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Sample records for nonsurgical periodontal therapy

  1. Surgical and nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Learned and unlearned concepts.

    PubMed

    Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A; Lang, Niklaus P

    2013-06-01

    This review aims to highlight concepts relating to nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapy, which have been learned and unlearned over the past few decades. A number of treatment procedures, such as gingival curettage and aggressive removal of contaminated root cementum, have been unlearned. Advances in technology have resulted in the introduction of a range of new methods for use in nonsurgical periodontal therapy, including machine-driven instruments, lasers, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and local antimicrobial-delivery devices. However, these methods have not been shown to offer significant benefits over and above nonsurgical debridement using hand instruments. The method of debridement is therefore largely dependent on the preferences of the operator and the patient. Recent evidence indicates that specific systemic antimicrobials may be indicated for use as adjuncts to nonsurgical debridement in patients with advanced disease. Full-mouth disinfection protocols have been proven to be a relevant treatment option. We have learned that while nonsurgical and surgical methods result in similar long-term treatment outcomes, surgical therapy results in greater probing-depth reduction and clinical attachment gain in initially deep pockets. The surgical technique chosen seems to have limited influence upon changes in clinical attachment gain. What has not changed is the importance of thorough mechanical debridement and optimal plaque control for successful nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapy.

  2. Nonsurgical recovery of interdental papillae under supportive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagishita, Yuka; Yoshino, Koichi; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Yoda, Yasushi; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We observed nonsurgical improvement of interdental papillae in a patient undergoing supportive periodontal therapy. The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese man presenting with widespread gingival recession at Daniele's papilla presence index level 3 and Miller Class I recession affecting the facial aspect of tooth number 42. Initial periodontal therapy for periodontitis was performed, included oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, resulting in a reduction in inflammation. Use of an interdental brush was then suspended to allow the interdental papillae to recover. The type of toothbrush and tooth brushing method were checked repeatedly. Mechanical debridement was performed every 2 to 3 months. A gradual improvement was observed in recession of the interdental papillae over a period of several years together with coronal regrowth of the gingival margin.

  3. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Aimetti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of nonsurgical periodontal therapy is to control microbial periodontal infection by removing bacterial biofilm, calculus, and toxins from periodontally involved root surfaces. A review of the scientific literature indicates that mechanical nonsurgical periodontal treatment predictably reduces the levels of inflammation and probing pocket depths, increases the clinical attachment level and results in an apical shift of the gingival margin. Another parameter to be considered, in spite of the lack of scientific evidence, is the reduction in the degree of tooth mobility, as clinically experienced. It is important to point out that nonsurgical periodontal treatment presents limitations such as the long-term maintainability of deep periodontal pockets, the risk of disease recurrence, and the skill of the operator. A high number of posttreatment residual pockets exhibiting bleeding on probing and > 5 mm deep are related to lower clinical stability. The successful treatment of plaque-induced periodontitis will restore periodontal health, but with reduced periodontium. In such cases, anatomical damage from previous periodontal disease will persist and inverse architecture of soft tissue may impair home plaque removal. The clinician can select one of the following therapeutic options according to the individual patient's needs: - Quadrant/sextant wise instrumentation (conventional staged debridement, CSD). - Instrumentation of all pockets within a 24-hour period with (full mouth disinfection [FMD]) or without (full mouth scaling and root planing [FMSRP]) local antiseptics. Both procedures can be associated with systemic antimicrobials. -CSD or FMD in combination with laser or photodynamic therapy. Patients with aggressive periodontitis constitute a challenge to the clinician. To date there are no established protocols for controlling the disease. However, data from the literature on the application of the FMD protocol combined with amoxicillin

  4. Salivary Visfatin Concentration in Response to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Zahra Alizadeh; Azadmehr, Abbas; Nohekhan, Ali; Tabrizi, Mohammad Amir Alizadeh; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Talebi; Naddafpour, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Visfatin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been associated with several immunomodulating processes. The relationship between visfatin and periodontitis has been the subject of a few studies that have described visfatin as an inflammatory marker for periodontitis. However, studies on visfatin as a potential therapeutic target in periodontal diseases are scarce. In the present study, we evaluated the alterations in salivary visfatin levels in response to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods: Twenty individuals with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis and twenty periodontally healthy individuals were selected for this study according to clinical parameters. Patients with chronic periodontitis were treated by non-surgical periodontal therapy. Clinical parameters were recorded and saliva samples were obtained from the control group and test group before (T1 group) and one month after periodontal treatment (T2 group). Salivary visfatin concentrations were measured by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed with the statistical software SPSS, version 18. Results: Visfatin was detectable in all samples. T1 and control groups were significantly different in terms of clinical parameters and visfatin levels. Visfatin concentrations were reduced significantly after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal treatment also resulted in significant reductions of all clinical parameters with the exception of clinical attachment level. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that salivary levels of visfatin are reduced after non-surgical periodontal therapy to the levels comparable with those found in healthy individuals. Therefore, the salivary visfatin level may have the potential to be a target marker for assessment of responses to non-surgical periodontal therapy. However, more studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:26023633

  5. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  6. Successful nonsurgical management of post-orthodontic gingival enlargement with intensive cause-related periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2015-03-01

    Successful nonsurgical management of severe postorthodontic gingival enlargement and erythema in a 24-year-old male is presented. The patient received an intensive cause-related periodontal therapy, consisting of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and weekly recall visits. At week five, complete resolution of the lesions was achieved. By targeting the primary etiologic factor, i.e., plaque, periodontal health was restored without needing surgical intervention. Reducing the bacterial load will give the biologic natural healing capacity of the body the opportunity to stabilize the periodontal condition and, thus, should be considered as the first line of intervention before a surgical approach is taken. PMID:25928969

  7. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602391

  8. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis.

  9. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. Aim To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Materials and methods Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Results Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (p<0.0001). Both procedures were effective in improving GI, PI and PD, but the use of diode laser was associated with more evident results. Conclusions Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis. PMID:26161248

  10. Nonsurgical mechanical treatment strategies for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Apatzidou, Danae A; Kinane, Denis F

    2010-01-01

    The comparison of the efficacy of surgical and nonsurgical procedures revealed that scaling and root planing alone or in combination with flap procedures are effective methods for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Also, the consistent message is that in treating deep pockets, open-flap debridement results in greater probing pocket depth reduction and clinical attachment gain than nonsurgical modalities. Nonsurgical modalities in shallower pockets consistently involve less post-therapy recession and are clearly recognized as being more conservative. Research is still needed on the clinical benefit of the granulation tissue removal that is a feature of periodontal surgical therapy and, to a lesser extent, occurs through indirect trauma in nonsurgical therapy.

  11. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit.

  12. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26464855

  13. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on salivary myeloperoxidase levels: A biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Dagar, Mona; Deepa, Dhruv Kumar; Molly, Madan; Sharma, Anamika; Khattak, Braham Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO), the most abundant protein in neutrophils, is the focus of inflammatory pathologies. MPO could participate in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients with healthy gingiva, gingivitis, periodontitis between age group of 20–55 years were selected. Group I - 20 Patients with healthy gingiva, Group II - 20 Patients with generalized gingivitis, Group III - 20 Patients with generalized chronic periodontitis, Group IV - 20 Patients of Group III after 1-month of scaling and root planning. The following parameters were recorded: Gingival index, plaque index, bleeding on probing index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, salivary MPO levels. All the parameters were then statistically analyzed. Results: The mean MPO levels in Group I recorded was - 0.320 + 0.06, Group II was - 0.183 + 0.04, Group III was - 0.814 + 0.08 and Group IV was - 0.386 + 0.08 respectively. All these values were statistically significant when compared between the four groups (P < 0.05). A significantly elevated salivary MPO levels were found in subjects with chronic periodontitis as compared to the gingivitis group and the healthy group (P < 0.05). However, moderate but statistically significant increase in the MPO levels were observed in the gingivitis group as compared to the healthy group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, significant reduction in MPO levels were observed in Group IV after 1-month of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Conclusion: The activities of MPO enzyme were significantly increased in the saliva of patients with periodontal disease in comparison to healthy individuals. Furthermore, nonsurgical periodontal therapy was found to be effective in improving clinical parameters and in reducing MPO levels. Salivary enzymes like MPO could be considered as a biochemical marker of periodontal disease activity. PMID:26644720

  14. Effect of hyperlipidemia on response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy: Statin users versus nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Aditi; Tewari, Shikha; Singh, Harpreet; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar; Narula, Satish Chander

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy among hyperlipidemic subjects and whether statin use by hyperlipidemic subjects influences the response. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 107 chronic periodontitis subjects (35 normolipidemic [NL] controls, 36 hyperlipidemics on nonpharmacological therapy and 36 hyperlipidemics on statins). Periodontal (plaque index, gingival index [GI], probing depth [PD], and clinical attachment level [CAL]) and biochemical (plasma triglyceride [TG], total cholesterol [TC], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], and high-DL-C [HDL-C] levels) examination was done at baseline and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Results: Both the NL and statin groups exhibited significantly greater improvement in GI as compared to the hyperlipidemic group on nonpharmacological therapy (P = 0.004 and 0.006, respectively). Mean change in PD correlated negatively with baseline TC (r = −0.306) and LDL-C (r = −0.360) while mean change in GI positively correlated with baseline HDL-C (r = 0.219). Regression analyses revealed that mean change in PD was negatively associated with LDL-C (β = −0.358, P < 0.001) while mean change in GI was positively associated with HDL-C (β = 0.219, P = 0.023). Conclusions: While higher baseline lipid levels were somewhat detrimental to the resolution of inflammation postperiodontal treatment, the inclusion of statin therapy among hyperlipidemic subjects seemed to improve clinical response as compared to those devoid of the drug. The findings of the study are suggestive of a possible adjunctive role of statins in periodontal treatment that warrants future studies. PMID:27011743

  15. Prevalence of periodontopathogens and Candida spp. in smokers after nonsurgical periodontal therapy - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Gabriela Alessandra da Cruz Galhardo; Abreu, Mariana Gouvêa Latini; Cordeiro, Renata Dos Santos; Wenderoscky, Letícia de Farias; Duque, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the influence of smoking on clinical and microbiological parameters after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Forty-eight subjects were grouped into smokers (SM, n = 24) and nonsmokers (NS, n = 24) and paired according to gender, age, ethnicity, and periodontal status. Both groups received oral hygiene education and scaling and root planing. Clinical evaluation was performed using plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), pocket probing depth (PPD), gingival recession (GR), and clinical attachment level (CAL) before instrumentation (baseline) and at 3 and 6 months. The prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida dubliniensis in subgingival biofilm was determined by polymerase chain reaction. The data were statistically analyzed considering p < 0.05. Clinical conditions improved between baseline and 3 months after periodontal treatment. However, NS had a better clinical response, presenting greater PPD reduction and CAL increase in comparison to SM. Periodontal treatment reduced the levels of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and T. forsythia individually after 3 months for the NS group and after 6 months for both groups. The prevalence of Candida species was markedly higher in SM than in NS at all time points evaluated. Periodontopathogens associated or not with C. albicans or C. dubliniensis were more prevalent in SM than in NS at baseline and after 3 months. It was concluded that smoking impairs clinical and microbiological responses to periodontal therapy. Periodontopathogens combined or not with some Candida species are resistant to short-term periodontal therapy in SM. PMID:27556680

  16. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  17. Effect of Exposure to Portland Cement Dust on the Periodontal Status and on the Outcome of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cement dust contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead and chromium, pollutants hazardous to the biotic environment, with adverse impact for vegetation, human and animal health and ecosystems. Objective To investigate if long term exposure to cement dust can affect the periodontal health and affect the outcome of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods A total of sixty subjects were included in this study. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were grouped into; Group I comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis working in the Portland Cement Company and Group II comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis who does not work in cement factories nor live near any of them. Twenty healthy subjects were included in this study as healthy control group (Group III). Clinical parameters including gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CLA) were scored for all patients before and after periodontal therapy. All patients received non-surgical periodontal therapy together with strict oral hygiene program for one month. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from both groups at baseline and one month after periodontal therapy. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze the GCF samples for detection and assessment of the levels of IL-1β and TNFα. Results The two studied groups responded well to non-surgical periodontal treatment and there was no significant difference between GI and GII (P>0.05). The levels of TNFα was higher in GI than in GII before and after periodontal therapy (P<0.05). The levels of IL-1β did not show any significant difference between the two groups at base line (P>0.05), but represented with a highly significant difference between G1 and GII after periodontal therapy (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between the levels of both IL-1β and TNFα and all the clinical parameters in GI before and after periodontal therapy and in GII

  18. Effect of Exposure to Portland Cement Dust on the Periodontal Status and on the Outcome of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cement dust contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead and chromium, pollutants hazardous to the biotic environment, with adverse impact for vegetation, human and animal health and ecosystems. Objective To investigate if long term exposure to cement dust can affect the periodontal health and affect the outcome of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods A total of sixty subjects were included in this study. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were grouped into; Group I comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis working in the Portland Cement Company and Group II comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis who does not work in cement factories nor live near any of them. Twenty healthy subjects were included in this study as healthy control group (Group III). Clinical parameters including gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CLA) were scored for all patients before and after periodontal therapy. All patients received non-surgical periodontal therapy together with strict oral hygiene program for one month. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from both groups at baseline and one month after periodontal therapy. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze the GCF samples for detection and assessment of the levels of IL-1β and TNFα. Results The two studied groups responded well to non-surgical periodontal treatment and there was no significant difference between GI and GII (P>0.05). The levels of TNFα was higher in GI than in GII before and after periodontal therapy (P<0.05). The levels of IL-1β did not show any significant difference between the two groups at base line (P>0.05), but represented with a highly significant difference between G1 and GII after periodontal therapy (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between the levels of both IL-1β and TNFα and all the clinical parameters in GI before and after periodontal therapy and in GII

  19. Photodynamic therapy as adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients on periodontal maintenance: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chondros, Panos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Christodoulides, Nicos; Rössler, Ralf; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sculean, Anton

    2009-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested the potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, currently, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of the adjunctive use of PDT in non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients receiving supportive periodontal therapy. Twenty-four patients receiving regularly supportive periodontal therapy were randomly treated with either subgingival scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or subgingival scaling and root planing alone (control). The following parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy: full mouth plaque score (FMPS), full mouth bleeding score (FMBS), bleeding on probing (BOP) at experimental sites, probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival recession (REC), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Primary outcome variables were changes in PPD and CAL. Microbiological evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), Prevotella intermedia (P.i.), Tannerella forsythensis (T.f.), Treponema denticola (T.d.), Peptostreptococcus micros (P.m.), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n.), Campylobacter rectus (C.r.), Eubacterium nodatum (E.n.), Eikenella corrodens (E.c.), and Capnocytophaga species (C.s.) was also performed at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy, using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. No differences in any of the investigated parameters were observed at baseline between the two groups. At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of PPD, CAL and FMPS. At 3 months and 6 months, a statistically significantly higher improvement of BOP was found in the test group. At 3 months after therapy

  20. Characterization of the release profile of doxycycline by PLGA microspheres adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Moura, Lucas Alves; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Aiello, Talita Bianchi; Duek, Eliana Ap De Rezende; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Nociti Junior, Francisco Humberto; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Antonio Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the release of locally delivered doxycycline by poly (l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres in the periodontal pocket of patients with chronic periodontitis, treated by non-surgical periodontal therapy. Nineteen sites of non-adjacent teeth of four different patients were evaluated. Five milligram of PLGA microspheres loaded with 16 doxycycline hyclate (DOX) was administered per periodontal site. To quantify DOX released into the periodontal pocket, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected from the sites on days 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 after DOX application, and high-performance liquid chromatography was performed. Data were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Tukey test. At days 2, 5, and 7, the DOX concentration was stably sustained (23.33 ± 1.38, 23.4 ± 1.82, and 22.75 ± 1.33 μg/mL, respectively), with no significant differences over these assessment times (p > 0.05). At days 10 and 15, a tendency was observed toward a decrease in DOX concentration (21.74 ± 0.91 and 20.53 ± 4.88 μg/mL, respectively), but a significant decrease in GCF drug concentration (19.69 ± 4.70 μg/mL) was observed only on day 20. The DOX delivery system developed demonstrated a successful sustained release after local administration, as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy. PMID:25917501

  1. Effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on clinical response, microbiological profile, and glycemic control in Malaysian subjects with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buzinin, Samira Mukhtar; Alabsi, Aied Mohammed; Tan, Alexander Tong Boon; Vincent-Chong, Vui King; Swaminathan, Dasan

    2014-01-01

    The association between diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontal disease has long been established. Most of the researches linking these two very common chronic diseases were based on type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontal disease. However, this study was conducted to investigate the association between type 1 diabetes and chronic periodontal disease in Malaysian subjects. Forty-one Malaysian subjects, of which 20 subjects were type 1 diabetics and with chronic periodontal disease (test group) and 21 subjects with only chronic periodontal disease (control group), were included in the study. Periodontal parameters and plaque samples for microbiological evaluation were done at baseline, 2 and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Blood samples were taken from only the test group and evaluated for HbA1c at baseline and 3 months after periodontal therapy. There were no statistically significant difference in periodontal parameters between groups (P>0.05) and no significant improvement in the level of HbA1c in the test group. Microbiological studies indicated that there were significant reductions in the levels of the tested pathogens in both groups. The results of our study were similar to the findings of several other studies that had been done previously.

  2. Association of susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease with the clinical outcome and tooth survival after non-surgical periodontal therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2016-01-01

    Background The real clinical utility of genetic testing is the prognostic value of genetic factors in the clinical outcome of periodontal treatment and the tooth survival. A meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and the tooth survival. Material and Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE-Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Scopus was performed. Additionally, a hand search was done in three journals. No specific language restriction was applied. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases resulted in 283 articles. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, nine of them examined the clinical outcome, while the other one investigated the tooth survival in susceptible individuals after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Eight of included studies were selected for the meta-analysis. IL-1 positive genotypes increase the risk of tooth loss, while no association found between the bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and plaque index (PI) with the genotype status. Probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction in the first three months and in long-term results found to have a significant association with the genotype. Conclusions There is no difference in the clinical measurements after non-surgical periodontal treatment, apart from PPD. More publications are needed to identify a cause-effect relationship. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, periodontal therapy, clinical outcome, tooth loss, susceptibility, polymorphism, genotype, meta-analysis, systematic review. PMID:26595831

  3. The Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hyman, Leslie G.; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Gelato, Marie C.; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Reddy, Michael S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Oates, Thomas W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A.; Orlander, Philip R.; Paquette, David W.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. Objective To determine if non-surgical periodontal treatment reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes (DM) and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. Design, Setting and Participants The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) is a 6-month, single-masked, randomized, multi-center clinical trial. Participants had DM, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c ≥7% and <9%, and untreated periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with five academic medical centers. Intervention The treatment group (n=257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline, and supportive periodontal therapy at three and six months. The control group (n=257) received no treatment for six months. Main Outcome Measure Difference in HbA1c change from baseline between groups at six months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose, and the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2). Results Enrollment was stopped early due to futility. At 6 months, the periodontal therapy group increased HbA1c 0.17% (1.0) (mean (SD)) compared to 0.11% (1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference = -0.05%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.23%, 0.12%; p=0.55). Probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing and gingival index measures improved in the treatment group compared to the control group at six months with adjusted between-group differences of 0.33mm (95% CI: 0.26, 0.39), 0

  4. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of Volatile Sulfur Compound in Mouth Air of a Group of Nigerian Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehizele, AO; Akhionbare, O

    2013-01-01

    Background: The major goal of non-surgical periodontal therapy is to reduce or eliminate the subgingival pathogenic microbial flora that is known to be associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Aim: The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of VSC in mouth air of young adults. Subjects and Methods: Four hundred subjects, grouped into two based on the absence or presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study. Basic periodontal examination was used for the grouping. The measurement of the concentration of the VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively, using the Halimeter, before and after the therapy, and at recall visits 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Chi-square and Paired t-test were used to find statistical significance. Results: The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non-surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration of more than 250 ppb while all the subjects with no periodontal disease had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb. The same pattern of reduction in the concentration of the VSC and improvement in oral hygiene was also obtained 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Conclusion: It can be concluded that non-surgical periodontal therapy brought about reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air of young adults. PMID:24116328

  5. An Evaluation of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Torres, Caio V.G; Neto, José S; Souza, Marcio A; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O; Brandt, William C; Diniz, Ricardo E.A.S

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal scaling and oral hygiene instruction for patients with mild chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis through clinical periodontal parameters and laboratory tests for CRP (C- reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Twelve individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 12 healthy individuals were evaluated, with a mean age of 45.38 and 46.75 respectively, all female and with mild, chronic periodontitis. The participants were evaluated clinically and periapical radiographs were taken (T1), after which periodontal treatment was instituted. After ninety days (T2), new clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Probing depth, bleeding index, and plaque indexes were observed in both groups, and the results demonstrated reductions but no statistical differences. Laboratory tests for CRP and ESR produced higher values for the rheumatoid arthritis group with T1- T2 reductions on the average, but the values were still higher than in the health group. We conclude that periodontal therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mild chronic periodontitis showed a improvement in the periodontal clinical parameters and laboratory tests that were evaluated. PMID:26140059

  6. Adjunctive Application of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mogi, Makio; Okabe, Iichiro; Okada, Kosuke; Goto, Hisashi; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Takeki; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Mitani, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is caused by dental plaque biofilms, and the removal of these biofilms from the root surface of teeth plays a central part in its treatment. The conventional treatment for periodontal disease fails to remove periodontal infection in a subset of cases, such as those with complicated root morphology. Adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been proposed as an additional treatment for this infectious disease. Many periodontal pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to low-power lasers in the presence of dyes, such as methylene blue, toluidine blue O, malachite green, and indocyanine green. aPDT uses these light-activated photosensitizer that is incorporated selectively by bacteria and absorbs a low-power laser/light with an appropriate wavelength to induce singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are toxic to bacteria. While this technique has been evaluated by many clinical studies, some systematic reviews and meta-analyses have reported controversial results about the benefits of aPDT for periodontal treatment. In the light of these previous reports, the aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information about aPDT and help extend knowledge of advanced laser therapy. PMID:26473843

  7. Adjunctive Application of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment: A Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mogi, Makio; Okabe, Iichiro; Okada, Kosuke; Goto, Hisashi; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Takeki; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Mitani, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is caused by dental plaque biofilms, and the removal of these biofilms from the root surface of teeth plays a central part in its treatment. The conventional treatment for periodontal disease fails to remove periodontal infection in a subset of cases, such as those with complicated root morphology. Adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been proposed as an additional treatment for this infectious disease. Many periodontal pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to low-power lasers in the presence of dyes, such as methylene blue, toluidine blue O, malachite green, and indocyanine green. aPDT uses these light-activated photosensitizer that is incorporated selectively by bacteria and absorbs a low-power laser/light with an appropriate wavelength to induce singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are toxic to bacteria. While this technique has been evaluated by many clinical studies, some systematic reviews and meta-analyses have reported controversial results about the benefits of aPDT for periodontal treatment. In the light of these previous reports, the aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information about aPDT and help extend knowledge of advanced laser therapy. PMID:26473843

  8. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy with/without diode laser modulates metabolic control of type 2 diabetics with periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koçak, Emrah; Sağlam, Mehmet; Kayış, Seyit Ali; Dündar, Niyazi; Kebapçılar, Levent; Loos, Bruno G; Hakkı, Sema S

    2016-02-01

    In order to evaluate whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without diode laser (DL) decontamination improves clinical parameters, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in gingival crevicular fluid and metabolic control (HbA1c) in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Sixty patients with DM2 and CP were randomly assigned into two groups to receive scaling and root planing (SRP, n = 30) or SRP followed by diode laser application (SRP + DL, n = 30). Clinical periodontal and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) parameters were assessed at baseline, 1, and 3 months after periodontal treatment. HbA1c levels were evaluated at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Total amounts of cytokines and molecules were analyzed by ELISA. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without DL appeared to improve clinical, biochemical parameters, and glycemic control in DM2 patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) with CP. The SRP + DL group provided better reductions in probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) parameters compared to the SRP group (P < 0.05). Significant reductions were found in the total amounts of GCF levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, ICAM, and VCAM after treatment (P < 0.05). HbA1c levels decreased significantly at 3 months after treatment (P < 0.05). SRP + DL reduced HbA1c levels more significantly compared to SRP alone (0.41 vs. 0.22 %, P < 0.05). SRP, especially in combination with DL, shows improvement of glycemic control for DM2 patients with CP.

  9. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy with/without diode laser modulates metabolic control of type 2 diabetics with periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koçak, Emrah; Sağlam, Mehmet; Kayış, Seyit Ali; Dündar, Niyazi; Kebapçılar, Levent; Loos, Bruno G; Hakkı, Sema S

    2016-02-01

    In order to evaluate whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without diode laser (DL) decontamination improves clinical parameters, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in gingival crevicular fluid and metabolic control (HbA1c) in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Sixty patients with DM2 and CP were randomly assigned into two groups to receive scaling and root planing (SRP, n = 30) or SRP followed by diode laser application (SRP + DL, n = 30). Clinical periodontal and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) parameters were assessed at baseline, 1, and 3 months after periodontal treatment. HbA1c levels were evaluated at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Total amounts of cytokines and molecules were analyzed by ELISA. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without DL appeared to improve clinical, biochemical parameters, and glycemic control in DM2 patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) with CP. The SRP + DL group provided better reductions in probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) parameters compared to the SRP group (P < 0.05). Significant reductions were found in the total amounts of GCF levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, ICAM, and VCAM after treatment (P < 0.05). HbA1c levels decreased significantly at 3 months after treatment (P < 0.05). SRP + DL reduced HbA1c levels more significantly compared to SRP alone (0.41 vs. 0.22 %, P < 0.05). SRP, especially in combination with DL, shows improvement of glycemic control for DM2 patients with CP. PMID:26754181

  10. Photodynamic therapy in non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis: short term randomized clinical trial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, C.; Palaia, G.; Loskutova, E.; Libotte, F.; Kornblit, R.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to exposition to plaque and tartar. Conventional treatments consist of scaling and root planing (SRP) and antibiotics administration. Among them encouraging results have been obtained using alternative protocols, like the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT). Aim of the Study: Evaluation of PDT effects added to conventional methods. Materials and Methods: 11 patients (4M/7F, 37-67 years aged, non-smoking) affected by untreated chronic periodontal disease, with >3mm pockets in at least 4 teeth were divided in two groups, test and control group. Each patient had to made full-intraoral before and after the treatment. The test group received SRP+PDT, while the control group was subjected to SRP. The PDT was performed through the HELBO®TheraLite (Bredent Medical), diode laser battery powered 670nm with an output of 75mW/cm2. The Helbo Blue photosensitizer, containing methylene blue, was used. The exposure time to the laser effect was of 10'' for each site, for a total of 60'' at 3J/cm2. Results: Both groups had a significant improvement in the reduction of pocket depth (PD), above all in the test group. Statistical analysis was performed through the T-test, evaluating PD between the two groups p=0.96 (p> 0.05), resulting not statistically significant. Conclusion: PDT is a promising support to SRP, achieving a significant reduction in the pocket depth, but more cases are needed to confirm the validity of the used protocol.

  11. Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Combined With Diode Laser or Photodynamic Therapy on Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Split-Mouth Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Birang, Reza; Shahaboui, Mohammad; Kiani, Sima; Shadmehr, Elham; Naghsh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The optimum removal of bacteria and their toxins from periodontal pockets is not always obtained by conventional mechanical debridement. Adjunctive therapies may improve tissue healing through detoxification and bactericidal effects. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of adjunctive laser therapy (LT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) on patients with chronic periodontitis. Methods: Twenty patients with at least three quadrants involved and each of them presenting pockets 4-8 mm deep were included in the study. Periodontal treatment comprising scaling and root planning (SRP) was accomplished for the whole mouth. Applying a split-mouth design, each quadrant was randomly treated with SRP alone (group A), SRP with LT (group B), and SRP with PDT (group C). The clinical indices were measured at baseline 6 weeks and 3 months after treatment. Microbiological samples were taken and evaluated at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results: All groups showed statistically significant improvements in terms of clinical attachment level (CAL) gain, periodontal pocket depth (PPD) reduction, papilla bleeding index and microbial count compared to baseline (P < .05). The results showed more significant improvement in the 6-week evaluation in terms of CAL in groups B and C than in group A (P < .05). Group B also revealed a greater reduction in PPD than the other treatment modalities (P < .05). Conclusion: The obtained data suggested that adjunctive LT and PDT have significant short-term benefits in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Furthermore, LT showed minimal additional advantages compared to PDT. PMID:26464778

  12. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy verses oral hygiene instructions on Type 2 diabetes subjects with chronic periodontitis: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. Methods 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. Results 15 subjects from NSPT group and 17 from OHI group completed the study. The difference in plaque index (PI) between NSPT and OHI groups were significant at 2 months recall (p = 0.013). There was no significant difference between NSPT and OHI group for all other clinical periodontal parameters, HbA1c and CRP levels. At 3 months post-therapy, periodontal parameters improved significantly in both groups with sites with probing pocket depth (PPD) < 4 mm reported as 98 ± 1.8% in NSPT group and 92 ± 14.9% in OHI group. Mean PPD and mean probing attachment loss (PAL) within the NSPT group reduced significantly from baseline (2.56 ± 0.57 mm, 3.35 ± 0.83 mm) to final visit (1.94 ± 0.26 mm, 2.92 ± 0.72 mm) (p = 0.003, p < 0.001). For OHI group, improvements in mean PPD and mean PAL were also seen from baseline (2.29 ± 0.69 mm, 2.79 ± 0.96 mm) to final visit (2.09 ± 0.72 mm, 2.62 ± 0.97 mm) (p < 0.001 for both). Similarly, HbA1c levels decreased in both groups with NSPT group recording statistically significant reduction (p = 0.038). Participants who demonstrated ≥ 50% reduction in PPD showed significant reductions of HbA1c and hs-CRP levels (p = 0.004 and p = 0.012). Conclusion NSPT significantly reduced PI at 2 months post-therapy as compared to OHI. Both NSPT and OHI demonstrated improvements in other clinical parameters as well as HbA1c and CRP levels. Trial registration

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Azithromycin as an Adjunctive Therapy to Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jörg; Schönfelder, Antje; Schwarzenberger, Fabian; Jentsch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the years, numerous trials have sufficiently documented benefits of adjuvant administration of antibiotics in combination to Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) in treatment of periodontitis. Nevertheless there are justified doubts in respect to antibiotics administration with regard to increasing development of resistances. Aim The aim of this review study and meta-analysis was to verify a possible benefit of Azithromycin (AZM) as an alternative adjuvant antibiotic in combination with SRP. Materials and Methods Electronic databases (Pubmed) were searched from the earliest point of record until May 2015. A hand search was also conducted. The variables considered in this respect were Probing Depth (PD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), Bleeding on Probing (BOP) and SRP. A meta-analysis containing trials comparing SRP as a sole therapy with SRP and administration of AZM was produced once all of the data obtained had been reviewed. Results Six randomised clinical trials were accepted into the review and the meta-analysis following the process of trial selection. Meta-analysis revealed larger overall effects by the systemic administration of AZM compared with SRP on their own in terms of PD, CAL, BOP, Plaque-Index and total bacterial load reduction after three and six months. Conclusion The data used in this study revealed that the systemic administration of AZM is beneficial compared with SRP on its own for the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Azithromycin as an Adjunctive Therapy to Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jörg; Schönfelder, Antje; Schwarzenberger, Fabian; Jentsch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the years, numerous trials have sufficiently documented benefits of adjuvant administration of antibiotics in combination to Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) in treatment of periodontitis. Nevertheless there are justified doubts in respect to antibiotics administration with regard to increasing development of resistances. Aim The aim of this review study and meta-analysis was to verify a possible benefit of Azithromycin (AZM) as an alternative adjuvant antibiotic in combination with SRP. Materials and Methods Electronic databases (Pubmed) were searched from the earliest point of record until May 2015. A hand search was also conducted. The variables considered in this respect were Probing Depth (PD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), Bleeding on Probing (BOP) and SRP. A meta-analysis containing trials comparing SRP as a sole therapy with SRP and administration of AZM was produced once all of the data obtained had been reviewed. Results Six randomised clinical trials were accepted into the review and the meta-analysis following the process of trial selection. Meta-analysis revealed larger overall effects by the systemic administration of AZM compared with SRP on their own in terms of PD, CAL, BOP, Plaque-Index and total bacterial load reduction after three and six months. Conclusion The data used in this study revealed that the systemic administration of AZM is beneficial compared with SRP on its own for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27630968

  15. Lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in obese and non-obese subjects undergoing non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Elizangela P; Barroso, Eliane M; Fabricio, Mariana; Carrareto, Ana Luiza V; Toledo, Benedicto E C; R Pires, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal treatment may improve the metabolic control of dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese and non-obese patients undergoing periodontal therapy. Patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were divided into obese (n = 28) and non-obese groups (n = 26). The periodontal parameters (visible plaque index, gingival bleeding index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing), anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and body fat), and serum analyses (triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and hs-CRP) were measured at baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment. The results showed that the obese subjects presented alterations in triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP at baseline when compared with non-obese patients (P < 0.05). Periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters in both groups similarly (P > 0.05). Obese subjects showed a significant decrease in the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP post-therapy (P < 0.05), while non-obese patients showed improvement only in hs-CRP (P < 0.05). In conclusion, periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters and circulating hs-CRP in obese and non-obese subjects. Lipid profile was modified only in obese patients post-therapy. (J Oral Sci 58, 423-430, 2016). PMID:27665983

  16. NONSURGICAL PERIODONTAL MANAGEMENT OF IATROGENIC PERI-IMPLANTITIS: A CLINICAL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Roncati, M; Lauritano, D; Tagliabue, A; Tettamanti, L

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have emerged as a first line of treatment to replace missing teeth for both the edentulous and partially dentate patients. The anticipated high degree of success is somewhat challenged by the onset of peri-implantitis. Peri-implant diseases are a cluster of “contemporary” oral infections in humans; they are characterized by the inflammatory destruction of the implant-supporting tissues, as a result of biofilm formation on the implant surface. It is still not clear how the roles of its etiologic agents work. A history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, and smoking are considered as risk factors for peri-implant diseases. Occasionally failing implants are associated with iatrogenic factors, that, only recently, have been acknowledged as direct cause of peri-implant complications, i.e.: non-parallel adjacent implants or the presence of a gap, between fixture and prosthetic components. The use both of traditional protocols of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and the diode laser seems to be an effective alternative treatment modality for peri-implantitis. By the application of laser-assisted non-surgical peri-implant therapy the periodontal pocket depth was reduced. Intraoral periapical radiographs, taken at 6 months and 1 year post nonsurgical treatment, seemed to provide evidence of some improvement of the bone level. The present article illustrates the nonsurgical management of one case, where failure to remove residual cement, from an implant-supported dental prosthesis, seemed to cause peri-implant inflammation. PMID:26511197

  17. Rescue of a periodontally compromised tooth by non-surgical treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a case of the successful non-surgical management of a periodontally compromised maxillary premolar. Methods A combination therapy, including root planing, occlusal adjustment, and tooth splinting, was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 16-month follow-up period. Results All periodontal parameters were improved. There were dramatic decreases (3–6 mm) in the probing pocket depth, tooth mobility, and marginal bone loss. Interestingly, gradual resolution of the periapical radiolucency and alveolar bone regeneration were observed in the radiographs, and the periodontal condition was maintained during the follow-up period. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, these results demonstrate the importance of natural tooth preservation through proper periodontal treatment and occlusal adjustment of the periodontally compromised tooth, which is typically targeted for tooth extraction and dental implantation. PMID:27127693

  18. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis.

  19. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  20. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  1. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  2. Current status of clinical laser applications in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Sasaki, Katia Miyuki; Nagai, Shigeyuki; Schwarz, Frank; Yoshida, Itaru; Eguro, Toru; Zeredo, Jorge Luis; Izumi, Yuichi

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by bacterial infection. Laser treatment demonstrates specific characteristics that may be valuable in managing periodontal disease. In addition, lasers reduce stress and uncomfortable conditions for patients during and after treatment compared to other conventional tools. This article reviews the literature to describe the current clinical applications of lasers for gingival tissue management-including esthetic treatment, non-surgical and surgical periodontal pocket therapy, osseous surgery, and implant therapy.

  3. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  4. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo.

  5. Nonsurgical therapy for hair loss.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Aron G; Rose, Paul T; Nusbaum, Bernard P

    2013-08-01

    This article is an update of the currently available options for medical therapies to treat androgenetic alopecia in men and women. Emerging novel therapeutic modalities with potential for treating these patients are discussed. Because androgenetic alopecia is progressive in nature, stabilization of the process using medical therapy is an important adjunct to any surgical hair-restoration plan. PMID:24017975

  6. Design Features of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT): A Multicenter Randomized Single-Masked Clinical Trial Testing the Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Levels in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), raising the question of whether periodontitis treatment may improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Meta-analyses of mostly small clinical trials suggest that periodontitis treatment results in a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb) A1c. Purpose The purpose of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) was to determine if periodontal treatment reduces HbA1c in patients with T2DM and periodontitis. Methods DPTT was a phase-III, single-masked, multi-center, randomized trial with a planned enrollment of 600 participants. Participants were randomly assigned to receive periodontal treatment immediately (Treatment Group) or after 6 months (Control Group). HbA1c values and clinical periodontal measures were determined at baseline and 3 and 6 months following randomization. Medication usage and dosing were assessed at each visit. Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling and root planing for a minimum of two 90-minute sessions, plus the use of an antibacterial mouth rinse for at least 32 days afterwards. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months and the trial was powered to detect a between-group difference of 0.6%. Secondary outcomes included changes in periodontal clinical measures, fasting plasma glucose, the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) and the need for rescue diabetes or periodontal therapy. Conclusion Dental and medical researchers collaborated to recruit, treat and monitor participants with two chronic diseases to determine if treatment of one condition affects the status of the other. PMID:24080100

  7. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy: will periodontal therapy remain a technologic laggard?

    PubMed

    Rethman, Michael P; Harrel, Stephen K

    2010-10-01

    Minimally invasive therapeutic approaches have become the standard of care for many medical procedures. In contrast, the use of minimally invasive techniques in non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy has not progressed to the same extent. This commentary explores some of the technologic forces that influence the acceptance of minimally invasive therapeutic modalities. There is adequate science to support the development and clinical use of minimally invasive periodontal treatment but the technology to perform minimally invasive procedures is not currently available. Potential explanations for what seems to be a growing technologic lag are explored.

  8. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  9. The non-surgical management of a patient with Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Stephanie; Frydman, Alon

    2014-12-01

    Kostmann syndrome is a rare, congenital immunological disorder caused by a mutation of the hematopoietic cell-specific LYN substrate 1-associated protein X1. These patients pose a unique challenge to the dental practitioner due to the severe oral infections that are often seen in this population. The patient described in this report is a 16-year-old female with Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis. The treatment consisted of scaling and root planing performed in conjunction with subgingival irrigation with povidone-iodine solution. This report details how Kostmann syndrome-associated periodontitis can be successfully treated and maintained long-term, using non-surgical treatment modalities and local antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25500931

  10. Body mass index as a predictive factor of periodontal therapy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Suvan, J; Petrie, A; Moles, D R; Nibali, L; Patel, K; Darbar, U; Donos, N; Tonetti, M; D'Aiuto, F

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and obesity are associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontitis. This study investigated the predictive role of overweight/obesity on clinical response following non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis. Two hundred sixty adults received an intensive course of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal status at baseline and 2 months was based upon probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), and whole-mouth gingival bleeding (FMBS) as assessed by two calibrated examiners. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to estimate the impact of BMI and overweight/obesity on periodontal treatment response while controlling for baseline status, age, smoking status (smoker or non-smoker), and full-mouth dental plaque score. BMI (continuous variable) and obesity (vs. normal weight) were associated with worse mean PPD (p < .005), percentage of PPD > 4 mm (p = .01), but not with FMBS (p > .05) or CAL (p > .05) at 2 months, independent of age, smoking status, or dental plaque levels. The magnitude of this association was similar to that of smoking, which was also linked to a worse clinical periodontal outcome (p < .01). BMI and obesity appear to be independent predictors of poor response following non-surgical periodontal therapy. PMID:24165943

  11. Body Mass Index as a Predictive Factor of Periodontal Therapy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Suvan, J.; Petrie, A.; Moles, D.R.; Nibali, L.; Patel, K.; Darbar, U.; Donos, N.; Tonetti, M.; D’Aiuto, F.

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and obesity are associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontitis. This study investigated the predictive role of overweight/obesity on clinical response following non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis. Two hundred sixty adults received an intensive course of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal status at baseline and 2 months was based upon probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), and whole-mouth gingival bleeding (FMBS) as assessed by two calibrated examiners. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to estimate the impact of BMI and overweight/obesity on periodontal treatment response while controlling for baseline status, age, smoking status (smoker or non-smoker), and full-mouth dental plaque score. BMI (continuous variable) and obesity (vs. normal weight) were associated with worse mean PPD (p < .005), percentage of PPD > 4 mm (p = .01), but not with FMBS (p > .05) or CAL (p > .05) at 2 months, independent of age, smoking status, or dental plaque levels. The magnitude of this association was similar to that of smoking, which was also linked to a worse clinical periodontal outcome (p < .01). BMI and obesity appear to be independent predictors of poor response following non-surgical periodontal therapy. PMID:24165943

  12. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  13. Interleukin-1 haplotype and periodontal disease progression following therapy.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, B; Kress, W; Karch, H; Grimm, T; Klaiber, B; Flemmig, T F

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic value of the IL-1 haplotype on the progression of periodontal disease following therapy. 48 adult patients with untreated periodontitis harboring Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and/or Porphyromonas gingivalis were randomly assigned to receive full-mouth scaling alone (control) or in combination with systemic metronidazole plus amoxicillin and supragingival irrigation with chlorhexidine digluconate (test). All patients received supportive periodontal therapy at 3 to 6 months intervals. In 33 patients, lymphocyte DNA was analyzed for polymorphism in the IL-1A gene at position -889 and IL-1B gene at position +3953. Overall, 16 of 33 patients (7 of 17 test and 9 of 16 control) carried the IL-1 haplotype. 2 years following initial periodontal therapy, no differences in the survival rates of sites or teeth not exhibiting probing attachment loss of 2 mm or more compared to baseline, were found between patients who tested positive (85% sites, 53% teeth) and patients who tested negative (89% sites, 56% teeth) for the IL-1 haplotype. The results indicated that the IL-1 haplotype may be of limited value for the prognosis of periodontal disease progression following non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  14. Host modulation therapeutics in periodontics: role as an adjunctive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shinwari, Muhammad Saad; Tanwir, Farzeen; Hyder, Pakiza Raza; Bin Saeed, Muhammad Humza

    2014-09-01

    Host Modulation Therapy (HMT) is a treatment concept that reduces tissue destruction and stabilizes or even regenerates inflammatory tissue by modifying host response factors. It has been used for treating osteoporosis and arthritis for several decades. However, its use in dentistry has only been recently reported. The objective of this article is to present a review of the various literatures available on HMT and also its role as adjunct therapy in periodontics. For identifying studies for this review, a PUBMED search was carried out in 2013 for all articles published till December 2012. The search was restricted to English language publications only. Longitudinal prospective and retrospective studies were included in the search. The key words used were: Host Modulation Therapy; Sub antimicrobial dose doxycycline and Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy. The main outcomes sought were host modulation therapeutics in periodontics. Exclusion criteria included cross sectional studies, short case series as well as studies with short follow-up periods. There is a paucity of literature on HMT in periodontics although the only drug approved by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) with highly predictable results as a host modulating agent in periodontal diseases and also an effective adjunctive therapy in various diseases of periodontium. However, more randomized controlled trials are needed to obtain clinical guidelines on the usage of other host modulating agents as adjunct as well as definite therapy for periodontal diseases. SDD is an effective adjunct therapy when used in dosage of 20mg twice daily for minimum 3 months duration in various periodontal diseases with predictable clinical outcomes. It is also recommended that future clinical research on anti cytokine drugs, chemically modified tetracycline and other HMT agents should be conducted so that new drugs are available with highly predictable results.

  15. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mauri-Obradors, Elisabet; Jané-Salas, Enric; Sabater-Recolons, Maria del Mar; Vinas, Miguel; López-López, José

    2015-09-01

    This review was designed to determine whether non-surgical periodontal treatment is able to reduce serum glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Several previous reports showed that scaling and root planning (SRP) improve periodontal status in patients with DM, but whether it also improves metabolic control of the disease is unclear. A systematic review was conducted according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration and PRISMA. A literature search was conducted in October 2012 using three libraries (Cochrane, Web of Knowledge, and Scopus) and the keywords "periodontal disease" and "diabetes mellitus." Only 21 of the articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. A total of 1,454 patients were thus included in this study to evaluate whether periodontal treatment improved serum HbA1c levels. Both the methodological quality and the risk of bias of each study were taken into account using the Jadad scale. Only ten of the included studies had an acceptable-good score of 3-5. Fourteen of the studies reported a significant decrease in serum HbA1c levels (p < 0.05) after periodontal treatment. The remaining seven studies failed to find a significant decrease in serum HbA1c. The findings of this review suggest that the published literature is insufficient and inconclusive to clearly support periodontal treatment as a means to improve serum HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 DM. It also demonstrates the need for homogeneous studies, with larger samples and longer follow-up periods, to properly address this question.

  16. Effects of periodontal therapy on white blood cell count and levels of transforming growth factor beta in serum of subjects with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leite, A C E; Carneiro, V M A; Morandini, A C; Ramos-Junior, E S; Guimarães, M C M

    2015-03-28

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on white blood cell (WBC) count and levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF—β) in serum from subjects with severe periodontitis. Serum from 28 subjects with periodontitis (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9—12 months). A well—controlled periodontal treatment protocol was established in three stages: mechanical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planning), reinstrumentation of dental sites, and supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal and systemic parameters such as the total number of WBCs and TGF—β levels, accessed by enzyme—linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were included. After therapy, all clinical periodontal parameters decreased (p<0.0001). There were no statistical differences in WBC count between experimental and control groups before or after therapy. However, after therapy, the mean value of lymphocytes in patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) was statistically higher than that of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP) (p<0.0357). Additionally, TGF—β levels in LAgP and GCP patients were higher compared to controls before therapy (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In LAgP patients, periodontal therapy was associated with increased number of lymphocytes.

  17. Interlinking Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus by Assessment of Crevicular Visfatin Levels in Health and in Disease Before and After Initial Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shettar, Leena; Bajaj, Mahesh; Math, Abhishek Savir; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Visfatin is a new adipocytokine associated with both chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus independently. Aim We aimed to estimate and compare the changes in the levels of visfatin in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) of healthy subjects and in subjects with periodontitis with or without controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) after administration of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty two subjects were equally divided into Group 1 (healthy), Group 2 (systemically healthy with chronic periodontitis), Group 3 (subjects with chronic periodontitis having controlled T2DM). Defined clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and at one month follow-up period. Visfatin was assessed using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. One way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple post hoc procedures were used. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for correlation. Results Significant increase in the visfatin levels was seen with the highest values observed in diabetes with periodontal disease. Visfatin responded to non-surgical periodontal therapy as observed by significant decrease in levels after one month but even at this period diabetics showed the highest levels. Conclusion Visfatin levels are highest in individuals with both periodontal disease and diabetes even after periodontal therapy. Individuals with T2DM may be at higher risk of developing periodontal disease. PMID:27656567

  18. Lasers in minimally invasive periodontal and peri-implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Koji; Aoki, Akira; Coluzzi, Donald; Yukna, Raymond; Wang, Chen-Ying; Pavlic, Verica; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    Laser therapy has the potential to be an effective, minimally invasive procedure in periodontal therapy. The aim of the present review was to survey the relevant literature on the clinical application of lasers as a minimally invasive treatment for periodontitis and peri-implant disease. Currently, there are a large number of published clinical studies and case reports that evaluate the adjunctive use of diode, carbon dioxide, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG), erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers or antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for nonsurgical and minimally invasive surgical treatment of periodontal pockets. These procedures are expected not only to control inflammation but also to provide biostimulation effects with photonic energy. Recent meta-analyses did not show statistically significant differences in pocket reduction and clinical attachment gain compared with mechanical debridement alone, although limited positive effects of adjunctive laser therapy were reported. At present, systematic literature approaches suggest that more evidence-based studies need to be performed to support the integration of various laser therapies into the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The disparity between previous statistical analyses and individual successful clinical outcomes of laser applications might reveal the necessity of developing optimal laser-treatment modalities of different wavelengths and better-defined indications for each protocol. PMID:27045437

  19. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Dannan, Aous

    2011-10-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that preserves dentition and supporting structures. However, minimally invasive procedures in periodontal treatment are supposed to be limited within periodontal surgery, the aim of which is to represent alternative approaches developed to allow less extensive manipulation of surrounding tissues than conventional procedures, while accomplishing the same objectives. In this review, the concept of minimally invasive periodontal surgery (MIPS) is firstly explained. An electronic search for all studies regarding efficacy and effectiveness of MIPS between 2001 and 2009 was conducted. For this purpose, suitable key words from Medical Subject Headings on PubMed were used to extract the required studies. All studies are demonstrated and important results are concluded. Preliminary data from case cohorts and from many studies reveal that the microsurgical access flap, in terms of MIPS, has a high potential to seal the healing wound from the contaminated oral environment by achieving and maintaining primary closure. Soft tissues are mostly preserved and minimal gingival recession is observed, an important feature to meet the demands of the patient and the clinician in the esthetic zone. However, although the potential efficacy of MIPS in the treatment of deep intrabony defects has been proved, larger studies are required to confirm and extend the reported positive preliminary outcomes.

  20. Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Salivary Interleukin-12 Levels in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khattak, B.P.; Naagtilak, S; Singh, Ganesh; Bano, Tanveer

    2014-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is considered a central regulator of host resistance against a variety of pathogens. The influence of scaling and root planing was evaluated on amount of IL-12 in salivary fluid of patients with chronic generalized severe periodontitis, in relation to clinical parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 subjects were enrolled, of which 25 had chronic generalized severe periodontitis, and 25 periodontally healthy as control. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), pocket probing depth (PPD) bleeding on probing (BOP) and clinical attachment loss (CAL). The level of IL-12 in salivary fluid was measured by ELISA kit at baseline and at four week following scaling and root planing. Results: Mean IL-12 levels in patients with periodontitis at baseline (9.79 ± 5.70 pg/ml) were higher than in controls (9.18±4.94 pg/ml; p=0.54.) Scaling and root planing resulted in significant increase in IL-12 levels (mean: 15.93±12.09 pg/ml; p =0.001) (control vs postoperative p <0.001). No significant correlations were found between IL-12 levels and any of the above clinical parameters. Conclusion: Short-term nonsurgical therapy resulted in a significant improvement in periodontal indices and a marked increase in IL-12 levels. PMID:25478457

  1. Regeneration of alveolar bone following surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Isidor, F; Attström, R; Karring, T

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the regeneration of alveolar bone following surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment. A total of 16 patients who had advanced periodontitis and demonstrated angular bony defects on radiographs participated in the study. After the initial examination, they received instruction in oral hygiene and had their teeth thoroughly scaled. When the individual patient at 2 succeeding appointments had plaque on less than 20% of the tooth surfaces, one maxillary and one mandibular quadrant was treated with the modified Widman flap procedure while one of the remaining quadrants was treated with the reverse bevel flap procedure. The last quadrant was treated with root planing under local anesthesia. None of these procedures included bone contouring. Following treatment, the patients were recalled every 2 weeks for professional tooth cleaning. Radiographs taken 12 months following treatment revealed that only minor changes in the bone level had occurred in areas with horizontal bone loss following the various treatment modalities. Following the modified Widman flap procedure, however, a statistically significant coronal regrowth of bone (0.5 mm) had occurred in angular bony defects. The majority of the angular bony defects persisted following all 3 treatment modalities.

  2. Relationship between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis and the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Márcia de Noronha; Oliveira, Renê Donizeti Ribeiro; Novaes, Arthur Belém; Voltarelli, Júlio César

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzed the association of periodontal disease (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-five 35-60-year-old patients were assigned to 5 groups according to the presence (+) or not (-) of PD and RA and the treatment received (TR+) or not (TR-) for PD. Group 3 uses total prosthesis (TP). Clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed at baseline, 3 and 6 months of follow-up by probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing and plaque index for PD, HAQ, DAS28, SF-36 and laboratory: AAG, ESR, CRP for RA. Statistically significant differences for PD after 3 (p=0.0055) and after 6 months (p=0.0066) were obtained in Group 1 (RA+PD+TR+) and 2(RA+PD+TR-); significant reduction in the % of BOP after 6 months (p=0.0128) and significant reduction in the % of Pl after 3 (p=0.0128) and 6 months (p=0.0002) in Group 1. Statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 3 (RA+TP) for DAS28 at baseline and after 3 months were observed, but not after 6 months. No other parameters for RA were significantly affected. The relationship between RA and PD disease activities is not clear, but the importance of periodontal treatment in the control of inflammation to avoid tooth extraction is evident. PMID:20126902

  3. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  4. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Mark I; Armitage, Gary C

    2016-06-01

    There remains a high prevalence of mild-to-moderate forms of periodontal diseases in both developed and developing countries. Although many periodontal specialty practices currently place strong emphasis on implant surgery, periodontal plastic surgery and esthetics, general dentists and hygienists have often assumed more responsibility than periodontal specialty practices for the diagnosis, treatment, assessment and maintenance, and possible referral, of their patients. To address these current trends and challenges, this volume of Periodontology 2000 presents a series of topics on the basic biological principles of periodontal disease, as well as on approaches to diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment, in what is called 'conservative' or 'noninvasive' periodontal therapy. These topics include risk assessment of the periodontal condition; reduction, elimination and/or control of etiologies and risk factors, including mechanical, antimicrobial and host-modulation approaches; considerations for evaluation of clinical outcomes based on treatment approaches; and selected topics in laser therapy, halitosis and gingival recession. PMID:27045427

  5. Periodontopathogens levels and clinical response to periodontal therapy in individuals with the interleukin-4 haplotype associated with susceptibility to chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Finoti, L S; Anovazzi, G; Pigossi, S C; Corbi, S C T; Teixeira, S R L; Braido, G V V; Kim, Y J; Orrico, S R P; Cirelli, J A; Mayer, M P A; Scarel-Caminaga, R M

    2013-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that results from an interaction between dental biofilm agents and the host immune-inflammatory response. Periodontopathogenic organisms, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, as well as the host's susceptibility, represented by the host's genetic makeup, are the key factors that influence this complex disease. Recently, we identified haplotypes in the IL4 gene that were associated with chronic periodontitis (CP). This study aimed to evaluate whether subjects with different IL4 haplotypes (TCI/CCI and TTD/CTI) would be differentially colonized by periodontopathogens and whether they would respond differently to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Thirty-nine patients carrying the IL4 haplotype of genetic susceptibility to CP (IL4+) or protection against CP (IL4-) were evaluated. Those groups were further subdivided into individuals with CP (CP IL4+ or CP IL4-) and those that were periodontally healthy (H) (H IL4+ or H IL4-). CP patients were submitted to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Clinical and microbiological analyses were performed considering the data at baseline and 45 and 90 days after periodontal therapy. Periodontopathogens levels were evaluated by absolute quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The baseline data revealed that the total levels of periodontopathogens were higher in the CP IL4+ than in the CP IL4- groups. Clinical analyses revealed that the periodontal therapy was equally effective, independent of the subject's IL4 genetic load. The TCI/CCI IL4 haplotype, previously associated with genetic susceptibility to CP, was also associated with increased levels of periodontopathogenic bacteria, but this genetic background did not influence the response to non-surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:23748736

  6. Periodontal and peri-implant wound healing following laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Schwarz, Frank; Sculean, Anton; Yukna, Raymond A; Takasaki, Aristeo A; Romanos, Georgios E; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Sasaki, Katia M; Zeredo, Jorge L; Koshy, Geena; Coluzzi, Donald J; White, Joel M; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation has numerous favorable characteristics, such as ablation or vaporization, hemostasis, biostimulation (photobiomodulation) and microbial inhibition and destruction, which induce various beneficial therapeutic effects and biological responses. Therefore, the use of lasers is considered effective and suitable for treating a variety of inflammatory and infectious oral conditions. The CO2 , neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers have mainly been used for periodontal soft-tissue management. With development of the erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers, which can be applied not only on soft tissues but also on dental hard tissues, the application of lasers dramatically expanded from periodontal soft-tissue management to hard-tissue treatment. Currently, various periodontal tissues (such as gingiva, tooth roots and bone tissue), as well as titanium implant surfaces, can be treated with lasers, and a variety of dental laser systems are being employed for the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. In periodontics, mechanical therapy has conventionally been the mainstream of treatment; however, complete bacterial eradication and/or optimal wound healing may not be necessarily achieved with conventional mechanical therapy alone. Consequently, in addition to chemotherapy consisting of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents, phototherapy using lasers and light-emitting diodes has been gradually integrated with mechanical therapy to enhance subsequent wound healing by achieving thorough debridement, decontamination and tissue stimulation. With increasing evidence of benefits, therapies with low- and high-level lasers play an important role in wound healing/tissue regeneration in the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. This article discusses the outcomes of laser therapy in soft-tissue management, periodontal

  7. The effects of photodynamic laser therapy in the treatment of marginal chronic periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifor, Radu; Badea, Iulia; Avram, Ramona; Chifor, Ioana; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy performed during the treatment of deep periodontal disease by using 40 MHz high frequency ultrasonography. The periodontal data recorded during the clinical examination before each treatment session were compared with volumetric changes of the gingiva measured on periodontal ultrasound images. The results show a significant decrease of gingival tissue inflammation proved both by a significant decrease of bleeding on probing as well as by a decrease of the gingival tissues volume on sites where the laser therapy was performed. Periodontal tissues that benefit of laser therapy besides classical non-surgical treatment showed a significant clinical improvement of periodontal status. Based on these findings we were able to conclude that the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy applied on marginal periodontium has important anti-inflamatory effect. The periodontal ultrasonography is a method which can provide useful data for assessing the volume changes of gingival tissues, allowing a precise monitoring of marginal periodontitis.

  8. Dietary therapy is the best option for refractory nonsurgical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Felton, Elizabeth A; Cervenka, Mackenzie C

    2015-09-01

    Ketogenic diet therapies for epilepsy have been described since the fifth century and published in scientific literature since the early 1900s. Since that time, the diet's popularity has waxed and waned as newer drugs and other treatments have been introduced. However, in recent years, dietary therapy for epilepsy has been increasingly accepted by physicians and desired by patients as an alternative to new drugs and neurostimulation. The introduction of less restrictive versions of the classic ketogenic diet, such as the modified Atkins diet (MAD), have led to increased numbers of adult patients with refractory epilepsy who are initiating dietary treatment. Approximately half of adults and children who start a ketogenic diet have a >50% seizure reduction, which is impressive given that these patients typically have medically refractory epilepsy. We believe that ketogenic dietary treatment is the best option for children and adults with refractory nonsurgical epilepsy due to its efficacy, rapid seizure reduction, synergistic effects with other antiseizure treatments, known and treatable side effects, potential to treat comorbid medical conditions, and worldwide availability.

  9. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:26481895

  10. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air

  11. An evaluation of recruitment methods utilized for a clinical trial with periodontal and diabetes enrollment criteria: the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Hyman, Leslie; Simpson, Leslie Long; Michalowicz, Bryan; Reddy, Michael; Gelato, Marie; Hou, Wei; Engebretson, Steven P; Hytner, Catherine; Lenton, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes and its complications are a major United States public health concern. Methods The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) evaluated whether non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease influenced diabetes management among persons with Type 2 diabetes and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate DPTT’s many recruitment strategies in terms of enrollment success. Results/Conclusion Targeted recruitment strategies were more effective in identifying individuals who met periodontal and diabetes eligibility criteria. Individuals eligible for a baseline visit/enrollment were more often male, had a younger age at diabetes diagnosis, a longer diabetes duration, more often Hispanic and less often African–American. Tracking and evaluating recruitment sources during study enrollment optimized recruitment methods to enroll a diverse participant population based upon gender, race and ethnicity. PMID:25574373

  12. Management of failed periodontal surgical intervention for a furcal lesion with a nonsurgical endodontic approach.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2014-05-01

    As long as the prognosis of teeth remains a matter of concern, the endodontic-periodontal relationship will be considered a challenge for the clinician. Many etiologic factors, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, plus other contributing factors, such as trauma, root resorptions/perforations, and dental malformations, play a role in the co-occurrence of endodontic and periodontal lesions. Whatever the cause, a correct diagnosis on which to base the treatment plan is the key to successful maintenance of the tooth. This article reports the successful endodontic management of a furcation lesion in a mandibular molar that was nonresponsive to a previous periodontal surgical graft. The case had presented a diagnostic challenge for the clinicians, and this article reviews the key points that can lead to a correct diagnosis and treatment planning.

  13. PDT in non-surgical treatment of periodontitis in kidney transplanted patients: a split-mouth, randomized clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Kelly C. T.; Giovani, Elcio M.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate clinical and microbiological effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease in kidney-transplanted patients. Eight kidney transplanted patients treated at Paulista University were arranged in two groups: SRP performed scaling and root planning by ultrasound; SRP+PDT- in the same patient, which was held to PDT in the opposite quadrant, with 0.01% methylene blue and red laser gallium aluminum arsenide, wavelength 660 nm, power 100 mW. There was reduction in probing pocket depth after 45 days and 3 months regardless the group examined; plaque and bleeding index showed improvement over time, regardless the technique used, and bleeding index in the SRP+PDT group was lower when compared with the baseline the other times. There was no difference in the frequency of pathogens. Photodynamic therapy may be an option for treatment of periodontal disease in renal-transplanted patients and its effectiveness is similar to conventional therapy.

  14. Non-surgical periodontal treatment of peri-implant diseases with the adjunctive use of diode laser: preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Francesco; Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa; Attorresi, Enrica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implant diseases present in two forms: peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant complications is significantly rising. The aim of this study was to compare conventional treatment of inflamed peri-implant tissues with conventional treatment together with diode laser application. Twenty-seven patients (age 36 to 67, 15 women and 12 men, 12 smokers and 15 non-smokers) requiring treatment for mucositis or peri-implantitis were taken into account for this preliminary study. Plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD), and bleeding on probing (BoP) were recorded at baseline evaluation. Patients in control group (CG) received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment. Patients in test group received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment together with diode laser application (810 nm, 30 s, 1 W, 50 Hz, t on = 100 ms, t off = 100 ms, energy density = 24.87 J/cm(2)). Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference in repeated measurements of considered indexes at T 0 and T 1 (1 year) in both groups. A total of 606 sites were taken into account in the test group (TG) and 144 in the CG. PD mean variation in the TG was 2.66 mm ± 1.07, while mean PD variation in the CG was 0.94 ± 1.13 mm. Paired t testing of the variation in PD in CG and TG revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.0001). A reduction of pathological sites from 89 % (T 0) to 14.35 % (T 1) was achieved in the TG, while reduction obtained in the CG was from 75.69 % (T 0) to 50 % (T 1); BoP scores at time T 1 had fallen below 5 % in the TG and decreased to 59.7 %, in the CG. Within the limitations of this study, diode laser seems to be an additional valuable tool for peri-implant disease treatment.

  15. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated.

  16. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. PMID:24958498

  17. Periodontal Regenerative Therapy in Patient with Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Seshima, Fumi; Nishina, Makiko; Namba, Takashi; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus requiring periodontal treatment including regenerative therapy. The patient was a 66-year-old man who presented with the chief complaint of gingival inflammation and mobile teeth in the molar region. He had been being treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus since 1999. His glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.8%. An initial examination revealed sites with a probing depth of ≥7 mm in the molar region, and radiography revealed angular bone defects in this area. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized chronic periodontitis, the patient underwent initial periodontal therapy. An improvement was observed in periodontal conditions on reevaluation, and his HbA1c level showed a reduction to 6.9%. Periodontal regenerative therapy with enamel matrix derivative was then performed on #16, 26, and 27. Following another reevaluation, a removable partial denture was fabricated for #47 and the patient placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). To date, periodontal conditions have remained stable and the patient's HbA1c level has increased to 7.5% during SPT. The results show the importance of collaboration between dentist and physician in managing periodontal and diabetic conditions in such patients.

  18. Management of an Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Palatal Radicular Groove: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sooratgar, Aidin; Tabrizizade, Mehdi; Nourelahi, Maryam; Asadi, Yasin; Sooratgar, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The radicular groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth to periodontal break-down. Sometimes the situation becomes more complicated by pulp necrosis and development of a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion which is a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. This report presents the successful management of an endodontic-periodontal lesion in a maxillary lateral incisor that has a developmental palatal radicular groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy and periodontal regenerative techniques. Conclusion: The combination of nonsurgical endodontic and periodontal regenerative treatment is a predictable method in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by palato-gingival groove. PMID:27141225

  19. Systemic antimicrobial therapy (minocycline) as an adjunct to non-surgical approach to recurrent chronic generalized gingival hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Parag M; Bacha, Shraddanand

    2014-03-01

    Systemic antibiotic treatment has emerged as a powerful adjunct to conventional mechanical debridement for therapeutic management of the periodontal diseases. The conceptual basis for treating periodontal diseases as infections is particularly attractive in part because of substantial data indicating that these diseases may be associated with specific putative pathogens. Further, discrete groups of patients respond well to systemic antibiotics and exhibit improvement of clinical parameters, including attachment level and inflammation. This bacterial-host interaction, which is ever-so-present in periodontitis, directs us toward utilizing antimicrobial agents along with the routine mechanical debridement. This case report presents a case of a female patient with recurrence of the chronic generalized periodontitis with gingival enlargement, which is treated thrice by referral dentist. A through clinical examination was carried out pre-operatively and treatment was planned with systemic minocycline in conjunction with the conventional non-surgical approach. There was a significant reduction of pocket depth, gain in attachment with dramatic improvement clinically.

  20. Sports medicine and platelet-rich plasma: nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    A Cochrane Review was performed to assess the effects of platelet-rich therapies for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Selection criteria were randomized and quasirandomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared platelet-rich therapy with either placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy for people with acute or chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Primary outcomes were functional status, pain, and adverse effects. The investigators found 19 studies that compared platelet-rich therapy with placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy. Disorders included rotator cuff tears (arthroscopic repair; 6 trials); shoulder impingement syndrome surgery (1 trial); elbow epicondylitis (3 trials); anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (4 trials), ACL reconstruction (donor graft site application; 2 trials), patellar tendinopathy (1 trial), Achilles tendinopathy (1 trial), and acute Achilles rupture surgical repair (1 trial). They further subdivided the studies based on type of treatment, including tendinopathies in which platelet-rich therapy injections were the main treatment (5 trials), and surgical augmentation procedures in which platelet-rich therapy was applied during surgery (14 trials). The conclusion was that there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of platelet-rich therapy for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Researchers contemplating RCTs should consider the coverage of currently ongoing trials when assessing the need for future RCTs on specific conditions. There is a need for standardization of PRP preparation methods. At this time, the use of PRP in foot and ankle surgery as an orthobiologic does not have an absolute indication. Many of the studies are lower evidence-based from surgical techniques. Several in vitro studies have shown that growth factors promote the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and tendons. More clinical studies are

  1. Sports medicine and platelet-rich plasma: nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    A Cochrane Review was performed to assess the effects of platelet-rich therapies for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Selection criteria were randomized and quasirandomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared platelet-rich therapy with either placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy for people with acute or chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Primary outcomes were functional status, pain, and adverse effects. The investigators found 19 studies that compared platelet-rich therapy with placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy. Disorders included rotator cuff tears (arthroscopic repair; 6 trials); shoulder impingement syndrome surgery (1 trial); elbow epicondylitis (3 trials); anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (4 trials), ACL reconstruction (donor graft site application; 2 trials), patellar tendinopathy (1 trial), Achilles tendinopathy (1 trial), and acute Achilles rupture surgical repair (1 trial). They further subdivided the studies based on type of treatment, including tendinopathies in which platelet-rich therapy injections were the main treatment (5 trials), and surgical augmentation procedures in which platelet-rich therapy was applied during surgery (14 trials). The conclusion was that there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of platelet-rich therapy for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Researchers contemplating RCTs should consider the coverage of currently ongoing trials when assessing the need for future RCTs on specific conditions. There is a need for standardization of PRP preparation methods. At this time, the use of PRP in foot and ankle surgery as an orthobiologic does not have an absolute indication. Many of the studies are lower evidence-based from surgical techniques. Several in vitro studies have shown that growth factors promote the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and tendons. More clinical studies are

  2. Three Years of a Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Protocol to Observe Clinical Outcomes in ≥ 6-mm Pockets: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    A total of 25 patients were treated with a nonsurgical periodontal treatment protocol (NSPTP) consisting of four appointments (three within 1 week and one approximately 30 days later). Nonsurgical periodontal instrumentation was implemented, with the adjunctive use of thermal diode lasers (wavelength of 808 or 980 nm). The patients were scheduled for recall visits every 3 months and reevaluated 1 year post-NSPTP. They were subsequently monitored at 4-month intervals for the remaining 2-year follow-up maintenance period. In total, 698 teeth (210 multirooted and 488 single-rooted) were included in the study. The mean bleeding on probing was 43% at baseline and decreased to 12% at 12 months and to 8% at 3 years. The initial ≥ 6-mm probing pocket depth (PPD) in single-rooted teeth decreased from 6.2 mm at baseline to a mean of 1.8 mm at 12 months and remained at 1.8 mm at 3 years, with a mean clinical attachment level (CAL) gain of 4.4 mm. In multirooted teeth, the PPD decreased from 6.7 mm to a mean of 3.9 mm at 12 months and 3.6 mm at 3 years, with a mean CAL gain of 2.9 mm. The mean overall recession was 0.3 mm at baseline, 0.1 mm at 1 year, and 0.3 mm at the 3-year follow-up. In the short-term followup period, uniform and consistent implementation of the NSPTP used here with adjunctive use of thermal diode lasers seemed to convey therapeutic benefits, stable periodontal soft tissue levels, and satisfactory esthetics in patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. The present protocol is relevant as a treatment option for medically compromised patients, those who refuse or delay surgical treatment, or those who present with other limitations. PMID:26901297

  3. Adjunct Antimicrobial Therapy and Periodontal Surgery to Treat Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Makino-Oi, Asako; Fujita, Takahisa; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a case of generalized aggressive periodontitis treated with periodontal therapy including adjunct antimicrobial therapy and periodontal surgery. The patient was a 22-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of gingival recession. Baseline examination revealed generalized plaque deposition and gingival inflammation. Thirty-nine percent of the sites had a probing depth (PD) of 4-6 mm and 2% a PD of ≥7 mm; 63% exhibited bleeding on probing (BOP). Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone loss in the molars and horizontal bone loss in other teeth. Microbiological examination of subgingival plaque revealed the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Tannerella forsythia. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed as a measure of patient-reported outcome. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized aggressive periodontitis, initial periodontal therapy and adjunct antimicrobial therapy were implemented. After reducing inflammation and subgingival bacteria, open flap debridement was performed for teeth with a PD of ≥4 mm. Reevaluation showed no sites with a PD of ≥5 mm, a minimal level of BOP, and a marked reduction in the level of the targeted periodontal pathogens. The patient's oral health-related quality of life was slightly worsened during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Implementation of adjunct antimicrobial therapy targeting periodontal pathogens and subsequent periodontal surgery resulted in improvement in periodontal and microbiological parameters. This improvement has been adequately maintained over a 2-year period. However, additional care is necessary to further improve the patient's oral health-related quality of life during SPT. PMID:27320300

  4. Local drug delivery agents as adjuncts to endodontic and periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Puri, K; Puri, N

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained/controlled drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. The conventional method for the elimination of subgingival microbial infection includes mechanical debridement, irrigation with antimicrobial agents or surgical access. But, the effectiveness of conventional nonsurgical treatment is limited by lack of accessibility to bacteria in deeper periodontal pockets, and/or does not completely eliminate intracanal microorganisms. Surgical intervention may be beneficial but cannot be done in all cases, medically compromised cases and also in patients not willing to be subjected to surgical therapy. Development of local drug delivery systems provides an answer to all such difficulties. This comprehensive review tries to cover the detailed information about the latest advances in the various local drug delivery systems, their indications, contraindications and their advantages over systemic drug therapy. PMID:24868252

  5. Nonsurgical management of urolithiasis: an overview of expulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Healy, K A; Ogan, K

    2005-09-01

    Although minimally invasive stone therapies such as shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are efficacious, these techniques are not free of risks and are relatively expensive. Watchful waiting may be appropriate in patients without infection whose pain can be controlled with oral medication but is associated with pain, uncertainty, potential risks to renal function, and time lost from work. Hydroxyprogesterone, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, calcium-channel blockers such as nifedipine, alpha-1 blockers such as tamsulosin, and corticosteroids may have some beneficial effect. Future studies are likely to provide additional data in support of their use.

  6. Antibiotics/antimicrobials: systemic and local administration in the therapy of mild to moderately advanced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karin; Jepsen, Søren

    2016-06-01

    This review gives an update of the current scientific evidence on the efficacy of the adjunctive use of systemic and local antibiotics/antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. In particular, it addresses whether their use can improve the results of nonsurgical mechanical therapy in mild-to-moderate forms of the disease. Large numbers of randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews with meta-analyses have clearly established that adjunctive systemic antibiotics, combined with mechanical debridement, offer clinical improvements additional to those obtained with scaling and root planing alone. These effects are more pronounced in aggressive periodontitis and in initially deep pockets, whereas more limited additional improvements, of 0.3 mm for additional pocket reduction and 0.2 mm for additional clinical attachment gain, have been documented for moderately deep sites (4-6 mm) in patients with chronic periodontitis. The marginal clinical benefit in patients with moderate disease has to be balanced against possible side effects. Notably, it has to be realized that an increasing number of warnings have been articulated against the unrestricted use of antibiotics in treating periodontal diseases because of the emerging global public health issue of bacterial resistance. The effects of the adjunctive local administration of antimicrobials have also been very well documented in several systematic reviews. Overall, in persistent or recurrent localized deep sites, the application of antimicrobials by sustained-delivery devices may offer a benefit of an additional 0.4 mm in pocket depth reduction and 0.3 mm in clinical attachment level gain. In conclusion, the slight additional benefits of adjunctive antimicrobials, which were shown for moderate forms of periodontitis, have to be balanced against their side effects and therefore their prescription should be limited as much as possible. PMID:27045432

  7. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  8. Supportive periodontal therapy and periodontal biotype as prognostic factors in implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Aisa, Francisco J.; Estefanía-Fresco, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate bone loss around implants placed in patients with a history of treated chronic periodontitis and who did or did not attend supportive periodontal therapy, after one year in function. Furthermore, the influence of periodontal biotype and level of plaque was also evaluated. Material and Methods: Forty-nine patients participated voluntarily in the study. All subjects had a history of chronic periodontitis, which had been previously treated. After the active treatment, 27 patients attended supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) and the rest did not (No SPT). The O’Leary plaque index and periodontal biotype were recorded for each subject and 246 Astra Tech® OsseospeedTM implants were radiographically analysed (123 placed in SPT patients and 123 in No SPT patients) at the time of loading and one year later, measuring marginal bone loss with the program Dental Studio NX 6.0®. The statistical analysis was performed with Windows SPSS, applying Pearson’s correlation index and the Kruskal-Wallis and U-Mann Whitney non-parametric tests. Results: Six patients were found to have periimplantitis and sixteen mucositis. The survival rate was 99.59% (100% SPT and 99.18% No SPT). Mean bone loss was 0.39 mm (range [-0.71 - 8.05]). Among SPT patients, 95% of the implants had losses less than or equal to the mean (mean bone loss of 0.16 mm) compared to 53.7% for the No SPT group (mean bone loss of 0.62 mm). A statistically significant relationship was demonstrated between bone loss around the implant and the patient’s periodontal biotype and plaque index. Conclusions: The marginal bone loss around implants in patients with treated chronic periodontitis is minimal if they are in a controlled SPT programme and there is individual control of plaque index. Moreover, the presence of a thin periodontal biotype represents a risk factor for additional bone loss. Key words:Peri-implantitis, chronic periodontitis, bacterial plaque, periodontal biotype. PMID:23722147

  9. Baseline adjustment and change revisited: effect of smoking on change in periodontal status following periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Preus, Hans R; Sandvik, Leiv; Gjermo, Per; Baelum, Vibeke

    2014-04-01

    Smokers have frequently been reported to have more severe periodontitis, to respond less favorably to periodontal therapy, and to show elevated rate of recurrence compared with non-smokers. The aims of this study was to compare the results of baseline-adjusted and -unadjusted analyses when assessing the effect of smoking on change in periodontal status following therapy and to discuss the methodological issues involved. This is a secondary analysis of data from 180 periodontitis patients enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical intervention trial. Information on smoking habits was elicited from the participants before, and 12 months after, therapy. The clinical parameters analyzed were probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, using both simple analysis of change (SAC) and analysis of covariance (ancova), adjusting for age, gender, and treatment group. The current smokers presented with more severe periodontitis at baseline than did former and never smokers. Results of the SAC indicated that the current smokers benefitted more from treatment than did former or never smokers, whereas the results of the baseline-adjusted ancova indicated no such differences. Both sets of results are likely to be biased with respect to valid conclusions regarding the 'causal' effect of smoking. Possible sources of bias are discussed.

  10. Photodynamic therapy and its role in periodontitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek-Badora, Ewa; Szulc, Małgorzata

    2013-11-13

    Photodynamic therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontal disease. Inactivation of microorganisms using photodynamic therapy has been defined as either antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) or photodynamic disinfection. The use of aPDT requires a non-toxic photosensitizer, harmless visible light and oxygen. The photosensitizer binds to targeted bacteria and then can be activated by light of the appropriate wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Photoinactivation of bacteria is tightly restricted to the localization of the photosensitizer, ensuring the protection of distant cells from side-effects. Because of the fact that conventional treatment such as scaling and root planing (SRP) does not completely eliminate periodontal pathogens, especially in deep periodontal pockets, aPDT may be considered to be an alternative therapeutic strategy. This article describes the mechanism of aPDT and novel approaches such as nanoparticles. The aim of the study was to review the literature concerning the assessment of the effectiveness of aPDT in periodontitis treatment. Although studies have not indicated the superiority of aPDT compared to conventional periodontitis treatment, antimicrobial photodynamic treatment has been reported to be effective as an adjunct to conventional therapy to destroy bacteria in sites where there is limited access for mechanical instrumentation.

  11. Orthotics Compared to Conventional Therapy and Other Non-Surgical Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca D.; Wright, Paul; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In adults with acute plantar fasciitis whose symptoms have not been relieved with the conventional regimen of NSAIDS, stretching and lifestyle modification, do the addition of orthotics (prefabricated or custom fitted) reduce pain and improve function compared with other non-surgical treatments (manipulative chiropractic, physical therapy and/or heel steroid injections)? Answer Yes. Studies have shown that orthotics, both prefabricated and custom fitted, reduce pain and improve function in adults with acute plantar fasciitis with few risks or side effects. Used alone or in addition to conventional therapy (NSAIDs, stretching, lifestyle modification), orthotics are effective and well tolerated by patients for short-term pain relief and improved function. Prefabricated orthotics are less costly and provide similar relief to more expensive custom orthotics. Level of Evidence of the Answer A Search Terms Plantar fasciitis, heel pain, treatment, orthotics, Limits Adult, human, English, Review, Randomized-Control Trials, Systematic Reviews, adults age 18 or more, publication dates 2004 to present. Date Search was Conducted January 16, 2014; updated January 20, 2015 Inclusion Criteria Recent published systematic reviews, randomized controlled, meta-analyses; adults with confirmed acute or recent diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Exclusion Criteria Studies older than 10 years, children, adolescents less than 18 years of age, chronic or recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. PMID:26855444

  12. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: evolution, early results, and impact on nonsurgical gallstone therapies.

    PubMed

    Brandon, J C; Velez, M A; Teplick, S K; Mueller, P R; Rattner, D W; Broadwater, J R; Lang, N P; Eidt, J F

    1991-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a surgical technique first performed in France, has gained widespread acceptance among surgeons in the United States. The abdominal cavity is inflated by carbon dioxide, a video monitor is inserted via a laparoscope placed periumbilically, and the gallbladder is freed and removed from the liver bed by using small subcostal ports for access and dissection. Intraoperative cholangiography is routinely performed, but uncertainty exists about how best to manage choledocholithiasis. Compared with traditional cholecystectomy, initial reports describing laparoscopic cholecystectomy cite shorter recovery times because no large incisions are made, thus potentially reducing the cost and morbidity of cholecystectomy. A survey of 614 early cases supports these claims, with a reported complication rate of 1.5% and quick resumption of normal activities by patients. Because of its promise for reduced morbidity, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is challenging open cholecystectomy as the therapeutic gold standard for symptomatic cholelithiasis. Thus, the standard to which the nonsurgical gallstone therapies, such as lithotripsy and contact dissolution, will be compared may shift to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. As the laparoscopic complications are similar to those of traditional cholecystectomy, such as abscesses and bile leaks, their percutaneous treatment should not change. PMID:1830188

  13. Challenging Obesity: Patient, Provider, and Expert Perspectives on the Roles of Available and Emerging Nonsurgical Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Ryan, Donna H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adult obesity is recognized as a chronic disease. According to principles of chronic disease management, healthcare professionals should work collaboratively with patients to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies that address overweight and obesity, specifically considering a patient’s disease status in addition to their individual needs, preferences, and attitudes regarding treatment. A central role and responsibility of healthcare professionals in this process is to inform and educate patients about their treatment options. Although current recommendations for the management of adult obesity provide general guidance regarding safe and proper implementation of lifestyle, pharmacological, and surgical interventions, healthcare professionals need awareness of specific evidence-based information that supports individualized clinical application of these therapies. More specifically, healthcare professionals should be up-to-date on approaches that promote successful lifestyle management and be knowledgeable about newer weight loss pharmacotherapies, so they can offer patients with obesity a wide range of options to personalize their treatment. Accordingly, this educational activity has been developed to provide participants with the latest information on treatment recommendations and therapeutic advances in lifestyle intervention and pharmacotherapy for adult obesity management. Design and Methods This supplement is based on the content presented at a live CME symposium held in conjunction with ObesityWeek 2014. Results This supplement provides an expert summary of current treatment recommendations and recent advances in nonsurgical therapies for the management of adult obesity. Patient and provider perspectives on obesity management are highlighted in embedded video clips available via QR codes, and new evidence will be applied using clinically relevant case studies. Conclusions This supplement provides a topical update of obesity management

  14. Effects of Periodontal Therapy on Metabolic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Jen, I-An; Chou, Chyuan; Lei, Yen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiologic studies have reported increased incidence, prevalence and acuity of periodontitis in adults with diabetes and some have also suggested that treating periodontal disease may improve glycemic control in diabetic patients. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of different periodontal therapies on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and periodontal disease. We searched the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (Central) databases up to January 2014 for relevant studies pertaining to periodontal treatments and glycemic control in adults with T2DM. The search terms were periodontal treatment/periodontal therapy, diabetes/diabetes mellitus, periodontitis/periodontal and glycemic control. The primary outcome measure taken from the included studies was glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). We compared differences in patients’ pre- and post-intervention HbA1c results between a treatment group receiving scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with administration of oral doxycycline (n = 71) and controls receiving SRP alone or SRP plus placebo (n = 72). Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. Four trials involving a total of 143 patients with T2DM and periodontal disease were determined to be eligible for analysis. Data of 1 study were not retained for meta-analysis because HbA1c results were recorded as median with IQR. Meta-analysis of the included 3 studies revealed no significant differences in HbA1c results between the periodontal treatment group (n = 71) and control group (n = 72) (HbA1c SMD = −0.238, 95% CI = −0.616 to 0.140; P = 0.217). Systemic doxycycline added to SRP does not significantly improve metabolic control in patients with T2DM and chronic periodontitis. Current evidence is insufficient to support a significant association between periodontal therapy and metabolic

  15. Advanced Biomatrix Designs for Regenerative Therapy of Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.H.; Park, C.H.; Perez, R.A.; Lee, H.Y.; Jang, J.H.; Lee, H.H.; Wall, I.B.; Shi, S.; Kim, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body’s innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices—including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner—which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. PMID:25139364

  16. Evidence-based periodontal regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    McGuire, M K; Newman, M G; Whitley, N

    1996-01-01

    Periodontal health care has progressed into a new era. It is distinguished by a rapidly expanding volume of literature, rapid influx of new technologies, and need for new skills to perform increasingly complex procedures. Correspondingly, practice management changes are required to adapt to the extensive follow-up care associated with some of these new treatments. This must be accomplished while also acknowledging the deepening concern for escalating costs and increased attention to the quality of care provided. As with most change, clinicians can fight it by continuing to rely on old ways of doing things and hope to keep these issues at bay, but history would say they are unlikely to succeed. Instead, clinicians can embrace these changes and adapt to them by adding new tools, such as evidence-based methodology, to their armamentarium. The evidence-based approach offers a "bridge" from science to clinical practice. It can strengthen the foundation by providing a framework for integrating patient preferences, scientific knowledge, clinical judgment, and personal experience. By adapting the way treatment decisions are made in daily practice to an evidence-based approach, clinicians can deliver the highest quality care to their patients and be in better control of their own destiny. These new challenges can be perceived as problems or as opportunities--it is a choice!

  17. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics. PMID:27688398

  18. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report.

    PubMed

    Puhar, Ivan; Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-06-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics.

  19. Severe Generalized Periodontitis in a Patient with an Aplastic Anemia: a 5 Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Jelušić, Damir; Plančak, Darije

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder characterized by pancytopenia. This case report presents a young patient with untreated periodontitis associated with hematological disorders, and cyclosporine therapy. During 2 consecutive days, periodontal therapy which consisted of nonsurgical therapy supplemented with an antibiotic treatment and antifibrinolytic therapy was performed. Commercial microbiological PCR tests and periodontitis IL-1 polymorphism risk test were performed. Following the periodontal therapy, the inflammation was resolved and the patient's occlusion was restored by means of removable partial dentures. After the 5 year follow-up, the patient still remained with shallow probing depths although there was inadequate compliance during the maintenance phase. Aplastic anemia increases the risk of onset of severe forms of periodontitis that can be additionally complicated with cyclosporine therapy. In such patients, periodontal therapy must be supplemented with antibiotics.

  20. The effect of conventional mechanical periodontal treatment on red complex microorganisms and clinical parameters in Down syndrome periodontitis patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M H; Rodrigues, T O; Finoti, L S; Teixeira, S R L; Mayer, M P A; Scarel-Caminaga, R M; Giro, E M A

    2015-03-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is induced by a complex microbiota, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola (together called the red complex), which triggers intense inflammatory reaction. Down syndrome (DS) individuals demonstrate a high prevalence of PD compared with those who are otherwise chromosomally normal (euploids). This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment in DS chronic periodontitis patients on clinical and microbiological parameters. Patients with chronic periodontitis, 23 DS and 12 euploids (control group), were submitted to non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment, followed by maintenance for 45 days. Clinical parameters after periodontal treatment were similar in diseased and healthy sites, independent of the genetic background. Diseased sites of DS and control patients harbored similar levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia at baseline, but significantly higher levels of T. denticola were found in DS patients. Increased levels of P. gingivalis at healthy sites were found in DS individuals. Non-surgical periodontal therapy decreased the levels of red complex microorganisms and improved the tested clinical parameters of diseased sites in both groups. However, the levels of red complex bacteria were higher in diseased sites of DS patients after the periodontal treatment. We conclude in this pilot study that, although the mechanical periodontal treatment seemed to be effective in DS subjects over a short-term period, the red complex bacteria levels did not decrease significantly in diseased sites, as occurred in controls. Therefore, for DS patients, it seems that the conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy should be improved by utilizing adjuvants to reduce the presence of periodontopathogens.

  1. Economics of periodontal care: market trends, competitive forces and incentives.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Thomas F; Beikler, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The adoption of new technologies for the treatment of periodontitis and the replacement of teeth has changed the delivery of periodontal care. The objective of this review was to conduct an economic analysis of a mature periodontal service market with a well-developed workforce, including general dentists, dental hygienists and periodontists. Publicly available information about the delivery of periodontal care in the USA was used. A strong trend toward increased utilization of nonsurgical therapy and decreased utilization of surgical periodontal therapy was observed. Although periodontal surgery remained the domain of periodontists, general dentists had taken over most of the nonsurgical periodontal care. The decline in surgical periodontal therapy was associated with an increased utilization of implant-supported prosthesis. Approximately equal numbers of implants were surgically placed by periodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and general dentists. Porter's framework of the forces driving industry competition was used to analyze the role of patients, dental insurances, general dentists, competitors, entrants, substitutes and suppliers in the periodontal service market. Estimates of out-of-pocket payments of self-pay and insured patients, reimbursement by dental insurances and providers' earnings for various periodontal procedures and alternative treatments were calculated. Economic incentives for providers may explain some of the observed shifts in the periodontal service market. Given the inherent uncertainty about treatment outcomes in dentistry, which makes clinical judgment critical, providers may yield to economic incentives without jeopardizing their ethical standards and professional norms. Although the economic analysis pertains to the USA, some considerations may also apply to other periodontal service markets.

  2. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    Pyorrhea - gum disease; Inflammation of gums - involving bone ... Periodontitis occurs when inflammation or infection of the gums ( gingivitis ) occurs and is not treated. Infection and inflammation spreads from the gums (gingiva) ...

  3. [Therapy of both surgical and non-surgical related complication of gastric cancer for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, Jiabin

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common digestive malignant tumors. More and more elderly gastric cancer patients are diagnosed and need to undergo surgical treatment as the population ages. Since the elderly patients decrease in organ function and increase in internal diseases, the tolerance to anesthesia and surgery is poor. As a result, the incidence of surgical and postoperative complications is obviously higher. Complications can be divided into surgical complications and non-surgical related complications. Surgical complications consist mainly of hemorrhage, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic dehiscence and intestinal obstruction, while non-surgical related complications include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary infection, anesthesia-related complication, abdominal infection, urinary infection, incision infection, poor wound healing, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dumping syndrome and so on. Hence, we should consider more about the elderly patients' physical condition instead of the extent of radical operation. To reduce complications, we should evaluate the organ function and take an active role in underlying diseases before operation. Meanwhile, high quality nursing, powerful analgesia, anti-inflammation, keeping water electrolyte balance and nutrition support are also required postoperatively. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) can reduce the postoperative complications in elderly patients with gastric cancer as well. Further prospective randomized controlled trials about elderly gastric cancer should be carried out in the future, which can provide advanced evidences for treatment. PMID:27215514

  4. Efect of periodontal disease and non surgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein. Evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Guiha, Rami; Bautista, Daniel; Caffesse, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze how anti-infectious periodontal treatment affects C reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with type 1 diabetes, and correlate baseline CRP levels with periodontal disease severity. Study Design: A cohort of fifty three subjects with type 1 diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal parameters were measured, and blood samples were obtained to evaluate high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Group 1 was treated with scaling, root planning, and systemic administration of doxycycline. Group 2 received only scaling and root planning. Results: Hs-CRP was reduced after periodontal treatment in group 1 (-0.22 mg/l) and 2 (-0.21 mg/l ) but this reduction was not statistically significant, even in the patients with the best response to periodontal treatment. However, significant correlation appeared between hs-CRP and mean probing pocket depth (PPD) (p=0, 01) and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) (p=0,03). Conclusions: Non-surgical periodontal treatment couldn’t reduce hs-CRP values, however, it was found an association between advanced periodontitis and elevated blood hs-CRP levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. It can be speculated that periodontal disease increases production of pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with type 1 diabetes, but other producing sources of these pro-inflammatory substances may exist. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 1, periodontal therapy, C reactive protein. PMID:22322513

  5. Dietary therapy is not the best option for refractory nonsurgical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vaccarezza, María Magdalena; Silva, Walter Horacio

    2015-09-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is currently a well-established treatment for patients with medically refractory, nonsurgical epilepsy. However, despite its efficacy, the KD is highly restrictive and constitutes a treatment with serious potential adverse effects, and often with difficulties in its implementation and compliance. Patients on the KD require strict follow-up and constant supervision by a medical team highly experienced in its management in order to prevent complications. Other alternative treatments for patients with refractory epilepsy include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), new-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), corpus callosotomy (CC), and responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS). In this review, we explain not only the difficulties of the KD as a therapeutic option for refractory epilepsy but also the benefits of other therapeutic strategies, which, in many cases, have proven to have better efficacy than the KD itself.

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review of Existing and Emerging Nonsurgical Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  7. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome. PMID:25024562

  8. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K

    2014-05-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of recurrent laryngeal cancer following initial nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Agra, Ivan Marcelo Gonçalves; Ferlito, Alfio; Takes, Robert P; Silver, Carl E; Olsen, Kerry D; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Strojan, Primož; Rodrigo, Juan P; Gonçalves Filho, João; Genden, Eric M; Haigentz, Missak; Khafif, Avi; Weber, Randal S; Zbären, Peter; Suárez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kowalski, Luiz P

    2012-05-01

    Surgery is the preferred modality for curative treatment of recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of nonsurgical treatments. Patients with initial early-stage cancer experiencing recurrence following radiotherapy often have more advanced-stage tumors by the time the recurrence is recognized. About one third of such recurrent cancers are suitable for conservation surgery. Endoscopic resection with the CO(2) laser or open partial laryngectomy (partial vertical, supracricoid, or supraglottic laryngectomies) have been used. The outcomes of conservation surgery appear better than those after total laryngectomy, because of selection bias. Transoral laser surgery is currently used more frequently than open partial laryngectomy for treatment of early-stage recurrence, with outcomes equivalent to open surgery but with less associated morbidity. Laser surgery has also been employed for selective cases of advanced recurrent disease, but patient selection and expertise are required for application of this modality to rT3 tumors. In general, conservation laryngeal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for localized recurrences after radiotherapy for early-stage glottic cancer. Recurrent advanced-stage cancers should generally be treated by total laryngectomy. PMID:21484925

  10. Low-Level Lasers as an Adjunct in Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Jovanović, Goran; Antić, Slobodan; Brkić, Zlata

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of periodontitis, and severe periodontitis often coexists with severe DM. The proposed dual pathway of tissue destruction suggests that control of chronic periodontal infection and gingival inflammation is essential for achieving long-term control of DM. The purpose this study is to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) by exfoliative cytology in patients with DM and gingival inflammation. Subjects and Methods Three hundred patients were divided in three equal groups: Group 1 consisted of patients with periodontitis and type 1 DM, Group 2 of patients with periodontitis and type 2 DM, and Group 3 of patients with periodontitis (control group). After oral examination, smears were taken from gingival tissue, and afterward all of the patients received oral hygiene instructions, removal of dental plaque, and full-mouth scaling and root planing. A split-mouth design was applied; on the right side of jaws GaAlAs LLLT (670 nm, 5 mW, 14 min/day) (model Mils 94; Optica Laser, Sofia, Bulgaria) was applied for five consecutive days. After the therapy was completed, smears from both sides of jaws were taken. The morphometric analysis was done using the National Institutes of Health Image software program and a model NU2 microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany). Results Investigated parameters were significantly lower after therapy compared with values before therapy. After therapy on the side subjected to LLLT, there was no significantly difference between patients with DM and the control group. Conclusions It can be concluded that LLLT as an adjunct in periodontal therapy reduces gingival inflammation in patients with DM and periodontitis. PMID:22928615

  11. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms.

  12. Antibacterial properties of metal and metalloid ions in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis therapy.

    PubMed

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal diseases like periodontitis and peri-implantitis have been linked with Gram-negative anaerobes. The incorporation of various chemotherapeutic agents, including metal ions, into several materials and devices has been extensively studied against periodontal bacteria, and materials doped with metal ions have been proposed for the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions already used in the treatment of periodontal diseases, as well as the potential use of alternative materials that are currently available for other applications but have been proved to be cytotoxic to the specific periodontal pathogens. The sources of this review included English articles using Google Scholar™, ScienceDirect, Scopus and PubMed. Search terms included the combinations of the descriptors "disease", "ionic species" and "bacterium". Articles that discuss the biocidal properties of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions against the specific periodontal bacteria were included. The articles were independently extracted by two authors using predefined data fields. The evaluation of resources was based on the quality of the content and the relevance to the topic, which was evaluated by the ionic species and the bacteria used in the study, while the final application was not considered as relevant. The present review summarizes the extensive previous and current research efforts concerning the use of metal ions in periodontal diseases therapy, while it points out the challenges and opportunities lying ahead.

  13. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

    PubMed Central

    Gokulanathan, Subramanium; Balan, Natarajan; Aravind, Ramaraj Jayabalan; Thangavelu, Kavin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy. PMID:25210365

  14. Effects of Periodontal Therapy on Rate of Preterm Delivery A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D.; Jared, Heather L.; Mauriello, Sally M.; Mendoza, Luisto C.; Couper, David J.; Stewart, Dawn D.; Murtha, Amy P.; Cochran, David L.; Dudley, Donald J.; Reddy, Michael S.; Geurs, Nicolaas C.; Hauth, John C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the effects of maternal periodontal disease treatment on the incidence of preterm birth (delivery before 37 weeks of gestation). METHODS The Maternal Oral Therapy to Reduce Obstetric Risk Study was a randomized, treatment-masked, controlled clinical trial of pregnant women with periodontal disease who were receiving standard obstetric care. Participants were assigned to either a periodontal treatment arm, consisting of scaling and root planing early in the second trimester, or a delayed treatment arm that provided periodontal care after delivery. Pregnancy and maternal periodontal status were followed to delivery and neonatal outcomes until discharge. The primary outcome (gestational age less than 37 weeks) and the secondary outcome (gestational age less than 35 weeks) were analyzed using a χ2 test of equality of two proportions. RESULTS The study randomized 1,806 patients at three performance sites and completed 1,760 evaluable patients. At baseline, there were no differences comparing the treatment and control arms for any of the periodontal or obstetric measures. The rate of preterm delivery for the treatment group was 13.1% and 11.5% for the control group (P=.316). There were no significant differences when comparing women in the treatment group with those in the control group with regard to the adverse event rate or the major obstetric and neonatal outcomes. CONCLUSION Periodontal therapy did not reduce the incidence of preterm delivery. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00097656. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE I PMID:19701034

  15. [Sports capacity after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament--surgical versus non-surgical therapy].

    PubMed

    Fink, C; Hoser, C; Benedetto, K P

    1993-12-01

    Using a new rating system (Innsbruck Knee-Sports Rating Scale) 75 patients 5 to 6 years after ACL-injury have been compared to their sports activity (47 patients with ACL reconstruction and 28 conservative treated patients). Under the viewpoint of knee load and especially the demand on stability sports activities have been divided into 3 categories: High Risk, Low Risk and Non Risk Pivoting Sports. Operative therapy shows an advantage in High Risk Pivoting sports (e.g. soccer, basketball) and in Low Risk Pivoting (e.g. running, hiking) sports, expressed by fewer knee related symptoms and higher participation levels. In the Non Risk Pivoting category (e.g. swimming, cycling) good results could also be achieved by conservative therapy. The careful evaluation of each patient's sports activities is therefore an important factor in the decision for the right therapy on one hand, and for comparing the results of different therapy programs or patient collectives on the other.

  16. Application of transtheoretical model to assess the compliance of chronic periodontitis patients to periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Shilpa; Thomas, Raison; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to assess whether the transtheoretical model for oral hygiene behavior was interrelated in theoretically consistent directions in chronic periodontitis patients and its applicability to assess the compliance of the chronic periodontitis patients to the treatment suggested. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 chronic periodontitis patients were selected for the proposed study. The selected patients were given four questionnaires that were constructed based on transtheoretical model (TTM), and the patients were divided subsequently into five different groups (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance groups) based on their answers to the questionnaires. Then, each patient was given four appointments for their periodontal treatment spaced with a time gap of 10 days. The patients visit for each appointments scheduled to them was documented. The results obtained were assessed using TTM. Results: Higher mean pro scores of decisional balance, self-efficacy, and process of change scores was recorded in maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group, respectively, whereas higher mean cons score was recorded in precontemplation group followed by contemplation group, preparation group, action group, and maintenance group, respectively. The difference scores of TTM constructs were statistically highly significant between all the five groups. Furthermore, the number of appointment attended in were significantly more than maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that transtheoretical model can be successfully applied to chronic periodontitis patients to assess their compliance to the suggested periodontal treatment. PMID:27307663

  17. Tobacco smoke in the development and therapy of periodontal disease: progress and questions.

    PubMed

    Rota, M T; Poggi, P; Baratta, L; Gaeta, E; Boratto, R; Tazzi, A

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological studies have pointed to a significant correlation between cigarette smoke and poor periodontal status. Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for the onset and development of periodontal disease, and an association between reduced healing response subsequent to periodontal therapies and cigarette smoking has been found. The epidemiological studies reported here are also supported by the results of an in vitro study on the cytotoxicity of two of the volatile components of cigarette smoke that we ourselves conducted, in which the investigated compounds were found to damage human gingival fibroblasts. We concluded that this damage would be reflected in periodontal health and could slow down wound healing. Patients should thus be alerted by clinicians to the risks smoking poses to oral and dental health.

  18. Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Owen N; Kontis, Theda C

    2016-10-01

    "Nonsurgical rhinoplasty" refers to the use of injectable temporary fillers used to augment select areas of the nose to achieve improved appearance or function in select patients. Nonpermanent fillers can be used safely and must be properly chosen based on their properties and the desired effect. In addition to proper patient and product selection, a thorough understanding of nasal anatomy, analysis of the deformity, and recommended injection techniques are absolutely necessary to obtain good outcomes and avoid complications. The proper plane for injection is the deep fatty layer, just superficial to the perichondrium and periosteum. Erring on the side of undercorrection, small incremental boluses, and constant reassessment are the best way to avoid overfilling or producing irregularities and asymmetries. The most devastating and feared complications are vascular compromise, tissue necrosis, and even blindness, making the nose a challenging area to treat with fillers. The surgeon wishing to use fillers in the nose should be familiar with proper technique, recognition of developing problems, and have a practical plan in place for immediate reversal and treatment. PMID:27680521

  19. Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Owen N; Kontis, Theda C

    2016-10-01

    "Nonsurgical rhinoplasty" refers to the use of injectable temporary fillers used to augment select areas of the nose to achieve improved appearance or function in select patients. Nonpermanent fillers can be used safely and must be properly chosen based on their properties and the desired effect. In addition to proper patient and product selection, a thorough understanding of nasal anatomy, analysis of the deformity, and recommended injection techniques are absolutely necessary to obtain good outcomes and avoid complications. The proper plane for injection is the deep fatty layer, just superficial to the perichondrium and periosteum. Erring on the side of undercorrection, small incremental boluses, and constant reassessment are the best way to avoid overfilling or producing irregularities and asymmetries. The most devastating and feared complications are vascular compromise, tissue necrosis, and even blindness, making the nose a challenging area to treat with fillers. The surgeon wishing to use fillers in the nose should be familiar with proper technique, recognition of developing problems, and have a practical plan in place for immediate reversal and treatment.

  20. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms. PMID:27602399

  1. [NONSURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION METHOD INTERDENTALLY PAPILLAE IN THE RESTATION OF APROXIMAL CAVITIES AS ONE OF THE STAGES OF REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZAD PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Obolonskaya, A A

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of missing papilla--the basis of modern concepts of objective treatment of dental diseases. Interproximal spaces are important anatomical structures, as are bulky in the mouth and repeated many times. Violation of relations between different structural elements increases the risk of inflammation in periodontitis. Patients with approximal caries posteriors and generalized periodontitis studied anthropometric parameters of the structures of the interdental spaces and their impact on the volume papilla before and after restoration, carried out with move a contact point to the apex. The results showed that the relationship between anthropometric data interdental had certain patterns in all groups surveyed. Important was a clear relationship between anthropometric indicators of basic elements of interdental spaces. In the absence of the interproximal papilla length (IPL) was on average 7.2 mm, the distance from the gingival margin to the proximal contact--3.9 mm and the horizontal distance between the roots at the enamel--cement border (HDR) reached 3.2 mm. Following the restoration with move a contact point to the apex to an average of 4.5 mm IPL, there was a significant increase in the interdental papillae. In the case of patients prior to treatment was determined by a thin biotype, the small width of attached gingival significant HDR--volume papilla week after restorations movement of the contact point to the root apex contact point is not increased. The results obtained require long-term studies for the possibility of forecasting the success of the restoration or preservation of the interdental papillae in the restoration of approximal cavities on the stages of rehabilitation of patients with generalized periodontitis. PMID:27089727

  2. [NONSURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION METHOD INTERDENTALLY PAPILLAE IN THE RESTATION OF APROXIMAL CAVITIES AS ONE OF THE STAGES OF REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZAD PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Obolonskaya, A A

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of missing papilla--the basis of modern concepts of objective treatment of dental diseases. Interproximal spaces are important anatomical structures, as are bulky in the mouth and repeated many times. Violation of relations between different structural elements increases the risk of inflammation in periodontitis. Patients with approximal caries posteriors and generalized periodontitis studied anthropometric parameters of the structures of the interdental spaces and their impact on the volume papilla before and after restoration, carried out with move a contact point to the apex. The results showed that the relationship between anthropometric data interdental had certain patterns in all groups surveyed. Important was a clear relationship between anthropometric indicators of basic elements of interdental spaces. In the absence of the interproximal papilla length (IPL) was on average 7.2 mm, the distance from the gingival margin to the proximal contact--3.9 mm and the horizontal distance between the roots at the enamel--cement border (HDR) reached 3.2 mm. Following the restoration with move a contact point to the apex to an average of 4.5 mm IPL, there was a significant increase in the interdental papillae. In the case of patients prior to treatment was determined by a thin biotype, the small width of attached gingival significant HDR--volume papilla week after restorations movement of the contact point to the root apex contact point is not increased. The results obtained require long-term studies for the possibility of forecasting the success of the restoration or preservation of the interdental papillae in the restoration of approximal cavities on the stages of rehabilitation of patients with generalized periodontitis.

  3. Estimate of CRP and TNF-alpha level before and after periodontal therapy in cardiovascular disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Pradeep; Durvasula, Satyanarayana; Palaparthy, Rajababu; Rao, Mukhesh; Sagar, Vidya; Reddy, Sunil Kumar; Lingam, Swapna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies show that individuals with periodontitis have a radically amplified threat to develop cardiovascular disease. CRP& TNF-α, are acute phase proteins monitored as a marker of inflammatory status, which have been identified as a major risk factor for atherosclerotic complications. Elevated CRP & TNF-α level in periodontitis patients have been reported by several groups. The present study was performed to determine whether presence of periodontitis and periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of CRP & TNF-α in cardiovascular disease patients. Methods Forty cardiovascular disease subjects participated in the study. They were classified into two groups. Group A (Control) where no periodontal treatment was given, Group B (Test) where periodontal treatment (scaling & root planing) was performed. Periodontal clinical parameters like OHI-S, probing pocket depth, were evaluated together with serum CRP, TNF-α, at baseline and reassessed after 8 weeks for all the subjects in both the groups. Results The CRP & TNF-α levels in both the groups decreased but the decrease in the Group A was minimal and was not statistically significant (P > 0.05); whereas in Group B where periodontal therapy was performed, there was statistically significant decrease. Conclusion It can be concluded from the study that there can be a possible causal relationship between pathogenesis of periodontal disease and CVD as inferred from the statistical significant outcome in the form of decreased inflammatory biomarkers after the periodontal treatment. PMID:24198887

  4. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  5. Effect of Supragingival Irrigation with Aerosolized 0.5% Hydrogen Peroxide on Clinical Periodontal Parameters, Markers of Systemic Inflammation, and Morphology of Gingival Tissues in Patients with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Žekonis, Gediminas; Žekonis, Jonas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Noreikienė, Viktorija; Balnytė, Ingrida; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Narbutaitė, Julija

    2016-01-01

    Background Various studies have shown that non-surgical periodontal treatment is correlated with reduction in clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide as maintenance therapy followed by non-surgical periodontal treatment on clinical parameters, plasma levels of inflammatory markers, and morphological changes in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods In total, 43 patients with chronic periodontitis were randomly allocated to long-term maintenance therapy. The patients’ periodontal status was assessed using clinical parameters of approximal plaque index, modified gingival index, bleeding index, pocket probing depth, and plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and white blood cell count) at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years. The morphological status of gingival tissues (immediately after supragingival irrigation) was assessed microscopically. Results Complete data were obtained on 34 patients. A highly statistically significant and consistent reduction was observed in all long-term clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Morphological data showed abundant spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. Conclusions 1. The present study showed that non-surgical periodontal treatment with long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide improved clinical periodontal status and plasma levels of inflammatory markers and may be a promising method in periodontology. 2. We found that supragingival irrigation with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide created large numbers of spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. PMID:27743448

  6. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G.; Galea, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Clinical Features: A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. Intervention: The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. Discussion: This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Summary: Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy. PMID:26816415

  7. Treatment modalities and evaluation models for periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad; Iqbal, Zeenat; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Sahni, Jasjeet K

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most common localized dental inflammatory disease related with several pathological conditions like inflammation of gums (gingivitis), degeneration of periodontal ligament, dental cementum and alveolar bone loss. In this perspective, the various preventive and treatment modalities, including oral hygiene, gingival irrigations, mechanical instrumentation, full mouth disinfection, host modulation and antimicrobial therapy, which are used either as adjunctive treatments or as stand-alone therapies in the non-surgical management of periodontal infections, have been discussed. Intra-pocket, sustained release systems have emerged as a novel paradigm for the future research. In this article, special consideration is given to different locally delivered anti-microbial and anti inflammatory medications which are either commercially available or are currently under consideration for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The various in vitro dissolution models and microbiological strain investigated to impersonate the infected and inflamed periodontal cavity and to predict the in vivo performance of treatment modalities have also been thrashed out. Animal models that have been employed to explore the pathology at the different stages of periodontitis and to evaluate its treatment modalities are enlightened in this proposed review. PMID:23373002

  8. Localized periodontal defect associated with unusual furcation involvement on a mandibular incisor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Intini, Giuseppe; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2013-10-01

    A localized periodontal defect associated with an unusual furcation on a mandibular central incisor and its treatment sequences are presented. A 54-year-old woman presented with a persistent localized periodontal defect, which was not responsive to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. An exploratory surgery revealed complete through and through furcation involvement on the right mandibular central incisor, resulting in a three-walled infrabony defect. Following thorough mechanical debridement and root planing, the infrabony aspect of the defect was grafted with freeze-dried bone allograft combined with the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB. The flaps were positioned to enable patient's home care and professional dental cleaning. Follow-up examination revealed uneventful healing and resolution of the infrabony periodontal defect. Clinicians should be aware of this unusual condition and consider it as a potential etiology when dealing with a persistent localized periodontal defect in the mandibular anterior sextant, which may not respond to the conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Eliminating the active disease as well as enabling careful maintenance and oral hygiene may prevent further deterioration and result in a stable long-term outcome preserving the compromised tooth. PMID:23878844

  9. The Effect of Orthodontic Therapy on Periodontal Health: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alfuriji, Samah; Alhazmi, Nora; Alhamlan, Nasir; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Alruwaithi, Moatazbellah; Alkatheeri, Nasser; Geevarghese, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This review aims to evaluate the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health. Data. Original articles that reported on the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health were included. The reference lists of potentially relevant review articles were also sought. Sources. A literature search was conducted using the databases, Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The search was carried out by using a combined text and the MeSH search strategies: using the key words in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “orthodontics” and “root resorption.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Articles published only in English language were included. Letters to the Editor, historical reviews and unpublished articles were not sought. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the present literature review, it was observed that there is a very close inter-relationship between the periodontal health and the outcome of orthodontic therapy. PMID:24991214

  10. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  11. Longitudinal effects of clinical therapy and the edentulous state on the transformation of lymphocytes from patients with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J J; Wright, W E; Chan, S P; Oppenheim, J J

    1978-01-01

    Twenty dentulous subjects undergoing clinical therapy for severe periodontitis were used to determine the longitudinal effects of bacterial plaque reduction in vitro lymphocyte transformation. The therapy consisted of either complete extractions or partial extractions and periodontal surgery combined with rigorous oral hygiene. Prior to therapy lymphocytes from these subjects responded significantly to Streptolysin O (SLO) but were not transformed significantly by solubilized dental plaque. However, after therapy lymphocytes from these same subjects responded significantly to both solubilized dental plaque and SLO. This indicates that the severe periodontitis patients were specifically unresponsive to solubilized dental plaque prior to therapy. The mechanism of the unresponsiveness is not clear, but probably does not involve serum factors because supplementation of the lymphocyte cultures with pooled homologous plasma from individuals with gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (instead of the patient's autologous plasma) did not significantly change the mean lymphocyte responses to solubilized dental plaque. In addition, lymphocytes from eleven long-term (5--18 yr) edentulous subjects, who were free of oral inflammation, were significantly transformed by solubilized dental plaque. The latter lymphocyte responses and those of the treated periodontitis patients could be due either to the presence of low levels of oral bacteria in the edentulous mouth or to the lymphocyte transformation assay being a measure of previous antigen sensitization rather than current disease status. In either case, lymphocyte transformation to solubilized dental plaque is not a useful diagnostic tool in periodontitis, but should continue to be a valuable research tool for investigating pathological mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:737903

  12. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for periodontal pockets: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribac, Valentin; Todea, Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    The applications of lasers in medicine, both in the field of diagnosis and treatment are gaining momentum. In dentistry in particular, numerous types of lasers with a wide range of characteristics are being utilized in all fields. In consequence, a lot of experience and knowledge has been gained in the last two decades in this domain; this resulted in the development of novel technologies and devices. A brief overview is made in the first part of this article on these topics. The treatment of periodontal disease with laser therapy is pointed out, as well as the photodynamic therapy which is using LLLT for the activation of the sensitizing gel that is introduced in the periodontal pockets. This paper reviews also the application of photodynamic therapy in clinical trials which have different results; a standardization of the protocol utilized for this procedure is concluded to be necessary.

  13. Regenerative periodontal therapy: 30 years of lessons learned and unlearned.

    PubMed

    Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we reflect upon advances and hindrances encountered over the last three decades in the development of strategies for periodontal regeneration. In this soul-searching pursuit we focus on revisiting lessons learned that should guide us in the quest for the reconstruction of the lost periodontium. We also examine beliefs and traditions that should be unlearned so that we can continue to advance the field. This learned/unlearned body of knowledge is consolidated into core principles to help us to develop new therapeutic approaches to benefit our patients and ultimately our society.

  14. Clinical observation of gene expression-guided chemoradiation therapy for nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients: a retrospective analysis of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Dai, Honghai; Lv, Dongxiao; Feng, A Lei; Shu, Weibin; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To make an informed choice of chemotherapy drugs according to the oncogene mRNA expression and to explore whether it could increase the survival rate of patients. Patients and methods The study retrospectively analyzed 36 cases of nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated at the Center for Oncology of Shandong Provincial Hospital from December 1, 2010, to November 1, 2013. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for the treatment with a conventional radiotherapy dose of 60–66 Gy. Chemotherapy started 1–5 weeks after radiation therapy. The selection of the chemotherapy drug was based on the mRNA expression levels of excision repair cross-complementation 1, thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. The objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were observed. Results The reason for poor prognosis of patients with high expression of excision repair cross-complementation 1 was unknown. No correlation was observed between patient survival and expression of thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 25, five, three, and three patients, respectively. The objective response rate was 83.3%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year progression-free survival rates were 79.8%, 58.9%, and 54.4%, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates were 83.3%, 68.1%, and 58.4%, respectively. Conclusion Selecting the chemotherapy drug according to the oncogene expression, combined with radiation therapy, could increase the 3-year survival rate in nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Such conclusion needs to be further confirmed using a larger sample size. PMID:27524911

  15. Levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid as potential markers of inflammation in patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt Doğan, Şeyma; Öngöz Dede, Figen; Ballı, Umut; Sertoğlu, Erdim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to evaluate GCF vaspin and omentin-1 levels after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study included 60 subjects: 15 systemically and periodontally healthy individuals, 15 periodontally healthy patients with T2DM, 15 systemically healthy patients with CP, and 15 patients with both CP and T2DM. GCF and clinical periodontal parameters were examined at the baseline and 6 weeks after periodontal therapy. Levels of vaspin, omentin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured by ELISA, and their relative ratios were calculated. GCF vaspin and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and decreased after therapy in the former (P < 0.025). GCF omentin-1 levels were significantly lower in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and increased after therapy in the former (P < 0.05). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the total amount of vaspin and TNF-α, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinical attachment level and gingival index, whereas the level of omentin-1 was negatively correlated with these parameters in all groups (P < 0.05). We found that non-surgical periodontal therapy influenced the GCF levels of both vaspin and omentin-1 in the CP groups. Our results suggest that the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in GCF could have potential application as inflammatory markers of diabetes, periodontal disease and treatment outcome. (J Oral Sci 58, 379-389, 2016). PMID:27665978

  16. Five-year comparative study on conventional and laser-assisted therapy of periimplantitis and periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Georg; Neckel, Claus P.

    2000-03-01

    Numerous groups have recommended the use of the diode laser to decontaminate infected root and implant surfaces. The aim of this study was to show the outcome after laser assisted and conventional therapy of periimplantitis and periodontitis administering approved treatment protocols. Between 1994 and 1999 a total of 50 patients with periimplantitis (20) and periodontitis (30) were treated in two groups each. Clinical, microbiological and radiographic evaluation was performed before and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after treatment. In addition to the conventional treatment protocol, flap surgery, the tooth or implant surface was decontaminated with a 810 nm diode laser using 1 Watt output for 20 sec (CW mode). All accessible surfaces were decontaminated at the follow up dates. In the periimplantitis group recurrence of the marker bacteria was higher and faster over time for the conventionally operated patients. Also the clinical and radiographic reevaluation showed significantly better results. The laser group of the periodontitis patients also showed significantly better outcome in terms of clinical evaluation, microbiological counts, radiographic evaluation and tooth loss. In comparison to other long term studies our results for the conventional therapy were adequate, the laser assisted therapy brought up significantly better and reproducible results.

  17. Effect of hyaluronan on periodontitis: A clinical and histological study

    PubMed Central

    Gontiya, Gauri; Galgali, Sushama R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Conventional, non-surgical periodontal therapy consists of supra- and subgingival tooth debridement. However, it is a technically demanding procedure and is not always efficient at eradicating all periodontal pathogens and in reducing inflammation. Therefore, local subgingival application of other chemotherapeutic agents may be used as an adjunct to non-surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histological outcomes of local subgingival application of 0.2% hyaluronic acid gel (GENGIGEL®) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty sites were chosen from 26 patients with chronic periodontitis (criteria being periodontal pockets ≥5mm). Experimental sites additionally received HA gel subgingivally at baseline, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd week. Clinical parameters were re-assessed at 4th, 6th, and 12th week. At 4th week recall, a gingival biopsy was obtained from test and control site for histologic examination. Results: Intra-group analysis of all the clinical parameters at all sites from baseline to 4th, 6th, and 12th week showed statistically significant changes. Experimental sites showed statistically significant improvement in Gingival index and Bleeding index at 6th and 12th week when compared with control sites. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in the PPD and RAL between control and experimental sites at 4th, 6th, and 12th week time interval. No statistically significant association was found between the histological grading of the sites that received HA treatment. Conclusion: Subgingival placement of 0.2% HA gel along with SRP provided a significant improvement in gingival parameters. However, no additional benefit was found in periodontal parameters. Histologically, experimental sites showed reduced inflammatory infiltrate, but it was not statistically significant. PMID:23055583

  18. Impact of Periodontal Therapy on the Subgingival Microbiota of Severe Periodontitis: Comparison between Good Responders and “Refractory” Subjects by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM)

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Ana Paula V.; Bennet, Susan; Cotton, Sean L.; Goodson, J. Max; Kent, Ralph; Haffajee, Anne D.; Socransky, Sigmund S.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Paster, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study compared the changes on the subgingival microbiota of subjects with “refractory” periodontitis (RP) or treatable periodontitis (GR) before and after periodontal therapy by using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Methods Individuals with chronic periodontitis were classified as RP (n=17) based on mean attachment loss (AL) and/or >3 sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after scaling and root planing, surgery and systemically administered amoxicillin and metronidazole or as GR (n=30) based on mean attachment gain and no sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after treatment. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and 15 months after treatment and analyzed for the presence of 300 species by HOMIM analysis. Significant differences in taxa before and after therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon test. Results The majority of species evaluated decreased in prevalence in both groups after treatment; however, only a small subset of organisms was significantly affected. Species that increased or persisted in high frequency in RP but were significantly reduced in GR included Bacteroidetes sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Tannerella forsythia, Dialister spp., Selenomonas spp., Catonella morbi, Eubacterium spp., Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus sp. OT113, Fusobacterium sp. OT203, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Streptococcus intermedius or Streptococcus constellatus and Shuttlesworthia satelles. In contrast, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Cardiobacterium hominis, Gemella haemolysans, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Kingella oralis, Lautropia mirabilis, Neisseria elongata, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus australis and Veillonella spp. were more associated with therapeutic success. Conclusion Persistence of putative and novel periodontal pathogens, as well as low prevalence of beneficial species was associated with chronic “refractory” periodontitis. PMID:22324467

  19. Natural History of Periodontitis and a Review of Technologies to Prevent and Treat It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antczak-Bouckoms, Alexia

    1994-01-01

    The classification scheme for periodontal diseases developed in 1989 is discussed, and technologies, both surgical and nonsurgical, for prevention, control, and regeneration of periodontal tissues are described and compared. Research needs are discussed. (MSE)

  20. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Warad, Shivaraj B.; Kolar, Sahana S.; Kalburgi, Veena; Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass) is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy. PMID:24991068

  1. Efficacy of a dentifrice and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract in conjunction with initial periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, M P; Powell, R N; Faddy, M J; Seymour, G J

    1997-02-01

    In the treatment of periodontal disease initial therapy aims at reducing marginal inflammation so allowing assessment of residual disease and further treatment options. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the use of a dentifrice and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract led to a more rapid resolution of gingival inflammation following initial therapy. Thirty-four subjects, randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, took part in this randomized double-blind parallel study. All subjects received initial therapy including oral hygiene instruction and scaling and root planing as required. One group also received an active dentifrice and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract (an antiplaque agent) and zinc chloride. The other group received a placebo dentifrice and oral rinse. The gingival index (GI), plaque index (PLI) and probing pocket depths (PD) were recorded at six sites per tooth at baseline, two weeks after initial therapy and six weeks after initial therapy. There was no significant difference between the groups for any of the parameters at the baseline examination. Two weeks following initial therapy both groups showed a statistically significant increase in the number of sites with PLI of 0 or 1 (p < 0.0001) and a statistically significant increase in the number of sites with a GI of 0 or 1 (that is, no bleeding on probing), (p < 0.0001). Also there was a statistically significant increase in the number of sites with probing depths < or = 3 mm (p < 0.0001) compared with baseline. These changes were maintained through to six weeks post therapy. There was no significant advantage to the sanguinaria group. Results demonstrate that initial therapy in the form of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing leads to a significant improvement in periodontal status which is maintained at least in the short term. Further, use of a dentifrice and oral rinse containing sanguinaria did not improve the efficacy of initial therapy.

  2. Periodontal Side Effect During Orthopedic Face Mask Therapy.

    PubMed

    Incerti-Parenti, Serena; Checchi, Vittorio; Molinari, Camilla; Alessandri-Bonetti, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old patient exhibited gingival recession of tooth #41 and severe plaque accumulation after 3 months of face mask therapy. The recession improved only slightly after appropriate oral hygiene instructions and motivation. Decisive improvement began when the vertical chin pad extension was reduced to avoid pressure on the affected area. PMID:27029093

  3. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  4. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Therapy for Chronic Periodontitis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Laura Marise; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Chorilli, Marlus; Giusti, Juçaíra Stella M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Fontana, Carla Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is increasingly being explored for treatment of periodontitis. Here, we investigated the effect of aPDT on human dental plaque bacteria in suspensions and biofilms in vitro using methylene blue (MB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles (MB-NP) and red light at 660 nm. The effect of MB-NP-based aPDT was also evaluated in a clinical pilot study with 10 adult human subjects with chronic periodontitis. Dental plaque samples from human subjects were exposed to aPDT—in planktonic and biofilm phases—with MB or MB-NP (25 µg/mL) at 20 J/cm2 in vitro. Patients were treated either with ultrasonic scaling and scaling and root planing (US + SRP) or ultrasonic scaling + SRP + aPDT with MB-NP (25 µg/mL and 20 J/cm2) in a split-mouth design. In biofilms, MB-NP eliminated approximately 25% more bacteria than free MB. The clinical study demonstrated the safety of aPDT. Both groups showed similar improvements of clinical parameters one month following treatments. However, at three months ultrasonic SRP + aPDT showed a greater effect (28.82%) on gingival bleeding index (GBI) compared to ultrasonic SRP. The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with MB may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial periodontal treatment. PMID:27213356

  5. In Situ Anabolic Activity of Periodontal Pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis in Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Ralee; Weigel, Kris M; Harrison, Peter L; Lee, KyuLim; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis are fastidious anaerobic bacteria strongly associated with chronic forms of periodontitis. Our understanding of the growth activities of these microorganisms in situ is very limited. Previous studies have shown that copy numbers of ribosomal-RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) of specific pathogen species relative to genomic-DNA (gDNA) of the same species (P:G ratios) are greater in actively growing bacterial cells than in resting cells. The method, so-called steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis, represents a novel culture-independent approach to study bacteria. This study employed this technique to examine the in situ growth activities of oral bacteria in periodontitis before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Sub-gingival paper-point samples were taken at initial and re-evaluation appointments. Pre-rRNA and gDNA levels of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were quantified and compared using reverse-transcriptase qPCR. The results indicate significantly reduced growth activity of P. gingivalis, but not F. alocis, after therapy. The P:G ratios of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were compared and a low-strength, but statistically significant inter-species correlation was detected. Our study demonstrates that steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis can be a valuable culture-independent approach to studying opportunistic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:27642101

  6. In Situ Anabolic Activity of Periodontal Pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, Ralee; Weigel, Kris M.; Harrison, Peter L.; Lee, KyuLim; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis are fastidious anaerobic bacteria strongly associated with chronic forms of periodontitis. Our understanding of the growth activities of these microorganisms in situ is very limited. Previous studies have shown that copy numbers of ribosomal-RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) of specific pathogen species relative to genomic-DNA (gDNA) of the same species (P:G ratios) are greater in actively growing bacterial cells than in resting cells. The method, so-called steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis, represents a novel culture-independent approach to study bacteria. This study employed this technique to examine the in situ growth activities of oral bacteria in periodontitis before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Sub-gingival paper-point samples were taken at initial and re-evaluation appointments. Pre-rRNA and gDNA levels of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were quantified and compared using reverse-transcriptase qPCR. The results indicate significantly reduced growth activity of P. gingivalis, but not F. alocis, after therapy. The P:G ratios of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were compared and a low-strength, but statistically significant inter-species correlation was detected. Our study demonstrates that steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis can be a valuable culture-independent approach to studying opportunistic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:27642101

  7. Oxygen high level laser therapy is efficient in treatment of chronic periodontitis: a clinical and microbiological study using PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Caccianiga, G; Rey, G; Paiusco, A; Lauritano, D; Cura, F; Ormianer, Z; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    In periodontology, lasers have been suggested for the photodynamic therapy (PDT). Such therapy can be defined as the inactivation of cells, microorganisms or molecules induced by light and not by heat. The aim of our study is to assess the effect of Oxygen high-level laser therapy (OHLLT) in removing all bacterial deposits on root or implant surface by means of mechanical instrumentation and laser irradiation. OHLLT has two effects on targeted bacteria and tissues, decontamination and biostimulation. A total of 33 patients were randomly selected with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. The patients enrolled were 16 females and 17 males, six smokers and 4 diabetic patients. For each patient a periodontal charting was performed, assessing probing depth, plaque index and bleeding on probing at baseline and after 6 months. Microbiological analysis were performed with PCR Real Time, using paper tips to withdraw gingival fluid in periodontal pockets before and after treatment, at baseline and after 6 months. All patients were treated with OHLLT at baseline, after 1 week, after 2 weeks and every month for 6 months. After 6 months, all periodontal pockets were treated successfully, without complications and no significant differences in results. All clinical parameters showed an improvement, with a decrease both of plaque index (average decrease of 75%), bleeding on probing (average decrease of 62%) and probing depth (average decrease of 1.8 mm). After the treatment, a remarkable decrease in bacteria amount, both for each species and for total bacteria was observed except for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis demonstrating that this laser protocol is effective on periodontitis treatment. OHLLT is efficient in treatment of chronic periodontitis as demonstrated by clinical and microbiological parameters, going beyond the traditional periodontal therapy.

  8. Oxygen high level laser therapy is efficient in treatment of chronic periodontitis: a clinical and microbiological study using PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Caccianiga, G; Rey, G; Paiusco, A; Lauritano, D; Cura, F; Ormianer, Z; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    In periodontology, lasers have been suggested for the photodynamic therapy (PDT). Such therapy can be defined as the inactivation of cells, microorganisms or molecules induced by light and not by heat. The aim of our study is to assess the effect of Oxygen high-level laser therapy (OHLLT) in removing all bacterial deposits on root or implant surface by means of mechanical instrumentation and laser irradiation. OHLLT has two effects on targeted bacteria and tissues, decontamination and biostimulation. A total of 33 patients were randomly selected with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. The patients enrolled were 16 females and 17 males, six smokers and 4 diabetic patients. For each patient a periodontal charting was performed, assessing probing depth, plaque index and bleeding on probing at baseline and after 6 months. Microbiological analysis were performed with PCR Real Time, using paper tips to withdraw gingival fluid in periodontal pockets before and after treatment, at baseline and after 6 months. All patients were treated with OHLLT at baseline, after 1 week, after 2 weeks and every month for 6 months. After 6 months, all periodontal pockets were treated successfully, without complications and no significant differences in results. All clinical parameters showed an improvement, with a decrease both of plaque index (average decrease of 75%), bleeding on probing (average decrease of 62%) and probing depth (average decrease of 1.8 mm). After the treatment, a remarkable decrease in bacteria amount, both for each species and for total bacteria was observed except for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis demonstrating that this laser protocol is effective on periodontitis treatment. OHLLT is efficient in treatment of chronic periodontitis as demonstrated by clinical and microbiological parameters, going beyond the traditional periodontal therapy. PMID:27469554

  9. Indications for laser therapy in diverse models of periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Erina, Stanislava V.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Lepechina, L. I.; Malinovskaya, L. A.; Chitrina, L. L.

    1996-11-01

    Parodontal diseases have an immunological pathogenic mechanism leading to various manifestations and can not be referred to as a common inflammation. The home and foreign research points at active and immunological reaction with the following distraction surrounding tissues of the tooth. Histochemical and biochemical examinations show metabolic disturbances of parodontal tissues. A total sample size of 604 people suffering from average height of chronic generalized parodontitis was examined in the survey. Immunological and histochemical tests were taken before and after a course of laser therapy with the use of helium-neon laser 'YAGODA', an inhibitory and stimulating dosage irradiations and anti-inflammatory dosage irradiations with infrared laser 'UZOR'. We selected a group of patients with the decreased local immunological status on the ground of immunological tests. Histochemical tests shaped the next group with the passive and active forms of parodontitis pathology. The tests data resulted in a method of laser therapy. The investigations confirm that the chronic generalized parodontitis has a shift in tissue immunity of the oral cavity and cell-bound metabolic disturbance of gum epithelium. It is expedient to use the anti-inflammatory dosage irradiations with infrared laser 'UZOR' to correct immunity, and in case of and active process to realize the DNA and RNA synthesis by means of increasing the irradiation with the apparatus 'YAGODA'. The irradiation decreases in case of a passive process.

  10. Guided tissue regeneration and GTAM for periodontal regenerative therapy, ridge augmentation and dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, E S; Cutler, S A

    1992-01-01

    In dentistry, the goals of regenerative therapy are to gain new attachment around natural teeth, improve the aesthetics and ridge form in cases of collapsed or deformed ridges and increase the amount of available bone for osseointegrated implants. The purpose of this paper is to describe the dental and periodontal applications of the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided tissue augmentation material (GTAM) therapy. Successful results can be achieved around periodontally diseased natural teeth, however, the procedures are not fully predictable at this time. Correct membrane placement and proper choice of defect configuration in the use of GTR can enhance clinical attempts to gain new attachment. Regenerative therapy can be utilized to augment edentulous ridges and improve ridge-pontic relationships as well as improve aesthetics in ridge abnormalities. Edentulous ridges augmented by GTR can have increased amount of bone height and width for endosseous implant placement. In areas where non-mobile implant fixtures have lost some osseous support, GTR has demonstrated successful gain of new bone support.

  11. Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Treatment Response in Primary and Permanent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    MERCHANT, SHERIN. N.; VOVK, ANDREA.; KALASH, DANNY.; HOVENCAMP, NICOLE; AUKHIL, IKRAMUDDIN.; HARRISON, PETER; ZAPERT, EDWARD; BIDWELL, JOHN; VARNADO, PHYLLIS; SHADDOX, LUCIANA. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The comparative treatment response of children and young adults with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) affecting primary and permanent dentition is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of non-surgical periodontal therapy with adjunctive systemic antibiotics on the clinical outcome of children/young adults with primary versus permanent dentition affected by LAP. Methods A cohort of 97 African-American participants between the ages of 5–21 (30M; 66F; 22 primary and 75 permanent dentition affected), diagnosed with LAP were included. Patients presented with no significant medical history. All patients underwent periodontal therapy, which consisted of full mouth mechanical debridement at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 month appointments. Additionally, all patients were prescribed a one-week regimen of systemic antibiotics at the initial appointment. Clinical parameters were analyzed, including probing depth (PD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and percentage of visible plaque. Results Overall, periodontal therapy was found to be effective in improving the clinical outcomes of both primary and permanent dentitions. Although baseline CAL were similar between the groups, the reductions in mean CAL at 3, 6 and 12 months as well as reduction in % Plaque at 3 months were significantly greater in primary dentition as compared to permanent dentition. Conclusions Non-surgical therapy with systemic antibiotics is effective for LAP in both primary and permanent dentitions. A greater reduction in CAL in LAP of primary dentition may suggest that younger children may carry a greater propensity for positive treatment outcomes and healing potential as compared to children/young adults with permanent dentition. PMID:25186780

  12. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy minimizes the deleterious effect of nicotine in female rats with induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Erivan Clementino; Theodoro, Letícia Helena; Longo, Mariellén; Novaes, Vivian Cristina Noronha; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; Ervolino, Edilson; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of experimentally induced periodontitis in female rats that were systemically treated with or without nicotine. Female rats (n = 180) were divided into two groups: vehicle administration (Veh) and nicotine administration (Nic). Mini-pumps containing either vehicle or nicotine were implanted in the rats 30 days before the induction of experimental periodontitis (EP). EP was induced by placing a cotton ligature around the left mandibular first molar. After 7 days, the ligature was removed, and the rats were randomly divided into three treatment subgroups: SRP (only SRP), DL (SRP plus diode laser), and aPDT (SRP plus aPDT). The aPDT consisted of phenothiazine photosensitizer deposition followed by diode laser irradiation. Ten rats from each subgroup were euthanized at 7, 15, and 30 days after treatment. Alveolar bone loss (ABL) in the furcation region was evaluated using histological, histometric, and immunohistochemical analyses. The rats that were treated with nicotine showed more ABL compared to those treated with vehicle. In both the Veh and Nic groups, SRP plus aPDT treatment resulted in reduced ABL, smaller numbers of both TRAP- and RANKL-positive cells, and higher numbers of PCNA-positive cells compared to SRP treatment alone. aPDT was an effective adjunctive therapy for the treatment of periodontitis in female rats regardless of whether they received nicotine.

  13. Comparison of cisplatinum/paclitaxel with cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil as first-line therapy for nonsurgical locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guofang; Wang, Zhehai; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Qingqing; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liyan; Han, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    group B. Cisplatinum/paclitaxel can be considered a good candidate chemotherapy regimen for patients with locally advanced ESCC who are being treated with nonsurgical therapy. PMID:27445460

  14. Changes in Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis Following Periodontal Flap Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, T.; Anilkumar, K.; Ambalavanan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess changes in Transforming Growth Factor– β1 (TGF-β1) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and examine correlation of TGF-β1 levels and periodontal parameters: probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) in sites with chronic periodontitis at various time intervals before and after periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods: The effects of non-surgical and surgical therapy on periodontal parameters and GCF TGF-β1 levels in 18 sites affected with chronic periodontitis were assessed upto 6 weeks post conventional flap surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Baseline. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Pre-surgery and flap surgery performed. GCF was collected from all sites at Two Weeks Post-surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Six Weeks Post-surgery. The concentration of TGF-β1 in GCF was determined using a human TGF-β1 enzyme immunometric assay kit. Results: Mean TGF-β1 concentrations were significantly reduced at Pre-surgery, at Two Weeks Post-surgery and at Six Weeks Post-surgery (p<0.05) when compared to Baseline TGF-β1 values. There was a statistically significant reduction in PPD and gain in CAL following non-surgical and surgical therapy when compared to baseline (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results indicate that TGF-β1 may play a role in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of periodontal disease and could be considered as a disease predictive biomarker. PMID:25859517

  15. Periodontal Therapy and Systemic Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; Foz, Adriana Moura; Rabelo, Mariana de Sousa; Gomes, Giovane Hisse; Orlandi, Marco; Suvan, Jean; D’Aiuto, Francesco; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of periodontal therapy (PT) on serum levels of inflammatory markers in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods of Study Selection A literature search was carried out using MEDLINE via Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases. Randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) evaluating the effect of PT on systemic inflammatory markers were deemed eligible. Case series (CS), reports and pilot trials were excluded. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s risk assessment tool. Meta-analysis was carried out using random effect methods. Results The search strategy identified 3,164 potential studies of which 61 were assessed for eligibility and 9 (6 RCTs and 3 CCTs) were included in this systematic review. Three RCTs were classified by the authors as being at low risk of bias and three were “unclear” and classified as uncertain risk of bias. All CCTs were considered to be at a high risk of bias. The meta-analysis showed a statistically significant mean difference (MD) for TNF- α (-1.33 pg/ml, 95% CI: -2.10; -0.56, p<0.001) and CRP (-1.28 mg/l, 95% CI: -2.07; - 0.48, p<0.001) favoring periodontal intervention versus control. Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that PT reduces serum levels of TNF- α and CRP in T2DM individuals. The decrease of inflammatory burden has important implications for metabolic control and can, in part, explain the mechanisms linking periodontitis and increased risk for complications in people with T2DM. PMID:26010492

  16. The use of diffuse laser photonic energy and indocyanine green photosensitiser as an adjunct to periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Parker, S

    2013-08-01

    Light-activated chemical therapy - generally known as photodynamic therapy (PDT) - has been developed within medicine, to allow the use of an applied agent (photosensitiser) that could be activated using laser photonic energy, leading to the destruction of target cellular structures. In clinical dentistry, PDT has been utilised within a wide scope of topical application in endodontic, periodontal and oral epithelial pathology where specifically, anti-bacterial action may prove useful. Underlying the complex and multi-factorial aetiology, periodontal disease remains of essentially-bacterial origin and anti-bacterial PDT (aPDT) has been investigated as an adjunctive to other periodontal treatment therapies. Of several topically-applied photosensitisers, one agent, indocyanine green, may be activated using a diode laser wavelength (810 nm) that is commonly-available in clinical dental practice, to provide generalised bacteriocidal effect. Unlike antibiotics and antibacterial mouthwashes, the mode of action appears to be nonspecific to bacterial species and is linked to cell death through a process of oxidative stress. Additionally, indocyanine green has otherwise low toxicity to non-target host tissue and dental restorative materials. This paper explores the background to this therapy, its position within the broader delivery of periodontal treatment and the specific application of indocyanine green in clinical dental practice.

  17. [Complete dental care of patients suffering from localized aggressive periodontitis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt; Nemes, Júlia; Nyárasdy, Ida

    2015-12-01

    A 34 years old male patient was referred to our clinic for restorative dental treatment. During detailed consultation and dental examination a relatively rare form of periodontal disease had been diagnosed. Intraoral examination included recording of dental and periodontal status. Based on patient's dental history, measurements of probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and also the X-ray findings, Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP) unknown by the patient was diagnosed. After patient's consent the comprehensive treatment plan covered the dental prevention, periodontal non-surgical and surgical therapy and rehabilitation. The treatment started with oral hygienic instruction, motivation then supra- and subgingival scaling and rootplaning. Later extraction and elective root canal treatment were performed, followed by open flap periodontal surgery combined with hemisection of two molars. After a full mouth conservative restorative therapy, function and esthetics were restored by fix dental prostheses. This case is a good example to underline the importance of periodontal examination during the dental screening and dental status recording for each patients showing up at dental clinics. Otherwise in many cases this asympthomatic disease can remain undetected. PMID:26863818

  18. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance.

  19. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance. PMID:22311659

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of clindamycin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing therapy in chronic periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Pejčić, Ana; Kojović, Draginja; Minić, Ivan; Mirković, Dimitrije; Denić, Marko; Stojanović, Mariola

    2015-03-01

    Clindamycin, a lincosamide antibiotic, has been under-recognized as an antimicrobial agent for use in dentistry. The aim of the present work was to evaluate clinical efficacy of 2% clindamycin gel in addition to the basic mechanical periodontal therapy. At baseline, scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed at all 50 subjects (control group and test group). Clindamycin gel was applied after SRP only in the test group. Clinical measurements including periodontal pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and plaque index (PI) were done at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Compared to baseline, the PPD and CAL values significantly decreased in the test group (p < 0.05) and were statistically lower (p < 0.05) compared to control group. PPD reduction of 2.42 mm was obtained in the test group and could be generally considered as clinically significant. A PPD reduction greater than 2 mm indicated that clindamycin gel could be used efficiently as an adjunct to SRP. Also, between-group difference in BOP and PI scores was statistically significant 6 months after treatment. In conclusion, the application of clindamycin gel in combination with SRP enhanced the efficacy of non surgical periodontal therapy in reducing pocket depth and improving attachment levels in chronic periodontitis subjects and had additional benefits over mechanical therapy alone. PMID:26058242

  1. Local Drug Delivery Systems in the Treatment of Periodontitis: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Da Rocha, Huberth Alexandre Júnior; Silva, Camila Ferreira; Santiago, Fernanda Lopes; Martins, Ludiele Gonçalves; Dias, Pâmella Coelho; De Magalhães, Denildo

    2015-07-01

    In order to complement non-surgical therapy in periodontitis, there are multiple options of antimicrobials, such as metronidazole, chlorhexidine, minocycline, doxycycline and tetracycline, which can be locally delivered into the mucosa. These drugs are used in periodontal pockets and can inhibit or eliminate periodontopathogenic microorganisms as well as modulate the inflammatory response of tissues. However, limited data are available concerning the relationship between effect, efficacy and clinical status of the periodontium. This review aims to evaluate the effect and the efficacy of five types of local drug delivery systems in clinical parameters of periodontology. Researched papers using MEDLINE via PubMed, and LILACS databases related to five types of local drug delivery systems as chlorhexidine gluconate, doxycycline hyclate, metronidazole gel, minocycline ointment and tetracycline fibers, were reviewed aiming to address the mechanism of action and the evidence of clinical effectiveness of adjunctive use of these antimicrobials following surgical and/or non-surgical therapies. Inclusion criteria defined that articles must be randomized controlled trials performed in humans and published between 1996 and 2014. The adjunctive use of local drug delivery systems with controlled release properties may provide a defined, but limited, beneficial response on periodontal pockets. Furthermore, local drug delivery as an active treatment or maintenance therapy depends on clinical findings, responses to treatment described in the literature, desired clinical outcomes, and patients' dental and medical histories, including their past usage of antimicrobials. PMID:26373225

  2. Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

  3. Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Monheit, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Facial rejuvenation has evolved from purely surgical to the use of nonsurgical techniques such as lasers and injectable fillers and toxins. This has occurred as a product of consumer demand for less down time and risk, as well as a new scientific knowledge of facial aging. A review of patient consultation evaluation and use of injectable products will be discussed in this chapter.

  4. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sgolastra, Fabrizio; Petrucci, Ambra; Gatto, Roberto; Marzo, Giuseppe; Monaco, Annalisa

    2013-02-01

    This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy used alone or adjunctive to scaling root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. The meta-analysis was conducted according to the QUOROM statement and recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. An extensive literature search was performed on seven databases, followed by a manual search. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for clinical attachment level, probing depth and gingival recession. The I(2) test was used for inter-study heterogeneity; visual asymmetry inspection of the funnel plot, Egger's regression test and the trim-and-fill method were used to investigate publication bias. At 3 months, significant differences in clinical attachment level (p = 0.006) and probing depth reduction (p = 0.02) were observed for scaling root planing with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, while no significant differences were retrieved for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy used alone; at 6 months no significant differences were observed for any investigated outcome. Neither heterogeneity nor publication bias was detected. The use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy adjunctive to conventional treatment provides short-term benefits, but microbiological outcomes are contradictory. There is no evidence of effectiveness for the use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as alternative to scaling root planing. Long-term randomized controlled clinical trials reporting data on microbiological changes and costs are needed to support the long-term efficacy of adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and the reliability of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as alternative treatment to scaling root planing.

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy of a new oral gel as an adjunct to home oral hygiene in the management of chronic periodontitis. A microbiological study using PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Bignozzi, C A; Pazzi, D; Palmieri, A; Gaudio, R M; Di Muzio, M; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The use of chemical devices for non-surgical periodontal therapy has led to new treatment strategies aiming primarily at infection control and oral bacterial load. Over the last few decades adjunctive chemical devices has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of a new oral gel named Parodongel on the red complex organisms using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for microbiological analysis. A total of 10 patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis in the age group >25 years, were selected. None of these patients had received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and demonstrated radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. Four non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient for monitoring based on criteria that the sites will localize chronic periodontitis. Microbial analysis (MA) was performed at baseline and at day 15. Paired T-Test was used to detect statistical significant reduction of specific bacteria. The results showed statistically significant reduction of the overall bacterial loading and Treponema Denticola from baseline to day 15. Parodongel can be used as an effective local drug delivery together with oral home care in treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27469558

  6. Training of Dental Professionals in Motivational Interviewing can Heighten Interdental Cleaning Self-Efficacy in Periodontal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woelber, Johan P.; Spann-Aloge, Narin; Hanna, Gilgamesh; Fabry, Goetz; Frick, Katrin; Brueck, Rigo; Jähne, Andreas; Vach, Kirstin; Ratka-Krüger, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success of periodontal therapy depends on the adherence of patients to professional recommendations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a workshop in motivational interviewing (MI) on non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by dental students. Materials and Methods: In the experimental group patients with periodontitis were treated by students trained in MI, while in the control group patients were treated by students who had not been trained in MI. Clinical oral parameters were assessed by a blinded periodontist in addition to the evaluation of psychological questionnaires given before and after the non-surgical periodontal treatment (6 months). Conversations between patients and students were recorded and rated with the Motivational Treatment Integrity Code (MITI-d) by a blinded psychologist. Results: There were 73 patients in the MI group and 99 patients in the control group. The MI group showed significantly higher scores in the MITI-d analysis. Regression analysis showed that there were no significant differences between groups with regard to plaque level, gingival bleeding, pocket depth reduction or bleeding upon probing. However, patients in the MI-group showed significantly higher interdental cleaning self-efficacy than patients in the control group (MI = 19.57 ± 4.7; control = 17.38 ± 6.01; p = 0.016). Conclusion: Teaching MI to dental students resulted in a significant improvement in the self-efficacy of interdental cleaning in patients compared to a control group of non-trained students, but no improvement in other aspects of non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study also showed that an 8-h workshop with supervision significantly improved the MI-compliant conversations of dental students without requiring more conversation time. PMID:26941698

  7. [Risks and side effects of periodontitis therapy. Focus on restorative possibilities for improving esthetic defects].

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the prophylaxis and therapy of periodontitis is the establishment and the preservation of the secondary oral health. Thereby, the main expected outcomes are the reduction of inflammation and probing pocket depths. During the healing process, some tissue shrinkage during the reparative process and healing is inevitable in most cases and leads to more or less pronounced recession. The latter can cause subsequent secondary side effects due to dentin exposure, which appear - in most cases - unwanted and negative, i. e. hypersensitivity, increased caries risk, erosion and abrasion of the exposed dentin. These pathologic conditions may also encounter esthetic and functional impairments. The aim of this article is to elucidate and discuss these potential clinical pitfalls and their minimal-invasive management, especially when using adhesive strategies using composite resin materials.

  8. Commentary: Is There Clinical Benefit From Using a Diode or Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Laser in the Treatment of Periodontitis?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Charles M

    2016-10-01

    Despite a quarter of a century of laser research, there is a persistent debate regarding the efficacy of dental lasers in the treatment of periodontitis or periodontal maintenance therapy. There are many claims and much hyperbole surrounding the use of lasers, either as a monotherapy or adjunctive to scaling and root planing, to treat periodontitis. There is little evidence that using a diode or neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser adds clinical value over and above conventional non-surgical or surgical periodontal treatment. There is a significant need for better designed human clinical trials. Data from such trials should be analyzed according to initial probing depth and characteristics of the treated sites, such as non-molar, molar flat surfaces, and molar furcations, and evaluated for long-term post-treatment results. PMID:27181116

  9. Commentary: Is There Clinical Benefit From Using a Diode or Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Laser in the Treatment of Periodontitis?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Charles M

    2016-10-01

    Despite a quarter of a century of laser research, there is a persistent debate regarding the efficacy of dental lasers in the treatment of periodontitis or periodontal maintenance therapy. There are many claims and much hyperbole surrounding the use of lasers, either as a monotherapy or adjunctive to scaling and root planing, to treat periodontitis. There is little evidence that using a diode or neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser adds clinical value over and above conventional non-surgical or surgical periodontal treatment. There is a significant need for better designed human clinical trials. Data from such trials should be analyzed according to initial probing depth and characteristics of the treated sites, such as non-molar, molar flat surfaces, and molar furcations, and evaluated for long-term post-treatment results.

  10. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Srividya

    2016-01-01

    As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as “erratic healing,” may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications. PMID:27807485

  11. Azithromycin buccal patch in treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Sajith Abdul; Vandana, K. L.; Thimmashetty, J.; Dalvi, Priyanka Jairaj

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to explore the clinical, microbiological, and biochemical impact of azithromycin (AZM) buccal patch in chronic generalized patients as a monotherapy as well as an adjunct to nonsurgical therapy. Materials and Methods: A parallel design was used forty periodontitis patients were randomly allocated into five groups, namely Group 1 scaling root planing (SRP) alone, Group 2 (SRP + AZM patch group), Group 3 (SRP + AZM tablet group), Group 4 (AZM patch monotherapy), and Group 5 (AZM tablet as monotherapy). Plaque index, gingival bleeding index, modified gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline and 21 and 90 days. Subgingival pooled plaque sample was collected to assess periodontopathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) by anaerobic culture method. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was also evaluated at baseline and 21 days. Periodontal maintenance was performed in Group 1 until 90th day, and clinical parameter was assessed at the end of 90th day. Results: SRP + AZM tablets showed greater reduction in clinical parameters (P < 0.05) AZM as monotherapy did not offer clinical benefits over SRP. Baseline data were compared at the end, i.e., 90th day a significant reduction in plaque scores, gingival bleeding, and PPD was observed however no significant gain in the clinical attachment was observed. Conclusion: The monotherapy resulted in no improvement of periodontal parameters, microbial parameters, and TNF-α level. It is safe to use AZM + SRP as a mode of nonsurgical treatment in periodontitis patients. PMID:27127325

  12. Nonsurgical Interventions for Peyronie's Disease: Update as of 2016.

    PubMed

    Joice, Gregory A; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-08-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a debilitating condition of the penis that leads to significant pain, erectile dysfunction, and emotional distress in men. PD is likely underreported due to lack of knowledge of the disease and the absence of well-established available treatments. Surgical treatment can lead to sustained improvements, but is often associated with penile shortening and places the patient at risk for perioperative morbidity. Nonsurgical management has been studied for several years as an alternative to surgery for men with PD. Currently, much of the data on nonsurgical management is conflicting, with only one treatment that has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Significant effort has been devoted to advancing non-surgical treatments for PD that can be implemented outside of the operating room. This review aims to describe the research behind current nonsurgical therapies for PD and to highlight the recent advances that have been made within the last three years. PMID:27574590

  13. Nonsurgical Interventions for Peyronie's Disease: Update as of 2016

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a debilitating condition of the penis that leads to significant pain, erectile dysfunction, and emotional distress in men. PD is likely underreported due to lack of knowledge of the disease and the absence of well-established available treatments. Surgical treatment can lead to sustained improvements, but is often associated with penile shortening and places the patient at risk for perioperative morbidity. Nonsurgical management has been studied for several years as an alternative to surgery for men with PD. Currently, much of the data on nonsurgical management is conflicting, with only one treatment that has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Significant effort has been devoted to advancing non-surgical treatments for PD that can be implemented outside of the operating room. This review aims to describe the research behind current nonsurgical therapies for PD and to highlight the recent advances that have been made within the last three years. PMID:27574590

  14. Thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Gurwith, Meredith M P; Dobromirski, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with cancer and cancer patients requiring non-surgical therapy are considered as non-surgical cancer patients and are at moderate to high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE): approximately 10-30% of these patients may develop asymptomatic or symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and the latter is a leading contributor to deaths in hospital. Other medical conditions associated with a high risk of VTE include cardiac disease, respiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Pre-disposing risk factors in non-surgical cancer patients include a history of VTE, immobilisation, history of metastatic malignancy, complicating infections, increasing age, obesity hormonal or antiangiogenic therapies, thalidomide and lenalidomide therapy. Heparins, both unfractionated (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux have been shown to be effective agents in prevention of VTE in the medical setting with patients having a history of cancer. UFH and LMWH along with semuloparin also have a role in outpatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. However, it has not yet been possible to demonstrate a significant effect on mortality rates in this population. UFH has a higher rate of bleeding complications than LMWH. Thromboprophylaxis has been shown to be effective in medical patients with cancer and may have an effect on cancer outcomes. Thromboprophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy remains controversial and requires further investigation. There is no evidence for the use of aspirin, warfarin or mechanical methods. We recommend either LMWH, or fondaparinux for the prevention of VTE in cancer patients with acute medical illnesses and UFH for those with significant severe renal impairment. For ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy we recommend LMWH or semuloparin. These are safe and effective agents in the thromboprophylaxis of non-surgical cancer

  15. Non-surgical management of peri-implant diseases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit

    2014-08-01

    There are similarities between peri-implant diseases and periodontal diseases in terms of aetiology, pathogenesis and management. Patients with a past history of periodontitis are at greater risk of peri-implantitis and it is essential in partially dentate patients to ensure that control of periodontitis has been achieved before implants are placed. Careful maintenance and monitoring of implant patients should be performed on a regular basis to identify, at the earliest opportunity, the clinical and radiographic markers of peri-implant disease. Good self-performed biofilm control and professional maintenance of implants is essential to prevent the onset of peri-implant diseases. Once peri-implantitis has become established, it can initially be managed non-surgically, although surgical intervention may be required for more severe lesions. PMID:25198642

  16. Plasma levels of N-telopeptide of Type I collagen in periodontal health, disease and after treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, Ganganna

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine plasma concentrations of bone resorption marker cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide (NTx) of Type I collagen in periodontal health, disease and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis group. In addition, to know the association between plasma NTx levels and the different clinical parameters. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were divided on the basis of their periodontal status and were categorized as Group I: Healthy, Group II: Gingivitis, and Group III: Chronic periodontitis. Group III subjects were treated with scaling and root planing, 6-8 weeks later blood samples were analyzed, and they constituted Group IV. NTx levels in plasma were analyzed by competitive - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS) (α = 0.05). Results: All the samples tested positive for the presence of NTx. The mean NTx concentration was highest in Group III (18.77 nanomole Bone Collagen Equivalent [nm BCE]) and the lowest in Group IV (16.02 nm BCE). The values of Group I and Group II fell between the highest and the lowest values (16.23 nm BCE and 16.70 nm BCE, respectively). The difference in mean NTx levels in Group III and Group IV were statistically significant. NTx levels in all the groups positively correlated with the clinical parameters. All data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS) (α = 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it may be suggested that plasma NTx levels may provide distinguishing data between periodontally healthy diseased sites and after nonsurgical therapy of diseased sites. PMID:26962311

  17. Nonsurgical Management of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Jaime A; Hresko, M Timothy; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric patient visits for spinal deformity are common. Most of these visits are for nonsurgical management of scoliosis, with approximately 600,000 visits for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) annually. Appropriate management of scoliotic curves that do not meet surgical indication parameters is essential. Renewed enthusiasm for nonsurgical management of AIS (eg, bracing, physical therapy) exists in part because of the results of the Bracing in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Trial, which is the only randomized controlled trial available on the use of bracing for AIS. Bracing is appropriate for idiopathic curves between 20° and 40°, with successful control of these curves reported in >70% of patients. Patient adherence to the prescribed duration of wear is essential to maximize the effectiveness of the brace. The choice of brace type must be individualized according to the deformity and the patient's personality as well as the practice setting and brace availability. PMID:27388720

  18. POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY OF SILICA DIOXIDE COLLOIDAL SOLUTIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS: A CASE CONTROL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Cura, F; Gaudio, R M; Pezzetti, F; Andreasi Bassi, M; Carinci, F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of supportive periodontal therapy [i.e. scaling and rooth planing (SRP)] alone versus a chemical silica dioxide (SiO2) colloidal solution (SDCS) device used in association with SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in adult patients. A total of 20 patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis (40 localized chronic periodontitis sites) in the age group of 35 to 55 were selected. None of these patients had previously received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and had radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. Two non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient to monitorize treatment efficacy (split mouth design). Clinical pocket depth (PD) and microbial analysis (MA) were analyzed at baseline and on 15th day. SPSS program and paired simple statistic t-test were used to detect significant differences. Total bacteria loading, Tannerella forsitia and Treponema denticola loading were statistically reduced when SiO2 was locally delivered. SDCS gel is an adjuvant therapy which should be added to SRP in the management of moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. PMID:26511193

  19. Rotary instruments in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study aimed at comparing the effectiveness of rotary instruments with hand instruments in non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight patients with chronic periodontitis, enrolled to this randomized, controlled clinical trial, were divided into two groups. Patients in the control group received scaling and root planing with hand instruments, whereas patients in the test group received treatment with rotary instruments. Clinical assessment by plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level was made prior to and at 6 months after treatment. Differences in the clinical parameters were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: Both treatments resulted in a significant improvement in all clinical recordings, but no differences in any of the investigated parameters were observed at baseline between the two groups. Conclusion: Non-surgical periodontal therapy with the tested rotary instruments may lead to clinical improvements comparable to those obtained with conventional hand instruments. PMID:24554884

  20. Results From the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) Study: A Pilot Multicentered, Randomized, Controlled Trial to Study Effects of Periodontal Therapy in a Secondary Prevention Model of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D.; Moss, Kevin; Mendoza, Luisito; Paquette, David W.; Barrow, David A.; Couper, David J.; Stewart, Dawn D.; Falkner, Karen L.; Graham, Susan P.; Grossi, Sara; Gunsolley, John C.; Madden, Theresa; Maupome, Gerardo; Trevisan, Maurizio; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background In the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study, periodontal therapy was provided as an intervention in a secondary cardiac event prevention model through five coordinated cardiac– dental centers. Methods Subjects were randomized to either community care or protocol provided scaling and root planing to evaluate effects on periodontal status and systemic levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Results After 6 months, there was a significant reduction in mean probing depth and extent of 4- or 5-mm pockets. However, there were no significant differences in attachment levels, bleeding upon probing, or extent of subgingival calculus comparing subjects assigned to protocol therapy (n = 151) to those assigned to community care (n = 152). Using intent-to-treat analyses, there was no significant effect on serum hs-CRP levels at 6 months. However, 48% of the subjects randomized to community care received preventive or periodontal treatments. Secondary analyses demonstrated that consideration of any preventive or periodontal care (i.e., any treatment) compared to no treatment showed a significant reduction in the percentage of people with elevated hs-CRP (values >3 mg/l) at 6 months. However, obesity nullified the periodontal treatment effects on hs-CRP reduction. The adjusted odds ratio for hs-CRP levels >3 mg/l at 6 months for any treatment versus no treatment among non-obese individuals was 0.26 (95%confidence interval: 0.09 to 0.72), adjusting for smoking, marital status, and gender. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the critical role of considering obesity as well as rigorous preventive and periodontal care in trials designed to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:19186958

  1. Future dentistry: cell therapy meets tooth and periodontal repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Catón, Javier; Bostanci, Nagihan; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; De Bari, Cosimo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based tissue repair of the tooth and – tooth-supporting – periodontal ligament (PDL) is a new attractive approach that complements traditional restorative or surgical techniques for replacement of injured or pathologically damaged tissues. In such therapeutic approaches, stem cells and/or progenitor cells are manipulated in vitro and administered to patients as living and dynamic biological agents. In this review, we discuss the clonogenic potential of human dental and periodontal tissues such as the dental pulp and the PDL and their potential for tooth and periodontal repair and/or regeneration. We propose novel therapeutic approaches using stem cells or progenitor cells, which are targeted to regenerate the lost dental or periodontal tissue. PMID:21199329

  2. Initial serum antibody titer to Porphyromonas gingivalis influences development of antibody avidity and success of therapy for chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, J; Adonogianaki, E; Riggio, M P; Takahashi, K; Haerian, A; Kinane, D F

    1995-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of periodontal therapy on specific serum antibody concentration, expressed as titer, and antibody binding strength, expressed as relative avidity. The immune responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were investigated. Antibody titer was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and relative avidity was measured by thiocyanate elution in 17 adult periodontitis patients before and after therapy. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) avidities (expressed as thiocyanate molarity) to P. gingivalis increased from 1.01 to 1.38 M (P = 0.05) and IgA titers (expressed as ELISA units [EU]) increased from 89 to 237 EU (P = 0.012). There were no significant changes in avidity to A. actinomycetemcomitans, but the titer of all three immunoglobulin classes increased significantly (P < 0.03). More specifically, when patients were divided into subgroups which had originally been either IgG seropositive (i.e., having an IgG titer to this organism > 2 times the control median) or seronegative for P. gingivalis, only patients who were initially seropositive showed a significant increase in antibody avidity (P = 0.026; mean difference, 0.69 M). Patients who were originally seropositive in terms of IgG and IgA titer to P. gingivalis had demonstrably better treatment outcomes in terms of a reduced number of deep pockets and sites which bled on probing (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that periodontal therapy affects the magnitude and quality of the humoral immune response to suspected periodontopathogens, that this effect is dependent on initial serostatus, and that initial serostatus may have a bearing on treatment outcome. PMID:7642270

  3. Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Mazor-Aronovitch, Kineret; Landau, Heddy; Gillis, David

    2009-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism is a functional disorder of insulin secretion. In its diffuse severe form, it is traditionally treated with over 95% pancreatectomy. However, even after this procedure normoglycemia is not always achieved. Non-surgical therapy with frequent or continuous feeding, medication and close monitoring is another alternative. In this review we compare the two approaches to this condition focusing on early complications, diabetes, neurological outcome and home management issues. Early complications of pancreatectomy include mechanical, metabolic and infectious complications. Non-surgical interventions can be complicated by unwarranted effects of medications and of invasive procedures. Diabetes occurs with both approaches but much less frequently and years later with non-surgical treatment. Regarding neurodevelopmental outcome, most data come from heterogeneous groups. Nevertheless, it appears that outcome is not adversely affected by avoiding surgery. Home management is far more difficult for the non-surgical form. When the non-surgical approach is successful in achieving normoglycemia and parents are highly motivated, this mode of therapy should be considered.

  4. Prognostic factors in periodontal therapy and their association with treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Andreas L; Kotsakis, Georgios A; Hinrichs, James E

    2014-12-16

    During the incipient steps of periodontal treatment, clinicians are usually asked to predict the prognosis of teeth with compromised periodontium. The aim of this literature review was to investigate the association between periodontal Prognosis, Tooth Loss and risk indicators, such as smoking and genetics. Results showed that the definition of good prognosis has much higher predictability than the one for questionable prognosis. Several risk indicators for periodontal prognosis and tooth loss are discussed as well as different definitions of questionable prognosis and their success in predicting tooth loss. In conclusion, the major focus of future studies should be to construct simplified prognostic models with high predictability that will increase the confidence of dentists and periodontists when assigning teeth prognosis. PMID:25516855

  5. Periodontal regeneration in class III furcation defects of beagle dogs using guided tissue regenerative therapy with platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Park, J B; Matsuura, M; Han, K Y; Norderyd, O; Lin, W L; Genco, R J; Cho, M I

    1995-06-01

    We developed an effective regenerative therapy, referred to as platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-modulated guided tissue regenerative (GTR) therapy (P-GTR), capable of achieving periodontal regeneration of horizontal (Class III) furcation defects in the beagle dog. To determine its efficacy, repair and regeneration of horizontal furcation defects by P-GTR therapy and GTR therapy were compared. Chronically inflamed horizontal furcation defects were created around the second (P2) and fourth mandibular premolars (P4). After demineralization of the root surfaces with citric acid, the surfaces of left P2 and P4 were treated with PDGF-BB (P-GTR therapy) and those of contralateral teeth were treated with vehicle only (GTR therapy). Periodontal membranes were placed and retained 0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction for both groups. The mucoperiosteal flap was sutured in a coronal position and plaque control was achieved by daily irrigation with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate. At 5, 8, and 11 weeks, two animals each were sacrificed by perfusion with 2.5% glutaraldehyde through the carotid arteries, and the lesions were sliced mesio-distally, demineralized, dehydrated, and embedded. Periodontal healing and regeneration after GTR and P-GTR therapy were compared by histomorphometric as well as morphological analysis. Morphometric analysis for each time period was performed on the pooled samples of P2 and P4. Five weeks after both therapies, the lesions were filled primarily by tissue-free area, epithelium, inflamed tissue, and a small amount of newly formed fibrous connective tissue. At 8 and 11 weeks after P-GTR therapy, there was a statistically greater amount of bone and periodontal ligament formed in the lesions. The newly formed bone filled 80% of the lesion at 8 weeks and 87% at 11 weeks with P-GTR therapy, compared to 14% of the lesion at 8 weeks and 60% at 11 weeks with GTR therapy. Also, with P-GTR therapy there was less epithelium and tissue-free area, less

  6. Management of Chronic Periodontitis Using Chlorhexidine Chip and Diode Laser-A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ambooken, Majo; Mathew, Jayan Jacob; Issac, Annie Valayil; Kunju, Ajithkumar Parachalil; Parameshwaran, Renjith Athirkandathil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of adjuncts like chlorhexidine local delivery and diode laser decontamination have been found to improve the clinical outcomes of scaling and root planing in non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Aim To evaluate the effects of diode laser and chlorhexidine chip as adjuncts to scaling and root planing in the management of chronic periodontitis. The objective is to evaluate the outcome of chlorhexidine chip and diode laser as adjuncts to scaling and root planing on clinical parameters like Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Study and Design Department of Periodontics. Randomized clinical trial with split mouth design. Materials and Methods Fifteen chronic periodontitis patients having a probing pocket depth of 5mm-7mm on at least one interproximal site in each quadrant of the mouth were included in the study. After initial treatment, four sites in each patient were randomly subjected to scaling and root planing (control), chlorhexidine chip application (CHX chip group), diode laser (810 nm) decontamination (Diode laser group) or combination of both (Diode laser and chip group). Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline, one month and three months. Statistical analysis Results were statistically analysed using paired T test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD test and repeated measure ANOVA. Results Post-treatment, the test and control sites showed a statistically significant reduction in PI, GI, PPD, and CAL. After three months, a mean PPD reduction of 1.47±0.52 mm in control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67±0.62 mm in CHX group, and 2.80± 0.77 mm in combination group was seen. The mean gain in CAL were 1.47±0.52 mm in the control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67± 0.49 mm in CHX group and 2.67± 0.82 mm in combination group respectively. The

  7. Effect of Intensive Oral Hygiene Regimen During Pregnancy on Periodontal Health, Cytokine Levels, and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Maninder; Geisinger, Maria L.; Geurs, Nicolaas C.; Griffin, Russell; Vassilopoulos, Philip J.; Vermeulen, Lisa; Haigh, Sandra; Reddy, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data are limited on the potential effect of intensive oral hygiene regimens and periodontal therapy during pregnancy on periodontal health, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum cytokines, and pregnancy outcomes. Methods A clinical trial was conducted on 120 community-dwelling, 16- to 35-year-old pregnant women at 16 to 24 weeks of gestation. Each participant presented with clinical evidence of generalized, moderate-to-severe gingivitis. Oral hygiene products were provided, together with instructions for an intensive daily regimen of hygiene practices. Non-surgical therapy was provided at baseline. Oral examinations were completed at baseline and again at 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, samples of blood and GCF were collected at baseline and week 8. Mean changes in clinical variables and GCF and serum cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) between baseline and week 8 were calculated using paired t test. Pregnancy outcomes were recorded at parturition. Results Results indicated a statistically significant reduction in all clinical variables (P <0.0001) and decreased levels of TNF-α (P = 0.0076) and IL-1β (P = 0.0098) in GCF during the study period. The rate of preterm births (<37 weeks of gestation) was 6.7% (P = 0.113) and low birth weight (<2,500 g) was 10.2% (P = 1.00). Conclusions Among the population studied, intensive instructions and non-surgical periodontal therapy provided during 8 weeks at early pregnancy resulted in decreased gingival inflammation and a generalized improvement in periodontal health. Large-scale, randomized, controlled studies are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:25079400

  8. Nicotine and periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Grover, Vishakha; Kaushal, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco use has been recognized to be a significant risk factor for the development and progression of periodontal disease. Its use is associated with increased pocket depths, loss of periodontal attachment, alveolar bone and a higher rate of tooth loss. Nicotine, a major component and most pharmacologically active agent in tobacco is likely to be a significant contributing factor for the exacerbation of periodontal diseases. Available literature suggests that nicotine affects gingival blood flow, cytokine production, neutrophil and other immune cell function; connective tissue turnover, which can be the possible mechanisms responsible for overall effects of tobacco on periodontal tissues. Inclusion of tobacco cessation as a part of periodontal therapy encourages dental professionals to become more active in tobacco cessation counseling. This will have far reaching positive effects on our patients’ oral and general health. PMID:20922084

  9. Clinical and microbiological benefits of strict supragingival plaque control as part of the active phase of periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    FERES, Magda; GURSKY, Lauren Christine; FAVERI, Marcelo; TSUZUKI, Claudia Ota; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To compare the clinical and microbiological effects of scaling and root planing (SRP) alone or combined with mechanical (professional plaque control - PPC) or chemical (chlorhexidine rinsing - CHX) control of supragingival plaque in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to receive SRP alone or combined with PPC (twice a week) or with CHX rinsing (twice a day). The adjunctive treatments began with SRP and continued for 42 days. Clinical and microbiological examinations were performed at baseline, 2 and 6 months post-therapy. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for 38 bacterial species by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Results The two test treatments were more effective in improving probing depth and clinical attachment level (CAL) than SRP alone, even in intermediate and deep sites. CAL gain was better maintained in the CHX group. The most beneficial microbiological changes were observed in CHX-treated subjects, who showed a significant reduction in the proportions of red and orange complexes, as well as an increase in the proportions of the host-compatible bacterial species. Conclusion Strict plaque control performed during and after SRP improves periodontal treatment outcomes. The greatest microbiological and clinical benefits were observed with the use of CHX rinsing. PMID:19703236

  10. Periodontal disease as a risk marker in coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over half a million Americans die each year from coronary heart disease (CHD), 26 million suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a large proportion have periodontal disease (PD), a chronic infection of the tissues surrounding teeth. Chronic inflammation contributes to CHD and CKD occurrence and progression, and PD contributes to the cumulated chronic systemic inflammatory burden. This review examines recent evidence regarding the role of PD in CHD and CKD. Recent findings Periodontal pathogens cause both local infection and bacteremia, eliciting local and systemic inflammatory responses. PD is associated with the systemic inflammatory reactant CRP, a major risk factor for both CHD and CKD. Non-surgical PD treatment is shown to improve periodontal health, endothelial function and levels of CRP and other inflammatory markers. Evidence for the association of PD with CKD consists of a small body of literature represented mainly by cross-sectional studies. No definitive randomized-controlled trials exist with either CHD or CKD as primary endpoints. Summary Recent evidence links PD with CHD and CKD. Adding oral health self-care and referral for professional periodontal assessment and therapy to the repertoire of medical care recommendations is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduce CHD and CKD risk. PMID:20948377

  11. A Novel Surgical Procedure for Er:YAG Laser-Assisted Periodontal Regenerative Therapy: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Sakai, Kazuto; Mizutani, Koji; Meinzer, Walter; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an Er:YAG laser (ErL) application for periodontal regenerative surgery in angular bone defects at nine sites in six patients. Debridement was thoroughly performed using a combination of curettage with a Gracey-type curette and ErL irradiation at a panel setting of 70 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz with sterile saline spray. After applying an enamel matrix derivative and autogenous bone grafting, ErL was used to form a blood clot coagulation on the grafted bone surface at 50 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz without water spray for approximately 30 seconds. Twelve months after surgery the mean probing depth had improved from 6.2 mm to 2.0 mm, the mean clinical attachment level had reduced from 7.5 mm to 3.4 mm, and bleeding on probing had improved from (+) to (-). Mean intrabony defect depth decreased from 6.0 mm before surgery to 1.0 mm 12 months after surgery. A novel procedure for periodontal regenerative surgery applying ErL irradiation for thorough decontamination during debridement as well as blood coagulation following autogenous bone grafting seems to have achieved favorable and stable healing of periodontal pockets with significant clinical improvement and desirable regeneration of angular bone defects, including one-wall defects.

  12. A Novel Surgical Procedure for Er:YAG Laser-Assisted Periodontal Regenerative Therapy: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Sakai, Kazuto; Mizutani, Koji; Meinzer, Walter; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an Er:YAG laser (ErL) application for periodontal regenerative surgery in angular bone defects at nine sites in six patients. Debridement was thoroughly performed using a combination of curettage with a Gracey-type curette and ErL irradiation at a panel setting of 70 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz with sterile saline spray. After applying an enamel matrix derivative and autogenous bone grafting, ErL was used to form a blood clot coagulation on the grafted bone surface at 50 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz without water spray for approximately 30 seconds. Twelve months after surgery the mean probing depth had improved from 6.2 mm to 2.0 mm, the mean clinical attachment level had reduced from 7.5 mm to 3.4 mm, and bleeding on probing had improved from (+) to (-). Mean intrabony defect depth decreased from 6.0 mm before surgery to 1.0 mm 12 months after surgery. A novel procedure for periodontal regenerative surgery applying ErL irradiation for thorough decontamination during debridement as well as blood coagulation following autogenous bone grafting seems to have achieved favorable and stable healing of periodontal pockets with significant clinical improvement and desirable regeneration of angular bone defects, including one-wall defects. PMID:27333008

  13. [The importance of periodontal evaluation in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pré, P

    1998-01-01

    The orthodontist is in fact a periodontal-therapist since his aim is to move the teeth with and through the periodontal tissues. It is most important for the orthodontist to be able to determine at the initial clinical examination what are the various periodontal risk factors. When the pathology is obvious with inflammation, periodontal pockets, gingival hyperplasia, edema of the papillae, gingival recessions, the need for periodontal treatment is manifest. But many times, the periodontal evaluation is complicated by the presence of slight variations of the quality of the marginal tissue that represent a risk of developing periodontal defects during the orthodontic treatment. The aim of this presentation is to put forward the importance of the periodontal evaluation during the initial examination of the patient so that, if necessary, an adequate periodontal therapy can be initiated to stabilize the periodontal tissues and thus improves the esthetical outcome.

  14. Therapy and treatment with a high-energy laser in case of a periodontal disease treatment instead of physiotherapy or low-level laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerger, Friedhelm R.

    1996-12-01

    Since intensive efforts ofprophylaxis including fluoridisation, better oral hygiene, eating ofless sugar containing foods, reduced the risk ofcaries and the problems ofcaries lesions significantly. But, especially beginning at the age of3O years more than 80 % ofthe population in almost every nation shows signs of periodontal defects. This you can call an epidemic disease. Because people get older and expect a lot concerning their outlook, their esthetic, their phonetic, they have great expectations towards their natural dentition and keep their own teeth. This is a great challenge to periodontal prophylaxis and periodontal therapy. According to the progress ofthe disease different therapies are indicated. Starting with oral hygiene instructions to establish better oral hygiene with all the modem technologies ofmicrobiological investigations, pharmaceutical therapy, physiotherapy, low level laser treatment, periodontal-surgery, like curettage, deepscaling and rootplaning but also more sophisticated teatmentplans with gingivoplasty, gingivectomy, flap-procedures and mucogingival surgeiy including bone fillings, regenerativ technics the whole spectrum oftreatment options has widely expanded during the last years.

  15. Evaluation of clinical and metabolic changes after non surgical periodontal treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A clinico biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Praveen; Tabasum, Syeda Tawkhira; Garg, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical and metabolic changes following nonsurgical periodontal therapy of type-2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen nondiabetics and fifteen type-2 diabetics with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected after meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Periodontal pocket probing was performed using a Williams graduated periodontal probe and comparisons of the clinical and biochemical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, glycated hemoglobin, and lipid profile (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein) were done between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. Results: A correlation was observed between clinical and biochemical parameters between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. The P value of diabetic group was<0.001 in all clinical parameters (plaque index PI, Gingival index GI, and Probing Pocket Depth PPD) in diabetic and nondiabetic group, showed statistically highly significant difference in GI, PI, PPD, <.01 in Glycated Hemoglobulin (HbAlc1) in test group and<0.05 in control group showed statistically significant difference. The P value of test group was >0.05 in Lipid profile (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, serum triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein) that showed no significant difference and in control group<0.05 in total Cholesterol, high density lipoprotein and <0.01 in Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, respectively, showed statistically significant in Total cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, not significant in high density lipoprotein. The P value >0.05 showed no statistical significance of correlation between the test and control groups. Conclusion: Both groups of patients showed an improvement in clinical and metabolic

  16. Effect of periodontal treatment on the clinical parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: study protocol of the randomized, controlled ESPERA trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that leads to joint damage, deformity, and pain. It affects approximately 1% of adults in developed countries. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection, caused by inflammatory reactions to gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, and affecting about 35 to 50% of adults. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss. A significant association has been shown to exist between periodontitis and RA in observational studies. Some intervention studies have suggested that periodontal treatment can reduce serum inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We hypothesize that periodontitis could be an aggravating factor in patients with RA, and that its treatment would improve RA outcomes. The aim of this clinical trial is to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on the biological and clinical parameters of patients with RA. Methods/design The ESPERA (Experimental Study of Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis) study is an open-label, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects with both RA and periodontitis will be recruited at two university hospitals in southwestern France. In total, 40 subjects will be randomized into two arms (intervention and control groups), and will be followed up for 3 months. Intervention will consist of full-mouth supra-gingival and sub-gingival non-surgical scaling and root planing, followed by systemic antibiotic therapy, local antiseptics, and oral hygiene instructions. After the 3-month follow-up period, the same intervention will be applied to the subjects randomized to the control group. The primary outcome will be change of in Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (DAS28) at the end of the follow-up period. Secondary outcomes will be the percentages of subjects with 20%, 50%, and 70% improvement in disease according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Health-related quality of life assessments (the Health

  17. Vital Pulp Therapy of a Mature Molar with Concurrent Hyperplastic Pulpitis, Internal Root Resorption and Periradicular Periodontitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Kemal Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) of permanent mature teeth is continuously ascertaining to be a more reliable endodontic treatment. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful VPT of a mature mandibular left first molar with concurrent hyperplastic pulpitis, internal root resorption and periradicular periodontitis in a 35-year-old male patient. After complete caries removal and access cavity preparation, the dental pulp was removed from the coronal third of the roots. To protect the remaining pulp, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed and adapted into the cavities; the tooth was then restored with amalgam. Six months after VPT, radiographic examination showed evidence of periradicular healing. Clinically, the tooth was functional without signs and symptoms of infection/inflammation. The successful outcome of this case suggests that diseased dental pulp (i.e. irreversible pulpitis) has the potential to heal after pulp protection with CEM biocement. PMID:26523145

  18. On the reliability of the holographic method for measurement of soft tissue modifications during periodontal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; de Sabata, Aldo; Rominu, Mihai; Ogodescu, Alexandru; Rusu, Darian

    2014-01-01

    Holographic evaluations count among recent measurement tools in orthodontics and prosthodontics. This research introduces holography as an assessment method of 3D variations of gingival retractions. The retraction of gingiva on frontal regions of 5 patients with periodontitis was measured in six points and was evaluated by holographic methods using a He-Ne laser device (1mV, Superlum, Carrigtwohill, Ireland) inside a holographic bank of 200 x 100cm. Impressions were taken during first visit and cast models were manufactured. Six months after the end of periodontal treatment, clinical measurements were repeated and the hologram of the first model was superimposed on a final model cast, by using reference points, while maintaining the optical geometric perimeters. The retractions were evaluated 3D in every point using a dedicated software (Sigma Scan Pro,Systat Software, SanJose, CA, USA). The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the mean recession changes between baseline and six months after treatment, and between values in vivo and the values on hologram. No statistically significant differences between values in vivo and on the hologram were found. In conclusion, holography provides a valuable tool for assessing gingival retractions on virtual models. The data can be stored, reproduced, transmitted and compared at a later time point with accuracy.

  19. Pattern of mineralization after regenerative periodontal therapy with enamel matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Bosshardt, Dieter D; Sculean, Anton; Donos, Nikolaos; Lang, Niklaus P

    2006-05-01

    A derivative (EMD) of enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) is used for periodontal regeneration because EMPs are believed to induce the formation of acellular extrinsic fiber cementum (AEFC). Other reports, however, indicate that EMPs have osteogenic potential. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of the tissue that forms on the root surface following application of EMD. Ten human teeth affected by periodontitis and scheduled for extraction were treated with EMD. Four to six weeks later, they were extracted and processed for analysis by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Immunocytochemistry with antibodies against bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN) was performed to determine the mineralization pattern. The newly formed tissues on the root were thick and contained embedded cells. Small mineralization foci were regularly seen, and large organic matrix patches were occasionally seen, but a distinct mineralization front was lacking. While labeling for BSP was always associated with small mineralization foci and large matrix patches, OPN labeling was seen inconsistently. It is concluded that tissues resembling either cellular intrinsic fiber cementum or a type of bone were observed. The mineralization pattern mostly resembled that found in bone, except for a few areas that exhibited a hitherto undescribed mineralization pattern. PMID:16674690

  20. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein metabolism in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Rachel; Barbour, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the incidence of atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with periodontitis – a chronic infection of the oral cavity. This article summarizes the evidence that suggests periodontitis shifts the lipoprotein profile to be more proatherogenic. LDL-C is elevated in periodontitis and most studies indicate that triglyceride levels are also increased. By contrast, antiatherogenic HDL tends to be low in periodontitis. Periodontal therapy tends to shift lipoprotein levels to a healthier profile and also reduces subclinical indices of atherosclerosis. In summary, periodontal disease alters lipoprotein metabolism in ways that could promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20835400

  1. Adjunctive effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in induced periodontal disease. Animal study with histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical, and cytokine evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Paula Gabriela Faciola Pessôa; Silveira E Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Novaes, Arthur Belém; Taba, Mário; Messora, Michel Reis; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Grisi, Márcio Fernando Moraes; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; de Souza, Sérgio Luis Scombatti

    2016-09-01

    Scaling and root planing (SRP) may not always be effective in preventing periodontal disease (PD) progression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adjunctive effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) to SRP on induced PD in rats, analyzing histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical, and immunoenzymatic parameters. Ligatures were placed around the first mandibular molars and second maxillary molars of 60 rats to induce PD. After 14 days, they were removed and the animals were divided into six groups, with nine animals each: G1 = no treatment, G2 = SRP, G3 = light-emitting diode (LED), G4 = SRP + aPDT, G5 = aPDT, and G6 = erythrosine. The animals were euthanized after 3, 7, and 15 days. There were also two control groups (n = 3): without PD (WPD) induction and with maximum PD (PD+). In the histomorphometrical analysis of linear bone loss, G4 showed a statistically significant difference from the other experimental groups after 3 and 15 days. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cell counting was significantly lower in G4 when compared to G2 and PD+ after 3 days. Immunoenzymatic assay shows the values of the ratio (RANKL/OPG × 100). The lowest value is from the WPD group, and the group that received the SRP + aPDT treatment tended to approach this value over time. After 3 days, statistically significant differences were observed between G4 and all other experimental groups, as well as versus PD+ (one-way ANOVA + Tukey's post hoc test were performed, p < 0.05). It was concluded that the adjunctive use of aPDT in combination with SRP showed the best therapeutic results in the treatment of periodontal disease in rats. PMID:27351664

  2. Non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Li, Tianjing

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency is a common eye muscle co-ordination problem in which the eyes have a strong tendency to drift outward (exophoria) when reading or doing close work. Symptoms may include eye strain, headaches, double vision, print moving on the page, frequent loss of place when reading, inability to concentrate, and short attention span. Objectives To systematically assess and synthesize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) on 7 October 2010. We manually searched reference lists and optometric journals. Selection criteria We included RCTs examining any form of non-surgical intervention against placebo, no treatment, sham treatment, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed eligibility, risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. Main results We included six trials (three in children, three in adults) with a total of 475 participants. We graded four trials at low risk of bias. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism reading glasses was no more effective than placebo reading glasses in improving clinical signs or symptoms in children. Evidence from one trial (graded at high risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism glasses using a progressive addition lens design was more effective than progressive addition lens alone in decreasing symptoms in adults. At three weeks of therapy, the mean difference in Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) score was −10.24 points (95% confidence interval (CI) −15.45 to −5.03). Evidence from two trials (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that outpatient (or office-based as used in the

  3. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy of Tulsi leaf (Ocimum sanctum) extract on periodontal pathogens: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallikarjun, Sajjanshetty; Rao, Ashwini; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Shenoy, Ramya; Pai, Mithun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is an infection of the periodontal complex with severe forms of disease associated with specific bacteria colonizing the subgingival area. Widespread use of drugs has resulted in the emergence of side effects, uncommon infections, and resistance. Plant medicine like Tulsi has been used in many clinical conditions, and it appears to be a suitable alternative to manage conditions affecting the oral cavity. Hence, the objective was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Tulsi leaves extract (Ocimum sanctum) on periodontal pathogens with doxycycline as standard, as doxycycline has been used as an adjunct to nonsurgical therapy in periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Tulsi was prepared by cold extraction method. Extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethyl formamide, to obtain five different concentrations (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, and 10%). Doxycycline was used as a positive control and dimethyl formamide, as a negative control. The extract and controls were subjected to the microbiological investigation against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Agar well diffusion method was employed to determine the concentration at which Tulsi gave an inhibition zone, similar to doxycycline. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc test was used for inter- and intra-group comparisons. Results: At 5% and 10% concentrations, Tulsi extracts demonstrated antimicrobial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, similar to doxycycline with similar inhibition zones (P > 0.05). P. gingivalis and P. intermedia, however, exhibited resistance to Tulsi extract that showed significantly smaller inhibition zones (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Tulsi demonstrated effective antimicrobial property against A. actinomycetemcomitans, suggesting its possible use as an effective and affordable “adjunct” along with the standard care in the management of

  5. Clinical Effects of Subgingivally Delivered Spirulina Gel in Chronic Periodontitis Cases: A Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Mahendra, Little; Muthu, Jananni; John, Libby; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effects of Spirulina in-situ gel as an adjunct to Scaling And Root Planning (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis subjects. Material and Methods: 64 sites were selected with probing pocket depth of ≥5mm and they were divided into 2 groups; 33 sites were treated with SRP along with spirulina gel (Group A) and 31 sites were treated with SRP alone (Group B). Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline before SRP and at 120th day after the treatment therapy. The parameters included Probing Pocket Depth (PPD) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). Results: Both the groups showed significant improvement in the parameters. However, Group A (SRP along with spirulina) showed statistically significant decrease in mean probing pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level after 120 days as compared to Group B SRP alone. Conclusion: Locally delivered spirulina gel, along with scaling and root planning, has been shown to cause a beneficial impact. The efficacy of the product as a local drug delivery system in the non-surgical treatment of periodontitis without any side effects has been proved. Spirulina appears to be promising. It exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects which are closely connected with its antioxidative activity. This study can have a significant impact on the treatment procedures of periodontitis, with the use of blue green algae in the future. PMID:24298522

  6. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis. PMID:26554281

  7. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  8. Novel non-surgical prenatal approaches to treating congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, Cerine; Kunisaki, Shaun M; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-12-01

    This review focuses on the emerging field of non-surgical in-utero therapies in the management of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). These experimental approaches include pharmacologic as well as stem-cell-based strategies. Current barriers of non-surgical therapies toward clinical translation are emphasized. As the severity of CDH will likely influence the efficacy of any in-utero therapy, the current status of prenatal imaging and the role of novel biomarkers, especially those related to fetal inflammation, are also reviewed. PMID:25456754

  9. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  10. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy. PMID:24032400

  11. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy.

  12. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Infrabony Periodontal Defects Using Dual-Wavelength Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Falaki, Rana; Hughes, Francis J; Wadia, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical management of infrabony defects is an invasive procedure, frequently requiring the use of adjunctive material such as grafts or biologics, which is time-consuming and associated with expense and morbidity to the patient. Lasers in periodontal regeneration have been reported in the literature, with each wavelength having potential benefits through different laser-tissue interactions. The purpose of this case series was to assess the efficacy of a new dual-wavelength protocol in the management of infrabony defects. Materials and Methods. 32 defects (one in each patient) were treated using ultrasonic debridement, followed by flapless application of Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium, Scandium, Gallium, Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (wavelength 2780 nm), and final application of diode laser (wavelength 940 nm). Pocket depths (PD) were measured after 6 months and repeat radiographs taken after one year. Results. The mean baseline PD was 8.8 mm (range 6-15 mm) and 6 months later was 2.4 mm (range 2-4 mm), with mean PD reduction being 6.4 ± 1.7 mm (range 3-12 mm). There was a significant gain in relative linear bone height (apical extent of bone), with mean percentage bone fill of 39.7 ± 41.2% and 53% of sites showing at least 40% infill of bone. Conclusion. The results compare favourably with traditional surgery and require further validation through randomised clinical controlled trials. PMID:27366790

  13. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Infrabony Periodontal Defects Using Dual-Wavelength Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Francis J.; Wadia, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical management of infrabony defects is an invasive procedure, frequently requiring the use of adjunctive material such as grafts or biologics, which is time-consuming and associated with expense and morbidity to the patient. Lasers in periodontal regeneration have been reported in the literature, with each wavelength having potential benefits through different laser-tissue interactions. The purpose of this case series was to assess the efficacy of a new dual-wavelength protocol in the management of infrabony defects. Materials and Methods. 32 defects (one in each patient) were treated using ultrasonic debridement, followed by flapless application of Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium, Scandium, Gallium, Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (wavelength 2780 nm), and final application of diode laser (wavelength 940 nm). Pocket depths (PD) were measured after 6 months and repeat radiographs taken after one year. Results. The mean baseline PD was 8.8 mm (range 6–15 mm) and 6 months later was 2.4 mm (range 2–4 mm), with mean PD reduction being 6.4 ± 1.7 mm (range 3–12 mm). There was a significant gain in relative linear bone height (apical extent of bone), with mean percentage bone fill of 39.7 ± 41.2% and 53% of sites showing at least 40% infill of bone. Conclusion. The results compare favourably with traditional surgery and require further validation through randomised clinical controlled trials. PMID:27366790

  14. Milk as Desensitizing Agent for Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity Following Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentinal hypersensitivity is a commonly observed problem after periodontal treatment procedures in periodontal patients. This further complicates preventive oral hygiene procedures by patients which jeopardize periodontal treatment, or even may aid in periodontal treatment failure. Aims and Objectives The aims and objectives of present study were to assess the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment and selection of cases for evaluation of commercially available milk at room temperature as mouth rinse for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity caused by periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods Patients were selected randomly for nonsurgical periodontal treatment and then were assessed for dentine hypersensitivity. Those having dentine hypersensitivity were assigned in two groups. Group one patients were advised to rinse with commercially available milk at room temperature, group two patients were advised to rinse with luke warm water as control. A four point Verbal Rating Score (VRS) was designed to record the numerical value of dentine hypersensitivity. Results The results show incidence of 42.5% and prevalence of 77.5% for dentine hypersensitivity after periodontal treatment procedures. After rinsing with milk following periodontal treatment procedures, there was found a significant reduction of dentine hypersensitivity with probability by unpaired t-test as 0.0007 and 0.0001 at tenth and fifteenth day post periodontal treatment procedures respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the milk rinse is a suitable, cheaper, fast acting, home-use and easily available solution to the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Milk can be used as desensitizing agent and rinsing with milk for few days is effective in quick reduction of dentine hypersensitivity due to periodontal treatment procedures. PMID:26674005

  15. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  16. The Adjunctive Use of the Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet Laser in Closed Flap Periodontal Therapy. A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Falaki, Rana; Cronshaw, Mark; Parker, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The current periodontal literature has been inconsistent in finding an added advantage to using lasers in periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes following root surface instrumentation alone (NL group), or with adjunctive use of Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (L group). Material and Methods: Patients diagnosed with generalized chronic periodontitis, having a minimum of 1 year follow up were selected by a blinded party for inclusion in a retrospective analysis from patients treated prior to and after integration of laser in a single clinic setting. Probing depths (PD) of all sites ≥5 mm and full mouth bleeding scores were analyzed. Further analysis was carried out on the treatment outcomes of only the molar teeth and of pockets >6mm. Results: 53 patients were included (25 NL,28 L). There was no significant difference between baseline PDs (NL=6.19mm, L=6.27mm, range 5-11mm). The mean PD after one year was 2.83mm (NL) 2.45mm (L), with the mean PD reductions being 3.35mm (NL) and 3.82mm (L) (p<0.002). The mean PD reduction for the molars were 3.32mm (NL) and 3.86mm (L) (p< 0.007), and for ≥7mm group were 4.75mm (NL) compared to 5.14mm (L) (p< 0.009). There was significantly less bleeding on probing in the laser group after one year (p<0.001) Conclusion: Both treatment modalities were effective in treating chronic periodontitis, but the added use of laser may have advantages, particularly in molar tooth sites and deeper pockets. Further research with RCTs is needed to test this hypothesis further. PMID:27350796

  17. Efficacy of a commercially available multi-herbal formulation in periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suchetha, A.; Bharwani, Ashit G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This prospective clinical trial was designed to evaluate the clinical effects of a commercially available powder (Periocare® Gum massage powder), containing various herbal medicaments, in the reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation in subjects diagnosed with gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five subjects diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided into the following three groups: Group I - Scaling + Periocare® Gum Massage powder, Group II - Periocare® Gum Massage powder alone, and Group III - Scaling only. Clinical evaluation was done at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks using gingival index, plaque index, and microbiological culturing of plaque samples. Results: Periocare® Gum Massage (multi-herbal formulation) powder as an adjunct to mechanical therapy (scaling) showed significant clinical and microbiological improvement in the gingival index and plaque index scores as compared to other groups. Periocare® Gum Massage powder as a monotherapy did not prove to be effective for plaque control. Conclusion: Periocare® Gum Massage may be a useful herbal formulation for chemical plaque control and improvement in plaque scores and gingival status. PMID:23869125

  18. Advances in non-surgical management of primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Mei; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. There have been great improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of HCC in recent years, but the problems, including difficult diagnosis at early stage, quick progression, and poor prognosis remain unsolved. Surgical resection is the mainstay of the treatment for HCC. However, 70%-80% of HCC patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when most are ineligible for potentially curative therapies such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. In recent years, non-surgical management for unrespectable HCC, such as percutaneous ethanol injection, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, biotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been developed. These therapeutic options, either alone or in combination, have been shown to control tumor growth, prolong survival time, and improve quality of life to some extent. This review covers the current status and progress of non-surgical management for HCC. PMID:25469032

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of subgingival irrigation with 2% povidone-iodine and tetracycline HCl in subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis: A clinico microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Perayil, Jayachandran; Menon, Keerthy S.; Biswas, Raja; Fenol, Angel; Vyloppillil, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to evaluate and compare the clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of subgingival irrigation with tetracycline and povidone-iodine as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis were recruited in this split-mouth study with probing pocket depth of >3 and ≤5 mm and clinical attachment loss of 3-4 mm in relation to 16, 36, and 46. In each subject, three selected periodontal pockets were assigned to receive one out of three irrigants (1) sterile water (control) in 16; (2) tetracycline at 10 mg/ml in 36; (3) 2% povidone-iodine in 46, and these sites were designated as Group A, Group B, and Group C, respectively. Plaque score, gingival score, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment level were evaluated before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to detect Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis which have been implicated as the major risk factors for periodontal disease. Subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and repeated measure ANOVA. Results were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results: Clinical and microbiological parameters were reduced posttreatment, the reduction being significantly higher in Group B compared to Group C. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemical and mechanical therapies were of slight benefit in the treatment of chronic moderate periodontitis, and there was an adjunctive effect of significance when scaling and root planing was combined with a single subgingival irrigation with tetracycline or povidone-iodine in lower concentration. PMID:27076823

  20. Enamel matrix protein derivatives: role in periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rathva, Vandana J

    2011-01-01

    The role of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of lost periodontal structures, ie, new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The outcome of basic research has pointed to the important role of enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in periodontal wound healing. Histologic results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of this paper is to review the existing literature on EMD. PMID:23674918

  1. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  2. Comparative evaluation of subgingivally delivered chlorhexidine varnish and chlorhexidine gel in reducing microbial count after mechanical periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manthena, Sathish; Ramesh, Amitha; Srikanth, Adusumilli; Ramoji Rao, M. V.; Preethi, P. Lakshmi; Samatha, Y. Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antimicrobial efficacy of subgingival chlorhexidine (CHX) application using two different vehicles of delivery. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of CHX varnish and gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in reducing microbial count within moderate to deep periodontal pockets. Settings and Design: Experimental parallel mouth study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 30 subjects between the age groups 25 and 55 years having moderate to severe periodontitis, with pocket depth ≥ 5 mm were selected for the study. The selected patients were randomized into three groups of 10 each. Subjects in Group 1 received SRP followed by subgingival application of CHX varnish, subjects in Group 2 received SRP followed by subgingival application of CHX gel, subjects in Group 3 received SRP alone. Subgingival plaque samples were collected to estimate mean motile and nonmotile microbial counts using dark field microscopy at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. Results: After 3 months, there was statistically significant reduction in nonmotile microbial count in all the three groups. Motile microbial count was significantly reduced in all the three groups till 1 month from baseline. Only subjects in Group 1 who received subgingival CHXvarnish after SRP showed a significant reduction in motile microbial count till 3 months from baseline. Conclusions: Subgingival application of highly concentrated CHX varnish following SRP is beneficial in reducing microbial count in moderate to deep periodontal pockets. PMID:25538468

  3. Evaluation of the efficacy of a new oral gel containing carvacrol and thymol for home oral care in the management of chronic periodontitis using PCR analysis: a microbiological pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Pazzi, D; Iapichino, A; Gaudio, R M; Di Muzio, M; Lo Russo, L; Pezzetti, F

    2016-01-01

    The use of chemical devices for domestic oral hygiene in periodontal patients has led to new treatment strategies aiming primarily at a control of infection. Over the last few years, carvacrol and thymol (CT) have been subjected to many scientific and medical studies. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of CT on the red complex bacteria using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for microbiological analysis. Five patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis in the age group >25 years, were selected. None of these patients had received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and demonstrated radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. After scaling and root planning, patients received a CT gel to be used at home. Four non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient for monitoring, based on criteria that the sites localize chronic periodontitis. Microbial analysis (MA) was analyzed at baseline and at day 15. SPSS program was used for statistical purposes and a paired samples correlation was performed at the end of the observation period. Although an absolute reduction was observed among the studied bacteria (i.e. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus and Total bacteria loading) none reach a statistical significant value. The present study demonstrated that CT gel has a small impact on oral biofilm. Additional studies are needed to detect the efficacy of CT gel. PMID:27469559

  4. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  5. Comparative evaluation of co-enzyme Q10 and Melaleuca alternifolia as antioxidant gels in treatment of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Chetan Purushottam; Sethi, Kunal S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy has been proven to be an effective treatment for patients with chronic periodontitis. Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil (TTO) are known to have potential therapeutic benefits in chronic periodontitis. Aims: The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of Coenzyme Q10 (Perio Q®) and tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided equally into three groups: Group I (Control group): those receiving placebo gel + SRP, Group II (Test group I): those receiving Perio QTM gel + SRP, and Group III (Test group II): those receiving tea tree oil gel + SRP. A total of 15 patients with 45 sites were enrolled in the study. Clinical parameters evaluated were plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was applied using SPSS software. Results: Mean PPD reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.50 ± 0.2, 2.95 ± 0.20, and 2.09 ± 0.15, respectively. Mean CAL reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.45 ± 0.22, 2.33 ± 0.04, and 2.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Changes in mean PI scores for Group I, Group II, and Group III were 0.67 ± 017, 1.00 ± 0.11, and 1.08 ± 0.05 and GBI scores were 0.92 ± 0.29, 1.08 ± 0.13, and 0.88 ± 0.28, respectively. Conclusions: Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil gel proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

  6. Comparative evaluation of co-enzyme Q10 and Melaleuca alternifolia as antioxidant gels in treatment of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Chetan Purushottam; Sethi, Kunal S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy has been proven to be an effective treatment for patients with chronic periodontitis. Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil (TTO) are known to have potential therapeutic benefits in chronic periodontitis. Aims: The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of Coenzyme Q10 (Perio Q®) and tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided equally into three groups: Group I (Control group): those receiving placebo gel + SRP, Group II (Test group I): those receiving Perio QTM gel + SRP, and Group III (Test group II): those receiving tea tree oil gel + SRP. A total of 15 patients with 45 sites were enrolled in the study. Clinical parameters evaluated were plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was applied using SPSS software. Results: Mean PPD reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.50 ± 0.2, 2.95 ± 0.20, and 2.09 ± 0.15, respectively. Mean CAL reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.45 ± 0.22, 2.33 ± 0.04, and 2.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Changes in mean PI scores for Group I, Group II, and Group III were 0.67 ± 017, 1.00 ± 0.11, and 1.08 ± 0.05 and GBI scores were 0.92 ± 0.29, 1.08 ± 0.13, and 0.88 ± 0.28, respectively. Conclusions: Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil gel proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27630504

  7. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  8. Nonsurgical Innovations in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Sadegh; Viera, Martha H.; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of cancer in the United States and represent 75 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Since ultraviolet radiation is implicated in their development, photoprotection is fundamental in their prevention. Additional preventive measures include identifying high-risk individuals for early detection along with using agents, such as retinoids, that are effective in decreasing the risk of premalignant cells further developing into carcinomas. Newer agents achieving this goal include perillyl alcohol, T4 endonuclease 5, DL-α-tocopherol, and α-difluoromethylornithine. Procedural modalities are currently the standard of treatment, but recent evidence has consistently shown that newer (nonsurgical) therapies, such as interferon, imiquimod, retinoids, and 5-fluorouracil, can be used effectively either as monotherapies or as adjuvants to those surgical modalities for the treatment of superficial nonmelanoma skin cancers and premalignant lesions. These newer therapies have achieved significant reductions in morbidity and mortality. Procedural modalities that have been evolving into important tools for the treatment of actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancers include photodynamic therapy and lasers. Nonsurgical therapies currently proving to be effective in clinical trials include ingenol mebutate and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Agents that are showing promising results in early phases of clinical trials include betulinic acid; hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors, such as cyclopamine and GDC-0449; α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone analogs, such as afamelanotide; epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib; anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab; and the 5-fluorouracil prodrug capecitabine. PMID:20725548

  9. Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole Therapy for Patients with Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes: A 2-year Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, N S; Duarte, P M; Miranda, T S; Maciel, S S; Figueiredo, L C; Faveri, M; Feres, M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes occurring in subgingival biofilm composition and in the periodontal clinical parameters of subjects with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) treated by means of scaling and root planing (SRP) only or combined with systemic metronidazole (MTZ) and amoxicillin (AMX). Fifty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to receive SRP only (n = 29) or with MTZ (400 mg/thrice a day [TID]) and AMX (500 mg/TID) (n = 29) for 14 d. Six subgingival plaque samples/subject were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization for 40 bacterial species at baseline and 3 mo, 1 y, and 2 y posttherapy. At 2 y posttherapy, the antibiotic-treated group harbored lower mean proportions (5.5%) of red complex pathogens than the control group (12.1%) (P < 0.05). The proportions of the Actinomyces species remained stable in the antibiotic group but showed a statistically significant reduction in the control group from 1 to 2 y in subjects achieving a low risk clinical profile for future disease progression (i.e., ≤4 sites with probing depth [PD] ≥5 mm). The test group also had a lower mean number of sites with PD ≥5 mm (3.5 ± 3.4) and a higher percentage of subjects reaching the low risk clinical profile (76%) than the control group (14.7 ± 13.1 and 22%, respectively) (P < 0.05) at 2 y posttreatment. MTZ + AMX intake was the only significant predictor of subjects achieving the low risk at 2 y (odds ratio, 20.9; P = 0.0000). In conclusion, the results of this study showed that the adjunctive use of MTZ + AMX improves the microbiological and clinical outcomes of SRP in the treatment of subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 DM up to 2 y (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02135952). PMID:27013640

  10. Peyronie's disease: A contemporary review of non-surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Levine, Laurence A

    2013-09-01

    In this review I discuss the current non-surgical treatment options for Peyronie's disease (PD), which remains a therapeutic dilemma for the treating physician. This is despite a large array of treatments that have been used since the time of de la Peyronie in the mid-18th century. Part of the problem with finding an effective treatment is the incomplete understanding of the aetiopathophysiology of this scarring disorder. Published articles in peer-reviewed journals were assessed, recognising that most of the reported trials are compromised by being single-centre studies with no placebo control. Various treatment options have emerged, most with limited and unreliable benefit, but a few treatments have shown a consistent, albeit incomplete, response rate. Currently the only scientifically sensible oral agents appear to be pentoxifylline, l-arginine, and possibly the phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. The current intralesional injection treatment options include verapamil and interferon, with a reported benefit in reducing deformity and improving sexual function. Intralesional clostridial collagenase is in the midst of phase-3 trial analysis by the USA Food and Drug Administration. External mechanical traction therapy has recently emerged as a technique to reduce the curvature, recover lost length, and possibly obviate surgery. Currently there is no clear, reliable and effective non-surgical treatment for PD, but it appears that several of the available treatments can reduce the deformity and improve sexual function, and might at least stabilise the disease process.

  11. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  12. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  13. The periodontal – endodontic continuum: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha V, Raja; Emmadi, Pamela; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan; Thyegarajan, Ramakrishnan; Rajaraman, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal therapy deals with many aspects of the supporting structures, including the prevention and repair of lesions of the gingival sulcus. Endodontics deals primarily with disease of the pulp and periapical tissues. The success of both periodontal and endodontic therapy depends on the elimination of both disease processes, whether they exist separately or as a combined lesion. The relationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has been a subject of speculation for many years. This paper aims at presenting a comprehensive review of several aspects of perio-endo lesions. PMID:20142886

  14. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  15. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  16. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Latheef, P; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; MN, Kumuda; Apine, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the periodontium i.e. the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis manifests as progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can cause loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is initiated by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, besides an over -aggressive immune response against these microorganisms. The primary goal of periodontal therapy is to preserve the natural dentition by accomplishing and preserving a healthy functional periodontium. Many treatment modalities have been introduced to improve the therapeutic result of periodontal treatment which may also damage the periodontiumiatrogenically. PMID:26312087

  17. Nonsurgical re-treatment of endodontic failures.

    PubMed

    Weine, F S

    1995-03-01

    Endodontic treatment has a very high percentage of success. When failures did occur, many were re-treated with surgery, although nonsurgical re-treatment often was an option. Recently, improvements in instruments for use in endodontic surgery have increased the ability to perform such re-treatments. Even so, this author believes that nonsurgical re-treatment is preferable to surgical intervention whenever possible because of the greater comfort to the patient and the increased indication of failure for amalgam reverse fillings. Advice for recall appointments and evaluations and the correct procedures for re-treating common failures without surgery are presented. These include failures caused by short or incomplete canal fillings, overextended canal fillings, untreated major canals, and chronically draining teeth.

  18. Nonsurgical Management of Early-onset Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Thorsness, Robert J; Faust, John R; Behrend, Caleb J; Sanders, James O

    2015-09-01

    Early-onset scoliosis is potentially fatal if left untreated. Although surgical management with growing instrumentation may be necessary, this is not a panacea and is associated with high complication rates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that nonsurgical treatment can be an effective early management strategy in delaying or even precluding the need for surgery, especially surgery with growing instrumentation. The goal of both nonsurgical and surgical management is to control or correct the spinal curve to allow appropriate pulmonary development while delaying definitive fusion until an appropriate skeletal age. Although more commonly used to delay surgery, serial cast correction using the Cotrel and Morel elongation-derotation-flexion technique may result in complete correction in patients with infantile idiopathic scoliosis and smaller curve magnitudes.

  19. Results after replantation of avulsed permanent teeth. II. Periodontal healing and the role of physiologic storage and antiresorptive-regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Yango; Filippi, Andreas; Kirschner, Horst

    2005-04-01

    The status of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and of the pulp are decisive for the healing of avulsed and replanted teeth. A tooth rescue box was developed and distributed to offer optimal storage conditions for avulsed teeth. The therapy comprised extraoral endodontic treatment and applications of medicaments to enhance periodontal healing. In this long-term clinical study the healing results following avulsion and replantation were investigated. Twenty-eight permanent teeth in 24 patients were evaluated. The extraoral storage media and periods varied considerably. Soon after avulsion six teeth were stored in a cell culture medium (tooth rescue box Dentosafe) for 1-53 h; the PDL was defined as not compromised. Sixteen teeth were stored in a non-physiologic situation temporarily, the PDL was considered as compromised. Six teeth were stored in non-physiologic conditions for longer periods; the condition of the PDL was defined as hopeless. On 14 teeth antiresorptive-regenerative therapy (ART) with the local application of glucocorticoids and enamel matrix derivative and the systemic administration of doxycyclin was used. In all teeth extraoral endodontic treatment by retrograde insertion of posts was performed. The mean observation period was 31.2 months (+/-24.1; 5.1-100.2; median: 23.8). All six teeth rescued physiologically healed with a functional PDL (functional healing, FH) irrespective of the storage period. Of eight teeth with a compromised PDL on which ART was used, three teeth healed with a functional PDL. All other teeth showed replacement resorption, in three teeth additionally infection-related resorption was recorded. The predominant influence on the healing results was the immediate physiologic rescue of avulsed teeth (chi-square, P = 0.0001). The use of ART seemed to support FH (chi-square, P = 0.0547) in teeth with a compromised PDL. No other factors (maturity of roots, crown fractures, gender, age, antibiotics) were related to healing. In a linear

  20. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients’ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment. PMID:20922083

  1. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2.5 kg), late abortion (14-24 weeks) or abortion (<14 weeks). The results obtained were statistically evaluated according to OR, unpaired t test and paired t test at 5% significance level. Results No significant differences were observed between groups at baseline examination. Periodontal treatment resulted in stabilization of CAL and PI (p>0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001), except for PI. Significant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001). The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  2. Radiologic Assessment of the Periodontal Patient.

    PubMed

    Korostoff, Jonathan; Aratsu, Ali; Kasten, Brian; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal examination involves evaluation of soft and hard tissue parameters to gauge gingival inflammatory changes and quantify attachment loss. Conventional radiographs are vital components of this process and can be used to assess the presence of calculus and other local factors to establish a diagnosis, prognosis, and periodontal treatment plan. The 2-dimensional nature of these images limits their utility. The advent of high-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers 3-dimensional images that might overcome these limitations. We discuss the use of conventional radiographic techniques as well as CBCT for evaluating, diagnosing, and treatment planning patients presenting for periodontal and/or implant therapy. PMID:26614950

  3. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  4. Application of laser therapy in the surgical treatment of periodontal osseous defects with the Bio-Oss Spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Uzunov, T.; Grozdanova, R.

    2004-06-01

    We have made an investigation on three-wall and four-wall osseous defects on which a surgical treatment was conducted with application of Bio-Oss ( Geistlich ) and laser therapy. After conducting of clinical oral hygiene to the patients and curettage with flap, a Bio-Oss Spongiosa of Geistlich is applied. We have conducted the laser therapy pre- and postoperative scanning with power density of 100 mW/cm2 on scheme. The patients were traced out within 1 year. The obtained results showed that the application of laser therapy gives anaesthetic, anti-inflammatory and regeneration stimulating effect.

  5. Nonsurgical endodontic treatments in molar teeth with large periapical lesions in children: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kusgoz, Adem; Yildirim, Sibel; Gokalp, Alparslan

    2007-07-01

    Profound caries lesions may lead to invasion of microorganisms to the dental pulp, and periapical areas can promote the development of dentoalveolar abscess and periapical bone loss. Treatment options to manage large periapical lesions range from nonsurgical root canal treatment and/or apical surgical procedure to extraction. Young molar teeth with pulp necrosis and large periapical lesions in children are frequently treated with root canal treatment because the therapy is more difficult in multirooted teeth. In these case reports, nonsurgical endodontic treatments performed on 6 molar teeth with large periapical lesions, by repeated intracanal dressing with calcium hydroxide, are presented. Radiographs displayed significant bony healing at the end of the second year. In conclusion, large periapical lesions can respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, and complex and difficult endodontic treatments in children might not be required.

  6. Nonsurgical treatment of adult open bite using edgewise appliance combined with high-pull headgear and class III elastics.

    PubMed

    Saito, Isao; Yamaki, Masaki; Hanada, Kooji

    2005-03-01

    This case report describes the effect of a combination of high-pull headgear and Class III elastics on the nonsurgical treatment of an adult open bite. The 19-year 1-month-old Japanese female presented with the anterior open bite of 4.0 mm and mild crowding. She had a skeletal Class II but a Class III molar relationship due to a severe proclination of the mandibular dental arch. Unilateral congenital missing premolars caused a discrepancy between the facial and dental midline. After extraction of two premolars and the impacted mandibular third molars, nonsurgical therapy was performed using the standard edgewise appliance combined with a high-pull headgear and Class III elastics. The successful treatment outcome and stability of the final occlusion indicates that a combination of high-pull headgear and Class III elastics is one of the effective devices in the nonsurgical treatment of open bite and, is especially helpful in uprighting the mandibular dental arch.

  7. Non-surgical treatment of sports-related temporomandibular joint disorders in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Muhtaroğullari, Mehmet; Demiralp, Burak; Ertan, Atila

    2004-12-01

    In this study, 18 basketball players (11 female, seven male; age range 14-32 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems who had a history of sport injuries related to head or jaw region were evaluated and the results of the treatment were presented. A standardized functional examination of the masticatory system was performed including measurement of maximal jaw movements, recording of joint sounds, pain on movement of the jaw as well as tenderness to palpation of the both TMJ or masticatory muscles. Patients were also evaluated periodontally. Diagnosis was made according the criteria, described by Okeson, and appropriate treatment was applied using different kind of splints. At the end of treatment only one patient continued with right TMJ reduction with slight pain. Except for that patient, none of the patients had pain after treatment. The maximum opening of the jaws and the maximal jaw movements were statistically increased after treatment. Patients with TMJ problems also showed periodontal problems, most likely due to inadequate oral hygiene because of the limited jaw movements and pain. Periodontal parameters including probing depth (PD), Plaque index (PI), and Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI) improved after treatment. Sports-related TMJ injuries may result in complex problems such as pain, TMJ sounds, limitation in maximal jaw movements and maximum opening of the mouth, difficulty in chewing. With the appropriate diagnosis this could be treated non-surgically in 6-8 months. This study also showed that the TMJ disorders may cause periodontal problems, which may affect all teeth and also the general health of the athlete.

  8. Photodynamic therapy associated with full-mouth ultrasonic debridement in the treatment of severe chronic periodontitis: a randomized-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    BALATA, Maybel Lages; de ANDRADE, Lyla Prates; SANTOS, David Barros Nunes; CAVALCANTI, Andrea Nóbrega; TUNES, Urbino da Rocha; RIBEIRO, Érica Del Peloso; BITTENCOURT, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method of microbial reduction which can benefit periodontal treatment in areas of difficult access, such as deep pockets and furcations. The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of PDT as an adjunct to full-mouth ultrasonic debridement in the treatment of severe chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients with at least one pocket with a probing depth (PD) of ≥7 mm and one pocket with a PD of ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) on each side of the mouth were included, characterizing a split mouth design. The control group underwent full-mouth ultrasonic debridement and the test group received the same treatment associated with PDT. The PDT was performed on only one side of the mouth and the initial step consisted of subgingival irrigation with 0.005% methylene blue dye. Two minutes after applying the photosensitizer, the low power laser - AsGaAl (Photon Lase III - PL7336, DMC, São Carlos -São Paulo, Brazil) was applied (660 nm, 100 mW, 9 J, 90 seconds per site, 320 J/cm2, diameter tip 600 µm).The following clinical parameters were evaluated: plaque index, gingival index, BOP, gingival recession (GR), PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL). All parameters were collected before, 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Results: An improvement in BOP, PD and CAL was observed after treatment, in both groups, but without any difference between them. After 6 months, the PD decreased from 5.11±0.56 mm to 2.83±0.47 mm in the test group (p<0.05) and from 5.15±0.46 mm to 2.83±0.40 mm in the control group (p<0.05). The CAL changed, after 6 months, from 5.49±0.76 mm to 3.41±0.84 mm in the test group (p<0.05) and from 5.53±0.54 to 3.39±0.51 mm in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Both approaches resulted in significant clinical improvements in the treatment of severe chronic periodontits, however, the PDT did not provide any additional benefit to those

  9. Periodontal Management of a Patient Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clozza, Emanuele; Segelnick, Stuart L; Sigal, Samuel H; Rovner, Deborah N; Weinberg, Mea A

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the periodontal management of a patient with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the first part of this article, all medical and dental findings are reported to elaborate adequate diagnoses. A patient-specific treatment plan was structured given the challenging periodontal and systemic scenarios. The second part describes the periodontal therapy delivered in close interaction with the referring physicians. Last, the article reviews current principles and protocols in managing these patients. PMID:26901304

  10. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus type II: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Kiaani, Sima; Mahdavian, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare developmental anomaly of teeth with complex root canal system morphology. The present case describes a peg shape maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II), necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed with the aim of removing the blind sac with diamond bur under the use of operating surgical microscope. The root canal system was obturated with thermoplastic technique. Final restoration was done using composite. The 20-months clinical and radiological follow up revealed an asymptomatic tooth with healing of the periapical pathology; however, for complete healed periradicular lesion more follow up is needed. This case illustrated that a dens invaginatus malformed teeth with a large periradicular lesion can be managed successfully with nonsurgical root canal therapy (NSRCT). PMID:25878686

  11. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  12. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis can usually be reversed with daily brushing and ...

  13. Short-term clinical outcomes of laser supported periodontal treatment concept using Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm): a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odor, Alin A.; Violant, Deborah; Badea, Victoria; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Backgrounds: Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers can be used adjacent to the conventional periodontal treatment as minimally invasive non-surgical devices. Aim: To describe the short-term clinical outcomes by combining Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode 940 nm lasers in non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients with periodontal disease (mild, moderate, severe) - 233 teeth and 677 periodontal pockets ranging from 4 mm to 12 mm - were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers in adjunct to manual and piezoelectric scaling and root planning (SRP). Periodontal parameters such as mean probing depth (PD), mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and mean bleeding on probing (BOP) were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the laser treatment using an electronic periodontal chart. Results: At baseline, the mean PD was 4.06 ± 1.06 mm, mean CAL was 4.56 ± 1.43 mm, and mean BOP was 43.8 ± 23.84 %. At 6 months after the laser supported periodontal treatments the mean PD was 2.6 ± 0.58 mm (p <0.001), mean CAL was 3.36 ± 1.24 mm (p <0.001) and mean BOP was 17 ± 9.34 % (p <0.001). Also 3 patients showed radiographic signs of bone regeneration. Conclusion: The combination of two laser wavelengths in adjunct to SRP offers significant improvements of periodontal clinical parameters such as PD, CAL and BOP. Keywords: Laser supported periodontal treatment concept, Er,Cr:YSGG and diode 940nm lasers, Scaling and root planning, Minimally invasive non-surgical device

  14. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    genetic profile, currently do not exist. Genetic markers have the potential to be implemented as screening tools to identify subjects at risk. This approach may significantly enhance treatment outcome through the early detection and treatment of affected subjects, as well as using future approaches based on gene therapy. At present, the treatment of this disease is directed toward elimination of the subgingival bacterial load and other local risk factors. Adjunctive use of appropriate systemic antibiotics is recommended and may contribute to a longer suppression of the microbial infection. Other aggressive forms of periodontal diseases occur in patients who are affected with certain systemic diseases, including the leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome and Down syndrome. Management of the periodontal component of these diseases is very challenging. Acute gingival and periodontal lesions include a group of disorders that range from nondestructive to destructive forms, and these lesions are usually associated with pain and are a common reason for emergency dental consultations. Some of these lesions may cause a rapid and severe destruction of the periodontal tissues and loss of teeth. Oral infections, particularly acute infections, can spread to extra-oral sites and cause serious medical complications, and even death. Hence, prompt diagnosis and treatment are paramount.

  15. Topical Tacrolimus and Periodontal Therapy in the Management of a Case of Oral Chronic GVHD Characterized by Specific Gingival Localization

    PubMed Central

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement. PMID:24639902

  16. Topical tacrolimus and periodontal therapy in the management of a case of oral chronic GVHD characterized by specific gingival localization.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  17. Non-Surgical Interventions for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis remain highly controversial. Despite the publication of numerous reviews no explicit methodological evaluation of papers labeled as, or having a layout of, a systematic review, addressing this subject matter, is available. Objectives Analysis and comparison of the content, methodology, and evidence-base from systematic reviews regarding non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Design Systematic overview of systematic reviews. Methods Articles meeting the minimal criteria for a systematic review, regarding any non-surgical intervention for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, with any outcomes measured, were included. Multiple general and systematic review specific databases, guideline registries, reference lists and websites of institutions were searched. The AMSTAR tool was used to critically appraise the methodology, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the Joanna Briggs Institute’s hierarchies were applied to analyze the levels of evidence from included reviews. Results From 469 citations, twenty one papers were included for analysis. Five reviews assessed the effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercise treatments, four assessed manual therapies, five evaluated bracing, four assessed different combinations of interventions, and one evaluated usual physical activity. Two reviews addressed the adverse effects of bracing. Two papers were high quality Cochrane reviews, Three were of moderate, and the remaining sixteen were of low or very low methodological quality. The level of evidence of these reviews ranged from 1 or 1+ to 4, and in some reviews, due to their low methodological quality and/or poor reporting, this could not be established. Conclusions Higher quality reviews indicate that generally there is insufficient evidence to make a judgment on whether non-surgical interventions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are effective. Papers

  18. Nonsurgical Fluoroscopically Guided Dacryocystoplasty of Common Canalicular Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Kai E.; Hofer, Ulrich; Textor, Hans J.; Boeker, Thorsten; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans H.

    2000-01-15

    Purpose: To assess dacryocystoplasty in the treatment of epiphora due to obstructions of the common canaliculus.Methods: Twenty patients with severe epiphora due to partial (n = 16) or complete (n = 4) obstruction of the common canaliculus underwent fluoroscopically guided dacryocystoplasty. In all cases of incomplete obstruction balloon dilation was performed. Stent implantation was attempted in cases with complete obstruction. Dacryocystography and clinical follow-up was performed at intervals of 1 week, and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 6 months (range 3-18 months).Results: Balloon dilation was technically successfully performed in all patients with incomplete obstructions (n = 16). In three of four patients with complete obstruction stent implantation was performed successfully. Subsequent to failure of stent implantation in one of these patients balloon dilation was performed instead. The long-term primary patency rate in patients with incomplete obstructions was 88% (n = 14/16). In three of four cases with complete obstruction long-term patency was achieved during follow-up. Severe complications, infections, or punctal splitting were not observed.Conclusion: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dacryocystoplasty is a feasible nonsurgical therapy in canalicular obstructions with good clinical results that may be used as an alternative to surgical procedures. In patients with complete obstructions stent placement is possible but further investigations are needed to assess the procedural and long-term results.

  19. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease. PMID:14595256

  20. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease.

  1. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases. PMID:26491574

  2. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases.

  3. Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks - David X. Zhao, MD Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of a nonsurgical treatment regimen in patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nonsurgical treatment regimen in the long-term control of necrotic areas of the jaws and pain in such patients. Methods: A total of 96 patients suffering from the disease were included in this study. All patients received nonsurgical treatment regimen for 10 days, and repeated every 3 months for 2 years. The size of the osteonecrotic lesions was measured and the pain level was self-assessed with a visual analog scale. Results: The patients showed a statistically significant (F = 16.1; p < .01; r2 = .95) gradual decrease in the size of exposed bone areas during the nonsurgical therapy (from 12.5 to 8.8 mm). Pain scores ranged from 0 to 3 score scale. Complete resolution of the disease was observed in some patients. Conclusions: This conservative nonsurgical treatment regimen seems to provide successful treatment in reduction of the sizes of exposed bone areas in the majority of patients. PMID:26770707

  5. Prevention and Periodontal Treatment in Down Syndrome Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de Resende, Maria Lúcia Rubo; Sant’Ana, Adriana Campos Passanezi; Damante, Carla Andreotti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate which type of periodontal preventive and therapeutic approaches presents superior outcomes in patients with Down syndrome (DS). Studies reporting different methods of periodontal care from DS patients were considered eligible. Included clinical studies should indicate at least two periodontal parameters in different periods of assessment. Screening of the articles, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. Electronic search according to the PICO search, with both Key-words and MESH terms were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases until March 2016. Manual search was conducted in four journals, namely Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and Special Care in Dentistry and their electronic databases were searched. Electronic and manual search resulted in 763 papers, and of them 744 were excluded after title/abstract assessment. The full text of 19 potentially eligible publications was screened and 9 studies met inclusion criteria. The results demonstrated the importance to introduce youngest DS patients in preventive programs, as well as participation of parents, caregivers or institutional attendants in supervising/performing oral hygiene. In studies with higher frequency of attendance, all age groups presented superior preventive and therapeutic results, irrespective of the therapeutic approach used (surgical/nonsurgical/periodontal care program). The important factors for reducing periodontal parameters were the frequency of the appointments and association with chlorhexidine/plaque disclosing agents as adjuvant treatment. This systematic review demonstrated that early introduction in periodontal care, participation of parents/caregivers/institutional attendants, frequency of attendance and association with chemical adjuvants (independently of the periodontal treatment adopted) seems to

  6. Gingival crevicular fluid and serum cystatin c levels in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anuj; Pradeep, A R; Raghavendra, N M; Arjun, P; Kathariya, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Cystatin C (CSTC) is an inhibitor of cysteine proteinases and could play a protective and regulatory role under inflammatory conditions. The present study was designed to assess the concentration of CSTC in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum, to find out their association if any, in periodontal health and disease. 30 subjects were selected divided into 3 groups consisting of 10 subjects in each group based on clinical parameters: periodontally healthy group, gingivitis group and chronic periodontitis group, while, chronic periodontitis group after 8 weeks of the treatment (scaling and root planing) constituted after periodontal therapy group. GCF and serum samples were collected from all subjects to estimate the levels of CSTC by ELISA. The mean CSTC concentration in GCF and serum was observed to be the highest in periodontitis group and lowest in periodontally healthy group with intermediate concentration in gingivitis group and after periodontal therapy group. CSTC concentration in GCF and serum increased proportionally with the severity of periodontal disease (from health to periodontitis group) and decreased after treatment. This suggests that CSTC increases with disease progression to prevent further periodontal degeneration and decreases after treatment due to bone metabolic homeostasis. Further, longitudinal prospective studies involving larger population are needed to confirm the findings of present study and to better understand the role of CSTC in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. PMID:22377703

  7. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  8. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively.

  9. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules.

    PubMed

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  10. Evidence-based, non-surgical treatments for vitiligo: a review.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupi, Robert M; Postolova, Anna; Davis, Ronald S

    2012-08-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder characterized by depigmented macules and patches secondary to the loss of functional melanocytes. It is a chronic disease that affects between 0.1% and 2% of the general population, affecting both sexes and all races. The appearance and the unpredictable course are psychologically and socially devastating. The success of current therapeutic options is limited. The objective of this review was to assess non-surgical treatments of vitiligo and to determine if comparing these studies can lead to (1) practical applications in the clinical setting and (2) recommendations for future research including study design and topics to be investigated further. Combination therapies were found to be more effective than monotherapy, and most combinations included a form of phototherapy, of which narrow-band-UVB was found to be most effective with the least adverse effects. Topical treatment with corticosteroids, immunomodulators, vitamin D analogs, and psoralens had mixed outcomes. Oral therapies including antioxidants were helpful adjuvants to treatment. Studies lacked consistent design, mechanism of disease assessment, and long-term follow-up. Sample size was also frequently limited. This review found that while several non-surgical therapies exist for the treatment of vitiligo, their usefulness, especially in the long term, is not well understood. Those studies that were able to elicit repigmentation often lacked an assessment on quality of life and/or patient satisfaction. More standardized methods of study design and assessment are needed to compare outcomes and make definitive conclusions on treatment effectiveness. PMID:22423621

  11. Determination of clinical biologic width in chronic generalized periodontitis and healthy periodontium: A clinico-radiographical study

    PubMed Central

    Gaddale, Reetika; Mudda, Jayashree; Karthikeyan, Ilangovan; Desai, Shrikar; Shinde, Harshada Hemchandra; Tapashetti, Roopali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The dimensions of dentogingival junction have been evaluated from autopsy jaw specimens. Previous studies demonstrated variability in histologic biologic width (BW) in periodontal health and mild periodontitis. Few studies have been done on the measurement of clinical BW in periodontitis. BW variation provides implications for selection of surgical or nonsurgical approaches. The purpose of this study was to determine clinical BW in periodontal health and chronic generalized periodontitis and to compare it with histologic dimensions of BW. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects with chronic generalized periodontitis and 20 subjects with healthy periodontium were included in the present study. Plaque index and community periodontal index of treatment needs were scored; moreover, probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level were measured. Full mouth intraoral periapical radiographs were taken, and digitalized images were obtained to measure the crestal bone level using computerized software. Results: Clinical BW was significantly greater in both healthy and periodontitis groups than previously reported histologic BW of 2.04 mm (P < 0.001). The mean clinical BW was 3.98 mm. Conclusion: Mean clinical BW in both groups was significantly greater than histologic BW and sites with shallow PDs demonstrated greatest BW, suggesting that these sites may be at increased risk for losing significant attachment during surgical procedures. PMID:26015671

  12. Periodontal considerations for children.

    PubMed

    Song, H Jung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews periodontal disease and gingival disease and also explores issues relating to mucogingival defects such as gingival hyperplasia, gingival recession, and exposure of impacted canines.

  13. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05) and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001). Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05) and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites. PMID:27563201

  14. Periodontal disease in three siblings with familial neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kirstilä, V; Sewón, L; Laine, J

    1993-06-01

    The periodontal status and treatment of three teenagers in a Finnish family with familial neutropenia is described. The mother was also diagnosed with neutropenia. At initial examination, the 15-year-old male and the 10-year-old female had severe periodontitis, whereas the 13-year-old male had oral ulcerations but no significant periodontal disease. The two siblings with periodontitis were treated and followed approximately 5 years. It was concluded that periodontal therapy including scaling, surgery, and use of antimicrobial agents can be successful in patients with familial neutropenia, and that such patients are not necessarily candidates for full mouth extraction. The role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in which was used in the treatment of these patients remains to be established.

  15. Investigation of hemorheological parameters in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Seringec, Nurten; Guncu, Guliz; Arihan, Okan; Avcu, Nihal; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). On the other hand, occurrence of CVD has also been related with increased blood viscosity. This study was planned to investigate four main hemorheological parameters contributing to blood viscosity - hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity - and also some biochemical parameters (hs-CRP, fibrinogen, globulin etc.) in patients with periodontal disease. We hypothesized that poor periodontal health would be associated with deterioration of hemorheological properties. According to periodontal health status, subjects were divided into three groups as control (healthy), with plaque induced gingivitis and with chronic periodontitis. All groups included 15 males who had not received periodontal therapy in the last six months before the study, were non-smokers, had no systemic diseases and were not on any medication. Erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation were measured with laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Plasma viscosity was measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test and Spearman Correlation Coefficient. Plasma viscosity (1.36 ± 0.01 mPa.s in the control group and 1.43 ± 0.02 mPa.s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), erythrocyte aggregation tendency (aggregation index, amplitude and t½ were 58.82 ± 1.78% , 20.22 ± 0.40 au, 2.80 ± 0.25 s respectively in the control group, and 67.05 ± 1.47% , 22.19 ± 0.50 au, 1.84 ± 0.15 s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), hs-CRP, fibrinogen and globulin levels were significantly higher, whereas HDL level was significantly lower in the chronic periodontitis group (P <  0.05) compared to the control group. All of these conditions may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in people with periodontal disease, via increasing blood viscosity. PMID:25261434

  16. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  17. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  18. A practical guide to the nonsurgical treatment of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Maudgal, D P; Northfield, T C

    1991-02-01

    Until recently, cholecystectomy was the only treatment available for symptomatic gallstone disease. During the past 20 years, better understanding of the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease has led to alternative nonsurgical methods for treating gallstones in selected groups of patients. Use of 2 naturally occurring bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), was reported in 1972 and 1975, respectively, for successful dissolution of cholesterol gallstones in humans. Both these bile acids act by reducing cholesterol secretion in bile, thus enabling it to solubilise more cholesterol from the stone surface. Micellar solubilisation is involved, together with liquid crystal formation in the case of UDCA. Having been extensively studied in clinical trials to assess efficacy and safety, both these compounds are now available for general use. The efficacy of CDCA can be enhanced by single bedtime dose administration and by taking a low cholesterol diet. Bedtime administration also enhances the effect of a suboptimal dose of UDCA. CDCA induces dose-related diarrhoea and hypertransaminaemia, and UDCA can induce calcification of gallstones, thus rendering them resistant to medical dissolution. A combination of the 2 bile acids at half the recommended dose for each has become an accepted practice for reducing adverse effects, and this may also enhance efficacy. One of the main problems of bile acid therapy is that dissolution of gallstones is a very slow process. Use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) to break the stones into smaller fragments, with concurrent use of bile acids, has been shown to speed dissolution rate and to achieve complete gallstone dissolution in 78% of selected cases within 12 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Periodontal considerations of the removable partial overdenture.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B C; Renner, R P

    1990-10-01

    1. An overdenture, whether complete or partial, is an excellent mode of treatment in the mutilated dentition for the preservation of the residual ridge. 2. Selection of patients for an overdenture should be based on past history of dental neglect, the status of the teeth and their periodontium, including present oral hygiene status, and patient motivation. The patients with a history of dental neglect, poor oral hygiene, and lack of motivation in having the teeth and the periodontium restored to health as well as strict compliance to a home-care regimen and recall schedule are not good candidates for treatment with an overdenture. 3. The choice of teeth or roots to serve as overdenture abutments must include their periodontal evaluation, which should consist of a detailed periodontal examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment when this is indicated, including chemical protection (fluoride gel) and an oral hygiene regimen tailored to individual needs. 4. The knowledge and expertise in the selection and implementation of appropriate periodontal treatment modalities is of paramount importance in restoring optimum periodontal health to the overdenture abutments before overdenture fabrication. 5. The maintenance phase of the overdenture abutments as well as of the existing natural teeth is of critical importance in the preservation of health of these abutments and teeth. This maintenance phase should consist of periodic recalls based on individual needs; a detailed periodontal evaluation, including patient's motivation and status of oral hygiene and denture hygiene; and detection of caries. If necessary, appropriate periodontal and/or restorative therapy should be performed, and oral hygiene measures reinforced. This will ensure longevity of both abutment teeth or roots and of the existing natural teeth resulting in a long-term success of an overdenture. 6. Because there is evidence of high incidence of periodontal disease and dental caries in overdenture wearers

  20. Role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    This article critically reviews the evidence for a role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis and discusses the study approaches commonly used to identify genetic risk factors of this disease. Available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations in multiple genes, combined with environmental effects. Syndromic periodontal diseases include certain monogenic disorders that express phenotypes showing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the genetic triggering factors of most of these syndromes have been identified. Other periodontal disease phenotypes seem to occur through different genetic predisposition patterns. Case-control and genome-wide studies have been used to investigate the association with gene polymorphisms. Association studies and the familial aggregation of aggressive periodontitis suggest a significant genetic component in the increased predisposition to this disease. There is evidence to support the contribution of a few major genes or of multiple small-effects genes. In addition, there is evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Early studies suggested an X-linked mode of transmission of aggressive periodontitis, and subsequent studies support an autosomal mode. Genetic studies have the potential to improve the screening programs of subjects at risk for developing aggressive periodontitis and may enhance treatment outcome through gene therapy.

  1. Interactions between chronic renal disease and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing and patients receiving renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation will comprise an enlarging segment of the dental patient population. Renal replacement therapy can affect periodontal tissues including gingival hyperplasia in immune suppressed renal transplantation patients and increased levels of plaque, calculus and gingival inflammation and possible increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal diseases in ESRD patients on dialysis maintenance therapy. Also, the presence of undiagnosed periodontitis may have significant effects on the medical management of the ESRD patient. Periodontitis has been found to contribute to systemic inflammatory burden including the elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the general population. Atherosclerotic complications including myocardial infarction and stroke are the primary causes of mortality in the ESRD population and, in contrast to that of the general population, the best predictor of all cause and cardiac death in this population is CRP. Consequently, periodontitis may be a covert but treatable source of systemic inflammation in the ESRD population. The objective of this review was to explore the interaction between chronic renal disease, renal replacement therapy and periodontal diseases based upon the results of studies published within the last decade.

  2. Current understanding of the role of microscopic monitoring, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide in the treatment of periodontal disease. Committee on Research, Science and Therapy. The American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    The Keyes technique came to national attention following a reference in The New York Times in the late 1970s. Several lay press articles and discussions on national television served to further focus the interest of patients, general dentists, and periodontists on this potential approach to periodontal therapy. Early evaluations of the data on the technique resulted in an Academy position paper in 1981. Recognizing that there was a lack of well-controlled studies on the technique led to extensive research efforts supported by the National Institute of Dental Research. The results of those efforts have provided substantial new information that serves as the basis of the present position paper. Although this technique is no longer widely used in the United States, some patients and dentists may have not had the benefit of the new data. PMID:9736380

  3. Current understanding of the role of microscopic monitoring, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide in the treatment of periodontal disease. Committee on Research, Science and Therapy. The American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    The Keyes technique came to national attention following a reference in The New York Times in the late 1970s. Several lay press articles and discussions on national television served to further focus the interest of patients, general dentists, and periodontists on this potential approach to periodontal therapy. Early evaluations of the data on the technique resulted in an Academy position paper in 1981. Recognizing that there was a lack of well-controlled studies on the technique led to extensive research efforts supported by the National Institute of Dental Research. The results of those efforts have provided substantial new information that serves as the basis of the present position paper. Although this technique is no longer widely used in the United States, some patients and dentists may have not had the benefit of the new data.

  4. [The effect of nitazole preparations on the microflora in periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Oleĭnik, I I; Maksimovskiĭ, Iu M; Ushakova, T V; Tsarev, V N; Chekhova, N O; Rudneva, E V

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with generalized periodontitis were examined. Microbiologic examination of the periodontal pouch contents, making use of anaerobic cultivation, resulted in isolation and identification of 103 strains, 76 (72.8%) of which were referred to obligate anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes made up 27.2% of the total number of the isolates. Therapy with water-soluble nitasole resulted in reduction of the number of microorganisms, decrease or arrest of pus discharge from the pouch, resolution of the edema and gingival ridge hyperemia, etc. Diffusion of nitasole (water-soluble) and cliostom from various dressings used in periodontitis was studied and the efficacy of combining these dressings revealed. PMID:1803669

  5. [Nonpharmacological and nonsurgical therapies for osteoarthritis: orthosis, exercises].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Katherine; Eloumri, Amine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Unloading valgus knee braces may be more effective than knee sleeves, to improve pain and disability for medial knee osteoarthritis, but have more adverse effects. A lateral-wedge insole could reduce pain in medial knee osteoarthritis. Cushioning insoles and footwear with shock absorbance could be proposed for hip osteoarthritis by authors' recommendations. Nocturnal splints for base-of-thumb osteoarthritis are recommended to reduce pain and disability. Aerobic, strengthening, range-of-motion and proprioceptive exercise are recommended to decrease pain and improve function and quality of life in knee and hip osteoarthritis. Strengthening and range-of-motion exercise is recommended for hand osteoarthritis.

  6. Role of Lycopene in Preventing Oral Diseases as a Nonsurgical Aid of Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur; Arora, Vikram; Mehta, Nishant; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Without pigments, we are nothing. Life presents us with a kaleidoscope of colors. From the green grass of home to a forest's ruddy autumn hues, we are surrounded by living colors. Living things obtain their colors, with few exceptions, from natural pigments. In addition to their role in coloration, natural pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. Of the various classes of pigments in nature, the carotenoids are among the most widespread and important ones, especially due to their varied functions. Lycopene is a red plant pigment found in tomatoes, apricots, guavas, watermelons, papayas, and pink grapefruits, with tomatoes being the largest contributor to the dietary intake of humans. Lycopene exhibits higher singlet oxygen quenching ability. Due to its strong color and nontoxicity, it is a useful food coloring agent. Moreover, it plays a multifunctional role as a nonsurgical aid in the treatment of oral diseases like leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and also prevents the destruction of periodontal tissues. This review article focuses mainly on the role of lycopene in the prevention of various oral diseases. PMID:26330986

  7. Role of Lycopene in Preventing Oral Diseases as a Nonsurgical Aid of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur; Arora, Vikram; Mehta, Nishant; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Without pigments, we are nothing. Life presents us with a kaleidoscope of colors. From the green grass of home to a forest's ruddy autumn hues, we are surrounded by living colors. Living things obtain their colors, with few exceptions, from natural pigments. In addition to their role in coloration, natural pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. Of the various classes of pigments in nature, the carotenoids are among the most widespread and important ones, especially due to their varied functions. Lycopene is a red plant pigment found in tomatoes, apricots, guavas, watermelons, papayas, and pink grapefruits, with tomatoes being the largest contributor to the dietary intake of humans. Lycopene exhibits higher singlet oxygen quenching ability. Due to its strong color and nontoxicity, it is a useful food coloring agent. Moreover, it plays a multifunctional role as a nonsurgical aid in the treatment of oral diseases like leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and also prevents the destruction of periodontal tissues. This review article focuses mainly on the role of lycopene in the prevention of various oral diseases. PMID:26330986

  8. Effectiveness of ozone against periodontal pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Huth, Karin C; Quirling, Martina; Lenzke, Stefanie; Paschos, Ekaterini; Kamereck, Klaus; Brand, Korbinian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2011-06-01

    Ozone has been proposed as an adjunct antiseptic in periodontitis therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effectiveness of gaseous/aqueous ozone, in comparison with that of the established antiseptic chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), against periodontal microorganisms. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Parvimonas micra in planktonic or biofilm cultures were exposed, for 1 min, to gaseous ozone, aqueous ozone, CHX, or phosphate-buffered saline (control). None of the agents was able to substantially reduce the A. actinomycetemcomitans count in biofilm cultures. In contrast, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. micra could be eliminated by 2% CHX or by ozone gas at 53 gm(-3) . Significantly greater antimicrobial effects were observed against planktonic cultures than against biofilm-associated bacteria. The rate of killing was influenced by the species of bacteria, and by the type and concentration of agent. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of aqueous ozone (20 μg ml(-1) ) or gaseous ozone (≥ 4 gm(-3) ) compared with 2% CHX but they were more effective than 0.2% CHX. Therefore, high-concentrated gaseous and aqueous ozone merit further investigation as antiseptics in periodontitis therapy. A safe system for applying gaseous ozone into the periodontal pocket that avoids inhalation still needs to be developed.

  9. Endo-periodontal lesion--endodontic approach.

    PubMed

    Jivoinovici, R; Suciu, I; Dimitriu, B; Perlea, P; Bartok, R; Malita, M; Ionescu, C

    2014-01-01

    Endo-perio lesions might be interdependent because of the vascular and anatomic connections between the pulp and the periodontium. The aim of this study is to emphasise that primary endodontic lesion heals after a proper instrumentation, disinfection and sealing of the endodontic space. The primary endodontic lesion with a secondary periodontal involvement first requires an endodontic therapy and, in the second stage, a periodontal therapy. The prognosis is good, with an adequate root canal treatment; it depends on the severity of the periodontal disease, appropriate healing time and the response to the treatment. A correct diagnosis is sometimes difficult; an accurate identification of the etiologic factors is important for an adequate treatment. Primary perio-endo lesion may heal after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system, the one-year follow-up radiograph showing bonny repair. Invasive periodontal procedures should be avoided at that moment. The microorganisms and by-products from the infected root canal may cross accessory and furcal canals and determine sinus tract and loss of attachment. In both clinical cases presented in this article, successful healing was obtained after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system.

  10. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia Furtado; Huang, Hong; McAninley, Suzanna; Alfant, Barnett; Harrison, Peter; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Walker, Clay; Shaddox, Luciana Macchion

    2015-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteinases reported to mediate multiple functions associated with periodontal destruction and inflammation. We have previously reported high MMP levels in African-American children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). However, little is known about MMP reductions in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after therapy. This study aimed to evaluate MMP levels in the GCF following treatment of LAP and to correlate these levels with clinical response. Methods GCF samples were collected from 29 African-American individuals diagnosed with LAP. GCF was collected from one diseased site (pocket depth [PD]>4mm, bleeding on probing [BoP] and clinical attachment level [CAL] ≥2mm) and one healthy site (PD≤3mm, no BoP) from each individual at baseline, 3 and 6 months after periodontal treatment, which consisted of full-mouth SRP and systemic antibiotics. The volume of GCF was controlled using a calibrated gingival fluid meter and levels of MMP-1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 were assessed using fluorometric kits. Results MMP-1, 8, 9 12, and 13 levels were reduced significantly up to 6 months, at which point were comparable with healthy sites. Significant correlations were noted between MMP-2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 levels and % of sites with PD>4mm. MMP-3, 12 and 13 levels also correlated with mean pocket depth of affected sites. Conclusion Treatment of LAP with SRP and systemic antibiotics was effective in reducing the local levels specific MMPs in African-American individuals, which correlated positively with some clinical parameters. PMID:23537121

  11. Dens in dente: A minimally invasive nonsurgical approach!

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek; Morawala, Abdul; Gupta, Abhilasha; Khandwawala, Naqiyaa

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus, also known as dens in dente, is a rare anomaly affecting human dentition. The condition results in invagination of an amelodental structure within the pulp. This case report discusses the current management protocol of dens invaginatus using a minimally invasive and nonsurgical treatment option. As with most conditions, early diagnosis and preventive measures help minimize complications in dens invaginatus cases. PMID:27656073

  12. Dens in dente: A minimally invasive nonsurgical approach!

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek; Morawala, Abdul; Gupta, Abhilasha; Khandwawala, Naqiyaa

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus, also known as dens in dente, is a rare anomaly affecting human dentition. The condition results in invagination of an amelodental structure within the pulp. This case report discusses the current management protocol of dens invaginatus using a minimally invasive and nonsurgical treatment option. As with most conditions, early diagnosis and preventive measures help minimize complications in dens invaginatus cases.

  13. Periodontitis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela; Deglovic, Juraj; Varga, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Today's knowledge and studies show a firm correlation between osteoporosis and periodontitis, particularly in postmenopausal women. This review study deals with epidemiological and etiopathogenetic association between chronic periodontitis and an osteoporosis. A special emphasis is put on explanation of possible relations between a premature tooth loss and decrease of length and density of jaw bones, particularly their alveolar prolongations. The second part of the paper deals with principles of treatment in patients suffering of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis reduces density of jaw bones and decreases a number of teeth in jaws, but it does not affect other clinical signs and markers of periodontitis such as inflammation, bleeding and the depth of periodontal pockets and microbial plaque.

  14. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  15. Periodontal parameters following orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis: A before-after clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Paknejad, Mojgan; Yaghobee, Siamak; Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza Rasouli; Bashizadefakhar, Hourieh; Khatami, Masoomeh; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The success of combined periodontal and orthodontic approach in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis patients with the pathologic extruded anterior teeth is a main concern and stability of the treatment results is an important factor to evaluate the treatment. The present study investigated the periodontal parameters at the end of the orthodontic treatment in patients with the aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with an aggressive periodontal disease, extruded maxillary incisors, infrabony defects and probing depth of ≥5 mm were enrolled in this clinical trial (before, after). After periodontal therapy, orthodontic treatment was carried out for intrusion and alignment of teeth. Plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla, root length (RL), and defect dimensions (depth and width) were examined at the end of treatment and three as well as 6 months afterward. The data were subjected to repeated measure ANOVA test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was statistically significant decrease in PPD, PI, and depth of the defects during T0, T3 and T6 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the RL and distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla (P = 0.95). Furthermore, width of the defects demonstrated significant decrease up to T3 (P = 0.042) while no significant changes from 3 months to 6 months were noted (P = 0.59). Conclusion: The results showed that combined periodontal and orthodontic approach would be a successful treatment with acceptable stability in the case of regular follow-up visits and controlled oral hygiene habits. PMID:24379862

  16. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Dabra, Sarita; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Soni, Nitin; Bhatnagar, Rakhi

    2012-11-01

    Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today's medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice. PMID:23559940

  17. Plasmin is essential in preventing periodontitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Lindh, Tomas; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Li, Jinan; Ny, Tor

    2011-08-01

    Periodontitis involves bacterial infection, inflammation of the periodontium, degradation of gum tissue, and alveolar bone resorption, which eventually leads to loss of teeth. To study the role of the broad-spectrum protease plasmin in periodontitis, we examined the oral health of plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, the periodontium was unaffected at all time points studied; in Plg-deficient mice, periodontitis progressed rapidly, within 20 weeks. Morphological study results of Plg-deficient mice revealed detachment of gingival tissue, resorption of the cementum layer, formation of necrotic tissue, and severe alveolar bone degradation. IHC staining showed massive infiltration of neutrophils in the periodontal tissues. Interestingly, doubly deficient mice, lacking both tissue- and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, developed periodontal disease similar to that in Plg-deficient mice; however, mice lacking only tissue- or urokinase-type plasminogen activator remained healthy. Supplementation by injection of Plg-deficient mice with human plasminogen for 10 days led to necrotic tissue absorption, inflammation subsidence, and full regeneration of gum tissues. Notably, there was also partial regrowth of degraded alveolar bone. Taken together, our results show that plasminogen is essential for the maintenance of a healthy periodontium and plays an important role in combating the spontaneous development of chronic periodontitis. Moreover, reversal to healthy status after supplementation of Plg-deficient mice with plasminogen suggests the possibility of using plasminogen for therapy of periodontal diseases.

  18. Periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taichi; Yasuda, Masaaki; Norizuki, Yoshie; Sasaki, Hodaka; Honma, Shinya; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Kato, Tetsuo; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is considered a risk factor in dental implant treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant therapy. A total of 169 patients visiting Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Implantology at Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital were targeted. The following intraoral parameters were measured in each patient: Community Periodontal Index (CPI) score, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and bleeding on probing (BOP). Prevalence of patients with periodontal pockets was high: 38% and 28% of patients had a CPI score of code 3 and 4, respectively. Prevalence of teeth with one or more sites with PPD≥4mm was 27%. Moreover, clinical signs suggestive of periodontitis (PPD, CAL≥4mm) were found in 10-15% of tooth sites. Prevalence rates at sites with severe periodontal breakdown (PPD, CAL≥7mm) were 2-5%. These results further emphasize the importance of thorough periodontal assessment in patients prior to dental implant treatment.

  19. Incidence and time course of dentinal hypersensitivity after periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Beneduce, Carla; Andreana, Sebastiano; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to characterize the incidence and clinical progression of dentinal hypersensitivity after periodontal surgery. Fourteen patients scheduled for open-flap periodontal debridement participated in the study. Ten subjects completed the study and were evaluated for six consecutive weeks after periodontal surgery. Tactile hypersensitivity was assessed using the Yeaple probe; thermal hypersensitivity measurements were obtained using a blast of air from the air/water syringe; and subjective hypersensitivity measurements were obtained using a visual analog scale (VAS). Measurements were taken preoperatively, one week postoperatively, and once a week for the next five consecutive weeks, for a total of six measurements after periodontal surgery. Depending on the stimuli used, dentinal hypersensitivity at one week after periodontal surgery ranged from 67 to 76%. Preoperative tactile and thermal hypersensitivity incidence combined was 30% at baseline. One week after periodontal surgery, the combined incidence had increased to 79%; at six weeks postsurgery, it had decreased to 45%. This study shows that postoperative dentinal hypersensitivity increases at one and three weeks after open-flap periodontal debridement before spontaneously and gradually decreasing to levels similar to those presurgery, even in the absence of desensitizing therapy. PMID:20129876

  20. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  1. Nonsurgical interventions for Peyronie disease: 2011 update.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Anthony J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie disease (PD) arises from the deposition of collagen and fibrin that creates a plaque in the tunica albuginea of the penis. The resulting induration and curvature of the penis leads to sexual dysfunction in many men. Despite the prevalence of the disease and natural history studies that suggest progression, men might not seek therapeutic intervention due to a lack of general knowledge about the disease, its pathophysiology, and treatments aimed at ameliorating its symptoms. Medical therapy using oral, topical, or intralesionally delivered drug is pursued in all but the most severe cases. This review of the literature in the last 4 years attempts to identify new trials of therapies and treatment modalities aimed at altering the PD process. Specifically, we will address clinical trials evaluating oral pharmacotherapies; topical, intralesional, and shockwave therapies; and penile traction devices. We will discuss the level of evidence and support for each of the new clinical trials.

  2. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  3. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    AlSarheed, Maha A.; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S.

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan. PMID:26219452

  4. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome.

    PubMed

    AlSarheed, Maha A; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S

    2015-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan. PMID:26219452

  5. Clinical, Radiographic and Microbiological Evaluation of High Level Laser Therapy, a New Photodynamic Therapy Protocol, in Peri-Implantitis Treatment; a Pilot Experience

    PubMed Central

    Caccianiga, Gianluigi; Rey, Gerard; Baldoni, Marco; Paiusco, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Endosseous implants are widely used to replace missing teeth but mucositis and peri-implantitis are the most frequent long-term complications related with dental implants. Removing all bacterial deposits on contaminated implant surface is very difficult due to implant surface morphology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal potential of photodynamic therapy by using a new high level laser irradiation protocol associated with hydrogen peroxide in peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. 10 patients affected by peri-implantitis were selected for this study. Medical history, photographic documentation, periodontal examination, and periapical radiographs were collected at baseline and 6 months after surgery. Microbiological analysis was performed with PCR Real Time. Each patient underwent nonsurgical periodontal therapy and surgery combined with photodynamic therapy according to High Level Laser Therapy protocol. Results. All peri-implant pockets were treated successfully, without having any complication and not showing significant differences in results. All clinical parameters showed an improvement, with a decrease of Plaque Index (average decrease of 65%, range 23–86%), bleeding on probing (average decrease of 66%, range 26–80%), and probing depth (average decrease of 1,6 mm, range 0,46–2,6 mm). Periapical radiographs at 6 months after surgery showed a complete radiographic filling of peri-implant defect around implants treated. Results showed a decrease of total bacterial count and of all bacterial species, except for Eikenella corrodens, 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Photodynamic therapy using HLLT appears to be a good adjunct to surgical treatment of peri-implantitis. PMID:27379251

  6. Crevicular Fluid Biomarkers and Periodontal Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min; Braun, Thomas M.; Ramseier, Christoph A.; Sugai, Jim V.; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Assess the ability of a panel of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) biomarkers as predictors of periodontal disease progression (PDP). Materials and Methods 100 individuals participated in a 12-month longitudinal investigation and categorized into 4 groups according to their periodontal status. GCF, clinical parameters, and saliva were collected bi-monthly. Sub-gingival plaque and serum were collected bi-annually. For 6 months, no periodontal treatment was provided. At 6-months, patients received periodontal therapy and continued participation from 6-12 months. GCF samples were analyzed by ELISA for MMP-8, MMP-9, OPG, CRP and IL-1β. Differences in median levels of GCF biomarkers were compared between stable and progressing participants using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p=0.05). Clustering algorithm was used to evaluate the ability of oral biomarkers to classify patients as either stable or progressing. Results Eighty-three individuals completed the 6-month monitoring phase. With the exception of GCF C-reactive protein, all biomarkers were significantly higher in the PDP group compared to stable patients. Clustering analysis showed highest sensitivity levels when biofilm pathogens and GCF biomarkers were combined with clinical measures, 74% (95% CI = 61,86). Conclusions Signature of GCF fluid-derived biomarkers combined with pathogens and clinical measures provides a sensitive measure for discrimination of PDP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00277745). PMID:24303954

  7. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26777261

  8. Intentional replantation of periodontally involved and endodontically mistreated tooth.

    PubMed

    Lu, D P

    1986-05-01

    This article presents a case in which a tooth was intentionally replanted after it was endodontically mistreated; there was also a severe periodontal involvement. The unusually long period of time that the tooth survived might be attributed to a different approach to the replantation technique, such as occlusion adjustment prior to replantation, preoperative reduction of oral cavity bacteria and of the harmful aerosols commonly found in the dental operatory, placement of a noneugenol periodontal packing under the acrylic splint to prevent residual liquid monomer from seeping into the periodontal space, use of the patient's own blood and no other material to moisten the root while it was out of the socket, a short extraoral period, loose splinting, complete isolation of the operative site in the oral cavity, and completion of periodontal therapy before intentional replantation.

  9. Salivary Antimicrobial Peptides in Early Detection of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Güncü, Güliz N.; Yilmaz, Dogukan; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K.

    2015-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of periodontitis, an infection-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, there is a complex interaction between the subgingival microbiota and host tissues. A periodontal diagnostic tool for detecting the initiation and progression of the disease, monitoring the response to therapy, or measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression has been of interest for a long time. The value of various enzymes, proteins, and immunoglobulins, which are abundant constituents of saliva, as potential biomarkers has been recognized and extensively investigated for periodontal diseases. Gingival defensins and cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that play an important role in innate immune response. However, their applicability as salivary biomarkers is still under debate. The present review focuses on proteomic biomarkers and antimicrobial peptides, in particular, to be used at early phases of periodontitis. PMID:26734583

  10. Treatment of combined endodontic: periodontic lesion by sealing of palato-radicular groove using biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Mayuri; de Ataide, Ida de Noronha; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Palatoradicular groove is a developmental anomaly which is predominantly found in maxillary lateral incisors. It provides a susceptible alcove for the progression of localised periodontal inflammation which can further cause pulpal involvement. This case report describes the successful treatment of a large periodontic – endodontic lesion usingnon surgical endodontic therapy and biodentine for the sealing of the palatoradicular groove. PMID:25506153

  11. Tele-periodontics - Oral health care at a grass root level

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Haritha

    2015-01-01

    A new concept of tele-periodontics, which merges the innovative technology of telecommunications and the field of periodontics, is proposed. This new field of tele-periodontics will have an infinite potential where access to a specialist will be provided at a grass root level, enhancing effective delivery of therapy and information to the rural and under privileged areas. It would allow the specialist and the patient to interact either by video conferencing (real time) or through supportive information (store and forward) over geographic distances. Different probabilities of tele-periodontics such as tele consultation, tele training, tele education and tele support are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26644730

  12. Autoimmune Neutropenia as a Cause of Periodontal Disease in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Rashewsky, Stephanie; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Stathopoulou, Panagiota

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune neutropenia, autoantibodies attack neutrophils resulting in their destruction or alteration of their function. Since neutrophils have important immunologic functions, aberrations in their homeostasis lead to increased susceptibility to diseases, such as periodontitis. Periodontitis as a manifestation of neutropenia can affect adults and children. In this paper, we describe the treatment of periodontal disease in a 2-year-old female with autoimmune neutropenia. The importance of an interdisciplinary approach, frequent recalls, and meticulous mechanical therapy in stabilizing her periodontal condition, despite ongoing systemic infections is emphasized.

  13. Autoimmune Neutropenia as a Cause of Periodontal Disease in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Rashewsky, Stephanie; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Stathopoulou, Panagiota

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune neutropenia, autoantibodies attack neutrophils resulting in their destruction or alteration of their function. Since neutrophils have important immunologic functions, aberrations in their homeostasis lead to increased susceptibility to diseases, such as periodontitis. Periodontitis as a manifestation of neutropenia can affect adults and children. In this paper, we describe the treatment of periodontal disease in a 2-year-old female with autoimmune neutropenia. The importance of an interdisciplinary approach, frequent recalls, and meticulous mechanical therapy in stabilizing her periodontal condition, despite ongoing systemic infections is emphasized. PMID:26696110

  14. Maternal Periodontitis Treatment and Child Neurodevelopment at 24 to 28 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, James S.; Lussky, Richard C.; Bada, Henrietta; Rawson, Twila; Buttross, L. Susan; Chiriboga, Claudia; DiAngelis, Anthony J.; Novak, M. John; Buchanan, William; Mitchell, Dennis A.; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some maternal infections are associated with impaired infant cognitive and motor performance. Periodontitis results in frequent bacteremia and elevated serum inflammatory mediators. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine if periodontitis treatment in pregnant women affects infant cognitive, motor, or language development. METHODS: Children born to women who had participated in a previous trial were assessed between 24 and 28 months of age by using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Third Edition) and the Preschool Language Scale (Fourth Edition). Information about the pregnancy, neonatal period, and home environment was obtained through chart abstractions, laboratory test results, and questionnaires. We compared infants born to women treated for periodontitis before 21 weeks' gestation (treatment group) or after delivery (controls). In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, associations between change in maternal periodontal condition during pregnancy and neurodevelopment scores were tested by using Student's t tests and linear regression. RESULTS: A total of 411 of 791 eligible mother/caregiver-child pairs participated. Thirty-seven participating children (9.0%) were born at <37 weeks' gestation. Infants in the treatment and control groups did not differ significantly for adjusted mean cognitive (90.7 vs 91.4), motor (96.8 vs 97.2), or language (92.2 vs 92.1) scores (all P > .5). Results were similar in adjusted analyses. Children of women who experienced greater improvements in periodontal health had significantly higher motor and cognitive scores (P = .01 and .02, respectively), although the effect was small (∼1-point increase for each SD increase in the periodontal measure). CONCLUSION: Nonsurgical periodontitis treatment in pregnant women was not associated with cognitive, motor, or language development in these study children. PMID:21482606

  15. Management of diabolical diabetes mellitus and periodontitis nexus: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2016-02-25

    Periodontitis is the commonest oral disease affecting population worldwide. This disease is notorious for the devastation of tooth supporting structures, ensuing in the loss of dentition. The etiology for this disease is bacterial biofilm, which accumulates on the teeth as dental plaque. In addition to the biofilm microorganisms, other factors such as environmental, systemic and genetic are also responsible in progression of periodontitis. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is metabolic disorder which has an impact on the global health. DM plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Periodontitis is declared as the "sixth" major complication of DM. Evidence based literature has depicted an enhanced incidence and severity of periodontitis in subjects with DM. A "two way" relationship has been purported between periodontitis and DM. Mutual management of both conditions is necessary. Periodontal therapy (PT) may assist to diminish the progression of DM and improve glycemic control. Various advanced technological facilities may be utilized for the purpose of patient education and disease management. The present paper clarifies the etio-pathogenesis of periodontitis, establishing it as a complication of DM and elaborating the various mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. The role of PT in amelioration of DM and application of digital communication will be discussed. Overall, it is judicious to create an increased patient cognizance of the periodontitis-DM relationship. Conjunctive efforts must be undertaken by the medical and oral health care professionals for the management of periodontitis affected DM patients. PMID:26962409

  16. Management of diabolical diabetes mellitus and periodontitis nexus: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed Central

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is the commonest oral disease affecting population worldwide. This disease is notorious for the devastation of tooth supporting structures, ensuing in the loss of dentition. The etiology for this disease is bacterial biofilm, which accumulates on the teeth as dental plaque. In addition to the biofilm microorganisms, other factors such as environmental, systemic and genetic are also responsible in progression of periodontitis. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is metabolic disorder which has an impact on the global health. DM plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Periodontitis is declared as the “sixth” major complication of DM. Evidence based literature has depicted an enhanced incidence and severity of periodontitis in subjects with DM. A “two way” relationship has been purported between periodontitis and DM. Mutual management of both conditions is necessary. Periodontal therapy (PT) may assist to diminish the progression of DM and improve glycemic control. Various advanced technological facilities may be utilized for the purpose of patient education and disease management. The present paper clarifies the etio-pathogenesis of periodontitis, establishing it as a complication of DM and elaborating the various mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. The role of PT in amelioration of DM and application of digital communication will be discussed. Overall, it is judicious to create an increased patient cognizance of the periodontitis-DM relationship. Conjunctive efforts must be undertaken by the medical and oral health care professionals for the management of periodontitis affected DM patients. PMID:26962409

  17. Management of diabolical diabetes mellitus and periodontitis nexus: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2016-02-25

    Periodontitis is the commonest oral disease affecting population worldwide. This disease is notorious for the devastation of tooth supporting structures, ensuing in the loss of dentition. The etiology for this disease is bacterial biofilm, which accumulates on the teeth as dental plaque. In addition to the biofilm microorganisms, other factors such as environmental, systemic and genetic are also responsible in progression of periodontitis. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is metabolic disorder which has an impact on the global health. DM plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Periodontitis is declared as the "sixth" major complication of DM. Evidence based literature has depicted an enhanced incidence and severity of periodontitis in subjects with DM. A "two way" relationship has been purported between periodontitis and DM. Mutual management of both conditions is necessary. Periodontal therapy (PT) may assist to diminish the progression of DM and improve glycemic control. Various advanced technological facilities may be utilized for the purpose of patient education and disease management. The present paper clarifies the etio-pathogenesis of periodontitis, establishing it as a complication of DM and elaborating the various mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. The role of PT in amelioration of DM and application of digital communication will be discussed. Overall, it is judicious to create an increased patient cognizance of the periodontitis-DM relationship. Conjunctive efforts must be undertaken by the medical and oral health care professionals for the management of periodontitis affected DM patients.

  18. Management of non-surgical pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Antonio José; González Valverde, Francisco Miguel; Méndez Martínez, Marcelino

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the best approach to feeding patients not eligible for oral nutrition who have a functioning digestive system. Pneumoperitoneum after PEG is a relatively common complication. As regards management, the most important decision is whether conservative therapy or an exploratory laparotomy should be indicated. We report the case of a patient with giant pneumoperitoneum following PEG, who was successfully managed with percutaneous air drainage. PMID:27643818

  19. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  20. [Control of generalized chronic periodontitis combined with calcium-antagonist-related gingival overgrowth by a complex periodontal-endodontic-prosthodontic treatment. Case report].

    PubMed

    Szánto, Erika; Gera, István

    2011-12-01

    To day a relatively high percentage of elderly population of the industrialized world suffers with different cardiovascular diseases and are on permanent antihypertensive therapy. One of the most frequently used drugs is the calcium channel blockers prescribed against high blood pressure. The most common oral side effect of these drugs is the gingival enlargement that might develop even on otherwise healthy gingiva. The incidence of chronic periodontitis in this age group is also high and the Ca antagonist medication in those individuals might substantially modify the clinical course of periodontal inflammation leading to gingival enlargement and hypertrophic pocket wall. The case presented here is a 52 years old hypertonic woman with a long history of Ca-antagonist therapy and generalized chronic periodontitis combined with gingival hyperplasia. After the change of medication the 1,5 years comprehensive periodontal endodontic and prosthodontic therapy restored patient's periodontal health and provided complex dental rehabilitation. Nevertheless, only regular periodontal supportive therapy could ensure predictable outcome and guarantee long lasting periodontal health. PMID:22308953

  1. [Control of generalized chronic periodontitis combined with calcium-antagonist-related gingival overgrowth by a complex periodontal-endodontic-prosthodontic treatment. Case report].

    PubMed

    Szánto, Erika; Gera, István

    2011-12-01

    To day a relatively high percentage of elderly population of the industrialized world suffers with different cardiovascular diseases and are on permanent antihypertensive therapy. One of the most frequently used drugs is the calcium channel blockers prescribed against high blood pressure. The most common oral side effect of these drugs is the gingival enlargement that might develop even on otherwise healthy gingiva. The incidence of chronic periodontitis in this age group is also high and the Ca antagonist medication in those individuals might substantially modify the clinical course of periodontal inflammation leading to gingival enlargement and hypertrophic pocket wall. The case presented here is a 52 years old hypertonic woman with a long history of Ca-antagonist therapy and generalized chronic periodontitis combined with gingival hyperplasia. After the change of medication the 1,5 years comprehensive periodontal endodontic and prosthodontic therapy restored patient's periodontal health and provided complex dental rehabilitation. Nevertheless, only regular periodontal supportive therapy could ensure predictable outcome and guarantee long lasting periodontal health.

  2. Effect of Alendronate with β – TCP Bone Substitute in Surgical Therapy of Periodontal Intra-Osseous Defects: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Vishali; Subbaraya, Dwijendra Kocherlakota; Prasanna, Jammula Surya; Panthula, Veerendranath Reddy; Koduganti, Rekha Rani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate, inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption and also stimulates osteogenesis. Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive graft material which provides a scaffold for bone formation and also a widely used drug delivery vehicle for growth factors and antibiotics. Drug delivery vehicles, like β-TCP, improve the potency of the drugs by specific local site delivery of the drug, optimal release characteristics and easy handling. Aim The aim of the this study was to evaluate the bone formation potential of 400μg ALN delivered in β-TCP in the treatment of periodontal intra-osseous defects. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with periodontal defects were randomly assigned to 400μg ALN + β-TCP + Saline (test) group and β-TCP + Saline (active-control) group. Clinical parameters like Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) gain, Probing Depth (PD) reduction, post-operative Gingival Recession (GR) were assessed from the baseline, 3 months and 6 months recordings. Radiographic parameters like Linear Bone Growth (LBG), Percentage Bone Fill (%BF), and change in alveolar crest height (ACH) were assessed from baseline and 6 months radiographs. Results Mean measurements in the ALN test group for CAL gain (3.4 ± 0.74 mm), PD reduction (4.33 ± 0.82 mm), LBG (2.88 ± 0.88 mm), and %BF (51.98 ± 15.84%) were significantly greater with a p-value <0.05 compared to the mean measurements of CAL gain (2.20 ± 0.86 mm), PD reduction (3.20 ± 1.15 mm), LBG (1.70 ± 0.39 mm), and %BF (30.35 ± 6.88%) of the control group. There was mild alveolar crestal apposition (0.32 ± 0.68 mm) in the ALN test group and mild alveolar crestal resorption (-0.24 ± 0.40 mm) in the control group. Conclusion 400μg ALN combined with β-TCP bone graft material was effective in improving soft tissue parameters, inhibiting alveolar crestal resorption and enhancing bone formation, compared to β-TCP alone. PMID:27656552

  3. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Rajkumar; Gokulanathan, Subramanium; Shanmugasundaram, Natarajan; Lakshmigandhan, Mahalingam; Kavin, Thangavelu

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each. PMID:23066270

  4. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K R; Dinesh, M; Pavithran, K

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule. PMID:27366272

  5. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K. R.; Dinesh, M.; Pavithran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule. PMID:27366272

  6. Nonsurgical hand rejuvenation with Dermicol-P35 30G.

    PubMed

    Inglefield, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic hand rejuvenation and restoration have been relatively overlooked compared with other aesthetic enhancements. Cosmetic dermal fillers provide physicians and patients with a nonsurgical option for restoring volume and a youthful appearance to the aging and damaged hand. This paper presents the clinical experience of patients who received Dermicol-P35 30G (Evolence Breeze; Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ) injection for rejuvenation and restoration of the hand.

  7. Prognostic indicators for failed nonsurgical reduction of intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Singhavejsakul, Jesda; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Siriwongmongkol, Jakraphan; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the risk factors for failure of nonsurgical reduction of intussusception. Methods Data from intussusception patients who were treated with nonsurgical reduction in Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital between January 2006 and December 2012 were collected. Patients aged 0–15 years and without contraindications (peritonitis, abdominal X-ray signs of perforation, and/or hemodynamic instability) were included for nonsurgical reduction. The success and failure groups were divided according to the results of the reduction. Prognostic indicators for failed reduction were identified by using generalized linear model for exponential risk regression. The risk ratio (RR) was used to report each factor. Results One hundred and ninety cases of intussusception were enrolled. Twenty cases were excluded due to contraindications. A total of 170 cases of intussusception were included for the final analysis. The significant risk factors for reduction failure clustered by an age of 3 years were weight <12 kg (RR =1.48, P=0.004), symptom duration >3 days (RR =1.26, P<0.001), vomiting (RR =1.63, P<0.001), rectal bleeding (RR =1.50, P<0.001), abdominal distension (RR =1.60, P=0.003), temperature >37.8°C (RR =1.51, P<0.001), palpable abdominal mass (RR =1.26, P<0.001), location of mass (left over right side) (RR =1.48, P<0.001), poor prognostic signs on ultrasound scans (RR =1.35, P<0.001), and method of reduction (hydrostatic over pneumatic) (RR =1.34, P=0.023). The prediction ability of this model was 82.21% as assessed from the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Conclusion The identified prognostic factors for the nonsurgical reduction failure may help to predict the reduction outcome and provide information to the parents. PMID:27563245

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001). Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and

  9. Photodynamic dosimetry in the treatment of periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. However, the translation of in vitro work to in vivo clinical efficacy has been difficult due to the number of variables present in any given patient. Parameters such as photosensitizer concentration, duration of light therapy and amount of light delivered to the target tissue all play a role in the dose response of PDT in vivo. In this 121 patient study we kept all parameters the same except for light dose which was delivered at either 150 mW or 220 mW. This clearly demonstrated the clinical benefits of a higher light dose in the treatment of periodontitis.

  10. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  11. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  12. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirrielees, Jeffrey; Crofford, Leslie J.; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis influenced levels of salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease. Methods Medical assessments, periodontal examinations, and pain ratings were obtained from 35 rheumatoid arthritis, 35 chronic periodontitis and 35 age and gender-matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix-metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α concentrations. Results The arthritis and healthy groups had significantly less oral disease than the periodontitis group (p<0.0001), with the arthritis group having significantly more sites bleeding on probing (BOP) than matched controls (p=0.012). Salivary levels of MMP-8 and IL-1β were significantly elevated in the periodontal disease group (p≤0.002), and IL-1β was the only biomarker with significantly higher levels in the arthritis group compared with controls (p=0.002). Arthritis patients receiving anti-TNF-α antibody therapy had significantly lower IL-1β and TNF-α levels compared with arthritis patients not on anti-TNF-α therapy (p=0.016, p=0.024) and healthy controls (p<0.001, p=0.011), respectively. Conclusion Rheumatoid arthritis patients have higher levels of periodontal inflammation than healthy controls, ie. increased BOP. Systemic inflammation appears to influence levels of select salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease, and anti-TNF-α antibody-based disease modifying therapy significantly lowers salivary IL-1β and TNF-α levels in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20880053

  14. Periodontal disease and systemic complications.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Weidlich, Patricia; Musskopf, Marta Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health. PMID:23318743

  15. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  16. Saliva: A diagnostic biomarker of periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Patil, Priti Basgauda; Patil, Basgauda Ramesh

    2011-10-01

    Early detection of disease plays a crucial role in successful therapy. Early diagnosis and management reduces the severity and possible complications of the disease process. To overcome this challenge, medical researchers are devoted to finding molecular disease biomarkers that reveal a hidden lethal threat before the disease becomes complicated. Saliva, an important physiologic fluid, containing a highly complex mixture of substances, is rapidly gaining popularity as a diagnostic tool. Periodontal disease is a chronic disease of the oral cavity comprising a group of inflammatory conditions affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. In the field of periodontology, traditional clinical criteria are often insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Saliva, as a mirror of oral and systemic health, is a valuable source for clinically relevant information because it contains biomarkers specific for the unique physiologic aspects of periodontal diseases. This review highlights the various potentials of saliva as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal diseases.

  17. The Application of Microencapsulation Techniques in the Treatment of Endodontic and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Asteria Luzardo; Espinar, Francisco Otero; Méndez, José Blanco

    2011-01-01

    In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. Microparticles made from biodegradable polymers have been reported to be an effective means of delivering antibacterial drugs in endodontic and periodontal therapy. The aim of this review article is to assess recent therapeutic strategies in which biocompatible microparticles are used for effective management of periodontal and endodontic diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain microparticle formulations and devices are presented. Future directions in the application of microencapsulation techniques in endodontic and periodontal therapies are discussed. PMID:24310596

  18. Novel and often bizarre strategies in the treatment of periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Jaya; Anumala, Naveen; Avula, Haritha

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of periodontal disease involves complex mechanical, surgical, and medical modalities. Some of the treatment regimens are patient centered, some involve a great amount of technical expertise and competence from a practitioner, and often involve complex procedures like use of tissue-engineered products. In spite of several advances, treatment of periodontal disease depends on scaling and root planing and various surgical procedures as the mainstay, but results of treatment are not always predictable and are often frustrating. The ultimate aim of periodontal treatment is regeneration of periodontal tissues and more particularly lost alveolar bone support. The treatment options include a myriad of approaches and scientists and researchers have tried various tools and agents to improve alveolar bone status and improve periodontal health. These approaches vary from simple monotherapy with systemic antibiotic usage to exotic and novel procedures like shock wave therapy, photodynamic therapy and application. PMID:22628955

  19. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration: a review of ceramics and polymers.

    PubMed

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect.

  20. Herbs as an antioxidant arsenal for periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Asha; Varghese, Sheeja Saji; Doraiswamy, Jayakumar Nadathur; Malaiappan, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines have long been used as a traditional mode of therapy for various ailments in India. They are being used increasingly as dietary supplements to ward off common diseases. Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the world population. Gingivitis is the mild form whereas periodontitis results in an irreversible loss of supporting structures of the teeth. Even though periodontal pathogens form a crucial component in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting oxidative stress playing a pivotal role in the disease initiation and progression. Studies have shown a direct correlation between increased levels of biomarkers for tissue damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the severity of periodontal disease. Thus, the focus of attention has revolved back to herbal medicines due to their wide spectrum of biological and medicinal activities, lower costs, and higher safety margin. Internet databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched, and the most relevant articles were considered for review. This review briefly describes the various herbs with antioxidant capacity and their potency in the treating periodontal disease. PMID:27069730

  1. Herbs as an antioxidant arsenal for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Asha; Varghese, Sheeja Saji; Doraiswamy, Jayakumar Nadathur; Malaiappan, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines have long been used as a traditional mode of therapy for various ailments in India. They are being used increasingly as dietary supplements to ward off common diseases. Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the world population. Gingivitis is the mild form whereas periodontitis results in an irreversible loss of supporting structures of the teeth. Even though periodontal pathogens form a crucial component in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting oxidative stress playing a pivotal role in the disease initiation and progression. Studies have shown a direct correlation between increased levels of biomarkers for tissue damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the severity of periodontal disease. Thus, the focus of attention has revolved back to herbal medicines due to their wide spectrum of biological and medicinal activities, lower costs, and higher safety margin. Internet databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched, and the most relevant articles were considered for review. This review briefly describes the various herbs with antioxidant capacity and their potency in the treating periodontal disease. PMID:27069730

  2. Prescribing for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, Fiona M; Chapple, Iain L C

    2014-11-01

    With concerns about the ever-increasing development of antimicrobial resistance, it is imperative that antimicrobials are prescribed responsibly and used appropriately. This article provides an overview and simple guidelines for antimicrobial prescribing in the management of periodontal diseases. PMID:25668374

  3. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  4. Decreased bone mineral density and periodontal management.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Michael S; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-02-01

    The definition of osteoporosis has evolved beyond low bone mineral density to include impaired bone morphology and matrix properties. As such, the subsequent bone density insufficiencies extend beyond the skeletal risks of fracture and have implications for oral health management patients. As our population ages there is a worldwide increase in the risk of decreased bone mineral density and its subsequent morbidity. This makes age an independent risk factor for fracture and decreased bone mineral density. Multiple examinations and diagnostic tests are currently used in combination to develop an algorithm to assess osteoporotic risk. Oral health care professionals should follow these principles and caution should be used in applying a single independent assessment to determine a patient's osteoporotic or bone metabolism risk. Therapeutic approaches for osteoporosis are often divided into nonpharmacological interventions and pharmacological therapies. The periodontist and other oral health care professionals should have a full understanding of the therapeutic options, benefits and implementation of preventive therapies. Bone turnover is a coupled event of bone formation and bone resorption and it is the imbalance of this homeostasis that results in osteoporosis. Based on this uncoupling of bone resorption and formation, osteoporosis or decreased bone mineral density and osteopenia, may be a risk factor for alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. The role of prevention and maintenance with a history of periodontitis and oesteopenia extends beyond biofilm control and should include management of bone mineral density. The chronic periodontal infection in a patient with osteopenia may place the patient at greatly increased risk for alveolar bone loss, gingival recession and root caries. A key component in the management is the oral health professional's knowledge of the interrelationship between skeletal health and periodontal health.

  5. Periodontal treatment to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients: study protocol of the randomized, controlled DIAPERIO trial

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Arrivé, Elise; Gourdy, Pierre; Hanaire, Hélène; Rigalleau, Vincent; Gin, Henri; Sédarat, Cyril; Dorignac, Georges; Bou, Christophe; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of tissues supporting the teeth. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown increased frequency, extent and severity of periodontitis among diabetic adults. More recently, some controlled clinical trials have also suggested that periodontal treatment could improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients. However current evidence does not provide sufficient information on which to confidently base any clinical recommendations. The main objective of this clinical trial is to assess whether periodontal treatment could lead to a decrease in glycated haemoglobin levels in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Methods The DIAPERIO trial is an open-label, 13-week follow-up, randomized, controlled trial. The total target sample size is planned at 150 participants, with a balanced (1:1) treatment allocation (immediate treatment vs delayed treatment). Periodontal treatment will include full mouth non-surgical scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotherapy, local antiseptics (chlorhexidine 0.12%) and oral health instructions. The primary outcome will be the difference in change of HbA1c between the two groups after the 13-weeks' follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be the difference in change of fructosamine levels and quality of life between the two groups. Discussion The DIAPERIO trial will provide insight into the question of whether periodontal treatment could lead to an improvement in glycaemic control in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from periodontitis. The results of this trial will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians and a draft framework for designing national health policies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15334496 PMID:19646281

  6. Nonsurgical Treatment of a Massive Substance Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Pasquale; Paolo, Fioramonti; Massera, Diego; Amorosi, Vittoria; Onesti, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic wounds are caused by severe trauma, resulting in lesions with extensive skin and subcutaneous tissue loss and damage to tissue viability. A “difficult wound” is a solution of continuity that does not heal spontaneously within three months. The factors that determine it may be as follows: a massive loss of substance, an infection, the presence of foreign bodies, or the clinical condition of the patient. We report a case of a 25-year-old man that presents a skin lesion on the anterior region of the left arm with extensive necrosis of skin and subcutaneous plants that involve the underlying muscle planes, caused by a trauma due to a car accident. In most of the lesions of such size and position, there is always a need for surgery. But in this case, considering the young age and the regenerative capacity of the patient, a quick and targeted antibiotic therapy was chosen, combined with debridement and worked with collagenase ointment. PMID:24073001

  7. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26278788

  8. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-08-17

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Surgical and Non-Surgical Interventions for Obesity in Service of Preserving Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Andreana P.; Alosco, Michael L.; Gunstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to highlight what is currently known about the mechanisms of obesity-related cognitive impairment and weight-loss-related cognitive improvement, and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of available treatments. Methods The manuscript is based on a live debate, presenting the main advantages and disadvantages of exercise interventions and bariatric surgery as related to cognitive functioning. The live debate took place during a one-day conference on Diabetes, Obesity and the Brain, organized by the American Psychosomatic Society in October of 2013. Results While it is well established that bariatric surgery tends to lead to greater weight loss, better glycemic control, and cognitive improvement (effect sizes ranging between 0.61 to 0.78) during the first one to two years post intervention than non-surgical treatments, medical complications are possible, and follow-up data beyond five years is limited. In contrast, non-surgical therapies have been extensively studied in a variety of clinical settings and have proved that they can sustain positive health outcomes up to 10 years later, but their cognitive benefits tend to be more modest (effect sizes ranging from 0.18 to 0.69) and long-term regiment compliance, especially in obese individuals is uncertain. Conclusions Rather than focusing on debating whether surgical or no-surgical interventions for obesity are better, additional research is needed to identify the most efficient and practical combination of approaches to ensure sustained positive health outcomes for the largest number of patients possible. PMID:26163819

  10. Nonsurgical treatment of moderate and advanced periimplantitis lesions: a controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Bieling, Katrin; Bonsmann, Martin; Latz, Thilo; Becker, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this controlled, parallel design clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an Er:YAG (erbium-doped:yttrium, aluminum, and garnet) laser for nonsurgical treatment of periimplantitis lesions. Twenty patients, each of whom displayed at least one implant with (a) moderate and (b) advanced periimplantitis (n=40 implants; IMZ, ITI, Spline Twist, ZL-Duraplant, Camlog), were randomly instrumented nonsurgically using either (1) an Er:YAG laser (100 mJ/pulse, 10 Hz) device (LAS) or (2) mechanical debridement using plastic curettes and antiseptic therapy with chlorhexidine digluconate (0.2%) (C). The following clinical parameters were measured at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment: plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Mean BOP improved significantly in both groups at 3, 6, and 12 months (a- lesions: P<0.001 and b- lesions: P<0.01, respectively). After 3 and 6 months, the mean reduction of BOP was significantly higher in the LAS group when compared to the C group (a- and b- lesions: P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). At 3 and 6 months, both groups revealed significant CAL gains at a- and b- lesions (P<0.01, respectively). In both groups, however, the mean CAL at a- and b- lesions was not significantly different from the respective baseline values at 12 months (P>0.05, respectively). Although treatment of periimplantitis lesions with LAS resulted in a significantly higher BOP reduction than C, its effectiveness seemed to be limited to a period of 6 months, particularly at b- lesions.

  11. Severe Periodontal Disease Associated with Long-Term Treatment with Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Rocha, Amanda Leal; Costa, Lidiane Cristina Machado; Travassos, Denise; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used in the treatment of neuropathy. This case report presents, for the first time, a patient with severe periodontal destruction after chronic therapy with IVIG. The patient reported having extracted his maxillary anterior teeth himself due to high mobility. Clinical examination and radiographic images show a generalized and severe periodontitis. No significant alterations in genetic or microbiological features were observed. The present case suggests that periodontal disease aggravation could be considered a new adverse effect of IVIG therapy. Postulated mechanisms are immune complexes formation, complement activation, and a direct effect in osteoclasts. In conclusion, it is important that patients that will receive IVIG treatment underwent dental evaluation. PMID:25379295

  12. Periodontal disease exacerbates systemic ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Anbinder, Ana Lia; Moraes, Renata M; Lima, Gabriela M G; Oliveira, Felipe E; Campos, Débora R C; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Oliveira, Luciane D; Junqueira, Juliana C; Ma, Yun; Elefteriou, Florent

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal pathogens and/or inflammatory products from periodontitis participate in the development or progression of systemic diseases. In this context, periodontitis acts as a modifying factor to systemic health, including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Osteoporosis is an increasingly prevalent condition in our aging population and considered a risk factor for periodontal disease, but the effect of periodontitis on systemic bone homeostasis is unknown. We thus evaluated the effects of experimental periodontitis (EP) on systemic bone loss and the influence of estrogen deficiency in this context, using a mouse model of combined periodontitis and osteoporosis. Experimental periodontitis (EP) was induced by a ligature insertion around the mandibular first molars and Porphyromonas gingivalis infection. Three-dimensional microcomputed tomographic analyses performed 48days following infection revealed that EP and ovariectomy (OVX) induced a significantly higher femoral and mandibular bone loss compared to EP or OVX alone. EP alone did not induce systemic bone loss. In addition, the EP+OVX and EP groups showed significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α than OVX and control groups at end point. These results suggest that periodontitis could be a risk factor for systemic bone loss, especially in post-menopausal women, and warrant further clinical investigations to confirm this association and propose adapted prophylactic and curative therapies.

  13. Correlation of alkaline phosphatase activity to clinical parameters of inflammation in smokers suffering from chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vishakha; Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Bither, Rupika; Sachdeva, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Current clinical periodontal diagnostic techniques emphasize the assessment of clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal diseases which can provide a measure of history of disease. Hence, new methodologies for early identification and determination of periodontal disease activity need to be explored which will eventually result in expedited treatment. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation in smokers with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Study population included 15 smoker male patients in the age group of 35–55 years suffering from moderate generalized chronic periodontitis with history of smoking present. Following parameters were evaluated at baseline, 1 month and 3 months after scaling and root planing: plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PD), relative attachment level (RAL), and GCF ALP activity. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent variables for measurements over time were analyzed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: A statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters and GCF ALP activity was observed from baseline to 1 month and 3 months. A correlation was observed between change in GCF ALP activity and PD reduction as well as gain in RAL at 3 months. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes that total ALP activity could be used as a marker for periodontal disease activity in smokers. Estimation of changes in the levels of this enzyme has a potential to aid in the detection of progression of periodontal disease and monitoring the response to periodontal therapy. PMID:27563197

  14. A Filifactor alocis-centered co-occurrence group associates with periodontitis across different oral habitats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Menghui; Wang, Guoyang; Qi, Zhengnan; Bridgewater, Laura; Zhao, Liping; Tang, Zisheng; Pang, Xiaoyan

    2015-03-12

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent polymicrobial disease worldwide, yet the synergistic pattern of the multiple oral pathogens involved is still poorly characterized. Here, saliva, supragingival and subgingival plaque samples from periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy volunteers were collected and profiled with 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Different oral habitats harbored significantly different microbiota, and segregation of microbiota composition between periodontitis and health was observed as well. Two-step redundancy analysis identified twenty-one OTUs, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Filifactor alocis, as potential pathogens that were significantly associated with periodontitis and with two periodontitis diagnostic parameters (pocket depth and attachment loss) in both saliva and supragingival plaque habitats. Interestingly, pairwise correlation analysis among the 21 OTUs revealed that Filifactor alocis was positively correlated with seven other putative pathogens (R > 0.6, P < 0.05), forming a co-occurrence group that was remarkably enriched in all three habitats of periodontitis patients. This bacterial cluster showed a higher diagnostic value for periodontitis than did any individual potential pathogens, especially in saliva. Thus, our study identified a potential synergistic ecological pattern involving eight co-infecting pathogens across various oral habitats, providing a new framework for understanding the etiology of periodontitis and developing new diagnoses and therapies.

  15. Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease in Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, William Michael; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Salivary biomarkers of periodontitis were assessed longitudinally to determine response to therapy. Methods A 6-month case-controlled study of adults with chronic periodontitis was performed, with 33 participants receiving oral hygiene instructions (OHI) alone and 35 with scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with OHI. Saliva samples collected at week 0, 16 and 28 were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α. Clinical measures of periodontal disease were recorded at each visit. Results All parameters of periodontal health improved significantly in both groups by week 16 (p<0.0001) with the SRP group demonstrating greater benefit at week 16 and 28. Baseline OPG and TNF-α levels changed significantly at both follow-up visits (p<0.03), regardless of treatment group. IL-1β and MMP-8 levels decreased significantly from baseline (p≤0.04) in the SRP group only. OPG, MMP-8 and MIP-1α were significantly reduced in responders compared with non-responders (p=0.04, 0.01, 0.05 respectively). In receiver operating characteristic analyses, MMP-8 produced the highest area under the curve (≥ 0.7; p=0.01). Conclusion Salivary levels of IL-1β, MMP-8, OPG and MIP-1α reflected disease severity and response to therapy suggesting their potential utility for monitoring periodontal disease status. PMID:21480939

  16. Non-surgical options for the management of gallstone disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cuschieri, A

    1990-01-01

    The modalities for the non-surgical treatment of gallstones include oral dissolution by bile salts, local dissolution by methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and percutaneous gallstone clearance. The results of oral bile salt therapy for cholesterol stones have been disappointing, and the only indication for this treatment is after ESWL. The high efficacy initially reported for MTBE has not been confirmed by subsequent experience in other centres: this therapy is toxic and best confined to specialized centres. ESWL, though effective in noncalcified stones, has limited overall applicability (approx. 15%) and is frequently followed by recurrence despite maintenance therapy with oral bile salts. Percutaneous gallstone clearance (radiologic or laparoscopic) has been superseded by laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This offers definitive treatment in a single session and has significant advantages over open cholecystectomy in terms of short hospital stay and accelerated recovery with early return to work or full activity. Destruction of the gallbladder by sclerosant agents (chemical cholecystectomy) requires further experimental evaluation before its introduction to clinical practice.

  17. Nonsurgical Management of Severe Osteonecrosis of the Knee in an HIV-Positive Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Stephanie A.; O'Brien, Kelly K.; Rubin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Due to the life-prolonging effects of combination antiretroviral therapy, many people with HIV are living longer. However, this enhanced longevity is often mirrored by increased disability resulting from HIV and/or the adverse effects of medication. Management of HIV-positive patients is further complicated by comorbidities related to aging, including bone and joint disorders. In this paper, we describe the nonsurgical management of an HIV-positive patient with premature onset of severe osteonecrosis of the knee. A 50-year-old man who had been HIV-positive for 16 years and on combination antiretroviral therapy for 11 years presented to his family physician with extreme discomfort in his right knee. He was diagnosed with osteonecrosis of the right knee, but resisted total knee arthroplasty because of potential complications under anesthesia related to comorbid advanced liver disease. Instead, a successful combination of non-surgical management strategies was employed by the patient and his health care team. PMID:22570802

  18. Cell- and Gene-Based Therapeutic Strategies for Periodontal Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Hector F.; Lin, Zhao; Oh, BiNa; Park, Chan Ho; Giannobile, William V.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are a leading cause of tooth loss and are linked to multiple systemic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. Reconstruction of the support and function of affected tooth-supporting tissues represents an important therapeutic endpoint for periodontal regenerative medicine. An improved understanding of periodontal biology coupled with current advances in scaffolding matrices has introduced novel treatments that use cell and gene therapy to enhance periodontal tissue reconstruction and its biomechanical integration. Cell and gene delivery technologies have the potential to overcome limitations associated with existing periodontal therapies, and may provide a new direction in sustainable inflammation control and more predictable tissue regeneration of supporting alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and cementum. This review provides clinicians with the current status of these early-stage and emerging cell- and gene-based therapeutics in periodontal regenerative medicine, and introduces their future application in clinical periodontal treatment. The paper concludes with prospects on the application of cell and gene tissue engineering technologies for reconstructive periodontology. PMID:21284553

  19. Correlation of Levels of Oncostatin M Cytokine in Crevicular Fluid and Serum in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thorat, ManojKumar; AR, Pradeep; Garg, Garima

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to measure the level of Oncostatin M (OSM) a gp130 cytokine in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of chronic periodontitis patients and to find any correlation between them before and after periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing, SRP). Methodology 60 subjects (age 25–50 years) were enrolled into three groups (n=20 per group), group I (healthy), group II (gingivitis) and group III (chronic periodontitis). Group III subjects were followed for 6–8 weeks after the initial periodontal therapy (SRP) as the group IV (after periodontal therapy). Clinical parameters were assessed as gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and radiographic evidence of bone loss. GCF and serum levels of OSM were measured by using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Results It was found that mean OSM levels had been elevated in both the GCF and serum of chronic periodontitis subjects (726.65 ± 283.56 and 65.59 ± 12.37 pg·mL−1, respectively) and these levels were decreased proportionally after the periodontal therapy (95.50 ± 38.85 and 39.98 ± 16.69 pg·mL−1 respectively). However, OSM was detected in GCF of healthy subjects (66.15 ± 28.10 pg·mL−1) and gingivitis-suffering subjects (128.33 ± 22.96 pg·mL−1) and was found as below the detectable limit (≈0.0 pg·mL−1) in the serum of same subjects. Significant correlation has been found between clinical parameters and GCF-serum levels of OSM. Conclusion Increased OSM level both in the GCF and serum, and the decreased levels after initial periodontal therapy (SRP) may suggest a use as an inflammatory bio-marker in the periodontal disease. PMID:21404969

  20. A nonsurgical approach to painful piezogenic pedal papules.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; Holmes, James; Leonard, James A

    2004-05-01

    For more than 3 decades, piezogenic pedal papules have been described in the literature. While many individuals with these papules are asymptomatic, patients with trauma or connective tissue diseases can experience pain. In our case study, we describe a unique, nonsurgical approach that abates the pain of painful piezogenic pedal papule (PPPP). Three injections of a solution of equal parts betamethasone (Celestone) and bupivacaine (Marcaine) were curative in a male patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III with PPPP. In addition, combination steroid/anesthetic injection provides another method of treatment in the management of PPPP. PMID:15186050

  1. Promoting Health Literacy in the Nonsurgical Cosmetic Patient.

    PubMed

    Warren, Hermine

    2016-01-01

    Significant numbers of adults, when presented with basic health care information, have been shown to struggle with their abilities to comprehend and integrate materials presented to them. This lack of perception underscores the essence of health literacy. Even though health literacy is a newer concept, its impact is gathering momentum, as politicians, health care providers, researchers, and the media become more aware of the extent this disparity is seen within the health care system and how it affects patient care. This article explores how nursing philosophy and knowledge development have the capacity to provide a solid infrastructure that may promote increased health literacy among patients within the nonsurgical cosmetic arena.

  2. Non-surgical management of urinary incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Duel, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and neurogenic bladder are common in children, and can be difficult to treat. This themed issue includes contributions by experts in the management of these disorders. Dr. John Kryger discusses the nonsurgical management of neurogenic bladder in children with spina bifida. Drs. Lori Dyer and Israel Franco summarize the literature and their experience with the use of botulinum toxin in neurogenic and non-neurogenic incontinence in children. Dr. Paul Austin summarizes the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers. These drugs are primarily used to treat bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic hyperplasia, but show great promise in the treatment of dysfunctional voiding in children. PMID:19936567

  3. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu; Fan, Dongliang

    2016-04-01

    There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  4. Bacteraemia caused by periodontal probing.

    PubMed

    Daly, C; Mitchell, D; Grossberg, D; Highfield, J; Stewart, D

    1997-04-01

    Bacteraemia of oral origin may result in infective endocarditis in susceptible individuals. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the occurrence of bacteraemia due to periodontal probing. Thirty patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age 42.7 years) with untreated periodontitis were investigated. All were free of significant medical disorders and none had taken antibiotics in the previous month. Prior to and immediately following periodontal probing, 20 mL of venous blood were obtained from each patient and inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated. Negative bottles were monitored continuously for three weeks before being discarded. Periodontal probing consisted of measuring pockets at six points around each tooth and recording the presence or absence of bleeding. A positive bacteraemia was recorded for three of the patients prior to probing. One patient exhibited Prevotella species whilst two exhibited skin commensals. Following probing, 13 patients (43 per cent) exhibited bacteraemia of oral origin. Viridans streptococci were the most common isolates (45 per cent). No significant correlations were found between bacteraemia and the severity of periodontitis or extent of bleeding on probing. The results indicate that periodontal probing can cause bacteraemia in patients with periodontitis. It would be advisable for patients considered at risk of developing infective endocarditis to receive antibiotic prophylaxis for periodontal probing if they have radiographic evidence of periodontitis.

  5. Pregnancy following nonsurgical donor ovum transfer to a functionally agonadal woman

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.V.; Macaso, T.M.; Ishida, E.H.; Giudice, L.; Marshall, J.R.; Buster, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report this country's first nonsurgical donor ovum transfer pregnancy in a functionally agonadal woman who had received chemotherapy and radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. For women with ovarian failure, nonsurgical uterine lavage and ovum transfer may provide an opportunity for motherhood that was not possible previously.

  6. Proresolving nanomedicines activate bone regeneration in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Hasturk, H; Kantarci, A; Freire, M O; Nguyen, D; Dalli, J; Serhan, C N

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases.

  7. Proresolving nanomedicines activate bone regeneration in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Hasturk, H; Kantarci, A; Freire, M O; Nguyen, D; Dalli, J; Serhan, C N

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25389003

  8. [Non-surgical management after blunt traumatic liver injuries: A review article].

    PubMed

    Noyola-Villalobos, Héctor Faustino; Loera-Torres, Marco Antonio; Jiménez-Chavarría, Enrique; Núñez-Cantú, Olliver; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Arcaute-Velázquez, Fernando Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic trauma is a common cause for admissions in the Emergency Room. Currently, non-surgical management is the standard treatment in haemodynamically stable patients with a success rate of around 85 to 98%. This haemodynamic stability is the most important factor in selecting the appropriate patient. Adjuncts in non-surgical management are angioembolisation, image-guided drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure in non-surgical management is relatively rare but potentially fatal, and needs to be recognised and aggressively treated as early as possible. The main cause of failure in non-surgical management is persistent haemorrhage. The aim of this paper is to describe current evidence and guidelines that support non-surgical management of liver injuries in blunt trauma.

  9. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    PubMed

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs. PMID:24878263

  10. Cytological analysis of the periodontal pocket in patients with aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Cecilia, E. Castro; Myriam, A. Koss; María, E. López

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral exfoliative cytology includes the study and interpretation of the features cells exfoliated from the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to analyze cytological changes in the periodontal pocket of patients with different clinical stages of aggressive periodontitis (AP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Materials and Methods: Patients aged 24–54 years, of whom 41 were diagnosed with AP, 40 with CP, sub-classified as mild, moderate and severe periodontitis, and 40 healthy individuals who were the control group. Samples of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket were taken for the cytological study. Results: Superficial and intermediate cell values were significantly greater in patients with AP than in patients with CP or the control group. Histiocyte number was higher in patients with CP than in those with AP, and differed significantly in both types of periodontitis compared to the control group. There were significant differences in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes when both types of periodontitis were compared to the control group. Microbial flora was statistically higher in patients with CP, and there were differences between patients with periodontitis and the control group. Conclusions: The cytological study demonstrated that patients with AP had greater tissue damage, shown by the increase in intermediate and superficial cells of the epithelium of the periodontal pocket compared to the group of healthy subjects and to a lesser extent, to patients with CP. Only superficial cells made it possible to differentiate the sub-stages of the disease. PMID:25395766

  11. Evidence that periodontal treatment improves diabetes outcomes: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, S.; Kocher, T.

    2014-01-01

    Context The effect of periodontal therapy on diabetes outcomes has not been established. Objective This update examines the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes outcomes. Data Sources Literature since October 2009 using MEDLINE. Study eligibility criteria Published RCTs including periodontal therapy for diabetic subjects, a metabolic outcome, an untreated control group, and follow up of 3 months. Data Extraction Predefined data fields, including study quality indicators were used. Data Synthesis A search revealed 56 publications of which 9 met inclusion criteria. Mean change of HbA1c from baseline was compared across treatment groups. Pooled analysis was based on random effects models. Results A meta analysis indicated a mean treatment effect of −0.36% HbA1c (CI −0.54, − 0.19) compared to no treatment after periodontal therapy (p<0.0001). Heterogeneity tests revealed only minimal evidence of publication bias (I2 =9%). Limitations Small sample size and high risk of bias remain problematic for studies of this type. Periodontal therapy varied considerably. Conclusion The modest reduction in HbA1c observed as a result of periodontal therapy in subjects with type 2 diabetes is consistent with previous systematic reviews. Despite this finding, multi-center trials of sufficient sample size are lacking. PMID:23631575

  12. Emerging Regenerative Approaches for Periodontal Reconstruction: Practical Applications From the AAP Regeneration Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Hector F.; Bashutski, Jill D.; McAllister, Bradley S.; Murakami, Shinya; Cobb, Charles M.; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Lin, Zhao; Mandelaris, George A.; Cochran, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Focused Clinical Question Can emerging technologies for periodontal regeneration become clinical reality? Summary Emerging technologies are presenting options to hopefully improve the outcomes of regeneration in challenging clinical scenarios. Cellular allografts represent a current technology in which cells and scaffolds are being delivered directly to the periodontal lesion. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 2 and teriparatide (parathyroid 1–34) have each been tested in controlled prospective human randomized clinical trials, and both have been shown to have potential for periodontal regeneration. These examples, as well as other emerging technologies, show promise for continued advancement in the field of periodontal regenerative therapy. Conclusions At present, there are indications that emerging technologies can be used successfully for periodontal regeneration. Case reports and clinical trials are being conducted with a variety of emerging technologies. However, many are yet to be approved by a regulatory agency, or there is a lack of evidence-based literature to validate their expanded use. PMID:26146593

  13. Rehabilitation of periodontally compromised teeth with fiber-reinforced composite resin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Márcio Grama; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Pfau, Eduardo Augusto; Justo, Flávio Roberto Machado; Fávero, Alexandre; Bremm, Laerte Luiz

    2011-02-01

    The rehabilitation of prosthetic spaces resulting from severe periodontitis represents a challenge in terms of functional and esthetic aspects. Generally, tooth extraction is followed by alveolar ridge volume reduction, which increases the esthetic problem. The aim of this article is to report the integration of esthetics and functional parameters in the oral rehabilitation of extracted periodontally compromised mandibular central incisors through the construction of a direct glass fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture (DFPD). After periodontal therapy, the patient received a periodontal subepithelial graft, enabling an increase in the thickness and height of the alveolar ridge. The DFPD was fabricated with the use of extracted teeth. Mandibular canines and lateral incisors received cavities 2 mm deep and wide. After fiber insertion, tooth adaptation, and composite resin coverage, the teeth were finished and polished. Results showed an excellent esthetic result with stabilization and function of the remaining periodontally affected teeth. PMID:21359245

  14. Non-surgical prevention and management of scoliosis for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrienne; Baker, Louise; Williams, Katrina

    2014-10-01

    A review was performed to examine the evidence for non-surgical interventions for preventing scoliosis and the need for scoliosis surgery in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Medline and Embase databases and reference lists from key articles were searched. After the inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 13 studies were critically appraised independently by two reviewers. The included studies examined spinal orthoses and steroid therapy. There were no studies with high levels of evidence (randomised or other controlled trials). The studies with the highest level of evidence were non-randomised experimental trials. There is some evidence that children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who receive steroid therapy might have delayed onset of scoliosis, but more evidence is required about the long-term risks versus benefits of this intervention. There is weak evidence that spinal orthoses do not prevent and only minimally delay the onset of scoliosis.

  15. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  16. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  17. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed. PMID:25972093

  18. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  19. Design of a Multiple Drug Delivery System Directed at Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, Sharath C.; Thomas, Mark V.; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Puleo, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  20. Laser assisted periodontal treatment: from bactericidal effect to local modification of the host response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurescu, Codruţa.; Teslaru, Silvia; Zetu, Liviu; Ciurescu, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present short-term study is to investigate efficiency of laser therapy as adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Methods. The study protocol included 44 patients (20 males, 24 females; age 45-60) with moderate and advanced chronic periodontitis, recruited in Private Clinic Krondent (Brasov, Romania). The patients were randomly assigned in two groups, one group (test-sites group, 22 patients) treated by ultrasonic scaling and root planning followed by laser therapy (940 nm diode laser and 2780 nm Er:Cr:YAG laser) and second group (control-sites group, 22 patients) treated only by ultrasonic scaling and root planning. All patients were submitted to initial evaluation, recording of bleeding on probing (BOP) and probing of pockets depth (PPD), oral hygiene instruction and motivation. Indices BOP and PPD for the assessed periodontal sites were also recorded at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks after treatment. Results. Periodontal inflammatory parameters PPD (PPD>=4mm) were significantly lower in test-sites group as compared with control-sites group at 2 months (82% vs. 90%), 4 months (42% vs. 62%), and 6 months (11% vs. 30%).Periodontal parameters BOP were lower among patients in control-sites group and test-sites group at 2 months (38% vs. 32%), and significantly lower in test-sites group at 4 months (42% vs.26%), and 6 months (44% vs. 24%). Conclusions. The additional use of laser therapy increases significantly the efficiency of periodontal treatment comparing with conventional periodontal therapy.

  1. Occurrence of periodontal pathogens among patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Farias, B.C.; Souza, P.R.E.; Ferreira, B.; Melo, R.S.A.; Machado, F.B.; Gusmão, E.S.; Cimões, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of the periodontal pathogens that form the red complex (Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in patients with chronic periodontitis. The sample consisted of 29 patients with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of chronic periodontitis based on the criteria of the American Academy of Periodontology (3). Samples for microbiological analysis were collected from the four sites of greatest probing depth in each patient, totaling 116 samples. These samples were processed using conventional polymerase chain reaction, which achieved the following positive results: 46.6% for P. gingivalis, 41.4% for T. forsythia, 33.6% for T. denticola and 27.6% for A. actinomycetemcomitans. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were more prevalent (p < 0.05) in periodontal pockets ≥ 8 mm. The combinations T. forsythia + P. gingivalis (23.2%) and T. forsythia + P. gingivalis + T. denticola (20.0%) were more frequent in sites with a probing depth ≥ 8 mm. Associations with the simultaneous presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans + P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans + T. forsythia, P. gingivalis + T. forsythia and T. forsythia + T. denticola were statistically significant (p < 0.05). It was concluded that the red complex pathogens are related to chronic periodontitis, presenting a higher occurrence in deep periodontal pockets. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of these bacteria in deep sites suggests a symbiotic relationship between these virulent species, favoring, in this way, a further progression of periodontal disease. PMID:24031906

  2. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Summary There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  3. Non-surgical treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Romina M; Shah, Adit P; Diyora, Shamil D; Rathva, Vandana J

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of skeletal class III malocclusion has a mean of 3% in the Caucasian population, 5% in African-American adolescents and about 14% in the Asian population. In India, the incidence of class III malocclusion is reported to be 3.4%. A patient having class III malocclusion shows findings ranging from edge-to-edge bite to large reverse overjet, with extreme variations of underlying skeletal jaw bases and craniofacial form. This is a case report of a 20-year-old man having skeletal class III malocclusion with concave profile, anterior crossbite and a negative overjet of 3 mm treated non-surgically with extraction of only one lower left first premolar. PMID:24722711

  4. Nonsurgical Treatment of Hemifacial Microsomia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a birth defect involving craniofacial structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Although it is a relatively uncommon malformation, it is the second most common craniofacial birth defect after cleft lip and palate (CL/P). Case Presentation: This is a case report about the successful orthodontic treatment of a patient with mild hemifacial microsomia (HFM), using a non-surgical orthopedic and orthodontic treatment approach. The aim of this approach was to make the best noninvasive modality to treat HFM. A 7-year-old boy with a mild HFM presented with a convex profile and slight chin deviation. Orthopedic treatment performed using a hybrid functional and high pulls headgear. Treatment continued by fixed orthodontic straight wire appliance to achieve perfect occlusion. Conclusions: Excellent esthetic and functional results achieved; total treatment duration was about 72 months. PMID:26734473

  5. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics. PMID:26770199

  6. Non-surgical Management of Congenital Auricular Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Imani, Mohammad Taghi; Kardeh, Sina; Karami, Mehrab Mohammad; Kherad, Masoomeh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unlike congenital auricular malformations which are identified by underdevelopment of dermal and cartilaginous tissues, deformed ears are less sever congenital anomalies characterized only by a misshaped pinna structure and can be improved with acceptable cosmetic results and minimal cost through ear molding if treated in early neonatal period. In this study, authors present the first report of using splinting techniques for treatment of deformational auricular anomalies in Iranian children. METHODS Our case load consisted of a series of 29 patients (Male=16, Female=13) who were referred to Plastic Surgery Unit of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from September 2011 to December 2014. Children aged more than 6 moths were excluded. Twenty-nine children affected by various deformities including prominent ears (n=11), lop ears (n=8) and constricted ears (n=10) were treated by splintage as a nonsurgical technique. The mean time of treatment was 13.33±2 weeks. RESULTS Eight (27.6%) patients did not complete the treatment. Splinting resulted in excellent or satisfactory results in 12 (57.14%) of treated cases. No improvement was observed at the end of the molding treatment in 9 patients. No complication was observed during the treatment in any of the patients. CONCLUSION The nonsurgical molding can be used as an effective approach for achieving natural outcomes and correcting cosmetic abnormalities. Rate of satisfaction is dependent on type of deformity, the neonatal age in which treatment started and also parents’ adherence to treatment methods and principals. Concerning the low rate of complications and high satisfactory results the method can be used instead of surgery in appropriate cases. PMID:27579269

  7. Xerostomy, dental caries and periodontal disease in HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Cavasin Filho, Julio César; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2009-02-01

    We studied xerostomy and its correlation with periodontal and dental cavity diseases in HIV patients, through measurement of salivary flow and through variables such as saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, periodontal index, MDF index, dental carie risk and risk of periodontal disease. One hundred patients were analyzed. They were distributed into two groups: Group I (test) - 50 patients evidently HIV+, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases, levels of T-CD4 lymphocytes, viral load and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); and Group II - (control) 50 HIV- patients, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases. In both groups, measurement of salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity was made. Group I presented high MDF, bacteria plaque and bleeding, with a greater susceptibility to the risks of oral cavities and periodontal disease. The salivary flow and the buffering capacity of the saliva were low, indicating a high level of xerostomy. Two important modifying factors influence these pathologies in an incisive way: one is immunossuppression and the other is HAART therapy. The control exhibited results that are closer to normality; it had better oral-health conditions.

  8. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Amy WY; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. PMID:24855389

  9. Cartilage regeneration for treatment of osteoarthritis: a paradigm for nonsurgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with articular cartilage abnormalities and affects people of older age: preventative or therapeutic treatment measures for OA and related articular cartilage disorders remain challenging. In this perspective review, we have integrated multiple biological, morphological, developmental, stem cell and homeostasis concepts of articular cartilage to develop a paradigm for cartilage regeneration. OA is conceptually defined as an injury of cartilage that initiates chondrocyte activation, expression of proteases and growth factor release from the matrix. This regenerative process results in the local activation of inflammatory response genes in cartilage without migration of inflammatory cells or angiogenesis. The end results are catabolic and anabolic responses, and it is the balance between these two outcomes that controls remodelling of the matrix and regeneration. A tantalizing clinical clue for cartilage regrowth in OA joints has been observed in surgically created joint distraction. We hypothesize that cartilage growth in these distracted joints may have a biological connection with the size of organs and regeneration. Therefore we propose a novel, practical and nonsurgical intervention to validate the role of distraction in cartilage regeneration in OA. The approach permits normal wake-up activity while during sleep; the index knee is subjected to distraction with a pull traction device. Comparison of follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 and 6 months of therapy to those taken before therapy will provide much-needed objective evidence for the use of this mode of therapy for OA. We suggest that the paradigm presented here merits investigation for treatment of OA in knee joints. PMID:26029269

  10. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Amy Wy; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

  11. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Adjunct Diode Laser Application for the Nonsurgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Arıcı, Selahattin Volkan; Topçuoğlu, Nursen; Külekçi, Güven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In this radiographic and microbiologic split-mouth clinical trial, efficacy of a diode laser as an adjunct to conventional scaling in the nonsurgical treatment of peri-implantitis was investigated. Background data: Eradication of pathogenic bacteria and infected sulcular epithelium presents a significant challenge in the nonsurgical treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and methods: Ten patients (mean age, 55.1 years; SD, 11.4) with 48 two piece, rough-surface implants and diagnosed with peri-implantitis were recruited (NCT02362854). In addition to conventional scaling and debridement (control group), crevicular sulci and the corresponding surfaces of 24 random implants were lased by a diode laser running at 1.0 W power at the pulsed mode (λ, 810 nm; energy density, 3 J/cm2; time, 1 min; power density, 400 mW/cm2; energy, 1.5 J; and spot diameter, 1 mm); (laser group). Healing was assessed via periodontal indexes (baseline and after 1 and 6 months after the intervention), microbiologic specimens (baseline and after 1 month), and radiographs (baseline and after 6 months). Results: Baseline mean pocket depths (4.71, SD, 0.67; and 4.38, SD 0.42 mm) and marginal bone loss (2.71, SD 0.11; and 2.88, SD 0.18 mm) were similar (p = 0.09 and p = 0.12) between the control and laser groups, respectively. After 6 months, the laser group revealed higher marginal bone loss (2.79, SD 0.48) than the control groups (2.63, SD 0.53) (p < 0.0001). However, in both groups, the microbiota of the implants was found unchanged after 1 month. Conclusions: In this clinical trial, adjunct use of diode laser did not yield any additional positive influence on the peri-implant healing compared with conventional scaling alone. PMID:26382562

  12. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... UI? Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5- ... own home. Page 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on ...

  13. Adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Innovative developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have yielded various implementation strategies and the possibility of functional tissue regeneration. Technologic advances in the combination of stem cells, biomaterials, and growth factors have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in vivo and in vitro. The therapeutic potential of human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are harvested from bone marrow and adipose tissue, has generated increasing interest in a wide variety of biomedical disciplines. These cells can differentiate into a variety of tissue types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and nerve tissue. Adipose-derived stem cells have some advantages compared with other sources of stem cells, most notably that a large number of cells can be easily and quickly isolated from adipose tissue. In current clinical therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration, several methods have been developed and applied either alone or in combination, such as enamel matrix proteins, guided tissue regeneration, autologous/allogeneic/xenogeneic bone grafts, and growth factors. However, there are various limitations and shortcomings for periodontal tissue regeneration using current methods. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using MSCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because the various secreted growth factors from MSCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissue but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells are especially effective for neovascularization compared with other MSC sources. In this review, the possibility and potential of adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine are introduced. Of particular interest, periodontal tissue regeneration with adipose-derived stem cells is discussed.

  14. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  15. Developing skeletal Class III malocclusion treated nonsurgically with a combination of a protraction facemask and a multiloop edgewise archwire.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Ding, Yin; Feng, Xue

    2011-08-01

    For a girl, aged 12 years 3 months, with a skeletal Class III malocclusion, negative overjet, severe maxillary crowding, and hyperdivergent pattern, orthognathic surgery combined with orthodontic treatment is often the treatment of choice, because it can greatly improve the patient's facial profile and ensure the long-term stability of the results. However, because of high risks and treatment expenses, patients sometimes refuse to have surgery. We report a nonsurgical combination therapy including facemask and multiloop edgewise archwires and the outcome for a patient with a developing skeletal Class III malocclusion and a long anterior facial height. Treatment included advancement of the maxilla by orthopedic means and counterclockwise rotation of the mandibular occlusal plane by the orthodontic dentoalveolar compensation of distal en-masse movement of the mandibular dentition.

  16. Adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: the keys to functional periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Numerous different types of periodontal tissue regeneration therapies have been developed clinically with variable outcomes and serious limitations. A key goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate the destroyed periodontal tissues including alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament. The critical factors in attaining successful periodontal tissue regeneration are the correct recruitment of cells to the site and the production of a suitable extra cellular matrix consistent with the periodontal tissues. Adipose tissue, from which mesenchymal stem cells can be harvested easily and safely, is an especially attractive stem cell source, because adipose-derived stem cells have a strong potential for cell differentiation and growth factor secretion. Meanwhile, the usefulness of platelet-rich plasma in the field of dental surgery has attracted attention. Therapeutic effects of platelet-rich plasma are believed to occur through the provision of concentrated levels of platelet-derived growth factors. Further, recent reports suggested the effect of platelet-rich plasma on mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival rate. Therefore, the admixture of mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma may indicate the great potential for tissue regenerations including periodontal tissue regeneration. In this review, the potential of adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich plasma is introduced. Of particular interest, the usefulness in periodontal tissue regeneration and future perspective is discussed.

  17. The effect of a periodontal intervention on cardiovascular risk markers in Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease: the PerioCardio study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indigenous Australians experience an overwhelming burden of chronic disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Periodontal disease (inflammation of the tissues surrounding teeth) is also widespread, and may contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases via pathogenic inflammatory pathways. This study will assess measures of vascular health and inflammation in Indigenous Australian adults with periodontal disease, and determine if intensive periodontal therapy improves these measures over a 12 month follow-up. The aims of the study are: (i) to determine whether there is a dose response relationship between extent and severity of periodontal disease and measures of vascular health and inflammation among Indigenous Australian adults with moderate to severe periodontal disease; and (ii) to determine the effects of periodontal treatment on changes in measures of vascular health and inflammation in a cohort of Indigenous Australians. Methods/Design This study will be a randomised, controlled trial, with predominantly blinded assessment of outcome measures and blinded statistical analysis. All participants will receive the periodontal intervention benefits (with the intervention delayed 12 months in participants who are randomised to the control arm). Participants will be Indigenous adults aged ≥25 years from urban centres within the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. Participants assessed to have moderate or severe periodontal disease will be randomised to the study's intervention or control arm. The intervention involves intensive removal of subgingival and supragingival calculus and plaque biofilm by scaling and root-planing. Study visits at baseline, 3 and 12 months, will incorporate questionnaires, non-fasting blood and urine samples, body measurements, blood pressure, periodontal assessment and non-invasive measures of vascular health (pulse wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness). Primary outcome measures are pulse wave

  18. Systemic effects of periodontitis: lessons learned from research on atherosclerotic vascular disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Papapanou, Panos N

    2015-12-01

    Studies conducted over the past 25 years have focussed on the role of periodontitis, an inflammatory condition of microbial aetiology that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues, as a systemic inflammatory stressor that can act as an independent risk factor of atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVSD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). It has been suggested that periodontitis-associated bacteraemias and systemic dissemination of inflammatory mediators produced in the periodontal tissues may result in systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, and that bacteria of oral origin may translocate into the feto-placental unit. Epidemiological studies largely support an association between periodontitis and ASVD/APOs, independently of known confounders; indeed, periodontitis has been shown to confer statistically significantly elevated risk for clinical events associated with ASVD and APOs in multivariable adjustments. On the other hand, intervention studies demonstrate that although periodontal therapy reduces systemic inflammation and improves endothelial function, it has no positive effect on the incidence of APOs. Studies of the effects of periodontal interventions on ASVD-related clinical events are lacking. This review summarises key findings from mechanistic, association and intervention studies and attempts to reconcile the seemingly contradictory evidence that originates from different lines of investigation.

  19. [ROLE OF INNATE IMMUNITY FACTORS IN PERIODONTITIS PATHOGENESIS].

    PubMed

    Gankovskaya, L V; Khelminskaya, N M; Molchanova, E A; Svitich, O A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP) is a disease of periodontium tissues supporting tooth induced by bacteria, that is characterized by the presence of processes of inflammation with destruction of bone tissue. The knowledge of molecular mechanisms of CGP pathogenesis facilitates creation of the most effective methods of therapy of this disease. Bacterial infection is a primary factor in periodontitis etiology, however is not sufficient for its start and subsequent development. It is known, that bacterial factors induce alocal inflammationreaction and.activate the system of innate immunity through activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR), located on the surface of resident cells and leukocytes. Activation of these cells results in production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of phagocytes and lymphocytes into the inflammation zone. In review we examined the known data regarding factors of immune protection of periodontium including cell populations and cytokines, as well as mechanisms of tissue destruction, that support the tooth. Perspectives of therapy are also discussed

  20. Periodontal surgery as an aid to restoring fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    McDonald, F L; Davis, S S; Whitbeck, P

    1982-04-01

    The periodontal, orthodontic, and prosthetic management of four indications for subgingival or subosseous tooth fractures has been discussed. The importance of having the aveolar crest a minimal distance of 2.5 mm from the margin of the restoration has been explained. The pitfalls of an external, rather than internal, bevel and flap procedure were assessed. Coordinated interspecialty therapy provides diverse, conservative treatment for the general practitioner and successful restorations for the patient. PMID:6951035

  1. Non-surgical interventions for threatened and recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed

    Tien, J C; Tan, T Y T

    2007-12-01

    Many surgical and non-surgical interventions are used in the management of threatened and recurrent miscarriages. Evidence-based management of recurrent miscarriages requires investigations into the underlying aetiology. When a specific cause is identified, directed treatment may reduce miscarriage rates. Combined aspirin and heparin for antiphospholipid syndrome, and screening and treatment of bacterial vaginosis between ten and 22 weeks of pregnancy with clindamycin, are the only interventions proven to be useful in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The use of periconceptional metformin for polycystic ovarian (PCO) syndrome is promising, though data from RCTs are still required. The use of heparin in inherited thrombophilias, bromocriptine in hyperprolactinaemia and luteinising hormone suppression in fertile patients with PCO syndrome are more controversial. In threatened miscarriages, or when no cause is found, treatment becomes empirical. Supportive care may reduce miscarriage rates. Dydrogesterone, a progesterone derivative, may further reduce miscarriage rates. Bed rest and avoidance of sexual intercourse, though commonly advised, are of no proven benefit. Use of uterine relaxing agents, human chorionic gonadotrophin, immunotherapy and vitamins remain controversial in idiopathic recurrent miscarriages. PMID:18043834

  2. Evaluation of bone morphogenic proteins in periodontal practice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Supreet; Grover, Vishakha; Kaur, Harkiran; Malhotra, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago Marshal R. Urist discovered a substance in bone matrix that had inductive properties for the development of bone and cartilage, until date, at least 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been identified, some of which have been shown in vitro to stimulate the process of stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts in human and animal models. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of BMPs and to review critically the clinical data currently available on the use of BMPs in various periodontal applications. The literature on BMPs was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal applications were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicates BMPs to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. On the basis of the data provided in the studies that were reviewed BMPs provide revolutionary therapies in periodontal practice. PMID:27134452

  3. Cytoskeletal disease: a role in the etiology of adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Binderman, I; Gadban, N; Yaffe, A

    2014-01-01

    All cells and organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, from the most primitive to the most complex, are mechanosensitive. As the cytoskeleton is a key in controlling the normal basal prestress of cells and therefore is involved in virtually all physiological cellular processes, abnormalities in this essential cellular characteristic may result in diseases. Indeed, many diseases have now been associated with abnormalities in cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal proteins. We propose that adult periodontitis is, at least in part, such a cytoskeletal disease. It is well established that adult periodontitis starts by bacterial invasion at the interface between the tooth surface and marginal gingiva that induces a local inflammatory response. The inflammatory cells release metalloproteinases which degrade gingival collagenous fibrous tissue and loss of local tissue integrity that reduces the normal prestressed cell-extracellular matrix network. This is a major signaling trigger that induces a local and rapid release of ATP, which then activates P2X receptors and stimulates a calcium influx, further activating osteoclastic resorption of the alveolar bone. As periodontitis is a chronic disease, it seems reasonable to suggest that agents that maintain cytoskeletal tensegrity, for example, inhibitors of ATP receptors, may diminish the bone loss and may have a role in future periodontal therapy. PMID:23679579

  4. Evaluation of bone morphogenic proteins in periodontal practice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Supreet; Grover, Vishakha; Kaur, Harkiran; Malhotra, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago Marshal R. Urist discovered a substance in bone matrix that had inductive properties for the development of bone and cartilage, until date, at least 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been identified, some of which have been shown in vitro to stimulate the process of stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts in human and animal models. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of BMPs and to review critically the clinical data currently available on the use of BMPs in various periodontal applications. The literature on BMPs was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal applications were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicates BMPs to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. On the basis of the data provided in the studies that were reviewed BMPs provide revolutionary therapies in periodontal practice. PMID:27134452

  5. [CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HYPERTROPHIC GINGIVITIS: CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Shinkevich, V; Udaltsova, K; Pisarenko, E; Kolomiets, S; Khmil, T

    2015-12-01

    Gingivitis in traditional national dentistry referred to independent diseases or symptomatic condition in periodontitis and classified morphologically. The diagnostic features of the diseases are characteristic, but the clinical presentation of symptomatic gingivitis and patterns of bone destructions may vary between patients. Successful treatment of the disease depends from proper diagnosis and advanced disease stages, but for symptomatic gingivitis that accompanying chronic periodontitis, protocols include surgical excision. Despite of the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis, its active treatment often start in severe destruction and bone loss (2-3 stage severity). Today etiotropic antimicrobial therapy is real way to control microbial biofilm and has solid evidence base. Applying of etiotropic antimicrobial therapy as systemic azithromycin with timely treatment of mild to moderate periodontal and bone destruction may reduce severe periodontitis incidence of and treatment-related complications in the future. This paper attempts to describe the clinical diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of chronic generalized periodontitis and hypertrophic gingivitis patient with case reports and a brief review. PMID:26719550

  6. Manipulation of the peri-implant tissue for better maintenance: a periodontal perspective.

    PubMed

    Maksoud, Mohamed A

    2003-01-01

    Enhancement of peri-implant soft tissue is an essential factor in implant survival. As in periodontal tissue, the integrity of the attached gingiva, plus gingival contour, color, shape, size, consistency, and bleeding upon probing, is an indicator of bacterial activity that will eventually lead to gingivitis and periodontitis. The trajectory of peri-implant tissue is different from that of periodontal tissue because of periodontal ligament fibers, the absence of which makes the implant-bone interface weaker than that of natural dentition. The destruction of peri-implant tissue can be a faster and more devastating process, so maintenance of the peri-implant tissue is a must in implant therapy to avoid a potentially massive destruction of the understructure. The treatment of inadequately attached gingiva, gingiva hyperplasia, and peri-implant gingivitis is discussed with techniques that can alleviate these problems.

  7. The role of tobacco use in periodontal diseases: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Burgan, S W

    1997-01-01

    This article surveys early and current research on the relationship between smoking and various aspects of dental health. Results of early studies on the prevalence of periodontal diseases in smokers, which were often contradictory, are discussed briefly, and more recent research on the effects of tobacco on the periodontium is presented. This includes research examining the relationship--between smoking and the various indicators of periodontitis, such as bone and tooth loss. Studies examining the effect of smoking on the outcome of periodontal therapy, and ways in which tobacco may be harmful are also reviewed, as are the effects of smokeless tobacco on the periodontium. It is suggested that a separate category for smoking-associated periodontitis be created. PMID:9515412

  8. Lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Ricardo; Teles, Flavia; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Paster, Bruce; Haffajee, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by bacterial species living in polymicrobial biofilms at or below the gingival margin and progress largely as a result of the inflammation initiated by specific subgingival species. In the past few decades, efforts to understand the microbiota of periodontal diseases have led to an exponential increase in information about biofilms associated with periodontal health and disease. In fact, the oral microbiota is one of the best characterized microbiomes that colonize the human body. Despite this increased knowledge, one has to ask if our fundamental concepts of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases have really changed. In this chapter we will review how our comprehension of the structure and function of the subgingival microbiota evolved over the years in search of lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology. More specifically, this review focuses on: 1) how the data obtained through molecular techniques has impacted our knowledge of the etiology of periodontal infections; 2) the potential role of viruses in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases; 3) how concepts of microbial ecology have expanded our understanding of host microbial interactions that might lead to periodontal diseases; 4) the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases; and 5) the impact of these evolving concepts on treatment and preventive approaches to periodontal infections. We will conclude by reviewing how novel systems biology approaches promise to unravel new details of the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of periodontal disease mechanisms. PMID:23574465

  9. Smoking and periodontal disease severity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Canut, P; Lorca, A; Magán, R

    1995-10-01

    This study was performed to assess the influence of smoking on periodontal disease severity. Data concerning periodontal status and smoking habits were collected from 889 periodontal patients: 340 male and 549 female, 21 to 76 years of age, 47.4% being non smokers and 52.6% smokers. Periodontal parameters, recorded by the same examiner (PMC), were: gingival recession (GR), Pocket depth (PD), Probing attachment level (PAL), and mobility (M). The influence of age, sex and tobacco consumption on these periodontal parameters was statistically evaluated using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with covariates. A non-linear effect model was also fitted by taking the natural logarithms of the response variables (GR, PD, PAL) closer to biomedical phenomena. Mobility was analyzed by a chi2-test. The effect of smoking on periodontitis showed no association with age or with sex. Smoking, age and sex were shown to be statistically significant for periodontitis, by performing both univariate (t-test for equal means) and multivariate tests. p-values for smoking and periodontitis were: GR (p=0.000), PD (p=0.000), PAL (p=0.000) and M (P=0.015). Smoking one cigarette per day, up to 10, and up to 20, increased PAL by 0.5%, 5% and 10%, respectively. The impact of tobacco is comparable to the impact resulting from the factor of age in this sample, increasing PAL by 0.7% for each year of life. Comparison between smokers of less than 10 cigarettes per day (PAL mean 3.72 mm +/-0.86) and non-smokers (PAL mean 3.84 +/- 0.89) showed no differences in PAL (p=0.216), while comparison for smokers from 11 to 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.36 +/- 1.23) and for more than 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.50 +/- 1.04) demonstrated significant differences (p=0.000). These findings suggest that: (1) tobacco increases periodontal disease severity; (2) this effect is clinically evident above consumption of a certain quantity of tobacco.

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs' potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs' homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs' involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair.

  11. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs’ potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs’ homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs’ involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair. PMID:26722424

  12. Periodontal plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Mounssif, Ilham

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present article is to summarize current knowledge in terms of the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and surgical treatment of gingival recession. Whilst the main etiological factors (i.e. toothbrushing trauma and bacterial plaque) are well established, challenges still remain to be solved in the diagnostic, prognostic and classification processes of gingival recession, especially when the main reference parameter - the cemento-enamel junction - is no longer detectable on the affected tooth or when there is a slight loss of periodontal interdental attachment. Root coverage in single type gingival recession defects is a very predictable outcome following the use of various surgical techniques. The coronally advanced flap, with or without connective tissue grafting, is the technique of choice. The adjunctive use of connective tissue grafts improves the probability of achieving complete root coverage. Surgical coverage of multiple gingival recessions is also predictable with the coronally advanced flap and the coronally advanced flap plus the connective tissue graft, but no data are available indicating which, and how many, gingival recessions should be treated adjunctively with connective tissue grafting in order to limit patient morbidity and improve the esthetic outcome. None of the allograft materials currently available can be considered as a full substitute for the connective tissue graft, even if some recent results are encouraging. The need for future studies with patient-based outcomes (i.e. esthetics and morbidity) as primary objectives is emphasized in this review. PMID:25867992

  13. [Digital subtraction radiography for the detection of periodontal bone changes].

    PubMed

    Mera, T

    1989-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of digital subtraction radiography in detecting alveolar bone changes. In order to test the sensitivity of quantitative evaluation by subtraction radiography, a copper equivalent thickness obtained from digitized radiographs was compared with the actual mineral content of bone phantoms with 15 different minerals and 25 bone specimens. Results demonstrated that the copper equivalent thickness correlated well with the actual mineral content (bone phantoms: gamma s = 1.0, bone specimens: gamma s = 0.985). In order to test the ability of digitized subtraction radiography in assessing alveolar bone changes in vivo, subtraction images were compared with histological features. The experimental angular bony defects were treated with conservative periodontal therapy in 3 monkeys. The standardized radiographs were taken longitudinally after therapy, and subtraction images were made from the sequentially obtained radiographs. In addition, for fluorescent histomorphometrical evaluations of new bone formations, the animals were dosed with oxytetracycline, calsein solution and arizarin complex solution. Radiographic and histological evaluations were scheduled to provide healing periods of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 9 weeks after periodontal therapy. Subtraction radiography offered an objective method to follow histological changes of alveolar bone, and the copper equivalent thickness obtained from subtraction radiographs correlated with the histometric bone volume (gamma s = 0.9023, p less than 0.01). The results of these studies indicated that subtraction radiography was useful in monitoring alveolar bone changes associated with periodontal disease and treatment and that the quanitative measurement of periodontal bone changes by subtraction radiography was feasible. PMID:2517790

  14. The influence of cellular source on periodontal regeneration using calcium phosphate coated polycaprolactone scaffold supported cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Dan, Hongxia; Vaquette, Cédryck; Fisher, Anthony G; Hamlet, Stephen M; Xiao, Yin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is considered a promising approach to achieving predictable periodontal regeneration. In this study, the regenerative potential of cell sheets derived from different parts of the periodontium (gingival connective tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament) were investigated in an athymic rat periodontal defect model. Periodontal ligament (PDLC), alveolar bone (ABC) and gingival margin-derived cells (GMC) were obtained from human donors. The osteogenic potential of the primary cultures was demonstrated in vitro. Cell sheets supported by a calcium phosphate coated melt electrospun polycaprolactone (CaP-PCL) scaffold were transplanted to denuded root surfaces in surgically created periodontal defects, and allowed to heal for 1 and 4 weeks. The CaP-PCL scaffold alone was able to promote alveolar bone formation within the defect after 4 weeks. The addition of ABC and PDLC sheets resulted in significant periodontal attachment formation. The GMC sheets did not promote periodontal regeneration on the root surface and inhibited bone formation within the CaP-PCL scaffold. In conclusion, the combination of either PDLC or ABC sheets with a CaP-PCL scaffold could promote periodontal regeneration, but ABC sheets were not as effective as PDLC sheets in promoting new attachment formation.

  15. The Epidemiology of Nonsurgical Hypoparathyroidism in Denmark: A Nationwide Case Finding Study.

    PubMed

    Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja; Mosekilde, Leif; Rejnmark, Lars

    2015-09-01

    Nonsurgical hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is a rare disorder most often caused by mutations in different genes. It is characterized by hypocalcaemia with inappropriately low PTH levels. Knowledge about this group of patients, including their mortality and morbidity, is very sparse. The aim was to identify all patients diagnosed with nonsurgical HypoPT in Denmark and assess their mortality and risk of complications. Through registers and review of individual patient hospital charts we identified all patients diagnosed with nonsurgical HypoPT in Denmark between 1977 and 2012. We assessed their mortality and morbidity by comparing them with a group of age- and gender-matched population-based controls. We identified a total of 180 patients with nonsurgical HypoPT among whom 123 (68%) were alive at the date of follow-up (prevalence of 2.3/100,000 inhabitants). Compared with controls, mortality was not increased, but patients had a significantly increased risk of renal insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR] 6.01), cardiovascular diseases (HR 1.91), neuropsychiatric complications (HR 2.45), infections (HR 1.94), seizures (HR 10.05), cataract (HR 4.21), and fractures at the upper extremities (HR 1.93). In contrast patients had significantly reduced risk of malignant diseases (HR 0.44). In conclusion, nonsurgical HypoPT is a rare disease associated with a number of complications that should be considered when taking care of these patients.

  16. Periodontal status in snow leopards.

    PubMed

    Cook, R A; Stoller, N H

    1986-11-01

    Periodontal examinations were performed on ten 1- to 22-year-old snow leopards (6 males and 4 females), using dentistry methods for determining the plaque and gingival indices. All tooth surfaces were probed, and alveolar bone attachment loss was determined. After subgingival plaque removal, plaque specimens were examined for differential bacterial morphotypes. The small number of leopards evaluated precluded definitive statistical analysis. However, the progression from gingival health to gingivitis to periodontitis was similar to that seen in man. Therefore, the use of plaque index, gingival index, alveolar bone attachment loss, and differential bacterial morphotypes can be used to determine the dental health of snow leopards. PMID:3505932

  17. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research.

  18. Association between postmenopausal osteoporosis and experimental periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kai; Ma, Souzhi; Guo, Jianbin; Huang, Yongling; Yan, Fuhua; Xiao, Yin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) and the pathogenesis of periodontitis, ovariectomized rats were generated and the experimental periodontitis was induced using a silk ligature. The inflammatory factors and bone metabolic markers were measured in the serum and periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats using an automatic chemistry analyzer, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and immunohistochemistry. The bone mineral density of whole body, pelvis, and spine was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and image analysis. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 statistical software. It was found that ovariectomy could upregulate the expression of interleukin- (IL-)6, the receptor activator of nuclear factor- κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and downregulate IL-10 expression in periodontal tissues, which resulted in progressive alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. This study indicates that changes of cytokines and bone turnover markers in the periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats contribute to the damage of periodontal tissues.

  19. Cell- and Gene- Based Therapeutics for Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abbayya, Keshava; Zope, Sameer Anil; Naduwinmani, Sanjay; Pisal, Apurva; Puthanakar, Nagraj

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease of the periodontium, characterized by loss of connective tissue attachment and supporting the alveolar bone. Therefore, to regenerate these lost tissues of the periodontium researchers have included a variety of surgical procedures including grafting materials growth factors and the use of barrier membranes, ultimately resulting into regeneration that is biologically possible but clinically unpredictable. Recently a newer approach of delivering DNA plasmids as therapeutic agents is gaining special attention and is called gene delivery method. Gene therapy being considered a novel approach have a potential to channel their signals in a very systematic and controlled manner thereby providing encoded proteins at all stages of tissue regeneration. The aim of this review was to enlighten a view on the application involving gene delivery and tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration.

  20. Esthetic periodontal surgery for impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ju; Lin, Yi-Chun; Kaung, Shou-Shin; Yang, Shue-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians do not frequently see impacted dilacerated maxillary incisors in their patients. When they do, there are several diagnostic and management challenges for correcting root dilacerations. An unfavorable esthetic outcome might occur as a result of soft-tissue complications during surgical eruption procedures. We present 2 patients with an impacted and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Computed tomography scans with 3-dimensional reformation were used to accurately assess the positions of the dilacerated teeth, the degree of dilaceration, and the stage of root formation. The therapy primarily involved 2-stage crown exposure surgery combined with orthodontic traction. An apicoectomy was performed on 1 dilacerated tooth; the other exhibited pulp vitality. This article highlights the periodontal surgical strategies for the esthetic management of inverted crowns. Through periodontal plastic surgery and interdisciplinary cooperation, the impacted dilacerated central incisors were properly aligned, and successful esthetic results were achieved. PMID:22999678

  1. Effect of Cimetidine on Nitro-Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    CULIC, CARINA; PARVU, ALINA ELENA; ALB, SANDU FLORIN; ALB, CAMELIA; POP, ANGELA

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Periodontitis is a chronic inflammation that involves nitro-oxidative stress with damaging periodontal structural effects. We aimed to evaluate the consequences of low-dose cimetidine on nitro-oxidative stress in periodontitis. Methods A rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis was used. After two weeks, the periodontitis groups were treated with cimetidine, aminoguanidine, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and trolox for one week. On day 21, blood was drawn and the serum analyzed for measurement of total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status, total antioxidant response, and oxidative stress index. Results Cimetidine had an inhibitory effect on the synthesis of nitric oxide (p=0.001), total oxidative status (p=0.01) and oxidative stress index (p=0.01). Total antioxidant reactivity was increased by cimetidine (p=0.01). The effects of cimetidine were almost like those of aminoguanidine, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and trolox. Conclusions Low-dose cimetidine can be used as adjunctive host modulatory therapy in chronic periodontitis because it reduces nitro-oxidative stress. PMID:26528020

  2. Systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of chronic periodontal diseases: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Martin, M V

    2003-01-01

    The use of systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of acute and chronic periodontal diseases must be viewed as a dilemma. On the one hand, the approach is attractive because of the microbial nature of periodontal diseases but, on the other hand, evidence of benefit of these agents is equivocal for the majority of periodontal diseases and antimicrobials have the potential to cause harm. The disadvantages of systemic antimicrobials can be grouped under the headings of allergic reactions, superinfection, toxicity, drug interactions, patient compliance and, perhaps of most widespread importance, bacterial resistance. Mechanical debridement methods, including drainage of pus for acute periodontal abscesses, should be considered the first line treatment for most periodontal diseases. Systemic antimicrobials should be considered as adjuncts to mechanical debridement methods and, in chronic disease, never used alone as they can predispose to abscess formation. Adjunctive systemic antimicrobials may be considered in acute disease where debridement or drainage of pus is difficult, where there is local spread or systemic upset. In chronic periodontal diseases, adjunctive antimicrobials should be considered in early onset or rapidly progressive disease or in advanced chronic adult disease where mechanical therapies have failed or surgery is not a preferred option. Inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco smoking are contraindications to the use of antimicrobials. The value of systemic antimicrobials, where other systemic risk factors co-exist, has still to be established. The role of microbial diagnosis and sensitivity testing for antimicrobial selection at this time must be questioned.

  3. Are herpes virus associated to aggressive periodontitis? A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Patrícia Maria de Sousa; Teixeira, Ana Luísa; Kustner, Eduardo Chimenos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal Disease includes a wide variety of infectious entities with various clinical manifestations in the oral cavity and responses to treatment. The determinants of clinical manifestations of periodontal disease include the type of infectious agent, the host immune response and environmental factors. Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is defined as a type of inflammation with specific clinical and laboratory features, which distinguish it from other types of periodontitis, with high incidence rates in a sub-group of individuals. Bacteria have been frequently mentioned as the agent inciting gingival inflammation and tissue destruction that underlies the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, recent studies, with some controversial results, have suggested that the herpes family of viruses, including CMV and EBV-1 as well as papillomaviruses, HIV, Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, Torquetenovirus and hepatitis B and C occur with high frequency in active periodontal lesions. There is a lack of information about this disease and the role of herpesviruses in its pathophysiology. This review provides a critical analysis of the scientific evidence linking bacteria and viruses with AP and their potential impact on clinical characteristics, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26980964

  4. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY in Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Filho, I. S.; Meyer, R.; Olczak, T.; Xavier, M. T.; Trindade, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease, with participation of bacterial, environmental, and host factors. It results from synergistic and dysbiotic multispecies microorganisms, critical “keystone pathogens,” affecting the whole bacterial community. The purpose of this study was to review the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the immunopathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, with special attention paid to HmuY. The host response during periodontitis involves the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. In this proinflammatory process, the ability of P. gingivalis to evade the host immune response and access nutrients in the microenvironment is directly related to its survival, proliferation, and infection. Furthermore, heme is an essential nutrient for development of these bacteria, and HmuY is responsible for its capture from host heme-binding proteins. The inflammatory potential of P. gingivalis HmuY has been shown, including induction of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and CCL2, decreased levels of IL-8, and increased levels of anti-HmuY IgG and IgG1 antibodies in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the HmuY protein might be a promising target for therapeutic strategies and for development of diagnostic methods in chronic periodontitis, especially in the case of patients with chronic periodontitis not responding to treatment, monitoring, and maintenance therapy. PMID:27403039

  5. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY in Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Filho, P C; Gomes-Filho, I S; Meyer, R; Olczak, T; Xavier, M T; Trindade, S C

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease, with participation of bacterial, environmental, and host factors. It results from synergistic and dysbiotic multispecies microorganisms, critical "keystone pathogens," affecting the whole bacterial community. The purpose of this study was to review the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the immunopathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, with special attention paid to HmuY. The host response during periodontitis involves the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. In this proinflammatory process, the ability of P. gingivalis to evade the host immune response and access nutrients in the microenvironment is directly related to its survival, proliferation, and infection. Furthermore, heme is an essential nutrient for development of these bacteria, and HmuY is responsible for its capture from host heme-binding proteins. The inflammatory potential of P. gingivalis HmuY has been shown, including induction of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and CCL2, decreased levels of IL-8, and increased levels of anti-HmuY IgG and IgG1 antibodies in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the HmuY protein might be a promising target for therapeutic strategies and for development of diagnostic methods in chronic periodontitis, especially in the case of patients with chronic periodontitis not responding to treatment, monitoring, and maintenance therapy. PMID:27403039

  6. Are herpes virus associated to aggressive periodontitis? A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Patrícia Maria de Sousa; Teixeira, Ana Luísa; Kustner, Eduardo Chimenos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal Disease includes a wide variety of infectious entities with various clinical manifestations in the oral cavity and responses to treatment. The determinants of clinical manifestations of periodontal disease include the type of infectious agent, the host immune response and environmental factors. Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is defined as a type of inflammation with specific clinical and laboratory features, which distinguish it from other types of periodontitis, with high incidence rates in a sub-group of individuals. Bacteria have been frequently mentioned as the agent inciting gingival inflammation and tissue destruction that underlies the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, recent studies, with some controversial results, have suggested that the herpes family of viruses, including CMV and EBV-1 as well as papillomaviruses, HIV, Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, Torquetenovirus and hepatitis B and C occur with high frequency in active periodontal lesions. There is a lack of information about this disease and the role of herpesviruses in its pathophysiology. This review provides a critical analysis of the scientific evidence linking bacteria and viruses with AP and their potential impact on clinical characteristics, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26980964

  7. Non-Surgical Root Canal Treatment of Dens Invaginatus 3 in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Saeed; Donyavi, Zakyeh; Esmaealzade, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the clinical management of an unusual dens invaginatus type 3. A case of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion is reported. The patient presented with pain and localized swelling. Despite the complex anatomy and diagnosis of dens invaginatus, non-surgical root canal treatment was performed successfully. Key Learning Points: - Dens invaginatus may be presented in different forms, and the etiology of this phenomenon is not fully understood. - Due to abnormal anatomical configuration, dens invaginatus presents technical difficulties in its clinical management. - Non-surgical root canal treatment can be performed successfully. PMID:24171017

  8. Non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis using spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tod, Laura; Ghosh, Jonathan; Lieberman, Ilan; Baguneid, Mohamed

    2013-08-05

    We report the use of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) for non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis. A 59-year-old woman with polycythaemia rubra vera presented with extensive superior mesenteric artery thrombosis not amenable to surgical or endovascular revascularisation. A SCS was implanted for analgesia thereby allowing enteral feeding to be tolerated during the acute period. Four months later the patient developed a focal ischaemic jejunal stricture and underwent resection of a short segment of small bowel with primary anastomosis that healed without complication. Spinal cord stimulation can facilitate non-surgical management of mesenteric ischaemia.

  9. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding. PMID:27267530

  10. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  11. Periodontal considerations in veneer cases.

    PubMed

    Peto, David

    2015-04-01

    Porcelain veneers are a minimally invasive technique to enhance patients' smiles. A crucial component in these cases is the supporting periodontal apparatus and its interaction with the restorations. This article addresses basic concepts such as biologic width, altered eruption patterns, appropriate gingival contouring and smile design to give practitioners the tools to diagnose, evaluate and treat cases successfully and predictably.

  12. Biomaterials in periodontal osseous defects

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Nand; Dixit, Jaya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Osseous defects in periodontal diseases require osseous grafts and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using barrier membranes. The present study was undertaken with the objectives to clinically evaluate the osteogenic potential of hydroxyapatite (HA), cissus quadrangularis (CQ), and oxidized cellulose membrane (OCM) and compare with normal bone healing. Materials and Methods Twenty subjects with periodontitis in the age group ranging from 20 years to 40 years were selected from our outpatient department on the basis of presence of deep periodontal pockets, clinical probing depth ≥5 mm, vertical osseous defects obvious on radiograph and two- or three-walled involvement seen on surgical exposure. Infrabony defects were randomly divided into four groups on the basis of treatment to be executed, such that each group comprised 5 defects. Group I was control, II received HA, III received CQ and IV received OCM. Probing depth and attachment level were measured at regular months after surgery. Defects were re-exposed using crevicular incisions at 6 months. Results There was gradual reduction in the mean probing pocket depth in all groups, but highly significant in the site treated with HA. Gain in attachment level was higher in sites treated with HA, 3.2 mm at 6 months. Conclusion Hydroxyapatite and OCM showed good reduction in pocket depth, attachment level gain and osseous defect fill. Further study should be conducted by using a combination of HA and OCM in periodontal osseous defects with growth factors and stem cells. PMID:25756030

  13. [THE USE OF OZONATED SEA BUCKTHORN OIL IN THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF TOBACCO DEPENDENCE PERIODONTITIS IN THE EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Zubachyk, V; Ilchyshyn, M

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic properties ozonated of sea buckthorn oil in the experiment on the model of generalized periodontitis in Wistar rats induced by action of extracted products of incomplete combustion of tobacco smoke was investigated. It is proved that the proposed method of ozone therapy in combination with fitooil prevents and corrects metabolic disturbances in the periodontal tissues, caused a by high therapeutic effect of the drug. PMID:26638475

  14. [THE USE OF OZONATED SEA BUCKTHORN OIL IN THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF TOBACCO DEPENDENCE PERIODONTITIS IN THE EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Zubachyk, V; Ilchyshyn, M

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic properties ozonated of sea buckthorn oil in the experiment on the model of generalized periodontitis in Wistar rats induced by action of extracted products of incomplete combustion of tobacco smoke was investigated. It is proved that the proposed method of ozone therapy in combination with fitooil prevents and corrects metabolic disturbances in the periodontal tissues, caused a by high therapeutic effect of the drug.

  15. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: non-surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, F; Arends, J; Lundholm, K; Micklewright, A; Zurcher, G; Muscaritoli, M

    2009-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increasing or ensuring nutrient intake in patients in whom normal food intake is inadequate and enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of parenteral nutrition in cancer patients. They were developed by an interdisciplinary expert group in accordance with accepted standards, are based on the most relevant publications of the last 30 years and share many of the conclusions of the ESPEN guidelines on enteral nutrition in oncology. Under-nutrition and cachexia occur frequently in cancer patients and are indicators of poor prognosis and, per se, responsible for excess morbidity and mortality. Many indications for parenteral nutrition parallel those for enteral nutrition (weight loss or reduction in food intake for more than 7-10 days), but only those who, for whatever reason cannot be fed orally or enterally, are candidates to receive parenteral nutrition. A standard nutritional regimen may be recommended for short-term parenteral nutrition, while in cachectic patients receiving intravenous feeding for several weeks a high fat-to-glucose ratio may be advised because these patients maintain a high capacity to metabolize fats. The limited nutritional response to the parenteral nutrition reflects more the presence of metabolic derangements which are characteristic of the cachexia syndrome (or merely the short duration of the nutritional support) rather than the inadequacy of the nutritional regimen. Perioperative parenteral nutrition is only recommended in malnourished patients if enteral nutrition is not feasible. In non-surgical well-nourished oncologic patients routine parenteral nutrition is not recommended because it has proved to offer no advantage and is associated with increased morbidity. A benefit, however, is reported in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  16. Cementum and Periodontal Ligament Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Menicanin, Danijela; Hynes, K; Han, J; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    The unique anatomy and composition of the periodontium make periodontal tissue healing and regeneration a complex process. Periodontal regeneration aims to recapitulate the crucial stages of wound healing associated with periodontal development in order to restore lost tissues to their original form and function and for regeneration to occur, healing events must progress in an ordered and programmed sequence both temporally and spatially, replicating key developmental events. A number of procedures have been employed to promote true and predictable regeneration of the periodontium. Principally, the approaches are based on the use of graft materials to compensate for the bone loss incurred as a result of periodontal disease, use of barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration and use of bioactive molecules. More recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been integrated into research and applications of regenerative dentistry, including periodontics, to aim to manage damaged and lost oral tissues, through reconstruction and regeneration of the periodontium and alleviate the shortcomings of more conventional therapeutic options. The essential components for generating effective cellular based therapeutic strategies include a population of multi-potential progenitor cells, presence of signalling molecules/inductive morphogenic signals and a conductive extracellular matrix scaffold or appropriate delivery system. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered suitable candidates for cell-based tissue engineering strategies owing to their extensive expansion rate and potential to differentiate into cells of multiple organs and systems. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple tissue sources have been investigated in pre-clinical animal studies and clinical settings for the treatment and regeneration of the periodontium.

  17. Indicators of periodontal disease activity: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fine, D H; Mandel, I D

    1986-05-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the traditional clinical criteria are inadequate for: determining active disease sites in periodontitis, monitoring quantitatively the response to therapy or measuring the degree of susceptibility to future breakdown. In an attempt to develop objective measures, a wide variety of studies have been undertaken using saliva, blood, plaque and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) as the specimen source. Examination has included: specific bacteria and their products; host cells and their products (enzymatic and antibacterial, both immunologic and non-immunologic); products of tissue injury derived from local epithelial and connective tissues and bone. Although most of the work to date has failed to provide reliable aids to the clinician, refinements in techniques for sampling and the availability of more sophisticated analytic techniques give cause for optimism. Methods proposed for detection of disease-associated bacteria in subgingival plaque vary in their sensitivity and specificity. Dark field microscopy shows some correlation with existing disease; however, the limited specificity of this method imposes severe restrictions on its usefulness. Highly specific polyclonal and monoclonal antisera to suspected pathogens Bacteroides gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans have been developed and improved methods of identification of these microbes in plaque by ELISA immunofluorescence and flow cytometry are under development. With respect to the host response, a strong correlation between antibody patterns to specific bacteria and periodontal disease categories appears to be emerging. Although most studies have focused on serum antibody derived from peripheral blood, a shift to detection of local antibody response appears to be likely. Techniques of measurement that are exquisitely sensitive have been developed for detection of major immune recognition proteins such as antibody and complement in crevicular fluid. Research

  18. Gender Differences in Periodontal Status and Oral Hygiene of Non-Diabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Antina; Busse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated gender dependent differences by the comparison of periodontal status and oral hygiene between diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects. Methods: 517 mostly obese subjects (171 non-diabetic, 205 type 2 diabetic with oral and 141 with insulin therapy; mean: 59 years) completed an oral hygiene questionnaire and had a clinical examination, including periodontal screening and recording (PSR), percentage of bleeding teeth (PBT), probing pocket depth (PD), gingivitis index (GI), and number of teeth (Tn). Main parameters were “periodontitis” and “oral hygiene behaviour”, each defined by 5 sub-parameters. For a comparison of all results, each sub-parameter was set 0.2. The “low performance index“ (LoP) was the sum of significantly worse sub-parameters in the compared groups (maximum of low performing = 1.0). Results: Gender comparison: In non-diabetic and diabetic patients with oral medication, males performed worse (LoP: periodontitis 0.6 - 0.8; oral hygiene 0.4 - 0.6). The male insulin group performed worse oral hygiene (LoP: 0.4) than females with insulin therapy, whereas the periodontal status showed no difference. Diabetic and non-diabetic groups: Females: Diabetic groups performed worse than non-diabetics (LoP: periodontitis 0.2 - 1.0; oral hygiene 0.4). Insulin patients had worse periodontal status and showed no difference in oral hygiene when compared to diabetic patients with oral medication (LoP: 0.2). Males: Diabetic group with oral medication had worse periodontal status than non-diabetics (LoP: 0.6). Conclusions: The periodontal status was mainly due to oral hygiene behaviour, which was worse in men. Apparently behaviour and not diabetes is the major determinant of periodontitis. Men apparently need much more advise than women. PMID:27347232

  19. The Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate and Nicotine on Periodontal Tissue in a Periodontitis Model Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mikiko; Yanagita, Manabu; Mori, Kenta; Hasegawa, Shiori; Yamashita, Motozo; Yamada, Satoru; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle-related risk factor for periodontal diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of cigarette smoking in periodontal disease has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report that the systemic administration of cigarette smoke condensate or nicotine, which is the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, augmented alveolar bone loss. Concomitantly, the number of osteoclasts in periodontal tissues increased and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand was upregulated at the ligated side in mice with periodontitis. Nicotine also attenuated alveolar bone repair after ligature removal. These observations highlight the destruction of periodontal tissue by smoking and the unfavorable clinical course of periodontal disease in patients with a cigarette smoking habit. The present study demonstrates that periodontal disease models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of cigarette smoking-related periodontal diseases. PMID:27203240

  20. [Gender-related marker pathogens of periodontal disease in chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Zorina, O A; Aymadinova, N K; Basova, A A; Shibaeva, A V; Rebrikov, D V

    2016-01-01

    By using qPCR system, women as well as men were found to have an equal periodontal pathogen colonization. However, the women are subjected to have a higher risk of chronic periodontitis onsets. Women with the chronic periodontitis usually expose an evident hypercolonization with a single pathogen. P. gingivalis is the most prevalent causative agent of the chronic periodontitis in women but not in men. In health as well as in the chronic periodontitis a complex of periodontal pathogens forms such as P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythensis and T. denticola. T. forsythensis demonstrates the highest correlation with the chronic periodontitis onset in men. Our data allow us to prove T. forsythensis playing the key role in the forming of periodontal pathogen complex.

  1. The Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate and Nicotine on Periodontal Tissue in a Periodontitis Model Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kenta; Hasegawa, Shiori; Yamashita, Motozo; Yamada, Satoru; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle-related risk factor for periodontal diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of cigarette smoking in periodontal disease has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report that the systemic administration of cigarette smoke condensate or nicotine, which is the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, augmented alveolar bone loss. Concomitantly, the number of osteoclasts in periodontal tissues increased and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand was upregulated at the ligated side in mice with periodontitis. Nicotine also attenuated alveolar bone repair after ligature removal. These observations highlight the destruction of periodontal tissue by smoking and the unfavorable clinical course of periodontal disease in patients with a cigarette smoking habit. The present study demonstrates that periodontal disease models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of cigarette smoking-related periodontal diseases. PMID:27203240

  2. Periodontal disease and hypertriglyceridemia in Japanese subjects: potential association with enhanced lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Nakarai, Hideo; Yamashita, Akiko; Takagi, Mikimasa; Adachi, Masataka; Sugiyama, Masaharu; Noda, Haruhiko; Katano, Masafumi; Yamakawa, Ryuji; Nakayama, Keiji; Takumiya, Hitomi; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2011-06-01

    Although periodontal disease may be associated with increased risk for atherosclerosis, the mechanism by which the disease causes atherosclerosis is still unknown. The candidates contributing to atherosclerosis in periodontal disease include low-grade inflammation such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and insulin resistance. A previous study demonstrated that periodontal therapy leads to an improvement in CRP as well as insulin resistance, indicating the relationship between periodontal disease and low-grade inflammation or insulin resistance. On the other hand, we previously demonstrated that serum triglyceride (TG) per se is independently associated with CRP or insulin resistance in Japanese populations with a body mass index (BMI) of 21.5 to 27.0 (midrange BMI). To the best of our knowledge, however, the relationship between periodontal disease and serum TG is not fully clarified. The first aim of the present study is to investigate whether periodontal disease is associated with serum TG in Japanese subjects with midrange BMI. If so, another aim of the study is to determine which mechanism is responsible for the association between periodontal disease and serum TG in these subjects. We have performed a periodontal examination in the Ogaki metabolic syndrome medical examination. One hundred sixty-two participants from 40 to 74 years old (56 men and 106 women; mean age, 66.43 ± 6.25 years) were enrolled in the study. Besides medical examination, oral panoramic radiograph was taken for all participants. Average bone score was also calculated. Periodontal bone destruction increased according to the age of the participants (r = 0.227, P < .004, Spearman correlation coefficient). Periodontal bone destruction was also associated with serum TG levels (r = 0.299, P = .000). This association was more evident in subjects with midrange BMI (r = 0.332, P < .001). In subjects with midrange BMI, TG was not correlated with BMI or waste circumstances. Furthermore, TG was not

  3. Could early rheumatoid arthritis resolve after periodontitis treatment only?: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management. PMID:25501069

  4. Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, K. S.; Thomas, Deepak; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kumar, M. S. Arun

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that chronic infections and inflammation are associated with increased risk of cancer development. There has also been considerable evidence that proves the interrelationship between bacterial and viral infections and carcinogenesis. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection thought to be caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria in the dental biofilm. Periodontal bacteria and viruses may act synergistically to cause periodontitis. Many studies have shown that periodontal pockets may act as reservoirs for human papilloma virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, and suspected agents associated with oral cancer. Periodontitis, characterized by epithelial proliferation and migration, results in a chronic release of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, prostaglandins, and enzymes, all of which are associated with cancer development. This review article intends to shed light on the association between periodontal health and carcinogenesis. PMID:24554877

  5. Associations between Periodontal Microbiota and Death Rates

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Chang, Min-Lee; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    It is conceived that specific combinations of periodontal bacteria are associated with risk for the various forms of periodontitis. We hypothesized that such specificity is also related to human cause-specific death rates. We tested this hypothesis in a representative sample of the US population followed for a mean duration of 11 years and found that two specific patterns of 21 serum antibodies against periodontal bacteria were significantly associated with increased all-cause and/or diabetes-related mortalities. These data suggested that specific combinations of periodontal bacteria, even without inducing clinically significant periodontitis, may have a significant impact on human cause-specific death rates. Our findings implied that increased disease and mortality risk could be transmittable via the transfer of oral microbiota, and that developing personalized strategies and maintaining healthy oral microbiota beyond protection against periodontitis would be important to manage the risk. PMID:27748442

  6. Periodontal pathogens in erupting third molars of periodontally healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rajasuo, A; Sihvonen, O J; Peltola, M; Meurman, J H

    2007-09-01

    The presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythensis in bacteriologic samples of 5-7-mm deep mandibular third-molar pericoronal pockets was analysed by polymerase chain reaction, to test the hypothesis that these sites would harbour the bacteria. The patients were periodontally healthy 20-year-old Finnish male conscripts. Sixteen had acute pericoronitis, 28 chronic pericoronitis, and 15 were symptom-free controls. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in only 7% of the samples from chronic pericoronitis cases, whereas P. gingivalis was positive in 20% of the symptom-free versus 69% (P = 0.018) of the acute and 57% (P = 0.044) of the chronic cases. The percentages for P. intermedia were 93, 94 and 93%, and for T. forsythensis 47, 63 and 57%, respectively. These results confirm that, apart from A. actinomycetemcomitans, periodontopathogens are common in third-molar sites in periodontally healthy individuals.

  7. Nonsurgical embryo recovery and transfer in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jeferson F; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria G; Oliveira, Maria Emília F; Leite, Ceci R; Nascimento-Penido, Paula Maria P; Brandão, Felipe Z; Lehloenya, Khoboso C

    2016-07-01

    The embryo transfer techniques used in small ruminants worldwide are based in surgical procedures. These actions are performed under general anesthesia which needs a combination of animal fasting and drugs for secure animal handling and surgery manipulations. Therefore, it involves risks to animal health and life. The major limiting sequels are adhesions formed by the abdominal surgery, in the ovaries, uterus, or between them. These occurrences can both compromise uterus accessing and oocyte capture and are responsible for decreasing success and limiting successive embryo collections. In contrast, nonsurgical embryo procedures can be performed in a relatively simplified way. Nonsurgical embryo recovery does not need animal prolonged starvation, drug retention is minimized, and donors can stay in a standing position. After the end of embryo recovery, donors are promptly restored to their routine housing and feeding. Furthermore, this technique does not need incisions and, therefore, can be used repetitively in superovulated or nonsuperovulated goats and sheep for embryo recovery-a similar procedure done in cattle. In Brazil, promising results are reported using nonsurgical embryo transfer in recipient goats, and studies are currently evaluating similar procedures in sheep. Therefore, this review aimed to present the current panorama of nonsurgical embryo transfer in sheep and goats.

  8. Relationships Among IL-6, TNF-α, Adipokines, Vitamin D and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    TELES, F.R.; TELES, R.P.; MARTIN, L.; SOCRANSKY, S.S.; HAFFAJEE, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives to explore relationships among serum adipokines, vitamin D, clinical and microbial parameters of chronic periodontitis before and after treatment. Methods weight, height and smoking status were recorded for 56 patients with chronic periodontitis. Plaque, gingivitis, bleeding on probing (BOP), suppuration, pocket depth (PD) and attachment level (AL) were measured at all teeth present. Subgingival biofilm samples from each tooth were analyzed for levels of 40 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), adiponectin, leptin, resistin and vitamin D were measured at baseline. Sample collection was then performed in a subset of the population 6 months post-therapy (n=17). Serum samples were analyzed using ELISA and immunoassays. Differences in clinical, microbial and serum factors among groups were sought using the Mann-Whitney test. Correlations among factors were evaluated using regression analysis. Effects of therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test Results There were positive correlations between adiponectin/vitamin D and between IL-6/leptin; negative correlations between IL-6/vitamin D, and leptin/vitamin D, but no associations between serum analytes and clinical or microbial parameters. Gender and BMI were associated with levels of adipokines. Periodontal therapy improved clinical and microbiological parameters, but did not influence the levels of serum analytes. Conclusions Adipokines and IL-6 levels were affected by gender and BMI. Serum analytes were not influenced by periodontal therapy. PMID:22181684

  9. Emdogain--periodontal regeneration based on biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Gestrelius, S; Lyngstadaas, S P; Hammarström, L

    2000-06-01

    Biomimicry has been introduced as a term for innovations inspired by nature [1]. Such innovations may appear in almost every part of modern society. This review on the effects of enamel matrix proteins on the formation of cementum and the development of emdogain for regeneration of periodontal tissues lost due to periodontitis shows an example of biomimicry in dentistry. Findings from clinical and laboratory investigations are summarized and the biological basis for enamel matrix-induced periodontal regeneration is discussed.

  10. Effect of gene polymorphisms on periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tarannum, Fouzia; Faizuddin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory diseases of supporting structures of the tooth. It results in the destruction of the supporting structures and most of the destructive processes involved are host derived. The processes leading to destruction and regeneration of the destroyed tissues are of great interest to both researchers and clinicians. The selective susceptibility of subjects for periodontitis has remained an enigma and wide varieties of risk factors have been implicated for the manifestation and progression of periodontitis. Genetic factors have been a new addition to the list of risk factors for periodontal diseases. With the availability of human genome sequence and the knowledge of the complement of the genes, it should be possible to identify the metabolic pathways involved in periodontal destruction and regeneration. Most forms of periodontitis represent a life-long account of interactions between the genome, behaviour, and environment. The current practical utility of genetic knowledge in periodontitis is limited. The information contained within the human genome can potentially lead to a better understanding of the control mechanisms modulating the production of inflammatory mediators as well as provides potential therapeutic targets for periodontal disease. Allelic variants at multiple gene loci probably influence periodontitis susceptibility. PMID:22754216

  11. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  12. Periodontal Diagnosis Affected by Variation in Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John A.; Grill, Ashley C.; Matthews, Abigail G.; Vena, Don; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.; Curro, Frederick A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The randomized case presentation (RCP) study is designed to assess the degree of diagnostic accuracy for described periodontal cases. This is to lay the basis for practitioner calibration in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network for future clinical studies. Methods The RCP consisted of 10 case scenarios ranging from periodontal health to gingivitis and mild, moderate, and severe periodontitis. Respondents were asked to diagnose the described cases. Survey diagnoses were compared to two existing classifications of periodontal disease status. The RCP was administered via a proprietary electronic data capture system maintained by the PEARL Data Coordinating Center. Standard analytic techniques, including frequency counts and cross-tabulations, were used for categorical data with mean and standard deviation and median values reported for continuous data elements. Results Demonstrable variations in periodontal assessment for health, gingivitis, and mild, moderate, and severe periodontitis were found among the 130 PEARL general practitioners who participated in the RCP survey. The highest agreement for diagnosis among dentists was for severe periodontitis (88%) and the lowest for gingivitis (55%). The highest percentage of variation was found in cases with health and gingivitis. Conclusions There was variation among PEARL practitioners in periodontal diagnosis that may affect treatment outcomes. Our findings add clinical support to recent publications suggesting a need for standardization of terminology in periodontitis diagnosis. PMID:22702518

  13. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. PMID:26608580

  14. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions.

  15. Initial periodontal screening and radiographic findings - A comparison of two methods to evaluate the periodontal situation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The periodontal screening index (PSI) is an element of the initial dental examination. The PSI provides information on the periodontal situation and allows a first estimation of the treatment required. The dental panoramic tomography (DPT) indicates the proximal bone loss, thus also allowing conclusions on the periodontal situation. In this study, the results of both methods in determining the periodontal situation are compared. Methods The clinical examination covered DMF-T, QHI, and PSI scores at four proximal sites per tooth; the examining dentist was unaware of the radiographic finding. Based on the PSI scores, the findings were diagnosed as follows: score 0 - 2 "no periodontitis", score 3 and 4 "periodontitis". Independent of the locality and time of the clinical evaluation, two dentists examined the DPTs of the subjects. The results were classified as follows: no bone loss = "no periodontitis", and bone loss = "periodontitis". Results 112 male subjects (age 18 to 58, Ø 37.7 ± 8 years) were examined. Regarding the PSI, 17 subjects were diagnosed "no periodontitis" and 95 subjects "periodontitis". According to the evaluation of the DPTs, 70 subjects were diagnosed "no periodontitis" and 42 "periodontitis". A comparison of both methods revealed that the diagnosis "no periodontitis" corresponded in 17 cases and "periodontitis" in 42 cases (53%). In 47% (53 cases) the results were not congruent. The difference between both methods was statistically significant (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.194). Conclusion The present study shows that the initial assessment of the periodontal situation significantly depends on the method of evaluation. PMID:21235747

  16. Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Marja L.; Loos, Bruno G.; Crielaard, W.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in the IL1, IL6, IL10, vitamin D receptor, and CD14 genes may be associated with CP in certain populations. However, carriage rates of the rare (R)-allele of any polymorphism varied considerably among studies and most of the studies appeared under-powered and did not correct for other risk factors. Larger cohorts, well-defined phenotypes, control for other risk factors, and analysis of multiple genes and polymorphisms within the same pathway are needed to get a more comprehensive insight into the contribution of gene polymorphisms in CP. PMID:20339487

  17. Periodontal Proteomics: Wonders Never Cease!

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Kapoor, Shalini; Saksena, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, as they are integral components of the physiological metabolic pathways of cells. Periodontal tissues comprise multicompartmental groups of interacting cells and matrices that provide continuous support, attachment, proprioception, and physical protection for the teeth. The proteome map, that is, complete catalogue of the matrix and cellular proteins expressed in alveolar bone, cementum, periodontal ligament, and gingiva, is to be explored for more in-depth understanding of periodontium. The ongoing research to understand the signalling pathways that allow cells to divide, differentiate, and die in controlled manner has brought us to the era of proteomics. Proteomics is defined as the study of all proteins including their relative abundance, distribution, posttranslational modifications, functions, and interactions with other macromolecules, in a given cell or organism within a given environment and at a specific stage in the cell cycle. Its application to periodontal science can be used to monitor health status, disease onset, treatment response, and outcome. Proteomics can offer answers to critical, unresolved questions such as the biological basis for the heterogeneity in gingival, alveolar bone, and cemental cell populations. PMID:24490073

  18. Clinical assessment of periodontal conditions in patients treated with nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B; Klug, C; Darius, H

    1996-03-19

    Calcium antagonists are widely used in treating acute and chronic coronary insufficiency disorders. A major side effect of long-term treatment is gingival hyperplasia. In the present study, 70 patients taking nifedipine for at least six months and 70 controls similar in age, gender, approximal hygiene and systemic disease with at least 6 anterior teeth in upper and lower arches were examined. Their periodontal conditions were determined by modified Sulcus-Bleeding-Index (mSBI), modified Approximal-Plaque-Index (mAPI), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN), a hyperplasia index quantifying the extent of gingival overgrowth, probing depths, clinical attachment loss and the modified Phenytoin-Gingival-Inflammation-Index (mPGI). A mild to moderate gingival hyperplasia was diagnosed in 21 of 70 patients resulting in a prevalence of 30% compared to 8.5% in controls. The hyperplastic changes were situated mainly in the anterior region of the dentition. Significant differences between both groups could be found comparing the severity of the gingival hyperplasia, the CPITN, mSBI, probing depths and the part of mPGI evaluating colour and turgor of the gingiva (p < 0.05). The severity of gingival overgrowth was strongly correlated with the inflammatory gingival changes, probing depths, the periodontal treatment need and the approximal hygiene of the patients. No statistically significant correlation could be found between the severity of gingival hyperplasia and the age and gender of the patient, or the dose or duration of nifedipine therapy. Gingival changes seemed to be more pronounced in patients with cardiovascular disorders than in patients under hemodialysis. The high incidence of gingival hyperplasia in patients receiving nifedipine on a long-term basis emphasises the role of the dentist and general practitioner in the early detection and prophylaxis of gingival changes and requires a thorough information to the patient concerning periodontal side

  19. Coordinated Pediatric and Periodontal Dental Care of a Child with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Gentry; Quinonez, Rocio B; Offenbacher, Steven; Keels, Martha Ann; Guthmiller, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe the management of an eight-year-old Bulgarian male with Down syndrome presenting with periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease in the early mixed dentition. Treatment involved full-mouth mechanical debridement and extraction of hopeless teeth under general anesthesia followed by systemic antibiotics and chemical adjunctive therapy. Microbial culture and sensitivity testing aided in diagnosis and guided treatment decisions. This case report demonstrates a multidisciplinary approach in the management of aggressive periodontal disease in an internationally adopted pediatric patient with special health care needs. PMID:26314608

  20. Epstein-Barr virus infection induces bone resorption in apical periodontitis via increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Miletic, Maja; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Milasin, Jelena

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes in periapical tissues caused by etiological agents of endodontic origin lead to apical periodontitis. Apart from bacteria, two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are recognized as putative pathogens in apical periodontitis. Although previous reports suggest the involvement of EBV in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis, its exact role in periapical bone resorption has not yet been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that EBV infection in apical periodontitis is capable of inducing periapical bone resorption via stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Increased levels of ROS induce expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). RANKL binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) present on the surface of preosteoclasts induces their maturation and activation which consequently leads to bone resorption. The potential benefit of antiviral and antioxidant-based therapies in periapical bone resorption treatment remains to be assessed. PMID:27515196

  1. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, S.; Laine, M. L.; Buijs, M. J.; Brandt, B. W.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B. G.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches. PMID:26830979

  2. Estimation of Salivary and Serum Total Sialic Acid Levels in Periodontal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Surekha R; Kolte, Abhay P; Gupta, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic gingivitis and periodontitis are inflammatory diseases. An important function of host sialic acid is to regulate innate immunity. The aim of the study was to assess the concentration of Total sialic acid (TSA) in saliva and serum and also to find out their association if any, in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 subjects were clinically examined and distributed into three groups (n=30) according to the periodontal status namely healthy, chronic gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.Clinical measurements including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, oral hygeine index were recorded .TSA concentration was determined in saliva and serum of all subjects. Results: In healthy group the mean salivary TSA level was 39.05mg/dl ±6.35(p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 49.75 mg/dl ± 4.87 (p<0.0001). In the chronic gingivitis group the mean salivary TSA level was 68.23 mg/dl ± 2.71 (p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 65.65 mg/dl ±3.56 (p<0.0001). In the chronic periodontitis group the mean salivary TSA was 81.33 mg/dl ±3.94 (p<0.0001), mean serum TSA level was 75.98 mg/dl ±3.58 (p<0.0001). Conclusion:The present data indicates that salivary & serum TSA levels can differentiate between chronic periodontitis patients and normal individuals. Thus it can be used as an adjunct to diagnose, monitor response to therapy, to determine the current periodontal disease status and to assess the treatment outcomes. PMID:25386514

  3. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  4. [Diabetes and periodontitis: A bidirectional relationship].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, a defect in insulin action or a combination of both. Periodontitis is now considered a chronic localized infection of the oral cavity that can trigger inflammatory host immune responses at local and systemic levels, and can also be a source of bacteremia. It is now known that periodontitis has an influence on the pathogenesis of certain systemic diseases. The biological relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease is well documented. In the mid-90s sufficient scientific support for the association between diabetes and periodontitis was published, and periodontitis was designated as the sixth complication of diabetes. There have been studies that show an improvement in both clinical and immunological parameters of periodontitis and glycemic control in long-term diabetes after treatment of periodontal disease. In addition, scientific evidence confirms that poorer glycemic control contributes to a worse periodontal condition. The interplay between the 2 conditions highlights the importance of the need for a good communication between the internist and dentist about diabetic patients, considering always the possibility that the 2 diseases may be occurring simultaneously in order to ensure an early diagnosis of both.

  5. Quorum sensing inhibition, relevance to periodontics.

    PubMed

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  6. Role and Efficacy of L-PRFmatrix in the Regeneration of Periodontal Defect: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Padmavathi; Kumar R, Vinaya; Kripal, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of the periodontal unit. The therapeutic use of L-PRF matrix constitutes a relatively new biotechnology that has been a breakthrough in the acceleration of hard and soft tissue healing. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) belongs to a new generation of platelet concentrates, with simplified processing and without biochemical blood handling. The slow polymerization during PRF preparation seems to generate a fibrin network very similar to the natural one. Such a network leads to a more efficient cell migration and proliferation and thus cicatrization. This article proposes an overview of use of platelet-rich fibrin in management of periodontal hard and soft tissue defects and goes on to describe the clinical benefits of PRF and its advantage over PRP. PMID:25654042

  7. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression. PMID:19767584

  8. Automated system for periodontal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Salvador E.; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of periodontal disease is one of the most important data for the clinicians in order to achieve correct planning and treatment. Clinical measure of the periodontal sulcus depth is the most important datum to know the exact state of periodontal disease. These measures must be done periodically study bone resorption evolution around teeth. Time factor of resorption indicates aggressiveness of periodontitis. Manual probes are commonly used with direct reading. Mechanical probes give automatic signal but this method uses complicated and heavy probes that are only limited for University researchers. Probe position must be the same to have right diagnosis. Digital image analysis of periodontal probing provides practical, accurate and easy tool. Gum and plaque index could also be digitally measured with this method.

  9. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression.

  10. Periodontal disease among New England elders.

    PubMed

    Fox, C H; Jette, A M; McGuire, S M; Feldman, H A; Douglass, C W

    1994-07-01

    Much of the existing oral epidemiologic literature is limited by having inadequate numbers of the oldest-old in their sample, having used rudimentary periodontal measures, or not having examined probability samples of community-dwelling elders. The New England Elders Dental Study (NEEDS) is the first study that documents the periodontal disease status of a probability sample of 554 adults aged 70 to 96 living within an entire U.S. Public Health Service region. The NEEDS study revealed substantially higher estimates of periodontal destruction among older adults than previous national studies would suggest. These results are consistent with several papers in the literature that suggest that periodontal disease rates are on the increase in older adults. In the coming decades dentistry should be prepared to meet the increasing need and demand for periodontal services in the growing older population. PMID:7608844

  11. Role of antibiotics in generalized aggressive periodontitis: A review of clinical trials in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Annapurna; Baiju, C. S.; Ahuja, Vipin

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is well-recognized fact that periodontal diseases are caused by multifactorial etiologies, in which microorganisms play an important role. An essential component of therapy is to eliminate or manage these pathogens. This has been traditionally accomplished through mechanical means by scaling and root planning which is ineffective in some of the aggressive periodontal diseases. These aggressive diseases involve particular groups of microorganisms which are not eliminated by mechanical means; and they require anti-infective therapy, which includes local and systemic antimicrobials. This approac