we report the first structure of a signal peptide peptidase, that of the Escherichia coli SppA (SppAEC). SppAEC forms a tetrameric assembly with a novel bowl-shaped architecture. The bowl has a dramatically hydrophobic interior and contains four separate active sites that utilize a Ser/Lys catalytic dyad mechanism. Our structural analysis of SppA reveals that while in many Gram-negative bacteria as well as characterized plant variants, a tandem duplication in the protein fold creates an intact active site at the interface between the repeated domains, other species, particularly Gram-positive and archaeal organisms, encode half-size, unduplicated SppA variants that could form similar oligomers to their duplicated counterparts, but using an octamer arrangement and with the catalytic residues provided by neighboring monomers. The structure reveals a similarity in the protein fold between the domains in the periplasmic Ser/Lys protease SppA and the monomers seen in the cytoplasmic Ser/His/Asp protease ClpP. We propose that SppA may, in addition to its role in signal peptide hydrolysis, have a role in the quality assurance of periplasmic and membrane-bound proteins, similar to the role that ClpP plays for cytoplasmic proteins.

  6. Inhibition of DD-peptidases by a specific trifluoroketone: crystal structure of a complex with the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase.

    PubMed

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Adediran, S A; Herman, Raphael; Kerff, Frédéric; Duez, Colette; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric; Pratt, R F

    2013-03-26

    Inhibitors of bacterial DD-peptidases represent potential antibiotics. In the search for alternatives to β-lactams, we have investigated a series of compounds designed to generate transition state analogue structures upon reaction with DD-peptidases. The compounds contain a combination of a peptidoglycan-mimetic specificity handle and a warhead capable of delivering a tetrahedral anion to the enzyme active site. The latter includes a boronic acid, two alcohols, an aldehyde, and a trifluoroketone. The compounds were tested against two low-molecular mass class C DD-peptidases. As expected from previous observations, the boronic acid was a potent inhibitor, but rather unexpectedly from precedent, the trifluoroketone [D-α-aminopimelyl(1,1,1-trifluoro-3-amino)butan-2-one] was also very effective. Taking into account competing hydration, we found the trifluoroketone was the strongest inhibitor of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase, with a subnanomolar (free ketone) inhibition constant. A crystal structure of the complex between the trifluoroketone and the R39 enzyme showed that a tetrahedral adduct had indeed formed with the active site serine nucleophile. The trifluoroketone moiety, therefore, should be considered along with boronic acids and phosphonates as a warhead that can be incorporated into new and effective DD-peptidase inhibitors and therefore, perhaps, antibiotics.

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. An archaeal peptidase assembles into two different quaternary structures: A tetrahedron and a giant octahedron.

    PubMed

    Schoehn, Guy; Vellieux, Frédéric M D; Asunción Durá, M; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Fabry, Céline M S; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Ebel, Christine; Roussel, Alain; Franzetti, Bruno

    2006-11-24

    Cellular proteolysis involves large oligomeric peptidases that play key roles in the regulation of many cellular processes. The cobalt-activated peptidase TET1 from the hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhTET1) was found to assemble as a 12-subunit tetrahedron and as a 24-subunit octahedral particle. Both quaternary structures were solved by combining x-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy data. The internal organization of the PhTET1 particles reveals highly self-compartmentalized systems made of networks of access channels extended by vast catalytic chambers. The two edifices display aminopeptidase activity, and their organizations indicate substrate navigation mechanisms different from those described in other large peptidase complexes. Compared with the tetrahedron, the octahedron forms a more expanded hollow structure, representing a new type of giant peptidase complex. PhTET1 assembles into two different quaternary structures because of quasi-equivalent contacts that previously have only been identified in viral capsids.

  9. Hemoglobin digestion in Blood-Feeding Ticks: Mapping a Multi-Peptidase Pathway by Functional Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Martin; Nussbaumerová, Martina; Šanda, Miloslav; Kovářová, Zuzana; Srba, Jindřich; Franta, Zdeněk; Sojka, Daniel; Bogyo, Matthew; Caffrey, Conor R.; Kopáček, Petr; Mareš, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hemoglobin digestion is an essential process for blood-feeding parasites. Using chemical tools, we deconvoluted the intracellular hemoglobinolytic cascade in the tick Ixodes ricinus, a vector of Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis. In tick gut tissue, a network of peptidases was demonstrated through imaging with specific activity-based probes and activity profiling with peptidic substrates/inhibitors. This peptidase network is induced upon blood feeding and degrades hemoglobin at acidic pH. Selective inhibitors were applied to dissect the roles of the individual peptidases and determine the peptidase-specific cleavage map of the hemoglobin molecule. The degradation pathway is initiated by endopeptidases of aspartic and cysteine class (cathepsin D supported by cathepsin L and legumain) and continued by cysteine amino- and carboxy-dipeptidases (cathepsins C and B). The identified enzymes are potential targets to developing novel anti-tick vaccines. PMID:19875079

  10. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored-product pests.

    PubMed

    Goptar, I A; Semashko, T A; Danilenko, S A; Lysogorskaya, E N; Oksenoit, E S; Zhuzhikov, D P; Belozersky, M A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Oppert, B; Filippova, I Yu; Elpidina, E N

    2012-02-01

    The major storage proteins in cereals, prolamins, have an abundance of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Storage pests need specific digestive enzymes to efficiently hydrolyze these storage proteins. Therefore, post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored-product pest, Tenebrio molitor (yellow mealworm). Three distinct PGP activities were found in the anterior and posterior midgut using the highly-specific chromogenic peptide substrate N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Gln p-nitroanilide. PGP peptidases were characterized according to gel elution times, activity profiles in buffers of different pH, electrophoretic mobility under native conditions, and inhibitor sensitivity. The results indicate that PGP activity is due to cysteine and not serine chymotrypsin-like peptidases from the T. molitor larvae midgut. We propose that the evolutionary conservation of cysteine peptidases in the complement of digestive peptidases of tenebrionid stored-product beetles is due not only to the adaptation of insects to plants rich in serine peptidase inhibitors, but also to accommodate the need to efficiently cleave major dietary proteins rich in glutamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors: a promising new therapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2006-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 is an insulinotropic hormone with antidiabetic potential due to its spectrum of effects, which include glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin and inhibition of glucagon secretion, tropic effects on the pancreatic beta-cells, inhibition of gastric emptying and the reduction of appetite. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is, however, extremely rapidly inactivated by the serine peptidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV, so that the native peptide is not useful clinically. A new approach to utilise the beneficial effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 in the treatment of type 2 diabetes has been the development of orally active dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that this approach is effective in enhancing endogenous levels of glucagon-like peptide-1, resulting in improved glucose tolerance in glucose-intolerant and diabetic animal models. In recent studies of 3-12 months duration in patients with type 2 diabetes, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors have proved efficacious, both as monotherapy and when given in combination with metformin. Fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations were reduced, leading to reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin levels, while beta-cell function was preserved. Current information suggests dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors are body weight neutral and are well tolerated. A number of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors are now in the late stages of clinical development. These have different properties, in terms of their duration of action and anticipated dosing frequency, but data from protracted dosing studies is presently not available to allow comparison of their clinical efficacy.

  12. ABCG2/BCRP: Specific and Nonspecific Modulators.

    PubMed

    Peña-Solórzano, Diana; Stark, Simone Alexandra; König, Burkhard; Sierra, Cesar Augusto; Ochoa-Puentes, Cristian

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is the development of resistance to a variety of structurally and functionally nonrelated anticancer drugs. This phenomenon has become a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy seriously affecting the clinical outcome. MDR is associated with increased drug efflux from cells mediated by an energy-dependent mechanism involving the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, mainly P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), the MDR-associated protein-1 (ABCC1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). The first two transporters have been widely studied already and reviews summarized the results. The ABCG2 protein has been a subject of intense study since its discovery as its overexpression has been detected in resistant cell lines in numerous types of human cancers. To date, a long list of modulators of ABCG2 exists and continues to increase. However, little is known about the clinical consequences of ABCG2 modulation. This makes the design of novel, potent, and nontoxic inhibitors of this efflux protein a major challenge to reverse MDR and thereby increase the success of chemotherapy. The aim of the present review is to describe and highlight specific and nonspecific modulators of ABCG2 reported to date based on the selectivity of the compounds, as many of them are effective against one or more ABC transport proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Children with chronic nonspecific isolated cough.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Ertoy Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge; Topal, Erdem; Turktas, Ipek

    2014-06-01

    This study observed children with chronic nonspecific isolated cough (NIC) to investigate clinical differences between children whose symptoms resolved spontaneously and those who eventually developed asthma and then explored the differences among the children who eventually developed asthma in terms of their time of response to a trial of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS). Children with chronic NIC were managed either with a wait-and-review approach or with a 2-week trial with 400 μg/d inhaled budesonide according to the preference of their parents. Responses were monitored with a validated cough score. Treatment was prolonged to 8 weeks in the case of partial responders. All children were followed up at 3-month intervals. A total of 109 children (median [interquartile range] age, 5 [3.5-9] years; cough duration, [8-16] weeks]) were followed for a mean (± SD) time of 21(± 5) months. Cough did not recur in 71% (spontaneous resolution) but relapsed in 28% of the children who later responded to ICS treatment again (asthma). Aeroallergen sensitization (relative risk, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.17-6.99) and previous history of chronic cough (relative risk, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.10-6.49) increased the risk of asthma. Cough duration, the cough score, the family history of asthma, and serum eosinophilia were not found discriminative for the final diagnosis. There were no differences among children who eventually developed asthma and responded to either the 2-week or 8-week trial in terms of the study parameters. Chronic NIC does not recur in the majority of children. Initial response to the ICS trial may be misleading but the trial may be preferred for children who have atopic sensitization, a previous history of chronic cough, or both .

  14. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP.

  15. Kinetic study of interaction between BRL 42715, beta-lactamases, and D-alanyl-D-alanine peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, A; Ledent, P; Monnaie, D; Felici, A; Jamin, M; Raquet, X; Galleni, M; Klein, D; François, I; Frère, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed kinetic study of the interactions between BRL 42715, a beta-lactamase-inhibiting penem, and various beta-lactamases (EC 3.5.2.6) and D-alanyl-D-alanine peptidases (DD-peptidases, EC 3.4.16.4) is presented. The compound was a very efficient inactivator of all active-site serine beta-lactamases but was hydrolyzed by the class B, Zn(2+)-containing enzymes, with very different kcat values. Inactivation of the Streptomyces sp. strain R61 extracellular DD-peptidase was not observed, and the Actinomadura sp. strain R39 DD-peptidase exhibited a low level of sensitivity to the compound. PMID:7695311

  16. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A group of enzymes, mostly hydrolases or certain transferases, utilize one or a few side-chain carboxyl groups of Asp and/or Glu as part of the catalytic machinery at their active sites. This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major types of carboxyl peptidases including aspartic peptidases, glutamic peptidases and serine-carboxyl peptidases. PMID:23759941

  17. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 8/9 impairs preadipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruijun; Wang, Xinying; Bachovchin, William; Zukowska, Zofia; Osborn, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytes are the primary cells in adipose tissue, and adipocyte dysfunction causes lipodystrophy, obesity and diabetes. The dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 family includes four enzymes, DPP4, DPP8, DPP9 and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). DPP4 family inhibitors have been used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes patients, but their role in adipocyte formation are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the DPP8/9 selective inhibitor 1G244 blocks adipogenesis in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F422A, while DPP4 and FAP inhibitors have no effect. In addition, knockdown of DPP8 or DPP9 significantly impairs adipocyte differentiation in preadipocytes. We further uncovered that blocking the expression or activities of DPP8 and DPP9 attenuates PPARγ2 induction during preadipocyte differentiation. Addition of PPARγ agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs), or ectopic expression of PPARγ2, is able to rescue the adipogenic defect caused by DPP8/9 inhibition in preadipocytes. These results indicate the importance of DPP8 and DPP9 on adipogenesis. PMID:26242871

  18. Bacterial type I signal peptidases as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    Smitha Rao, C V; Anné, Jozef

    2011-11-01

    Despite an alarming increase in morbidity and mortality caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, the number of antibiotics available to efficiently combat them is dwindling. Consequently, there is a pressing need for new drugs, preferably with novel modes of action to avert the problem of cross-resistance. Several new targets have been proposed, including proteins essential in the protein secretion pathway such as the type I signal peptidase (SPase), indispensable for the release of the signal peptide during secretion of Sec- and Tat-dependent proteins. The type I SPase is considered to be an attractive target because it is essential, substantially different from the eukaryotic counterpart, and its active site is located at the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, permitting relatively easy access to potential inhibitors. A few SPase inhibitors have already been identified, but their suitability as drugs is yet to be confirmed. An overview is given on the currently known SPase inhibitors, how they can give valuable information on the structural, biochemical and target validation aspects of the SPases, the approaches to identify them, and their future potential as drugs.

  19. Neutral Peptidases in the Stroma of Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Qin; Jagendorf, André T.

    1986-01-01

    One endopeptidase (EP1) and at least three aminopeptidases (AP1, AP2, and AP3) were discovered in the stroma of chloroplasts isolated from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.), and purified over 100-fold. EP1 requires added Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity, may have an additional tightly bound metal atom, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents but not by serine residue-directed inhibitors. It is reversibly inhibited by dithiothreitol. Its specificity is for the bond between two adjacent Ala or Gly residues. Its molecular mass is 93 kilodaltons, estimated on a gel filtration column. Aminopeptidase activities were detected with the aid of different amino acyl-β-naphthylamides as substrates. They were resolved into at least three individual proteins by gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography, having apparent molecular masses of 269,000 (AP1), 84,000 (AP2), and 42,000 (AP3) daltons, respectively. Each has a unique specificity for substrates, with AP1 hydrolyzing only the Prolyl-β-naphthylamide. None of the APs require added divalent cations for activity, but the possibility of a tightly bound metal function was suggested in AP2 and AP3 (not AP1) from effects of inhibitors. A probable sulfhydryl residue function was indicated for all three, from inhibition by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate and Zn2+. All these peptidases had pH optima at 7.7. PMID:16664864

  20. Prolyl-specific peptidases for applications in food protein hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Nicole; Zorn, Holger; Rühl, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Various food proteins including, e.g. gluten, collagen and casein are rich in L-proline residues. Due to the cyclic structure of proline, these proteins are well protected from enzymatic degradation by typical digestive enzymes. Proline-specific peptidases (PsP) belong to different families of hydrolases acting on peptide bonds (EC 3.4.x.x). They occur in various organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants and insects. Based on their biochemical characteristics, PsP type enzymes are further grouped into different subclasses of which prolyl aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.5, PAP), prolyl carboxypeptidases (EC 3.4.17.16, PCP) and prolyl oligopeptidases/prolyl endopeptidases (EC 3.4.21.26, POP/PEP) are of major interest for applications in food biotechnology. This mini review summarises the biochemical assays employed for these subclasses of PsP and their structural properties and the reaction mechanisms. A special focus was set on PsP derived from fungi and insects and important industrial applications in the field of food biotechnology. The degradation of gluten and collagen as well as the hydrolysis of bitter peptides are discussed.

  1. Computational Design of an α-Gliadin Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The ability to rationally modify enzymes to perform novel chemical transformations is essential for the rapid production of next-generation protein therapeutics. Here we describe the use of chemical principles to identify a naturally occurring acid-active peptidase, and the subsequent use of computational protein design tools to reengineer its specificity toward immunogenic elements found in gluten that are the proposed cause of celiac disease. The engineered enzyme exhibits a kcat/KM of 568 M–1 s–1, representing a 116-fold greater proteolytic activity for a model gluten tetrapeptide than the native template enzyme, as well as an over 800-fold switch in substrate specificity toward immunogenic portions of gluten peptides. The computationally engineered enzyme is resistant to proteolysis by digestive proteases and degrades over 95% of an immunogenic peptide implicated in celiac disease in under an hour. Thus, through identification of a natural enzyme with the pre-existing qualities relevant to an ultimate goal and redefinition of its substrate specificity using computational modeling, we were able to generate an enzyme with potential as a therapeutic for celiac disease. PMID:23153249

  2. A New TASK for Dipeptidyl Peptidase-like Protein 6

    PubMed Central

    Nadin, Brian M.; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Dipeptidyl Peptidase-like Protein 6 (DPP6) is widely expressed in the brain where it co-assembles with Kv4 channels and KChIP auxiliary subunits to regulate the amplitude and functional properties of the somatodendritic A-current, ISA. Here we show that in cerebellar granule (CG) cells DPP6 also regulates resting membrane potential and input resistance by increasing the amplitude of the IK(SO) resting membrane current. Pharmacological analysis shows that DPP6 acts through the control of a channel with properties matching the K2P channel TASK-3. Heterologous expression and co-immunoprecipitation shows that DPP6 co-expression with TASK-3 results in the formation of a protein complex that enhances resting membrane potassium conductance. The co-regulation of resting and voltage-gated channels by DPP6 produces coordinate shifts in resting membrane potential and A-current gating that optimize the sensitivity of ISA inactivation gating to subthreshold fluctuations in resting membrane potential. PMID:23593319

  3. Comparative review of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sulphonylureas.

    PubMed

    Deacon, C F; Lebovitz, H E

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a progressive disease, and pharmacotherapy with a single agent does not generally provide durable glycaemic control over the long term. Sulphonylurea (SU) drugs have a history stretching back over 60 years, and have traditionally been the mainstay choice as second-line agents to be added to metformin once glycaemic control with metformin monotherapy deteriorates; however, they are associated with undesirable side effects, including increased hypoglycaemia risk and weight gain. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are, by comparison, more recent, with the first compound being launched in 2006, but the class now globally encompasses at least 11 different compounds. DPP-4 inhibitors improve glycaemic control with similar efficacy to SUs, but do not usually provoke hypoglycaemia or weight gain, are relatively free from adverse side effects, and have recently been shown not to increase cardiovascular risk in large prospective safety trials. Because of these factors, DPP-4 inhibitors have become an established therapy for T2DM and are increasingly being positioned earlier in treatment algorithms. The present article reviews these two classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (DPP-4 inhibitors and SUs), highlighting differences and similarities between members of the same class, as well as discussing the potential advantages and disadvantages of the two drug classes. While both classes have their merits, the choice of which to use depends on the characteristics of each individual patient; however, for the majority of patients, DPP-4 inhibitors are now the preferred choice.

  4. Applications of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Kim, Su-Jin; Pospisilik, J Andrew; Pederson, Raymond A

    2006-01-01

    A number of alternative therapies for type 2 diabetes are currently under development that take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide on the pancreatic beta-cell. One such approach is based on the inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes and type 2 human diabetics. While enhancement of insulin secretion, resulting from blockade of incretin degradation, has been proposed to be the major mode of inhibitor action, there is also evidence that inhibition of gastric emptying, reduction in glucagon secretion and important effects on beta-cell differentiation, mitogenesis and survival, by the incretins and other DP IV-sensitive peptides, can potentially preserve beta-cell mass, and improve insulin secretory function and glucose handling in diabetics.

  5. Inhibition of a secreted glutamic peptidase prevents growth of the fungus Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Mahon, Cathal S; Goetz, David H; O'Malley, James M; Gallagher, Denise M; Zhou, Min; Murray, Patrick G; Craik, Charles S; Tuohy, Maria G

    2008-10-24

    The thermophilic filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii secretes a variety of hydrolytic enzymes that are of interest for processing of biomass into fuel. Many carbohydrases have been isolated and characterized from this fungus, but no studies had been performed on peptidases. In this study, two acid-acting endopeptidases were isolated and characterized from the culture filtrate of T. emersonii. One of these enzymes was identified as a member of the recently classified glutamic peptidase family and was subsequently named T. emersonii glutamic peptidase 1 (TGP1). The second enzyme was identified as an aspartyl peptidase (PEP1). TGP1 was cloned and sequenced and shown to exhibit 64 and 47% protein identity to peptidases from Aspergillus niger and Scytalidium lignocolum, respectively. Substrate profiling of 16 peptides determined that TGP1 has broad specificity with a preference for large residues in the P1 site, particularly Met, Gln, Phe, Lys, Glu, and small amino acids at P1' such as Ala, Gly, Ser, or Thr. This enzyme efficiently cleaves an internally quenched fluorescent substrate containing the zymogen activation sequence (k(cat)/K(m)=2 x 10(5) m(-1) s(-1)). Maximum hydrolysis occurs at pH 3.4 and 50 degrees C. The reaction is strongly inhibited by a transition state peptide analog, TA1 (K(i)=1.5 nM), as well as a portion of the propeptide sequence, PT1 (K(i)=32 nM). Ex vivo studies show that hyphal extension of T. emersonii in complex media is unaffected by the aspartyl peptidase inhibitor pepstatin but is inhibited by TA1 and PT1. This study provides insight into the functional role of the glutamic peptidase TGP1 for growth of T. emersonii.

  6. Aspartic Peptidases of Human Pathogenic Trypanosomatids: Perspectives and Trends for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L.O.; Garcia-Gomes, A.S.; Catanho, M.; Sodré, C.L.; Santos, A.L.S.; Branquinha, M.H.; d’Avila-Levy, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas’ disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  7. DapE Can Function as an Aspartyl Peptidase in the Presence of Mn2+

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Daniel H.; Miller, Charles G.

    2003-01-01

    Extracts of a multiply peptidase-deficient (pepNABDPQTE iadA iaaA) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain contain an aspartyl dipeptidase activity that is dependent on Mn2+. Purification of this activity followed by N-terminal sequencing of the protein suggested that the Mn2+-dependent peptidase is DapE (N-succinyl-l,l-diaminopimelate desuccinylase). A dapE chromosomal disruption was constructed and transduced into a multiply peptidase-deficient (MPD) strain. Crude extracts of this strain showed no aspartyl peptidase activity, and the strain failed to utilize Asp-Leu as a leucine source. The dapE gene was cloned into expression vectors in order to overproduce either the native protein (DapE) or a hexahistidine fusion protein (DapE-His6). Extracts of a strain carrying the plasmid overexpresssing native DapE in the MPD dapE background showed a 3,200-fold elevation of Mn2+-dependent aspartyl peptidase activity relative to the MPD dapE+ strain. In addition, purified DapE-His6 exhibited Mn2+-dependent peptidase activity toward aspartyl dipeptides. Growth of the MPD strain carrying a single genomic copy of dapE on Asp-Leu as a Leu source was slow but detectable. Overproduction of DapE in the MPD dapE strain allowed growth on Asp-Leu at a much faster rate. DapE was found to be specific for N-terminal aspartyl dipeptides: no N-terminal Glu, Met, or Leu peptides were hydrolyzed, nor were any peptides containing more than two amino acids. DapE is known to bind two divalent cations: one with high affinity and the other with lower affinity. Our data indicate that the form of DapE active as a peptidase contains Zn2+ in the high-affinity site and Mn2+ in the low-affinity site. PMID:12896993

  8. DapE can function as an aspartyl peptidase in the presence of Mn2+.

    PubMed

    Broder, Daniel H; Miller, Charles G

    2003-08-01

    Extracts of a multiply peptidase-deficient (pepNABDPQTE iadA iaaA) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain contain an aspartyl dipeptidase activity that is dependent on Mn(2+). Purification of this activity followed by N-terminal sequencing of the protein suggested that the Mn(2+)-dependent peptidase is DapE (N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelate desuccinylase). A dapE chromosomal disruption was constructed and transduced into a multiply peptidase-deficient (MPD) strain. Crude extracts of this strain showed no aspartyl peptidase activity, and the strain failed to utilize Asp-Leu as a leucine source. The dapE gene was cloned into expression vectors in order to overproduce either the native protein (DapE) or a hexahistidine fusion protein (DapE-His(6)). Extracts of a strain carrying the plasmid overexpresssing native DapE in the MPD dapE background showed a 3,200-fold elevation of Mn(2+)-dependent aspartyl peptidase activity relative to the MPD dapE(+) strain. In addition, purified DapE-His(6) exhibited Mn(2+)-dependent peptidase activity toward aspartyl dipeptides. Growth of the MPD strain carrying a single genomic copy of dapE on Asp-Leu as a Leu source was slow but detectable. Overproduction of DapE in the MPD dapE strain allowed growth on Asp-Leu at a much faster rate. DapE was found to be specific for N-terminal aspartyl dipeptides: no N-terminal Glu, Met, or Leu peptides were hydrolyzed, nor were any peptides containing more than two amino acids. DapE is known to bind two divalent cations: one with high affinity and the other with lower affinity. Our data indicate that the form of DapE active as a peptidase contains Zn(2+) in the high-affinity site and Mn(2+) in the low-affinity site.

  9. Aspartic peptidases of human pathogenic trypanosomatids: perspectives and trends for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, L O; Garcia-Gomes, A S; Catanho, M; Sodre, C L; Santos, A L S; Branquinha, M H; d'Avila-Levy, C M

    2013-01-01

    Aspartic peptidases are proteolytic enzymes present in many organisms like vertebrates, plants, fungi, protozoa and in some retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These enzymes are involved in important metabolic processes in microorganisms/virus and play major roles in infectious diseases. Although few studies have been performed in order to identify and characterize aspartic peptidase in trypanosomatids, which include the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease and sleeping sickness, some beneficial properties of aspartic peptidase inhibitors have been described on fundamental biological events of these pathogenic agents. In this context, aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs) used in the current chemotherapy against HIV (e.g., amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) were able to inhibit the aspartic peptidase activity produced by different species of Leishmania. Moreover, the treatment of Leishmania promastigotes with HIV PIs induced several perturbations on the parasite homeostasis, including loss of the motility and arrest of proliferation/growth. The HIV PIs also induced an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species and the appearance of irreversible morphological alterations, triggering parasite death pathways such as programed cell death (apoptosis) and uncontrolled autophagy. The blockage of physiological parasite events as well as the induction of death pathways culminated in its incapacity to adhere, survive and escape of phagocytic cells. Collectively, these results support the data showing that parasites treated with HIV PIs have a significant reduction in the ability to cause in vivo infection. Similarly, the treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi cells with pepstatin A showed a significant inhibition on both aspartic peptidase activity and growth as well as promoted several and irreversible morphological changes. These studies indicate that aspartic peptidases can be promising targets in

  10. Trypsin-like serine peptidase profiles in the egg, larval, and pupal stages of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus, a ubiquitous mosquito, is one of the main vectors of dengue and yellow fever, representing an important threat to public health worldwide. Peptidases play key roles in processes such as digestion, oogenesis, and metamorphosis of insects. However, most of the information on the proteolytic enzymes of mosquitoes is derived from insects in the adult stages and is often directed towards the understanding of blood digestion. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of active peptidases from the preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus. Methods Ae. albopictus eggs, larvae, and pupae were analyzed using zymography with susbtrate-SDS-PAGE. The pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, the proteolytic activities of larval instars were assayed using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results The proteolytic profile of the larval stage was composed of 8 bands ranging from 17 to 130 kDa. These enzymes displayed activity in a broad range of pH values, from 5.5 to 10.0. The enzymatic profile of the eggs was similar to that of the larvae, although the proteolytic bands of the eggs showed lower intensities. The pupal stage showed a complex proteolytic pattern, with at least 6 bands with apparent molecular masses ranging from 30 to 150 kDa and optimal activity at pH 7.5. Peptidases from larval instars were active from 10°C to 60°C, with optimal activity at temperatures between 37°C and 50°C. The proteolytic profile of both the larval and pupal stages was inhibited by phenyl-methyl sulfonyl-fluoride (PMSF) and Nα-Tosyl L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride (TLCK), indicating that the main peptidases expressed during these developmental stages are trypsin-like serine peptidases. Conclusion The preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus exhibited a complex profile of trypsin-like serine peptidase activities. A comparative analysis of the active peptidase profiles revealed differential expression

  11. S46 Peptidases are the First Exopeptidases to be Members of Clan PA

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Masaki, Mika; Ohta, Kazunori; Okada, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Takamasa; Morikawa, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazuo T.; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    The dipeptidyl aminopeptidase BII (DAP BII) belongs to a serine peptidase family, S46. The amino acid sequence of the catalytic unit of DAP BII exhibits significant similarity to those of clan PA endopeptidases, such as chymotrypsin. However, the molecular mechanism of the exopeptidase activity of family S46 peptidase is unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of DAP BII. DAP BII contains a peptidase domain including a typical double β-barrel fold and previously unreported α-helical domain. The structures of peptide complexes revealed that the α-helical domain covers the active-site cleft and the side chain of Asn330 in the domain forms hydrogen bonds with the N-terminus of the bound peptide. These observations indicate that the α-helical domain regulates the exopeptidase activity of DAP BII. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals, we expect that our study will be useful for the design of specific inhibitors of S46 peptidases from pathogens. PMID:24827749

  12. Kinetics of Extracellular Peptidases in Sediments of the White Oak River, NC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, A. D.; Kevorkian, R. T.; Alperin, M. J.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent molecular work has shed light on the mechanisms underlying organoheterotrophy in the marine subsurface, including production of extracellular peptidases by deeply-branching Archaea. Here we present measurements of the potential activity (Vmax) and half-saturation constants (Km) for six extracellular peptidase substrates in sediments from 0 to 83 cm deep in the White Oak River estuary, NC, USA. Potential activities at 83 cm were on average 12% of the values at the surface, but because surface Vmax values were several orders of magnitude greater than comparable values from surface seawater, the deep activities were still substantial. Km values did not display a clear trend with depth. Activities consistent with leucyl aminopeptidase were higher than any other extracellular peptidase, but there was no clear division in activities between endopeptidases (which cleave bonds in the interior of proteins) versus aminopeptidases (which cleave N-terminal amino acids). Competitive inhibition experiments will reveal the extent to which the activities we measured reflect the distinct enzymes. We will also present model-based estimates of organic carbon mineralization rates based on methane and sulfate profiles in order to assess the relative importance of extracellular peptidases as a means to acquire organic carbon in the subsurface. Saturation curves for 5 peptidase substrates at the surface and 83 cm in the White Oak River.

  13. Functionality of lactic acid bacteria peptidase activities in the hydrolysis of gliadin-like fragments.

    PubMed

    Gerez, C L; Font de Valdez, G; Rollán, G C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the role of the peptidase activities from sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the degradation of alpha-gliadin fragments. Different proline-containing substrates were hydrolysed by LAB indicating pro-specific peptidase activities. Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 775 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CRL 792 displayed the highest tri- and di-peptidase activities, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum strains hydrolysed more than 60%alpha-gliadin fragments corresponding to the 31-43 and 62-75 amino acids in the protein after 2 h. None of the LAB strains alone could hydrolyse 57-89 alpha-gliadin peptide; however, the combination of L. plantarum CRL 775 and P. pentosaceus CRL 792 led to hydrolysis (57%) of this peptide in 8 h. The capacity of LAB strains to degrade alpha-gliadin fragments was not correlated to individual peptidase activities. Several strains separately degraded the 31-43 and 62-75 alpha-gliadin fragments, while the 57-89 peptide degradation was associated with the combination of peptidase profiles from pooled LAB strains. This is the first report on the peptide hydrolase system of sourdough pediococci and its ability to reduce alpha-gliadin fragments. This study contributes to a better knowledge of sourdough LAB proteolytic system and its role in the degradation of proline-rich alpha-gliadin peptides involved in celiac disease.

  14. Analysis of Peptidases in Non-Infected and Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mouse Embryo Hepatocyte Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Ana Cristina Nogueira; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Leal Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Branquinha, Marta Helena; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Cellular and extracellular peptidase profiles from non-infected and Trypanosoma cruzi-infected hepatocyte cell cultures were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) containing different copolymerized proteins as substrates. A 100 kDa metallopeptidase activity was detected in the cellular extracts and in the culture supernatant fluids of both systems, had the ability to exclusively degrade gelatin. However, non-infected hepatocytes produced an additional extracellular metallopeptidase of 85 kDa. In the non-infected and in the infected hepatocytes, a cysteine peptidase migrating in gelatin-SDS-PAGE at 60 kDa presented the broadest specificity, since it was also able to hydrolyze casein and hemoglobin. The 100 kDa component was only detected at alkaline pH and predominantly expressed in non-infected hepatocytes. Conversely, the 60 kDa cysteine peptidase was only observed in acidic condition and its production was robustly augmented in T. cruzi-infected cells, probably due to the cysteine peptidase synthesized by the parasites, as corroborated by immunoblotting assay using anti-cruzipain antibody. Collectively, these results suggest that peptidases may be involved in the interaction process between T. cruzi and hepatocytes in vitro. PMID:23675074

  15. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of nonexempt records. Nonspecific requests or requests for a large number of documents that require... policy reasons justifying the requests. A decision on the processing of such a request for information...

  16. Distribution of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV in Patients with Chronic Tonsillitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Milan; Vlahovic, Predrag; Avramovic, Verica; Todorovic, Miroljub

    2008-01-01

    In the pathogeneses of recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and tonsillar hypertrophy (TH), different immunological mechanisms are involved. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) and aminopeptidase N (APN) participate in the regulation of the immune response during inflammation. In this study, the localization of DPP IV and the enzymatic activities of DPP IV and APN in 32 patients, 13 with RT and 19 with TH, who underwent tonsillectomy were investigated. The localization of DPP IV in tonsils was studied using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The enzymatic activities of DPP IV and APN in tonsillar lymphocytes and the patients' sera were determined kinetically at 37°C using Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide (for DPP IV) and Ala-p-nitroanilide (for APN) as chromogenic substrates. In samples from both RT and TH patients, DPP IV was found to localize mainly in extrafollicular areas of tonsillar tissue in a pattern corresponding to the T-cell distribution. Significantly higher (P < 0.001) levels of DPP IV and APN activities in sera from patients with TH than in sera from patients with RT were found. A correlation of DPP IV activities in sera and tonsillar lymphocytes from patients with TH was also found (r = 0.518; P < 0.05). Moreover, the results show that DPP IV and APN activities in sera decreased significantly with age. Tonsillar lymphocytes demonstrated a wide range of DPP IV and APN activities, without significant differences between the investigated groups. The results of this study show that the localization of DPP IV does not depend on the type of tonsillitis, whereas the variety in levels of DPP IV and APN activities in sera of patients with TH and RT suggests different patterns of participation of antigen-stimulated tonsils in the immune system. PMID:18385458

  17. Distribution of dipeptidyl peptidase IV in patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Milan; Vlahovic, Predrag; Avramovic, Verica; Todorovic, Miroljub

    2008-05-01

    In the pathogeneses of recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and tonsillar hypertrophy (TH), different immunological mechanisms are involved. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) and aminopeptidase N (APN) participate in the regulation of the immune response during inflammation. In this study, the localization of DPP IV and the enzymatic activities of DPP IV and APN in 32 patients, 13 with RT and 19 with TH, who underwent tonsillectomy were investigated. The localization of DPP IV in tonsils was studied using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The enzymatic activities of DPP IV and APN in tonsillar lymphocytes and the patients' sera were determined kinetically at 37 degrees C using Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide (for DPP IV) and Ala-p-nitroanilide (for APN) as chromogenic substrates. In samples from both RT and TH patients, DPP IV was found to localize mainly in extrafollicular areas of tonsillar tissue in a pattern corresponding to the T-cell distribution. Significantly higher (P < 0.001) levels of DPP IV and APN activities in sera from patients with TH than in sera from patients with RT were found. A correlation of DPP IV activities in sera and tonsillar lymphocytes from patients with TH was also found (r = 0.518; P < 0.05). Moreover, the results show that DPP IV and APN activities in sera decreased significantly with age. Tonsillar lymphocytes demonstrated a wide range of DPP IV and APN activities, without significant differences between the investigated groups. The results of this study show that the localization of DPP IV does not depend on the type of tonsillitis, whereas the variety in levels of DPP IV and APN activities in sera of patients with TH and RT suggests different patterns of participation of antigen-stimulated tonsils in the immune system.

  18. An Entamoeba cysteine peptidase specifically expressed during encystation.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Frank; Bachmann, Anna; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Hennings, Ina; Drescher, Babette; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tannich, Egbert; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2008-12-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Entamoeba possess a considerable number of cysteine peptidases (CPs), the function of most of these molecules for amoeba biology needs to be established. In order to determine whether CPs may play a role during Entamoeba stage conversion from trophozoites into cysts and vice versa, expression of cp genes was analysed in the reptilian parasite Entamoeba invadens, a model organism for studying Entamoeba cyst development. By homology search, 28 papain-like cp genes were identified in public E. invadens genome databases. For eight of these genes the expression profiles during stage conversion was determined. By Northern blot analysis, transcripts for eicp-a9, -b7, -b8 and -c2, respectively, were detected neither in trophozoites or cysts nor at any of the point of times analysed during stage conversion. On the other hand, eicp-a5 is constitutively expressed during all developmental stages, whereas eicp-a3 and eicp-a11, respectively, are trophozoite-specific. Only eicp-b9 was found to be cyst-specific as it is expressed exclusively 18 to 28 h after cyst induction. Cyst-specific expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy of the corresponding protein EiCP-B9. In immature cysts, the molecule is located in structures that accumulate near the cyst wall, but which are uniformly distributed in mature cysts. The precise function of EiCP-B9 during Entamoeba encystation remains to be determined. However, colocalisation studies with an Entamoeba marker for autophagosomes suggest that EiCP-B9 is not associated with Entamoeba autophagy.

  19. Navigating the chemical space of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shoombuatong, Watshara; Prachayasittikul, Veda; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Songtawee, Napat; Monnor, Teerawat; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    This study represents the first large-scale study on the chemical space of inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4), which is a potential therapeutic protein target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Herein, a large set of 2,937 compounds evaluated for their ability to inhibit DPP4 was compiled from the literature. Molecular descriptors were generated from the geometrically optimized low-energy conformers of these compounds at the semiempirical AM1 level. The origins of DPP4 inhibitory activity were elucidated from computed molecular descriptors that accounted for the unique physicochemical properties inherently present in the active and inactive sets of compounds as defined by their respective half maximal inhibitory concentration values of less than 1 μM and greater than 10 μM, respectively. Decision tree analysis revealed the importance of molecular weight, total energy of a molecule, topological polar surface area, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, and number of hydrogen-bond donors, which correspond to molecular size, energy, surface polarity, electron acceptors, and hydrogen bond donors, respectively. The prediction model was subjected to rigorous independent testing via three external sets. Scaffold and chemical fragment analysis was also performed on these active and inactive sets of compounds to shed light on the distinguishing features of the functional moieties. Docking of representative active DPP4 inhibitors was also performed to unravel key interacting residues. The results of this study are anticipated to be useful in guiding the rational design of novel and robust DPP4 inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26309399

  20. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs)

    PubMed Central

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn2+ ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α2-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  1. Hepatic Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Controls Pharmacokinetics of Vildagliptin In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The main route of elimination of vildagliptin, which is an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), in humans is cyano group hydrolysis to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7. Our in vitro study previously demonstrated that DPP-4 itself greatly contributed to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in mouse, rat, and human livers. To investigate whether hepatic DPP-4 contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in vivo, in the present study, we conducted in vivo pharmacokinetics studies of vildagliptin in mice coadministered with vildagliptin and sitagliptin, which is another DPP-4 inhibitor, and also in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) value of M20.7 in mice coadministered with vildagliptin and sitagliptin was significantly lower than that in mice administered vildagliptin alone (P < 0.01). Although plasma DPP-4 expression level was increased 1.9-fold, hepatic DPP-4 activity was decreased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The AUC values of M20.7 in STZ-induced diabetic mice were lower than those in control mice (P < 0.01). Additionally, the AUC values of M20.7 significantly positively correlated with hepatic DPP-4 activities in the individual mice (Rs = 0.943, P < 0.05). These findings indicated that DPP-4 greatly contributed to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in vivo and that not plasma, but hepatic DPP-4 controlled pharmacokinetics of vildagliptin. Furthermore, enzyme assays of 23 individual human liver samples showed that there was a 3.6-fold interindividual variability in vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activities. Predetermination of the interindividual variability of hepatic vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity might be useful for the prediction of blood vildagliptin concentrations in vivo.

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the coleopteran-specific Cry3Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Larvae digest protein initially with cysteine peptidases in the anterior midgut and further with serine peptidases in middle and poste...

  3. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    PubMed

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector.

  4. Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine. PMID:25569475

  5. Bioinformatic flowchart and database to investigate the origins and diversity of Clan AA peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Renaud, Gabriel; Moya, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Background Clan AA of aspartic peptidases relates the family of pepsin monomers evolutionarily with all dimeric peptidases encoded by eukaryotic LTR retroelements. Recent findings describing various pools of single-domain nonviral host peptidases, in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, indicate that the diversity of clan AA is larger than previously thought. The ensuing approach to investigate this enzyme group is by studying its phylogeny. However, clan AA is a difficult case to study due to the low similarity and different rates of evolution. This work is an ongoing attempt to investigate the different clan AA families to understand the cause of their diversity. Results In this paper, we describe in-progress database and bioinformatic flowchart designed to characterize the clan AA protein domain based on all possible protein families through ancestral reconstructions, sequence logos, and hidden markov models (HMMs). The flowchart includes the characterization of a major consensus sequence based on 6 amino acid patterns with correspondence with Andreeva's model, the structural template describing the clan AA peptidase fold. The set of tools is work in progress we have organized in a database within the GyDB project, referred to as Clan AA Reference Database . Conclusion The pre-existing classification combined with the evolutionary history of LTR retroelements permits a consistent taxonomical collection of sequence logos and HMMs. This set is useful for gene annotation but also a reference to evaluate the diversity of, and the relationships among, the different families. Comparisons among HMMs suggest a common ancestor for all dimeric clan AA peptidases that is halfway between single-domain nonviral peptidases and those coded by Ty3/Gypsy LTR retroelements. Sequence logos reveal how all clan AA families follow similar protein domain architecture related to the peptidase fold. In particular, each family nucleates a particular consensus motif in the sequence position

  6. Accumulation of acyl-enzyme in DD-peptidase-catalysed reactions with analogues of peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, M; Adam, M; Damblon, C; Christiaens, L; Frère, J M

    1991-01-01

    Thioester substrates can be used to study the hydrolysis and transfer reactions catalysed by beta-lactamases and DD-peptidases. With the latter enzymes, accumulation of the acyl-enzyme can be detected directly. The efficiency of various amines as acceptor substrates was in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with peptide substrates of the DD-peptidases. The results indicated the presence of a specific binding site for the acceptor substrates. Although most of the results agreed well with a simple partition model, more elaborate hypotheses will be needed to account for all the data presented. PMID:1747125

  7. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  8. The mechanism of action of DD-peptidases: the role of tyrosine-159 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, J M; Jamin, M; Damblon, C; Zhao, G H; Joris, B; Duez, C; Frère, J M

    1993-01-01

    Tyrosine-159 of the Streptomyces R61 penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidase was replaced by serine or phenylalanine. The second mutation yielded a very poorly active protein whose rate of penicillin binding was also drastically decreased, except for the reactions with nitrocefin and methicillin. The consequences of the first mutation were more surprising, since a large proportion of the thiolesterase activity was retained, together with the penicillin-binding capacity. Conversely, the peptidase properties was severely affected. In both cases, a drastic decrease in the transferase activity was observed. The results are compared with those obtained by mutation of the corresponding residue in the class A beta-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G. PMID:8484734

  9. Synthesis and use of 4-peptidylhydrazido-N-hexyl-1,8-naphthalimides as fluorogenic histochemical substrates for dipeptidyl peptidase IV and tripeptidyl peptidase I.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tasheva, Donka; Todorova, Ralitza; Dimitrova, Mashenka

    2009-01-01

    Gly-Pro-, Gly-Pro-Met- and Ala-Ala-Phe-N'-(2-hexyl-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-6-yl)-hydrazides are synthesized by guanidinium/uronium type condensing reagent and used as fluorogenic substrates to localize dipeptidyl peptidase IV and tripeptidyl peptidase I activities in mammalian tissue sections. Enzyme hydrolysis releases 2-hexyl-6-hydrazino-1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione, which couples with piperonal to form insoluble fluorescent hydrazone, precipitating on the enzyme locations and marking them. The fluorescent technique reveals precisely the enzymes locations at the lack of background noise in a single incubation step. It avoids most of the drawbacks of the previously proposed fluorescent histochemical techniques and can be valuable for the in situ studies of these enzymes in norm and pathology.

  10. Linagliptin: a novel methylxanthin based approved dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ritesh; Jain, Pratima; Dikshit, S N

    2012-06-01

    Chemically, methylxanthine nucleus based Linagliptin (BI-1356, BI-1356-BS) is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor, which has been developed by Boehringer Ingelheim in association with Lilly for the treatment of Type-II Diabetes. Linagliptin was marketed by Lilly under the trade name Tradjenta and Trajenta. Linagliptin was approved as the once-daily dose by USFDA on 2 May 2011, for the treatment of Type-II Diabetes. Linagliptin 5mg once daily dose was approved based on a clinical trial program, which was conducted on approximately 4,000 adults with Type-II Diabetes. Linagliptin demonstrated statistically significant mean difference in HbA1c from placebo of up to 0.72 percent, when it was used monotherapically. In patients, who were not adequately controlled on metformin or metformin plus sulphonylurea, the addition of Linagliptin resulted in a statistically significant mean difference in HbA1c from placebo of -0.6 percent. Linagliptin was observed to produce significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to placebo, when used as a monotherapy in combination with metformin, sulfonylurea and/or pioglitazone. Linagliptin demonstrated significant reduction post-prandial glucose (PPG) levels in two hours as compared with placebo in monotherapy as well as in combination with metformin. In vitro assays also anticipated that Linagliptin is a potent DPPIV inhibitor as well as it exhibits good selectivity for DPP-IV as compared with other DPPs. The in-vivo studies also demonstrated same anticipation with respect to Linagliptin. Consequently, increasing the GLP-1 levels so far improved glucose tolerance in both healthy animals. X-ray crystallography anticipates that Linagliptin complexes with human DPPIV enzyme, e.g. butynyl substituent occupies the S1 hydrophobic pocket of the enzyme; the aminopiperidine substituent in the xanthine scaffold occupies the S2 subsite and its primary amine interacts with the key amino acid residues, which involves in the

  11. Nonspecificity in a nonimmune human scFv repertoire.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ryan L; Zhao, Jessie; Le, Doris; Wittrup, K Dane

    2017-09-14

    Efforts to develop effective antibody therapeutics are frequently hampered by issues such as aggregation and nonspecificity, often only detected in late stages of the development process. In this study, we used a high throughput cross-reactivity assay to select nonspecific clones from a naïve human repertoire scFv library displayed on the surface of yeast. Most antibody families were de-enriched; however, the rarely expressed VH6 family was highly enriched among nonspecific clones, representing almost 90% of isolated clones. Mutational analysis of this family reveals a dominant role of CDRH2 in driving nonspecific binding. Homology modeling of a panel of VH6 antibodies shows a constrained beta-sheet structure in CDRH2 that is not present in other families, potentially contributing to nonspecificity of the family. These findings confirm the common decision to exclude VH6 from synthetic antibody libraries, and support VH6 polyreactivity as a possible important role for the family in early ontogeny and cause for its overabundance in cases of some forms of autoimmunity.

  12. Systemic sclerosis with normal or nonspecific nailfold capillaroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fichel, Fanny; Baudot, Nathalie; Gaitz, Jean-Pierre; Trad, Salim; Barbe, Coralie; Francès, Camille; Senet, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis (SSc), a specific nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) pattern is observed in 90% of cases and seems to be associated with severity and progression of the disease. To describe the characteristics of SSc patients with normal or nonspecific (normal/nonspecific) NVC. In a retrospective cohort study, clinical features and visceral involvements of 25 SSc cases with normal/nonspecific NVC were compared to 63 SSc controls with the SSc-specific NVC pattern. Normal/nonspecific NVC versus SSc-specific NVC pattern was significantly associated with absence of skin sclerosis (32 vs. 6.3%, p = 0.004), absence of telangiectasia (47.8 vs. 17.3%, p = 0.006) and absence of sclerodactyly (60 vs. 25.4%, p = 0.002), and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement (26.3 vs. 58.2%, p = 0.017). Normal/nonspecific NVC in SSc patients appears to be associated with less severe skin involvement and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Nonspecific toxicites in the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Segner, W P; Schmidt, C F

    1968-08-01

    In inoculated pack experiments on Clostridium botulinum type E, unirradiated and 0.1-Mrad irradiated haddock fillets often gave nonspecific toxicities by the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. Samples given 0.2-Mrad radiation failed to produce nonspecific reactions. Nonspecific deaths sometimes occurred within 24 hr after injection, although deaths between 24 and 48 hr were more common. The symptoms and the pattern of these deaths suggested a septicemia. Heart-blood cultured from mice showing nonspecific symptoms indicated an infectious process. Among 23 isolates from the blood, eight were identified as Proteus vulgaris, two P. morganii, one P. rettgeri, one Providence subgroup B, two Aerobacter aerogenes, one Actinobacillus, three enterococci, one Alcaligenes marshalli, and four Erysipelothrix insidiosa. The E. insidiosa, Aerobacter, Providence group, and most of the Proteus isolates were infectious for mice when injected by the intraperitoneal route. But the enterococci, Alcaligenes, and Actinobacillus isolates were not infectious and probably represent secondary invaders. The cultural characteristics of the E. insidiosa isolates conform to those described in the literature, with the exception that the four strains grew in the temperature range 50 F (10 C) to 40 F (4.4 C). Nonspecific toxicities were avoided in assays for botulinum toxin by the protection of mice with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline.

  14. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  15. Expenditures for nonspecific back injuries in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Federspiel, C F; Guy, D; Kane, D; Spengler, D

    1989-11-01

    This study reports results based on the 29,421 Tennessee Workers' Compensation claims that were closed in 1986. The study encompasses over $160 million in paid claims. Nearly 8000 cases (27%) involved back injuries, of which more than 90% were nonspecific. Forty percent of the total expenditures were for these nonspecific back injuries. Counterpart data on 8696 injuries involving extremities are included for comparison. Medical expenses account for about 40% of all payments. Data concerning time intervals between injury and return to work are provided. Separate analyses reveal characteristics of those subjects in the highest total expenditure decile, the 2941 subjects who received 57% of total dollar payments. This report provides fiscal data supporting recent appeals for a reappraisal of the clinical management of nonspecific back problems.

  16. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  17. Association of circulating dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 levels with osteoporotic fracture in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Baek, K H; Lee, S-Y; Ahn, S H; Lee, S H; Koh, J-M; Rhee, Y; Kim, C H; Kim, D-Y; Kang, M-I; Kim, B-J; Min, Y-K

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal women with osteoporotic fracture (OF) had higher plasma dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) levels than those without. Furthermore, higher plasma DPP4 levels were significantly associated with higher bone turnover and a higher prevalence of OF. These results indicated that DPP4 may be associated with OF by mediating bone turnover rate.

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of an extracellular serine peptidase from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Biaggio, Rafael Tage; Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues da; Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales da; Leite, Rodrigo Simões Ribeiro; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Cabral, Tatiana Pereira de Freitas; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Cabral, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Peptidases are important because they play a central role in pharmaceutical, food, environmental, and other industrial processes. A serine peptidase from Aspergillus terreus was isolated after two chromatography steps that showed a yield of 15.5%. Its molecular mass was determined to be 43 kD, by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This peptidase was active between pH 5.0 to 8.0 and had maximum activity at pH 7.0, at 45°C. When exposited with 1 M of urea, the enzyme maintained 100% activity and used azocasein as substrate. The N-terminal (first 15 residues) showed 33% identity with the serine peptidase of Aspergillus clavatus ES1. The kinetics assays showed that subsite S2 did not bind polar basic amino acids (His and Arg) nonpolar acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). The subsite S1 showed higher catalytic efficiency than the S2 and S3 subsites.

  19. Chromogenic depsipeptide substrates for beta-lactamases and penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M; Damblon, C; Plaitin, B; Christiaens, L; Frère, J M

    1990-01-01

    Various ester and thioester derivatives of hippuric acid have been prepared which were substrates of both beta-lactamases and DD-peptidases. The thioesters were more rapidly hydrolysed by nearly all the enzymes. Surprisingly, the enzymes acted rather efficiently on substrates which did not contain any chiral centre. PMID:2400398

  20. Chymotrypsin-like peptidases from Tribolium castaneum: A role in molting revealed by RNA interference

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chymotrypsin-like peptidases (CTLPs) of insects are primarily secreted into the gut lumen where they act as digestive enzymes. We studied the gene family encoding CTLPs in the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Using an extended search pattern, we identified 14 TcCTLP genes that e...

  1. Evaluation of the catalytic specificity, biochemical properties, and milk clotting abilities of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; Souto, Tatiane Beltramini; de Oliveira, Tássio Brito; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Karcher, Daniel; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; de Oliveira, Arthur H C; Rodrigues, André; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we detail the specificity of an aspartic peptidase from Rhizomucor miehei and evaluate the effects of this peptidase on clotting milk using the peptide sequence of k-casein (Abz-LSFMAIQ-EDDnp) and milk powder. Molecular mass of the peptidase was estimated at 37 kDa, and optimum activity was achieved at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. The peptidase was stable at pH values ranging from 3 to 5 and temperatures of up 45 °C for 60 min. Dramatic reductions in proteolytic activity were observed with exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate, and aluminum and copper (II) chloride. Peptidase was inhibited by pepstatin A, and mass spectrometry analysis identified four peptide fragments (TWSISYGDGSSASGILAK, ASNGGGGEYIFGGYDSTK, GSLTTVPIDNSR, and GWWGITVDRA), similar to rhizopuspepsin. The analysis of catalytic specificity showed that the coagulant activity of the peptidase was higher than the proteolytic activity and that there was a preference for aromatic, basic, and nonpolar amino acids, particularly methionine, with specific cleavage of the peptide bond between phenylalanine and methionine. Thus, this peptidase may function as an important alternative enzyme in milk clotting during the preparation of cheese.

  2. Trelagliptin (SYR-472, Zafatek), novel once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes, inhibits dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) via a non-covalent mechanism

    DOE PAGES

    Grimshaw, Charles E.; Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; ...

    2016-06-21

    Trelagliptin (SYR-472), a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy by once-weekly dosing in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, we characterized in vitro properties of trelagliptin, which exhibited approximately 4-and 12-fold more potent inhibition against human dipeptidyl peptidase-4 than alogliptin and sitagliptin, respectively, and >10,000-fold selectivity over related proteases including dipeptidyl peptidase-8 and dipeptidyl peptidase-9. Kinetic analysis revealed reversible, competitive and slow-binding inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by trelagliptin (t1/2 for dissociation ≈ 30 minutes). X-ray diffraction data indicated a non-covalent interaction between dipeptidyl peptidase and trelagliptin. Altogether, potent dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitionmay partially contribute to sustained efficacy of trelagliptin.

  3. Trelagliptin (SYR-472, Zafatek), novel once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes, inhibits dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) via a non-covalent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Grimshaw, Charles E.; Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; Ueno, Hikaru; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Takuo; Tani, Akiyoshi; Sano, Hiroki; Kinugawa, Yoshinobu; Koumura, Emiko; Shi, Lihong; Takeuchi, Koji

    2016-06-21

    Trelagliptin (SYR-472), a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy by once-weekly dosing in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, we characterized in vitro properties of trelagliptin, which exhibited approximately 4-and 12-fold more potent inhibition against human dipeptidyl peptidase-4 than alogliptin and sitagliptin, respectively, and >10,000-fold selectivity over related proteases including dipeptidyl peptidase-8 and dipeptidyl peptidase-9. Kinetic analysis revealed reversible, competitive and slow-binding inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by trelagliptin (t1/2 for dissociation ≈ 30 minutes). X-ray diffraction data indicated a non-covalent interaction between dipeptidyl peptidase and trelagliptin. Altogether, potent dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitionmay partially contribute to sustained efficacy of trelagliptin.

  4. Standardized measurement of recovery from nonspecific back pain.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Kamper, Steven J; Stanton, Tasha R; Ostelo, Raymond; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2012-05-01

    To propose standardized, patient-centered measures of recovery from nonspecific low back pain (LBP) in research, underpinned by an empirically derived concept of recovery and informed by expert opinion. Synthesis of literature reviews and expert panel opinion. Primary care centers for the management of nonspecific LBP. Persons with nonspecific LBP. Conservative treatments for nonspecific LBP. Three phases of research were conducted. First, qualitative research that explored patients' perspectives of recovery from nonspecific LBP was reviewed. Second, measures of recovery used in LBP clinical trials during the past decade were investigated in a systematic review. Third, opinion was sought from an expert panel of clinicians and researchers about how to measure recovery from nonspecific LBP, in a workshop at the 10th International Forum for Primary Care Research in Low Back Pain. An empirically derived and patient-centered concept of recovery from nonspecific LBP was developed from the qualitative research phase. The systematic review conducted in the second study phase revealed that researchers have used vastly heterogeneous measures of LBP recovery in clinical trials during the past decade. Finally, the key conclusions of the LBP Forum workshop were (1) that appropriate patient-centered instruments to measure recovery include global measures and patient-specific measures; and (2) that the benefits of implementing the same recovery measures for acute and chronic LBP outweigh the disadvantages of using different measures. The results were synthesized to inform our recommendation that researchers consider adopting 2 instruments as standardized measures of recovery from nonspecific LBP, as an adjunct to the existing core set of LBP outcome measures. These instruments are an 11-point Global Back Recovery Scale, for a simple measure of global recovery, and the Patient-Generated Index of Quality of Life-Back Pain, to evaluate specific relevant dimensions of recovery. This

  5. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleaving enzymes: structural and functional homologues of dipeptidyl peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Frerker, Nadine; Wagner, Leona; Wolf, Raik; Heiser, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Torsten; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Schade, Jutta; Karl, Tim; Naim, Hassan Y; Alfalah, Marwan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2007-02-01

    N-terminal truncation of NPY has important physiological consequences, because the truncated peptides lose their capability to activate the Y1-receptor. The sources of N-terminally truncated NPY and related peptides are unknown and several proline specific peptidases may be involved. First, we therefore provide an overview on the peptidases, belonging to structural and functional homologues of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4) as well as aminopeptidase P (APP) and thus, represent potential candidates of NPY cleavage in vivo. Second, applying selective inhibitors against DP4, DP8/9 and DP2, respectively, the enzymatic distribution was analyzed in brain extracts from wild type and DP4 deficient F344 rat substrains and human plasma samples in activity studies as well as by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry. Third, co-transfection of Cos-1 cells with Dpp4 and Npy followed by confocal lasermicroscopy illustrated that hNPY-dsRed1-N1 was transported in large dense core vesicles towards the membrane while rDP4-GFP-C1 was transported primarily in different vesicles thereby providing no clear evidence for co-localization of NPY and DP4. Nevertheless, the review and experimental results of activity and mass spectrometry studies support the notion that at least five peptidases (DP4, DP8, DP9, XPNPEP1, XPNPEP2) are potentially involved in NPY cleavage while the serine protease DP4 (CD26) could be the principal peptidase involved in the N-terminal truncation of NPY. However, DP8 and DP9 are also capable of cleaving NPY, whereas no cleavage could be demonstrated for DP2.

  6. Peptidases prevent μ-opioid receptor internalization in dorsal horn neurons by endogenously released opioids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of peptidases on μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation by endogenous opioids, we measured MOR-1 internalization in rat spinal cord slices. A mixture of inhibitors of aminopeptidases (amastatin), dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (captopril), and neutral endopeptidase (phosphoramidon) dramatically increased the potencies of Leu-enkephalin and dynorphin A to produce MOR-1 internalization, and also enhanced the effects of Met-enkephalin and α-neoendorphin, but not endomorphins or β-endorphin. Omission of any one inhibitor abolished Leu-enkephalin-induced internalization, indicating that all three peptidases degraded enkephalins. Amastatin preserved dynorphin A-induced internalization, and phosphoramidon, but not captopril, increased this effect, indicating that the effect of dynorphin A was prevented by aminopeptidases and neutral endopeptidase. Veratridine (30 μM) or 50 mM KCl produced MOR-1 internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors, but little or no internalization in their absence. These effects were attributed to opioid release, because they were abolished by the selective MOR antagonist CTAP and were Ca2+-dependent. The effect of veratridine was protected by phosphoramidon plus amastatin or captopril, but not by amastatin plus captopril or by phosphoramidon alone, indicating that released opioids are mainly cleaved by neutral endopeptidase, with a lesser involvement of aminopeptidases and dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase. Therefore, since the potencies of endomorphin-1 and -2 to elicit internalization were unaffected by peptidase inhibitors, the opioids released by veratridine were not endomorphins. Confocal microscopy revealed that MOR-1-expressing neurons were in close proximity to terminals containing opioids with enkephalin-like sequences. These findings indicate that peptidases prevent the activation of extrasynaptic MOR-1 in dorsal horn neurons. PMID:12629189

  7. Prokaryote-derived protein inhibitors of peptidases: a sketchy occurrence and mostly unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Rawlings, Neil D.; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan organisms protein inhibitors of peptidases are important factors essential for regulation of proteolytic activity. In vertebrates genes encoding peptidase inhibitors constitute up to 1% of genes reflecting a need for tight and specific control of proteolysis especially in extracellular body fluids. In stark contrast unicellular organisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic consistently contain only few, if any, genes coding for putative peptidase inhibitors. This may seem perplexing in the light of the fact that these organisms produce large numbers of proteases of different catalytic classes with the genes constituting up to 6% of the total gene count with the average being about 3%. Apparently, however, a unicellular life-style is fully compatible with other mechanisms of regulation of proteolysis and does not require protein inhibitors to control their intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activity. So in prokaryotes occurrence of genes encoding different types of peptidase inhibitors is infrequent and often scattered among phylogenetically distinct orders or even phyla of microbiota. Genes encoding proteins homologous to alpha-2-macroglobulin (family I39), serine carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor (family I51), alpha-1-peptidase inhibitor (family I4) and ecotin (family I11) are the most frequently represented in Bacteria. Although several of these gene products were shown to possess inhibitory activity, with an exception of ecotin and staphostatins, the biological function of microbial inhibitors is unclear. In this review we present distribution of protein inhibitors from different families among prokaryotes, describe their mode of action and hypothesize on their role in microbial physiology and interactions with hosts and environment. PMID:20558234

  8. Intracranial hypotension: the nonspecific nature of MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Bruera, O C; Bonamico, L; Giglio, J A; Sinay, V; Leston, J A; Figuerola, M L

    2000-01-01

    We present three patients who complained of postural headache related to different types of intracranial hypotension: spontaneous or primary, and secondary, but presenting the same findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement supports the belief that the enhancement is a nonspecific meningeal reaction to low pressure.

  9. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PUBLIC INFORMATION Procedures and Fees § 20.50 Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. The Food and... impact that this diversion will have upon the agency's consumer protection activities, and the public policy reasons justifying the requests. A decision on the processing of such a request for information...

  10. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  11. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. 20.50 Section 20.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Drug Administration will make every reasonable effort to comply fully with all requests for...

  12. 21 CFR 20.50 - Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PUBLIC INFORMATION Procedures and Fees § 20.50 Nonspecific and overly burdensome requests. The Food and... impact that this diversion will have upon the agency's consumer protection activities, and the public policy reasons justifying the requests. A decision on the processing of such a request for...

  13. Non-Specific Microbicide Product Development: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Joseph W.; Robbiani, Melissa; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Moench, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the identification of HIV-1 as the etiological agent responsible for AIDS nearly 30 years ago, a sterilizing vaccine capable of preventing transmission of the virus remains elusive. In response to struggles on the vaccine development front, significant effort has been devoted to preventing the transmission of HIV with alternative products, technologies, and strategies. One of the early alternative HIV prevention strategies was microbicides, which are topical products that can be used to prevent sexual transmission of HIV either vaginally or rectally. First generation microbicide products were designed to be simple gel formulations comprised of readily available active agents that were inexpensive and broadly active (i.e., non-specific). Unfortunately, despite the clinical investigation of multiple product concepts satisfying these requirements, none were shown to be efficacious in pivotal trials. More recently, microbicide and oral prevention strategies involving highly specific and potent anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs have shown to be efficacious in trials. Although building on these successes continues, these products have a number of issues including potential toxicity with long term use, selection of HIV resistance, and cost. Further, all of the original justifications for non-specific microbicide products remain valid. This review provides a brief history of non-specific microbicide development, outlines the evolution to, and limitations of, ARV based microbicides, and summarizes the current activity on non-specific microbicide product development. PMID:22264041

  14. Non-specific colitis, is it a justifiable diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Haboubi, N Y; Kamal, F

    2001-07-01

    The terms non-specific and chronic colitis are often used by histopathologists. The aim of this study is to look into the validity of the label non-specific chronic colitis (NSCC), the consistency of its reporting, as well as its clinical usefulness in patients who, on review, have shown to have normal biopsies. Colonic and rectal biopsies from 35 patients who presented with acute onset diarrhoea, were initially diagnosed as nonspecific chronic colitis (NSCC) by a number of pathologists in one Department, and were reviewed by an outside pathologist (NYH) without the knowledge of the clinical details. A previously described set of histological criteria in reporting colonic biopsies in inflammatory conditions were used. Normal biopsies were found in 13 of the 35 patients (37%). These patients recovered without clinical intervention. In a further seven patients there was active inflammation with no features of chronicity, in 12 patients there were features of chronicity, in two patients there were hyperplastic polyps, and in one patient there were features of solitary ulcer syndrome. NSCC was used, without consistency, to cover a variety of conditions, including normal biopsies, sometimes relaying a wrong message. We suggest that histological criteria for chronicity should be adhered to when this label is used and the term Non-Specific Colitis should no longer be used.

  15. Lymecycline (Tetralysal) in the management of non-specific urethritis.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, K R

    1976-10-27

    One thousand and sixty patients with non-specific urethritis were treated with lymecycline (Tetralysal). An initial course of 600mg 12-hourly for one week was successful in 90.5% of cases, while 2% responded to a further course of 300mg 12-hourly for three weeks.

  16. Discrete Pathophysiology is Uncommon in Patients with Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kortlever, Joost T.P.; Janssen, Stein J.; Molleman, Jeroen; Hageman, Michiel G.J.S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific symptoms are common in all areas of medicine. Patients and caregivers can be frustrated when an illness cannot be reduced to a discrete pathophysiological process that corresponds with the symptoms. We therefore asked the following questions: 1) Which demographic factors and psychological comorbidities are associated with change from an initial diagnosis of nonspecific arm pain to eventual identification of discrete pathophysiology that corresponds with symptoms? 2) What is the percentage of patients eventually diagnosed with discrete pathophysiology, what are those pathologies, and do they account for the symptoms? Methods: We evaluated 634 patients with an isolated diagnosis of nonspecific upper extremity pain to see if discrete pathophysiology was diagnosed on subsequent visits to the same hand surgeon, a different hand surgeon, or any physician within our health system for the same pain. Results: There were too few patients with discrete pathophysiology at follow-up to address the primary study question. Definite discrete pathophysiology that corresponded with the symptoms was identified in subsequent evaluations by the index surgeon in one patient (0.16% of all patients) and cured with surgery (nodular fasciitis). Subsequent doctors identified possible discrete pathophysiology in one patient and speculative pathophysiology in four patients and the index surgeon identified possible discrete pathophysiology in four patients, but the five discrete diagnoses accounted for only a fraction of the symptoms. Conclusion: Nonspecific diagnoses are not harmful. Prospective randomized research is merited to determine if nonspecific, descriptive diagnoses are better for patients than specific diagnoses that imply pathophysiology in the absence of discrete verifiable pathophysiology. PMID:27517064

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Pz peptidase A from Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Akio; Nakano, Hiroaki; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Nakatsu, Toru; Kato, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2007-02-01

    Pz peptidase A is an intracellular M3 metallopeptidase found in the thermophile Geobacillus collagenovorans MO-1 that recognizes collagen-specific tripeptide units (Gly-Pro-Xaa). Pz peptidase A shares common reactions with mammalian thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and neurolysin, but has extremely low primary sequence identity to these enzymes. In this work, Pz peptidase A was cocrystallized with a phosphine peptide inhibitor (PPI) that selectively inhibits TOP and neurolysin. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 56.38, b = 194.15, c = 59.93 A, beta = 106.22 degrees . This is the first crystallographic study of an M3 family peptidase-PPI complex.

  18. Functional analysis of C1 family cysteine peptidases in the larval gut of Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied protein digestion the tenebrionids Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum, pests of stored grains and grain products, to identify potential targets for biopesticide development. Tenebrionid larvae have highly compartmentalized guts, with primarily cysteine peptidases in the acidic anter...

  19. Cysteine Peptidases, Secreted by Trichomonas gallinae, Are Involved in the Cytopathogenic Effects on a Permanent Chicken Liver Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Aziza; Nöbauer, Katharina; Patzl, Martina; Berger, Evelyn; Hess, Michael; Bilic, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Trichomonas gallinae, the aetiological agent of avian trichomonosis, was shown to secrete soluble factors involved in cytopathogenic effect on a permanent chicken liver (LMH) cell culture. The present study focused on the characterization of these molecules. The addition of specific peptidase inhibitors to the cell-free filtrate partially inhibited the monolayer destruction, which implied the presence of peptidases in the filtrate and their involvement in the cytopathogenic effect. One-dimensional substrate (gelatin) SDS-PAGE confirmed the proteolytic character of the filtrate by demonstrating the proteolytic activity within the molecular weight range from 38 to 110 kDa. In addition, the proteolytic activity was specifically inhibited by addition of TLCK and E-64 cysteine peptidase inhibitors implying their cysteine peptidase nature. Furthermore, variations in the intensity and the number of proteolytic bands were observed between cell-free filtrates of low and high passages of the same T. gallinae clonal culture. Two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of concentrated T. gallinae cell-free filtrate identified at least six proteolytic spots. The mass spectrometric analysis of spots from 2-D gels identified the presence of at least two different Clan CA, family C1, cathepsin L-like cysteine peptidases in the cell-free filtrate of T. gallinae. In parallel, a PCR approach using degenerated primers based on the conserved amino acid sequence region of cysteine peptidases from Trichomonas vaginalis identified the coding sequences for four different Clan CA, family C1, cathepsin L-like cysteine peptidases. Finally, this is the first report analyzing molecules secreted by T. gallinae and demonstrating the ubiquity of peptidases secreted by this protozoon. PMID:22649527

  20. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    PubMed Central

    Elpidina, Elena N.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut that are critical to the early stages of food digestion. In previous studies, we described 26 putative cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum (types B, L, O, F, and K) located mostly on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 10. In the present study, we hypothesized that specific cysteine peptidase genes could be associated with digestive functions for food processing based on comparison of gene expression profiles in different developmental stages, feeding and non-feeding. RNA-Seq was used to determine the relative expression of cysteine peptidase genes among four major developmental stages (egg, larvae, pupae, and adult) of T. castaneum. We also compared cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum to those in other model insects and coleopteran pests. By combining transcriptome expression, phylogenetic comparisons, response to dietary inhibitors, and other existing data, we identified key cysteine peptidases that T. castaneum larvae and adults use for food digestion, and thus new potential targets for biologically-based control products. PMID:26819843

  1. Involvement of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Normal and Pathologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Ana Carolina B.; da Cunha, Bianca Rodrigues; Henrique, Tiago; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2015-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a subgroup of serine proteases that participate in proteolytic pathways and control protein levels in normal physiology as well as in several pathological conditions. Their complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory interactions may induce inflammatory and immune responses and contribute to the neoplastic phenotype through the regulation of several cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. This family of proteases, which includes one of the most useful cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidase 3 or PSA, also has a protective effect against cancer promoting apoptosis or counteracting angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Therefore, they represent attractive therapeutic targets and may have important applications in clinical oncology. Despite being intensively studied, many gaps in our knowledge on several molecular aspects of KLK functions still exist. This review aims to summarize recent data on their involvement in different processes related to health and disease, in particular those directly or indirectly linked to the neoplastic process. PMID:26783378

  2. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  3. In vitro digestion of gliadin by gastrointestinal enzymes and by pyrrolidonecarboxylate peptidase.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, K A

    1980-02-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of whole gliadin has been studied in vitro using sequential treatments by pepsin, trypsin, and pancreatin. Amino-terminal pyroglutamic acid-peptides were formed at each stage of the digestion process and the concentration of these peptides increased as the hydrolysis proceeded. Digests were further fractionated on columns of AG 50W-X8 or SE-Sephadex. Enzymic digests and selected column fractions were analyzed with pyrrolidonecarboxylate peptidase. Each digest or fraction was degraded further by this peptidase. Enzyme activity was greatest towards peptic-tryptic-pancreatic digests, peptic-tryptic digests, peptic digests, and undigested gliadin, in that order. The stability of lysosomal membranes to synthetic L-pyroglutamic acid, L-pyroglutamyl-L-alanine, L-pyroglutamyl-L-proline, and to selected fractions of the enzymic digests was tested. Each treatment ruptured lysosomal membranes. Findings are discussed in relation to the normal catabolism of gliadin and the alterations that may occur in certain pathological states.

  4. Hieronymain I, a new cysteine peptidase isolated from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariela A; Pardo, Marcelo F; Caffini, Néstor O; López, Laura M I

    2003-02-01

    A new peptidase, named hieronymain I, was purified to homogeneity from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae) by acetone fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC) on CM-Sepharose FF. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF), isoelectric focusing, and SDS-PAGE. Hieronymain is a basic peptidase (pI > 9.3) and its molecular mass was 24,066 Da. Maximum proteolytic activity on casein (>90% of maximum activity) was achieved at pH 8.5-9.5. The enzyme was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid and activated by the addition of cysteine; these results strongly suggest that the isolated protease should be included within the cysteine group. The N-terminal sequence of hieronymain (ALPESIDWRAKGAVTEVKRQDG) was compared with 25 plant cysteine proteases that showed more than 50% of identity.

  5. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III acts as a post-proline-cleaving enzyme on endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Barsun, Marina; Jajcanin, Nina; Vukelić, Bojana; Spoljarić, Jasminka; Abramić, Marija

    2007-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is a zinc exopeptidase with an implied role in the mammalian pain-modulatory system owing to its high affinity for enkephalins and localisation in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn. Our study revealed that this human enzyme hydrolyses opioid peptides belonging to three new groups, endomorphins, hemorphins and exorphins. The enzymatic hydrolysis products of endomorphin-1 were separated and quantified by capillary electrophoresis and the kinetic parameters were determined for human DPP III and rat DPP IV. Both peptidases cleave endomorphin-1 at comparable rates, with liberation of the N-terminal Tyr-Pro. This is the first evidence of DPP III acting as an endomorphin-cleaving enzyme.

  6. Identification of peptidase substrates in human plasma by FTMS based differential mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Nathan A.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Geissler, Wayne; Wiener, Matthew C.; Sachs, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Kenny K.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Sinha Roy, Ranabir; Settlage, Robert E.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 2% of the human genome encodes for proteases. Unfortunately, however, the biological roles of most of these enzymes remain poorly defined, since the physiological substrates are typically unknown and are difficult to identify using traditional methods. We have developed a proteomics experiment based on FTMS profiling and differential mass spectrometry (dMS) to identify candidate endogenous substrates of proteases using fractionated human plasma as the candidate substrate pool. Here we report proof-of-concept experiments for identifying in vitro substrates of aminopeptidase P2, (APP2) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), a peptidase of therapeutic interest for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. For both proteases, previously validated peptide substrates spiked into the human plasma pool were identified. Of note, the differential mass spectrometry experiments also identified novel substrates for each peptidase in the subfraction of human plasma. Targeted MS/MS analysis of these peptides in the complex human plasma pool and manual confirmation of the amino acid sequences led to the identification of these substrates. The novel DPP-4 substrate EPLGRQLTSGP was chemically synthesized and cleavage kinetics were determined in an in vitro DPP-4 enzyme assay. The apparent second order rate constant (kcat/KM) for DPP-4-mediated cleavage was determined to be 2.3 x 105 M-1 s-1 confirming that this peptide is efficiently processed by the peptidase in vitro. Collectively, these results demonstrate that differential mass spectrometry has the potential to identify candidate endogenous substrates of target proteases from a human plasma pool. Importantly, knowledge of the endogenous substrates can provide useful insight into the biology of these enzymes and provides useful biomarkers for monitoring their activity in vivo.

  7. Evidence for an oxyanion hole in serine beta-lactamases and DD-peptidases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B P; Pratt, R F

    1988-12-01

    A thionocephalosporin is shown to be a much poorer substrate of representative serine beta-lactamases of class A (RTEM-2) and class C (Enterobacter cloacae P99) and a much poorer inhibitor of the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase than is the analogous oxo beta-lactam. These results provide kinetic evidence for the existence of a catalytic oxyanion hole in these enzymes.

  8. How immune peptidases change specificity: cathepsin G gained tryptic function but lost efficiency during primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Wilfred W; Trivedi, Neil N; Makarova, Anastasia; Ray, Manisha; Craik, Charles S; Caughey, George H

    2010-11-01

    Cathepsin G is a major secreted serine peptidase of neutrophils and mast cells. Studies in Ctsg-null mice suggest that cathepsin G supports antimicrobial defenses but can injure host tissues. The human enzyme has an unusual "Janus-faced" ability to cleave peptides at basic (tryptic) as well as aromatic (chymotryptic) sites. Tryptic activity has been attributed to acidic Glu(226) in the primary specificity pocket and underlies proposed important functions, such as activation of prourokinase. However, most mammals, including mice, substitute Ala(226) for Glu(226), suggesting that human tryptic activity may be anomalous. To test this hypothesis, human cathepsin G was compared with mouse wild-type and humanized active site mutants, revealing that mouse primary specificity is markedly narrower than that of human cathepsin G, with much greater Tyr activity and selectivity and near absence of tryptic activity. It also differs from human in resisting tryptic peptidase inhibitors (e.g., aprotinin), while favoring angiotensin destruction at Tyr(4) over activation at Phe(8). Ala(226)Glu mutants of mouse cathepsin G acquire tryptic activity and human ability to activate prourokinase. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the Ala(226)Glu missense mutation appearing in primates 31-43 million years ago represented an apparently unprecedented way to create tryptic activity in a serine peptidase. We propose that tryptic activity is not an attribute of ancestral mammalian cathepsin G, which was primarily chymotryptic, and that primate-selective broadening of specificity opposed the general trend of increased specialization by immune peptidases and allowed acquisition of new functions.

  9. Evidence for an oxyanion hole in serine beta-lactamases and DD-peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, B P; Pratt, R F

    1988-01-01

    A thionocephalosporin is shown to be a much poorer substrate of representative serine beta-lactamases of class A (RTEM-2) and class C (Enterobacter cloacae P99) and a much poorer inhibitor of the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase than is the analogous oxo beta-lactam. These results provide kinetic evidence for the existence of a catalytic oxyanion hole in these enzymes. PMID:3066349

  10. Nodulin 41, a novel late nodulin of common bean with peptidase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The legume-rhizobium symbiosis requires the formation of root nodules, specialized organs where the nitrogen fixation process takes place. Nodule development is accompanied by the induction of specific plant genes, referred to as nodulin genes. Important roles in processes such as morphogenesis and metabolism have been assigned to nodulins during the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. Results Here we report the purification and biochemical characterization of a novel nodulin from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules. This protein, called nodulin 41 (PvNod41) was purified through affinity chromatography and was partially sequenced. A genomic clone was then isolated via PCR amplification. PvNod41 is an atypical aspartyl peptidase of the A1B subfamily with an optimal hydrolytic activity at pH 4.5. We demonstrate that PvNod41 has limited peptidase activity against casein and is partially inhibited by pepstatin A. A PvNod41-specific antiserum was used to assess the expression pattern of this protein in different plant organs and throughout root nodule development, revealing that PvNod41 is found only in bean root nodules and is confined to uninfected cells. Conclusions To date, only a small number of atypical aspartyl peptidases have been characterized in plants. Their particular spatial and temporal expression patterns along with their unique enzymatic properties imply a high degree of functional specialization. Indeed, PvNod41 is closely related to CDR1, an Arabidopsis thaliana extracellular aspartyl protease involved in defense against bacterial pathogens. PvNod41's biochemical properties and specific cell-type localization, in uninfected cells of the common bean root nodule, strongly suggest that this aspartyl peptidase has a key role in plant defense during the symbiotic interaction. PMID:21985276

  11. High-level expression of nattokinase in Bacillus licheniformis by manipulating signal peptide and signal peptidase.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Wei, X; Qiu, Y; Chen, Y; Chen, J; Wen, Z; Chen, S

    2016-09-01

    Nattokinase is an enzyme produced by Bacillus licheniformis and has potential to be used as a drug for treating cardiovascular disease due to its beneficial effects of preventing fibrin clots etc. However, the low activity and titre of this protein produced by B. licheniformis often hinders its application of commercial production. The aim of this work is to improve the nattokinase production by manipulating signal peptides and signal peptidases in B. licheniformis. The P43 promoter, amyL terminator and AprN target gene were used to form the nattokinase expression vector, pHY-SP-NK, which was transformed into B. licheniformis and nattokinase was expressed successfully. A library containing 81 predicted signal peptides was constructed for nattokinase expression in B. licheniformis, with the maximum activity being obtained under the signal peptide of AprE. Among four type I signal peptidases genes (sipS, sipT, sipV, sipW) in B. licheniformis, the deletion of sipV resulted in a highest decrease in nattokinase activity. Overexpression of sipV in B. licheniformis led to a nattokinase activity of 35·60 FU ml(-1) , a 4·68-fold improvement over activity produced by the initial strain. This work demonstrates the potential of B. licheniformis for industrial production of nattokinase through manipulation of signal peptides and signal peptidases expression. This study has screened the signal peptides of extracellular proteins of B. licheniformis for nattokinase production. Four kinds of Type I signal peptidases genes have been detected respectively in B. licheniformis to identify which one played the vital role for nattokinase production. This study provided a promising strain for industry production of nattokinase. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidases found in Aspergillus oryzae show varying substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takuji; Morita, Hiroto; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei

    2016-06-01

    Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidase genes, dppB, dppE, and dppF, were unveiled by sequence analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae genome. We investigated their differential enzymatic profiles, in order to gain an understanding of the diversity of these genes. The three dipeptidyl peptidases were expressed using Aspergillus nidulans as the host. Each recombinant enzyme was purified and subsequently characterized. The enzymes displayed similar optimum pH values, but optimum temperatures, pH stabilities, and substrate specificities varied. DppB was identified as a Xaa-Prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase, while DppE scissile substrates were similar to the substrates for Aspergillus fumigatus DPPV (AfDPPV). DppF was found to be a novel enzyme that could digest both substrates for A. fumigatus DPPIV and AfDPPV. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the transcription of dppB in A. oryzae was induced by protein substrates and repressed by the addition of an inorganic nitrogen source, despite the presence of protein substrates. The transcription of dppE depended on its growth time, while the transcription of dppF was not affected by the type of the nitrogen source in the medium, and it started during the early stage of the fungal growth. Based on these results, we conclude that these enzymes may represent the nutrition acquisition enzymes. Additionally, DppF may be one of the sensor peptidases responsible for the detection of the protein substrates in A. oryzae environment. DppB may be involved in nitrogen assimilation control, since the transcription of dppB was repressed by NaNO3, despite the presence of protein substrates.

  13. A small jab - a big effect: nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines.

    PubMed

    Benn, Christine S; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K; Aaby, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease.

  14. Aetiology and management of non-specific vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dattani, I M; Gerken, A; Evans, B A

    1982-01-01

    In a study of 100 women with non-specific vaginitis, characterised by a vaginal discharge which was malodorous and pruritic in most cases and caused dyspareunia and dysuria in some, Gardnerella vaginalis was isolated in 46% of patients. When present, G vaginalis was significantly associated with Mycoplasma hominis and Bacteroides species. Isolation of G vaginalis was unrelated to the presenting symptoms. Treatment with povidone-iodine pessaries for two weeks produced no pronounced benefit, either clinically or microbiologically, compared with a placebo. Nevertheless, 68% of all patients followed reported improvement four weeks after the start of treatment. The findings suggest that G vaginalis is one cause of non-specific vaginitis, which is more likely to be seen in women using oral contraceptives and is usually cured spontaneously. PMID:7034858

  15. Purification and partial characterization of nonspecific lipase from rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Albron, P W; Corbett, B J; Latimer, A D

    1976-03-26

    Nonspecific lipase (also referred to as micelle lipase and secondary ester hydrolase) has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity starting from acetone powder of rat pancreas. The purified enzyme is found to have a molecular weight (gel filtration) of 64 000 +/- 2000, and an equivalent weight (titration with E-600) of 65 000. Nonspecific lipase is seen to be very sensitive to inhibition by organophosphates but resistant to quinine. Evidence for the presence of sulfhydryl and imidazole groups essential for activity is presented, and some observations on substrate specificity are made. The purified enzyme appears to lack phosphate groups and lipids, and is unstable under conditions of low ionic strength and/or exposure to 2-mercaptoethanol.

  16. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  17. Intentional and Unintentional Contributions to Nonspecific Preparation: Electrophysiological Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los, Sander A.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that there are distinct intentional and unintentional influences on nonspecific preparation for a future event. In 2 experiments, participants responded to an imperative stimulus (S-sub-2) that was presented equiprobably either 400 ms or 1,200 ms after the offset of a warning stimulus (S-sub-1). During the S-sub-1-S-sub-2…

  18. Calcium Regulates the Activity and Structural Stability of Tpr, a Bacterial Calpain-like Peptidase*

    PubMed Central

    Staniec, Dominika; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Sroka, Aneta; Bryzek, Danuta; Bogyo, Matthew; Abrahamson, Magnus; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a peptide-fermenting asaccharolytic periodontal pathogen. Its genome contains several genes encoding cysteine peptidases other than gingipains. One of these genes (PG1055) encodes a protein called Tpr (thiol protease) that has sequence similarity to cysteine peptidases of the papain and calpain families. In this study we biochemically characterize Tpr. We found that the 55-kDa Tpr inactive zymogen proteolytically processes itself into active forms of 48, 37, and 33 kDa via sequential truncations at the N terminus. These processed molecular forms of Tpr are associated with the bacterial outer membrane where they are likely responsible for the generation of metabolic peptides required for survival of the pathogen. Both autoprocessing and activity were dependent on calcium concentrations >1 mm, consistent with the protein's activity within the intestinal and inflammatory milieus. Calcium also stabilized the Tpr structure and rendered the protein fully resistant to proteolytic degradation by gingipains. Together, our findings suggest that Tpr is an example of a bacterial calpain, a calcium-responsive peptidase that may generate substrates required for the peptide-fermenting metabolism of P. gingivalis. Aside from nutrient generation, Tpr may also be involved in evasion of host immune response through degradation of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and complement proteins C3, C4, and C5. Taken together, these results indicate that Tpr likely represents an important pathogenesis factor for P. gingivalis. PMID:26385924

  19. Characterization of the peptidase activity of recombinant porcine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein-2.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Green, Jonathan A

    2008-12-01

    The pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) belong to the aspartic peptidase family. They are expressed exclusively in trophoblasts of even-toed ungulates such as swine, cattle, sheep, etc. In pigs, two distinct PAG transcripts (and some variants) have been described. One of the transcripts, porcine PAG-1 (poPAG-1) may not be capable of acting as a peptidase. The second transcript, poPAG-2, possesses a conserved catalytic centre and has been predicted, but not shown, to have proteolytic activity. The thrust of this work was to test such a possibility. PoPAG-2 was expressed as a recombinant protein with an amino-terminal 'FLAG-tag' in a Baculoviral expression system. The expressed proteins were affinity purified by using an anti-FLAG antibody. The purified preparations were then analysed for proteolytic activity against a fluorescent substrate. Porcine PAG-2 had optimal proteolytic activity around pH 3.5. Against this substrate, it had a k(cat)/K(m) of 1.2 microM(-1) s(-1) and was inhibited by the aspartic peptidase inhibitor, pepstatin A, with a K(i) of 12.5 nM. Since the proteolytic activity of PAGs in the pig has now been established, the search for putative substrates to gain insight into the physiological role of PAGs will likely be the focus of future investigations.

  20. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata O; Via, Allegra; Brandão, Marcelo M; Tramontano, Anna; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-03-01

    Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic L-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  1. Tripeptidyl Peptidase II Mediates Levels of Nuclear Phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2*

    PubMed Central

    Wiemhoefer, Anne; Stargardt, Anita; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Renner, Maria C.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Stap, Jan; Raspe, Marcel A.; Tomkinson, Birgitta; Kessels, Helmut W.; Ovaa, Huib; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Florea, Bogdan; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) is a serine peptidase involved in various biological processes, including antigen processing, cell growth, DNA repair, and neuropeptide mediated signaling. The underlying mechanisms of how a peptidase can influence this multitude of processes still remain unknown. We identified rapid proteomic changes in neuroblastoma cells following selective TPP2 inhibition using the known reversible inhibitor butabindide, as well as a new, more potent, and irreversible peptide phosphonate inhibitor. Our data show that TPP2 inhibition indirectly but rapidly decreases the levels of active, di-phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in the nucleus, thereby down-regulating signal transduction downstream of growth factors and mitogenic stimuli. We conclude that TPP2 mediates many important cellular functions by controlling ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation. For instance, we show that TPP2 inhibition of neurons in the hippocampus leads to an excessive strengthening of synapses, indicating that TPP2 activity is crucial for normal brain function. PMID:26041847

  2. New insights into the complex mixture of latex cysteine peptidases in Calotropis procera.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M V; Araújo, E S; Jucá, T L; Monteiro-Moreira, A C O; Vasconcelos, I M; Moreira, R A; Viana, C A; Beltramini, L M; Pereira, D A; Moreno, F B

    2013-07-01

    The latex of Calotropis procera is a rich source of proteolytic activity. This latex is known to contain two distinct cysteine peptidases: procerain and procerain B. In this study, new cysteine peptidases were purified from C. procera latex. The enzymes were purified by two sequential ion-exchange chromatography steps (CM-Sepharose plus Resource S(®)) at pH 5.0 and 6.0. The purified enzymes had molecular mass spectra corresponding to CpCP-1=26,213, CpCP-2=26,133 and CpCP-3=25,086 Da. These enzymes exhibited discrete differences in terms of enzymatic activity at a broad range of pH and temperature conditions and contained identical N-terminal amino acid sequences. In these respects, these three new proteins are distinct from those previously studied (procerain and procerain B). Circular dichroism analysis revealed that the new peptidases contain extensive secondary structures, α(15-20%) and β(26-30%), that were stabilized by disulfide bonds. The purified enzymes exhibited plasma-clotting activity mediated by a thrombin-like mechanism. The set of results suggest the three isolated polypeptides correspond to different post-translationally processed forms of the same protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heterologous production of the stain solving peptidase PPP1 from Pleurotus pulmonarius.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Robin-Hagen; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G; Linke, Diana

    2016-05-01

    A novel stain solving subtilisin-like peptidase (PPP1) was identified from the culture supernatant of the agaricomycete Pleurotus pulmonarius. It was purified to homogeneity using a sequence of preparative isoelectric focusing, anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Peptides were identified by ab initio sequencing (nLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS), characterizing the enzyme as a member of the subtilase family (EC 3.4.21.X). An expression system was established featuring the pPIC9K vector, an alternative Kozak sequence, the codon optimized gene ppp1 gene without the native signal sequence with C-terminal hexa-histidine tag, and Pichia pastoris GS115 as expression host. Intracellular active enzyme was obtained from cultivations in shake flasks and in a five liter bioreactor. With reaction optima of 40 °C and a pH > 8.5, considerable bleaching of pre-stained fabrics (blood, milk and India ink), and the possibility of larger-scale production, the heterologous enzyme is well suitable for detergent applications, especially at lower temperatures as part of a more energy- and cost-efficient washing process. Showing little sequence similarity to other subtilases, this unique peptidase is the first subtilisin-like peptidase from Basidiomycota, which has been functionally produced in Pichia pastoris.

  4. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, M.F.M.; Alves, F.M.; Assis, D.M.; Hirata, I.Y.; Juliano, L.; Oliveira, V.; Juliano, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1′ substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1′. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2′ and P3′ positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1′ substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  5. Structure and function of tripeptidyl peptidase II, a giant cytosolic protease.

    PubMed

    Rockel, Beate; Kopec, Klaus O; Lupas, Andrei N; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II is the largest known eukaryotic peptidase. It has been described as a multi-purpose peptidase, which, in addition to its house-keeping function in intracellular protein degradation, plays a role in several vital cellular processes such as antigen processing, apoptosis, or cell division, and is involved in diseases like muscle wasting, obesity, and in cancer. Biochemical studies and bioinformatics have identified TPPII as a subtilase, but its structure is very unusual: it forms a large homooligomeric complex (6 MDa) with a spindle-like shape. Recently, the high-resolution structure of TPPII homodimers (300 kDa) was solved and a hybrid structure of the holocomplex built of 20 dimers was obtained by docking it into the EM-density. Here, we summarize our current knowledge about TPPII with a focus on structural aspects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peptidases released by necrotic cells control CD8+ T cell cross-priming

    PubMed Central

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Kapanadze, Tamar; Han, Miaojun; Wissing, Josef; Ma, Chi; Jaensch, Lothar; Manns, Michael P.; Armstrong, Todd; Jaffee, Elizabeth; White, Ayla O.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-priming of CD8+ T cells and generation of effector immune responses is pivotal for tumor immunity as well as for successful anticancer vaccination and therapy. Dead and dying cells produce signals that can influence Ag processing and presentation; however, there is conflicting evidence regarding the immunogenicity of necrotic cell death. We used a mouse model of sterile necrosis, in which mice were injected with sterile primary necrotic cells, to investigate a role of these cells in priming of CD8+ T cells. We discovered a molecular mechanism operating in Ag donor cells that regulates cross-priming of CD8+ T cells during primary sterile necrosis and thereby controls adaptive immune responses. We found that the cellular peptidases dipeptidyl peptidase 3 (DPP-3) and thimet oligopeptidase 1 (TOP-1), both of which are present in nonimmunogenic necrotic cells, eliminated proteasomal degradation products and blocked Ag cross-presentation. While sterile necrotic tumor cells failed to induce CD8+ T cell responses, their nonimmunogenicity could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by inactivation of DPP-3 and TOP-1. These results indicate that control of cross-priming and thereby immunogenicity of primary sterile necrosis relies on proteasome-dependent oligopeptide generation and functional status of peptidases in Ag donor cells. PMID:24216478

  7. The molecular structure and catalytic mechanism of a novel carboxyl peptidase from Scytalidium lignicolum

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Masao; Cherney, Maia M.; Oyama, Hiroshi; Oda, Kohei; James, Michael N. G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular structure of the pepstatin-insensitive carboxyl peptidase from Scytalidium lignicolum, formerly known as scytalidopepsin B, was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement phasing methods and refined to an R factor of 0.230 (Rfree = 0.246) at 2.1-Å resolution. In addition to the structure of the unbound peptidase, the structure of a product complex of cleaved angiotensin II bound in the active site of the enzyme was also determined. We propose the name scytalidocarboxyl peptidase B (SCP-B) for this enzyme. On the basis of conserved, catalytic residues identified at the active site, we suggest the name Eqolisin for the enzyme family. The previously uninvestigated SCP-B fold is that of a β-sandwich; each sheet has seven antiparallel strands. A tripeptide product, Ala-Ile-His, bound in the active site of SCP-B has allowed for identification of the catalytic residues and the residues in subsites S1, S2, and S3, which are important for substrate binding. The most likely hydrolytic mechanism involves nucleophilic attack of a general base (Glu-136)-activated water (OH-) on the si-face of the scissile peptide carbonylcarbon atom to form a tetrahedral intermediate. Electrophilic assistance and oxyanion stabilization is provided by the side-chain amide of Gln-53. Protonation of the leaving-group nitrogen is accomplished by the general acid function of the protonated carboxyl group of Glu-136. PMID:14993599

  8. Superior non-specific motor learning in the blind.

    PubMed

    Morin-Parent, Florence; de Beaumont, Louis; Théoret, Hugo; Lepage, Jean-Francois

    2017-07-20

    It is well established that blindness induces changes in cerebral function and structure, namely affecting the somatomotor regions. However, the behavioural significance of these changes on the motor system, and on motor learning in particular, remains elusive. In this study, we used a modified version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT) with auditory cues to assess sequence specific and non-specific motor learning in blind adults and sighted controls, and compare them with sighted controls performing the classic visual SRTT. Our results show that the auditory SRTT faithfully replicates the typical learning pattern obtained with the visual SRTT. On the auditory SRTT, blind individuals consistently showed faster reaction times than sighted controls, being at par with sighted individuals performing the visual SRTT. On the other hand, blind participants displayed a particular pattern of motor learning in comparison to both sighted groups; while controls improved prominently on sequence specific learning, blind individuals displayed comparable performance on both specific and non-specific learning, markedly outperforming the control groups on non-specific learning. These results show that blindness, in addition to causing long-term changes in cortical organisation, can also influence dynamic neuroplastic mechanisms in systems beyond those typically associated with compensatory sensory processing.

  9. Controllable Nonspecific Protein Adsorption by Charged Hyperbranched Polyglycerol Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaming; Frey, Holger

    2015-12-08

    Antifouling thin films derived from charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (hbPG) layers were fabricated and evaluated. The anionic hbPG (a-hbPG) monolayers and cationic hbPG/anionic hbPG (c/a-hbPG) bilayers were adsorbed on the underlying self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of cysteamine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) by electrostatic interaction, respectively, and their procession was monitored by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen on the premade a-hbPG and c/a-hbPG thin films was measured and the capability of these thin films to resist nonspecific protein adsorption was evaluated by SPR as well. It is observed that the c/a-hbPG bilayer films possessed good antifouling properties. With c/a-hbPG bilayers consisting of higher molecular weight a-hbPG, the adsorption of BSA and fibrinogen were as low as 0.015 ng/mm(-2) and 0.0076 ng/mm(-2), respectively, comparable to the traditionally ultralow antifouling surfaces (<0.05 ng/mm(-2) of nonspecific protein adsorption). This work proved that the charged hbPG thin films can strongly reduce the nonspecific protein adsorption and have the promise for the antifouling coatings with improved performance.

  10. Phase separation in solutions with specific and nonspecific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, William M.; Frenkel, Daan; Oxtoby, David W.

    2014-05-28

    Protein solutions, which tend to be thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions, can demix into protein-enriched and protein-depleted phases when stressed. Using a lattice-gas model of proteins with both isotropic and specific, directional interactions, we calculate the critical conditions for phase separation for model proteins with up to four patches via Monte Carlo simulations and statistical associating fluid theory. Given a fixed specific interaction strength, the critical value of the isotropic energy, which accounts for dispersion forces and nonspecific interactions, measures the stability of the solution with respect to nonspecific interactions. Phase separation is suppressed by the formation of protein complexes, which effectively passivate the strongly associating sites on the monomers. Nevertheless, we find that protein models with three or more patches can form extended aggregates that phase separate despite the assembly of passivated complexes, even in the absence of nonspecific interactions. We present a unified view of the critical behavior of model fluids with anisotropic interactions, and we discuss the implications of these results for the thermodynamic stability of protein solutions.

  11. Nonspecific provocation of target organs in allergic diseases: EAACI-GA(2)LEN consensus report.

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Brusasco, V; Carlsen, K-H; Crimi, E; Popov, T; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Gramiccioni, C; Bonini, M; Passali, D; Bachert, C; van Cauwenberge, P B; Bresciani, M; Bonini, S; Calonge, M; Montan, P G; Serapiao Dos Santos, M; Belfort, R; Lambiase, A; Sacchetti, M

    2007-06-01

    It is widely accepted that nonspecific tissue reactivity is a distinct pathophysiological hallmark of allergic diseases, influenced by genetic and environmental factors different from those involved in causing sensitization and allergen response of target organs. This consensus document aims at reviewing procedures currently used for nonspecific provocation of the bronchi, nose and eye and for measuring their responsiveness to nonspecific stimuli.

  12. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  13. The Crude Skin Secretion of the Pepper Frog Leptodactylus labyrinthicus Is Rich in Metallo and Serine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Libério, Michelle da Silva; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Pires Júnior, Osmindo R.; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M.; Castro, Mariana S.

    2014-01-01

    Peptidases are ubiquitous enzymes involved in diverse biological processes. Fragments from bioactive peptides have been found in skin secretions from frogs, and their presence suggests processing by peptidases. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the peptidase activity present in the skin secretion of Leptodactylus labyrinthicus. Zymography revealed the presence of three bands of gelatinase activity of approximately 60 kDa, 66 kDa, and 80 kDa, which the first two were calcium-dependent. These three bands were inhibited either by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and phenathroline; thus, they were characterized as metallopeptidases. Furthermore, the proteolytic enzymes identified were active only at pH 6.0–10.0, and their activity increased in the presence of CHAPS or NaCl. Experiments with fluorogenic substrates incubated with skin secretions identified aminopeptidase activity, with cleavage after leucine, proline, and alanine residues. This activity was directly proportional to the protein concentration, and it was inhibited in the presence of metallo and serine peptidase inhibitors. Besides, the optimal pH for substrate cleavage was determined to be 7.0–8.0. The results of the in gel activity assay showed that all substrates were hydrolyzed by a 45 kDa peptidase. Gly-Pro-AMC was also cleaved by a peptidase greater than 97 kDa. The data suggest the presence of dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs) and metallopeptidases; however, further research is necessary. In conclusion, our work will help to elucidate the implication of these enzymatic activities in the processing of the bioactive peptides present in frog venom, expanding the knowledge of amphibian biology. PMID:24906116

  14. In vitro cleavage of bioactive peptides by peptidases from Bothrops jararaca venom and its neutralization by bothropic antivenom produced by Butantan Institute: Major contribution of serine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Alexandre Kazuo; Kodama, Roberto Tadashi; Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Duzzi, Bruno; Iwai, Leo Kei; Lima, Ismael Feitosa; Cajado-Carvalho, Daniela; Portaro, Fernanda Vieira

    2017-10-01

    In Brazil, envenomation by Bothrops pitvipers is responsible for over 73% of snakebites, and their venom is a rich source of proteolytic enzymes. Most studies have demonstrated that Bothrops jararaca venom acts on macromolecular substrates, causing an imbalance in the victim's hemostatic system. In contrast, fewer studies have examined the proteolytic activity on small molecules such as peptides. In this study, we used a set of bioactive peptides (insulin B chain, Met-enkephalin, Leu-enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, substance P and somatostatin) to identify new peptide substrates for the metallopeptidases and serine peptidases from the B. jararaca venom. The majority of these peptides were substrates for the venom, but neuropeptide Y and pancreatic polypeptide presented higher hydrolyses rates. Although most of the peptides were simultaneously substrates for both classes of proteases, serine peptidases were the most active. Substance P was an exclusive substrate for metallopeptidases, while somatostatin was a selective substrate for serine peptidases. The neutralizing efficacy of the bothropic antivenom produced by the Butantan Institute was also assessed and found to totally prevent substance P hydrolysis, whereas somatostatin cleavage was not inhibited. Thus, the antivenom effectively inhibited metallopeptidase activity, but did not neutralize some of the serine peptidases. These results indicate that, in addition to cleaving proteins, the proteolytic enzymes from this venom also hydrolyze bioactive peptides, and this peptidase activity could effectively contribute to some of the many dire manifestations of envenomation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Method for Extracting Viral Hemagglutination-Inhibiting Antibodies from the Nonspecific Inhibitors of Serum

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, William A.; Mundon, Francis K.; Top, Franklin H.; Russell, Philip K.

    1970-01-01

    Various methods are used to remove nonspecific inhibitors from sera before titering viral hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. These methods have several undesirable features; some are tedious and time-consuming, some remove antibody along with nonspecific inhibitors, and different techniques are usually required to remove the nonspecific inhibitors for different viruses. This communication describes a single method that uses diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex to extract the immunoglobulin G antibodies for several viruses from nonspecific inhibitors. The procedure is fast, simple to perform, and removed the nonspecific inhibitors for influenza, Western equine encephalitis, dengue-2, and rubella viruses. Images PMID:5463576

  16. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P < 0.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P < 0.001) indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  17. Crystal structure of nonspecific lipid transfer protein from Solanum melongena.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2017-10-01

    Lipids are considered to protect protein allergens from proteolysis and are generally seen to exist in a bound form. One of the well-known plant protein families with bound lipids is non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). Structure-function relationships in the case of the members of non-specific lipid transfer protein family are not clearly understood. As part of exploring the seed proteome, we have analyzed the proteome of a member of Solanaceae family, Solanum melongena (eggplant) and a non-specific lipid transfer protein from S. melongena, SM80.2 was purified, crystallized and the structure was determined at 1.87 Å resolution. Overall, the tertiary structure is a cluster of α-helices forming an internal hydrophobic cavity. Absence of conserved Tyr79, known to govern the plasticity of hydrophobic cavity, and formation of hydrogen bond between Asn79 and Asn36 further reduced the pocket size. Structural analysis of SM80.2 thus gives insight about a new hydrogen bond mediated mechanism followed in closure of the binding pocket. Extra electron densities observed at two different places on the protein surface and not in the cavity could provide interesting physiological relevance. In light of allergenic properties, probably overlapping of epitopic region and ligand binding on surface could be a main reason. This work shows first crystal structure of A-like nsLTP with a close binding pocket and extra density on the surface suggesting a plausible intermediate state during transfer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Predicting Nonspecific Ion Binding Using DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Ions are an important component of the cell and affect the corresponding biological macromolecules either via direct binding or as a screening ion cloud. Although some ion binding is highly specific and frequently associated with the function of the macromolecule, other ions bind to the protein surface nonspecifically, presumably because the electrostatic attraction is strong enough to immobilize them. Here, we test such a scenario and demonstrate that experimentally identified surface-bound ions are located at a potential that facilitates binding, which indicates that the major driving force is the electrostatics. Without taking into consideration geometrical factors and structural fluctuations, we show that ions tend to be bound onto the protein surface at positions with strong potential but with polarity opposite to that of the ion. This observation is used to develop a method that uses a DelPhi-calculated potential map in conjunction with an in-house-developed clustering algorithm to predict nonspecific ion-binding sites. Although this approach distinguishes only the polarity of the ions, and not their chemical nature, it can predict nonspecific binding of positively or negatively charged ions with acceptable accuracy. One can use the predictions in the Poisson-Boltzmann approach by placing explicit ions in the predicted positions, which in turn will reduce the magnitude of the local potential and extend the limits of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In addition, one can use this approach to place the desired number of ions before conducting molecular-dynamics simulations to neutralize the net charge of the protein, because it was shown to perform better than standard screened Coulomb canned routines, or to predict ion-binding sites in proteins. This latter is especially true for proteins that are involved in ion transport, because such ions are loosely bound and very difficult to detect experimentally. PMID:22735539

  19. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid.

  20. Predicting nonspecific ion binding using DelPhi.

    PubMed

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-06-20

    Ions are an important component of the cell and affect the corresponding biological macromolecules either via direct binding or as a screening ion cloud. Although some ion binding is highly specific and frequently associated with the function of the macromolecule, other ions bind to the protein surface nonspecifically, presumably because the electrostatic attraction is strong enough to immobilize them. Here, we test such a scenario and demonstrate that experimentally identified surface-bound ions are located at a potential that facilitates binding, which indicates that the major driving force is the electrostatics. Without taking into consideration geometrical factors and structural fluctuations, we show that ions tend to be bound onto the protein surface at positions with strong potential but with polarity opposite to that of the ion. This observation is used to develop a method that uses a DelPhi-calculated potential map in conjunction with an in-house-developed clustering algorithm to predict nonspecific ion-binding sites. Although this approach distinguishes only the polarity of the ions, and not their chemical nature, it can predict nonspecific binding of positively or negatively charged ions with acceptable accuracy. One can use the predictions in the Poisson-Boltzmann approach by placing explicit ions in the predicted positions, which in turn will reduce the magnitude of the local potential and extend the limits of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In addition, one can use this approach to place the desired number of ions before conducting molecular-dynamics simulations to neutralize the net charge of the protein, because it was shown to perform better than standard screened Coulomb canned routines, or to predict ion-binding sites in proteins. This latter is especially true for proteins that are involved in ion transport, because such ions are loosely bound and very difficult to detect experimentally. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by

  1. Crystal structure and activity studies of the C11 cysteine peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the human gut microbiome

    DOE PAGES

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S.; Das, Debanu; ...

    2016-03-03

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other familiesmore » in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Altogether, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms.« less

  2. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the C11 Cysteine Peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the Human Gut Microbiome*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Collectively, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms. PMID:26940874

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of a membrane-associated, catalytically active type I signal peptidase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yi Tian; Batot, Gaëlle; Baker, Edward N; Young, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat as they rapidly develop resistance to existing antibiotics. Bacterial type I signal peptidases are membrane-associated, cell-surface serine proteases with a unique catalytic mechanism that differs from that of eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum signal peptidases. They are thus potential antimicrobial targets. S. aureus has a catalytically active type I signal peptidase, SpsB, that is essential for cell viability. To elucidate its structure, the spsB gene from S. aureus Newman strain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. After exploring many different protein-modification constructs, SpsB was expressed as a fusion protein with maltose-binding protein and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1) and diffracted to 2.05 Å resolution. The crystal structure of SpsB is anticipated to provide structural insight into Gram-positive signal peptidases and to aid in the development of antibacterial agents that target type I signal peptidases.

  4. Epidemiology of chronic non-specific respiratory diseases*

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The current state of research into the epidemiology of chronic non-specific respiratory diseases (CNSRD) is reviewed. Recommendations are made on the definitions of CNSRD for use in epidemiological studies, and various aspects of the etiology and natural history of CNSRD are identified as requiring further investigation. The need for standardization of investigative methods is emphasized. Since smoking is such an important factor in the etiology of CNSRD, it is recommended that efforts be made to discourage children from taking up the habit. PMID:1084795

  5. Carbohydrate malabsorption in patients with non-specific abdominal complaints

    PubMed Central

    Born, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Non-specific abdominal complaints are a considerable problem worldwide. Many patients are affected and many differential diagnoses have to be considered. Among these, carbohydrate malabsorption seems to play an important role. However, so far, only incomplete absorption of lactose is broadly accepted, while the malabsorption of fructose and sorbitol is still underestimated, although in many parts of the world it is much more frequent. Despite the success of dietary interventions in many patients, there are still a lot of unanswered questions that make further investigations necessary. PMID:17963293

  6. Specific and nonspecific multiple unit activities during the onset of pentylenetetrazol seizures. II. Acute lesions interrupting nonspecific system connections.

    PubMed

    Velasco, F; Velasco, M; Maldonado, H; Estrada-Villanueva, F

    1976-12-01

    Nonspecific cortical, thalamic, mesencephalic, and pontine multiple unit activities (MUA) and changes in EEG and MUS of the sciatic nerve after threshold pentylenetetrazol activation were studied in three groups of animals in which neuronal connections were interrupted at three different levels of the central nervous system: spinal, mesencephalic, and prethalamic. Maximal increments of nonspecific MUA and maximal increments and maximal decrements of sciatic MUA after pentylenetetrazol from each group of lesioned animals were statistically compared with tose observed in intact animals. 1. Pentylenetetrazol threshold for producing cortical tonic-clonic EEG discharges was increased in animals with nesencephaic and prethalamic lesions but was not modified in animals with spinal transection. 2. Cortical MUA maximal increment was significantly decreased in mesencephalic and prethalamic lesioned animals, whereas thalamic MUA maximal increment was significantly decreased in mesencephalic and significantly increased in prethalamic lesioned animals. Pontine MUA maximal increment was significantly increased in spinal, mesencephalic, and prethalamic lesioned animals, and mesencephalic M-A maximal increment was not significantly modified in either prethalamic lesioned or in spinal transected animals. 3. Sciatic MUA maximal increment and maximal decrement were significatly decreased in spinal transected animals, whereas only maximal increment was significantly decreased in mesencephalic and only maximal decrement was significantly decreased in prethalamic lesioned animals. These results based on lesion experiments permit us to infer than under normal cinditions the development of generalized seizures induced by threshold pentylenetetrazol injection is highly dependent upon the neuronal interactions between nonspecific structures at different levels of the central nervous system. The possible nature of these neuronal interactions in the intact animals is discussed.

  7. Targeting microbial biofilms using Ficin, a nonspecific plant protease

    PubMed Central

    Baidamshina, Diana R.; Trizna, Elena Y.; Holyavka, Marina G.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Artyukhov, Valeriy G.; Akhatova, Farida S.; Rozhina, Elvira V.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Kayumov, Airat R.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, the communities of surface-attached bacteria embedded into extracellular matrix, are ubiquitous microbial consortia securing the effective resistance of constituent cells to environmental impacts and host immune responses. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are generally inaccessible for antimicrobials, therefore the disruption of biofilm matrix is the potent approach to eradicate microbial biofilms. We demonstrate here the destruction of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms with Ficin, a nonspecific plant protease. The biofilm thickness decreased two-fold after 24 hours treatment with Ficin at 10 μg/ml and six-fold at 1000 μg/ml concentration. We confirmed the successful destruction of biofilm structures and the significant decrease of non-specific bacterial adhesion to the surfaces after Ficin treatment using confocal laser scanning and atomic force microscopy. Importantly, Ficin treatment enhanced the effects of antibiotics on biofilms-embedded cells via disruption of biofilm matrices. Pre-treatment with Ficin (1000 μg/ml) considerably reduced the concentrations of ciprofloxacin and bezalkonium chloride required to suppress the viable Staphylococci by 3 orders of magnitude. We also demonstrated that Ficin is not cytotoxic towards human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) and dog adipose derived stem cells. Overall, Ficin is a potent tool for staphylococcal biofilm treatment and fabrication of novel antimicrobial therapeutics for medical and veterinary applications. PMID:28387349

  8. Metronidazole in the treatment of non-specific vaginitis (NSV).

    PubMed Central

    Jerve, F; Berdal, T B; Bohman, P; Smith, C C; Evjen, O K; Gjønnaess, H; Gaasemyr, M; Hausken, L; Hesla, K; Hoftvedt, E

    1984-01-01

    In a large multicentre study of 429 patients with the usual signs and symptoms of non-specific vaginitis (NSV), we studied the effect of different doses of metronidazole. The patients were divided into five treatment groups as follows: group A was given 400 mg metronidazole three times daily for seven days, group B 2000 mg as a single dose, group C 2000 mg on days 1 and 2, group D 2000 mg on days 1 and 3, and group E was given 1200 mg metronidazole once daily for five days. At follow up examination four weeks from the start of treatment, patients in groups D and E showed the best clinical results with cure rates of 94.0% and 93.6% respectively. In addition the rate of reisolation of Gardnerella vaginalis was lowest in group D. We therefore recommend metronidazole 2000 mg on days 1 and 3 as routine treatment for non-specific or vaginitis associated with gardnerella. PMID:6375804

  9. Functional diversity of secreted cestode Kunitz proteins: Inhibition of serine peptidases and blockade of cation channels.

    PubMed

    Fló, Martín; Margenat, Mariana; Pellizza, Leonardo; Graña, Martín; Durán, Rosario; Báez, Adriana; Salceda, Emilio; Soto, Enrique; Alvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Cecilia

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported a multigene family of monodomain Kunitz proteins from Echinococcus granulosus (EgKU-1-EgKU-8), and provided evidence that some EgKUs are secreted by larval worms to the host interface. In addition, functional studies and homology modeling suggested that, similar to monodomain Kunitz families present in animal venoms, the E. granulosus family could include peptidase inhibitors as well as channel blockers. Using enzyme kinetics and whole-cell patch-clamp, we now demonstrate that the EgKUs are indeed functionally diverse. In fact, most of them behaved as high affinity inhibitors of either chymotrypsin (EgKU-2-EgKU-3) or trypsin (EgKU-5-EgKU-8). In contrast, the close paralogs EgKU-1 and EgKU-4 blocked voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv); and also pH-dependent sodium channels (ASICs), while showing null (EgKU-1) or marginal (EgKU-4) peptidase inhibitory activity. We also confirmed the presence of EgKUs in secretions from other parasite stages, notably from adult worms and metacestodes. Interestingly, data from genome projects reveal that at least eight additional monodomain Kunitz proteins are encoded in the genome; that particular EgKUs are up-regulated in various stages; and that analogous Kunitz families exist in other medically important cestodes, but not in trematodes. Members of this expanded family of secreted cestode proteins thus have the potential to block, through high affinity interactions, the function of host counterparts (either peptidases or cation channels) and contribute to the establishment and persistence of infection. From a more general perspective, our results confirm that multigene families of Kunitz inhibitors from parasite secretions and animal venoms display a similar functional diversity and thus, that host-parasite co-evolution may also drive the emergence of a new function associated with the Kunitz scaffold.

  10. PNT1 is a C11 cysteine peptidase essential for replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast

    SciTech Connect

    Grewal, Jaspreet S.; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Schnaufer, Achim; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2016-03-03

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. Furthermore, these data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast.

  11. PNT1 is a C11 cysteine peptidase essential for replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast

    DOE PAGES

    Grewal, Jaspreet S.; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; ...

    2016-03-03

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrialmore » genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. Furthermore, these data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast.« less

  12. Functional diversity of secreted cestode Kunitz proteins: Inhibition of serine peptidases and blockade of cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Fló, Martín; Margenat, Mariana; Pellizza, Leonardo; Durán, Rosario; Salceda, Emilio; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported a multigene family of monodomain Kunitz proteins from Echinococcus granulosus (EgKU-1-EgKU-8), and provided evidence that some EgKUs are secreted by larval worms to the host interface. In addition, functional studies and homology modeling suggested that, similar to monodomain Kunitz families present in animal venoms, the E. granulosus family could include peptidase inhibitors as well as channel blockers. Using enzyme kinetics and whole-cell patch-clamp, we now demonstrate that the EgKUs are indeed functionally diverse. In fact, most of them behaved as high affinity inhibitors of either chymotrypsin (EgKU-2-EgKU-3) or trypsin (EgKU-5-EgKU-8). In contrast, the close paralogs EgKU-1 and EgKU-4 blocked voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv); and also pH-dependent sodium channels (ASICs), while showing null (EgKU-1) or marginal (EgKU-4) peptidase inhibitory activity. We also confirmed the presence of EgKUs in secretions from other parasite stages, notably from adult worms and metacestodes. Interestingly, data from genome projects reveal that at least eight additional monodomain Kunitz proteins are encoded in the genome; that particular EgKUs are up-regulated in various stages; and that analogous Kunitz families exist in other medically important cestodes, but not in trematodes. Members of this expanded family of secreted cestode proteins thus have the potential to block, through high affinity interactions, the function of host counterparts (either peptidases or cation channels) and contribute to the establishment and persistence of infection. From a more general perspective, our results confirm that multigene families of Kunitz inhibitors from parasite secretions and animal venoms display a similar functional diversity and thus, that host-parasite co-evolution may also drive the emergence of a new function associated with the Kunitz scaffold. PMID:28192542

  13. Hydrolysis of milk-derived bioactive peptides by cell-associated extracellular peptidases of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Zeeshan; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Jardin, Julien; Perrin, Clarisse; Dary, Annie; Miclo, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    The trend to confer new functional properties to fermented dairy products by supplementation with bioactive peptides is growing in order to encounter the challenge of health-promoting foods. But these functional ingredients have not to be hydrolysed by proteases of bacteria used in the manufacture of these products. One of the two yoghurt bacteria, Streptococcus thermophilus, has long been considered as weakly proteolytic since its only cell wall-associated subtilisin-like protease, called PrtS, is not always present. Nevertheless, a recent study pointed out a possible peptidase activity in certain strains. In this present study, the stability of milk-derived bioactive peptides, e.g. the anxiolytic peptide, αs1-CN-(f91-97), in the presence of two different S. thermophilus strains with PrtS+ or PrtS− phenotype was studied. Both strains appeared to be capable of hydrolysing the αs1-CN-(f91-97) and other bioactive peptides by recurrent removal of N-terminal residues. The hydrolysis was neither due to intracellular peptidases nor to HtrA protease. Results obtained showed that the observed activity originates from the presence at the surface of both strains of an extracellular aminopeptidase activity. Moreover, a cell wall-associated X-prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase activity was also highlighted when β-casomorphin-7 was used as substrate. All of these findings suggest that, in order to use fermented milks as vector of bioactive peptides, the stability of these bioactive peptides in this kind of products implies to carefully characterize the potential action of the surface proteolytic enzymes of S. thermophilus.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of microcin C resistance peptidase MccF from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Tikhonov, Anton; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Gu, Minyi; Zhou, Min; Makarova, Kira S.; Vondenhoff, Gaston; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Severinov, Konstantin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Microcin C (McC) is heptapeptide-adenylate antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli strains carrying the mccABCDEF gene cluster encoding enzymes, in addition to the heptapeptide structural gene mccA, necessary for McC biosynthesis and self-immunity of the producing cell. The heptapeptide facilitates McC transport into susceptible cells, where it is processed releasing a non-hydrolyzable aminoacyl adenylate that inhibits an essential aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The self-immunity gene mccF encodes a specialized serine-peptidase that cleaves an amide bond connecting the peptidyl or aminoacyl moieties of, respectively, intact and processed McC with the nucleotidyl moiety. Most mccF orthologs from organisms other than E. coli are not linked to the McC biosynthesis gene cluster. Here, we show that a protein product of one such gene, MccF from Bacillus anthracis (BaMccF), is able to cleave intact and processed McC and we present a series of structures of this protein. Structural analysis of apo-BaMccF and its AMP-complex reveal specific features of MccF-like peptidases that allow them to interact with substrates containing nucleotidyl moieties. Sequence analyses and phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that several distinct subfamilies form the MccF clade of the large S66 family of bacterial serine peptidases. We show that various representatives of the MccF clade can specifically detoxify non-hydrolyzable aminoacyl adenylates differing in their aminoacyl moieties. We hypothesize that bacterial mccF genes serve as a source of bacterial antibiotic resistance. PMID:22516613

  15. Differential expression of dipeptidyl peptidase IV in human versus cynomolgus monkey skin eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Serafino; Dubost, Valérie; Darribat, Katy; Couttet, Philippe; Grenet, Olivier; Busch, Steven; Moulin, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) is a peptidase whose inhibition is beneficial in Type II diabetes treatment. Several evidences suggest potential implication of DPP4 in skin disorders such as psoriasis, keloids and fibrotic skin diseases where its inhibition could also be beneficial. DPP4 expression in human skin was described mainly in dermal fibroblasts and a subset of keratinocytes in the basal layer. Of importance in the perspective of preclinical experimentation, DPP4 distribution in skin of non-human primate species has not been documented. This report evidences unexpected differences between a set of human and cynomolgus monkey skin samples revealing a major expression of DPP4 in eccrine sweat glands of cynomolgus monkeys but not in humans. This represents a unique distinctive feature compared to the conserved expression of dipeptidyl peptidases 8 and 9 and potential relevant DPP4 substrates such as neuropeptide Y (NPY) and receptors (NPY-receptor 1 and Neurokinin receptor). Finally the observation that cathepsin D, an unrelated protease, shows the opposite expression compared to DPP4 (present in human but not in cynomolgus monkey eccrine sweat glands) could indicate that human eccrine sweat glands evolved a divergent protease repertoire compared to non-human primates. These unexpected differences in the eccrine sweat glands protease repertoire will need to be confirmed extending the analysis to a major number of donors but could imply possible biochemical divergences, reflecting the functional evolution of the glands and the control of their activity. Our findings also demonstrate that non-human primates studies aiming at understanding DPP4 function in skin biology are not readily translatable to human.

  16. Alpha Alumina Nanoparticle Conjugation to Cysteine Peptidase A and B: An Efficient Method for Autophagy Induction

    PubMed Central

    Beyzay, Fatemeh; Zavaran Hosseini, Ahmad; Soudi, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background: Autophagy as a cellular pathway facilitates several immune responses against infection. It also eliminates invading pathogens through transferring content between the cytosol and the lysosomal vesicles and contributes to the cross-presentation of exogenous antigens to T lymphocytes via MHC class I pathway. Autophagy induction is one of the main targets for new drugs and future vaccine formulations. Nanoparticles are one of the candidates for autophagy induction. Cysteine Peptidase A (CPA) and Cysteine Peptidase B (CPB) are two members of papain family (Clan CA, family C1) enzyme that have been considered as a virulence factor of Leishmania (L.) major, making them suitable vaccine candidates. In this research, Leishmania major cysteine peptidase A and B (CPA and CPB) conjugation to alpha alumina nanoparticle was the main focus and their entrance efficacy to macrophages was assessed. Methods: For this purpose, CPA and CPB genes were cloned in expression vectors. Related proteins were extracted from transformed Escherichia coli (E. coli) and purified using Ni affinity column. Alpha alumina nanoparticles were conjugated to CPA/CPB proteins using Aldehyde/Hydrazine Reaction. Autophagy induction in macrophages was assessed using acridine orange staining. Results: CPA/CPB protein loading to nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. α-alumina conjugated CPA/CPB antigen uptake by macrophages at different concentrations was confirmed using fluorescence microscope and flowcytometry. Highly efficient CPA/CPB protein loading to α-alumina nanoparticles and rapid internalization to macrophages introduced these nanocarriers as a delivery tool. Acridine orange staining demonstrated higher autophagy induction in CPA/CPB protein conjugated with α-alumina nanoparticles. Conclusion: α-alumina nanoparticles may be a promising adjuvant in the development of therapeutic leishmania vaccines through antigen delivery to intracellular compartments

  17. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  18. Characterization of a Bacteriophage-Derived Murein Peptidase for Elimination of Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Keary, Ruth; Sanz-Gaitero, Marta; van Raaij, Mark J; O'Mahony, Jim; Fenton, Mark; McAuliffe, Olivia; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Coffey, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infection in humans and animals, causing a wide variety of diseases, from local inflammations to fatal sepsis. The bacterium is commonly multi-drug resistant and thus many front-line antibiotics have been rendered ineffective for treating such infections. Research on murein/peptidoglycan hydrolases, derived from bacterial viruses (bacteriophages), has demonstrated that such proteins are attractive candidates for development as novel antibacterial agents for combatting Gram-positive pathogens. Here we review the research produced to-date on the bacteriophage-derived CHAPK murein peptidase. Initially, we sequenced and annotated the genome of anti-staphylococcal bacteriophage K and cloned the gene for the bacteriophage endolysin, a murein hydrolase which plays a role in cell killing during the bacteriophage life cycle. An highly active domain of the enzyme, a cysteine, histidine-dependent amido hydrolase/peptidase (CHAPK), was cloned, overexpressed in E. coli and purified. This CHAPK enzyme was demonstrated to rapidly lyse several strains of methicillin resistant S. aureus and both disrupted and prevented the formation of a staphylococcal biofilm. The staphylolytic activity of the peptidase was demonstrated in vivo using a mouse model, without adverse effects on the animals. The crystal structure of the enzyme was elucidated, revealing a calcium ion close to the active site. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that this calcium ion is involved in the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. The crystal structure of this enzyme is a valuable source of information for efficient engineering of this and similar CHAP-domain-containing proteins. Overall, the data collected to date on CHAPK has demonstrated its strong potential as a novel therapeutic candidate for treatment of staphylococcal infections and has provided us with insight into the fundamental enzymatic mechanisms of CHAP domain-containing peptidoglycan hydrolases.

  19. Metacaspase 2 of Trypanosoma brucei is a calcium-dependent cysteine peptidase active without processing.

    PubMed

    Moss, Catherine X; Westrop, Gareth D; Juliano, Luiz; Coombs, Graham H; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2007-12-11

    Metacaspases are cysteine peptidases that are distantly related to the caspases, for which proteolytic processing is central to their activation. Here, we show that recombinant metacaspase 2 (MCA2) from Trypanosoma brucei has arginine/lysine-specific, Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic activity. Autocatalytic processing of MCA2 occurred after Lys55 and Lys268; however, this was shown not to be required for the enzyme to be proteolytically active. The necessity of Ca(2+), but not processing, for MCA2 enzymatic activity clearly distinguishes MCA2 from the caspases and would be consistent with different physiological roles.

  20. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  1. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    PubMed

    Rebollido-Rios, Rocio; Bandari, Shyam; Wilms, Christoph; Jakuschev, Stanislav; Vortkamp, Andrea; Grobe, Kay; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN) is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog), of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1) a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2) a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  2. Development of a dual fluorogenic and chromogenic dipeptidyl peptidase IV substrate.

    PubMed

    Ho, Nan-Hui; Weissleder, Ralph; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2006-05-15

    A new far-red dual fluorogenic and chromogenic substrate, 5-glycylprolylglycylprolyl-9-di-3-sulfonyl-propylaminobenza[a]phenoxazonium perchlorate (GPGP-2SBPO), was developed for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) sensing. The glycylprolylglycylprolyl tetrapeptide was chosen as the recognition sequence due to its stability under physiological conditions. In contrast, the truncated substrate, GP-2SBPO, containing only a glycylprolyl peptide, is unstable. Proteolysis of GPGP-2SBPO was assayed by monitoring the absorbance and fluorescence signals from the released fluorochrome, 2SBPO, at 625 and 670nm, respectively.

  3. Identification and characterization of peptidases secreted by quahog parasite unknown (QPX), the protistan parasite of hard clams.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Ewelina; Werneburg, Glenn T; Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Thanassi, David G; Allam, Bassem

    2016-11-22

    Quahog parasite unknown (QPX) is a protistan parasite capable of causing deadly infections in the hard clam Mercenaria mercenaria, one of the most valuable shellfish species in the USA. QPX is an extracellular parasite found mostly in the connective tissue of clam mantle and, in more severe cases of infection, other clam organs. Histopathologic examinations revealed that QPX cells within clam tissues are typically surrounded by hollow areas that have been hypothesized to be, at least in part, a result of extracellular digestion of clam proteins by the parasite. We investigated peptidase activity in QPX extracellular secretions using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin as a co-polymerized substrate. Multiple peptidase activity bands of molecular weights ranging from 20 to 100 kDa were detected in QPX secretions derived from a variety of culture media. One major band of approximately 35 kDa was composed of subtilisin-like peptidases that were released by QPX cells in all studied media, suggesting that these are the most common peptidases used by QPX for nutrient acquisition. PCR quantification of mRNA encoding QPX subtilisins revealed that their expression changes with the protein substrate used in the culture media. A fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) was used to fractionate QPX extracellular secretions. An FPLC-fraction containing a subtilisin-type serine peptidase was able to digest clam plasma proteins, suggesting that this peptidase might be involved in the disease process, and making it a good candidate for further investigation as a possible virulence factor of the parasite.

  4. HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors are effective drugs against the trypomastigote form of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Sangenito, Leandro S; Gonçalves, Diego S; Seabra, Sergio H; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Santos, André L S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2016-10-01

    There is a general lack of effective and non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas' disease despite more than a century of research. In this regard, we have verified the impact of human immunodeficiency virus aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on the viability and morphology of infective trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as on the aspartic peptidase and proteasome activities produced by this parasite. The effects of HIV-PIs on viability were assessed by counting motile parasites in a Neubauer chamber. Morphological alterations were detected by light microscopy of Giemsa-stained smears and scanning electron microscopy. Modulation of aspartic peptidase and proteasome activities by the HIV-PIs was measured by cleavage of fluorogenic peptide substrates. The majority of the HIV-PIs (6/9) were able to drastically decrease the viability of trypomastigotes after 4 h of treatment, with nelfinavir and lopinavir being the most effective compounds presenting LD50 values of 8.6 µM and 10.6 µM, respectively. Additionally, both HIV-PIs were demonstrated to be effective in a time- and cell density-dependent manner. Treatment with nelfinavir and lopinavir caused many morphological/ultrastructural alterations in trypomastigotes; parasites became round in shape, with reduced cell size and flagellar shortening. Nelfinavir and lopinavir were also capable of significantly inhibiting the aspartic peptidase and proteasome activities measured in trypomastigote extracts. These results strengthen the data on the positive effects of HIV-PIs on parasitic infections, possibly by targeting the parasite aspartic peptidase(s) and proteasome(s), opening a new possibility for the use of these clinically approved drugs as an alternative chemotherapy to treat Chagas' disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and characterization of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor from aronia juice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Yamane, Takuya; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Nakagaki, Takenori; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Aronia berries have many potential effects on health, including an antioxidant effect, effect for antimutagenesis, hepatoprotection and cardioprotection, an antidiabetic effect and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Previous human studies have shown that aronia juice may be useful for treatment of obesity disorders. In this study, we found that aronia juice has an inhibitory effect against dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) (EC 3.4.14.5). DPP IV is a peptidase that cleaves the N-terminal region of incretins such as glucagon-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Inactivation of incretins by DPP IV induces reduction of insulin secretion. Furthermore, we identified that cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside as the DPP IV inhibitor in aronia juice. DPP IV was inhibited more strongly by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside than by cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The results suggest that DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside present in aronia juice. The antidiabetic effect of aronia juice may be mediated through DPP IV inhibition by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. - Highlights: • DPP IV activity is inhibited by aronia juice. • DPP IV inhibitor is cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside in aronia juice. • DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside more than cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside.

  6. Potential Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV in the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Thiago A.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Barauna, Valério G.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) is a widely expressed multifunctional serine peptidase that exists as a membrane-anchored cell surface protein or in a soluble form in the plasma and other body fluids. Numerous substrates are cleaved at the penultimate amino acid by DPPIV, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-α), all of which play important roles in the cardiovascular system. In this regard, recent reports have documented that circulating DPPIV activity correlates with poorer cardiovascular outcomes in human and experimental heart failure (HF). Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that DPPIV inhibitors exert cardioprotective and renoprotective actions in a variety of experimental models of cardiac dysfunction. On the other hand, conflicting results have been found when translating these promising findings from preclinical animal models to clinical therapy. In this review, we discuss how DPPIV might be involved in the cardio-renal axis in HF. In addition, the potential role for DPPIV inhibitors in ameliorating heart disease is revised, focusing on the effects of the main DPPIV substrates on cardiac remodeling and renal handling of salt and water. PMID:25690036

  7. Arrabidaea chica hexanic extract induces mitochondrion damage and peptidase inhibition on Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Igor A; Azevedo, Mariana M B; Chaves, Francisco C M; Alviano, Celuta S; Alviano, Daniela S; Vermelho, Alane B

    2014-01-01

    Currently available leishmaniasis treatments are limited due to severe side effects. Arrabidaea chica is a medicinal plant used in Brazil against several diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of 5 fractions obtained from the crude hexanic extract of A. chica against Leishmania amazonensis and L. infantum, as well as on the interaction of these parasites with host cells. Promastigotes were treated with several concentrations of the fractions obtained from A. chica for determination of their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, the effect of the most active fraction (B2) on parasite's ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. To evaluate the inhibitory activity of B2 fraction on Leishmania peptidases, parasites lysates were treated with the inhibitory and subinhibitory concentrations of the B2 fraction. The minimum inhibitory concentration of B2 fraction was 37.2 and 18.6 μg/mL for L. amazonensis and L. infantum, respectively. Important ultrastructural alterations as mitochondrial swelling with loss of matrix content and the presence of vesicles inside this organelle were observed in treated parasites. Moreover, B2 fraction was able to completely inhibit the peptidase activity of promastigotes at pH 5.5. The results presented here further support the use of A. chica as an interesting source of antileishmanial agents.

  8. Fish skin gelatin hydrolysates produced by visceral peptidase and bovine trypsin: Bioactivity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Benjakul, Soottawat; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2017-01-15

    The peptidase from the viscera of farmed giant catfish was used for producing gelatin hydrolysates (HG) and compared with those produced from commercial bovine trypsin (HB). The degree of hydrolysis (DH) observed suggests that proteolytic cleavage rapidly occurred within the first 120min of incubation, and there was higher DH in HG than in HB. HG demonstrated the highest ACE-inhibitory activity, DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging activity, and FRAP. HB showed the highest FRAP activity. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of HG was quite stable over the pH range of 1-11, but it increased slightly when the heating duration time reached 240min at 100°C. The ACE-inhibitory activity of HG showed the highest stability at a pH of 7, and it remained very stable at 100°C for over 15-240min. The visceral peptidase from farmed giant catfish could be an alternative protease for generating protein hydrolysates with desirable bioactivities. The resulting hydrolysates showed good stability, making them potential functional ingredients for food formulations.

  9. Identification and characterization of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor from aronia juice.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Yamane, Takuya; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Nakagaki, Takenori; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Aronia berries have many potential effects on health, including an antioxidant effect, effect for antimutagenesis, hepatoprotection and cardioprotection, an antidiabetic effect and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Previous human studies have shown that aronia juice may be useful for treatment of obesity disorders. In this study, we found that aronia juice has an inhibitory effect against dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) (EC 3.4.14.5). DPP IV is a peptidase that cleaves the N-terminal region of incretins such as glucagon-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Inactivation of incretins by DPP IV induces reduction of insulin secretion. Furthermore, we identified that cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside as the DPP IV inhibitor in aronia juice. DPP IV was inhibited more strongly by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside than by cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The results suggest that DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside present in aronia juice. The antidiabetic effect of aronia juice may be mediated through DPP IV inhibition by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Pulmonary Perspective on GASPIDs: Granule-Associated Serine Peptidases of Immune Defense

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Airways are protected from pathogens by forces allied with innate and adaptive immunity. Recent investigations establish critical defensive roles for leukocyte and mast cell serine-class peptidases garrisoned in membrane-bound organelles-here termed Granule-Associated Serine Peptidases of Immune Defense, or GASPIDs. Some better characterized GASPIDs include neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G (which defend against bacteria), proteinase-3 (targeted by antineutrophil antibodies in Wegener’s vasculitis), mast cell β-tryptase and chymase (which promote allergic inflammation), granzymes A and B (which launch apoptosis pathways in infected host cells), and factor D (which activates complement’s alternative pathway). GASPIDs can defend against pathogens but can harm host cells in the process, and therefore become targets for pharmaceutical inhibition. They vary widely in specificity, yet are phylogenetically similar. Mammalian speciation supported a remarkable flowering of these enzymes as they co-evolved with specialized immune cells, including mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, cytolytic T-cells, natural killer cells, neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells. Many GASPIDs continue to evolve rapidly, providing some of the most conspicuous examples of divergent protein evolution. Consequently, students of GASPIDs are rewarded not only with insights into their roles in lung immune defense but also with clues to the origins of cellular specialization in vertebrate immunity. PMID:18516248

  11. Fly DPP10 acts as a channel ancillary subunit and possesses peptidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Yohei; Muto, Tomohiro; Zhang, Zhili; Baihaqie, Ahmad; Yoshizawa, Takamasa; Lee, Hye-in J.; Park, Eulsoon; Tsukiji, Shinya; Takimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DPP6 (DPPX) and DPP10 (DPPY) belong to a family of dipeptidyl peptidases, but lack enzyme activity. Instead, these proteins form complexes with voltage-gated K+ channels in Kv4 family to control their gating and other properties. Here, we find that the fly DPP10 ortholog acts as an ancillary subunit of Kv4 channels and digests peptides. Similarly to mammalian DPP10, the fly ortholog tightly binds to rat Kv4.3 protein. The association causes negative shifts in voltage dependence of channel activation and steady state inactivation. It also results in faster inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In addition to its channel regulatory role, fly DPP10 exhibits significant dipeptidyl peptidase activity with Gly-Pro-MCA (glycyl-L-proline 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) as a substrate. Heterologously expressed Flag-tagged fly DPP10 and human DPP4 show similar Km values towards this substrate. However, fly DPP10 exhibits approximately a 6-times-lower relative kcat value normalized with anti-Flag immunoreactivity than human DPP4. These results demonstrate that fly DPP10 is a dual functional protein, controlling Kv4 channel gating and removing bioactive peptides. PMID:27198182

  12. Decreased expression of kallikrein-related peptidase 13: possible contribution to metastasis of human oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Ogoshi, Kenji; Saito, Yasuhiro; Usukura, Katsuya; Yokoe, Hidetaka; Kouzu, Yukinao; Koike, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2014-07-01

    The human kallikrein-related peptidase family is comprised of 15 serine protease genes on chromosome 19q13.4. Our previous microarray analyses showed that the gene kallikrein-related peptidase 13 (KLK13) was down-regulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. We evaluated the expression status of KLK13 in primary OSCCs and performed functional molecular experiments in OSCC cell lines. In 102 primary tumors studied, KLK13 expression significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with matched normal counterparts. Interestingly, KLK13-negative cases correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with regional lymph node metastasis. In vitro, cells overexpressing KLK13 (oeKLK13) had decreased invasiveness and motility and up-regulation of adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, α-catenin, β-catenin, junction plakoglobin, plakophilin4, desmocollin2, desmoglein3, and desmoplakin) compared with control cells. A rescue experiment that transfected oeKLK13 cells with siRNA against KLK13 restored invasiveness and migration activities with down-regulated adhesion molecules. Based on our results, we concluded that KLK13 may play an important role in regulating cellular migration and invasiveness, making the loss of KLK13 a potential biomarker for early detection of lymph node metastasis in OSCCs.

  13. A Computational Study of the Glycine-Rich Loop of Mitochondrial Processing Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Kučera, Tomáš; Otyepka, Michal; Matušková, Anna; Samad, Abdul; Kutejová, Eva; Janata, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    An all atomic, non-restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit water was used to study in detail the structural features of the highly conserved glycine-rich loop (GRL) of the α-subunit of the yeast mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) and its importance for the tertiary and quaternary conformation of MPP. Wild-type and GRL-deleted MPP structures were studied using non-restrained MD simulations, both in the presence and the absence of a substrate in the peptidase active site. Targeted MD simulations were employed to study the mechanism of substrate translocation from the GRL to the active site. We demonstrate that the natural conformational flexibility of the GRL is crucial for the substrate translocation process from outside the enzyme towards the MPP active site. We show that the α-helical conformation of the substrate is important not only during its initial interaction with MPP (i.e. substrate recognition), but also later, at least during the first third of the substrate translocation trajectory. Further, we show that the substrate remains in contact with the GRL during the whole first half of the translocation trajectory and that hydrophobic interactions play a major role. Finally, we conclude that the GRL acts as a precisely balanced structural element, holding the MPP subunits in a partially closed conformation regardless the presence or absence of a substrate in the active site. PMID:24058582

  14. Induction of protective immune responses against schistosomiasis using functionally active cysteine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Dalton, John P.; Donnelly, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Each year schistosomiasis afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries, predominantly in the developing world. Yet we depend on a single drug, praziquantel, for its treatment and control. There is no vaccine available but one is urgently needed especially since praziquantel-resistant parasites are likely to emerge at some time in the future. The disease is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma. These express several classes of papain-like cysteine peptidases, cathepsins B and L, in various tissues but particularly in their gastrodermis where they employ them as digestive enzymes. We have shown that sub-cutaneous injection of recombinant and functionally active Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection in murine models of schistosomiasis. The immune modulating properties of this subcutaneous injection can boost protection levels (up to 83%) when combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP). Here, we discuss these data in the context of the parasite’s biology and development, and provide putative mechanism by which the native-like cysteine peptidase induce protective immune responses. PMID:24847355

  15. Arrabidaea chica Hexanic Extract Induces Mitochondrion Damage and Peptidase Inhibition on Leishmania spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2014-01-01

    Currently available leishmaniasis treatments are limited due to severe side effects. Arrabidaea chica is a medicinal plant used in Brazil against several diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of 5 fractions obtained from the crude hexanic extract of A. chica against Leishmania amazonensis and L. infantum, as well as on the interaction of these parasites with host cells. Promastigotes were treated with several concentrations of the fractions obtained from A. chica for determination of their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, the effect of the most active fraction (B2) on parasite's ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. To evaluate the inhibitory activity of B2 fraction on Leishmania peptidases, parasites lysates were treated with the inhibitory and subinhibitory concentrations of the B2 fraction. The minimum inhibitory concentration of B2 fraction was 37.2 and 18.6 μg/mL for L. amazonensis and L. infantum, respectively. Important ultrastructural alterations as mitochondrial swelling with loss of matrix content and the presence of vesicles inside this organelle were observed in treated parasites. Moreover, B2 fraction was able to completely inhibit the peptidase activity of promastigotes at pH 5.5. The results presented here further support the use of A. chica as an interesting source of antileishmanial agents. PMID:24818162

  16. Broadening the Spectrum of β-Lactam Antibiotics through Inhibition of Signal Peptidase Type I

    PubMed Central

    Therien, Alex G.; Huber, Joann L.; Wilson, Kenneth E.; Beaulieu, Patrick; Caron, Alexandre; Claveau, David; Deschamps, Kathleen; Donald, Robert G. K.; Galgoci, Andrew M.; Gallant, Michel; Gu, Xin; Kevin, Nancy J.; Lafleur, Josiane; Leavitt, Penny S.; Lebeau-Jacob, Christian; Lee, Suzy S.; Lin, Molly M.; Michels, Anna A.; Ogawa, Aimie M.; Painter, Ronald E.; Parish, Craig A.; Park, Young-Whan; Benton-Perdomo, Liliana; Petcu, Mihai; Phillips, John W.; Powles, Mary Ann; Skorey, Kathryn I.; Tam, John; Tan, Christopher M.; Young, Katherine; Wong, Simon; Waddell, Sherman T.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to all β-lactam classes limits treatment options for serious infections involving this organism. Our goal is to discover new agents that restore the activity of β-lactams against MRSA, an approach that has led to the discovery of two classes of natural product antibiotics, a cyclic depsipeptide (krisynomycin) and a lipoglycopeptide (actinocarbasin), which potentiate the activity of imipenem against MRSA strain COL. We report here that these imipenem synergists are inhibitors of the bacterial type I signal peptidase SpsB, a serine protease that is required for the secretion of proteins that are exported through the Sec and Tat systems. A synthetic derivative of actinocarbasin, M131, synergized with imipenem both in vitro and in vivo with potent efficacy. The in vitro activity of M131 extends to clinical isolates of MRSA but not to a methicillin-sensitive strain. Synergy is restricted to β-lactam antibiotics and is not observed with other antibiotic classes. We propose that the SpsB inhibitors synergize with β-lactams by preventing the signal peptidase-mediated secretion of proteins required for β-lactam resistance. Combinations of SpsB inhibitors and β-lactams may expand the utility of these widely prescribed antibiotics to treat MRSA infections, analogous to β-lactamase inhibitors which restored the utility of this antibiotic class for the treatment of resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:22710113

  17. Improvement in idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia after smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Kadota, Naoki; Hino, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Keishi; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of several interstitial lung diseases, the relationship between smoking and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) has not yet been fully elucidated. We here present a case of fibrotic NSIP with mild emphysema in an elderly male with normal pulmonary function, whose symptoms, serum KL-6 level, and high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial changes markedly improved without medication following the cessation of smoking. Our case suggests that smoking may be an etiological factor in some patients with NSIP and that early smoking cessation before a clinically detectable decline in pulmonary function may be critical for smokers with idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26029566

  18. Nonspecific low back pain and return to work.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang H; Randolph, David C

    2007-11-15

    As many as 90 percent of persons with occupational nonspecific low back pain are able to return to work in a relatively short period of time. As long as no "red flags" exist, the patient should be encouraged to remain as active as possible, minimize bed rest, use ice or heat compresses, take anti-inflammatory or analgesic medications if desired, participate in home exercises, and return to work as soon as possible. Medical and surgical intervention should be minimized when abnormalities on physical examination are lacking and the patient is having difficulty returning to work after four to six weeks. Personal and occupational psychosocial factors should be addressed thoroughly, and a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program should be strongly considered to prevent delayed recovery and chronic disability. Patient advocacy should include preventing unnecessary and ineffective medical and surgical interventions, prolonged work loss, joblessness, and chronic disability.

  19. Identifying nonspecific SAGE tags by context of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Wang, San Ming

    2008-01-01

    Many serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags can be matched to multiple genes, leading to difficulty in SAGE data interpretation and analysis. As only a subset of genes in the human genome are transcribed in a certain type of tissue/cell, we used microarray expression data from different tissue types to define contexts of gene expression and to annotate SAGE tags collected from the same or similar tissue sources. To predict the original transcript contributing a nonspecific SAGE tag collected from a particular tissue, we ranked the corresponding genes by their expression levels determined by microarray. We developed a tissue-specific SAGE tag annotation database based on microarray data collected from 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The database can be queried online at: http://www.basic.northwestern.edu/SAGE/. The accuracy of this database was confirmed by experimental data.

  20. Non-specific sensor arrays for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kevin; Minor, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Non-specific chemical sensor arrays have been the subject of considerable research efforts over the past thirty years with the idea that, by analogy to vertebrate olfaction, they are potentially capable of rendering complex chemical assessments with relatively modest logistical footprints. However, the actual implementation of such devices in challenging "real world" scenarios has arguably continued to fall short of these expectations. This work examines the inherent limitations of such devices for complex chemical sensing scenarios, placing them on a continuum between simple univariate sensors and complex multivariate analytical instrumentation and analyzing their utility in general-purpose chemical detection and accurate chemical sensing in the presence of unknown "unknowns." Results with simulated and acquired data sets are presented with discussion of the implications in development of chemical sensor arrays suitable for complex scenarios.

  1. Preventing biosensor non-specific adsorption: Static to dynamic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Lucy; Hopkins, Neal

    2012-02-01

    Biosensors are currently being developed for the detection of a wide range of analytes in a variety of scenarios. One such area is that of environmental monitoring for the presence of biological threats, from toxins through to viruses and bacteria. Environmental samples will contain a wide variety of contaminants, dependent on the location and prevalent environmental conditions. The sensing surfaces employed by biosensor instruments must be capable of resisting non-specific adsorption (NSA) of the contaminants whilst specifically capturing targets of interest. The ability to do so reduces the incidence of false positives and negatives increasing confidence in the system. We have assessed a range of biosensor surface chemistries of both two and three dimensional topography using a commercial BIAcore platform, for ability to prevent NSA of soluble materials of medical and military significance. This has highlighted that future solutions may benefit from dynamic interfaces as opposed to the conventional static interface often employed.

  2. Specific and nonspecific mediation of protective immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, L; Frenkel, J K

    1987-01-01

    We studied the specificity of protection conferred by Toxoplasma gondii immune lymphocytes and their supernatants on infected hamster kidney cells, using Besnoitia jellisoni immune lymphocytes as a nonspecific control. The intracellular growth of the organisms was measured by [3H]uracil incorporation, and inhibition of multiplication was used as a measurement of immunity. Although the immune lymphocytes restricted principally the multiplication of homologous organisms, partial protection, expressed against the heterologous organism, was found. This was true for either parasite with intact lymphocytes or their supernatants. Exposure of immune lymphocytes to antigen for 18 to 24 h and treatment of kidney cells with supernatant fluids for 18 to 24 h were required for maximal protection. The specific protective mediator in supernatants of immune lymphocytes was characterized by dialysis as having a molecular weight between 3,000 and 12,000 and was found in the 3,000 to 5,000 peak after Sephadex G-50 chromatography. Nonspecific protective activity was greater than 12,000 by dialysis; it chromatographed in the excluded peak, measuring over 43,000, and was destroyed by exposure to pH 2. In vitro production of lymphokines from toxoplasma immune lymphocytes was first detected 7 to 10 days after vaccination of hamsters. At about the same time, hamsters began to resist challenge infection with the pathogenic RH strain of T. gondii and were able to prevent its multiplication in lungs, liver, spleen, and the subcutaneous infection site. The expression of tissue immunity and the production of toxoplasma-immune lymphokines appear to be time-related events. PMID:3557619

  3. Differential Effects of Deep Sedation with Propofol on the Specific and Nonspecific Thalamocortical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Lauer, Kathryn K.; Ward, Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current state of knowledge suggests that disruption of neuronal information integration may be a unitary mechanism of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A neural system central for information integration is the thalamocortical system whose specific and nonspecific divisions may play the roles for representing and integrating information; respectively. How anesthetics affect the function of these systems individually is not completely understood. We studied the effect of propofol on thalamocortical functional connectivity in the specific and nonspecific systems using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Eight healthy volunteers were instructed to listen to and encode 40 English words during wakeful baseline, light sedation, deep sedation, and recovery in the scanner. Functional connectivity was determined as the temporal correlation of blood oxygen level-dependent signals with seed regions defined within the specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei. Results Thalamocortical connectivity at baseline was dominantly medial and bilateral frontal and temporal for the specific system and medial frontal and medial parietal for the nonspecific system. During deep sedation, propofol reduced functional connectivity by 43% (specific) and 79% (nonspecific), a significantly greater reduction of connections in the nonspecific than in the specific system and in the left hemisphere than in the right. Upon regaining consciousness, functional connectivity increased by 58% (specific) and 123% (nonspecific) during recovery, exceeding their values at baseline. Conclusions Propofol conferred differential changes in functional connectivity of the specific and nonspecific thalamocortical systems. The changes in nonspecific thalamocortical connectivity may correlate with loss and return of consciousness. PMID:23221862

  4. Peptidase activities in the semen from the ductus deferens and uterus of the neotropical rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Camila Eduardo; Almeida Santos, Selma Maria; Yamasaki, Simone Cristina; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2009-07-01

    To understand the role of peptidases in seminal physiology of Crotalus durissus terrificus, intra- and inter-seasonal activity levels of acid (APA), basic (APB), puromycin-sensitive (APN-PS) and puromycin-insensitive neutral (APN-PI), cystyl (CAP), dipeptidyl-IV (DPPIV), type-1 pyroglutamyl (PAP-I) and prolyl-imino (PIP) aminopeptidases as well as prolyl endopeptidase (POP) were evaluated in soluble (SF) and/or membrane-bound (MF) fractions of semen collected from the ductus deferens of the male reproductive tract and from the posterior portion of the uterus. Seminal APB, PIP and POP were detected in SF, while other peptidases were detected in SF and MF. Only the convoluted posterior uterus in winter and autumn had semen. Relative to other examined peptidases, in general, APN-PI, APN-PS and APB activities were predominant in the semen from the uterus and throughout the year in the semen from the ductus deferens, suggesting their great relevance in the seminal physiology of C. d. terrificus. The levels of peptidase activities in the ductus deferens semen varied seasonally and were different from those of semen in the uterus, suggesting that their modulatory actions on susceptible peptides are integrated to the male reproductive cycle events and spermatozoa viability of this snake.

  5. Enzyme-Histochemistry Technique for Visualizing the Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV (DPP-IV) Activity in the Liver Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Bertone, Vittorio; Tarantola, Eleonora; Freitas, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV is an enzyme involved in a lot of biochemical processes, where it modifies a number of regulatory proteins by removing the terminal peptides by hydrolysis. Here we describe a histochemical method to demonstrate with accuracy and precision its in situ activity on cryostatic section of Wistar rat liver by means of a simultaneous azo-coupling method.

  6. Heat-shock protein 90: intrinsic peptidase activity and in vitro long-term self-processing.

    PubMed

    Montel, V; Gardrat, F; Azanza, J L; Raymond, J

    2000-08-18

    When tested on Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA as substrate, purified full-length hsp90 displays a low "chymotrypsin-like" peptidase activity which is activated by Ca++ and Mg++ ions. On the other hand, using long-term in vitro experiments, we demonstrate the ability of hsp90 to convert into a 73 kDa truncated product. This autocatalytic degradation proceeds from the C-terminal end of the full-length hsp90 and shifts the oligomers toward monomeric truncated forms. This corresponds to an intermolecular process as addition of exogenous 73 kDa product speeds up the maturation kinetics. The peptidase activity is enhanced in the 73 kDa product and is sensitive to peptide aldehyde inhibitors but only partially to lactone compounds. The degradation process itself presents a great degree of similarity with the peptidase activity toward either the inhibitors or the tested ions. Neither 20S proteasome nor m-calpain are responsible for the observed activities. Indeed, the self-processing is a consequence of the peptidase activity which appears to be an intrinsic property of the chaperone. The functional importance of these findings is discussed.

  7. The Natural Product Cavinafungin Selectively Interferes with Zika and Dengue Virus Replication by Inhibition of the Host Signal Peptidase.

    PubMed

    Estoppey, David; Lee, Chia Min; Janoschke, Marco; Lee, Boon Heng; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Mathys, Philippe; Filipuzzi, Ireos; Schuhmann, Tim; Riedl, Ralph; Aust, Thomas; Galuba, Olaf; McAllister, Gregory; Russ, Carsten; Spiess, Martin; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Hoepfner, Dominic

    2017-04-18

    Flavivirus infections by Zika and dengue virus impose a significant global healthcare threat with no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccination or specific antiviral treatment available. Here, we present the discovery of an anti-flaviviral natural product named cavinafungin. Cavinafungin is a potent and selectively active compound against Zika and all four dengue virus serotypes. Unbiased, genome-wide genomic profiling in human cells using a novel CRISPR/Cas9 protocol identified the endoplasmic-reticulum-localized signal peptidase as the efficacy target of cavinafungin. Orthogonal profiling in S. cerevisiae followed by the selection of resistant mutants pinpointed the catalytic subunit of the signal peptidase SEC11 as the evolutionary conserved target. Biochemical analysis confirmed a rapid block of signal sequence cleavage of both host and viral proteins by cavinafungin. This study provides an effective compound against the eukaryotic signal peptidase and independent confirmation of the recently identified critical role of the signal peptidase in the replicative cycle of flaviviruses. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification and characterization of the metal ion-dependent L-alanoyl-D-glutamate peptidase encoded by bacteriophage T5.

    PubMed

    Mikoulinskaia, Galina V; Odinokova, Irina V; Zimin, Andrei A; Lysanskaya, Valentina Ya; Feofanov, Sergei A; Stepnaya, Olga A

    2009-12-01

    Although bacteriophage T5 is known to have lytic proteins for cell wall hydrolysis and phage progeny escape, their activities are still unknown. This is the first report on the cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a bacteriophage T5 lytic hydrolase. The endolysin-encoding lys gene of virulent coliphage T5 was cloned in Escherichia coli cells, and an electrophoretically homogeneous product of this gene was obtained with a high yield (78% of total activity). The protein purified was shown to be an L-alanoyl-D-glutamate peptidase. The enzyme demonstrated maximal activity in diluted buffers (25-50 mM) at pH 8.5. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA and BAPTA, and fully reactivated by calcium/manganese chlorides. It was found that, along with E. coli peptidoglycan, peptidase of bacteriophage T5 can lyse peptidoglycans of other Gram-negative microorganisms (Pectobacterium carotovorum, Pseudomonas putida, Proteus vulgaris, and Proteus mirabilis). This endolysin is the first example of an L-alanoyl-D-glutamate peptidase in a virulent phage infecting Gram-negative bacteria. There are, however, a great many sequences in databases that are highly similar to that of bacteriophage T5 hydrolase, indicating a wide distribution of endolytic L-alanoyl-D-glutamate peptidases. The article discusses how an enzyme with such substrate specificity could be fixed in the process of evolution.

  9. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut. We have descri...

  10. Role of peptidases of the intestinal microflora and prey in temperature adaptations of the digestive system in planktivorous and benthivorous fish.

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, V V; Skvortsova, E G; Shalygin, M V; Kovalenko, K E

    2015-12-01

    Many fish enzymatic systems possess limited adaptations to low temperature; however, little data are available to judge whether enzymes of fish prey and intestinal microbiota can mitigate this deficiency. In this study, the activity of serine peptidases (casein-lytic, mainly trypsin and hemoglobin-lytic, mainly chymotrypsin) of intestinal mucosa, chyme and intestinal microflora in four species of planktivorous (blue bream) and benthivorous (roach, crucian carp, perch) was investigated across a wide temperature range (0-70 °C) to identify adaptations to low temperature. At 0 °C, the relative activity of peptidases of intestinal mucosa (<13%) and usually intestinal microflora (5-12.6%) is considerably less than that of chyme peptidases (up to 40% of maximal activity). The level of peptidase relative activity in crucian carp intestinal microflora was 45% of maximal activity. The shape of t°-function curves of chyme peptidase also differs in fish from different biotopes. Fish from the littoral group are characterized by a higher degree of adaptation of chyme casein-lytic peptidases to functioning at low temperatures as compared to fish from the pelagic group. The role of intestinal microbiota and prey peptidases in digestive system adaptations of planktivorous and benthivorous fish to low temperatures is discussed.

  11. Non-specific filtering of beta-distributed data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Laird, Peter W; Hinoue, Toshinori; Groshen, Susan; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2014-06-19

    Non-specific feature selection is a dimension reduction procedure performed prior to cluster analysis of high dimensional molecular data. Not all measured features are expected to show biological variation, so only the most varying are selected for analysis. In DNA methylation studies, DNA methylation is measured as a proportion, bounded between 0 and 1, with variance a function of the mean. Filtering on standard deviation biases the selection of probes to those with mean values near 0.5. We explore the effect this has on clustering, and develop alternate filter methods that utilize a variance stabilizing transformation for Beta distributed data and do not share this bias. We compared results for 11 different non-specific filters on eight Infinium HumanMethylation data sets, selected to span a variety of biological conditions. We found that for data sets having a small fraction of samples showing abnormal methylation of a subset of normally unmethylated CpGs, a characteristic of the CpG island methylator phenotype in cancer, a novel filter statistic that utilized a variance-stabilizing transformation for Beta distributed data outperformed the common filter of using standard deviation of the DNA methylation proportion, or its log-transformed M-value, in its ability to detect the cancer subtype in a cluster analysis. However, the standard deviation filter always performed among the best for distinguishing subgroups of normal tissue. The novel filter and standard deviation filter tended to favour features in different genome contexts; for the same data set, the novel filter always selected more features from CpG island promoters and the standard deviation filter always selected more features from non-CpG island intergenic regions. Interestingly, despite selecting largely non-overlapping sets of features, the two filters did find sample subsets that overlapped for some real data sets. We found two different filter statistics that tended to prioritize features with

  12. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  13. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  14. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  15. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section. (b) Non-specification cargo tanks for petroleum products. Notwithstanding... non-specification cargo tank motor vehicle having a capacity of less than 13,250 L (3,500 gallons) may... accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (c) Permanently secured non-bulk tanks...

  16. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  17. Specific and Nonspecific Staining in Detecting Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin on Erythrocytes by Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Milton T.

    1972-01-01

    Specifically stained staphylococcal alpha toxin particles were detected on unstained and nonspecifically stained ghost membranes when rabbit erythrocytes were exposed to alpha toxin and stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled specific antitoxin. Fading of the nonspecific staining was observed and was attributed to the degradation of the membranes by alpha toxin. Images PMID:4118044

  18. Low expression of angiotensinogen and dipeptidyl peptidase 1 in saliva of patients with proliferative verrucous leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Isadora Luana; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo Della; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte

    2016-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the profile of the salivary proteome. METHODS Unstimulated whole mouth saliva was collected from 30 volunteers [15 proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) patients and 15 controls] and proteins were submitted for mass spectrometry-based proteomics using the discovery approach, followed by analyses of variance and logistic regression tests. RESULTS A total of two hundred and eighty-three proteins were confidently identified in saliva. By combining two low abundance proteins from the PVL group, angiotensinogen (AGT) and dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1), a model for group differentiation was built with a concordance index of 94.2%, identifying both proteins as potential etiologic biomarkers for PVL. CONCLUSION This study suggests that both AGT and DPP1 may be involved in developmental mechanisms of PVL. PMID:27900324

  19. The structure of human tripeptidyl peptidase II as determined by a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Schönegge, Anne-Marie; Villa, Elizabeth; Förster, Friedrich; Hegerl, Reiner; Peters, Jürgen; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Rockel, Beate

    2012-04-04

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) is a high molecular mass (∼5 MDa) serine protease, which is thought to act downstream of the 26S proteasome, cleaving peptides released by the latter. Here, the structure of human TPPII (HsTPPII) has been determined to subnanometer resolution by cryoelectron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The complex is built from two strands forming a quasihelical structure harboring a complex system of inner cavities. HsTPPII particles exhibit some polymorphism resulting in complexes consisting of nine or of eight dimers per strand. To obtain deeper insights into the architecture and function of HsTPPII, we have created a pseudoatomic structure of the HsTPPII spindle using a comparative model of HsTPPII dimers and molecular dynamics flexible fitting. Analyses of the resulting hybrid structure of the HsTPPII holocomplex provide new insights into the mechanism of maturation and activation.

  20. Analyzing a dipeptide library to identify human dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lan, Vu Thi Tuyet; Ito, Keisuke; Ohno, Masumi; Motoyama, Takayasu; Ito, Sohei; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki

    2015-05-15

    Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (hDPPIV) inhibitors provide an effective strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because certain peptides are known to act as hDPPIV inhibitors, a dataset of possible peptides with their inhibition intensities will facilitate the development of functional food for type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined a total of 337 dipeptides with respect to their hDPPIV inhibitory effects. Amino acid residues at N-termini dominated their inhibition intensities. Particularly highly inhibitory dipeptides discovered included the following novel dipeptides: Thr-His, Asn-His, Val-Leu, Met-Leu, and Met-Met. Using our dataset, prime candidates contributing to the hDPPIV inhibitory effect of soy protein hydrolyzates were successfully identified. Possible dietary proteins potentially able to produce particularly highly hDPPIV inhibitory peptides are also discussed on the basis of the dataset.

  1. Mosaic expression of membrane peptidases by confluent cultures of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Howell, S; Brewis, I A; Hooper, N M; Kenny, A J; Turner, A J

    1993-02-08

    The cell-surface expression of endopeptidase-24.11 (EC 3.4.24.11) on Caco-2 cells cultured to confluency is markedly heterogeneous unlike that of dipeptidylpeptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5). Here we have investigated the cell-surface expression of three other ectopeptidases: angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1), aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) and aminopeptidase W (EC 3.4.11.16). We show by indirect immunofluorescent staining that these three enzymes are present on the surface of some cells but not on others. However, these enzymes were detected in the majority of detergent-permeabilised Caco-2 cells indicating the presence of intracellular pools of these enzymes. This suggests that there may either be differential regulation of apical transport for these peptidases or that they recycle at different rates.

  2. Trp-Arg-Xaa tripeptides act as uncompetitive-type inhibitors of human dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    PubMed

    Lan, Vu Thi Tuyet; Ito, Keisuke; Ito, Sohei; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki

    2014-04-01

    Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (hDPPIV, alternative name: CD26) inhibitors provide an effective strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recently, our research group discovered a non substrate-mimic inhibitory dipeptide, Trp-Arg, by the systematic analysis of a dipeptide library. In the present study, a tripeptide library Trp-Arg-Xaa (where Xaa represents any amino acid) was analyzed to investigate the interactions of peptidergic inhibitors with hDPPIV. Trp-Arg-Glu showed the highest inhibitory effect toward hDPPIV (Ki=130 μM). All of the tested 19 Trp-Arg-Xaa tripeptides showed unique uncompetitive-type inhibition. The inhibition mechanism of Trp-Arg-Xaa is discussed based on the crystal structure of hDPPIV. The information obtained by this study suggests a novel concept for developing hDPPIV inhibitory peptides and drugs.

  3. Role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in new-onset diabetes after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Ji Zhe; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Li, Can

    2015-01-01

    Despite strict pre- and post-transplantation screening, the incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) remains as high as 60%. This complication affects the risk of cardiovascular events and patient and graft survival rates. Thus, reducing the impact of NODAT could improve overall transplant success. The pathogenesis of NODAT is multifactorial, and both modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors have been implicated. Monitoring and controlling the blood glucose profile, implementing multidisciplinary care, performing lifestyle modifications, using a modified immunosuppressive regimen, administering anti-metabolite agents, and taking a conventional antidiabetic approach may diminish the incidence of NODAT. In addition to these preventive strategies, inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) by the gliptin family of drugs has recently gained considerable interest as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus and NODAT. This review focuses on the role of DPP4 inhibitors and discusses recent literature regarding management of NODAT. PMID:26552451

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) preferentially cleaves substrate peptides with Asp and Glu at the P1 position [NH2–P2–P1(Asp/Glu)–P1′–P2′…]. For crystallographic studies, PgDPP11 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data to 1.82 Å resolution were collected from an orthorhombic crystal form belonging to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.33, b = 103.60, c = 177.33 Å. Structural analysis by the multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction method is in progress. PMID:25664797

  5. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease.

  6. [Non-specific facilitating influences on the responses of rabbit visual cortex neurons].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of neuronal responses in the rabbit visual cortex to patterned visual stimuli and their change during non-specific activation reaction. Non-specific activation while only slightly affecting the background neuronal activity, enhances the responses of most units to patterned visual stimuli. A comparison of responses with a different degree of inhibition participation shows that the depression of inhibitory processes may act as a mechanism of facilitation of the responses during non-specific activation. After facilitated responses evoked by the action of the stimulus during non-specific activation, the neurones retain a state of enhanced excitability. Repetition of stimuli not attended with non-specific activation leads to the diminution of excitability. The possible connection of the indicated effects with extinction processes is discussed.

  7. [LIFE CONDITIONS: NON-SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATORS AND DENTOALVEOLAR PATHOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Mosticone, Romina; Pescucci, Lisa; Porreca, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma, diseases, diet, daily work and environmental factors shape bodies. From birth to death, these processes leave on the skeleton markers that can be recognized and studied, thus providing an overview of the health conditions of past populations. The present work analyzes data collected in seven necropolises. During our study, we exploited nonspecific stress and dental pathologies as key indicators of health conditions. In particula; we analyzed the three most common indicators of stress: porotic hyperostosis; enamel hypoplasia; and Harris lines on shins. Additionally, we examined the most important dental alveolar pathologies, including carious lesions, periodontal diseases, antemortem tooth loss, abscesses, and calculi. The data we analyzed suggest that, despite the different urban and suburban origins, all the samples belong to a middle-range or low social class, whose living conditions were modest. The only necropolis which stands out is Casal Bertone Mausoleo, where the samples present the lowest frequencies with respect to both the stress indicators and the oral pathologies, suggesting better living conditions.

  8. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  9. Flow cytometric investigation of non-specific erythrocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Ernst, M; Sonneborn, H H

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies submitted to the Third Workshop on Erythrocyte Antigens from the panel "non-specific erythrocyte antigens" were tested for their reactivity with different types of cells. Most of them were defined as specific for adhesion antigens. The CD 44 antibodies 2D3-1, 2D3-2, 2D3-3 and 2D3-4 reacted as expected for CD 44 except their negative reactivity with the myeloid cell line HL 60 and B-cell line Raji. The CD 47 antibodies 2D3-5 and 2D3-6 reacted specific. Only with Raji and T-cell line MOLT 4 the CD 58 antibodies 2D3-7 and 2D3-8 showed reactivity as expected which indicates that they are "CD 58 related". The CD 99 antibody 2D3-9 shows similar results as expected for a CD 99 specific antibody except its high reactivity against Raji. From the RBC-related antibodies 2D3-11 and 2D3-12 the latter becomes completely negative with trypsin treated erythrocytes. The antibody is negative on normal peripheral blood lymphocytes but reacts with transformed cell lines like Raji and MOLT 4. With a view to their reactivity to the cells tested at least 2D3-13 of the Rh-related antibodies seems to be similar to CD 47 antibodies.

  10. Unexpected small urinary bladder pheochromocytoma: a nonspecific presentation.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Slama, Adel; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare tumor that typically presents with a hypertensive crisis during micturition. Preoperatively, it may be misdiagnosed due to nonspecific symptomatology, physical, and radiologic findings. Method. We report a case of unsuspected small pheochromocytoma which was incidentally found by CT scan and confirmed by the histological aspects after transurethral resection in a 63-year-old woman. Here, we have described the clinical presentation, physical findings, laboratory investigations, and treatment provided in our case. We have also included radiological images and histopathology slides with input from both radiologists and pathologists. Surgical management and postoperative follow-up are discussed, as are details of previous published data. Results. After undergoing surgical treatment (transurethral resection), our patient is asymptomatic, with complete resolution of her pathology. Conclusion. Diagnosis is difficult before histopathological examination and should be considered in patients with no risk factors for usual bladder tumor. Our purpose is to raise clinician's awareness for this condition so that they will be more likely to diagnose it. This will facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment and especially prevent complications due to pheochromocytoma which may be severe.

  11. Characterization of Non-Specific Crossover in SPLITT Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Hoyos, Mauricio; Kurowski, Pascal; Salhi, Dorra; Moore, Lee R.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Split-flow thin channel (SPLITT) fractionation is a technique for continuous separation of particles or macromolecules in a fluid stream into fractions according to the lateral migration induced by application of a field perpendicular to the direction of flow. Typical applications have involved isolation of different fractions from a polydisperse sample. Some specialized applications involve the separation of the fraction influenced by the transverse field from the fraction that is not. For example, immuno-magnetically labeled biological cells may be separated from non-labeled cells with the application of a transverse magnetic field gradient. In such cases, it may be critically important to minimize contamination of the labeled cells with non-labeled cells while at the same time maximizing the throughput. Such contamination is known as non-specific crossover (NSC) and refers to the real or apparent migration of non-mobile particles or cells across streamlines with the mobile material. The possible mechanisms for NSC are discussed, and experimental results interpreted in terms of shear-induced diffusion (SID) caused by viscous interactions between particles in a sheared flow. It is concluded that SID may contribute to NSC, but that further experiments and mathematical modeling are necessary to more fully explore the phenomenon. PMID:18698797

  12. Electrostatic forces control nonspecific virus attachment to lettuce.

    PubMed

    Vega, Everardo; Garland, Jay; Pillai, Suresh D

    2008-03-01

    Enteric viruses are key foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to compare the relative contributions of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces with the nonspecific attachment of virus to butterhead lettuce. The attachment of four viruses (echovirus 11, feline calicivirus [FCV], MS2, and phiX174) was studied. Three different conditions, namely (i) 1% Tween 80, (ii) 1 M NaCl, and (iii) 1% Tween 80 with 1 M NaCl, were investigated to determine the role of hydrophobic, electrostatic, and combined hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, respectively. Attachment above the pI of FCV and echovirus 11 was reduced or eliminated in the presence of NaCl, indicating an electrostatic interaction between the animal viruses and lettuce. The bacteriophage phiX174 was not significantly affected by any treatment, indicating a lack of electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions between the lettuce and phage phiX174. Overall, 1 M NaCl was the most effective treatment in desorbing viruses from the surface of lettuce at pH 7 and 8. The results imply that electrostatic forces play a major role in controlling virus adsorption to lettuce. The results indicate that 1 M NaCl solution would improve the recovery or elution of unenveloped viruses from lettuce.

  13. Nonspecific uptake and homeostasis drive the oceanic cadmium cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Tristan J.; Lee, Renee B. Y.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2013-02-01

    The global marine distributions of Cd and phosphate are closely correlated, which has led to Cd being considered as a marine micronutrient, despite its toxicity to life. The explanation for this nutrient-like behavior is unknown because there is only one identified biochemical function for Cd, an unusual Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase. Recent developments in Cd isotope mass spectrometry have revealed that Cd uptake by phytoplankton causes isotopic fractionation in the open ocean and in culture. Here we investigate the physiochemical pathways that fractionate Cd isotopes by performing subcellular Cd isotope analysis on genetically modified microorganisms. We find that expression of the Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase makes no difference to the Cd isotope composition of whole cells. Instead, a large proportion of the Cd is partitioned into cell membranes with a similar direction and magnitude of Cd isotopic fractionation to that seen in surface seawater. This observation is well explained if Cd is mistakenly imported with other divalent metals and subsequently managed by binding within the cell to avoid toxicity. This process may apply to other divalent metals, whereby nonspecific uptake and subsequent homeostasis may contribute to elemental and isotopic distributions in seawater, even for elements commonly considered as micronutrients.

  14. Gene Pyramiding of Peptidase Inhibitors Enhances Plant Resistance to the Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Maria Estrella; Cambra, Inés; Martinez, Manuel; Pozancos, Clara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a damaging pest worldwide with a wide range of host plants and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Recently, the complete T. urticae genome has been published and showed a proliferation of gene families associated with digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds which supports its polyphagous behaviour. To overcome spider mite adaptability a gene pyramiding approach has been developed by co-expressing two barley proteases inhibitors, the cystatin Icy6 and the trypsin inhibitor Itr1 genes in Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The presence and expression of both transgenes was studied by conventional and quantitative real time RT-PCR assays and by indirect ELISA assays. The inhibitory activity of cystatin and trypsin inhibitor was in vitro analysed using specific substrates. Single and double transformants were used to assess the effects of spider mite infestation. Double transformed lines showed the lowest damaged leaf area in comparison to single transformants and non-transformed controls and different accumulation of H2O2 as defence response in the leaf feeding site, detected by diaminobenzidine staining. Additionally, an impact on endogenous mite cathepsin B- and L-like activities was observed after feeding on Arabidopsis lines, which correlates with a significant increase in the mortality of mites fed on transformed plants. These effects were analysed in view of the expression levels of the target mite protease genes, C1A cysteine peptidase and S1 serine peptidase, identified in the four developmental mite stages (embryo, larvae, nymphs and adults) performed using the RNA-seq information available at the BOGAS T. urticae database. The potential of pyramiding different classes of plant protease inhibitors to prevent plant damage caused by mites as a new tool to prevent pest resistance and to improve pest control is discussed. PMID:22900081

  15. Gene pyramiding of peptidase inhibitors enhances plant resistance to the spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Maria Estrella; Cambra, Inés; Martinez, Manuel; Pozancos, Clara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a damaging pest worldwide with a wide range of host plants and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Recently, the complete T. urticae genome has been published and showed a proliferation of gene families associated with digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds which supports its polyphagous behaviour. To overcome spider mite adaptability a gene pyramiding approach has been developed by co-expressing two barley proteases inhibitors, the cystatin Icy6 and the trypsin inhibitor Itr1 genes in Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The presence and expression of both transgenes was studied by conventional and quantitative real time RT-PCR assays and by indirect ELISA assays. The inhibitory activity of cystatin and trypsin inhibitor was in vitro analysed using specific substrates. Single and double transformants were used to assess the effects of spider mite infestation. Double transformed lines showed the lowest damaged leaf area in comparison to single transformants and non-transformed controls and different accumulation of H(2)O(2) as defence response in the leaf feeding site, detected by diaminobenzidine staining. Additionally, an impact on endogenous mite cathepsin B- and L-like activities was observed after feeding on Arabidopsis lines, which correlates with a significant increase in the mortality of mites fed on transformed plants. These effects were analysed in view of the expression levels of the target mite protease genes, C1A cysteine peptidase and S1 serine peptidase, identified in the four developmental mite stages (embryo, larvae, nymphs and adults) performed using the RNA-seq information available at the BOGAS T. urticae database. The potential of pyramiding different classes of plant protease inhibitors to prevent plant damage caused by mites as a new tool to prevent pest resistance and to improve pest control is discussed.

  16. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  17. A Putative Bacterial ABC Transporter Circumvents the Essentiality of Signal Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Smith, Peter A.; Date, Shailesh V.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Truong, Chau Linda; Modrusan, Zora; Yan, Donghong; Kang, Jing; Xu, Min; Shah, Ishita M.; Mintzer, Robert; Kofoed, Eric M.; Cheung, Tommy K.; Arnott, David; Koehler, Michael F. T.; Heise, Christopher E.; Brown, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type I signal peptidase of Staphylococcus aureus, SpsB, is an attractive antibacterial target because it is essential for viability and extracellularly accessible. We synthesized compound 103, a novel arylomycin-derived inhibitor of SpsB with significant potency against various clinical S. aureus strains (MIC of ~1 µg/ml). The predominant clinical strain USA300 developed spontaneous resistance to compound 103 with high frequency, resulting from single point mutations inside or immediately upstream of cro/cI, a homolog of the lambda phage transcriptional repressor cro. These cro/cI mutations led to marked (>50-fold) overexpression of three genes encoding a putative ABC transporter. Overexpression of this ABC transporter was both necessary and sufficient for resistance and, notably, circumvented the essentiality of SpsB during in vitro culture. Mutation of its predicted ATPase gene abolished resistance, suggesting a possible role for active transport; in these bacteria, resistance to compound 103 occurred with low frequency and through mutations in spsB. Bacteria overexpressing the ABC transporter and lacking SpsB were capable of secreting a subset of proteins that are normally cleaved by SpsB and instead were cleaved at a site distinct from the canonical signal peptide. These bacteria secreted reduced levels of virulence-associated proteins and were unable to establish infection in mice. This study reveals the mechanism of resistance to a novel arylomycin derivative and demonstrates that the nominal essentiality of the S. aureus signal peptidase can be circumvented by the upregulation of a putative ABC transporter in vitro but not in vivo. PMID:27601569

  18. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established γ-Secretase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid β 1-25 (Aβ1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 51±79 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499±122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 1465±93 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by γ-secretase. PMID:26046535

  19. Profiling of Cross-Functional Peptidases Regulated Circulating Peptides in BRCA1 Mutant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jia; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Yang, Chuan; Ma, Li; Meng, Qing H.; Hu, Tony Y.; Singer, Christian F.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Women with inherited BRCA1 mutations are more likely to develop breast cancer (BC); however, not every carrier will progress to BC. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize circulating peptides that correlate with BC patients carrying BRCA1 mutations. Circulating peptides were enriched using our well-designed nanoporous silica thin films (NanoTraps) and profiled by mass spectrometry to identify among four clinical groups. To determine the corresponding proteolytic processes and their sites of activity, purified candidate peptidases and synthesized substrates were assayed to verify the processes predicted by the MERPOS database. Proteolytic processes were validated using patient serum samples. The peptides, KNG1K438-R457 and C 3fS1304-R1320, were identified as putative peptide candidates to differentiate BRCA1 mutant BC from sporadic BC and cancer-free BRCA1 mutant carriers. Kallikrein-2 (KLK2) is the major peptidase that cleaves KNG1K438-R457 from kininogen-1, and its expressions and activities were also found to be dependent on BRCA1 status. We further determined that KNG1K438-R457 is cleaved at its C-terminal arginine by carboxypeptidase N1 (CPN1). Increased KLK2 activity, with decreased CPN1 activity, results in the accumulation of KNG1K438-R457 in BRCA1-associated BC. Our work outlined a useful strategy for determining the peptide–petidase relationship and thus establishing a biological mechanism for changes in the peptidome in BRCA1-associated BC. PMID:27058005

  20. Increased collagenase and dipeptidyl peptidase I activity in leucocytes from healthy elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, L; Richaud-Patin, Y; Díaz-Borjón, A; Jakez-Ocampo, J; Alvarado-De La Barrera, C

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of infectious diseases increases with ageing. The enzymatic activity of leucocytes may have a relevant role in the morbidity and mortality due to infections in the elderly. In this study we have compared the activity of enzymes involved in the inflammatory response in leucocytes from young and elderly women. A total of 35 healthy females was studied, 20 volunteers aged 78–98 years (mean 89.1 years) and 15 young controls aged 19–34 years (mean 26 years). All of them were in good clinical condition, without any acute or chronic disease. Intracellular enzyme activity was analysed by flow cytometry in leucocytes from young and elderly women. The enzyme substrates employed were for oxidative burst, l-aminopeptidase, collagenase, cathepsin B, C, D and, G and dipeptidyl peptidase I. The intracellular enzyme activity assessed by flow cytometry in leucocytes from young and elderly women was similar, as far as oxidative burst, l-aminopeptidase, cathepsin B, C, D and G are concerned. An increased collagenase activity was detected in granulocytes from elders. The mean fluorescence channels for this enzyme corresponded to 86 ± 23 and 60 ± 15 in cells from elders and controls, respectively (P = 0.01224). An increased dipeptidyl peptidase I activity was detected in lymphocytes from elderly women. The corresponding values for this enzyme in elders and the young were 65.9 ± 43.3 and 17.3 ± 5, respectively (P = 0.0036). The proper functional activity of intracellular enzymes involved in inflammatory responses is likely to be determinant for successful ageing. PMID:10361229

  1. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  3. Yoga treatment for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Wieland, L Susan; Skoetz, Nicole; Pilkington, Karen; Vempati, Ramaprabhu; D'Adamo, Christopher R; Berman, Brian M

    2017-01-12

    Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and four trials registers to 11 March 2016 without restriction of language or publication status. We screened reference lists and contacted experts in the field to identify additional studies. We included randomized controlled trials of yoga treatment in people with chronic non-specific low back pain. We included studies comparing yoga to any other intervention or to no intervention. We also included studies comparing yoga as an adjunct to other therapies, versus those other therapies alone. Two authors independently screened and selected studies, extracted outcome data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors to obtain missing or unclear information. We evaluated the overall certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 12 trials (1080 participants) carried out in the USA (seven trials), India (three trials), and the UK (two trials). Studies were unfunded (one trial), funded by a yoga institution (one trial), funded by non-profit or government sources (seven trials), or did not report on funding (three trials). Most trials used Iyengar, Hatha, or Viniyoga forms of yoga. The trials compared yoga to no intervention or a non-exercise intervention such as education (seven trials), an exercise intervention (three trials), or both exercise and non-exercise interventions (two trials). All trials were at high risk of performance and detection bias because

  4. Proteolytic profiling and comparative analyses of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in preimaginal stages of Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatu s, a widespread insect in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, is a vector of multiple arboviruses and parasites, and is considered an important risk to human and veterinary health. Proteolytic enzymes play crucial roles in the insect physiology including the modulation of embryonic development and food digestion. Therefore, these enzymes represent important targets for the development of new control strategies. This study presents zymographic characterization and comparative analysis of the proteolytic activity found in eggs, larval instars and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods The proteolytic profiles of eggs, larvae and pupa of Cx. quinquefasciatus were characterized by SDS-PAGE co-polymerized with 0.1% gelatin, according to the pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity. In addition, the proteolytic activities were characterized in solution using 100 μM of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results Comparison of the proteolytic profiles by substrate-SDS-PAGE from all preimaginal stages of the insect revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in the peptidase expression among eggs, larvae and pupae. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that the proteolytic activity from preimaginal stages is mostly due to trypsin-like serine peptidases that display optimal activity at alkaline pH. In-solution, proteolytic assays of the four larval instars using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC in the presence or absence of a trypsin-like serine peptidase inhibitor confirmed the results obtained by substrate-SDS-PAGE analysis. The trypsin-like serine peptidases of the four larval instars were functional over a wide range of temperatures, showing activities at 25°C and 65°C, with an optimal activity between 37°C and 50°C. Conclusion The combined use of zymography and in-solution assays, as performed in this study, allowed for a more detailed analysis of the repertoire of proteolytic

  5. Evolutionary history of the non-specific lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Viitanen, Lenita; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan

    2011-11-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small, basic proteins characterized by a tunnel-like hydrophobic cavity, capable of transferring various lipid molecules between lipid bilayers. Most nsLTPs are synthesized with an N-terminal signal peptide that localizes the protein to the apoplastic space. The nsLTPs have only been identified in seed plants, where they are encoded by large gene families. We have initiated an analysis of the evolutionary history of the nsLTP family using genomic and EST information from non-seed land plants and green algae to determine: (1) when the nsLTP family arose, (2) how often new nsLTP subfamilies have been created, and (3) how subfamilies differ in their patterns of expansion and loss in different plant lineages. In this study, we searched sequence databases and found that genes and transcripts encoding nsLTPs are abundant in liverworts, mosses, and all other investigated land plants, but not present in any algae. The tertiary structures of representative liverwort and moss nsLTPs were further studied with homology modeling. The results indicate that the nsLTP family has evolved after plants conquered land. Only two of the four major subfamilies of nsLTPs found in flowering plants are present in mosses and liverworts. The additional subfamilies have arisen later, during land plant evolution. In this report, we also introduce a modified nsLTP classification system. © The Author 2011. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  6. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: What Is the Optimal Approach to Management?

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Sara; Ryu, Jay H; Piciucchi, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Poletti, Venerino

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed current aspects of the clinical and pathogenic profile of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), to better elucidate the complex issue of management and treatment options for NSIP patients. Recent findings suggest that idiopathic NSIP is a complex clinical entity with a disease spectrum that includes at least three different phenotypes: NSIP associated with autoimmune features, emphysema, and familial interstitial lung disease. This distinction, based mainly on clinical findings, may be of critical importance when it comes to making a decision on patients' management. This hypothesis warrants further studies. Currently, two major radiologic-pathologic different profiles have been well established. First, the "inflammatory type" characterized by prominent lymphocytic inflammation both on biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with mixed NSIP/organizing pneumonia pattern that tends to have a better response to corticosteroid and immunosuppressive treatment. Second, the "highly fibrotic" subgroup that shows prominent reticular changes and traction bronchiectasis by HRCT, high fibrotic background on biopsy, and no lymphocytosis on BAL. The latter fibrotic NSIP is the subgroup with less potential to respond to immunosuppressive treatment and a marginal risk to evolve into "full-blown idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis." The management of patients with fibrotic, progressive, and immunosuppressive treatment, refractory NSIP remains uncertain, and further studies are needed to address the role of antifibrotic drug in this settings. Oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation are of importance in the current management of severe, progressive, and refractory NSIP patients. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Biochemical properties and evaluation of washing performance in commercial detergent compatibility of two collagenolytic serine peptidases secreted by Aspergillus fischeri and Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Ida, Érika Lika; da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Tássio Brito; Souto, Tatiane Beltramini; Leite, Juliana Abigail; Rodrigues, André; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-03-16

    Filamentous fungi secrete diverse peptidases with different biochemical properties, which is of considerable importance for application in various commercial sectors. In this study, we describe the isolation of two fungal species collected from the soil of decayed organic matter: Aspergillus fischeri and Penicillium citrinum. In a submerged bioprocess, we observed better peptidase production with the fungus P. citrinum, which reached a peak production at 168 h with 760 U/mL, in comparison with the fungus A. fischeri, which reached a peak production at 72 h with 460 U/mL. In both situations, the fermentative medium contained 0.5% crushed feathers as a source of nitrogen. On performing biochemical characterization, we detected two alkaline serine peptidases: The one secreted by P. citrinum had optimal activity at pH 7.0 and at 45°C, while the one secreted by A. fischeri had optimal activity in pH 6.5-8 and at 55-60°C. Metallic ions were effective in modulating these peptidases; in particular, Cu(2+) promoted negative modulation of both peptidases. The peptidases were stable and functional under conditions of nonionic surfactants, temperatures up to 45°C for 1 h, and incubation over a wide pH range. In addition, it was observed that both peptidases had the capacity to hydrolyze collagen and performed well in removing an egg protein stain when supplemented into a commercial powder detergent; this was especially true for the peptidase from P. citrinum.

  8. Profiling of proteolytic enzymes in the gut of the tick Ixodes ricinus reveals an evolutionarily conserved network of aspartic and cysteine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Franta, Zdeněk; Horn, Martin; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Caffrey, Conor R; Mareš, Michael; Kopáček, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are vectors for a variety of viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases in human and domestic animals. To survive and reproduce ticks feed on host blood, yet our understanding of the intestinal proteolytic machinery used to derive absorbable nutrients from the blood meal is poor. Intestinal digestive processes are limiting factors for pathogen transmission since the tick gut presents the primary site of infection. Moreover, digestive enzymes may find practical application as anti-tick vaccine targets. Results Using the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus, we performed a functional activity scan of the peptidase complement in gut tissue extracts that demonstrated the presence of five types of peptidases of the cysteine and aspartic classes. We followed up with genetic screens of gut-derived cDNA to identify and clone genes encoding the cysteine peptidases cathepsins B, L and C, an asparaginyl endopeptidase (legumain), and the aspartic peptidase, cathepsin D. By RT-PCR, expression of asparaginyl endopeptidase and cathepsins B and D was restricted to gut tissue and to those developmental stages feeding on blood. Conclusion Overall, our results demonstrate the presence of a network of cysteine and aspartic peptidases that conceivably operates to digest host blood proteins in a concerted manner. Significantly, the peptidase components of this digestive network are orthologous to those described in other parasites, including nematodes and flatworms. Accordingly, the present data and those available for other tick species support the notion of an evolutionary conservation of a cysteine/aspartic peptidase system for digestion that includes ticks, but differs from that of insects relying on serine peptidases. PMID:18348719

  9. Role of histamine release in nonspecific vasodilatation during anodal and cathodal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yoshihito; Droog, Erik J; Henricson, Joakim; Wikström, Thore; Lennquist, Sten; Sjöberg, Folke

    2004-03-01

    Nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis is an important confounding factor in experimental pharmacology. In this investigation, we studied the involvement of sensory nerves and histamine-related reactions in causing nonspecific vasodilatation in a model of anodal and cathodal iontophoresis of sodium chloride. Firstly, we applied a mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream to confirm its suppressive effect on nonspecific vasodilatation and to measure its efficacy in three different dosages (duration: 1, 2, and 3 h). We then investigated the role of histamine in nonspecific vasodilatation by giving an oral antihistamine drug (cetirizine) to subjects who had and had not been given EMLA. We found substantial suppression of the nonspecific vasodilatation in all EMLA-treated groups (all dosages) compared with untreated controls (with suppression rates of 60-65%). Dosage had no significant effect. A further suppression of nonspecific vasodilatation was seen after oral cetirizine during anodal and cathodal iontophoresis in both EMLA-treated and untreated groups. The antihistamine effect was most pronounced during anodal iontophoresis. These results suggest a histaminergic increase in perfusion that may be independent of neurogenic mechanisms and depend on polarity (anode or cathode). Local nerve blocks (EMLA) together with cetirizine may therefore be used to reduce nonspecific vasodilatation in both anodal and cathodal iontophoresis.

  10. Synthesis and physical characterization of a P1 arginine combinatorial library, and its application to the determination of the substrate specificity of serine peptidases.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Stephen T; Mauger, Russell C; Strimpler, Anne M; Liu, Yi-Ping; Morris, Frank X; Edwards, Philip D

    2002-11-01

    Serine peptidases are a large, well-studied, and medically important class of peptidases. Despite the attention these enzymes have received, details concerning the substrate specificity of even some of the best known enzymes in this class are lacking. One approach to rapidly characterizing substrate specificity for peptidases is the use of positional scanning combinatorial substrate libraries. We recently synthesized such a library for enzymes with a preference for arginine at P1 and demonstrated the use of this library with thrombin (Edwards et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 2000, 10, 2291). In the present work, we extend these studies by demonstrating good agreement between the theroretical and measured content of portions of this library and by showing that the library permits rapid characterization of the substrate specificity of additional SA clan serine peptidases including factor Xa, tryptase, and trypsin. These results were consistent both with cleavage sites in natural substrates and cleavage of commercially available synthetic substrates. We also demonstrate that pH or salt concentration have a quantitative effect on the rate of cleavage of the pooled library substrates but that correct prediction of optimal substrates for the enzymes studied appeared to be independent of these parameters. These studies provide new substrate specificity data on an important class of peptidases and are the first to provide physical characterization of a peptidase substrate library.

  11. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Manish S.; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J.; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. PMID:25460737

  12. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Manish S; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptidase-1 expression in some organs of the salamander Pleurodeles waltl submitted to a 12-day space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautz, A.; Rudolf, E.; Mitashov, V.; Dournon, C.

    In Pleurodeles, the peptidase-1 is a sex-linked enzyme encoded by two codominant genes (Pep-1A and Pep-1B) located on the Z and W sex chromosomes. The sexual genotype can be determined by the electrophoretic pattern of the peptidase from erythrocytes. A_AW_B genotypic females characterized by 3 electrophoretic bands AA, AB and BB were embarked on Cosmos 2229. The pattern in ovary, muscles and gut issued from the embarked or synchrone females displayed the 3 characteristic bands. In heart and kidney, the bands AA and BB were revealed, while the band BB appeared very fainly. The specific enzymatic activity in the same organs was compared. Except for the kidney, no statistical significant difference was observed between flight and synchrone samples. This enzyme can be efficiently used as sexual genotypic marker of Pleurodeles experimentally submitted to the effects of space environment.

  14. Structure and Mechanism of Cysteine Peptidase Gingipain K (Kgp), a Major Virulence Factor of Porphyromonas gingivalis in Periodontitis*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Veillard, Florian; Sztukowska, Maryta N.; Guevara, Tibisay; Potempa, Barbara; Pomowski, Anja; Huntington, James A.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases are key proteolytic virulence factors of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, the most prevalent dysbiosis-driven disease in humans. Two peptidases, gingipain K (Kgp) and R (RgpA and RgpB), which differ in their selectivity after lysines and arginines, respectively, collectively account for 85% of the extracellular proteolytic activity of P. gingivalis at the site of infection. Therefore, they are promising targets for the design of specific inhibitors. Although the structure of the catalytic domain of RgpB is known, little is known about Kgp, which shares only 27% sequence identity. We report the high resolution crystal structure of a competent fragment of Kgp encompassing the catalytic cysteine peptidase domain and a downstream immunoglobulin superfamily-like domain, which is required for folding and secretion of Kgp in vivo. The structure, which strikingly resembles a tooth, was serendipitously trapped with a fragment of a covalent inhibitor targeting the catalytic cysteine. This provided accurate insight into the active site and suggested that catalysis may require a catalytic triad, Cys477-His444-Asp388, rather than the cysteine-histidine dyad normally found in cysteine peptidases. In addition, a 20-Å-long solvent-filled interior channel traverses the molecule and links the bottom of the specificity pocket with the molecular surface opposite the active site cleft. This channel, absent in RgpB, may enhance the plasticity of the enzyme, which would explain the much lower activity in vitro toward comparable specific synthetic substrates. Overall, the present results report the architecture and molecular determinants of the working mechanism of Kgp, including interaction with its substrates. PMID:25266723

  15. Biochemical characterization of VQ-VII, a cysteine peptidase with broad specificity, isolated from Vasconcellea quercifolia latex.

    PubMed

    Torres, María José; Trejo, Sebastián Alejandro; Natalucci, Claudia Luisa; López, Laura María Isabel

    2013-06-01

    The latex from Vasconcellea quercifolia ("oak leaved papaya"), a member of the Caricaceae family, contains at least seven cysteine endopeptidases with high proteolytic activity, which helps to protect these plants against injury. In this study, we isolated and characterized the most basic of these cysteine endopeptidases, named VQ-VII. This new purified enzyme was homogeneous by bidimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and exhibited a molecular mass of 23,984 Da and an isoelectric point >11. The enzymatic activity of VQ-VII was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid, confirming that it belongs to the catalytic group of cysteine endopeptidases. By investigating the cleavage of the oxidized insulin B-chain to establish the hydrolytic specificity of VQ-VII, we found 13 cleavage sites on the substrate, revealing that it is a broad-specificity peptidase. The pH profiles toward p-Glu-Phe-Leu-p-nitroanilide (PFLNA) and casein showed that the optimum pH is about 6.8 for both substrates, and that in casein, it is active over a wide pH range (activity higher than 80 % between pH 6 and 9.5). Kinetic enzymatic assays were performed with the thiol peptidase substrate PFLNA (K m = 0.454 ± 0.046 mM, k cat = 1.57 ± 0.07 s(-1), k cat/K m = 3.46 × 10(3) ± 14 s(-1) M(-1)). The N-terminal sequence (21 amino acids) of VQ-VII showed an identity >70 % with 11 plant cysteine peptidases and the presence of highly conserved residues and motifs shared with the "papain-like" family of peptidases. VQ-VII proved to be a new latex enzyme of broad specificity, which can degrade extensively proteins of different nature in a wide pH range.

  16. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x and Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase activities by ceftaroline.

    PubMed

    Zervosen, Astrid; Zapun, André; Frère, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Although the rate of acylation of a penicillin-resistant form of Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) by ceftaroline is 80-fold lower than that of its penicillin-sensitive counterpart, it remains sufficiently high (k(2)/K = 12,600 M(-1) s(-1)) to explain the sensitivity of the penicillin-resistant strain to this new cephalosporin. Surprisingly, the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase is not very sensitive to ceftaroline.

  17. Beneficial Effects of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors on Fonsecaea pedrosoi: Promising Compounds to Arrest Key Fungal Biological Processes and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Vanila F.; Kneipp, Lucimar F.; Rozental, Sonia; Alviano, Celuta S.; Santos, André L. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the principal etiologic agent of chromoblastomycosis, a fungal disease whose pathogenic events are poorly understood. Current therapy for chromoblastomycosis is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the fact that endemic countries and regions are economically poor. Purpose and Principal Findings In the present work, we have investigated the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) peptidase inhibitors (PIs) on the F. pedrosoi conidial secreted peptidase, growth, ultrastructure and interaction with different mammalian cells. All the PIs impaired the acidic conidial-derived peptidase activity in a dose-dependent fashion, in which nelfinavir produced the best inhibitory effect. F. pedrosoi growth was also significantly reduced upon exposure to PIs, especially nelfinavir and saquinavir. PIs treatment caused profound changes in the conidial ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including invaginations in the cytoplasmic membrane, disorder and detachment of the cell wall, enlargement of fungi cytoplasmic vacuoles, and abnormal cell division. The synergistic action on growth ability between nelfinavir and amphotericin B, when both were used at sub-inhibitory concentrations, was also observed. PIs reduced the adhesion and endocytic indexes during the interaction between conidia and epithelial cells (CHO), fibroblasts or macrophages, in a cell type-dependent manner. Moreover, PIs interfered with the conidia into mycelia transformation when in contact with CHO and with the susceptibility killing by macrophage cells. Conclusions/Significance Overall, by providing the first evidence that HIV PIs directly affects F. pedrosoi development and virulence, these data add new insights on the wide-spectrum efficacy of HIV PIs, further arguing for the potential chemotherapeutic targets for aspartyl-type peptidase produced by this human

  18. Plasma native and peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin responses to restraint stress in rats. Adaptation to repeated restraint.

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchala, K; Van Loon, G R

    1990-01-01

    Met-enkephalin and related proenkephalin A-derived peptides circulate in plasma at picomolar concentration as free, native pentapeptide and at nanomolar concentration in cryptic forms. We have optimized conditions for measurement of immunoreactive Met-enkephalin in plasma and for generation by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B of much greater amounts of total peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin in plasma of rats, dogs, and humans. Free Met-enkephalin (11 pM) is constituted by native pentapeptide and its sulfoxide. Characterization of plasma total Met-enkephalin derived by peptidic hydrolysis revealed a small amount (38 pM) of Met-enkephalin associated with peptides of molecular mass less than 30,000 D, and probably derived from proenkephalin A, but much larger amounts of Met-enkephalin associated with albumin (1.2 nM) and with a globulin-sized protein (2.8 nM). Thus, plasma protein precursors for peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin differ structurally and chemically from proenkephalin A. Met-enkephalin generated from plasma by peptidic hydrolysis showed naloxone-reversible bioactivity comparable to synthetic Met-enkephalin. Prolonged exposure of adult, male rats to restraint stress produced biphasic plasma responses, with peaks occurring at 30 s and 30 min in both free native and total peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin. Repeated daily exposure to this 30-min stress resulted in adaptive loss of responses of both forms to acute restraint. Initial plasma responses of Met-enkephalin paralleled those of epinephrine and norepinephrine, but subsequently showed divergence of response. In conclusion, Met-enkephalin circulates in several forms, some of which may be derived from proteins other than proenkephalin A, and plasma levels of both free native, and peptidase-derivable Met-enkephalin are modulated physiologically. PMID:2312729

  19. Non-specific low back pain: occupational or lifestyle consequences?

    PubMed

    Stričević, Jadranka; Papež, Breda Jesenšek

    2015-12-01

    Nursing occupation was identified as a risk occupation for the development of low back pain (LBP). The aim of our study was to find out how much occupational factors influence the development of LBP in hospital nursing personnel. Non-experimental approach with a cross-sectional survey and statistical analysis. Nine hundred questionnaires were distributed among nursing personnel, 663 were returned and 659 (73.2 %) were considered for the analysis. Univariate and multivariate statistics for LBP risk was calculated by the binary logistic regression. The χ(2), influence factor, 95 % confidence interval and P value were calculated. Multivariate binary logistic regression was calculated by the Wald method to omit insignificant variables. Not performing exercises represented the highest risk for the development of LBP (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.7-4.4; p < 0.001). The second and third ranked risk factors were frequent manual lifting > 10 kg (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.5-3.8; p < 0.001) and duration of employment ≥ 19 years (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.6-3.7; p < 0.001). The fourth ranked risk factor was better physical condition by frequent recreation and sports, which reduced the risk for the development of LBP (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.3-0.7; p = 0.001). Work with the computer ≥ 2 h per day as last significant risk factor also reduced the risk for the development of LBP (OR 0.6, 95 % CI 0.4-0.1; p = 0.049). Risk factors for LBP established in our study (exercises, duration of employment, frequent manual lifting, recreation and sports and work with the computer) are not specifically linked to the working environment of the nursing personnel. Rather than focusing on mechanical causes and direct workload in the development of non-specific LBP, the complex approach to LBP including genetics, psychosocial environment, lifestyle and quality of life is coming more to the fore.

  20. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  1. Crystal structures of DPP-IV (CD26) from rat kidney exhibit flexible accommodation of peptidase-selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, Kenton L; Stewart, Kent D; Madar, David J; Jakob, Clarissa G; Fry, Elizabeth H; Wilk, Sherwin; Lin, Chun W; Ballaron, Stephen J; Stashko, Michael A; Lubben, Thomas H; Yong, Hong; Pireh, Daisy; Pei, Zhonghua; Basha, Fatima; Wiedeman, Paul E; von Geldern, Thomas W; Trevillyan, James M; Stoll, Vincent S

    2006-06-20

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) belongs to a family of serine peptidases, and due to its indirect regulatory role in plasma glucose modulation, DPP-IV has become an attractive pharmaceutical target for diabetes therapy. DPP-IV inactivates the glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and several other naturally produced bioactive peptides that contain preferentially a proline or alanine residue in the second amino acid sequence position by cleaving the N-terminal dipeptide. To elucidate the details of the active site for structure-based drug design, we crystallized a natural source preparation of DPP-IV isolated from rat kidney and determined its three-dimensional structure using X-ray diffraction techniques. With a high degree of similarity to structures of human DPP-IV, the active site architecture provides important details for the design of inhibitory compounds, and structures of inhibitor-protein complexes offer detailed insight into three-dimensional structure-activity relationships that include a conformational change of Tyr548. Such accommodation is exemplified by the response to chemical substitution on 2-cyanopyrrolidine inhibitors at the 5 position, which conveys inhibitory selectivity for DPP-IV over closely related homologues. A similar conformational change is also observed in the complex with an unrelated synthetic inhibitor containing a xanthine core that is also selective for DPP-IV. These results suggest the conformational flexibility of Tyr548 is unique among protein family members and may be utilized in drug design to achieve peptidase selectivity.

  2. Human Lysozyme Peptidase Resistance Is Perturbed by the Anionic Glycolipid Biosurfactant Rhamnolipid Produced by the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kell K; Vad, Brian S; Scavenius, Carsten; Enghild, Jan J; Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-01-10

    Infection by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is accompanied by the secretion of virulence factors such as the secondary metabolite rhamnolipid (RL) as well as an array of bacterial enzymes, including the peptidase elastase. The human immune system tries to counter this via defensive proteins such as lysozyme (HLZ). HLZ targets the bacterial cell wall but may also have other antimicrobial activities. The enzyme contains four disulfide bonds and shows high thermodynamic stability and resistance to proteolytic attack. Here we show that RL promotes HLZ degradation by several unrelated peptidases, including the PA elastase and human peptidases. This occurs although RL does not by itself denature HLZ. Nevertheless, RL binds in a sufficiently high stoichiometry (8:1 RL:HLZ) to neutralize the highly cationic surface of HLZ. The initial cleavage sites agree well with the domain boundaries of HLZ. Thus, binding of RL to native HLZ may be sufficient to allow proteolytic attack at slightly exposed sites on the protein, leading to subsequent degradation. Furthermore, biofilms of RL-producing strains of PA are protected better against high concentrations of HLZ than RL-free PA strains are. We conclude that pathogen-produced RL may weaken host defenses by facilitating degradation of key host proteins.

  3. Reduction of food intake by central administration of cholecystokinin octapeptide in the rat is dependent upon inhibition of brain peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Griesbacher, T.; Leighton, G. E.; Hill, R. G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8) and caerulein, an amphibian decapeptide structurally related to CCK-8, are inconsistent in the rat. We have therefore investigated the possibility that enzymatic degradation could be responsible for the lack of activity of CCK-8 seen in some studies on food intake. 2. Injections of CCK-8 at doses of 2.5 nmol and 25 nmol into the lateral cerebral ventricle of rats did not reduce the intake of a highly palatable diet whereas injections of the same doses of caerulein reduced food intake potently and dose-dependently. 3. Co-administration of CCK-8 with a combination of the peptidase inhibitors bestatin (70 nmol), captopril (100 nmol) and thiorphan (120 nmol) resulted in an inhibition of feeding similar to that seen after the injection of caerulein alone. The peptidase inhibitors alone did not affect food intake. 4. When caerulein was injected i.c.v. in combination with bestatin, captopril and thiorphan the effect of caerulein was potentiated, suggesting that enzymatic breakdown of caerulein does occur. 5. It is concluded that the effect of centrally administered CCK-8 on food intake is dependent on the activity of cleaving enzymes in the brain. It is emphasized that the action of brain peptidases is a major factor which has to be considered when investigating the role of peptides in the central nervous system. PMID:2647203

  4. Dopamine D3 receptor inhibits the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 to promote NHE3 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Armando, Ines; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Jones, John E.; Lee, Hewang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D.; Yu, Peiying; Yang, Jian; Escano, Crisanto S.; Pascua-Crusan, Annabelle M.; Felder, Robin A.; Jose, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is crucial in the regulation of blood pressure and sodium balance, in that Drd3 gene ablation in mice results in hypertension and failure to excrete a dietary salt load. The mechanism responsible for the renal sodium retention in these mice is largely unknown. We now offer and describe a novel mechanism by which D3R decreases sodium transport in the long term by inhibiting the deubiquitinylating activity of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 (USP48), thereby promoting Na+-H+ exchanger (NHE)-3 degradation. We found that stimulation with the D3R-specific agonist PD128907 (1 μM, 30 min) promoted the interaction and colocalization among D3R, NHE3, and USP48; inhibited USP48 activity (−35±6%, vs. vehicle), resulting in increased ubiquitinylated NHE3 (+140±10%); and decreased NHE3 expression (−50±9%) in human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTCs). USP48 silencing decreased NHE3's half-life (USP48 siRNA t1/2=6.1 h vs. vehicle t1/2=12.9 h), whereas overexpression of USP48 increased NHE3 half-life (t1/2=21.8 h), indicating that USP48 protects NHE3 from degradation via deubiquitinylation. USP48 accounted for ∼30% of the total deubiquitinylating activity in these cells. Extending our studies in vivo, we found that pharmacologic blockade of D3R via the D3R-specific antagonist GR103691 (1 μg/kg/min, 4 d) in C57Bl/6J mice increased renal NHE3 expression (+310±15%, vs. vehicle), whereas an innovative kidney-restricted Usp48 silencing via siRNA (3 μg/d, 7 d) increased ubiquitinylated NHE3 (+250±30%, vs. controls), decreased total NHE3 (−23±2%), and lowered blood pressure (−24±2 mm Hg), compared with that in control mice that received either the vehicle or nonsilencing siRNA. Our data demonstrate a crucial role for the dynamic interaction between D3R and USP48 in the regulation of NHE3 expression and function.—Armando, I., Villar, V. A. M., Jones J. E., Lee, H., Wang, X., Asico L. D., Yu, P., Yang, J., Escano, C. S. Jr., Pascua

  5. Two isoforms of Clp peptidase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa control distinct aspects of cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hall, Branwen M; Breidenstein, Elena B M; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Reffuveille, Fany; Mawla, Gina D; Hancock, Robert E W; Baker, Tania A

    2016-11-14

    Caseinolytic peptidases (ClpPs) regulate diverse aspects of cellular physiology in bacteria. Some species have multiple ClpPs including opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in which there is an archetypical isoform, ClpP1, and a second isoform, ClpP2, about which little is known. Here we use phenotypic assays to investigate biological roles of ClpP1 and ClpP2 and biochemical assays to characterize purified ClpP1, ClpP2, ClpX and ClpA. Interestingly ClpP1 and ClpP2 have distinct intracellular roles for motility, pigment production, iron scavenging and biofilm formation. Of particular interest ClpP2, but not ClpP1, is required for microcolony organization, where multicellular, organized structures first form on the pathway to biofilm production. We found that purified ClpP1, with ClpX or ClpA was enzymatically active, yet to our surprise ClpP2 was inactive and not fully assembled in vitro; attempts to assist ClpP2 assembly and activation by mixing with the other Clp components failed to turn on ClpP2, as did solution conditions that have helped activate other ClpPs in vitro We postulate that the active form of ClpP2 has yet to be discovered and present several potential models to explain its activation as well as the unique role ClpP2 plays in development of the clinically important biofilms in P. aeruginosa IMPORTANCE: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for severe infections of immunocompromised patients. Our work demonstrates that two different isoforms of Clp peptidase, ClpP1 and ClpP2, control distinct aspects of cellular physiology for this organism. In particular, we identify ClpP2 as necessary for microcolony organization. Pure, active forms of ClpP1 and either ClpX, or ClpA were characterized as assembled and active, ClpP2 was incompletely assembled and inactive. By establishing both the unique biological roles of ClpP1 and ClpP2 and their initial biochemical assemblies, we set the stage for important future work on the structure, function and

  6. The use of hexazonium-p-rosanilin in the histochemical demonstration of peptidases.

    PubMed

    Lojda, Z

    1975-09-29

    The suitability of hexazonium-p-rosanilin (HP) in the histochemical demonstration of peptidases was investigated. The detection was carried out in cold mictrotome sections adherent to slides or semipermeable membranes. Alanyl-1-naphthylamide, alanyl-2-naphthylamide, leucyl-2-naphthylamide, leucyl-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide (all substrates in concentration of 0.4 mg/1 ml of citrate phosphate buffer pH 6.5), gamma-L-glutamyl-1-naphthylamide, gamma-L-glutamyl-2-naphthylamide (both substances in concentration of 0.24 mg/1 ml of acetate buffer pH 6.5) were used as the substrates. Results were compared with those obtained with Fast Blue B and Fast Garnet GBC. In comparison with Fast Blue B and Fast Garnet GBC HP is a faster coupler, furnishes azodyes which are stable, amorphous (even without lipid extractions from sections), more substantive and in the case of 1-naphthylamine almost insoluble in ordinary lipid solvents used for the dehydration and clearing of sections before mounting. The molecular extinction coefficient of azodyes furnished by HP is 1.5X higher for 1-naphthylamine than for 2-naphthylamine. It is higher than that of Fast Garnet GBC, however, lower than that of Fast Blue B. The inhibitory influence of individual diazonium salts on enzyme activity (activities) splitting leucyl-2-naphthylamide amounts to 36% (Fast Garnet GBC), 37% (Fast Blue B), 52% (HP, 0.03 ml/1 ml) and 63% (HP, 0.09 ml/1 ml) at pH 6.5. For gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase the corresponding values are 50%, 59%, 62% and 67%. The higher inhibitory influence of HP is compensated by the possibility of its using in the technic of semipermeable membranes. HP improves greatly the localization of peptidases in cold microtome sections from which lipids were not extracted. The best results are furnished by 1-naphthylamine dervatives. In the case of 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine derivatives the localization is very sharp, however, the azodye is less distinct than that of 2-naphthylamine. The localization as

  7. Identification and characterization of a cathepsin-L-like peptidase in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renqiang; Ma, Xueting; Liu, Aijun; Zhang, Lei; Cai, Jianping; Wang, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Avian coccidiosis, caused by Eimeria spp., is one of the major parasitic diseases in birds. Cysteine protease is a major virulence factor in parasitic protozoa, and it may be a suitable chemotherapeutic target and vaccine candidate molecule. A 100 amino acid (aa.) partial sequence of cathepsin L, which is a cysteine protease, was reported by Katrib et al. (Ac. No. CDJ41293) (2012). A 219 aa. sequence was reported by Reid et al. (Ac. No. AFV92863) (2013). However, the open reading frame (ORF) was not reported. In this study, a full sequence of a cathepsin-L-like peptidase in Eimeria tenella (EtcatL) was obtained and its biochemical characterizations and expression profiles were analyzed across different stages of the parasite's life cycle. Results showed that the EtcatL gene encodes a protein 470 aa. in length, with 47 and 49% identity to Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria acervulina. Considering the close phylogenetic relationship, TgcatL (PDB. ID 3F75) was selected for use as a template for homology modeling with quality factors of 90.9. Gelatin SDS-PAGE showed it to exert protease activity at ≈38 and ≈26 kDa. Further analysis showed the kinetic parameters of the recombinant peptidase to be K m  = 8.9 μM and V max = 5.7 RFU/s μM at pH 5.5 containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) in the reaction matrix, and the IC50 value of E64 was 65.32 ± 3.02 nM. The recombinant protein was active from 25 to 50 °C, with optimal activity at 42 °C. The RT-PCR and Western blot results showed it to be expressed mainly at the endogenous stages and the initial phase of the sporulation. The protective experiment showed that chickens immunized with 100 and 200 μg rEtcatL had reduction of weight loss values 48.7 and 57.9% those of infected controls, respectively. Their reduction of lesion scores (RLS) were 25.0 and 47.2% that of control chickens, and relative oocyst production (ROP) was 39.6 and 15.5% that of control chickens. These results indicate that the EtcatL can be

  8. Protective immune responses against Schistosoma mansoni infection by immunization with functionally active gut-derived cysteine peptidases alone and in combination with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Tallima, Hatem; Dvořák, Jan; Kareem, Sahira; Abou El Dahab, Marwa; Abdel Aziz, Nada; El Ridi, Rashika

    2017-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis, a severe disease caused by parasites of the genus Schistosoma, is prevalent in 74 countries, affecting more than 250 million people, particularly children. We have previously shown that the Schistosoma mansoni gut-derived cysteine peptidase, cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), administered without adjuvant, elicits protection (>60%) against challenge infection of S. mansoni or S. haematobium in outbred, CD-1 mice. Here we compare the immunogenicity and protective potential of another gut-derived cysteine peptidase, S. mansoni cathepsin L3 (SmCL3), alone, and in combination with SmCB1. We also examined whether protective responses could be boosted by including a third non-peptidase schistosome secreted molecule, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH), with the two peptidases. Methodology/Principal findings While adjuvant-free SmCB1 and SmCL3 induced type 2 polarized responses in CD-1 outbred mice those elicited by SmCL3 were far weaker than those induced by SmCB1. Nevertheless, both cysteine peptidases evoked highly significant (P < 0.005) reduction in challenge worm burden (54–65%) as well as worm egg counts and viability. A combination of SmCL3 and SmCB1 did not induce significantly stronger immune responses or higher protection than that achieved using each peptidase alone. However, when the two peptidases were combined with SG3PDH the levels of protection against challenge S. mansoni infection reached 70–76% and were accompanied by highly significant (P < 0.005) decreases in worm egg counts and viability. Similarly, high levels of protection were achieved in hamsters immunized with the cysteine peptidase/SG3PDH-based vaccine. Conclusions/Significance Gut-derived cysteine peptidases are highly protective against schistosome challenge infection when administered subcutaneously without adjuvant to outbred CD-1 mice and hamsters, and can also act to enhance the efficacy of other schistosome antigens, such as SG3PDH. This cysteine

  9. Optimal Redundancy Management in Reconfigurable Control Systems Based on Normalized Nonspecificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N.Eva; Klir, George J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the notion of normalized nonspecificity is introduced. The nonspecifity measures the uncertainty of the estimated parameters that reflect impairment in a controlled system. Based on this notion, a quantity called a reconfiguration coverage is calculated. It represents the likelihood of success of a control reconfiguration action. This coverage links the overall system reliability to the achievable and required control, as well as diagnostic performance. The coverage, when calculated on-line, is used for managing the redundancy in the system.

  10. Nonspecific effects of neonatal and infant vaccination: public-health, immunological and conceptual challenges.

    PubMed

    Aaby, Peter; Kollmann, Tobias R; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2014-10-01

    Vaccines can have nonspecific effects through their modulation of responses to infections not specifically targeted by the vaccine. However, lack of knowledge about the underlying immunological mechanisms and molecular cause-and-effect relationships prevent use of this potentially powerful early-life intervention to its greatest benefit. The World Health Organization has identified investigations into the molecular basis of nonspecific vaccine effects as a research priority.

  11. The Mitochondrial Unfoldase-Peptidase Complex ClpXP Controls Bioenergetics Stress and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Ho; Rivadeneira, Dayana B.; Caino, M. Cecilia; Chae, Young Chan; Speicher, David W.; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano; Rampini, Paolo; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria must buffer the risk of proteotoxic stress to preserve bioenergetics, but the role of these mechanisms in disease is poorly understood. Using a proteomics screen, we now show that the mitochondrial unfoldase-peptidase complex ClpXP associates with the oncoprotein survivin and the respiratory chain Complex II subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) in mitochondria of tumor cells. Knockdown of ClpXP subunits ClpP or ClpX induces the accumulation of misfolded SDHB, impairing oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production while activating “stress” signals of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and autophagy. Deregulated mitochondrial respiration induced by ClpXP targeting causes oxidative stress, which in turn reduces tumor cell proliferation, suppresses cell motility, and abolishes metastatic dissemination in vivo. ClpP is universally overexpressed in primary and metastatic human cancer, correlating with shortened patient survival. Therefore, tumors exploit ClpXP-directed proteostasis to maintain mitochondrial bioenergetics, buffer oxidative stress, and enable metastatic competence. This pathway may provide a “drugable” therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27389535

  12. Expression and bioregulation of the kallikrein-related peptidases family in the human neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Lizama, Alejandro J; Andrade, Yessica; Colivoro, Patricio; Sarmiento, Jose; Matus, Carola E; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2015-08-01

    The family of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) has been identified in a variety of immunolabeled human tissue sections, but no previous study has experimentally confirmed their presence in the human neutrophil. We have investigated the expression and bioregulation of particular KLKs in the human neutrophil and, in addition, examined whether stimulation by a kinin B(1) receptor (B1R) agonist or fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) induces their secretion. Western blot analysis of neutrophil homogenates indicated that the MM of the KLKs ranged from 27 to 50 kDa. RT-PCR showed that blood neutrophils expressed only KLK1, KLK4, KLK10, KLK13, KLK14 and KLK15 mRNAs, whereas the non-differentiated HL-60 cells expressed most of them, with exception of KLK3 and KLK7. Nevertheless, mRNAs for KLK2, KLK5, KLK6 and KLK9 that were previously undetectable appeared after challenging with a mixture of cytokines. Both kinin B(1)R agonist and fMLP induced secretion of KLK1, KLK6, KLK10, KLK13 and KLK14 into the culture medium in similar amounts, whereas the B(1)R agonist caused the release of lower amounts of KLK2, KLK4 and KLK5. When secreted, the differing proteolytic activity of KLKs provides the human neutrophil with a multifunctional enzymatic capacity supporting a new dimension for its role in human disorders of diverse etiology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Neutrophil maturation rate determines the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 1 inhibition on neutrophil serine protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Wikell, C; Clifton, S; Shearer, J; Benjamin, A; Peters, S A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) are activated by dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) during neutrophil maturation. The effects of neutrophil turnover rate on NSP activity following DPP1 inhibition was studied in a rat pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. Experimental Approach Rats were treated with a DPP1 inhibitor twice daily for up to 14 days; NSP activity was measured in onset or recovery studies, and an indirect response model was fitted to the data to estimate the turnover rate of the response. Key Results Maximum NSP inhibition was achieved after 8 days of treatment and a reduction of around 75% NSP activity was achieved at 75% in vitro DPP1 inhibition. Both the rate of inhibition and recovery of NSP activity were consistent with a neutrophil turnover rate of between 4–6 days. Using human neutrophil turnover rate, it is predicted that maximum NSP inhibition following DPP1 inhibition takes around 20 days in human. Conclusions and Implications Following inhibition of DPP1 in the rat, the NSP activity was determined by the amount of DPP1 inhibition and the turnover of neutrophils and is thus supportive of the role of neutrophil maturation in the activation of NSPs. Clinical trials to monitor the effect of a DPP1 inhibitor on NSPs should take into account the delay in maximal response on the one hand as well as the potential delay in a return to baseline NSP levels following cessation of treatment. PMID:27186823

  14. Novel Therapeutic Role for Dipeptidyl Peptidase III in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoling; Shimizu, Akio; Kurita, Souichi; Zankov, Dimitar P; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Ishida, Tetsuo; Ogita, Hisakazu

    2016-09-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) cleaves dipeptide residues from the N terminus of polypeptides ranging from 3 to 10 amino acids in length and is implicated in pathophysiological processes through the breakdown of certain oligopeptides or their fragments. In this study, we newly identified the biochemical properties of DPP III for angiotensin II (Ang II), which consists of 8 amino acids. DPP III quickly and effectively digested Ang II with Km = 3.7×10(-6) mol/L. In the in vivo experiments, DPP III remarkably reduced blood pressure in Ang II-infused hypertensive mice without alteration of heart rate. DPP III did not affect hemodynamics in noradrenalin-induced hypertensive mice or normotensive mice, suggesting specificity for Ang II. When DPP III was intravenously injected every other day for 4 weeks after Ang II osmotic minipump implantation in mice, Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy were significantly attenuated. This DPP III effect was at least similar to that caused by an angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan. Furthermore, administration of DPP III dramatically reduced the increase in urine albumin excretion and kidney injury and inflammation markers caused by Ang II infusion. Both DPP III and candesartan administration showed slight additive inhibition in the albumin excretion. These results reveal a novel potential use of DPP III in the treatment of hypertension and its protective effects on hypertension-sensitive organs, such as the heart and kidneys. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Tanner, Houston R.; Dillon, Brett A.; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Legume–rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes. PMID:26401024

  16. Microencapsulate Aspergillus niger peptidases from agroindustrial waste wheat bran: spray process evaluation and stability.

    PubMed

    Cabral, T P F; Bellini, N C; Assis, K R; Teixeira, C C C; Lanchote, A D; Cabral, H; Freitas, L A P

    2017-08-29

    The aim of this work was to obtain microencapsulated stable Aspergillus niger peptidases by post fermentation spray drying. The enzymatic extract was evaluated before and after spray drying microencapsulation to verify the effects of five different process parameters on the extract enzymatic activity, i.e. air flow, extract feed rate, drying temperature, homogenising time and weight ratio of extract to encapsulation material. The optimal conditions were determined by desirability functions and experimentally confirmed. Additionally, the stability of the microparticles was assessed during 60 days at 4 °C, 25 °C and 40 °C. The results revealed that the microparticles stored at 4 °C retained approximately 100% of their proteolytic activity at nine days of storage. Considering the industrial adaptation of the bioprocess and the prospect of commercial application of the proteases, the evaluation of different parameters for drying enzymes is required as a valuable alternative to obtain biotechnological products with high added value.

  17. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin suppresses mouse colon tumorigenesis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Iguchi, Munetaka; Fujiwara, Kaori; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kawakami, Ken; Abe, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been used as a new therapeutic tool for type 2 diabetes. Since the substrates for DPP-4 include intestinotrophic hormones and chemokines such as GLP-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which are associated with tumor progression, DPP-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of colorectal tumors. However, the influence of DPP-4 inhibitors on colorectal neoplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes remains unknown. In the present study, we show that long-term administration of a DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin (STG), suppressed colon carcinogenesis in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) C57BL/6J mice. Colonic mucosal concentrations of glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-2 were significantly elevated in the ob/ob mice. However, mucosal GLP concentrations and the plasma level of SDF-1 were not affected by the administration of STG. Real‑time PCR analysis revealed that colonic mucosal IL-6 mRNA expression, which was significantly upregulated in the ob/ob mice, was significantly suppressed by the long-term administration of STG. These results suggest that a DPP-4 inhibitor may suppress colon carcinogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes in a GLP-independent manner. Since DPP-4 has multiple biological functions, further studies analyzing other factors related to colon carcinogenesis are needed.

  18. A Small Subset of Signal Peptidase Residues are Perturbed by Signal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Musial-Siwek, Monika; Yeagle, Philip L.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Perturbations of the chemical shifts of a small subset of residues in the catalytically active domain of Escherichia coli signal peptidase I (SPase I) upon binding signal peptide suggest the contact surface on the enzyme for the substrate. SPase I, an integral membrane protein, is vital to preprotein transport in prokaryotic and eukaryotic secretory systems; it binds and proteolyses the N-terminal signal peptide of the preprotein, permitting folding and localization of the mature protein. Employing isotopically labeled C-terminal E. coli SPase I Δ2–75 and an unlabeled soluble synthetic alkaline phosphatase signal peptide, SPase I Δ2–75 was titrated with the signal peptide and 2Δ 1H-15N hetero-nuclear single-quantum correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed chemical shifts of specific enzyme residues sensitive to substrate binding. These residues were identified by 3D HNCACB, 3D CBCA(CO)NH, and 3D HN(CO) experiments. Residues Ile80, Glu82, Gln85, Ile86, Ser88, Gly89, Ser90, Met91, Leu95, Ile101, Gly109, Val132, Lys134, Asp142, Ile144, Lys145, and Thr234, alter conformation and are likely all in, or adjacent to, the substrate binding site. The remainder of the enzyme structure is unperturbed. Ramifications for conformational changes for substrate docking and catalysis are discussed. PMID:18637988

  19. The Binding Site of Human Adenosine Deaminase for Cd26/Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Eva; Arredondo-Vega, Francisco X.; Santisteban, Ines; Kelly, Susan J.; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Hershfield, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Human, but not murine, adenosine deaminase (ADA) forms a complex with the cell membrane protein CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase IV. CD26-bound ADA has been postulated to regulate extracellular adenosine levels and to modulate the costimulatory function of CD26 on T lymphocytes. Absence of ADA–CD26 binding has been implicated in causing severe combined immunodeficiency due to ADA deficiency. Using human–mouse ADA hybrids and ADA point mutants, we have localized the amino acids critical for CD26 binding to the helical segment 126–143. Arg142 in human ADA and Gln142 in mouse ADA largely determine the capacity to bind CD26. Recombinant human ADA bearing the R142Q mutation had normal catalytic activity per molecule, but markedly impaired binding to a CD26+ ADA-deficient human T cell line. Reduced CD26 binding was also found with ADA from red cells and T cells of a healthy individual whose only expressed ADA has the R142Q mutation. Conversely, ADA with the E217K active site mutation, the only ADA expressed by a severely immunodeficient patient, showed normal CD26 binding. These findings argue that ADA binding to CD26 is not essential for immune function in humans. PMID:11067872

  20. High resolution structure of an M23 peptidase with a substrate analogue

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Maja; Jagielska, Elzbieta; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias; Sabala, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    LytM is a Staphylococcus aureus autolysin and a homologue of the S. simulans lysostaphin. Both enzymes are members of M23 metallopeptidase family (MEROPS) comprising primarily bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases. LytM occurs naturally in a latent form, but can be activated by cleavage of an inhibitory N-terminal proregion. Here, we present a 1.45 Å crystal structure of LytM catalytic domain with a transition state analogue, tetraglycine phosphinate, bound in the active site. In the electron density, the active site of the peptidase, the phosphinate and the “diglycine” fragment on the P1′ side of the transition state analogue are very well defined. The density is much poorer or even absent for the P1 side of the ligand. The structure is consistent with the involvement of His260 and/or His291 in the activation of the water nucleophile and suggests a possible catalytic role for Tyr204, which we confirmed by mutagenesis. Possible mechanisms of catalysis and the structural basis of substrate specificity are discussed based on the structure analysis. PMID:26437833

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase III is a zinc metallo-exopeptidase. Molecular cloning and expression.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, K; Fukasawa, K M; Kanai, M; Fujii, S; Hirose, J; Harada, M

    1998-01-15

    We have purified dipeptidyl peptidase III (EC 3.4.14.4) from human placenta. It had a pH optimum of 8.8 and readily hydrolysed Arg-Arg-beta-naphthylamide. Monoamino acid-, Gly-Phe-, Gly-Pro- and Bz-Arg-beta-naphthylamides were not hydrolysed at all. The enzyme was inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonic acid, metal chelators and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin and contained 1 mol of zinc per mol of enzyme. The zinc dissociation constant was 250 fM at pH 7. 4 as determined by the zinc binding study. We isolated, by immunological screening of a Uni-ZAP XR cDNA library constructed from rat liver mRNA species, a cDNA clone with 2633 bp encoding the rat enzyme. The longest open reading frame encodes a 827-residue protein with a theoretical molecular mass of 92790 Da. Escherichia coli SOLR cells were infected with the pBluescript phagemid containing the cloned cDNA and established the overexpression of a protein that hydrolysed Arg-Arg-beta-naphthylamide. The recombinant protein was purified and the amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed. We presumed that the putative zinc-binding domain involved in catalysis was present in the recombinant enzyme. It was a novel zinc-binding motif in that one amino acid residue was inserted into the conserved HEXXH motif characteristic of the metalloproteinases.

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and bone metabolism: is vitamin D the link?

    PubMed

    Barchetta, I; Cimini, F A; Bloise, D; Cavallo, M G

    2016-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4-Is) represent a promising class of agents for type 2 diabetes treatment. Experimental models and clinical studies have reported positive effects of DPP4-Is on bone; however, how DPP4-Is positively impact bone homeostasis in humans remains an unanswered question. Aim of this study investigated the relationship between treatment with DPP4-Is and vitamin D balance in patients with type 2 diabetes. This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 295 consecutive individuals with type 2 diabetes referring to our diabetes outpatient clinics were enrolled; among them, 53 % were in treatment with DPP4-Is. Metabolic profile and routine biochemistry were assessed by standard methods; serum 25(OH) vitamin D levels [25(OH)D] were measured by colorimetric method (LAISON, DiaSorin). DPP4-Is-treated participants had significantly higher serum 25(OH)D levels then those undertaking other antidiabetic therapies (18.4 ± 10.7 vs. 14.9 ± 8.6 ng/ml, p = 0.004); this association persisted after adjusting for all major confounders. Increased 25(OH)D concentrations also correlated with the duration of DPP4-Is treatment and with a stronger DPP4 inhibitory activity. DPP4-Is treatment is associated with improved vitamin D balance in people with type 2 diabetes; our findings suggest that vitamin D may underlie the link between DPP4-Is and bone metabolism.

  3. SVMDLF: A novel R-based Web application for prediction of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sharat; Pandey, Jyotsana; Tamrakar, Akhilesh K; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2017-06-06

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a well-known target for the antidiabetic drugs. However, currently available DPP4 inhibitor screening assays are costly and labor-intensive. It is important to create a robust in silico method to predict the activity of DPP4 inhibitor for the new lead finding. Here, we introduce an R-based Web application SVMDLF (SVM-based DPP4 Lead Finder) to predict the inhibitor of DPP4, based on support vector machine (SVM) model, predictions of which are confirmed by in vitro biological evaluation. The best model generated by MACCS structure fingerprint gave the Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.87 for the test set and 0.883 for the external test set. We screened Maybridge database consisting approximately 53,000 compounds. For further bioactivity assay, six compounds were shortlisted, and of six hits, three compounds showed significant DPP4 inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 8.01 to 10.73 μm. This application is an OpenCPU server app which is a novel single-page R-based Web application for the DPP4 inhibitor prediction. The SVMDLF is freely available and open to all users at http://svmdlf.net/ocpu/library/dlfsvm/www/ and http://www.cdri.res.in/svmdlf/. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  5. The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors on cardiovascular disease risks in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadeh, Pegah; Wang, Xiangbing

    2013-01-01

    To review the current literature investigating the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We conducted a search of PubMed and MEDLINE database, using the term DPP-4 inhibitor in combination with the following terms: metabolic syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and CVD. We reviewed 100 relevant studies out of 227 articles, excluding single case reports, studies using animal models, and reports not written in English. We included 38 references in this review article. The majority of the recent clinical studies have demonstrated that DPP-4 inhibitors have beneficial effects on cardiovascular (CV) system. These agents may have the potential to lower blood pressure, improve lipid profile and endothelial dysfunction, decrease the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, and prevent myocardial injury. DPP-4 inhibitors have some CV protective effects in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in addition to their antidiabetic actions. Long-term outcome clinical trials are under way to investigate the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitors on the elevated CV risks in patients with T2DM. Further investigation in a large cohort is warranted to assess the exact mechanisms of CV protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitors.

  6. Role of intestinal brush border peptidases in the simulated digestion of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; Miralles, Beatriz; Mamone, Gianfranco; Sánchez-Rivera, Laura; Recio, Isidra; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the "often neglected" intestinal brush border membranes (BBMs) hydrolases on dietary peptides, exploring the possibility that the disintegration of proteins progressed in the small intestine up to a "core" of intrinsically stable oligopeptides, persisting independently on the up-stream breakdown. Samples of sodium caseinate, skim milk powder, and whey protein isolate were submitted to in vitro simulated gastropancreatic digestion using two different procedures: (i) a simplified model involving the main compartmental specific proteases; (ii) a static digestion method based on a frameset of parameters inferred from in vivo. The gastroduodenal digesta were further hydrolyzed with peptidases from porcine jejunal BBM. The peptidomes arising from the two digestion models, characterized by combined HPLC and MS techniques, differed to some extent. However, only specific protein domains survived digestion, among which are potential bioactive or immunogenic (food allergy) peptides. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) after BBM digestion (70-77%) practically did not differ between the digestion models and significantly increased the DH after duodenal steps. Any in vitro digestion model should be supplemented with a jejunal phase to realistically determine the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of dietary peptides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 impairs insulin signaling and promotes lipid accumulation in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rufinatscha, Kerstin; Radlinger, Bernhard; Dobner, Jochen; Folie, Sabrina; Bon, Claudia; Profanter, Elisabeth; Ress, Claudia; Salzmann, Karin; Staudacher, Gabriele; Tilg, Herbert; Kaser, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 [DPP-4) has evolved into an important target in diabetes therapy due to its role in incretin hormone metabolism. In contrast to its systemic effects, cellular functions of membranous DPP-4 are less clear. Here we studied the role of DPP-4 in hepatic energy metabolism. In order to distinguish systemic from cellular effects we established a cell culture model of DPP-4 knockdown in human hepatoma cell line HepG2. DPP-4 suppression was associated with increased basal glycogen content due to enhanced insulin signaling as shown by increased phosphorylation of insulin-receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/ERK, respectively. Additionally, glucose-6-phosphatase cDNA expression was significantly decreased in DPP-4 deficiency. Reduced triglyceride content in DPP-4 knockdown cells was paralleled by enhanced expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase -1 (CPT-1) while sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) expression was significantly decreased. Our data suggest that hepatic DPP-4 induces a selective pathway of insulin resistance with reduced glycogen storage, enhanced glucose output and increased lipid accumulation in the liver. Hepatic DPP-4 might be a novel target in fatty liver disease in patients with glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26)-based prodrugs of hydroxy-containing drugs.

    PubMed

    Diez-Torrubia, Alberto; Cabrera, Silvia; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2012-04-01

    We previously described a novel prodrug approach in which a di- or tetrapeptide moiety is linked to a wide variety of amine-containing drugs through an amide bond, which is specifically cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) activity. Herein we report the application of this prodrug approach to a variety of hydroxy-containing drugs (primary, secondary, tertiary, or aromatic hydroxy groups). We designed and studied tripartite prodrugs containing a dipeptide moiety (cleavable by DPPIV/CD26) and a valine as a hetero-bifunctional connector to link the dipeptide to the hydroxy group of the drug through a metabolically labile ester bond. The hydroxy-containing prodrugs showed various susceptibilities to hydrolysis by DPPIV/CD26 and serum, depending on the nature of the compound. Prodrugs of compounds containing a primary hydroxy group (as in didanosine) or a hydroxy moiety on an aromatic entity (as in acetaminophen) were most efficiently converted. In contrast, a tertiary hydroxy group was much less susceptible to conversion into its parent drug by DPPIV/CD26 or serum. A number of the prodrugs showed remarkable increases in water solubility relative to their parent drugs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Decreased hepatic glucose production in obese rats by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Li; Zhou, De-Quan; Zhai, Hua-Ling; Wu, Hui; Guo, Zeng-Kui

    2012-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibitors are now used to improve postprandial glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. However, their effects on hepatic glucose production (HGP) in obesity are not clear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that gluconeogenesis and HGP can be modulated by DPP-4 inhibitors in obesity. Sprague Dawley male rats were divided into four groups, each on a different diet: general rat chow, n = 10 (G); G + sitagliptin, n = 10; high fat chow (obesity), n = 10 (55% fat calories, HFO); HFO + sitagliptin, n = 10. After 10 weeks, the rats were fasted overnight and glucose metabolism was determined using 3-(3)H-glucose and (14)C-glycerol as tracers. Glycerol rate of appearance (P < 0.00001), plasma glycerol (P < 0.05) and free fatty acid (FFA) (P < 0.05) concentrations, and HGP (P < 0.05) were decreased in HFO + sitagliptin group compared with HFO group, but there was no significant difference between G and G + sitagliptin groups (P > 0.05). Gluconeogenesis in HFO group was five times of that in G rats (P < 0.01), but was significantly declined in HFO + sitagliptin group (P < 0.0001). Gluconeogenesis and HGP were inhibited by sitagliptin in high fat-induced obese rats due to decreased glycerol availability, which was a result of reduced glycerol release from adipose tissues. The finding suggests that sitagliptin is potentially useful for controlling fasting glucose in obesity, thereby delaying or preventing the development of diabetes.

  10. Identification and characterization of dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity in the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus).

    PubMed

    Merchant, Mark; Mead, Stephanie; McAdon, Charles; McFatter, Justin; Wasilewski, Joe

    2010-07-01

    Serum from the American crocodile was assayed for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) activity. We measured the DPP4-mediated hydrolysis of Ala-Pro-AFC. The generation of AFC was dependent on the titer of serum, with significant DPP4 activity (0.20 + or - 0.03 nmol product formed) measured using only 2 microL of crocodile serum, with maximum activity measured using 500 microL of serum. The hydrolysis of substrate was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by diprotin A, a specific inhibitor of DPP4 activity, indicating that this activity was due to the presence of DPP4. The crocodile serum DPP4 exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with K(m) and V(max) extrapolated, by double-reciprocal plot, to be 14.7 + or - 1.3 microM and 75.5 + or - 4.3 nmol/min, respectively. Crocodile DPP4 catalyzed the hydrolysis of Ala-Pro-AFC rapidly, with substantial activity measured within 5 min of the addition of substrate. After an initial rapid increase in activity, near maximal activity (7.43 + or - 0.24 nmol product formed) measured at 180 min. Crocodile serum DPP4 activity was temperature-dependent, with steadily increased activity from 5 to 40 degrees C.

  11. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  12. Kallikrein-related Peptidase 5 Functions in Proteolytic Processing of Profilaggrin in Cultured Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Mami; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Motoyama, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Ito, Taisuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Hibino, Toshihiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin protein is synthesized in the stratum granulosum of the skin and contributes to the formation of the human skin barrier. Profilaggrin is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes and converted to functional filaggrin, but its processing mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) is a major serine protease found in the skin, which is secreted from lamellar granules following its expression in the stratum granulosum and activated in the extracellular space of the stratum corneum. Here, we searched for profilaggrin-processing protease(s) by partial purification of epidermal extracts and found KLK5 as a possible candidate. We used high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to show that KLK5 cleaves profilaggrin. Furthermore, based on a proximity ligation assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis, we reveal that KLK5 and profilaggrin co-localize in the stratum granulosum in human epidermis. KLK5 knockdown in normal cultured human epidermal keratinocytes resulted in higher levels of profilaggrin, indicating that KLK5 potentially functions in profilaggrin cleavage. PMID:23629652

  13. Molecular modeling and statistical analysis in the design of derivatives of human dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alison L E; Dos Santos, Gabriela B; Franco, Márcia S F; Federico, Leonardo B; da Silva, Carlos H T P; Santos, Cleydson B R

    2017-01-24

    Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (hDDP-IV) has a considerable importance in inactivation of glucagon-like peptide-1, which is related to type 2 diabetes. One approach for the treatment is the development of small hDDP-IV inhibitors. In order to design better inhibitors, we analyzed 5-(aminomethyl)-6-(2,4-dichlrophenyl)-2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)pyrimidin-4-amine and a set of 24 molecules found in the BindingDB web database for model designing. The analysis of their molecular properties allowed the design of a multiple linear regression model for activity prediction. Their docking analysis allowed visualization of the interactions between the pharmacophore regions and hDDP-IV. After both analyses were performed, we proposed a set of nine molecules in order to predict their activity. Four of them displayed promising activity, and thus, had their docking performed, as well as, the pharmacokinetic and toxicological study. Two compounds from the proposed set showed suitable pharmacokinetic and toxicological characteristics, and therefore, they were considered promising for future synthesis and in vitro studies.

  14. Purification and Characterization of an X-Prolyl-Dipeptidyl Peptidase from Lactobacillus sakei

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Yolanda; Toldrá, Fidel

    2001-01-01

    An X-prolyl-dipeptidyl peptidase has been purified from Lactobacillus sakei by ammonium sulfate fractionation and five chromatographic steps, which included hydrophobic interaction, anion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. This procedure resulted in a recovery yield of 7% and an increase in specificity of 737-fold. The enzyme appeared to be a dimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 88 kDa. Optimal activity was shown at pH 7.5 and 55°C. The enzyme was inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors and several divalent cations (Cu2+, Hg2+, and Zn2+). The enzyme almost exclusively hydrolyzed X-Pro from the N terminus of each peptide as well as fluorescent and colorimetric substrates; it also hydrolyzed X-Ala at the N terminus, albeit at lower rates. Km s for Gly-Pro- and Lys-Ala-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin were 29 and 88 μM, respectively; those for Gly-Pro- and Ala-Pro-p-nitroanilide were 192 and 50 μM, respectively. Among peptides, β-casomorphin 1-3 was hydrolyzed at the highest rates, while the relative hydrolysis of the other tested peptides was only 1 to 12%. The potential role of the purified enzyme in the proteolytic pathway by catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds involving proline is discussed. PMID:11282638

  15. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  16. Reciprocal Influence of Protein Domains in the Cold-Adapted Acyl Aminoacyl Peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Parravicini, Federica; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina; Brocca, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Acyl aminoacyl peptidases are two-domain proteins composed by a C-terminal catalytic α/β-hydrolase domain and by an N-terminal β-propeller domain connected through a structural element that is at the N-terminus in sequence but participates in the 3D structure of the C-domain. We investigated about the structural and functional interplay between the two domains and the bridge structure (in this case a single helix named α1-helix) in the cold-adapted enzyme from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) using both protein variants in which entire domains were deleted and proteins carrying substitutions in the α1-helix. We found that in this enzyme the inter-domain connection dramatically affects the stability of both the whole enzyme and the β-propeller. The α1-helix is required for the stability of the intact protein, as in other enzymes of the same family; however in this psychrophilic enzyme only, it destabilizes the isolated β-propeller. A single charged residue (E10) in the α1-helix plays a major role for the stability of the whole structure. Overall, a strict interaction of the SpAAP domains seems to be mandatory for the preservation of their reciprocal structural integrity and may witness their co-evolution. PMID:23457536

  17. Secreted aspartic peptidases of Candida albicans liberate bactericidal hemocidins from human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bocheńska, Oliwia; Rąpała-Kozik, Maria; Wolak, Natalia; Braś, Grażyna; Kozik, Andrzej; Dubin, Adam; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Mak, Paweł

    2013-10-01

    Secreted aspartic peptidases (Saps) are a group of ten acidic hydrolases considered as key virulence factors of Candida albicans. These enzymes supply the fungus with nutrient amino acids as well as are able to degrade the selected host's proteins involved in the immune defense. Our previous studies showed that the human menstrual discharge is exceptionally rich in bactericidal hemoglobin (Hb) fragments - hemocidins. However, to date, the genesis of such peptides is unclear. The presented study demonstrates that the action of C. albicans isozymes Sap1-Sap6, Sap8 and Sap9, but not Sap7 and Sap10, toward human hemoglobin leads to limited proteolysis of this protein and generates a variety of antimicrobial hemocidins. We have identified these peptides and checked their activity against selected microorganisms representative for human vagina. We have also demonstrated that the process of Hb hydrolysis is most effective at pH 4.0, characteristic for vagina, and the liberated peptides showed pronounced killing activity toward Lactobacillus acidophilus, and to a lower degree, Escherichia coli. However, only a very weak activity toward Staphylococcus aureus and C. albicans was noticed. These findings provide interesting new insights into pathophysiology of human vaginal candidiasis and suggest that C. albicans may be able to compete with the other microorganisms of the same physiological niche using the microbicidal peptides generated from the host protein.

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and the ischemic heart: Additional benefits beyond glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-01-01

    Obese-insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have become global health problems, and they are both associated with a higher risk of ischemic heart disease. Although reperfusion therapy is the treatment to increase blood supply to the ischemic myocardium, this intervention potentially causes cardiac tissue damage and instigates arrhythmias, processes known as reperfusion injury. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are glycemic control drugs commonly used in T2DM patients. Growing evidence from basic and clinical studies demonstrates that a DPP-4 inhibitor could exert cardioprotection and improve left ventricular function by reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis, and increasing reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) activity. However, recent reports also showed potentially adverse cardiac events due to the use of a DPP-4 inhibitor. To investigate this disparity, future large clinical trials are essential in verifying whether DPP-4 inhibitors are beneficial beyond their glycemic control particularly for the ischemic heart in obese-insulin resistant subjects and T2DM patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 regulates Mdm2 protein levels independent of its deubiquitinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Cetkovská, Kateřina; Šustová, Hana; Uldrijan, Stjepan

    2017-01-01

    The overexpression of Mdm2 has been linked to the loss of p53 tumour suppressor activity in several human cancers. Here, we present results suggesting that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 (USP48), a deubiquitinase that has been linked in previous reports to the NF-κB signaling pathway, is a novel Mdm2 binding partner that promotes Mdm2 stability and enhances Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. In contrast to other deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) that have been previously implicated in the regulation of Mdm2 protein stability, USP48 did not induce Mdm2 stabilization by significantly reducing Mdm2 ubiquitination levels. Moreover, two previously characterized USP48 mutants lacking deubiquitinase activity were also capable of efficiently stabilizing Mdm2, indicating that USP48 utilizes a non-canonical, deubiquitination-independent mechanism to promote Mdm2 oncoprotein stability. This study represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first report suggesting DUB-mediated target protein stabilization that is independent of its deubiquitinase activity. In addition, our results suggest that USP48 might represent a new mechanism of crosstalk between the NF-κB and p53 stress response pathways. PMID:28233861

  20. Substrate Specificity of the Lanthipeptide Peptidase ElxP and the Oxidoreductase ElxO

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The final step in lanthipeptide biosynthesis involves the proteolytic removal of an N-terminal leader peptide. In the class I lanthipeptide epilancin 15X, this step is performed by the subtilisin-like serine peptidase ElxP. Bioinformatic, kinetic, and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that ElxP recognizes the stretch of amino acids DLNPQS located near the proteolytic cleavage site of its substrate, ElxA. When the ElxP recognition motif was inserted into the noncognate lanthipeptide precursor NisA, ElxP was able to proteolytically remove the leader peptide from NisA. Proteolytic removal of the leader peptide by ElxP during the biosynthesis of epilancin 15X exposes an N-terminal dehydroalanine on the core peptide of ElxA that hydrolyzes to a pyruvyl group. The short-chain dehydrogenase ElxO reduces the pyruvyl group to a lactyl moiety in the final step of epilancin 15X maturation. Using synthetic peptides, we also investigated the substrate specificity of ElxO and determined the 1.85 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme. PMID:24866416

  1. Saxagliptin: a new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2009-05-01

    Saxagliptin is a potent and selective reversible inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is being developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is absorbed rapidly after oral administration and has a pharmacokinetic profile compatible with once daily dosing. Saxagliptin is metabolized in vivo to form an active metabolite, and both parent drug and metabolite are excreted primarily via the kidneys. Saxagliptin reduces the degradation of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1, thereby enhancing its actions, and is associated with improved beta-cell function and suppression of glucagon secretion. Clinical trials of up to 24 weeks duration have shown that saxagliptin improves glycemic control in monotherapy and provides additional efficacy when used in combination with other oral antidiabetic agents (metformin, sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione). Both fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations are reduce leading to clinically meaningful reductions in glycated hemoglobin, and due to the glucose-dependency of its mechanism of action, there is a low risk of hypoglycemia. Saxagliptin is reported to be well tolerated with a side-effect profile similar to placebo. It has a neutral effect on body weight and dose adjustment because of age, gender, or hepatic impairment is not necessary. Saxagliptin is being co-developed by Bristol-Myers-Squibb (New York, NY, USA) and AstraZeneca (Cheshire, UK), and is currently undergoing regulatory review.

  2. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  3. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul A; Tanner, Houston R; Dillon, Brett A; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C; Griffitts, Joel S

    2015-12-08

    Legume-rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes.

  4. Translocase and major signal peptidase malfunctions affect aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gullón, Sonia; Palomino, Carmen; Navajas, Rosana; Paradela, Alberto; Mellado, Rafael P

    2012-08-31

    Deficiency in the translocase complex (SecG mutant strain) or in the major type I signal peptidase (SipY mutant strain) function in Streptomyces lividans resulted, as expected, in a drastic reduction of secretory protein production and in a bald phenotype. The transcriptional profiling of both strains showed that the expression of a set of genes involved in the morphological differentiation process was down regulated in both mutant strains (bldG, bldN and bldM), whereas bldA and bldH were only down-regulated in the SipY mutant strain. Consistently, low temperature scanning electron microscopy revealed that the disruption of sipY had a more noticeable effect in the growth/morphological aspect of the mycelium than that of secG, suggesting that in the sipY mutant, the blockage of the export process might have more severe consequences than in the secG mutant. In both cases, the likely degradation of the proteins that cannot be secreted might provide nutrients that might be responsible for the lack of induction of the bald cascade, which is thought to be triggered under conditions of nutritional limitation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and fracture risk: an updated meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianying; Zhu, Jianhong; Hao, Yehua; Guo, Chongchong; Zhou, Zhikun

    2016-01-01

    Data on the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on fracture risk are conflicting. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Electronic databases were searched for relevant published articles, and unpublished studies presented at ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for relevant clinical data. Eligible studies included prospective randomized trials evaluating DPP-4 inhibitors versus placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Study quality was determined using Jadad scores. Statistical analyses were performed to calculate the risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using fixed-effects models. There were 62 eligible RCTs with 62,206 participants, including 33,452 patients treated with DPP-4 inhibitors. The number of fractures was 364 in the exposed group and 358 in the control group. The overall risk of fracture did not differ between patients exposed to DPP-4 inhibitors and controls (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83–1.10; P = 0.50). The results were consistent across subgroups defined by type of DPP-4 inhibitor, type of control, and length of follow-up. The study showed that DPP-4 inhibitor use does not modify the risk of bone fracture compared with placebo or other anti-diabetic medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27384445

  6. Linagliptin: the newest dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Rachael; Cheng-Lai, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are some of the newest medications in our armamentarium for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Through inhibition of the DPP-4 enzyme, these agents increase the amount of circulating incretin hormones, leading to an increase in insulin release and a suppression of glucagon secretion. Linagliptin is the third DPP-4 inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. It has been studied as monotherapy and as an adjunctive therapy to other oral agents in a dual or triple combination regimen. Linagliptin lowers glycosylated hemoglobin by about 0.4% when used as monotherapy and by about 0.5% to 1.1% when used in combination with other oral antihyperglycemic agents. Since linagliptin is mostly eliminated via the enterohepatic system (80%) and not to a significant extent through renal excretion, dosage adjustment is not necessary in patients with renal impairment. Linagliptin also has a favorable safety profile; nasopharyngitis is one of the more common observed side effects. Given its encouraging safety and efficacy profile, linagliptin is a good alternative to the other 2 agents in this class, especially for patients with renal impairment. This article provides a review of the pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties of linagliptin. The differences among the 3 available DPP-4 inhibitors will also be examined.

  7. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition by Pterocarpus marsupium and Eugenia jambolana ameliorates streptozotocin induced Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Madhunapantula, Subbarao V; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Khatwal, Rizwan Basha; Dubala, Anil; Muthureddy Nataraj, Satish Kumar; Basavan, Duraiswamy

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is characterized by the loss of normal functions of brain cells and neuronal death, ultimately leading to memory loss. Recent accumulating evidences have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of anti-diabetic agents, such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), providing opportunities to explore and test the DPP-4 inhibitors for treating this fatal disease. Prior studies determining the efficacy of Pterocarpus marsupium (PM, Fabaceae) and Eugenia jambolana (EJ, Myrtaceae) extracts for ameliorating type 2 diabetes have demonstrated the DPP-4 inhibitory properties indicating the possibility of using of these extracts even for the treating AD. Therefore, in the present study, the neuroprotective roles of PM and EJ for ameliorating the streptozotocin (STZ) induced AD have been tested in rat model. Experimentally, PM and EJ extracts, at a dose range of 200 and 400mg/kg, were administered orally to STZ induced AD Wistar rats and cognitive evaluation tests were performed using radial arm maze and hole-board apparatus. Following 30 days of treatment with the extracts, a dose- and time-dependent attenuation of AD pathology, as evidenced by decreasing amyloid beta 42, total tau, phosphorylated tau and neuro-inflammation with an increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels was observed. Therefore, PM and EJ extracts contain cognitive enhancers as well as neuroprotective agents against STZ induced AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced serum dipeptidyl peptidase-IV after metformin and pioglitazone treatments.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, James M; Croom, Dallas K; Minnick, Dana T

    2004-11-05

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) regulates metabolism by degrading incretins involved in nutritional regulation. Metformin and pioglitazone improve insulin sensitivity whereas glyburide promotes insulin secretion. Zucker diabetic rats were treated with these antidiabetic agents for 2 weeks and DPP-IV activity and expression were determined. Serum DPP-IV activity increased whereas tissue activity decreased as the rats aged. Treatment of rats with metformin, pioglitazone, and glyburide did not alter DPP-IV mRNA expression in liver or kidney. Metformin and pioglitazone significantly (P<0.05) reduced serum DPP-IV activity and glycosylated hemoglobin. Glyburide did not lower DPP-IV activity or glycosylated hemoglobin. Regression analysis showed serum DPP-IV activity correlated with glycosylated hemoglobin (r=0.92) and glucagon-like peptide-1 levels (r=-0.49). Metformin, pioglitazone, and glyburide had no effect on serum DPP-IV activity in vitro, indicating these are not competitive DPP-IV inhibitors. We propose the in vivo inhibitory effects observed with metformin and pioglitazone on serum DPP-IV activity results from reduced DPP-IV secretion.

  9. C-Peptide Levels Predict the Effectiveness of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Sevin; Sargin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to define the conditions that affect therapeutic success when dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor is added to metformin monotherapy. Materials and Methods. We reviewed the medical records of 56 patients who had received DPP-4 inhibitor as an add-on to metformin monotherapy and evaluated their response in the first year of therapy. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), HbA1c, C-peptide, and weight of the patients were recorded at 3-month intervals during the first year of treatment. Results. Patients who added DPP-4 inhibitor to metformin monotherapy had significant weight loss (P = 0.004) and FBG and HbA1c levels were significantly lowered during the first 6 months (both P < 0.001). Baseline levels of C-peptide were predictive for success of the treatment (P = 0.02), even after correction for confounding factors, for example, age, gender, or BMI (P = 0.03). Duration of diabetes was not a predictor of response to treatment (P = 0.60). Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that in patients having inadequate glycemic control, the addition of a DPP-4 inhibitor as a second oral agent to metformin monotherapy provides better glycemic control, protects β-cell reserves, and does not cause weight gain. These effects depend on baseline C-peptide levels. PMID:27882332

  10. Computational Analysis of Gynura bicolor Bioactive Compounds as Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rozano, Lina; Abdullah Zawawi, Muhammad Redha; Ahmad, Muhamad Aizuddin; Jaganath, Indu Bala

    2017-01-01

    The inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPPIV) is a popular route for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Commercially available gliptin-based drugs such as sitagliptin, anagliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, and alogliptin were specifically developed as DPPIV inhibitors for diabetic patients. The use of Gynura bicolor in treating diabetes had been reported in various in vitro experiments. However, an understanding of the inhibitory actions of G. bicolor bioactive compounds on DPPIV is still lacking and this may provide crucial information for the development of more potent and natural sources of DPPIV inhibitors. Evaluation of G. bicolor bioactive compounds for potent DPPIV inhibitors was computationally conducted using Lead IT and iGEMDOCK software, and the best free-binding energy scores for G. bicolor bioactive compounds were evaluated in comparison with the commercial DPPIV inhibitors, sitagliptin, anagliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, and alogliptin. Drug-likeness and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) analysis were also performed. Based on molecular docking analysis, four of the identified bioactive compounds in G. bicolor, 3-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and trans-5-p-coumaroylquinic acid, resulted in lower free-binding energy scores when compared with two of the commercially available gliptin inhibitors. The results revealed that bioactive compounds in G. bicolor are potential natural inhibitors of DPPIV.

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition improves left ventricular function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Kim A; Bowskill, Bridgit B; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Chen, Li-Hao; Kabir, M Golam; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a common comorbidity in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for which no evidence-based treatment currently exists. Recently, a group of anti-hyperglycemic agents used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, termed incretin-based therapies, have come under scrutiny for their putative glucose-independent effects on cardiac function. In the present study, the actions of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor class of incretin-based therapy in preventing HFpEF induced by chronic renal impairment were investigated. Sham-operated and subtotally-nephrectomized rats were randomized to receive the DPP-4 inhibitors, linagliptin or sitagliptin for seven weeks before assessment of cardiac and renal structure and function. Analysis of pressure-volume loops revealed that both linagliptin and sitagliptin prevented the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction, with cardiac collagen I synthesis also being reduced by DPP-4 inhibition. These attenuating cardiac effects occurred without change in renal function or structure where, in the doses administered, neither linagliptin nor sitagliptin affected GFR decline, proteinuria, renal fibrosis or the increased urinary excretion of biomarkers of renal toxicity. The beneficial cardiac effects of DPP-4 inhibition, in the absence of a concurrent improvement in renal dysfunction, raise the possibility that these agents may confer cardiovascular advantages in the CKD population.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1 and rheumatic disease: genetics.

    PubMed

    Ombrello, Michael J; Kastner, Daniel L; Remmers, Elaine F

    2015-07-01

    This article will review the genetic evidence implicating ERAP1, which encodes the endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1, in susceptibility to rheumatic disease. Genetic variants and haplotypes of ERAP1 are associated with AS, psoriasis, and Behçet's disease in people of varying ancestries. In each of these diseases, disease-associated variants of ERAP1 have been shown to interact with disease-associated class I human leukocyte antigen alleles to influence disease risk. Functionally, disease-associated missense variants of ERAP1 concertedly alter ERAP1 enzymatic function, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whereas other disease-associated variants influence ERAP1 expression. Therefore, ERAP1 haplotypes (or allotypes) should be examined as functional units. Biologically, this amounts to an examination of the gene regulation and function of the protein encoded by each allotype. Genetically, the relationship between disease risk and ERAP1 allotypes should be examined to determine whether allotypes or individual variants produce the most parsimonious risk models. Future investigations of ERAP1 should focus on comprehensively characterizing naturally occurring ERAP1 allotypes, examining the enzymatic function and gene expression of each allotype, and identifying specific allotypes that influence disease susceptibility.

  13. Effect of temperature on the stability of various peptidases during peptide-enriched soy sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takeharu; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Uchida, Riichiro

    2012-03-01

    We previously developed a peptide-enriched soy sauce-like seasoning called Fermented Soybean Seasoning (FSS) with high-temperature fermentation, and we have reported the antihypertensive effects of FSS. Seryl-tyrosine (Ser-Tyr) and glycyl-tyrosine (Gly-Tyr) were identified from FSS as active constituents in the antihypertensive effects. They were found to be particularly enriched in FSS; more so than in regular soy sauce. In the present study, we clarified one of the mechanisms underlying the accumulation of these bioactive peptides during high temperature soy sauce brewing. Crude enzyme extracts were prepared from model soy sauce mash (moromi) fermented at various temperatures. Leucine aminopeptidase-I, II, and seryl-tyrosine hydrolytic activity were found to decrease in the moromi incubated at the fermentation temperature of FSS whereas almost no decrease was observed in that of regular soy sauce. The concentrations of ACE inhibitory peptides, Ser-Tyr and Gly-Tyr, in the moromi incubated at high temperature were revealed to be higher than those at low temperature through quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis. These results suggested that the peptidases responsible for degrading low molecular weight bioactive peptides were inactivated during the high temperature fermentation, thus, these peptides would be likely to remain in the high temperature fermentation.

  14. Developmental study of tripeptidyl peptidase I activity in the mouse central nervous system and peripheral organs.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Mashenka; Deleva, Denislava; Pavlova, Velichka; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2011-11-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) - a lysosomal serine protease - is encoded by the CLN2 gene, mutations that cause late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) connected with profound neuronal loss, severe clinical symptoms and early death at puberty. Developmental studies of TPPI activity levels and distribution have been done in the human and rat central nervous systems (CNS) and visceral organs. Similar studies have not been performed in mouse. In this paper, we follow up on the developmental changes in the enzyme activity and localization pattern in the CNS and visceral organs of mouse over the main periods of life - embryonic, neonate, suckling, infantile, juvenile, adult and aged - using biochemical assays and enzyme histochemistry. In the studied peripheral organs (liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas and lung) TPPI is present at birth but further its pattern is not consistent in different organs over different life periods. TPPI activity starts to be expressed in the brain at the 10th embryonic day but in most neuronal types it appears at the early infantile period, increases during infancy, reaches high activity levels in the juvenile period and is highest in adult and aged animals. Thus, in mice TPPI activity becomes crucial for the neuronal functions later in development (juvenile period) than in humans and does not decrease with aging. These results are essential as a basis for comparison between normal and pathological TPPI patterns in mice. They can be valuable in view of the use of animal models for studying LINCL and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-01-29

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8(+) T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127(-)CD28(-)CD57(+) phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21(-) CD11c(+) phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias.

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase III is a zinc metallo-exopeptidase. Molecular cloning and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, K; Fukasawa, K M; Kanai, M; Fujii, S; Hirose, J; Harada, M

    1998-01-01

    We have purified dipeptidyl peptidase III (EC 3.4.14.4) from human placenta. It had a pH optimum of 8.8 and readily hydrolysed Arg-Arg-beta-naphthylamide. Monoamino acid-, Gly-Phe-, Gly-Pro- and Bz-Arg-beta-naphthylamides were not hydrolysed at all. The enzyme was inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonic acid, metal chelators and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin and contained 1 mol of zinc per mol of enzyme. The zinc dissociation constant was 250 fM at pH 7. 4 as determined by the zinc binding study. We isolated, by immunological screening of a Uni-ZAP XR cDNA library constructed from rat liver mRNA species, a cDNA clone with 2633 bp encoding the rat enzyme. The longest open reading frame encodes a 827-residue protein with a theoretical molecular mass of 92790 Da. Escherichia coli SOLR cells were infected with the pBluescript phagemid containing the cloned cDNA and established the overexpression of a protein that hydrolysed Arg-Arg-beta-naphthylamide. The recombinant protein was purified and the amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed. We presumed that the putative zinc-binding domain involved in catalysis was present in the recombinant enzyme. It was a novel zinc-binding motif in that one amino acid residue was inserted into the conserved HEXXH motif characteristic of the metalloproteinases. PMID:9425109

  17. The potential of signal peptide peptidase as a therapeutic target for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Moriishi, Kohji

    2017-09-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver steatosis, cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome with inflammation, and eventually leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein is a well-known capsid protein and pathogenic factor related to lipid accumulation, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and carcinogenesis. Cleavage of the C-terminal transmembrane region by signal peptide peptidase (SPP) is required for maturation of the core protein. Areas covered: Herein, this review details the general aspects of the structure, lifecycle, pathogenesis, and maturation of the HCV core protein, the function of SPP, and clinically available direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). SPP is classified into a group of GXGD-type intramembrane proteases including presenilin-1, which is a component of γ-secretase complex. Several SPP inhibitors were previously identified from γ-secretase inhibitors, but have not yet been improved based on specificity to SPP. Finally, the author discusses the potential of SPP inhibitors for hepatitis C therapy. Expert opinion: Currently available DAAs therapies are limited because of different viral genotypes and underlying conditions in each patient. DAA-resistant viruses have also been reported. Development of SPP-selective inhibitors may improve current HCV therapies by decreasing in the emergence of DAA-resistant viruses irrespective of viral genotype.

  18. Evaluation of human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases 6 and 10 expression in early gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grin, Andrea; Samaan, Sara; Tripathi, Monika; Rotondo, Fabio; Kovacs, Kalman; Bassily, Mena N; Yousef, George M

    2015-04-01

    Kallikreins are a family of serine proteases that are linked to malignancy of different body organs with potential clinical utility as tumor markers. In this study, we investigated kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) and KLK10 expression in early gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus (BE) with and without dysplasia. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly increased KLK6 expression in early invasive cancer compared with dysplastic (P = .009) and nondysplastic BE (P = .0002). There was a stepwise expression increase from metaplasia to dysplasia and invasive tumors. Significantly higher KLK10 was seen in dysplastic lesions compared with metaplasia but not between dysplastic lesions and invasive cancers. KLK6 staining intensity was increased at the invasive front (P = .006), suggesting its role in tumor invasiveness. Neither KLK6 nor KLK10 was significantly associated with other prognostic markers, including depth of invasion, indicating their potential as independent biomarkers. Our results should be interpreted with caution due to limited sample size. There was a significant correlation between KLK6 and KLK10 expression both at the invasive front and within the main tumor, indicating a collaborative effect. We then compared KLK6 and KLK10 messenger RNA expression between metaplastic and cancerous tissues in an independent data set of esophageal carcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas. KLK6 and KLK10 may be useful markers and potential therapeutic targets in gastroesophageal junction tumors.

  19. Effect of acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain morphology and tripeptidyl peptidase I activity.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Emilia B; Dimitrova, Mashenka B; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Pavlova, Velichka G; Dimitrova, Stella G; Kadiysky, Dimitar S

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxic events are known to cause substantial damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The impact of hypoxic shock on other brain parts is not sufficiently studied. Recent studies show that tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) activity in fish is altered after a hypoxic stress pointing out at a possible enzyme involvement in response to hypoxia. Similar studies are not performed in mammals. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite-induced acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain was studied at different post-treatment periods. Morphological changes in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, mesencephalon and pons were assessed using silver-copper impregnation for neurodegeneration. TPPI activity was biochemically assayed and localized by enzyme histochemistry. Although less vulnerable to oxidative stress, the studied brain areas showed different histopathological changes, such as neuronal loss and tissue vacuolization, dilatation of the smallest capillaries and impairment of neuronal processes. TPPI activity was strictly regulated following the hypoxic stress. It was found to increase 12-24h post-treatment, then decreased followed by a slow process of recovery. The enzyme histochemistry revealed a temporary enzyme deficiency in all types of neurons. These findings indicate a possible involvement of the enzyme in rat brain response to hypoxic stress.

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase I controls survival from Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection by processing surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Rachel E; Barry, Sophia S; Olsen, Joanna S; Salantes, D Brenda; Caughey, George H; Wolters, Paul J

    2014-07-18

    Prior work established that a deficiency in the cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) improves survival following polymicrobial septic peritonitis. To test whether DPPI regulates survival from severe lung infections, DPPI(-/-) mice were studied in a Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection model, finding that survival in DPPI(-/-) mice is significantly better than in DPPI(+/+) mice 8d after infection. DPPI(-/-) mice have significantly fewer bacteria in the lung than infected DPPI(+/+) mice, but no difference in lung histopathology, lung injury, or cytokine levels. To explore mechanisms of enhanced bacterial clearance in DPPI(-/-) mice, we examined the status of pulmonary collectins, finding that levels of surfactant protein D, but not of surfactant protein A, are higher in DPPI(-/-) than in DPPI(+/+) BAL fluid, and that DPPI(-/-) BAL fluid aggregate bacteria more effectively than control BAL fluid. Sequencing of the amino terminus of surfactant protein D revealed two or eight additional amino acids in surfactant protein D isolated from DPPI(-/-) mice, suggesting processing by DPPI. These results establish that DPPI is a major determinant of survival following Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and suggest that the survival disadvantage in DPPI(+/+) mice is in part due to processing of surfactant protein D by DPPI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dipeptidyl Peptidase I Controls Survival from Klebsiella pneumoniae Lung Infection by Processing Surfactant Protein D 1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; Salantes, D. Brenda; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior work established that a deficiency in the cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) improves survival following polymicrobial septic peritonitis. To test whether DPPI regulates survival from severe lung infections, DPPI −/− mice were studied in a Klebsiella pneumonia lung infection model, finding that survival in DPPI −/− mice is significantly better than in DPPI +/+ mice 8 d after infection. DPPI −/− mice have significantly fewer bacteria in the lung than infected DPPI +/+ mice, but no difference in lung histopathology, lung injury, or cytokine levels. To explore mechanisms of enhanced bacterial clearance in DPPI −/− mice, we examined the status of pulmonary collectins, finding that levels of surfactant protein D, but not of surfactant protein A, are higher in DPPI −/− than in DPPI +/+ BAL fluid, and that DPPI −/− BAL fluid aggregate bacteria more effectively than control BAL fluid. Sequencing of the amino terminus of surfactant protein D revealed two or eight additional amino acids in surfactant protein D isolated from DPPI −/− mice, suggesting processing by DPPI. These results establish that DPPI is a major determinant of survival following Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and suggest that the survival disadvantage in DPPI +/+ mice is in part due to processing of surfactant protein D by DPPI. PMID:24955853

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors as add-on therapy to insulin: rationale and evidences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-08

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus being a progressive disease will eventually require insulin therapy. While insulin therapy is the ultimate option, many patients still fall short of target glycemic goals. This could, perhaps be due to the fear, unwillingness and practical barriers to insulin intensification. Hypoglycemia, oedema and weight gain is another limitation. Newer therapies with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are exciting options as both classes do not cause hypoglycemia and are either weight neutral or cause weight loss. DPP-4 inhibitors are an appealing option as an add-on therapy to insulin especially in elderly and patients with renal impairment. Moreover, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) mediated augmentation of glucagon by DPP-4 inhibitors could also protect against hypoglycemia. These collective properties make these class a potential add-on candidate to insulin therapy. This article will review the efficacy and safety of DPP-4 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin therapy.

  3. Tyrosine 547 constitutes an essential part of the catalytic mechanism of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    PubMed

    Bjelke, Jais R; Christensen, Jesper; Branner, Sven; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Olsen, Christina; Kanstrup, Anders B; Rasmussen, Hanne B

    2004-08-13

    Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a ubiquitously expressed type II transmembrane serine protease. It cleaves the penultimate positioned prolyl bonds at the N terminus of physiologically important peptides such as the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide. In this study, we have characterized different active site mutants. The Y547F mutant as well as the catalytic triad mutants S630A, D708A, and H740L showed less than 1% wild type activity. X-ray crystal structure analysis of the Y547F mutant revealed no overall changes compared with wild type apoDPP-IV, except the ablation of the hydroxyl group of Tyr(547) and a water molecule positioned in close proximity to Tyr(547). To elucidate further the reaction mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of DPP-IV in complex with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, mimicking the tetrahedral intermediate. The kinetic and structural findings of the tyrosine residue are discussed in relation to the catalytic mechanism of DPP-IV and to the inhibitory mechanism of the 2-cyanopyrrolidine class of potent DPP-IV inhibitors, proposing an explanation for the specificity of this class of inhibitors for the S9b family among serine proteases.

  4. Kallikrein-related peptidases in prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers: from pathobiology to clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Avgeris, Margaritis; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK2-15) comprise a family of 15 highly conserved secreted serine proteases with similar structural characteristics and a wide spectrum of functional properties. Both gene expression and protein activity of KLKs are rigorously controlled at various levels via diverse mechanisms, including extensive steroid hormone regulation, to exert their broad physiological role. Nevertheless, deregulated expression, secretion, and function of KLK family members has been observed in several pathological conditions and, particularly, in endocrine-related human malignancies, including those of the prostate, breast, and ovary. The cancer-related abnormal activity of KLKs upon substrates such as growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cell surface receptors, and extracellular matrix proteins facilitate both tumorigenesis and disease progression to the advanced stages. The well-documented relationship between KLK status and the clinical outcome of cancer patients has led to their identification as promising diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment response monitoring biomarkers for these complex disease entities. The main objective of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge concerning the role of KLKs in prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers and to highlight their continually evolving biomarker capabilities that can provide significant benefits for the management of cancer patients.

  5. Preventing nonspecific adsorption on polymer brush covered gold electrodes using a modified ATRP initiator.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Abhinav; Nad, Suddhasattwa; Tanaka, Manabu; Mota, Nicolas Da; Tague, Michele; Baird, Barbara A; Abruña, Héctor D; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-10-12

    Biological systems have a tendency to adsorb nonspecifically onto a solid substrate, thus reducing the efficacy of the interface being used in biorecognition. This nonspecific adsorption is a common problem in the development of biosensors as it typically reduces the efficacy of the sensor platform. In this manuscript we report the synthesis of an oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) containing ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) thiol initiator and demonstrate the role of this initiator in preventing nonspecific adsorption of IgG antibodies on chemically functionalized gold electrode surfaces using cyclic voltammetry. A new synthetic route for the synthesis of the new ATRP thiol initiator in high yields has been reported. Surface initiated poly(acrylic acid) brushes grown off the gold surface with modified OEG containing and conventional ATRP thiol initiators were chemically modified with 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) groups. Amperometric studies were carried out on gold electrodes modified with DNP-PAA brushes using DNP-specific and nonspecific IgG antibodies. The cyclic voltammograms of an osmium redox mediator recorded over time suggest that the chemical modification of the gold electrodes with DNP-PAA brushes using the OEG-containing ATRP initiator is much more effective in preventing nonspecific adsorption of antibodies than polymer brushes grown from the conventional initiator. Finally, we confirmed these results with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique by quantitatively evaluating the adsorption of nonspecific IgG antibodies on DNP-PAA functionalized QCM surfaces. The use of this modified ATRP thiol initiator to chemically functionalize macro/microelectrode surfaces will help develop reproducible, reliable, and robust electrochemical biosensors with minimized nonspecific adsorption.

  6. Splitter imperfections in annular split-flow thin separation channels: experimental study of nonspecific crossover.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Decker, Keith; Nakamura, Masayuki; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Moore, Lee R; Zborowski, Maciej

    2003-12-01

    The separation performance of a split-flow thin (SPLITT) separation device depends on uniformity of channel thickness and the precise placement of the flow splitters at fixed distances between the channel walls. The observation of nonspecific crossover, that is, the transport of sample materials across the channel thickness without the influence of an applied field, has routinely been taken to indicate the presence of irregularities in splitter shape or placement. Computational fluid dynamics software may be used to predict the influence of splitter imperfections on nonspecific crossover, where it is assumed that sample transport is by convection alone. A previous study has shown how small inlet splitter imperfections can account for the relatively low levels of nonspecific crossover observed with typical annular SPLITT devices. This study, however, could not distinguish between the possible sources of nonspecific crossover; hydrodynamic lift or shear-induced diffusion could have contributed. To confirm the validity of the computational approach, a series of experiments has been carried out on a channel having a deliberately and severely bent splitter. Nonspecific crossover was measured for a range of inlet and outlet flow rate ratios, with the bent splitter placed at both the channel inlet and outlet. The severity of the splitter distortion was sufficient to produce significant nonspecific crossover over a wide range of flow conditions. Good agreement was found between experiment and prediction based on computational fluid dynamics, with experiment generally showing only slightly higher crossover than prediction. The quantitative agreement for this extreme case suggests that the contribution to nonspecific crossover due to geometrical imperfections can be well described using computational fluid dynamics.

  7. An angiotensin-(1-7) peptidase in the kidney cortex, proximal tubules, and human HK-2 epithelial cells that is distinct from insulin-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bryan A; Cruz-Diaz, Nildris; Marshall, Allyson C; Pirro, Nancy T; Su, Yixin; Gwathmey, TanYa M; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin 1-7 [ANG-(1-7)] is expressed within the kidney and exhibits renoprotective actions that antagonize the inflammatory, fibrotic, and pro-oxidant effects of ANG II. We previously identified an peptidase that preferentially metabolized ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the brain medulla and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep (Marshall AC, Pirro NT, Rose JC, Diz DI, Chappell MC. J Neurochem 130: 313-323, 2014); thus the present study established the expression of the peptidase in the kidney. Utilizing a sensitive HPLC-based approach, we demonstrate a peptidase activity that hydrolyzed ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the sheep cortex, isolated tubules, and human HK-2 renal epithelial cells. The peptidase was markedly sensitive to the metallopeptidase inhibitor JMV-390; human HK-2 cells expressed subnanomolar sensitivity (IC50 = 0.5 nM) and the highest specific activity (123 ± 5 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) compared with the tubules (96 ± 12 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) and cortex (107 ± 9 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)). The peptidase was purified 41-fold from HK-2 cells; the activity was sensitive to JMV-390, the chelator o-phenanthroline, and the mercury-containing compound p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), but not to selective inhibitors against neprilysin, neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase. Both ANG-(1-7) and its endogenous analog [Ala(1)]-ANG-(1-7) (alamandine) were preferentially hydrolyzed by the peptidase compared with ANG II, [Asp(1)]-ANG II, ANG I, and ANG-(1-12). Although the ANG-(1-7) peptidase and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) share similar inhibitor characteristics of a metallothiolendopeptidase, we demonstrate marked differences in substrate specificity, which suggest these peptidases are distinct. We conclude that an ANG-(1-7) peptidase is expressed within the renal proximal tubule and may play a potential role in the renal renin-angiotensin system to regulate ANG-(1-7) tone.

  8. An angiotensin-(1–7) peptidase in the kidney cortex, proximal tubules, and human HK-2 epithelial cells that is distinct from insulin-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan A.; Cruz-Diaz, Nildris; Marshall, Allyson C.; Pirro, Nancy T.; Su, Yixin; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Rose, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin 1–7 [ANG-(1–7)] is expressed within the kidney and exhibits renoprotective actions that antagonize the inflammatory, fibrotic, and pro-oxidant effects of ANG II. We previously identified an peptidase that preferentially metabolized ANG-(1–7) to ANG-(1–4) in the brain medulla and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep (Marshall AC, Pirro NT, Rose JC, Diz DI, Chappell MC. J Neurochem 130: 313–323, 2014); thus the present study established the expression of the peptidase in the kidney. Utilizing a sensitive HPLC-based approach, we demonstrate a peptidase activity that hydrolyzed ANG-(1–7) to ANG-(1–4) in the sheep cortex, isolated tubules, and human HK-2 renal epithelial cells. The peptidase was markedly sensitive to the metallopeptidase inhibitor JMV-390; human HK-2 cells expressed subnanomolar sensitivity (IC50 = 0.5 nM) and the highest specific activity (123 ± 5 fmol·min−1·mg−1) compared with the tubules (96 ± 12 fmol·min−1·mg−1) and cortex (107 ± 9 fmol·min−1·mg−1). The peptidase was purified 41-fold from HK-2 cells; the activity was sensitive to JMV-390, the chelator o-phenanthroline, and the mercury-containing compound p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), but not to selective inhibitors against neprilysin, neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase. Both ANG-(1–7) and its endogenous analog [Ala1]-ANG-(1–7) (alamandine) were preferentially hydrolyzed by the peptidase compared with ANG II, [Asp1]-ANG II, ANG I, and ANG-(1–12). Although the ANG-(1–7) peptidase and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) share similar inhibitor characteristics of a metallothiolendopeptidase, we demonstrate marked differences in substrate specificity, which suggest these peptidases are distinct. We conclude that an ANG-(1–7) peptidase is expressed within the renal proximal tubule and may play a potential role in the renal renin-angiotensin system to regulate ANG-(1–7) tone. PMID:25568136

  9. Ubiquitylation activates a peptidase that promotes cleavage and destabilization of its activating E3 ligases and diverse growth regulatory proteins to limit cell proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Dumenil, Jack; Lu, Fu-Hao; Na, Li; Vanhaeren, Hannes; Naumann, Christin; Klecker, Maria; Prior, Rachel; Smith, Caroline; McKenzie, Neil; Saalbach, Gerhard; Chen, Liangliang; Xia, Tian; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Seguela, Mathilde; Inzé, Dirk; Dissmeyer, Nico; Li, Yunhai; Bevan, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic shapes and sizes of organs are established by cell proliferation patterns and final cell sizes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms coordinating these are poorly understood. Here we characterize a ubiquitin-activated peptidase called DA1 that limits the duration of cell proliferation during organ growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. The peptidase is activated by two RING E3 ligases, Big Brother (BB) and DA2, which are subsequently cleaved by the activated peptidase and destabilized. In the case of BB, cleavage leads to destabilization by the RING E3 ligase PROTEOLYSIS 1 (PRT1) of the N-end rule pathway. DA1 peptidase activity also cleaves the deubiquitylase UBP15, which promotes cell proliferation, and the transcription factors TEOSINTE BRANCED 1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF 15 (TCP15) and TCP22, which promote cell proliferation and repress endoreduplication. We propose that DA1 peptidase activity regulates the duration of cell proliferation and the transition to endoreduplication and differentiation during organ formation in plants by coordinating the destabilization of regulatory proteins. PMID:28167503

  10. Crystal structure and activity studies of the C11 cysteine peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the human gut microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S.; Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2016-03-03

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Altogether, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms.

  11. Effect of molecular weight on the transepithelial transport and peptidase degradation of casein-derived peptides by using Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Bo

    2017-03-01

    The transepithelial transport routes of casein-derived peptides with different molecular weights (MWs) were investigated using a Caco-2 cell monolayer. The peptidase hydrolysis during transport was also studied. The results indicate that the paracellular route was the main pathway for F1 (1600-1300Da) and F2 (1000-500Da), and the bioavailabilities were 10.66% and 9.54%, respectively. Peptidase hydrolysis results reveal that brush-border peptidases (BBPs) as well as some other peptidases were responsible for peptide degradation in the paracellular route. The maximum hydrolysis rate of the former was 6.91 and 5.59μM Gly/min for the latter. However, PepT1 was involved in the transport of F3 (<500Da) and its bioavailability was 16.23%. BBPs were the main peptidases involved in the PepT1 transport and the maximum hydrolysis rate was 11.4μM Gly/min. Furthermore, we found that the amino acid sequence of di- and tripeptides might affect their bioavailabilities significantly.

  12. Discovering novel α-aminoacyl-containing proline derivatives with potent and selective inhibitory activity against dipeptidyl peptidase IV: design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Jiang; Su, Mingbo; Li, Zeng; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    On the basis of the enzyme-binding features of known potent inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV, novel α-aminoacyl-containing proline analogs (8Aa-8Ak, 8Ba-8Bj, 8Ca-8Ck, and 8Da-8Di) with the S configuration were designed, synthesized, and their activity profiled. Their structural features were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, low- and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Five compounds (8Aa, 8Aj, 8Ch, 8Ck, and 8Dc) were shown to have promising inhibitory activities against dipeptidyl peptidase IV. Two of them, compounds 8Aa and 8Aj inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV with IC(50) values of 4.56 and 8.4 μm, respectively, and displayed no inhibition at other dipeptidyl peptidase IV. The possible binding modes of compounds 6, 7, 8Aa, and 8Aj with dipeptidyl peptidase IV were also explored by molecular docking simulation. This study provides promising new templates for the further development of antidiabetic agents. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Nonspecific binding of the OR repressors CI and Cro of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed

    Bakk, Audun; Metzler, Ralf

    2004-12-21

    We estimate the Gibbs free energy for nonspecific binding (DeltaGNSB) to the Escherichia coli DNA for two regulatory proteins of the lambda phage, CI and Cro. By means of a statistical-mechanical approach, we calculate the cI and cro activities associated with the operator OR of an introduced lambda phage genome (prophage). In this statistical model we apply in vitro-measured binding free energies to fit in vivo experimental data for cI and cro activities, respectively, where DeltaGNSB is introduced as a free (fitting) parameter. Without nonspecific binding included in the model, the quality of the description is fairly poor, whereas data are nicely correlating with our model with nonspecific binding included over the entire data range. The obtained values of DeltaGNSB are -4.1+/-0.9 kcal/mol, for CI, and -4.2+/-0.8 kcal/mol, for Cro. In particular, in a lysogen (approximately 250 CI monomers per cell) we conclude that 86% of the total CI in the cell is nonspecifically bound, leaving on average around 10 CI dimers freely available in the E. coli cytoplasma. These findings corroborate the view that due to low free cellular particle numbers a dynamical analysis of genetic regulation at OR and comparable systems should include a stochastic component. In addition, we perform a stability analysis of the OR system in the presence of nonspecific binding.

  14. Self-harm to preferentially harm the pathogens within: non-specific stressors in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Therapies with increasing specificity against pathogens follow the immune system's evolutionary course in maximizing host defence while minimizing self-harm. Nevertheless, even completely non-specific stressors, such as reactive molecular species, heat, nutrient and oxygen deprivation, and acidity can be used to preferentially harm pathogens. Strategic use of non-specific stressors requires exploiting differences in stress vulnerability between pathogens and hosts. Two basic vulnerabilities of pathogens are: (i) the inherent vulnerability to stress of growth and replication (more immediately crucial for pathogens than for host cells) and (ii) the degree of pathogen localization, permitting the host's use of locally and regionally intense stress. Each of the various types of non-specific stressors is present during severe infections at all levels of localization: (i) ultra-locally within phagolysosomes, (ii) locally at the infected site, (iii) regionally around the infected site and (iv) systemically as part of the acute-phase response. We propose that hosts strategically use a coordinated system of non-specific stressors at local, regional and systemic levels to preferentially harm the pathogens within. With the rising concern over emergence of resistance to specific therapies, we suggest more scrutiny of strategies using less specific therapies in pathogen control. Hosts' active use of multiple non-specific stressors is likely an evolutionarily basic defence whose retention underlies and supplements the well-recognized immune defences that directly target pathogens. PMID:27075254

  15. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  16. Rational targeting of subclasses of intermolecular interactions: elimination of nonspecific binding for analyte sensing.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jordan S; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; O'Shea, Paul

    2014-08-12

    The ability to target and control intermolecular interactions is crucial in the development of several different technologies. Here we offer a tool to rationally design liquid media systems that can modulate specific intermolecular interactions. This has broad implications in deciphering the nature of intermolecular forces in complex solutions and offers insight into the forces that govern both specific and nonspecific binding in a given system. Nonspecific binding still continues to be a problem when dealing with analyte detection across a range of different detection technologies. Here, we exemplify the problem of nonspecific binding on model membrane systems and when dealing with low-abundance protein detection on commercially available SPR technology. A range of different soluble reagents that target specific subclasses of intermolecular interactions have been tested and optimized to virtually eliminate nonspecific binding while leaving specific interactions unperturbed. Thiocyanate ions are used to target nonpolar interactions, and small reagents such as glycylglycylglycine are used to modulate the dielectric constant, which targets charge-charge and dipole interactions. We show that with rational design and careful modulation these reagents offer a step forward in dissecting the intermolecular forces that govern binding, alongside offering nonspecific binding elimination in detection systems.

  17. Self-harm to preferentially harm the pathogens within: non-specific stressors in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Edmund K; Day, Judy D

    2016-04-13

    Therapies with increasing specificity against pathogens follow the immune system's evolutionary course in maximizing host defence while minimizing self-harm. Nevertheless, even completely non-specific stressors, such as reactive molecular species, heat, nutrient and oxygen deprivation, and acidity can be used to preferentially harm pathogens. Strategic use of non-specific stressors requires exploiting differences in stress vulnerability between pathogens and hosts. Two basic vulnerabilities of pathogens are: (i) the inherent vulnerability to stress of growth and replication (more immediately crucial for pathogens than for host cells) and (ii) the degree of pathogen localization, permitting the host's use of locally and regionally intense stress. Each of the various types of non-specific stressors is present during severe infections at all levels of localization: (i) ultra-locally within phagolysosomes, (ii) locally at the infected site, (iii) regionally around the infected site and (iv) systemically as part of the acute-phase response. We propose that hosts strategically use a coordinated system of non-specific stressors at local, regional and systemic levels to preferentially harm the pathogens within. With the rising concern over emergence of resistance to specific therapies, we suggest more scrutiny of strategies using less specific therapies in pathogen control. Hosts' active use of multiple non-specific stressors is likely an evolutionarily basic defence whose retention underlies and supplements the well-recognized immune defences that directly target pathogens.

  18. A protocol for iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside that minimises nonspecific vasodilatory effects.

    PubMed

    Droog, Erik J; Henricson, Joakim; Nilsson, Gert E; Sjöberg, Folke

    2004-03-01

    Iontophoresis of vasoactive substances is a promising tool for studying pharmacological aspects of the (patho)physiology of the microvasculature. However, nonspecific microvascular responses are a common problem in most protocols used. We studied the effect of current density (mA/cm2), charge density (mC/cm2), drug concentration (mass %) and vehicle concentration (M) on the nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis of sodium chloride, acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). We found that nonspecific vasodilatation depended on current density and charge density in both anodal and cathodal iontophoresis. The responses to ACh and SNP were dependent on current density, charge density and drug concentration. We found that by limiting current density (<0.01 mA/cm2) and charge density (<7.8 mC/cm2) and with adjusted concentrations for drugs and vehicles, it is possible to prevent nonspecific effects during iontophoresis of ACh and SNP, while maximum drug effects (plateaus in the dose-response curves) are still obtained. These new findings are important for future iontophoresis studies in which vasoactive drugs are used to assess microvascular function because the presented approach has advantages compared to older techniques, which mainly have attempted to suppress or compensate for the nonspecific responses during iontophoresis by the use of local anaesthetics or the measurement of drug-minus-vehicle responses, both of which present well-known experimental shortcomings.

  19. Back Schools for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Patrícia; Heymans, Martijn W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Esmail, Rosmin; Koes, Bart W; Poquet, Nolwenn; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G

    2017-08-03

    Many people with low back pain (LBP) become frequent users of healthcare services in their attempt to find treatments that minimise the severity of their symptoms. Back School consists of a therapeutic programme given to groups of people that includes both education and exercise. However, the content of Back School has changed over time and appears to vary widely today. This review is an update of a Cochrane review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effectiveness of Back School. We split the Cochrane review into two reviews, one focusing on acute and subacute LBP, and one on chronic LBP. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the effect of Back School on pain and disability for adults with chronic non-specific LBP; we included adverse events as a secondary outcome. In trials that solely recruited workers, we also examined the effect on work status. We searched for trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, two other databases and two trials registers to 15 November 2016. We also searched the reference lists of eligible papers and consulted experts in the field of LBP management to identify any potentially relevant studies we may have missed. We placed no limitations on language or date of publication. We included only RCTs and quasi-RCTs evaluating pain, disability, and/or work status as outcomes. The primary outcomes for this update were pain and disability, and the secondary outcomes were work status and adverse events. Two review authors independently performed the 'Risk of bias' assessment of the included studies using the 'Risk of bias' assessment tool recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We summarised the results for the short-, intermediate-, and long-term follow-ups. We evaluated the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. For the outcome pain, at short-term follow-up, we found very low-quality evidence that Back School is more effective than no

  20. Predictive Factors for Efficacy of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shusuke; Aihara, Ken-Ichi; Akaike, Masashi; Fukuda, Daiju; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Ishida, Masayoshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Shimabukuro, Michio; Matsumoto, Toshio; Sata, Masataka

    2015-08-01

    Predictive factors for the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors for lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) remain unclear in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is therefore to clarify predictive factors of the efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors for lowering HbA1c after 12 months of treatment. A total of 191 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients (male sex 55%, mean age, 68.3±35.8 years), who had been treated with DPP-4 inhibitors for 12 months, were enrolled in this study and evaluated retrospectively. After 12 months of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment, random blood glucose level, and HbA1c level, decreased from 167±63 to 151±49 mg/dL (P<0.01), and from 7.5%±1.3% to 6.9%±0.9% (P<0.01) respectively, without severe side effects. Multiple regression analysis showed that predictors of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment efficacy in lowering HbA1c level after 12 months were a decrease in HbA1c level after 3 months of treatment, a high baseline HbA1c level, a low baseline body mass index, and the absence of coronary artery disease. Most suitable candidates for treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors are diabetics who are not obese and do not have coronary artery disease. In addition, long-term efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors can be predicted by decrement of HbA1c after 3 months of treatment.

  1. Elevated serum dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, P; Avramović, V; Stanković, M; Savić, S; Todorović, M

    2007-01-01

    Palatine tonsils represent the first place of contact for a variety of antigenic substances present in air and food. Upon antigen stimulation, the interactions between T and B lymphocytes in the tonsil are known to depend on the expression of different co-stimulatory molecules, including proteolytic ectoenzymes. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) and aminopeptidase N (APN), as T lymphocyte co-stimulatory molecules, participate in the regulation of the immune response during inflammation. In this study, the serum and lymphocyte enzymatic activity of DPP IV and APN was investigated in 32 patients, 13 with recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and 19 with tonsillar hypertrophy (TH), before and one month after tonsillectomy. The enzymatic activity of DPP IV and APN in tonsillar lymphocytes and serum was determined kinetically at 37 degrees C using Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide (for DPP IV) and Ala-p-nitroanilide (for APN) as chromogenic substrates. Significantly higher serum DPP IV and APN activities (P<0.001) were found in TH patients compared with those with RT before tonsillectomy. DPP IV activity in TH patients was also elevated compared with the control of the same age (P<0.001), whereas the activity of APN was the same as the control group. The activity of both enzymes was the same as of controls after tonsillectomy. In addition, the results show that DPP IV and APN activities in serum decrease significantly with age. Tonsillar lymphocytes demonstrated a wide range of DPP IV and APN activities without significant differences between the investigated groups. An increased serum DPP IV activity was observed in TH patients compared with both RT patients and controls before tonsillectomy. After tonsillectomy, all activities were similar. The results suggest that serum DPP IV activity may have potential as a diagnostic marker for patients with TH.

  2. Disposition of vildagliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    He, Handan; Tran, Phi; Yin, Hequn; Smith, Harold; Flood, Dennis; Kramp, Roger; Filipeck, Ron; Fischer, Volker; Howard, Dan

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of vildagliptin, a potent and orally active inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4, were evaluated in male rats and dogs. Vildagliptin was rapidly absorbed with peak plasma concentrations occurring between 0.5 and 1.5 h. Moderate to high bioavailability was observed in both species (45-100%). The distribution and elimination half-lives of vildagliptin were short: 0.57 h [82% of area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC)] and 8.8 h in the rat and 0.05 and 0.89 h (87% of AUC) in the dog, respectively. The volume of distribution was 1.6 and 8.6 l/kg in dogs and rats, respectively, indicating moderate to high tissue distribution. The plasma clearance of vildagliptin was relatively high for the rat (2.9 l/h/kg) and dog (1.3 l/h/kg) compared with their hepatic blood flow. The major circulating components in plasma after an intravenous or oral dose were the parent compound (rat and dog), a carboxylic acid metabolite from the hydrolysis of the amide bond M15.3 (dog), and a carboxylic acid metabolite from the hydrolysis of the cyano moiety M20.7 (rat and dog). After intravenous dosing, urinary excretion of radioactivity (47.6-72.4%) was the major route of elimination for rats and dogs as 18.9 to 21.3% of the dose was excreted into urine as unchanged parent drug. The recovery was good in both species (81-100% of the dose). Vildagliptin was mainly metabolized before excretion in both species. Similar to plasma, the most predominant metabolite in excreta was M20.7 in rats and dogs, and another major metabolite in dogs was M15.3.

  3. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450 P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744 P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981 P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment.

  4. In silico modeling of the staphylococcal bacteriophage-derived peptidase CHAP(K).

    PubMed

    Fenton, Mark; Cooney, Jakki C; Ross, R Paul; Sleator, Roy D; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to use comparative modeling to predict the three-dimensional structure of the CHAP(K) protein (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain of the LysK endolysin, derived from bacteriophage K). Iterative PSI-BLAST searches against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and nonredundant (nr) databases were used to populate a multiple alignment for analysis using the T-Coffee Expresso server. A consensus Maximum Parsimony phylogenetic tree with a bootstrap analysis setting of 1,000 replicates was constructed using MEGA4. Structural templates relevant to our target (CHAP(K)) were identified, processed in Expresso and used to generate a 3D model in the alignment mode of SWISS-MODEL. These templates were also processed in the I-TASSER web server. A Staphylococcus saprophyticus CHAP domain protein, 2K3A, was identified as the structural template in both servers. The I-TASSER server generated the CHAP(K) model with the best bond geometries when analyzed using PROCHECK and the most logical organization of the structure. The predicted 3D model indicates that CHAP(K) has a papain-like fold. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry also indicated that CHAP(K) has an αβ fold, which is consistent with the model presented. The putative active site maintained a highly conserved Cys54-His117-Glu134 charge relay and an oxyanion hole residue Asn136. The residue triplet, Cys-His-Glu, is known to be a viable proteolytic triad in which we predict the Cys residue is used in a nucleophilic attack on peptide bonds at a specific site in the pentaglycine cross bridge of staphylococcal cell wall peptidoglycan. Use of comparative modeling has allowed approximation of the 3D structure of CHAP(K) giving information on the structure and an insight into the binding and active site of the catalytic domain. This may facilitate its development as an alternative antibacterial agent.

  5. In silico modeling of the staphylococcal bacteriophage-derived peptidase CHAPK

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Cooney, Jakki C.; Ross, R. Paul; Sleator, Roy D.; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use comparative modeling to predict the three-dimensional structure of the CHAPK protein (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain of the LysK endolysin, derived from bacteriophage K). Iterative PSI-BLAST searches against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and nonredundant (nr) databases were used to populate a multiple alignment for analysis using the T-Coffee Expresso server. A consensus Maximum Parsimony phylogenetic tree with a bootstrap analysis setting of 1,000 replicates was constructed using MEGA4. Structural templates relevant to our target (CHAPK) were identified, processed in Expresso and used to generate a 3D model in the alignment mode of SWISS-MODEL. These templates were also processed in the I-TASSER web server. A Staphylococcus saprophyticus CHAP domain protein, 2K3A, was identified as the structural template in both servers. The I-TASSER server generated the CHAPK model with the best bond geometries when analyzed using PROCHECK and the most logical organization of the structure. The predicted 3D model indicates that CHAPK has a papain-like fold. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry also indicated that CHAPK has an αβ fold, which is consistent with the model presented. The putative active site maintained a highly conserved Cys54-His117-Glu134 charge relay and an oxyanion hole residue Asn136. The residue triplet, Cys-His-Glu, is known to be a viable proteolytic triad in which we predict the Cys residue is used in a nucleophilic attack on peptide bonds at a specific site in the pentaglycine cross bridge of staphylococcal cell wall peptidoglycan. Use of comparative modeling has allowed approximation of the 3D structure of CHAPK giving information on the structure and an insight into the binding and active site of the catalytic domain. This may facilitate its development as an alternative antibacterial agent. PMID:23050213

  6. Optimization of gold nanoparticle-based real-time colorimetric assay of dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity.

    PubMed

    Aldewachi, Hasan Saad; Woodroofe, Nicola; Turega, Simon; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2017-07-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV also referred to as CD-26) is a serine protease enzyme with remarkable diagnostic and prognostic value in a variety of health and disease conditions. Herein, we describe a simple and real-time colorimetric assay for DPP-IV/CD-26 activity based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the peptide substrates: Gly-Pro-Asp-Cys (GPDC) or Val-Pro-ethylene diamine-Asp-Cys (VP-ED-DC). Cleavage of the substrates by DPP-IV resulted in aggregation of the AuNPs with accompanying color change in the solution from red to blue that was monitored using either a UV-visible spectrophotometer or by the naked eye. Factors, such as time course of the reaction, stability of the functionalized AuNPs and the structure of the substrate that influence the cleavage reaction in solution were investigated. The effects of potential interference from serum proteins (lysozyme, thrombin and trypsin) on the analytical response were negligible. The detection limits when GPDC or VP-EN-DC functionalized AuNPs were used for DPP-IV assay were 1.2U/L and 1.5U/L, respectively. The VP-EN-DC method was preferred for the quantitative determination of DPP-IV activity in serum because of its wide linear range 0-30U/L compared to 0-12U/L for the GPDC assay. Recoveries from serum samples spiked with DPP-IV activity, between 5 and 25U/L, and using the VP-EN-DC modified AuNPs method ranged between 83.6% and 114.9%. The two colorimetric biosensors described here are superior to other conventional methods because of their simplicity, stability, selectivity and reliability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alogliptin: a new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Courtney I; Cabrera, Adriana; Charron, Derek

    2013-11-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of alogliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Searches were conducted in MEDLINE (1946-August 2013) and Embase (1974-August 2013) for English language articles using key words alogliptin, SYR-332, Nesina, Oseni, and Kazano. References of articles were reviewed to identify any additional sources. Articles with adequate sample sizes, evaluating clinically relevant end points were included. Alogliptin is a highly selective and potent competitive inhibitor of DPP-4. The DPP-4 enzyme rapidly inactivates the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide. GLP-1, which releases postprandial insulin in response to meals, is thought to be deficient in patients with T2DM. Studies evaluating the role of alogliptin in T2DM have shown significant reductions in blood glucose and hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels. Alogliptin doses of 12.5 to 25 mg once daily reduced A1C by 0.56% to 0.59% as monotherapy. Patients given alogliptin in addition to other antidiabetic agentsexperienced additional A1C lowering of 0.4% to 0.8%. Side effects of alogliptin include nasopharyngitis, upper-respiratory tract infections, and headache. Alogliptin demonstrates a neutral effect on weight. A large trial evaluating the cardiovascular safety of alogliptin is currently being conducted. Alogliptin is the fourth DDP-4 inhibitor approved in the US for the treatment of T2DM. It is available alone (Nesina) and in fixed-dose combinations with metformin (Kazano) and pioglitazone (Oseni). It has no demonstrable advantages over other agents in its class.

  8. Clinical implications of cardiovascular preventing pleiotropic effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G; Chrysant, George S

    2012-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They exert their action through inhibition of the catabolism of locally secreted incretins such as glucagon-like peptide-4 (GLP-4) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) by inhibiting enzyme DPP-4. GLP-1 and GIP are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to food intake. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells present in the mucosa of the small intestine and colon, whereas GIP is secreted from K cells of the jejunum. These 2 incretins lower blood glucose levels and postprandial hyperglycemia by stimulating insulin release from b cells of the pancreas, thus increasing insulin sensitivity, delaying gastrointestinal emptying, decreasing food intake through early satiety, and causing weight loss in the long term. However, their action is short-lived (2 to 3 minutes) because of catabolism by the DPP-4 enzyme. The importance of DPP-4 inhibitors lies in their blockade of the DPP-4 enzyme leading to the prevention of their catabolism and thus increasing their blood levels, extending the duration of their action, and improving their blood glucose-lowering effect. In addition to their antidiabetic action, recent experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated a pleiotropic cardiovascular protective effect of these agents independent of their antidiabetic action. They prevent atherosclerosis, improve endothelial dysfunction, lower blood pressure, and prevent myocardial injury. All these actions are discussed in this concise review. In conclusion, DPP-4 inhibitors are novel antidiabetic agents with pleiotropic cardiovascular protective effects in addition to their antidiabetic action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450; P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744; P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981; P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment. PMID:27221742

  10. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors, Peripheral Arterial Disease, and Lower Extremity Amputation Risk in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Chin; Chen, Yung-Tai; Hsu, Chien-Yi; Su, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have elucidated the vascular protective effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. However, to date, no large-scale studies have been carried out to determine the impact of DPP-4 inhibitors on the occurrence of peripheral arterial disease, and lower extremity amputation risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a retrospective registry analysis using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to investigate the correlation between the use of DPP-4 inhibitors and risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 82,169 propensity score-matched pairs of DPP-4 inhibitor users and nonusers with type 2 diabetes mellitus were examined for the period 2009 to 2011. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.9 ± 12.0 years, and 54% of subjects were male. During the mean follow-up of 3.0 years (maximum, 4.8 years), a total of 3369 DPP-4 inhibitor users and 3880 DPP-4 inhibitor nonusers were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. Compared with nonusers, DPP-4 inhibitor users were associated with a lower risk of peripheral arterial disease (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.88). Additionally, DPP-4 inhibitor users had a decreased risk of lower-extremity amputation than nonusers (hazard ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.79). The association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and risk of peripheral arterial disease was also consistent in subgroup analysis. This large-scale nationwide population-based cohort study is the first to demonstrate that treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors is associated with lower risk of peripheral arterial disease occurrence and limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    PubMed

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  12. Renoprotective effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor in a mouse model of progressive renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Takahiro; Oda, Takashi; Matsubara, Hidehito; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takechi, Hanako; Oshima, Naoki; Sakurai, Yutaka; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2017-11-01

    Although the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors beyond their hypoglycemic action have been reported, whether these inhibitors have renoprotective effects in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. We examined the therapeutic effects of DPP-4 inhibition in mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), a nondiabetic model of progressive renal fibrosis. After UUO surgery, mice were administered either the DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin or a vehicle by oral gavage once a day for 10 days. Physiological parameters, degrees of renal fibrosis and inflammation, and molecules related to renal fibrosis and inflammation were then evaluated using sham-operated mice as controls. Positive area of α-smooth muscle actin was significantly smaller and expression of transforming growth factor β messenger RNA was significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. Renal total collagen content was also significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. These results suggest that alogliptin exerted renoprotective antifibrotic effects. The positive area of F4/80 was significantly smaller and expression of CD68 messenger RNA was significantly lower in the alogliptin-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group, suggesting an anti-inflammatory action by the DPP-4 inhibitor. Compared to the results for the vehicle-treated group, expression of markers for M1 macrophages tended to be lower in the alogliptin-treated group, and the relative expression of M2 macrophages tended to be higher. These data indicate the various protective effects of DPP-4 inhibition in nondiabetic mice with UUO. DPP-4 inhibitors may therefore be promising therapeutic choices even for nondiabetic CKD patients.

  13. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 serum activity and concentration are increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blauschmidt, Sindy; Greither, Thomas; Lampe, Katharina; Köller, Solveig; Kaltwaßer, Petra; Behre, Hermann M

    2017-08-11

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex disease, the etiology of which is not well understood. Alterations in potential candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of androgens, folliculogenesis, and insulin and glucose metabolism have been suggested as possible etiologies. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and, thus, in the regulation of insulin secretion. The aim of our study was to analyze the DPP4 activity and concentrations in the serum of PCOS and non-PCOS patients and, additionally, study the activation of the DPP4 promoter by androgens in vitro. Serum samples were obtained from 288 female patients treated at the Center for Reproductive Medicine and Andrology (154 non-PCOS and 134 PCOS patients). DPP4 activity was measured by the conversion of the DPP4 substrate Gly-Pro p-nitroanilide hydrochloride and DPP4 concentration with a commercial ELISA. Luciferase reporter assays, qPCR and Western Blot analyses were performed for the in vitro evaluation of the activation of the DPP4 promoter by androgens. DPP4 serum activity was increased in women with PCOS, regardless of which Rotterdam criteria led to the PCOS diagnosis. Furthermore, DPP4 serum levels were strongly correlated with the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) serum level. In vitro, the DPP4 promoter was stimulated by androgens in luciferase reporter assays, and DPP4 mRNA expression was increased in KGN granulosa carcinoma cells after androgen treatment. The results suggested that a deregulation of DPP4 serum levels could be an additional characteristic of the metabolic imbalances associated with PCOS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Linagliptin: a novel dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor with a unique place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Anthony H

    2011-06-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors comprise a promising new class of agent for the management of type 2 diabetes. They possess a range of physiological effects associated with improved glycemic control including stimulation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and suppression of glucagon secretion, and lower blood glucose levels through different, but potentially complementary, mechanisms to standard oral therapies. Linagliptin is the latest DPP-4 inhibitor to complete pivotal phase 3 trials. The data show that linagliptin provides significant, clinically meaningful and sustained improvements in glycemic control, with an incidence of adverse events similar to placebo and an excellent tolerability profile. In addition, linagliptin has been shown to be weight neutral and, importantly, there was no increased risk of hypoglycemia attributed to linagliptin use in monotherapy or combination therapy with metformin or pioglitazone. A unique characteristic of linagliptin that differentiates it from other members of the class is its primarily nonrenal route of excretion. The linagliptin phase 3 program included several hundred patients with type 2 diabetes and different stages of renal disease and the data suggest that the drug would not need dose adjustment, regardless of the degree of renal impairment. There is a particular need for safe and effective therapeutic agents that can be used when renal function declines. Linagliptin has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and may find a place in therapy as a treatment option for the significant number of patients in whom metformin and the other DPP-4 inhibitors are either contraindicated or require dose adjustment because of moderate to severe renal impairment.

  15. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 greatly contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in human liver.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-04-01

    The major metabolic pathway of vildagliptin in mice, rats, dogs, and humans is hydrolysis at the cyano group to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7 (LAY151), whereas the major metabolic enzyme of vildagliptin has not been identified. In the present study, we determined the contribution rate of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in the liver. We performed hydrolysis assay of the cyano group of vildagliptin using mouse, rat, and human liver samples. Additionally, DPP-4 activities in each liver sample were assessed by DPP-4 activity assay using the synthetic substrate H-glycyl-prolyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Gly-Pro-AMC). M20.7 formation rates in liver microsomes were higher than those in liver cytosol. M20.7 formation rate was significantly positively correlated with the DPP-4 activity using Gly-Pro-AMC in liver samples (r = 0.917, P < 0.01). The formation of M20.7 in mouse, rat, and human liver S9 fraction was inhibited by sitagliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that DPP-4 is greatly involved in vildagliptin hydrolysis in the liver. Additionally, we established stable single expression systems of human DPP-4 and its R623Q mutant, which is the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism of human DPP-4, in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells to investigate the effect of R623Q mutant on vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. M20.7 formation rate in HEK293 cells expressing human DPP-4 was significantly higher than that in control HEK293 cells. Interestingly, R623Q mutation resulted in a decrease of the vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. Our findings might be useful for the prediction of interindividual variability in vildagliptin pharmacokinetics.

  16. Increased Plasma Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Activities in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Yuzi; Cui, Lan; Jiang, Haiying; Li, Xiang; Jin, Chunzi; Jin, Dehao; Zhao, Guangxian; Jin, Jiyong; Sun, Rui; Piao, Limei; Xu, Wenhu; Fang, Chenghu; Lei, Yanna; Yuan, Kuichang; Xuan, Chunhua; Ding, Dazi

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is one of the most potent mammalian serine proteases participated in the pathogenesis of subclinical atherosclerosis. Here we investigated whether the plasma soluble form of DPP4 is associated with the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was conducted of 496 aged 26–81 years with (n = 362) and without (n = 134) CAD. Plasma DPP4 activity, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein levels were measured. The coronary atherosclerotic plaques were evaluated by coronary angiography. The CAD patients with (n = 84) and without (n = 278) DM had significantly higher DPP4 levels (11.8 ± 3.1 vs. 6.9 ± 3.5 ng/mL, P<0.01) than the nonCAD subjects. The acute coronary syndrome patients (n = 299) had elevated DPP4 levels than those with stable angina patients (n = 83). CAD patients even without DM had increased plasma DPP4 activities as compared with nonCAD subjects (10.9 ± 4.9 vs. 6.4 ± 3.1, ng/L, P< 0.01). A linear regression analysis revealed that overall, the DPP4 levels were positively associated with LCL-C and hs-CRP levels as well as syntax scores. A multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that plasma DPP4 activity was independent predictor of CAD (odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.19–1.73; P<0.01). Our study shows that increased DPP4 activity levels are associated with the presence of CAD and that the plasma DPP4 level serves as a novel biomarker for CAD even without DM. PMID:27654253

  17. Chaperone-assisted Post-translational Transport of Plastidic Type I Signal Peptidase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Endow, Joshua K.; Singhal, Rajneesh; Fernandez, Donna E.; Inoue, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Type I signal peptidase (SPase I) is an integral membrane Ser/Lys protease with one or two transmembrane domains (TMDs), cleaving transport signals off translocated precursor proteins. The catalytic domain of SPase I folds to form a hydrophobic surface and inserts into the lipid bilayers at the trans-side of the membrane. In bacteria, SPase I is targeted co-translationally, and the catalytic domain remains unfolded until it reaches the periplasm. By contrast, SPases I in eukaryotes are targeted post-translationally, requiring an alternative strategy to prevent premature folding. Here we demonstrate that two distinct stromal components are involved in post-translational transport of plastidic SPase I 1 (Plsp1) from Arabidopsis thaliana, which contains a single TMD. During import into isolated chloroplasts, Plsp1 was targeted to the membrane via a soluble intermediate in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent manner. Insertion of Plsp1 into isolated chloroplast membranes, by contrast, was found to occur by two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism requires ATP hydrolysis and the protein conducting channel cpSecY1 and was strongly enhanced by exogenously added cpSecA1. The second mechanism was independent of nucleoside triphosphates and proteinaceous components but with a high frequency of mis-orientation. This unassisted insertion was inhibited by urea and stroma extract. During import-chase assays using intact chloroplasts, Plsp1 was incorporated into a soluble 700-kDa complex that co-migrated with the Cpn60 complex before inserting into the membrane. The TMD within Plsp1 was required for the cpSecA1-dependent insertion but was dispensable for association with the 700-kDa complex and also for unassisted membrane insertion. These results indicate cooperation of Cpn60 and cpSecA1 for proper membrane insertion of Plsp1 by cpSecY1. PMID:26446787

  18. Obese patients have higher circulating protein levels of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Teuffel, Pauline; Hofmann, Tobias; Buße, Petra; Kobelt, Peter; Rose, Matthias; Klapp, Burghard F

    2014-11-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) is a protease with broad distribution involved in various homeostatic processes such as immune defense, psychoneuroendocrine functions and nutrition. While DPPIV protein levels were investigated in patients with hyporectic disorders, less is known under conditions of obesity. Therefore, we investigated DPPIV across a broad range of body mass index (BMI). Blood samples from hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)), anorexia nervosa (BMI <17.5 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI 30-40, 40-50 and >50 kg/m(2), n = 15/group) were tested cross-sectionally and DPPIV concentration and total enzyme activity and the DPPIV targets, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) were measured. DPPIV protein expression was detected in human plasma indicated by a strong band at the expected size of 110 kDa and another major band at 50 kDa, likely representing a fragment comprised of two heavy chains. Obese patients had higher DPPIV protein levels compared to normal weight and anorexics (+50%, p<0.05) resulting in a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.34, p = 0.004). DPPIV serum activity was similar in all groups (p>0.05), while the concentration/activity ratio was higher in obese patients (p<0.05). Plasma PP levels were highest in anorexic patients (∼ 2-fold increase compared to other groups, p<0.05), whereas GLP-1 did not differ among groups (p<0.05). Taken together, circulating DPPIV protein levels depend on body weight with increased levels in obese resulting in an increased concentration/activity ratio. Since DPPIV deactivates food intake-inhibitory hormones like PP, an increased DPPIV concentration/activity ratio might contribute to reduced food intake-inhibitory signaling under conditions of obesity.

  19. [Berberine regulates glycemia via local inhibition of intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase-Ⅳ].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiesheng; Dai, Guanhai; Li, Weijia

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the effect of berberine on glycemia regulation in rats with diabetes and the related mechanisms. Methods: Diabetic-like rat model was successfully induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 50 out of 60 male SD rats, which were then randomly divided into 5 groups with 10 rats in each:control group (received vehicle only), positive drug control group (sitagliptin 10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), low-dose berberine group (30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), moderate-dose berberine group (60 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), and high-dose berberine group (120 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). All animals were fed for 3 d, and fasting blood sampling was performed on day 3 of administration. Rats were given glucose (2 g/kg) by gavage 30 min after the last dose. Blood and intestinal samples were obtained 2 h after glucose loading. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (2h-PPG) were detected by using biochemical analyzer, and insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-Ⅳ(DPP-Ⅳ) were measured by using ELISA kit. Results: No significant difference in FBG and serum DPP-Ⅳ level were found between berberine groups and control group (all P>0.05). Compared with control group, serum levels of GLP-1 and insulin were increased in high-and moderate-dose berberine groups, while 2h-PPG was decreased (all P<0.05); GLP-1 levels in the intestinal samples were increased, while DPP-Ⅳ levels were decreased in all berberine groups (all P<0.05). Conclusions: Short-term berberine administration can decrease 2h-PPG level in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model through local inhibition of intestinal DPP-Ⅳ. The efficacy of DPP-Ⅳ inhibitor may be associated with its intestinal pharmacokinetics.

  20. A bacterial acyl aminoacyl peptidase couples flexibility and stability as a result of cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brocca, Stefania; Ferrari, Cristian; Barbiroli, Alberto; Pesce, Alessandra; Lotti, Marina; Nardini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Life in cold environments requires an overall increase in the flexibility of macromolecular and supramolecular structures to allow biological processes to take place at low temperature. Conformational flexibility supports high catalytic rates of enzymes in the cold but in several cases is also a cause of instability. The three-dimensional structure of the psychrophilic acyl aminoacyl peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) reported in this paper highlights adaptive molecular changes resulting in a fine-tuned trade-off between flexibility and stability. In its functional form SpAAP is a dimer, and an increase in flexibility is achieved through loosening of intersubunit hydrophobic interactions. The release of subunits from the quaternary structure is hindered by an 'arm exchange' mechanism, in which a tiny structural element at the N terminus of one subunit inserts into the other subunit. Mutants lacking the 'arm' are monomeric, inactive and highly prone to aggregation. Another feature of SpAAP cold adaptation is the enlargement of the tunnel connecting the exterior of the protein with the active site. Such a wide channel might compensate for the reduced molecular motions occurring in the cold and allow easy and direct access of substrates to the catalytic site, rendering transient movements between domains unnecessary. Thus, cold-adapted SpAAP has developed a molecular strategy unique within this group of proteins: it is able to enhance the flexibility of each functional unit while still preserving sufficient stability. Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession number 5L8S. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  2. Neural peptidase endothelin-converting enzyme 1 regulates endothelin 1–induced pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Kempkes, Cordula; Ikoma, Akihiko; Cevikbas, Ferda; Akiyama, Tasuku; Nunes, Frank; Seeliger, Stephan; Hasdemir, Burcu; Mess, Christian; Buhl, Timo; Sulk, Mathias; Müller, Frank-Ulrich; Metze, Dieter; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Bhargava, Aditi; Carstens, Earl; Furue, Masutaka; Steinhoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In humans, pruritus (itch) is a common but poorly understood symptom in numerous skin and systemic diseases. Endothelin 1 (ET-1) evokes histamine-independent pruritus in mammals through activation of its cognate G protein–coupled receptor endothelin A receptor (ETAR). Here, we have identified neural endothelin–converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1) as a key regulator of ET-1–induced pruritus and neural signaling of itch. We show here that ETAR, ET-1, and ECE-1 are expressed and colocalize in murine dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and human skin nerves. In murine DRG neurons, ET-1 induced internalization of ETAR within ECE-1–containing endosomes. ECE-1 inhibition slowed ETAR recycling yet prolonged ET-1–induced activation of ERK1/2, but not p38. In a murine itch model, ET-1–induced scratching behavior was substantially augmented by pharmacological ECE-1 inhibition and abrogated by treatment with an ERK1/2 inhibitor. Using iontophoresis, we demonstrated that ET-1 is a potent, partially histamine-independent pruritogen in humans. Immunohistochemical evaluation of skin from prurigo nodularis patients confirmed an upregulation of the ET-1/ETAR/ECE-1/ERK1/2 axis in patients with chronic itch. Together, our data identify the neural peptidase ECE-1 as a negative regulator of itch on sensory nerves by directly regulating ET-1–induced pruritus in humans and mice. Furthermore, these results implicate the ET-1/ECE-1/ERK1/2 pathway as a therapeutic target to treat pruritus in humans. PMID:24812665

  3. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays *

    PubMed Central

    Karakosta, Theano D.; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Batruch, Ihor

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  4. Bis-Pyrano Prenyl Isoflavone Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 in Hyperglycemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Altenhofen, Delsi; da Luz, Gabrielle; Frederico, Marisa Jádna Silva; Venzke, Dalila; Brich, Mayara; Vigil, Silvana; Fröde, Tania Silvia; Linares, Carlos Eduardo Blanco; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2017-01-01

    Isoflavones widely distributed in plants prevent diabetes. This study investigated the in vivo and in vitro effect of 3',4'-dihydroxy-6″,6″,6″',6″'-tetramethylbis(pyrano[2″,3″:5,6::2″',3″':7,8]isoflavone (bis-pyrano prenyl isoflavone) on glucose homeostasis in hyperglycemic rats. The ethyl acetate fraction from aerial parts of Polygala molluginifolia that contain isoflavones was assayed on glucose tolerance, on in vitro maltase activity and on protein glycation. The isoflavone bis-pyrano prenyl isolated from this fraction was investigated on glucose homeostasis. The in vivo action of the isoflavone exhibits an anti-hyperglycemic effect by improving glucose tolerance, augmenting the liver glycogen, inhibiting maltase activity, and stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and insulin secretion. The in vitro isoflavone inhibits dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity since the glucose tolerance was improved in the presence of the isoflavone as much as sitagliptin, an inhibitor of DPP-4. However, the co-incubation with isoflavone and sitagliptin exhibited an additive anti-hyperglycemic action. The isoflavone increased the GLP-1 faster than the positive hyperglycemic group, which shows that the intestine is a potential target. Thus, to clarify the main site of action in which isoflavone improves glucose balance, the in vitro mechanism of action of this compound was tested in intestine using calcium influx as a trigger for the signal pathways for GLP-1 secretion. The isoflavone stimulates calcium influx in intestine and its mechanism involves voltage-dependent calcium channels, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and stored calcium contributing for GLP-1 secretion. In conclusion, the isoflavone regulates glycaemia by acting mainly in a serum target, the DPP-4 inhibitor. Furthermore, the long-term effect of isoflavone prevents protein glycation. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 92-103, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (CD26): knowing the function before inhibiting the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, E; Giampietro, O

    2009-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) or adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2 (ADCP 2) or T-cell activation antigen CD26 (EC 3.4.14.5.) is a serine exopeptidase belonging to the S9B protein family that cleaves X-proline dipeptides from the N-terminus of polypeptides, such as chemokines, neuropeptides, and peptide hormones. The enzyme is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, expressed on the surface of many cell types, whose physiological functions are largely unknown. Protein dimerisation should be required for catalytic activity and glycosylation of the enzyme could impact on its physiological functions. The dimeric glycoprotein ADCP has been found linked to adenosine deaminase (ADA) whose relationship with lymphocyte maturation-differentiation is well-established. Since implicated in the regulation of the biological activity of hormones and chemokines, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, DPP4 inhibition offers a new potential therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes mellitus, as monotherapy and adjunct therapy to other oral agents. The clinical use of presently available orally active inhibitors of DPP4, however, has been associated with side effects that have been in part attributed to the inhibition of related serine proteases, such as DPP8 and DPP9. Indeed, it is noteworthy that CD26 has a key role in immune regulation as a T cell activation molecule and in immune-mediated disorder. All-cause infections were increased after sitagliptin treatment. It is noteworthy that the effects of DPP4 inhibition on the immune system have not been extensively investigated. So far, only routine laboratory safety variables have been measured in published randomised controlled trials. The review summarises present knowledge in the field and suggests some potential directions of future research.

  6. Elevated fecal peptidase D at onset of colitis in Galphai2-/- mice, a mouse model of IBD

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Robert; Sapnara, Maria; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2017-01-01

    Background The identification of novel fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hampered by the complexity of the human fecal proteome. On the other hand, in experimental mouse models there is probably less variation. We investigated the fecal protein content in mice to identify possible biomarkers and pathogenic mechanisms. Methods Fecal samples were collected at onset of inflammation in Galphai2-/- mice, a well-described spontaneous model of chronic colitis, and from healthy littermates. The fecal proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantitative mass spectrometry and results were then validated in a new cohort of mice. Results As a potential top marker of disease, peptidase D was found at a higher ratio in Galphai2-/- mouse feces relative to controls (fold change 27; p = 0.019). Other proteins found to be enriched in Gαi2-/- mice were mainly pancreatic proteases, and proteins from plasma and blood cells. A tendency of increased calprotectin, subunit S100-A8, was also observed (fold change 21; p = 0.058). Proteases are potential activators of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract through their interaction with the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Accordingly, the level of PAR2 was found to be elevated in both the colon and the pancreas of Galphai2-/- mice at different stages of disease. Conclusions These findings identify peptidase D, an ubiquitously expressed intracellular peptidase, as a potential novel marker of colitis. The elevated levels of fecal proteases may be involved in the pathogenesis of colitis and contribute to the clinical phenotype, possibly by activation of intestinal PAR2. PMID:28323866

  7. Secretion and lysophospholipase D activity of autotaxin by adipocytes are controlled by N-glycosylation and signal peptidase.

    PubMed

    Pradère, Jean Philippe; Tarnus, Evelyne; Grès, Sandra; Valet, Philippe; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien

    2007-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a lysophospholipase D involved in synthesis of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX is secreted by adipocytes and is associated with adipogenesis and obesity-associated diabetes. Here we have studied the mechanisms involved in biosynthesis and secretion of ATX by mouse 3T3-F442A adipocytes. We found that inhibition of N-glycosylation with tunicamycin or by double point deletion of the amino-acids N53 and N410 of ATX inhibit its secretion. In addition, N-glycosidase treatment and point deletion of the amino-acid N410 inhibits the lysophospholipase D activity of ATX. Analysis of the amino-acid sequence of mouse ATX shows the presence of a N-terminal signal peptide. Treatment with the signal peptidase inhibitor globomycin inhibits ATX secretion by adipocytes. Transfection in Cos-7 cells of site-directed deleted ATX shows that ATX secretion is dependent on the hydrophobic core sequence of the signal peptide, not on the putative signal peptidase cleavage site sequence. Analysis of the amino-acid sequence of mouse ATX also reveals the presence of a putative cleavage site by the protein convertase furin. Treatment of adipocytes with the furin inhibitor decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethylketone does not modified secretion or lysophospholipase D activity of ATX. Transfection in Cos-7 cells of site-directed deleted ATX shows that the furin recognition site is not required for secretion or lysophospholipase D activity of ATX. In conclusion, the present work demonstrates the crucial role of N-glycosylation in secretion and activity of ATX. The present work also confirms the crucial role signal peptidase in secretion of ATX by adipocytes.

  8. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the periaqueductal gray and rostral ventromedial medulla reduces flinching in the formalin model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been identified as significant analgesic targets. Systemic treatments with inhibitors of the enzymes that inactivate the peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), an mGluR3 agonist, have an analgesia-like effect in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to begin defining locations within the central pain pathway at which NAAG activation of its receptor mediates this effect. Results NAAG immunoreactivity was found in neurons in two brain regions that mediate nociceptive processing, the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Microinjection of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ43 into the PAG contralateral, but not ipsilateral, to the formalin injected footpad reduced the rapid and slow phases of the nociceptive response in a dose-dependent manner. ZJ43 injected into the RVM also reduced the rapid and slow phase of the response. The group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 blocked these effects of ZJ43 on the PAG and RVM. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the PAG and RVM did not affect the thermal withdrawal response in the hot plate test. Footpad inflammation also induced a significant increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Systemic injection of ZJ43 increased NAAG levels in the PAG and RVM and blocked the inflammation-induced increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Conclusion These data demonstrate a behavioral and neurochemical role for NAAG in the PAG and RVM in regulating the spinal motor response to inflammation and that NAAG peptidase inhibition has potential as an approach to treating inflammatory pain via either the ascending (PAG) and/or the descending pain pathways (PAG and RVM) that warrants further study. PMID:22971334

  9. Identification and Characterization of Noncovalent Interactions That Drive Binding and Specificity in DD-Peptidases and β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to standard (i.e., β-lactam-based) antibiotics has become a global pandemic. Simultaneously, research into the underlying causes of resistance has slowed substantially, although its importance is universally recognized. Key to unraveling critical details is characterization of the noncovalent interactions that govern binding and specificity (DD-peptidases, antibiotic targets, versus β-lactamases, the evolutionarily derived enzymes that play a major role in resistance) and ultimately resistance as a whole. Herein, we describe a detailed investigation that elicits new chemical insights into these underlying intermolecular interactions. Benzylpenicillin and a novel β-lactam peptidomimetic complexed to the Stremptomyces R61 peptidase are examined using an arsenal of computational techniques: MD simulations, QM/MM calculations, charge perturbation analysis, QM/MM orbital analysis, bioinformatics, flexible receptor/flexible ligand docking, and computational ADME predictions. Several key molecular level interactions are identified that not only shed light onto fundamental resistance mechanisms, but also offer explanations for observed specificity. Specifically, an extended π–π network is elucidated that suggests antibacterial resistance has evolved, in part, due to stabilizing aromatic interactions. Additionally, interactions between the protein and peptidomimetic substrate are identified and characterized. Of particular interest is a water-mediated salt bridge between Asp217 and the positively charged N-terminus of the peptidomimetic, revealing an interaction that may significantly contribute to β-lactam specificity. Finally, interaction information is used to suggest modifications to current β-lactam compounds that should both improve binding and specificity in DD-peptidases and their physiochemical properties. PMID:24803854

  10. Synthesis and processing of Escherichia coli TEM-beta-lactamase and Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase in E. coli: the role of signal peptidase I.

    PubMed

    van Dijl, J M; Smith, H; Bron, S; Venema, G

    1988-09-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli, in which signal peptidase I synthesis can be regulated, was constructed. The mutant was used to study the effects of signal peptidase I limitation on the synthesis and efficiency of processing of two proteins: the periplasmic E. coli TEM-beta-lactamase and Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase, which also accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli. Signal peptidase I limitation resulted in reduced rates of processing of pre-beta-lactamase and in strong inhibition of synthesis of alpha-amylase. The data suggest that beta-lactamase is processed post-translationally and that an intimate relationship exists between the synthesis and processing of alpha-amylase.

  11. Glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors: Their roles in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Al-Aubaidy, Hayder A; Mohammed, Bassim I

    2016-01-01

    This review paper highlights the major advances investigating the roles of glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and its receptors in glucose metabolism and their potential use in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It also focusses on the role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in the treatment of this disease. This study discussed the recent therapeutic development which have occurred in this field, and also covering the evolvement of the potential treatments for diabetes which can be discovered and implemented in the near future to design an effective therapy for diabetes and prediabetes. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Insecticidal effect of Canavalia ensiformis major urease on nymphs of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus and characterization of digestive peptidases.

    PubMed

    Defferrari, Marina S; Demartini, Diogo R; Marcelino, Thiago B; Pinto, Paulo M; Carlini, Celia R

    2011-06-01

    Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) ureases are entomotoxic upon the release of internal peptides by insect's digestive enzymes. Here we studied the digestive peptidases of Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug) and its susceptibility to jackbean urease (JBU). O. fasciatus nymphs fed urease showed a mortality rate higher than 80% after two weeks. Homogenates of midguts dissected from fourth instars were used to perform proteolytic activity assays. The homogenates hydrolyzed JBU in vitro, yielding a fragment similar in size to known entomotoxic peptides. The major proteolytic activity at pH 4.0 upon protein substrates was blocked by specific inhibitors of aspartic and cysteine peptidases, but not significantly affected by inhibitors of metallopeptidases or serine peptidases. The optimal activity upon N-Cbz-Phe-Arg-MCA was at pH 5.0, with complete blockage by E-64 in all pH tested. Optimal activity upon Abz-AIAFFSRQ-EDDnp (a substrate for aspartic peptidases) was detected at pH 5.0, with partial inhibition by Pepstatin A in the pH range 2-8. Fluorogenic substrates corresponding to the N- and C-terminal regions flanking a known entomotoxic peptide within urease sequence were also tested. While the midgut homogenate did not hydrolyze the N-terminal peptide, it cleaved the C-terminal peptide maximally at pH 4.0-5.0, and this activity was inhibited by E-64 (10 μM). The midgut homogenate was submitted to ion-exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration. A 22 kDa active fraction was obtained, resolved in SDS-PAGE (12%), the corresponding band was in-gel digested by trypsin, the peptides were analyzed by mass spectrometry, retrieving a cathepsin L protein. The purified cathepsin L was shown to have at least two possible cleavage sites within the urease sequence, and might be able to release a known insecticidal peptide in a single or cascade event. The results suggest that susceptibility of O. fasciatus nymphs to jackbean urease is, like in other insect models, due mostly

  13. [AGING AND OSTEOARTHRITIS. CHRONIC NONSPECIFIC INFLAMMATION AS A LINK BETWEEN AGING AND OSTEOARTHRITIS (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Mendel, O I; Luchihina, L V; Mendel, W

    2015-01-01

    This article presents review on the processes underlying aging and the most common age-associated diseases. Special attention is given to the role of chronic nonspecific inflammation. Based on the literature data it was demonstrated that aging and osteoarthritis have the same basic molecular and cellular mechanisms, among which general are cascades intracellular transcription chronic nonspecific inflammation and metabolic disturbances plays an important role. It is concluded that the process of normal aging is not a disease, but makes the human body, and particularly the musculoskeletal system, susceptible to age-associated changes. Number of changes in the human body that accompany the aging process, and play a role in the development and progression of OA, are potentially reversible, regardless of age (eg, chronic non-specific inflammation), and can be considered as a possible entry points for the effective prevention and complex therapy of OA in elderly people.

  14. Non-volatile fatty acids in the diagnosis of non-specific vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ison, C A; Easmon, C S; Dawson, S G; Southerton, G; Harris, J W

    1983-01-01

    In the vaginal washings of 100 women with symptomatic non-specific vaginitis a succinate/lactate ratio of greater than or equal to 0.4 had a diagnostic sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 83% for this condition. The predictive value of a positive test was 94%, but that of a negative test was only 55%. A strong association between the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobes, a vaginal pH of above 4.5, and amines was found not only in non-specific vaginitis, but also in trichomonal and gonococcal infection. A variety of primary changes may encourage the multiplication of both gardnerellae and anaerobes and their presence in non-specific vaginitis may be a secondary rather than a primary event. PMID:6606653

  15. Specific and nonspecific treatment factors in the experimental analysis of behavioral treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Jeffrey M; DeMaio, Christine; McGlynn, F Dudley

    2003-07-01

    Interest in the empirical demonstration of the clinical efficacy of psychosocial treatments has been rekindled by societal concerns over accountability and cost-effectiveness in the delivery of mental health services. Behavior therapy has had a long history of experimental research on treatment efficacy and enjoys a visible presence in contemporary mental health practice. The demonstration of behavioral treatment efficacy, however, requires experimental evidence that shows the efficacy of prescriptive structured procedures beyond nonspecific factors in delivery of such procedures. The authors provide an analysis of the nature of nonspecific treatment factors and nonspecific effects and suggest experimental procedures testing the incremental validity of specific treatments. They examine two widely promoted, prescriptive structured treatments to analyze the specificity of their clinical efficacy: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for anxiety disorders and cognitive-behavioral treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. They conclude that the treatments show different levels of efficacy and different degrees of specificity.

  16. Splitter imperfections in annular split-flow thin separation channels: effect on nonspecific crossover.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Moore, Lee R; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2003-03-15

    The separation performance of split-flow thin (SPLITT) separation channels generally falls short of ideal behavior. There are many possible contributing factors to the loss of separation resolution, and these are discussed in the text. The possibility that small imperfections in the splitters play a significant role is examined in this study. Computational fluid dynamics is used to determine the flow pattern within an annular SPLITT channel having small imperfections in the inlet splitter. These results are used to calculate the nonspecific crossover of particles from the inner annular inlet to the outer annular outlet under various flow rate regimes. Nonspecific crossover, obtained through convective transport alone, and not the result of field-induced transport, is often used as a check of channel behavior. The results of a typical experimental determination of nonspecific crossover are included for comparison. It is concluded that geometrical imperfections can indeed play a significant role in the loss of resolution observed for these systems.

  17. NAAG peptidase inhibitors block cognitive deficit induced by MK-801 and motor activation induced by d-amphetamine in animal models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, R T; Janczura, K J; Ball, S R; Madore, J C; Lavin, K M; Lee, J C-M; Lee, M J; Der, E K; Hark, T J; Farago, P R; Profaci, C P; Bzdega, T; Neale, J H

    2012-01-01

    The most widely validated animal models of the positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia involve administration of d-amphetamine or the open channel NMDA receptor blockers, dizocilpine (MK-801), phencyclidine (PCP) and ketamine. The drug ZJ43 potently inhibits glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), an enzyme that inactivates the peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and reduces positive and negative behaviors induced by PCP in several of these models. NAAG is an agonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGluR3). Polymorphisms in this receptor have been associated with expression of schizophrenia. This study aimed to determine whether two different NAAG peptidase inhibitors are effective in dopamine models, whether their efficacy was eliminated in GCPII knockout mice and whether the efficacy of these inhibitors extended to MK-801-induced cognitive deficits as assessed using the novel object recognition test. ZJ43 blocked motor activation when given before or after d-amphetamine treatment. (R,S)-2-phosphono-methylpentanedioic acid (2-PMPA), another potent NAAG peptidase inhibitor, also reduced motor activation induced by PCP or d-amphetamine. 2-PMPA was not effective in GCPII knockout mice. ZJ43 and 2-PMPA also blocked MK-801-induced deficits in novel object recognition when given before, but not after, the acquisition trial. The group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 blocked the effects of NAAG peptidase inhibition in these studies. 2-PMPA was more potent than ZJ43 in a test of NAAG peptidase inhibition in vivo. By bridging the dopamine and glutamate theories of schizophrenia with two structurally different NAAG peptidase inhibitors and demonstrating their efficacy in blocking MK-801-induced memory deficits, these data advance the concept that NAAG peptidase inhibition represents a potentially novel antipsychotic therapy. PMID:22850437

  18. Non-specific (anaerobic) vaginitis: relevance of clinical and laboratory studies in a practice population

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, M.C.; Mann, G.K.; Bangham, A.M.; Milnthorpe, J.

    1987-01-01

    Non-specific vaginitis is a commonly diagnosed condition defined in a similar manner by most authors. Although assumed to be of infective aetiology, no single organism has yet been accepted as the primary agent. This syndrome was studied in two groups of women presenting to general practitioners or attending a family planning clinic. The two groups were of similar ages and had similar markers of sexual activity. Of the 173 women studied, 90 had symptoms. Of the symptomatic women 9.5% could be categorized as having non-specific vaginitis and 36.7% as having an alternative cause for their discharge. Gardnerella vaginalis were found to be associated with anaerobes, clue cells and staphylococci more frequently than by chance. The isolation of G. vaginalis or anaerobes was assessed for their ability to help confirm the diagnosis of non-specific vaginitis and to distinguish this from other possible pathology. In patients with clinical non-specific vaginitis, the isolation of G. vaginalis proved the most sensitive (100%) though not a very specific (77.4%) indicator, whereas anaerobes were more specific (93.2%). The presence of anaerobes was a better predictor of non-specific vaginitis (30.8%) than G. vaginalis (18.9%). It was concluded that providing laboratory facilities specifically for the isolation of G. vaginalis would be of little benefit to the general practitioner in diagnosing non-specific vaginitis since it would add to the cost of processing specimens, whereas reporting the presence of heavy growths of anaerobes provides some confirmation and adds little to the cost. PMID:3499507

  19. Nonspecific hybridization scaling of microarray expression estimates: a physicochemical approach for chip-to-chip normalization.

    PubMed

    Binder, Hans; Brücker, Jan; Burden, Conrad J

    2009-03-05

    The problem of inferring accurate quantitative estimates of transcript abundances from gene expression microarray data is addressed. Particular attention is paid to correcting chip-to-chip variations arising mainly as a result of unwanted nonspecific background hybridization to give transcript abundances measured in a common scale. This study verifies and generalizes a model of the mutual dependence between nonspecific background hybridization and the sensitivity of the specific signal using an approach based on the physical chemistry of surface hybridization. We have analyzed GeneChip oligonucleotide microarray data taken from a set of five benchmark experiments including dilution, Latin Square, and "Golden spike" designs. Our analysis concentrates on the important effect of changes in the unwanted nonspecific background inherent in the technology due to changes in total RNA target concentration and/or composition. We find that incremental changes in nonspecific background entail opposite sign incremental changes in the effective specific binding constant. This effect, which we refer to as the "up-down" effect, results from the subtle interplay of competing interactions between the probes and specific and nonspecific targets at the chip surface and in bulk solution. We propose special rules for proper normalization of expression values considering the specifics of the up-down effect. Particularly for normalization one has to level the expression values of invariant expressed probes. Existing heuristic normalization techniques which do not exclude absent probes, level intensities instead of expression values, and/or use low variance criteria for identifying invariant sets of probes lead to biased results. Strengths and pitfalls of selected normalization methods are discussed. We also find that the extent of the up-down effect is modified if RNA targets are replaced by DNA targets, in that microarray sensitivity and specificity are improved via a decrease in

  20. BSA modification to reduce CTAB induced nonspecificity and cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasun, Emir; Li, Chunmei; Barut, Inci; Janvier, Denisse; Qiu, Liping; Cui, Cheng; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods (AuNRs) are excellent candidates for targeted hyperthermia therapy of cancer cells. However, in high concentrations of AuNRs, aptamer conjugation alone fails to result in highly cell-specific AuNRs due to the presence of positively charged cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a templating surfactant. Besides causing nonspecific electrostatic interactions with the cell surfaces, CTAB can also be cytotoxic, leading to uncontrolled cell death. To avoid the nonspecific interactions and cytotoxicity triggered by CTAB, we report the further biologically inspired modification of aptamer-conjugated AuNRs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. Following this modification, interaction between CTAB and the cell surface was efficiently blocked, thereby dramatically reducing the side effects of CTAB. This approach may provide a general and simple method to avoid one of the most serious issues in biomedical applications of nanomaterials: nonspecific binding of the nanomaterials with biological cells.Aptamer-conjugated gold nanorods (AuNRs) are excellent candidates for targeted hyperthermia therapy of cancer cells. However, in high concentrations of AuNRs, aptamer conjugation alone fails to result in highly cell-specific AuNRs due to the presence of positively charged cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a templating surfactant. Besides causing nonspecific electrostatic interactions with the cell surfaces, CTAB can also be cytotoxic, leading to uncontrolled cell death. To avoid the nonspecific interactions and cytotoxicity triggered by CTAB, we report the further biologically inspired modification of aptamer-conjugated AuNRs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. Following this modification, interaction between CTAB and the cell surface was efficiently blocked, thereby dramatically reducing the side effects of CTAB. This approach may provide a general and simple method to avoid one of the most serious issues in biomedical applications

  1. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Franke, Helge; Franke, Jan-David; Fryer, Gary

    2014-08-30

    Nonspecific back pain is common, disabling, and costly. Therefore, we assessed effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in the management of nonspecific low back pain (LBP) regarding pain and functional status. A systematic literature search unrestricted by language was performed in October 2013 in electronic and ongoing trials databases. Searches of reference lists and personal communications identified additional studies. Only randomized clinical trials were included; specific back pain or single treatment techniques studies were excluded. Outcomes were pain and functional status. Studies were independently reviewed using a standardized form. The mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and overall effect size were calculated at 3 months posttreatment. GRADE was used to assess quality of evidence. We identified 307 studies. Thirty-one were evaluated and 16 excluded. Of the 15 studies reviewed, 10 investigated effectiveness of OMT for nonspecific LBP, 3 effect of OMT for LBP in pregnant women, and 2 effect of OMT for LBP in postpartum women. Twelve had a low risk of bias. Moderate-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant effect on pain relief (MD, -12.91; 95% CI, -20.00 to -5.82) and functional status (SMD, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.58 to -0.14) in acute and chronic nonspecific LBP. In chronic nonspecific LBP, moderate-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT regarding pain (MD, -14.93; 95% CI, -25.18 to -4.68) and functional status (SMD, -0.32; 95% CI, -0.58 to -0.07). For nonspecific LBP in pregnancy, low-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT for pain (MD, -23.01; 95% CI, -44.13 to -1.88) and functional status (SMD, -0.80; 95% CI, -1.36 to -0.23), whereas moderate-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT for pain (MD, -41.85; 95% CI, -49.43 to -34.27) and functional status (SMD, -1.78; 95% CI, -2.21 to -1

  2. Biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from non-specific vaginitis patients in Bombay.

    PubMed

    Pandit, D V; Barve, S M; Deodhar, L P

    1989-11-01

    The incidence and prevalent biotypes of G. vaginalis in patients with non-specific vaginitis from Bombay, was studied. Of 300 patients screened, 105 were diagnosed to have nonspecific vaginitis (NSV). G. vaginalis was isolated from 71 per cent patients with NSV; 34.6 and 29.3 per cent G. vaginalis were belonging to biotypes 5 and 1 respectively. In 55 per cent patient, G. vaginalis was associated with anaerobes. None of the isolated strains of G. vaginalis was sensitive to 5 micrograms metronidazole disc whereas 93 per cent of the strains were sensitive to 50 micrograms metronidazole disc.

  3. Signal peptidase I processed secretory signal sequences: Selection for and against specific amino acids at the second position of mature protein.

    PubMed

    Zalucki, Yaramah M; Jennings, Michael P

    2017-02-12

    Signal peptides direct proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm. These N-terminal peptides are cleaved upon entry to the periplasm by either signal peptidase I, or signal peptidase II for lipoproteins. Signal peptidase I is a serine protease that has either a serine-lysine or serine-histidine catalytic dyad present in the active site. The recognition site for signal peptide cleavage by signal peptidase I has been defined primarily by an Ala-X-Ala motif at the C-terminal end of the signal peptide, one amino acid away from the cleavage site. We used a verified set of signal peptidase I cleaved proteins from E. coli to look for novel conserved features, focusing on the N-terminus of the mature protein. We observed a striking bias for the presence of acidic residues at second position of the mature protein (P2'), and a complete absence of aromatic amino acids at the same position. Whole genome analysis of the predicted set of all E. coli and B. subtilis secreted proteins confirmed the same strong bias for acidic residues at P2' of the mature protein, and against aromatic amino acids at the same position. When these studies were extended to archaeal genomes (M. voltae and S. tokodaii) and the yeast genome from S. cerevisiae, this bias was not observed. E. coli and B. subtilis primarily express a signal peptidase I contains a serine-lysine catalytic dyad, whilst those of archaeal and eukaryotic origin generally have a serine-histidine catalytic dyad. This difference may explain the differential bias for acidic residues and against aromatic residues at P2'. These observations suggest additional key residues that may favor or prevent signal sequence recognition or cleavage by signal peptidase I, and thereby facilitate more accurate in silico prediction of signal peptidase I cleavage sites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acid peptidase activity released from in vitro produced porcine embryos: a candidate marker to predict developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Spate, Lee; Prather, Randall S; Green, Jonathan A

    2009-04-01

    The ability to efficiently create high quality embryos, competent to produce normal viable offspring in vitro, facilitates diverse technological advancements in animal agriculture and assisted reproduction. Current methods for evaluation of embryos are predominantly based on morphological characteristics which are prone to potential bias of the scorer. Metabolic and genetic markers have also been explored for quality assessment, but they are cost prohibitive or require longer periods of time for evaluation. We hypothesized that secreted enzymes could provide another means of embryo quality assessment. In this report, we provide evidence that medium conditioned by porcine embryos often has proteolytic activity that operates in acidic conditions (acid peptidase activity or APA). The APA could be inhibited by pepstatin A, suggesting that the activity is derived from one or more aspartic peptidases. We also provide evidence that single embryos, incubated for as few as 24 hr, released enough APA that it was possible to measure it accurately at day 5 of culture. We also observed that such activity on day 6 could be positively correlated with advanced developmental stage and embryo quality. In addition, those embryos that were graded identically by morphological evaluations often differed in the amount of APA--with some being significantly higher than the experimental threshold value. Therefore, the APA of embryos might serve as an additional marker for evaluation of embryos. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Alterations in plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity in depression and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; De Meester, I; Scharpe, S; Desnyder, R; Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Recently, our laboratory reported that the activity of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV) was significantly lower in the peripheral blood of major depressed patients than in normal controls. The present study examines plasma DPP IV activity in 43 major depressed and 13 schizophrenic subjects versus 21 normal controls and the effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs on plasma DPP IV activity. DPP IV activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal controls and schizophrenic subjects. There was a trend towards higher DPP IV activity in schizophrenic patients than in normal controls. There were no significant effects of antidepressants or neuroleptics on plasma DPP IV activity in depressed and schizophrenic patients, respectively. There were no significant relationships between plasma DPP IV activity and plasma cortisol or immune-inflammatory markers, such as serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) or soluble IL-2 receptor. A significant and positive correlation was found between plasma DPP IV and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) enzyme activity in the study group as a whole and in schizophrenic subjects. The results support the hypothesis that lower and higher plasma DPP IV activities are trait markers of major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. It is concluded that alterations in the enzyme activity of peptidases, such as DPP IV and PEP, play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression and schizophrenia.

  6. A Target-Based Whole Cell Screen Approach To Identify Potential Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Signal Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The general secretion (Sec) pathway is a conserved essential pathway in bacteria and is the primary route of protein export across the cytoplasmic membrane. During protein export, the signal peptidase LepB catalyzes the cleavage of the signal peptide and subsequent release of mature proteins into the extracellular space. We developed a target-based whole cell assay to screen for potential inhibitors of LepB, the sole signal peptidase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using a strain engineered to underexpress LepB (LepB-UE). We screened 72,000 compounds against both the Lep-UE and wild-type (wt) strains. We identified the phenylhydrazone (PHY) series as having higher activity against the LepB-UE strain. We conducted a limited structure–activity relationship determination around a representative PHY compound with differential activity (MICs of 3.0 μM against the LepB-UE strain and 18 μM against the wt); several analogues were less potent against the LepB overexpressing strain. A number of chemical modifications around the hydrazone moiety resulted in improved potency. Inhibition of LepB activity was observed for a number of compounds in a biochemical assay using cell membrane fraction derived from M. tuberculosis. Compounds did not increase cell permeability, dissipate membrane potential, or inhibit an unrelated mycobacterial enzyme, suggesting a specific mode of action related to the LepB secretory mechanism. PMID:27642770

  7. Decrease in dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity is linked to the efficacy of differentiating compounds in follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, E; Engel, E; Wahl, R

    2011-05-01

    Metastasized differentiated thyroid carcinoma is treated by surgery followed by radioiodine remnant ablation. The application of differentiating agents is a possibility of increasing the efficacy of radioiodine therapy. We evaluated DPP IV and aminopeptidase N, both linked to malignancy in thyroid carcinoma, and dipeptidyl peptidase II activities in human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines upon treatment with retinol, apicidine, and lovastatin as differentiating agents. Decrease of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) activity may play a role in the differentiating action. In the human cancer cell lines FTC 138 and 238, high DPP IV and low aminopeptidase N activities were recorded. Retinol treatment induced increases in thyroid-specific protein expression [thyroglobulin and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)], increase in iodide uptake, and decrease in thymidine uptake accompanied by decrease in DPP IV activity. Decreases in DPP IV activities were also seen upon apicidine and lovastatin treatment, which also increased differentiation of the transformed thyrocytes. Our results demonstrate a link between decrease in DPP IV activity and increase in iodide uptake upon stimulation with differentiating agents. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and its cys-free mutant.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Chinami, M; Mizushima, T; Ogasahara, K; Ota, M; Tsukihara, T; Yutani, K

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of the thermostability of proteins from hyperthermophiles, X-ray crystalline structures of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus (PfPCP), and its mutant protein with Ser substituted at Cys142 and Cys188 were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 A resolution, respectively. The obtained structures were compared with those previously reported for pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidases from a hyperthermophilie, Thermococcus litoralis (TlPCP), and from a mesophile, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BaPCP). The PfPCP structure is a tetramer of four identical subunits similar to that of the TlPCP and BaPCP. The largest structural changes among the three PCPs were detected in the C-terminal protrusion, which interacts with that of another subunit. A comparison of the three structures indicated that the high stability of PfPCP is caused by increases in hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds, the formation of an intersubunit ion-pair network, and improvement to an ideal conformation. On the basis of the structures of the three proteins, it can be concluded that PfPCP does not have any special factors responsible for its extremely high stability and that the conformational structure of PfPCP is superior in its combination of positive and negative stabilizing factors compared with BaPCP.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of the Arylomycin Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotics and the Crystallographic Analysis of their Complex with Signal Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Luo, Chuanyun; Smith, Peter A.; Chin, Jodie K.; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Paetzel, Mark; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of natural products, including antibiotics, often plays an important role in determining their physical properties and their biological activity, and thus their potential as drug candidates. The arylomycin class of antibiotics inhibits bacterial type I signal peptidase and is comprised of three related series of natural products with a lipopeptide tail attached to a core macrocycle. Previously, we reported the total synthesis of several A series derivatives, which have unmodified core macrocycles, as well as B series derivatives, which have a nitrated macrocycle. We now report the synthesis and biological evaluation of lipoglycopeptide arylomycin variants whose macrocycles are glycosylated with a deoxy-α-mannose substituent, and also in some cases hydroxylated. The synthesis of the derivatives bearing each possible deoxy-α-mannose enantiomer allowed us to assign the absolute stereochemistry of the sugar in the natural product and also to show that while glycosylation does not alter antibacterial activity, it does appear to improve solubility. Crystallographic structural studies of a lipoglycopeptide arylomycin bound to its signal peptidase target reveal the molecular interactions that underlie inhibition and also that the mannose is directed away from the binding site into solvent which suggests that other modifications may be made at the same position to further increase solubility and thus reduce protein binding and possibly optimize the pharmacokinetics of the scaffold. PMID:21999324

  10. A new cold-adapted serine peptidase from Antarctic Lysobacter sp. A03: Insights about enzyme activity at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane Maria Pereira; Brandelli, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is a great interest for customized biocatalysts that can supply the ongoing demand of industrial processes, but also deal with the growing concern about the environment. In this scenario, cold-adapted enzymes have features that make them very attractive for industrial and biotechnological purposes. Here, we describe A03Pep1, a new cold-adapted serine peptidase isolated from Lysobacter sp. A03 by screening a genomic library. The enzyme is synthesized as a large inactive prepropeptidase that, after intramolecular processing, gives rise to the active form, of 35kDa. The heterologous expression of A03Pep1 was carried out in E. coli cells harboring the vector pGEX-4T-2-a0301. Its activity was optimal at pH 9.0 and 40°C, in the presence of 25mM Ca(2+), which may contribute to the thermal stability of the enzyme. The 3D structure modelling predicted a less deep and more open binding pocket in A03Pep1 than that observed in the crystal structure of its mesophilic homologous AprV2, presumably as a way to enhance the probability of substrate binding at low temperatures. These results provide possible approaches in developing new biotechnologically relevant peptidases active at low to moderate temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase reveals new domains in penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Eric; Herman, Raphaël; Petrella, Stephanie; Duez, Colette; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Frère, Jean-Marie; Charlier, Paulette

    2005-09-02

    Actinomadura sp. R39 produces an exocellular DD-peptidase/penicillin-binding protein (PBP) whose primary structure is similar to that of Escherichia coli PBP4. It is characterized by a high beta-lactam-binding activity (second order rate constant for the acylation of the active site serine by benzylpenicillin: k2/K = 300 mm(-1) s(-1)). The crystal structure of the DD-peptidase from Actinomadura R39 was solved at a resolution of 1.8 angstroms by single anomalous dispersion at the cobalt resonance wavelength. The structure is composed of three domains: a penicillin-binding domain similar to the penicillin-binding domain of E. coli PBP5 and two domains of unknown function. In most multimodular PBPs, additional domains are generally located at the C or N termini of the penicillin-binding domain. In R39, the other two domains are inserted in the penicillin-binding domain, between the SXXK and SXN motifs, in a manner similar to "Matryoshka dolls." One of these domains is composed of a five-stranded beta-sheet with two helices on one side, and the other domain is a double three-stranded beta-sheet inserted in the previous domain. Additionally, the 2.4-angstroms structure of the acyl-enzyme complex of R39 with nitrocefin reveals the absence of active site conformational change upon binding the beta-lactams.

  12. A Novel SUMO1-specific Interacting Motif in Dipeptidyl Peptidase 9 (DPP9) That Is Important for Enzymatic Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Esther; Möller, Ulrike; Sauer, Guido; Mattiroli, Francesca; Melchior, Frauke; Geiss-Friedlander, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Sumoylation affects many cellular processes by regulating the interactions of modified targets with downstream effectors. Here we identified the cytosolic dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) as a SUMO1 interacting protein. Surprisingly, DPP9 binds to SUMO1 independent of the well known SUMO interacting motif, but instead interacts with a loop involving Glu67 of SUMO1. Intriguingly, DPP9 selectively associates with SUMO1 and not SUMO2, due to a more positive charge in the SUMO1-loop. We mapped the SUMO-binding site of DPP9 to an extended arm structure, predicted to directly flank the substrate entry site. Importantly, whereas mutants in the SUMO1-binding arm are less active compared with wild-type DPP9, SUMO1 stimulates DPP9 activity. Consistent with this, silencing of SUMO1 leads to a reduced cytosolic prolyl-peptidase activity. Taken together, these results suggest that SUMO1, or more likely, a sumoylated protein, acts as an allosteric regulator of DPP9. PMID:23152501

  13. Assay for determination of alpha-glucosidase and peptidase activity and location in a nitrifying trickling filter.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, N; Sörensson, F

    2001-12-01

    Enzymatic alpha-glucosidase and peptidase activity in a nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) at the Rya wastewater treatment plant, Göteborg, Sweden, was investigated to evaluate whether these activities can be used as indicators of heterotrophic activity and polymer degradation. Samples of the biofilm were taken from the NTF and incubated in sterile filtered effluent water from the NTF with the addition of soluble starch, peptone, and ammonium chloride. In order to determine the distribution of enzyme activities, the alpha-glucosidase and peptidase activities were measured in the biofilm samples, in the filtered effluent water from the NTF and in the water phase in which the biofilm was incubated. Activities of both enzymes were found both in the effluent water from the NTF and in the biofilm. The enzyme activities were elevated in the samples when starch and peptone were present. In addition, there was a significant inhibition of ammonium oxidation in samples incubated with starch and peptone. Thus, the presence of starch, peptone and ammonium resulted in increased activity of heterotrophs, which lead to an inhibition of the nitrifiers, probably via competition for available oxygen.

  14. Cytosolic γ-Glutamyl Peptidases Process Glutathione Conjugates in the Biosynthesis of Glucosinolates and Camalexin in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Geu-Flores, Fernando; Møldrup, Morten Emil; Böttcher, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scheel, Dierk; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2011-01-01

    The defense-related plant metabolites known as glucosinolates play important roles in agriculture, ecology, and human health. Despite an advanced biochemical understanding of the glucosinolate pathway, the source of the reduced sulfur atom in the core glucosinolate structure remains unknown. Recent evidence has pointed toward GSH, which would require further involvement of a GSH conjugate processing enzyme. In this article, we show that an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant impaired in the production of the γ-glutamyl peptidases GGP1 and GGP3 has altered glucosinolate levels and accumulates up to 10 related GSH conjugates. We also show that the double mutant is impaired in the production of camalexin and accumulates high amounts of the camalexin intermediate GS-IAN upon induction. In addition, we demonstrate that the cellular and subcellular localization of GGP1 and GGP3 matches that of known glucosinolate and camalexin enzymes. Finally, we show that the purified recombinant GGPs can metabolize at least nine of the 10 glucosinolate-related GSH conjugates as well as GS-IAN. Our results demonstrate that GSH is the sulfur donor in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates and establish an in vivo function for the only known cytosolic plant γ-glutamyl peptidases, namely, the processing of GSH conjugates in the glucosinolate and camalexin pathways. PMID:21712415

  15. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Exerts Renoprotective Effects in Rats with Established Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Arruda-Junior, Daniel F.; Martins, Flavia L.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jensen, Leonardo; Antonio, Ednei L.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Tucci, Paulo J. F.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models, suggesting that DPPIV may play a role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Renal dysfunction is one of the key features of HF, but it remains to be determined whether DPPIV inhibitors are capable of improving cardiorenal function after the onset of HF. Therefore, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that DPPIV inhibition by vildagliptin improves renal water and salt handling and exerts anti-proteinuric effects in rats with established HF. To this end, male Wistar rats were subjected to left ventricle (LV) radiofrequency ablation or sham operation. Six weeks after surgery, radiofrequency-ablated rats who developed HF were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 4 weeks with vildagliptin (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage. Echocardiography was performed before (pretreatment) and at the end of treatment (post-treatment) to evaluate cardiac function. The fractional area change (FAC) increased (34 ± 5 vs. 45 ± 3%, p < 0.05), and the isovolumic relaxation time decreased (33 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 1 ms; p < 0.05) in HF rats treated with vildagliptin (post-treatment vs. pretreatment). On the other hand, cardiac dysfunction deteriorated further in vehicle-treated HF rats. Renal function was impaired in vehicle-treated HF rats as evidenced by fluid retention, low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and high levels of urinary protein excretion. Vildagliptin treatment restored urinary flow, GFR, urinary sodium and urinary protein excretion to sham levels. Restoration of renal function in HF rats by DPPIV inhibition was associated with increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) serum concentration, reduced DPPIV activity and increased activity of protein kinase A in the renal cortex. Furthermore, the anti-proteinuric effect of vildagliptin treatment in rats with established HF was associated with

  16. Effects of Inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP4) in Cows with Subclinical Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kirsten; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Meyer, Ulrich; Rehage, Jürgen; Piechotta, Marion; Meyerholz, Maria; Breves, Gerhard; Reiche, Dania; Sauerwein, Helga; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) via specific inhibitors is known to result in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and decreased accumulation of hepatic fat in type II diabetic human patients. The metabolic situation of dairy cows can easily be compared to the status of human diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver. For both, insulin sensitivity is reduced, while hepatic fat accumulation increases, characterized by high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and ketone bodies.Therefore, in the present study, a DPP4 inhibitor was employed (BI 14332) for the first time in cows. In a first investigation BI 14332 treatment (intravenous injection at dosages of up to 3 mg/kg body weight) was well tolerated in healthy lactating pluriparous cows (n = 6) with a significant inhibition of DPP4 in plasma and liver. Further testing included primi- and pluriparous lactating cows suffering from subclinical ketosis (β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in serum > 1.2 mM; n = 12). The intension was to offer effects of DPP4 inhibition during comprehensive lipomobilisation and hepatosteatosis. The cows of subclinical ketosis were evenly allocated to either the treatment group (daily injections, 0.3 mg BI 14332/kg body weight, 7 days) or the control group. Under condition of subclinical ketosis, the impact of DPP4 inhibition via BI 14332 was less, as in particular β-hydroxybutyrate and the hepatic lipid content remained unaffected, but NEFA and triglyceride concentrations were decreased after treatment. Owing to lower NEFA, the revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (surrogate marker for insulin sensitivity) increased. Therefore, a positive influence on energy metabolism might be quite possible. Minor impacts on immune-modulating variables were limited to the lymphocyte CD4+/CD8+ ratio for which a trend to decreased values in treated versus control animals was noted. In sum, the DPP4 inhibition in cows did not affect glycaemic control like

  17. Impact of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors on serum adiponectin: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Men, Peng; Wang, Yuhui; Zhai, Suodi; Liu, George

    2016-11-23

    Adiponectin, an adipose-specific protein, is negatively correlated with pro-atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. Therefore, low levels of adiponectin are associated with a higher risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4i) have been used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as reversible inhibitors through interacting with DPP4 substrate and increase serum incretins such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of DPP4i on serum adiponectin in T2DM patients. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched from inception to February 2016. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the DPP4i (sitagliptin and vildagliptin) versus comparator (placebo or active-comparison), in T2DM patients with duration of ≥ 12 weeks, were identified. Weighted differences in means of adiponectin levels were calculated by using a fixed or random-effects model. Ten randomized controlled trials, including 1,495 subjects, were identified. Compared with placebo, DPP4i (sitagliptin and vildagliptin) treatment significantly elevated adiponectin levels by 0.74 μg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 1.03) relative to that using an active-comparison by 0.00 μg/mL (95% CI, -0.57 to 0.56). Compared with active-comparison, vildagliptin treatment increased adiponectin levels by 0.32 μg/mL (95% CI, -0.01 to 0.65), whereas sitagliptin treatment decreased adiponectin levels by -0.24 μg/mL (95% CI, -1.07 to 0.58). Trials examining effects of other DPP4i were not found. Sitagliptin and vildagliptin increased serum adiponectin levels and had no stronger effect than traditional oral antidiabetic drugs. Further trials with larger sample size are needed to confirm the results and investigate the association between serum adiponectin levels and treatment of other DPP-4 inhibitors

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes therapy--focus on alogliptin.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Annalisa; Sportiello, Liberata; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Rossi, Francesco; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex and progressive disease that is showing an apparently unstoppable increase worldwide. Although there is general agreement on the first-line use of metformin in most patients with type 2 diabetes, the ideal drug sequence after metformin failure is an area of increasing uncertainty. New treatment strategies target pancreatic islet dysfunction, in particular gut-derived incretin hormones. Inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) slows degradation of endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and thereby enhances and prolongs the action of the endogenous incretin hormones. The five available DPP-4 inhibitors, also known as 'gliptins' (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, alogliptin), are small molecules used orally with similar overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. The main differences between the five gliptins on the market include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, long or short half-life, high or low binding to plasma proteins, metabolism, presence of active or inactive metabolites, excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug-drug interactions. On average, treatment with gliptins is expected to produce a mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) decrease of 0.5%-0.8%, with about 40% of diabetic subjects at target for the HbA1c goal <7%. There are very few studies comparing DPP-4 inhibitors. Alogliptin as monotherapy or added to metformin, pioglitazone, glibenclamide, voglibose, or insulin therapy significantly improves glycemic control compared with placebo in adult or elderly patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. In the EXAMINE trial, alogliptin is being compared with placebo on cardiovascular outcomes in approximately 5,400 patients with type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, DPP-4 inhibitors were generally safe and well tolerated. However, there are limited data on their tolerability

  19. Temperature and salts effects on the peptidase activities of the recombinant metallooligopeptidases neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vitor; Gatti, Reynaldo; Rioli, Vanessa; Ferro, Emer S; Spisni, Alberto; Camargo, Antonio C M; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2002-09-01

    We report the recombinant neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) hydrolytic activities towards internally quenched fluorescent peptides derived from the peptide Abz-GGFLRRXQ-EDDnp (Abz, ortho-aminobenzoicacid; EDDnp, N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) ethylenediamine), in which X was substituted by 11 different natural amino acids. Neurolysin hydrolyzed these peptides at R-R or at R-X bonds, and TOP hydrolyzed at R-R or L-R bonds, showing a preference to cleave at three or four amino acids from the C-terminal end. The kinetic parameters of hydrolysis and the variations of the cleavage sites were evaluated under different conditions of temperature and salt concentration. The relative amount of cleavage varied with the nature of the substitution at the X position as well as with temperature and NaCl concentration. TOP was activated by all assayed salts in the range 0.05-0.2 m for NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl and NaI, and 0.025-0.1 m for Na2SO4. Concentration higher than 0.2 N NH4Cl and NaI reduced TOP activity, while 0.5 N or higher concentration of NaCl, KCl and Na2SO4 increased TOP activity. Neurolysin was strongly activated by NaCl, KCl and Na2SO4, while NH4Cl and NaI have very modest effect. High positive values of enthalpy (DeltaH*) and entropy (DeltaS*) of activation were found together with an unusual temperature dependence upon the hydrolysis of the substrates. The effects of low temperature and high NaCl concentration on the hydrolytic activities of neurolysin and TOP do not seem to be a consequence of large secondary structure variation of the proteins, as indicated by the far-UV CD spectra. However, the modulation of the activities of the two oligopeptidases could be related to variations of conformation, in limited regions of the peptidases, enough to modify their activities.

  20. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  1. Identification of novel functional sequence variants in the gene for peptidase inhibitor 3

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mahboob A; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Romero, Roberto; Edwin, Samuel; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tromp, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Background Peptidase inhibitor 3 (PI3) inhibits neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3, and has a potential role in skin and lung diseases as well as in cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of chorioamniotic membranes revealed decreased expression of PI3 in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms contributing to the decreased expression in amniotic membranes, the PI3 gene was searched for sequence variations and the functional significance of the identified promoter variants was studied. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by direct sequencing of PCR products spanning a region from 1,173 bp upstream to 1,266 bp downstream of the translation start site. Fourteen SNPs were genotyped from 112 and nine SNPs from 24 unrelated individuals. Putative transcription factor binding sites as detected by in silico search were verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using nuclear extract from Hela and amnion cell nuclear extract. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested by χ2 goodness-of-fit test. Haplotypes were estimated using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Results Twenty-three sequence variations were identified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products covering 2,439 nt of the PI3 gene (-1,173 nt of promoter sequences and all three exons). Analysis of 112 unrelated individuals showed that 20 variants had minor allele frequencies (MAF) ranging from 0.02 to 0.46 representing "true polymorphisms", while three had MAF ≤ 0.01. Eleven variants were in the promoter region; several putative transcription factor binding sites were found at these sites by database searches. Differential binding of transcription factors was demonstrated at two polymorphic sites by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both in amniotic and HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Differential binding of the transcription factor GATA1 at -689C>G site was confirmed by a

  2. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  3. Molecular crowding drives active Pin1 into nonspecific complexes with endogenous proteins prior to substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Luh, Laura M; Hänsel, Robert; Löhr, Frank; Kirchner, Donata K; Krauskopf, Katharina; Pitzius, Susanne; Schäfer, Birgit; Tufar, Peter; Corbeski, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Dötsch, Volker

    2013-09-18

    Proteins and nucleic acids maintain the crowded interior of a living cell and can reach concentrations in the order of 200-400 g/L which affects the physicochemical parameters of the environment, such as viscosity and hydrodynamic as well as nonspecific strong repulsive and weak attractive interactions. Dynamics, structure, and activity of macromolecules were demonstrated to be affected by these parameters. However, it remains controversially debated, which of these factors are the dominant cause for the observed alterations in vivo. In this study we investigated the globular folded peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in native-like crowded oocyte extract by in-cell NMR spectroscopy. We show that active Pin1 is driven into nonspecific weak attractive interactions with intracellular proteins prior to substrate recognition. The substrate recognition site of Pin1 performs specific and nonspecific attractive interactions. Phosphorylation of the WW domain at Ser16 by PKA abrogates both substrate recognition and the nonspecific interactions with the endogenous proteins. Our results validate the hypothesis formulated by McConkey that the majority of globular folded proteins with surface charge properties close to neutral under physiological conditions reside in macromolecular complexes with other sticky proteins due to molecular crowding. In addition, we demonstrate that commonly used synthetic crowding agents like Ficoll 70 are not suitable to mimic the intracellular environment due to their incapability to simulate biologically important weak attractive interactions.

  4. A Comparison of Oral Narratives in Children with Specific Language and Non-Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Wendy M.; James, Deborah G. H.; McCormack, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) and non-specific language impairment (NLI) could be differentiated by their oral narrative characteristics. Oral narrative samples were collected from 69 children and comparisons were made among four groups of participants. The two language impairment groups (SLI…

  5. Genetic Influences on Specific versus Nonspecific Language Impairment in 4-Year-Old Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Oliver, Bonamy; Plomin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The present study addresses the distinction between specific (SLI) and nonspecific (NLI) language impairment at an etiological level by estimating the relative genetic and environmental contributions to language impairment in children with SLI and NLI. Drawing on a large longitudinal twin study, we tested a sample of 356 four-and-a-half-year-old…

  6. Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises for nonspecific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Guangmin; Liu, Yuanmei

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises on nonspecific low back pain. In the prospective study, ninety-two participants with nonspecific low back pain were divided into experimental and control group at random, and 46 in each. The experimental group were treated using Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises, while the control group were treated using Chinese massage alone. The two groups were evaluated using visual analog scale and Oswestry disability index at baseline, immediately after two and eight weeks. In addition, the recurrence rate of nonspecific low back pain was evaluated one year after the last intervention. Two weeks after treatment, both VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in two groups (p<0.05), when compared with the values before treatment, but no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Eight weeks later, the VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in both groups (p<0.05); at the same time, both VAS and ODI scores were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the experimental group than those in the control group. At the final follow-up, five cases recurred in the experimental group and nineteen cases in the control group, the control group has a significantly higher recurrence rate (p<0.05). Core stability exercises can improve the therapeutic effect of Chinese massage in treating nonspecific low back pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural basis for sequence-dependent DNA cleavage by nonspecific endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Yang, Wei-Jen; Li, Chia-Lung; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2007-01-01

    Nonspecific endonucleases hydrolyze DNA without sequence specificity but with sequence preference, however the structural basis for cleavage preference remains elusive. We show here that the nonspecific endonuclease ColE7 cleaves DNA with a preference for making nicks after (at 3′O-side) thymine bases but the periplasmic nuclease Vvn cleaves DNA more evenly with little sequence preference. The crystal structure of the ‘preferred complex’ of the nuclease domain of ColE7 bound to an 18 bp DNA with a thymine before the scissile phosphate had a more distorted DNA phosphate backbone than the backbones in the non-preferred complexes, so that the scissile phosphate was compositionally closer to the endonuclease active site resulting in more efficient DNA cleavage. On the other hand, in the crystal structure of Vvn in complex with a 16 bp DNA, the DNA phosphate backbone was similar and not distorted in comparison with that of a previously reported complex of Vvn with a different DNA sequence. Taken together these results suggest a general structural basis for the sequence-dependent DNA cleavage catalyzed by nonspecific endonucleases, indicating that nonspecific nucleases could induce DNA to deform to distinctive levels depending on the local sequence leading to different cleavage rates along the DNA chain. PMID:17175542

  8. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be used by an intrastate motor carrier for transportation of a flammable liquid petroleum product in... and parts 178 and 180 of this subchapter, a non-specification metal tank permanently secured to a... flammable liquid petroleum product in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (d...

  9. 49 CFR 173.8 - Exceptions for non-specification packagings used in intrastate transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be used by an intrastate motor carrier for transportation of a flammable liquid petroleum product in... and parts 178 and 180 of this subchapter, a non-specification metal tank permanently secured to a... flammable liquid petroleum product in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d) of this section. (d...

  10. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain.

  11. 49 CFR 173.204 - Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials. 173.204 Section 173.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  12. Infantile Autism and Computerized Tomography Brain-Scan Findings: Specific versus Nonspecific Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balottin, Umberto; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study of computerized tomography brain-scan findings with 45 autistic and 19 control subjects concluded that autism is nonspecifically associated with brain-scan abnormalities, and that other nonorganic, as well as organic, factors should be taken into account. (Author/DB)

  13. A physical approach to reduce nonspecific adhesion in molecular recognition atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, O H; Snel, M M; Kuipers, L; Figdor, C G; Greve, J; De Grooth, B G

    1999-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy is one of the few techniques that allow analysis of biological recognition processes at the single-molecule level. A major limitation of this approach is the nonspecific interaction between the force sensor and substrate. We have modeled the nonspecific interaction by looking at the interaction potential between a conical Si3N4 tip with a spherical end face and a mica surface in solution, using DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory and numerical calculations. Insertion of the tip-sample potential in a simulation of an approach-retract cycle of the cantilever gives the well-known force-distance curve. Simulating a force-distance curve at low salt concentration predicts a discrete hopping of the tip, caused by thermal fluctuations. This hopping behavior was observed experimentally and gave rise to a novel approach to making measurements in adhesion mode that essentially works in the repulsive regime. The distance between tip and sample will still be small enough to allow spacer-involved specific interactions, and the percentage of nonspecific interactions of the bare tip with the mica is minimized. We have validated this physical model by imaging intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) antigen with a tip functionalized with anti-ICAM-1 antibody. The measurement demonstrated that a significant decrease in the number of nonspecific interactions was realized, and the topographical image quality and the specific bonding capability of the tip were not affected.

  14. Copper UPD as non-specific adsorption barrier in electrochemical displacement immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Duarte, M V; Lozano-Sanchez, P; Katakis, I

    2009-03-15

    Non-specific adsorption events are responsible to a large extent for the lack of reliability and applicability of electrochemical immunosensors. In the particular case of displacement-based immunosensors, as an approach to achieve reagentless, labelless and easy to use immunosensors, the hindering effect of then non-specific adsorption is amplified when the system presents a low affinity constant between biorecognition element and target. The application of Copper UPD as non-specific adsorption barrier in combination with the use of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) to provide efficient binding of biomolecules to the immunosensor electrode surface is shown to be a very promising mechanism to construct protein resistant surfaces with no harming effects on the electrochemical transducing mechanism. The electrochemical immunodetection of TCA (2,4,6-Trichloroanisole) has been chosen as example for a real case study. A monoclonal antibody to detect the target TCA and an appropriate sub-optimum antigen were used. In addition to a rational strategy for displacement immunosensor development, the decrease of non-specific adsorption phenomena by introducing Copper UPD is reported here. With such strategy an electrochemical displacement immunosensor with a limit of detection of 200ppb and response time of 10min is achieved.

  15. Determination of the number of proteins bound non-specifically to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Liebesny, Paul; Goyal, Sachin; Dunlap, David; Family, Fereydoon; Finzi, Laura

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the change in the number of proteins bound non-specifically to DNA as a function of applied force using force–extension measurements on tethered DNA. Using magnetic tweezers, single molecules of λ DNA were repeatedly stretched and relaxed in the absence and presence of 170 nM λ repressor protein (CI). CI binds to six specific sites of λ DNA with nanomolar affinity and also binds non-specifically with micromolar affinity. The force versus extension data were analyzed using a recently developed theoretical framework for quantitative determination of protein binding to the DNA. The results indicate that the non-specific binding of CI changes the force–extension relation significantly in comparison to that of naked DNA. The DNA tether used in our experiment would have about 640 bound repressors, if it was completely saturated with bound proteins. We find that as the pulling force on DNA is reduced from 4.81 to 0.13 pN, approximately 138 proteins bind to DNA, which is about 22% of the length of the tethered DNA. Our results show that 0.13 pN is not low enough to cause saturation of DNA by repressor and 4.81 pN is also not high enough to eliminate all the repressors bound to DNA. This demonstrates that the force–extension relation provides an effective approach for estimating the number of proteins bound non-specifically to a DNA molecule. PMID:21386587

  16. In vivo activity of a nonspecific T cell-replacing factor.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Bösing-Schneider, R; Corley, R B

    1979-01-01

    Nonspecific T cell-replacing factors prepared as supernatants from mixed lymphocyte cultures or concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells are active in vivo iv injected into nude mice at least 3 days before antigen. The supernatants appear to act by enhancing the week IgM responses that occur in untreated nudes. Secondary responses and IgG antibody were not found.

  17. Nonspecific synaptic plasticity improves the recognition of sparse patterns degraded by local noise.

    PubMed

    Safaryan, Karen; Maex, Reinoud; Davey, Neil; Adams, Rod; Steuber, Volker

    2017-04-20

    Many forms of synaptic plasticity require the local production of volatile or rapidly diffusing substances such as nitric oxide. The nonspecific plasticity these neuromodulators may induce at neighboring non-active synapses is thought to be detrimental for the specificity of memory storage. We show here that memory retrieval may benefit from this non-specific plasticity when the applied sparse binary input patterns are degraded by local noise. Simulations of a biophysically realistic model of a cerebellar Purkinje cell in a pattern recognition task show that, in the absence of noise, leakage of plasticity to adjacent synapses degrades the recognition of sparse static patterns. However, above a local noise level of 20%, the model with nonspecific plasticity outperforms the standard, specific model. The gain in performance is greatest when the spatial distribution of noise in the input matches the range of diffusion-induced plasticity. Hence non-specific plasticity may offer a benefit in noisy environments or when the pressure to generalize is strong.

  18. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  19. Specific and non-specific symptoms of colorectal cancer and contact to general practice.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Larsen, Pia V; Søndergaard, Jens; Elnegaard, Sandra; Svendsen, Rikke P; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2015-08-01

    To improve survival rates for colorectal cancer, referral guidelines have been implemented. First step in the diagnostic process is for the individual to recognize the symptoms and contact his/her general practitioner (GP) for evaluation. To determine (i) the prevalence of specific and non-specific symptom experiences indicative of colorectal cancer, (ii) the proportion of subsequent contacts to GPs, (iii) to explore the possible differences in symptom experience and contact to GPs between age and sex. A nationwide study of 100000 adults, aged 20 years and older, were randomly selected in the general population and invited to participate in an internet-based survey. Items regarding experience of specific and non-specific alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer within the preceding 4 weeks and contact to GP were included. A total of 49706 subjects completed the questionnaire. Abdominal pain was the most common specific alarm symptom (19.7%) and tiredness was the most common non-specific symptom (49.8%). The experiences of symptoms were more common among women and more common in the youngest age groups for both sexes. The symptom leading to the highest proportion of GP contacts was rectal bleeding (33.8%). When experiencing any combination of two specific alarm symptoms, the proportion who contacted a GP was less than 50%. The combination of a non-specific and a specific alarm symptom gave rise to the highest proportion of GP contacts. Although specific and non-specific alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer are common in the general population, the proportion of GP contacts is low. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparison of cervical spine stiffness in individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Lewis A; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-03-01

    Clinical measurement, cross-sectional. To determine if spinal joint stiffness is different in individuals with nonspecific neck pain, and whether stiffness magnitude is associated with pain intensity and disability. Manual therapists commonly evaluate spinal joint stiffness in patients presenting with nonspecific neck pain. However, a relationship between stiffness and neck pain has not yet been demonstrated. Spinal stiffness at C7 was objectively measured in participants with chronic nonspecific neck pain whose symptomatic spinal level was identified as C7 (n = 12) and in age- and sex-matched asymptomatic controls (n = 12). Stiffness (slope of the linear region of the force-displacement curve) was quantified using a device that applied 5 standardized mechanical force cycles to the C7 spinous process, while concurrently measuring displacement and resistance to movement. Stiffness was compared between groups using an independent t test. Spearman rho and Pearson r were used to determine the extent to which stiffness magnitude was associated with pain intensity (visual analog scale) and level of disability (Neck Disability Index), respectively, in the group with neck pain. Participants with nonspecific neck pain had greater spinal joint stiffness at C7 compared with asymptomatic individuals (mean difference, 1.78 N/mm; 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 3.27; P = .022). However, stiffness magnitude in the group with neck pain was not associated (P>.05) with pain intensity or level of disability. These preliminary results suggest that cervical spine stiffness may be greater in the presence of nonspecific neck pain. However, judgments regarding pain intensity and level of disability should not be inferred from examinations of spinal joint stiffness.

  1. From Nonspecific DNA–Protein Encounter Complexes to the Prediction of DNA–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    DNA–protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA–protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA–protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA–protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA–protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA–protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Cα deviation from native is up to 5 Å from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA–protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein. PMID:19343221

  2. Physical activity and disability among adolescents and young adults with non-specific musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Stommen, Nancy C; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Gorter, Simone L; Goossens, Mariëlle E

    2012-01-01

    To compare physical activity levels of adolescents and young adults with chronic pain with that of healthy participants. To investigate the impact of pain intensity, pain catastrophizing and depressive symptoms on the level of physical activity and disability of adolescents and young adults with chronic pain. Case-control study. Levels of physical activity and disability of adolescents and young adults with chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain (n = 42) were compared with that of healthy participants (n = 42). For participants with chronic pain, measures of pain catastrophizing, pain intensity and depression were examined for their ability to explain levels of physical activity and disability. multivariate regression analysis, Mann-Whitney testing, Pearson correlation analysis. Participants with chronic pain were as active as healthy participants (p = 0.22) (confidence interval [CI] 95%), although they seemed to be less active in sports and heavy-loaded activities. Pain intensity (ß = 0.32) and depressive symptoms (ß = 0.36) contributed significantly to disability (CI 95%). There was no significant association between physical activity and disability (CI 95%). Chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain is a disabling condition for adolescents and young adults. The level of physical activity in the daily life of adolescents and young adults with chronic pain is comparable to that of healthy counterparts, although the performance of sports and heavy-loaded activities seems diminished. Both pain intensity and depressive symptoms are disabling. [ • Chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain is a disabling condition for adolescents and young adults.• Pain intensity and depressive symptoms predict disability.• The effect of pain on the physical-activity level of adolescents and young adults with chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain seems to be small.• Assessment and improvement of emotional well-being may improve treatment programs for adolescents and

  3. Different modes of vancomycin and D-alanyl-D-alanine peptidase binding to cell wall peptide and a possible role for the vancomycin resistance protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, J R; Pratt, R F

    1990-01-01

    A comparison was made of the binding modes of the bacterial cell wall precursor L-lysyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine to the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin and to the D-alanyl-D-alanine-cleaving peptidase of Streptomyces sp. strain R61, a model for cell wall-synthesizing enzymes whose X-ray three-dimensional structure is established. In each of the two pairings (vancomycin with peptide and DD-peptidase with peptide), polypeptide backbones were antiparallel, and the antibiotic or enzyme enveloped the peptide substrate from opposite sides. Hydrogen-bonding groups on the substrate which are involved with the DD-peptidase were shown to be different from the ones reported from nuclear magnetic resonance studies to be involved with vancomycin. Because of steric hindrance, the binding of either molecule to the substrate prevents the binding of the other molecule. Binding to the substrate by a D-alanyl-D-alanine-recognizing protein in a manner similar to that used by the DD-peptidase could explain recent observations of vancomycin resistance, in which a new membrane-associated protein has been detected. PMID:2386365

  4. Primary and predicted secondary structures of the Actinomadura R39 extracellular DD-peptidase, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) related to the Escherichia coli PBP4.

    PubMed Central

    Granier, B; Duez, C; Lepage, S; Englebert, S; Dusart, J; Dideberg, O; Van Beeumen, J; Frère, J M; Ghuysen, J M

    1992-01-01

    As derived from gene cloning and sequencing, the 489-amino-acid DD-peptidase/penicillin-binding protein (PBP) produced by Actinomadura R39 has a primary structure very similar to that of the Escherichia coli PBP4 [Mottl, Terpstra & Keck (1991) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 78, 213-220]. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of the two proteins shows that, providing that a large 174-amino-acid stretch is excluded from the analysis, the bulk of the two polypeptide chains possesses homologues of the active-site motifs and secondary structures found in the class A beta-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G of known three-dimensional structure. The 174-amino-acid insert occurs at equivalent places in the two PBPs, between helices alpha 2 and alpha 3, away from the active site. Such an insert is unique among the penicilloyl serine transferases. It is proposed that the Actinomadura R39 PBP and E. coli PBP4 form a special class, class C, of low-Mr PBPs/DD-peptidases. A vector has been constructed and introduced by electrotransformation in the original Actinomadura R39 strain, allowing high-level expression and secretion of the DD-peptidase/PBP (250 mg.l-1). The gene encoding the desired protein is processed differently in Actinomadura R39 and Streptomyces lividans. Incorrect processing in Streptomyces lividans leads to a secreted protein which is inert in terms of DD-peptidase activity and penicillin-binding capacity. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1554361

  5. Complementary Proteomic and Biochemical Analysis of Peptidases in Lobster Gastric Juice Uncovers the Functional Role of Individual Enzymes in Food Digestion.

    PubMed

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Craik, Charles S; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Crustaceans are a diverse group, distributed in widely variable environmental conditions for which they show an equally extensive range of biochemical adaptations. Some digestive enzymes have been studied by purification/characterization approaches. However, global analysis is crucial to understand how digestive enzymes interplay. Here, we present the first proteomic analysis of the digestive fluid from a crustacean (Homarus americanus) and identify glycosidases and peptidases as the most abundant classes of hydrolytic enzymes. The digestion pathway of complex carbohydrates was predicted by comparing the lobster enzymes to similar enzymes from other crustaceans. A novel and unbiased substrate profiling approach was used to uncover the global proteolytic specificity of gastric juice and determine the contribution of cysteine and aspartic acid peptidases. These enzymes were separated by gel electrophoresis and their individual substrate specificities uncovered from the resulting gel bands. This new technique is called zymoMSP. Each cysteine peptidase cleaves a set of unique peptide bonds and the S2 pocket determines their substrate specificity. Finally, affinity chromatography was used to enrich for a digestive cathepsin D1 to compare its substrate specificity and cold-adapted enzymatic properties to mammalian enzymes. We conclude that the H. americanus digestive peptidases may have useful therapeutic applications, due to their cold-adaptation properties and ability to hydrolyze collagen.

  6. Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene promoter: tissue-specific regulation from a TATA-less GC-rich sequence characteristic of a housekeeping gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, S K; Gum, J R; Erickson, R H; Hicks, J W; Kim, Y S

    1995-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene encodes a plasma-membrane exopeptidase that is highly expressed in small intestine, lung and kidney. In order to better understand the mechanisms responsible for this tissue-specific expression we cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized the 5'-flanking region of the human dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene. The first 500 bases of the 5'-flanking sequence constituted an unmethylated CpG island, contained several Sp1-binding sites and lacked a consensus TATA box, all characteristics of gene promoters lacking tissue-specific expression. RNase-protection analysis using both small intestinal and Caco2 cell RNA indicated that the dipeptidyl peptidase IV transcript was initiated from no fewer than six major and 12 minor start sites. The 5'-flanking sequence also exhibited functional promoter activity in transient transfection experiments. Here, various lengths of the sequence were cloned upstream of a luciferase gene and introduced into cultured cells using lipofectin. A region located between bases -150 and -109 relative to the start of translation was found to be important for high-level promoter activity in both Caco2 and HepG2 cells. Moreover, Caco2 cells and HepG2 cells, which express high levels of dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity, exhibited much higher normalized luciferase activity after transfection than did 3T3, Jurkat or COS-7 cells, which have low enzyme levels. Sodium butyrate was found to increase both enzyme activity and normalized luciferase in HepG2 cells. Thus the dipeptidyl peptidase IV promoter possesses the ability to initiate transcription in a tissue-specific fashion in spite of having the sequence characteristics of a housekeeping gene promoter. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7487939

  7. Cost effectiveness of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jinsong; Yu, Hao; Mao, Yiwei; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yingyao

    2015-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic drugs used for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. While many studies have reported on the cost-effectiveness of DPP-4 inhibitors for treating type 2 diabetes, a systematic review of economic evaluations of DPP-4 inhibitors is currently lacking. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the cost effectiveness of DPP-4 inhibitors for patients with type 2 diabetes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Web of Science, EconLit databases, and the Cochrane Library were searched in November 2013. Studies assessing the cost effectiveness of DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes were eligible for analysis. DPP-4 inhibitor monotherapy or combinations with other antidiabetic agents were included in the review. The DPP-4 inhibitors were all marketed drugs. Two reviewers independently reviewed titles, abstracts, and articles sequentially to select studies for data abstraction based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. The quality of included studies was assessed according to the 24-item checklist of the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement. The costs reported by the included studies were converted to US dollars via purchasing power parities (PPP) in the year 2013 using the CCEMG-EPPI-Center Cost Converter. A total of 11 published studies were selected for inclusion; all were cost-utility analyses. Nine studies were conducted from a payer perspective and one used a societal perspective; however, the perspective of the other study was unclear. Four studies were of good quality, six were of moderate quality, and one was of low quality. Of the seven studies comparing DPP-4 inhibitors plus metformin with sulfonylureas plus metformin, six concluded that DPP-4 inhibitors were cost effective in patients with type 2 diabetes who were no longer adequately controlled by metformin

  8. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramić, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft (“entropy reservoir”) as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies. PMID:22493238

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase I is required for the processing and activation of granzymes A and B in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Christine T. N.; Ley, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) is a lysosomal cysteine protease that has been implicated in the processing of granzymes, which are neutral serine proteases exclusively expressed in the granules of activated cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this report, we show that cytotoxic lymphocytes derived from DPPI−/− mice contain normal amounts of granzymes A and B, but these molecules retain their prodipeptide domains and are inactive. Cytotoxic assays with DPPI−/− effector cells reveal severe defects in the induction of target cell apoptosis (as measured by [125I]UdR release) at both early and late time points; this defect is comparable to that detected in perforin−/− or granzyme A−/− × B−/− cytotoxic lymphocytes. DPPI therefore plays an essential role in the in vivo processing and activation of granzymes A and B, which are required for cytotoxic lymphocyte granule-mediated apoptosis. PMID:10411926

  10. Shedding of glycan-modifying enzymes by signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) regulates cellular N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Künzel, Ulrike; Higel, Fabian; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio; Fukumori, Akio; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Grammer, Gudula; Seidl, Andreas; Schröder, Bernd; Obst, Reinhard; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Haass, Christian; Fluhrer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmunity, tumour progression and metastasis. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is an intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease of the GxGD type. Its physiological function, however, has remained enigmatic, since presently no physiological substrates have been identified. We demonstrate that SPPL3 alters the pattern of cellular N-glycosylation by triggering the proteolytic release of active site-containing ectodomains of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V, β-1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 and β-1,4 galactosyltransferase 1. Cleavage of these enzymes leads to a reduction in their cellular activity. In line with that, reduced expression of SPPL3 results in a hyperglycosylation phenotype, whereas elevated SPPL3 expression causes hypoglycosylation. Thus, SPPL3 plays a central role in an evolutionary highly conserved post-translational process in eukaryotes. PMID:25354954

  11. The Physarum polycephalum php gene encodes a unique cold-adapted serine-carboxyl peptidase, physarolisin II.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Wataru; Kuriyama, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji

    2003-07-10

    The php gene from a true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, is a late-replicating and transcriptionally active gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product is homologous to those of the serine-carboxyl peptidase family, including physarolisin I from the same organism, but lacks the propeptide region. In this study, the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to possess endopeptidase activity with unique substrate specificity. Thus, we named it physarolisin II. The enzyme was revealed to be a kind of cold-adapted enzyme since it was maximally active at 16-22 degrees C. The active enzyme was markedly unstable due to rapid autolysis (t(1/2)= approximately 5 min, at 18 degrees C). At higher temperature, the enzyme was less active but more stable, despite the fact that no gross conformational change was observed by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  12. Cathepsins L and S are not required for activation of dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mallen-St. Clair, Jon; Shi, Guo-Ping; Sutherland, Rachel E.; Chapman, Harold A.; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) activates granule-associated immune-cell serine proteases. The in vivo activator of DPPI itself is unknown; however, cathepsins L and S are candidates because they activate pro-DPPI in vitro. In this study, we tested whether cathepsins L and S activate pro-DPPI in vivo by characterizing DPPI activity and processing in cells lacking cathepsins L and S. DPPI activity, and the relative size and amounts of DPPI heavy and light chains, were identical in mast cells from wild-type and cathepsin L/S double-null mice. Furthermore, the activity of DPPI-dependent chymase was preserved in tissues of cathepsin L/S double-null mice. These results show that neither cathepsin L nor S is required for activation of DPPI and suggest that one or more additional proteases is responsible. PMID:16895486

  13. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Gustavo A; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramic, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-04-24

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft ("entropy reservoir") as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies.

  14. Association study of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 46 (USP46) with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kushima, Itaru; Aleksic, Branko; Ito, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Yukako; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mori, Norio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Nanko, Shinichiro; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Ujike, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Michio; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio

    2010-03-01

    Recently, ubiquitin-specific peptidase 46 (Usp46) has been identified as a quantitative trait gene responsible for immobility in the tail suspension test and forced swimming test in mice. Mice with 3-bp deletion in Usp46 exhibited loss of 'behavioral despair' under inescapable stresses in addition to abnormalities in circadian behavioral rhythms and the GABAergic system. Considering the face and construct validity as an animal model for bipolar disorder, we explored an association of USP46 and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. We also examined an association of USP46 and schizophrenia. We found nominal evidence for an association of rs12646800 and schizophrenia. This association was not significant after correction for multiple testing. No significant association was detected for bipolar disorder. In conclusion, our data argue against the presence of any strong genetic susceptibility factors for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the region USP46.

  15. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S.; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2015-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  16. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  17. A role for nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in reactive oxygen species-dependent DNA damage responses

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Glas, Rickard

    2009-11-27

    Responses to DNA damage are influenced by cellular metabolism through the continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), of which most are by-products of mitochondrial respiration. ROS have a strong influence on signaling pathways during responses to DNA damage, by relatively unclear mechanisms. Previous reports have shown conflicting data on a possible role for tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII), a large cytosolic peptidase, within the DNA damage response. Here we show that TPPII translocated into the nucleus in a p160-ROCK-dependent fashion in response to {gamma}-irradiation, and that nuclear expression of TPPII was present in most {gamma}-irradiated transformed cell lines. We used a panel of nine cell lines of diverse tissue origin, including four lymphoma cell lines (T, B and Hodgkins lymphoma), a melanoma, a sarcoma, a colon and two breast carcinomas, where seven out of nine cell lines showed nuclear TPPII expression after {gamma}-irradiation. Further, this required cellular production of ROS; treatment with either N-acetyl-Cysteine (anti-oxidant) or Rotenone (inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration) inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII. The local density of cells was important for nuclear accumulation of TPPII at early time-points following {gamma}-irradiation (at 1-4 h), indicating a bystander effect. Further, we showed that the peptide-based inhibitor Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH, but not its analogue Z-Gly-(D)-Leu-Ala-OH, excluded TPPII from the nucleus. This correlated with reduced nuclear expression of p53 as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation in {gamma}-irradiated lymphoma cells. Our data suggest a role for TPPII in ROS-dependent DNA damage responses, through alteration of its localization from the cytosol into the nucleus.

  18. Leishmania major metacaspase can replace yeast metacaspase in programmed cell death and has arginine-specific cysteine peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    González, Iveth J; Desponds, Chantal; Schaff, Cédric; Mottram, Jeremy C; Fasel, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    The human protozoan parasite Leishmania major has been shown to exhibit several morphological and biochemical features characteristic of a cell death program when differentiating into infectious stages and under a variety of stress conditions. Although some caspase-like peptidase activity has been reported in dying parasites, no caspase gene is present in the genome. However, a single metacaspase gene is present in L. major whose encoded protein harbors the predicted secondary structure and the catalytic dyad histidine/cysteine described for caspases and other metacaspases identified in plants and yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase YCA1 has been implicated in the death of aging cells, cells defective in some biological functions, and cells exposed to different environmental stresses. In this study, we describe the functional heterologous complementation of a S. cerevisiae yca1 null mutant with the L. major metacaspase (LmjMCA) in cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that LmjMCA is involved in yeast cell death, similar to YCA1, and that this function depends on its catalytic activity. LmjMCA was found to be auto-processed as occurs for caspases, however LmjMCA did not exhibit any activity with caspase substrates. In contrast and similarly to Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspases, LmjMCA was active towards substrates with arginine in the P1 position, with the activity being abolished following H147A and C202A catalytic site mutations. These results suggest that metacaspases are members of a family of peptidases with a role in cell death conserved in evolution notwithstanding possible differences in their catalytic activity.

  19. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-08

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology.

  20. Use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Nasser

    2012-07-01

    Choices of antidiabetic agents for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited. Available data suggest that the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors may be safe in patients at various stages of renal insufficiency. However, except for linagliptin, dosage adjustment is necessary. The efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors in patients with renal insufficiency is generally similar to that of the general population with T2DM, with reductions in mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels of 0.7% to 1.0% compared with baseline, and 0.4% to 0.7% compared with placebo. The frequency of moderate hypoglycemia is 21% to 80% higher with DPP-4 inhibitors compared with placebo, but the frequency of severe hypoglycemia is similar to that with placebo. The use of DPP-4 inhibitors in patients with renal insufficiency is associated with a slight weight loss of < 1 kg. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors may be used as monotherapy in patients with CKD and HbA1c levels < 8.5% as an alternative to insulin, glipizide, or pioglitazone. They can also be used as add-on therapy to glipizide and/or pioglitazone in patients with HbA(1c) levels < 9%, but studies are needed to evaluate these combinations in patients with renal insufficiency. Long-term and large-scale clinical trials are underway to better determine the safety and efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors in patients with T2DM with and without CKD.

  1. Exploring the active site of tripeptidyl-peptidase II through studies of pH dependence of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Sandra; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Hamnevik, Emil; Widersten, Mikael; Tomkinson, Birgitta

    2012-04-01

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPP II) is a subtilisin-like serine protease which forms a large enzyme complex (>4MDa). It is considered a potential drug target due to its involvement in specific physiological processes. However, information is scarce concerning the kinetic characteristics of TPP II and its active site features, which are important for design of efficient inhibitors. To amend this, we probed the active site by determining the pH dependence of TPP II catalysis. Access to pure enzyme is a prerequisite for kinetic investigations and herein we introduce the first efficient purification system for heterologously expressed mammalian TPP II. The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for hydrolysis of two different chromogenic substrates, Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and Ala-Ala-Ala-pNA, was determined for murine, human and Drosophila melanogaster TPP II as well as mutant variants thereof. The investigation demonstrated that TPP II, in contrast to subtilisin, has a bell-shaped pH dependence of k(cat)(app)/K(M) probably due to deprotonation of the N-terminal amino group of the substrate at higher pH. Since both the K(M) and k(cat)(app) are lower for cleavage of AAA-pNA than for AAF-pNA we propose that the former can bind non-productively to the active site of the enzyme, a phenomenon previously observed with some substrates for subtilisin. Two mutant variants, H267A and D387G, showed bell-shaped pH-dependence of k(cat)(app), possibly due to an impaired protonation of the leaving group. This work reveals previously unknown differences between TPP II orthologues and subtilisin as well as features that might be conserved within the entire family of subtilisin-like serine peptidases.

  2. Identifying neuropeptide Y (NPY) as the main stress-related substrate of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) in blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Leona; Kaestner, Florian; Wolf, Raik; Stiller, Harald; Heiser, Ulrich; Manhart, Susanne; Hoffmann, Torsten; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Rothermundt, Matthias; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4; EC 3.4.14.5; CD26) is a membrane-bound or shedded serine protease that hydrolyzes dipeptides from the N-terminus of peptides with either proline or alanine at the penultimate position. Substrates of DPP4 include several stress-related neuropeptides implicated in anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. A decline of DPP4-like activity has been reported in sera from depressed patient, but not fully characterized regarding DPP4-like enzymes, therapeutic interventions and protein. Sera from 16 melancholic- and 16 non-melancholic-depressed patients were evaluated for DPP4-like activities and the concentration of soluble DPP4 protein before and after treatment by anti-depressive therapies. Post-translational modification of DPP4-isoforms and degradation of NPY, Peptide YY (PYY), Galanin-like peptide (GALP), Orexin B (OrxB), OrxA, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and substance P (SP) were studied in serum and in ex vivo human blood. N-terminal truncation of biotinylated NPY by endothelial membrane-bound DPP4 versus soluble DPP4 was determined in rat brain perfusates and spiked sera. Lower DPP4 activities in depressed patients were reversed by anti-depressive treatment. In sera, DPP4 contributed to more than 90% of the overall DPP4-like activity and correlated with its protein concentration. NPY displayed equal degradation in serum and blood, and was equally truncated by serum and endothelial DPP4. In addition, GALP and rat OrxB were identified as novel substrates of DPP4. NPY is the best DPP4-substrate in blood, being truncated by soluble and membrane DPP4, respectively. The decline of soluble DPP4 in acute depression could be reversed upon anti-depressive treatment. Peptidases from three functional compartments regulate the bioactivity of NPY in blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  4. Non-specific SIRT inhibition as a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of ginkgolic acids and urushiols.

    PubMed

    Ryckewaert, Lucie; Sacconnay, Lionel; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia

    2014-09-02

    Ginkgolic acids and urushiols are natural alkylphenols known for their mutagenic, carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. However, the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds has not been thoroughly elucidated so far. Considering that the SIRT inhibitory potential of anacardic acids has been hypothesized by in silico techniques, we herein demonstrated through both in vitro and computational methods that structurally related compounds such as ginkgolic acids and urushiols are able to modulate SIRT activity. Moreover, their SIRT inhibitory profile and cytotoxicity were comparable to sirtinol, a non-specific SIRT inhibitor (SIRT1 and SIRT2), and different from EX-527, a SIRT1 specific inhibitor. This is the first report on the SIRT inhibition of ginkgolic acids and urushiols. The results reported here are in line with previously observed effects on the induction of apoptosis by this class of compounds, and the non-specific SIRT inhibition is suggested as a new mechanism for their in vitro cytotoxicity.

  5. Effectiveness of three contingency-nonspecific stimuli on bathroom graffiti prevention in a college setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Chung, Kyong-Mee

    2013-04-01

    An A-B-A design was adopted to test the effectiveness of different types of contingency-nonspecific stimuli in the prevention of bathroom graffiti in a college setting. The three stimuli examined in this study have been frequently used to prevent bathroom graffiti in South Korea and they were: (a) "Please do not write, draw, or mark on these walls;" (b) a mirror; and (c) "Courteous people keep public places clean." No graffiti was observed when the first and second stimuli were presented. In contrast, a notable increase in bathroom graffiti was observed when the third sign was presented. The results suggest that a contingency non-specific stimuli posting intervention can be effective in the prevention of bathroom graffiti only when appropriate stimuli are used. The practical implications, including cost-effectiveness, are discussed.

  6. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  7. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu Ogi,; Hironao Nagai,; Yuji Fukunishi,; Taiji Yanagida,; Masahiko Hirao,; Masayoshi Nishiyama,

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-μm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  8. Covalently modified silicon and diamond surfaces: resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and optimization for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, Tami L; Clare, Brian H; Abbott, Nicholas L; Hamers, Robert J

    2004-08-25

    We report the direct covalent functionalization of silicon and diamond surfaces with short ethylene glycol (EG) oligomers via photochemical reaction of the hydrogen-terminated surfaces with terminal vinyl groups of the oligomers, and the use of these monolayers to control protein binding at surfaces. Photochemical modification of Si(111) and polycrystalline diamond surfaces produces EG monolayers linked via Si-C bond formation (silicon) or C-C bond formation (diamond). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the monolayer composition. Measurements using fluorescently labeled proteins show that the EG-functionalized surfaces effectively resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of mixed monolayers on silicon and diamond and apply these surfaces to control specific versus nonspecific binding to optimize a model protein sensing assay.

  9. Thermostable Mismatch-Recognizing Protein MutS Suppresses Nonspecific Amplification during Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kenji; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-related technologies are hampered mainly by two types of error: nonspecific amplification and DNA polymerase-generated mutations. Here, we report that both errors can be suppressed by the addition of a DNA mismatch-recognizing protein, MutS, from a thermophilic bacterium. Although it had been expected that MutS has a potential to suppress polymerase-generated mutations, we unexpectedly found that it also reduced nonspecific amplification. On the basis of this finding, we propose that M