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Sample records for nonsurgical periodontal therapy

  1. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Drisko, C H

    2001-01-01

    reports, however, would indicate that, when daily irrigation with water was added to a regular oral hygiene home regimen, a significant reduction in probing depth, bleeding on probing and Gingival Index was observed. A significant reduction in cytokine levels (interleukin-1beta and prostaglandin E2, which are associated with destructive changes in inflamed tissues and bone resorption also occurs. If patient-applied antimicrobial therapy is insufficient in preventing, arresting, or reversing the disease progression, then professionally applied antimicrobial agents should be considered including sustained local drug delivery products. Other, more broadly based pharmacotherapeutic agents may be indicated for multiple failing sites. Such agents would include systemic antibiotics or host modulating drugs used in conjunction with periodontal debridement. More aggressive types of juvenile periodontitis or severe rapidly advancing adult periodontitis usually require a combination of surgical intervention in conjunction with systemic antibiotics and generally are not controlled with nonsurgical anti-infective therapy alone. It should be noted, however, that, to date, no home care products or devices currently available can completely control or eliminate the pathogenic plaques associated with periodontal diseases for extended periods of time. Daily home care and frequent recall are still paramount for long-term success. Nonsurgical therapy remains the cornerstone of periodontal treatment. Attention to detail, patient compliance and proper selection of adjunctive antimicrobial agents for sustained plaque control are important elements in achieving successful long-term results. Frequent re-evaluation and careful monitoring allows the practitioner the opportunity to intervene early in the disease state, to reverse or arrest the progression of periodontal disease with meticulous nonsurgical anti-infective therapy.

  2. Surgical and nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Learned and unlearned concepts.

    PubMed

    Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A; Lang, Niklaus P

    2013-06-01

    This review aims to highlight concepts relating to nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapy, which have been learned and unlearned over the past few decades. A number of treatment procedures, such as gingival curettage and aggressive removal of contaminated root cementum, have been unlearned. Advances in technology have resulted in the introduction of a range of new methods for use in nonsurgical periodontal therapy, including machine-driven instruments, lasers, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and local antimicrobial-delivery devices. However, these methods have not been shown to offer significant benefits over and above nonsurgical debridement using hand instruments. The method of debridement is therefore largely dependent on the preferences of the operator and the patient. Recent evidence indicates that specific systemic antimicrobials may be indicated for use as adjuncts to nonsurgical debridement in patients with advanced disease. Full-mouth disinfection protocols have been proven to be a relevant treatment option. We have learned that while nonsurgical and surgical methods result in similar long-term treatment outcomes, surgical therapy results in greater probing-depth reduction and clinical attachment gain in initially deep pockets. The surgical technique chosen seems to have limited influence upon changes in clinical attachment gain. What has not changed is the importance of thorough mechanical debridement and optimal plaque control for successful nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapy.

  3. Surgical and Non-Surgical Procedures Associated with Recurrence of Periodontitis in Periodontal Maintenance Therapy: 5-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Lages, Eugênio José Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prospective studies that investigated the influence of surgical and nonsurgical procedures in the recurrence of periodontitis and tooth loss in periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) programs have not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate longitudinally the recurrence of periodontitis in regular compliers (RC) and irregular compliers (IC) individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures over 5 years in a program of PMT. Materials and Methods A total of 212 individuals participated in this study. Full-mouth periodontal examination including bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment level were determined at all PMT visits over 5 years. The recurrence of periodontitis was evaluated in RC and IC individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures in PMT. The influences of risk variables of interest were tested through univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. Results Recurrence of periodontitis was significantly lower among RC when compared to IC. Individuals with recurrence of periodontitis and undergoing surgical procedures showed higher probing depth and clinical attachment loss than those who received non-surgical procedures. Recurrence of periodontitis was higher in individual undergoing surgical procedures and irregular compliance during PMT. Conclusions Irregular compliance and surgical procedures in individuals undergoing PMT presented higher rates of recurrence of periodontitis when compared to regular compliant patients undergoing non-surgical procedures. PMID:26496187

  4. Evaluation of glutathione level in gingival crevicular fluid in periodontal health, in chronic periodontitis and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy: A clinicobiochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Savita, A. M.; Sarun, E.; Arora, Shivli; Krishnan, Swathi

    2015-01-01

    Context: Periodontitis is predominantly due to exaggerated host response to pathogenic microorganisms and their products which causes an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species-antioxidant in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Glutathione is an important redox regulator in GCF and maintenance of stable reduced glutathione (GSH):oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio is essential for periodontal health. Aims: The present study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the level of glutathione and redox balance (GSH: GSSG ratio) in GCF of chronic periodontitis patients, periodontally healthy controls and also to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on the level of glutathione and redox balance during 3 months postoperative visit. Study Design: Baseline GCF samples were collected from 20 chronic periodontitis patients and 20 periodontally healthy subjects for GSH and GSSG levels estimation. Periodontitis patients were recalled 3 months postnonsurgical periodontal therapy to re-sample GCF. Materials and Methods: GSH and GSSG levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The values were statistically analyzed by Paired t-test. Results: The mean GSH and GSSG values in GCF were found to be significantly lower in periodontitis patients pre- and 3 months post-nonsurgical periodontal therapy, compared with those in the control group subjects. In addition, the successful nonsurgical therapy even though leading to a significant improvement in the GSH and GSSG levels, does not restore glutathione concentration to the levels seen in healthy subjects. Conclusion: Successful nonsurgical periodontal therapy leads to significant improvement in the redox balance (GSH: GSSG ratio) in chronic periodontitis patients. PMID:26097356

  5. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. Aim To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Materials and methods Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Results Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (p<0.0001). Both procedures were effective in improving GI, PI and PD, but the use of diode laser was associated with more evident results. Conclusions Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis. PMID:26161248

  6. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602391

  7. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit.

  8. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26464855

  9. Gingival crevicular fluid periostin levels in chronic periodontitis patients following nonsurgical periodontal treatment with low-level laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Dhanangchaayan; Balasundaram, Aruna; Naik, Vanaja Krishna; Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Periostin is a matricellular protein highly expressed in periosteum, periodontal ligament and is essential for tissue integrity and maturation. It plays a role in collagen fibrillogenesis and is downregulated in periodontal disease. Biostimulation utilizing low-level laser therapy (LLLT) influences periodontal ligament fibroblast proliferation. This study was conducted with the objective of estimating periostin levels in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients following LLLT as an adjunct to root surface debridement (RSD). Materials and Methods: Thirty periodontally healthy participants (Group I) and sixty CP participants were recruited. Based on the therapeutic intervention, CP patients were allocated to either RSD (Group II) or to RSD with LLLT (Group III) group. Clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) periostin levels were assessed at the baseline and at the 3rd month. Results: Periostin levels were significantly lower in CP patients when compared to healthy individuals at the baseline (P < 0.01). Following nonsurgical periodontal treatment (NSPT), periostin levels significantly increased in both Group II and III, when compared to baseline values (P < 0.001). Comparison of mean periostin levels between both the treatment groups showed a significant increase in LLLT group than RSD at the 3rd month (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, LLLT application was found to have additional benefits over RSD with respect to clinical periodontal parameters and GCF periostin levels. Moreover, periostin may be used as a possible biomarker to evaluate the outcome following NSPT. PMID:28042273

  10. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used successfully in treatment of bony defects caused by mesially tilted molars. PMID:26421197

  11. Effect of Exposure to Portland Cement Dust on the Periodontal Status and on the Outcome of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cement dust contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead and chromium, pollutants hazardous to the biotic environment, with adverse impact for vegetation, human and animal health and ecosystems. Objective To investigate if long term exposure to cement dust can affect the periodontal health and affect the outcome of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods A total of sixty subjects were included in this study. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were grouped into; Group I comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis working in the Portland Cement Company and Group II comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis who does not work in cement factories nor live near any of them. Twenty healthy subjects were included in this study as healthy control group (Group III). Clinical parameters including gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CLA) were scored for all patients before and after periodontal therapy. All patients received non-surgical periodontal therapy together with strict oral hygiene program for one month. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from both groups at baseline and one month after periodontal therapy. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze the GCF samples for detection and assessment of the levels of IL-1β and TNFα. Results The two studied groups responded well to non-surgical periodontal treatment and there was no significant difference between GI and GII (P>0.05). The levels of TNFα was higher in GI than in GII before and after periodontal therapy (P<0.05). The levels of IL-1β did not show any significant difference between the two groups at base line (P>0.05), but represented with a highly significant difference between G1 and GII after periodontal therapy (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between the levels of both IL-1β and TNFα and all the clinical parameters in GI before and after periodontal therapy and in GII

  12. Characterization of the release profile of doxycycline by PLGA microspheres adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Moura, Lucas Alves; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Aiello, Talita Bianchi; Duek, Eliana Ap De Rezende; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Nociti Junior, Francisco Humberto; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Antonio Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the release of locally delivered doxycycline by poly (l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres in the periodontal pocket of patients with chronic periodontitis, treated by non-surgical periodontal therapy. Nineteen sites of non-adjacent teeth of four different patients were evaluated. Five milligram of PLGA microspheres loaded with 16 doxycycline hyclate (DOX) was administered per periodontal site. To quantify DOX released into the periodontal pocket, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected from the sites on days 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 after DOX application, and high-performance liquid chromatography was performed. Data were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Tukey test. At days 2, 5, and 7, the DOX concentration was stably sustained (23.33 ± 1.38, 23.4 ± 1.82, and 22.75 ± 1.33 μg/mL, respectively), with no significant differences over these assessment times (p > 0.05). At days 10 and 15, a tendency was observed toward a decrease in DOX concentration (21.74 ± 0.91 and 20.53 ± 4.88 μg/mL, respectively), but a significant decrease in GCF drug concentration (19.69 ± 4.70 μg/mL) was observed only on day 20. The DOX delivery system developed demonstrated a successful sustained release after local administration, as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  13. Association of susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease with the clinical outcome and tooth survival after non-surgical periodontal therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2016-01-01

    Background The real clinical utility of genetic testing is the prognostic value of genetic factors in the clinical outcome of periodontal treatment and the tooth survival. A meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and the tooth survival. Material and Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE-Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Scopus was performed. Additionally, a hand search was done in three journals. No specific language restriction was applied. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases resulted in 283 articles. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, nine of them examined the clinical outcome, while the other one investigated the tooth survival in susceptible individuals after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Eight of included studies were selected for the meta-analysis. IL-1 positive genotypes increase the risk of tooth loss, while no association found between the bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and plaque index (PI) with the genotype status. Probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction in the first three months and in long-term results found to have a significant association with the genotype. Conclusions There is no difference in the clinical measurements after non-surgical periodontal treatment, apart from PPD. More publications are needed to identify a cause-effect relationship. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, periodontal therapy, clinical outcome, tooth loss, susceptibility, polymorphism, genotype, meta-analysis, systematic review. PMID:26595831

  14. The Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hyman, Leslie G.; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Gelato, Marie C.; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Reddy, Michael S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Oates, Thomas W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A.; Orlander, Philip R.; Paquette, David W.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. Objective To determine if non-surgical periodontal treatment reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes (DM) and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. Design, Setting and Participants The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) is a 6-month, single-masked, randomized, multi-center clinical trial. Participants had DM, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c ≥7% and <9%, and untreated periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with five academic medical centers. Intervention The treatment group (n=257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline, and supportive periodontal therapy at three and six months. The control group (n=257) received no treatment for six months. Main Outcome Measure Difference in HbA1c change from baseline between groups at six months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose, and the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2). Results Enrollment was stopped early due to futility. At 6 months, the periodontal therapy group increased HbA1c 0.17% (1.0) (mean (SD)) compared to 0.11% (1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference = -0.05%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.23%, 0.12%; p=0.55). Probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing and gingival index measures improved in the treatment group compared to the control group at six months with adjusted between-group differences of 0.33mm (95% CI: 0.26, 0.39), 0

  15. Creation of a nonsurgical papilla in orthodontic treatment with severe periodontal disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shuichi; Nomura, Naoyuki; Kawashima, Hideyuki; Ito, Koichi

    2007-04-01

    This case report describes the nonsurgical creation of an interdental papilla in orthodontic therapy of a patient with severe periodontal disease. A large diastema between the maxillary incisors was closed completely, and the lost interdental papilla was re-created by orthodontic therapy after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Radiographs showed improvement of the bone defect. Periodontal/orthodontic soft tissue manipulation is a nonsurgical technique that can lead to reformation of the interdental papilla, provided that periodontal health is maintained.

  16. An Evaluation of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Torres, Caio V.G; Neto, José S; Souza, Marcio A; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O; Brandt, William C; Diniz, Ricardo E.A.S

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal scaling and oral hygiene instruction for patients with mild chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis through clinical periodontal parameters and laboratory tests for CRP (C- reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Twelve individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 12 healthy individuals were evaluated, with a mean age of 45.38 and 46.75 respectively, all female and with mild, chronic periodontitis. The participants were evaluated clinically and periapical radiographs were taken (T1), after which periodontal treatment was instituted. After ninety days (T2), new clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Probing depth, bleeding index, and plaque indexes were observed in both groups, and the results demonstrated reductions but no statistical differences. Laboratory tests for CRP and ESR produced higher values for the rheumatoid arthritis group with T1- T2 reductions on the average, but the values were still higher than in the health group. We conclude that periodontal therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mild chronic periodontitis showed a improvement in the periodontal clinical parameters and laboratory tests that were evaluated. PMID:26140059

  17. Adjunctive Application of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mogi, Makio; Okabe, Iichiro; Okada, Kosuke; Goto, Hisashi; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Takeki; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Mitani, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is caused by dental plaque biofilms, and the removal of these biofilms from the root surface of teeth plays a central part in its treatment. The conventional treatment for periodontal disease fails to remove periodontal infection in a subset of cases, such as those with complicated root morphology. Adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been proposed as an additional treatment for this infectious disease. Many periodontal pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to low-power lasers in the presence of dyes, such as methylene blue, toluidine blue O, malachite green, and indocyanine green. aPDT uses these light-activated photosensitizer that is incorporated selectively by bacteria and absorbs a low-power laser/light with an appropriate wavelength to induce singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are toxic to bacteria. While this technique has been evaluated by many clinical studies, some systematic reviews and meta-analyses have reported controversial results about the benefits of aPDT for periodontal treatment. In the light of these previous reports, the aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information about aPDT and help extend knowledge of advanced laser therapy. PMID:26473843

  18. Laser Assisted Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Joseph D.; Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Kerns, David G.; Al-Hashimi, Ibtisam

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine potential benefits of using laser therapy for secular decontamination in conjunction with scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. The study was performed on 173 teeth in 14 patients in a split-mouth design, one side received scaling and root planing followed by laser therapy using a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser with an ablative handpiece (test group); the contralateral side received scaling and root planing without laser (control group). Clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated prior to treatment and at 3 and 6 months following therapy; clinical measurements were performed by two blinded examiners. The clinical parameters included measurement of gingival recession (REC), bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment level (CAL), pocket depth (PD), furcation involvement (FUR), and tooth mobility (MOB). Laboratory testing to determine the levels of periodontal pathogens was performed using PCR techniques. The results of the study revealed statistically significant differences in clinical and laboratory parameters at 3 and 6 months after therapy for both test and control groups, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. However, sites receiving laser therapy tended to show a greater decrease in probing depths, gain in clinical attachment level, and reduced bacterial levels. In conclusion, the overall results of the study suggest a potential benefit of using laser therapy in conjunction with scaling and root planing for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:28357001

  19. Microbiological Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Treatment: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Mohammadreza; Taliee, Rojin; Mojahedi, Masoud; Meymandi, Mansour; Torshabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The efficiency of routine scaling and root planning is negatively influenced by the tooth anatomy and residual bacteria all possibly affecting the treatment outcomes in future. The present study compared the microbiologic effectiveness of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunctive treatment modality for nonsurgical treatment in chronic periodontitis. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 18 chronic periodontitis patients were selected. Four quadrants were randomly treated by scaling and root planning (SRP), diode laser (810n m wavelength, 1.5 W and 320 μm fiber, contact and sweeping technique), SRP + PDT (with diode laser 808 nm, 0.5 W) and laser + SRP (with diode laser 808 nm, 1 W) in each patient. Presence of periodontal pathogen species in the treated areas were measured before the treatment, at 1 and 3 months afterwards. The identification and reproduction of the specific genes of pathogen bacteria were done by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Presence of oral pathogen bacteria in the treatment groups were analyzed by chi-square test. A semi quantitative analysis was used to measure the intensity of white light in each band. This was calculated by number of pixels in each band. Results: In the qualitative analysis, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Treponema denticola (Td) species were killed after 1 month in all treatment modalities. PDT had more effects to decrease Prevotella intermedia (Pi) species than SRP while Tannerella forsythensis count (Tf) species increased in all treatments. Furthermore, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) species decreased in all treatments and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) species increased in all treatments after 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: It can be concluded that PDT was more effective as an adjunctive treatment to SRP than SRP alone; however, no distinct differences were found between both treatment modalities regarding reduction of certain pathogen bacteria. PMID

  20. Photodynamic therapy in non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis: short term randomized clinical trial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, C.; Palaia, G.; Loskutova, E.; Libotte, F.; Kornblit, R.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to exposition to plaque and tartar. Conventional treatments consist of scaling and root planing (SRP) and antibiotics administration. Among them encouraging results have been obtained using alternative protocols, like the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT). Aim of the Study: Evaluation of PDT effects added to conventional methods. Materials and Methods: 11 patients (4M/7F, 37-67 years aged, non-smoking) affected by untreated chronic periodontal disease, with >3mm pockets in at least 4 teeth were divided in two groups, test and control group. Each patient had to made full-intraoral before and after the treatment. The test group received SRP+PDT, while the control group was subjected to SRP. The PDT was performed through the HELBO®TheraLite (Bredent Medical), diode laser battery powered 670nm with an output of 75mW/cm2. The Helbo Blue photosensitizer, containing methylene blue, was used. The exposure time to the laser effect was of 10'' for each site, for a total of 60'' at 3J/cm2. Results: Both groups had a significant improvement in the reduction of pocket depth (PD), above all in the test group. Statistical analysis was performed through the T-test, evaluating PD between the two groups p=0.96 (p> 0.05), resulting not statistically significant. Conclusion: PDT is a promising support to SRP, achieving a significant reduction in the pocket depth, but more cases are needed to confirm the validity of the used protocol.

  1. Generalized aggressive periodontitis: microbiological composition and clinical parameters in non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Usin, María M; Tabares, Sandra M; Menso, Julieta; de Albera, Estela R; Sembaj, Adela

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variations in periodontal parameters and microbiological composition in periodontal pockets at the baseline and 3 and 6 months post treatmentin patients with Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis(GAP) undergoing non surgical periodontal treatment combined with chlorhexidine and systemic antibiotics. Medical and dental history was taken from 10 subjects, average age 30.6±2.7 years, diagnosed with GAP. A non surgical periodontal treatment combined with 0.12% chlorhexidine, 875 mg amoxicillin and 500 mg metronidazole every 12 hours for ten days was conducted. At each visit, the following measurements wererecorded: bacterial plaque (BP), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), hypermobility, and furcation lesions, and a sample of subgingivalplaque was taken from the site of the deepest probing depth of each sextant to identify Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans using molecular biology techniques. After 6 months, the Wilcoxon test showed an increase of 0.97 mm in CAL (p=0.0047) and 2.54 mm in PD(p=0.009). A healthy site was defined as having a PD <5 mm, negative BOP and no pathogenic bacteria detected at 6 months, indicating significant improvement (p=0.008), with OR (95%CI) =4.7 (1.102220.11).With the treatment protocol used in this study, 6 months after treatment, patients had an approximately 4- fold higher possibility of presenting PD <5 mm and periodontal pockets without periodontal pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Regenerative periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hägi, Tobias T; Laugisch, Oliver; Ivanovic, Aleksandar; Sculean, Anton

    2014-03-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is to completely restore the tooth's supporting apparatus that has been lost due to inflammatory periodontal disease or injury. It is characterized by formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers, new periodontal ligament, and new alveolar bone. Indeed conventional, nonsurgical, and surgical periodontal therapy usually result in clinical improvements evidenced by probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain, but the healing occurs predominantly through formation of a long junctional epithelium and no or only unpredictable periodontal regeneration. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for new materials and improved surgical techniques, with the aim of predictably promoting periodontal wound healing/regeneration and improving the clinical outcome. This article attempts to provide the clinician with an overview of the most important biologic events involved in periodontal wound healing/ regeneration and on the criteria on how to select the appropriate regenerative material and surgical technique in order to optimize the clinical outcomes.

  3. Non-surgical periodontal management in scleroderma disease patients.

    PubMed

    Laforgia, A; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; Ballini, A; Pettini, F; Di Venere, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the periodontal status of people with scleroderma and their response to non-surgical treatment protocol aimed at controlling the evolution of the disease. The response to non-surgical periodontal treatment was tested on patients belonging to a scleroderma group and a control group: the data show an improvement of the periodontal conditions of all these patients in response to treatment. When compared on the same diagram, a slight remission of the periodontal disease was obtained in both scleroderma and healthy patients. This highlights the benefit to soft tissues produced by non-surgical periodontal treatment also in patients affected by systemic diseases.

  4. Non-surgical management of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Darby, I

    2009-09-01

    Non-surgical removal of plaque and calculus has been part of the initial phase of the management of patients with gingivitis and periodontitis for decades. It consists of patient motivation and oral hygiene instruction as well as mechanical removal of supra and subgingival plaque deposits. The purpose of this review was to assess recent changes. The article reports on changes in our understanding of plaque as a biofilm, developments in patient plaque control, chemical plaque control and scaling instruments. It also comments on full-mouth disinfection, the use of lasers and host modulation. Modern technology has made removal of microbial deposits by the patient and dental professionals more efficient. However, other advancements need to be used in conjunction with mechanical debridement at this time.

  5. The microbial community shifts of subgingival plaque in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Peng; Ge, Shaohua

    2017-02-07

    The object of this study is to characterize the bacterial community of subgingival plaque of two subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) pre- and post-treatment. We picked two patients with GAgP and used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing. V4 hypervariable region was picked for PCR amplification of subgingival samples. Then, the PCR products were sequenced through Illumina MiSeq platform. One month after therapy, both the clinical features and periodontal parameters improved obviously. Moreover, the composition and structure of subgingival bacterial community changed after initial periodontal therapy. Also, the composition of the subgingival microbiota was highly individualized among different patients. Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes and Fusobacteria were related to pathogenicity of GAgP while Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria seemed associated with clinical symptoms resolution. In this study, we found the subgingival bacterial community was high in species richness but dominated by a few species or phylotypes, with significant shifts of microbiota that occurred after treatment. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival bacterial community before and after treatment by high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing, and provided a concise method for analysis of microbial community for periodontal diseases.

  6. Locally delivered antioxidant gel as an adjunct to nonsurgical therapy improves measures of oxidative stress and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Gorremuchu; Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Reddy, Bavigadda Harish; Reddy, Chakravarthy; Nagarajan, Sripriya; Naveen, Anumala

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present study has two aims; firstly, it attempts to verify the presence of oxidative stress by estimating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in periodontal pockets ≥5 mm as compared to controls. The second aim is to evaluate the effect of lycopene as a locally delivered antioxidant gel on periodontal health and on the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative injury. Methods Thirty-one subjects participated in this study. In the pretreatment phase, the ROS levels in pockets ≥5 mm were measured by flow cytometry. Three sites in each subject were randomly assigned into each of the following experimental groups: sham group, only scaling and root planing (SRP) was done; placebo group, local delivery of placebo gel after SRP; and lycopene group, local delivery of lycopene gel after SRP. Clinical parameters included recording site-specific measures of GCF 8-OHdG, plaque, gingivitis, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. Results The gel, when delivered to the sites with oxidative stress, was effective in increasing clinical attachment and in reducing gingival inflammation, probing depth, and 8-OHdG levels as compared to the placebo and sham sites. Conclusions From this trial conducted over a period of 6 months, it was found that locally delivered lycopene seems to be effective in reducing the measures of oxidative stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23837126

  7. Lasers in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Passanezi, Euloir; Damante, Carla Andreotti; de Rezende, Maria L Rubo; Greghi, Sebastião L Aguiar

    2015-02-01

    About 50 years ago, lasers started to be used in periodontal treatment following evidence that wounds produced in animals healed more quickly after being irradiated with low-intensity lasers. Increased production of growth factors, stimulated mainly by red and infrared lasers, may participate in this process by influencing the behavior of various types of cells. High-intensity lasers have been used as an alternative to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in root biomodification and to reduce dentin hypersensivity; low-intensity lasers are frequently employed to improve tissue repair in regenerative procedures and in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Despite the abundance of promising data on the advantages of their use, there is still controversy regarding the real benefits of lasers and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in periodontal and peri-implant treatment. A huge variation in the parameters of laser application among studies makes comparisons very difficult. An overview of the current concepts and findings on lasers in periodontal therapy is presented with emphasis on data collected from Latin-American researchers.

  8. Rescue of a periodontally compromised tooth by non-surgical treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a case of the successful non-surgical management of a periodontally compromised maxillary premolar. Methods A combination therapy, including root planing, occlusal adjustment, and tooth splinting, was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 16-month follow-up period. Results All periodontal parameters were improved. There were dramatic decreases (3–6 mm) in the probing pocket depth, tooth mobility, and marginal bone loss. Interestingly, gradual resolution of the periapical radiolucency and alveolar bone regeneration were observed in the radiographs, and the periodontal condition was maintained during the follow-up period. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, these results demonstrate the importance of natural tooth preservation through proper periodontal treatment and occlusal adjustment of the periodontally compromised tooth, which is typically targeted for tooth extraction and dental implantation. PMID:27127693

  9. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  10. Lasers and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of Linking Research to Clinical Practice is to present evidence based information to clinical dental hygienists so that they can make informed decisions regarding patient treatment and recommendations. Each issue will feature a different topic area of importance to clinical dental hygienists with A BOTTOM LINE to translate the research findings into clinical application.

  11. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  12. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  13. [Non-surgical therapy for ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Asakura, H; Suzuki, K; Honma, T

    1997-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis involving primarily the mucosa of the colon and rectum is a diffuse and nonspecific inflammatory disease. Immunocompetent cells infiltrating in the inflammed mucosa are mainly lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils. These activated cells produce proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF alpha and inflammatory activators such as PAF, leukotriene, prostaglandins, free radicals and proteases, resulting in acute on chronic states. Non-surgical therapy for ulcerative colitis includes basic medical therapy with sulfasulphapyridine, 5-ASA, corticosteroids and immune suppressive drugs as well as new therapies, which are leukocytapheresis, granulocytapheresis, anticytokine therapy with antiTNF alpha monoclonal antibody, IL-1ra and IL-10, intravenous treatment of massive immunoglobulins and transdermal nicotine therapy.

  14. Effect of surgical and non-surgical periodontal debridement on vascular thrombotic markers in hypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Albush, Muhammad M.; Razan, Khattab K.; Raed, Al Dieri M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Periodontal debridement has an impact on the vascular thrombotic markers in healthy individuals. This study aimed to investigate changes in several vascular thrombotic markers after surgical and non-surgical periodontal debridement in hypertensives with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 40 hypertensives, 27 males and 13 females, 37-68 year old, mean 51.2 years, with moderate to severe periodontitis, were divided into two groups, (n = 20 for each); the first received comprehensive one session non-surgical periodontal debridement, (pockets 4-6 mm), while the second received comprehensive supragingival scaling with surgical debridement at one quadrant, (Pockets > 6 mm). Periodontal parameters included; plaque index (PI), gingival inflammation (GI), bleeding on probing (BOP), pocket probing depth (PPD). Vascular thrombotic tests included; platelets count (Plt), fibrinogen (Fib), Von Willebrand factor antigen activity (vWF:Ag), and D-dimers (DD). Results: PI, GI, BOP, PPD, decreased significantly (P = 0.001) after 6 weeks of periodontal debridement in both groups, while BOP and PPD remained higher in the surgical one (P < 0.05). Thrombotic vascular markers changes through the three-time intervals were significant in each group (P = 0.001), and time-group interception effect was significant for vWF:Ag (P = 0.005), while no significant differences between groups after treatment (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal debridement, surgical and non-surgical, improved the periodontal status in hypertensives. Periodontal treatment activated the coagulation system in hypertensives and recessed later while the treatment modality did not affect the degree of activation. PMID:24049332

  15. Systemic moxifloxacin vs amoxicillin/metronidazole adjunct to non-surgical treatment in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gurgan, Cem-Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of moxifloxacin compared to amoxicillin and metronidazole, combined with non-surgical treatment in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) in a 6-month follow-up. Material and Methods A total of 39 systemically healthy patients with GAgP were evaluated in this randomized clinical trial. Periodontal parameters were recorded at the baseline during the 1st, 3rd and 6th month. Patients received either 400 mg of moxifloxacin per os once daily or 500 mg of metronidazole and 500 mg amoxicillin per os three times daily for 7 days consecutively. Results No significant differences between groups were found in any parameters at the baseline. Both groups led to a statistically significant decrease in all clinical periodontal parameters compared to the baseline (PI, p<0.001 and GI, PD, BOP, CAL, p<0.01). There were no differences between the 1st and 3rd months or the 3rd and 6th months for clinical parameters in the groups. Also, no intergroup difference was observed in any parameters at any time, except the gingival index at 6th months. Conclusions Systemic administration of moxifloxacin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment significantly improves clinical outcomes and provides comparable clinical improvement with less adverse events to that of combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole in the treatment of GAgP. Key words: Aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, nonsurgical periodontal debridement. PMID:26034931

  16. Periodontal therapy: prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Page, R C

    1993-08-01

    Prior to the 1950s, periodontitis was treated mostly by tooth exfoliation or extraction, and that is still the predominant treatment for most of the world's populations today. Debridement of the root surface by scaling and root planning came into relatively common use in the first half of the present century and has become the central feature held in common by all currently-used forms of periodontal therapy. Until the 1980s, the most commonly-used treatment consisted of scaling and root planing, followed by resective surgery aimed at achieving zero pocket depth. During the 1980s, data were obtained demonstrating that the thoroughness of root debridement and subgingival infection control, not the presence or absence or periodontal pockets, is the major determinant of successful periodontal therapy, and non-surgical therapy became a commonly-used treatment. Neither resective surgery nor non-surgical therapy results in significant regeneration of periodontal attachment. With the realization that periodontitis is an infectious process, the use of antibiotics and other anti-infective agents came into common use as adjuncts to other standard therapies. An understanding of the pathways by which the soft and calcified tissues of the periodontium are destroyed has led to the likelihood of widespread future use of the non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory family of drugs to suppress alveolar bone destruction by blocking prostaglandin production, and to the use of chemically-modified tetracyclines that chelate divalent cations and thereby block tissue destruction by the metalloproteinases. Recent data clearly show that regeneration of the previously-destroyed periodontal attachment tissues is biologically possible, and regeneration has become the goal of therapy for the 1990s. Use of osteoconductive and osteoinductive graft materials can, under favorable conditions, induce roughly 60% to 70% regeneration of bone lesion height or volume with concomitant improvement in the clinical

  17. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  18. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  19. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Windisch, Péter; Döri, Ferenc; Keglevich, Tibor; Molnár, Balint; Gera, István

    2007-10-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of the current overview is to present, based on the existing evidence, the clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD. Surgical periodontal treatment of deep intrabony defects with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. The application of EMD in the context of non-surgical periodontal therapy has failed to result in periodontal regeneration. Surgical periodontal therapy of deep intrabony defects with EMD may lead to significantly higher improvements of the clinical parameters than open flap debridement alone. The results obtained following treatment with EMD are comparable to those following treatment with GTR and can be maintained over a longer period. Treatment of intrabony defects with a combination of EMD + GTR does not seem to additionally improve the results compared to treatment with EMD alone or GTR alone. The combination of EMD and some types of bone grafts/bone substitutes may result in certain improvements in the soft and hard tissue parameters compared to treatment with EMD alone. Treatment of recession-type defects with coronally repositioned flaps and EMD may promote formation of cementum, periodontal ligament and bone, and may significantly increase the width of the keratinized tissue. Application of EMD seems to provide better long-term results than coronally repositioned flaps alone. Application of EMD may enhance periodontal regeneration in mandibular Class II

  20. Body mass index as a predictive factor of periodontal therapy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Suvan, J; Petrie, A; Moles, D R; Nibali, L; Patel, K; Darbar, U; Donos, N; Tonetti, M; D'Aiuto, F

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and obesity are associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontitis. This study investigated the predictive role of overweight/obesity on clinical response following non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with severe periodontitis. Two hundred sixty adults received an intensive course of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal status at baseline and 2 months was based upon probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment levels (CAL), and whole-mouth gingival bleeding (FMBS) as assessed by two calibrated examiners. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to estimate the impact of BMI and overweight/obesity on periodontal treatment response while controlling for baseline status, age, smoking status (smoker or non-smoker), and full-mouth dental plaque score. BMI (continuous variable) and obesity (vs. normal weight) were associated with worse mean PPD (p < .005), percentage of PPD > 4 mm (p = .01), but not with FMBS (p > .05) or CAL (p > .05) at 2 months, independent of age, smoking status, or dental plaque levels. The magnitude of this association was similar to that of smoking, which was also linked to a worse clinical periodontal outcome (p < .01). BMI and obesity appear to be independent predictors of poor response following non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  1. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  2. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  3. Host modulation therapeutics in periodontics: role as an adjunctive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shinwari, Muhammad Saad; Tanwir, Farzeen; Hyder, Pakiza Raza; Bin Saeed, Muhammad Humza

    2014-09-01

    Host Modulation Therapy (HMT) is a treatment concept that reduces tissue destruction and stabilizes or even regenerates inflammatory tissue by modifying host response factors. It has been used for treating osteoporosis and arthritis for several decades. However, its use in dentistry has only been recently reported. The objective of this article is to present a review of the various literatures available on HMT and also its role as adjunct therapy in periodontics. For identifying studies for this review, a PUBMED search was carried out in 2013 for all articles published till December 2012. The search was restricted to English language publications only. Longitudinal prospective and retrospective studies were included in the search. The key words used were: Host Modulation Therapy; Sub antimicrobial dose doxycycline and Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy. The main outcomes sought were host modulation therapeutics in periodontics. Exclusion criteria included cross sectional studies, short case series as well as studies with short follow-up periods. There is a paucity of literature on HMT in periodontics although the only drug approved by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) with highly predictable results as a host modulating agent in periodontal diseases and also an effective adjunctive therapy in various diseases of periodontium. However, more randomized controlled trials are needed to obtain clinical guidelines on the usage of other host modulating agents as adjunct as well as definite therapy for periodontal diseases. SDD is an effective adjunct therapy when used in dosage of 20mg twice daily for minimum 3 months duration in various periodontal diseases with predictable clinical outcomes. It is also recommended that future clinical research on anti cytokine drugs, chemically modified tetracycline and other HMT agents should be conducted so that new drugs are available with highly predictable results.

  4. Effects of periodontal therapy on white blood cell count and levels of transforming growth factor beta in serum of subjects with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leite, A C E; Carneiro, V M A; Morandini, A C; Ramos-Junior, E S; Guimarães, M C M

    2015-03-28

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on white blood cell (WBC) count and levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF—β) in serum from subjects with severe periodontitis. Serum from 28 subjects with periodontitis (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9—12 months). A well—controlled periodontal treatment protocol was established in three stages: mechanical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planning), reinstrumentation of dental sites, and supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal and systemic parameters such as the total number of WBCs and TGF—β levels, accessed by enzyme—linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were included. After therapy, all clinical periodontal parameters decreased (p<0.0001). There were no statistical differences in WBC count between experimental and control groups before or after therapy. However, after therapy, the mean value of lymphocytes in patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) was statistically higher than that of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP) (p<0.0357). Additionally, TGF—β levels in LAgP and GCP patients were higher compared to controls before therapy (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In LAgP patients, periodontal therapy was associated with increased number of lymphocytes.

  5. Low-cost periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2012-10-01

    Periodontitis is a complex infectious disease that affects low-income individuals disproportionately. Periodontitis is associated with specific bacterial species and herpesviruses, and successful prevention and treatment of the disease is contingent upon effective control of these pathogens. This article presents an efficacious, highly safe, minimally invasive, practical and low-cost periodontal therapy that involves professional and patient-administered mechanical therapy and antimicrobial agents. The major components are scaling for calculus removal, periodontal pocket irrigation with potent antiseptics, and treatment with systemic antibiotics for advanced disease. Povidone-iodine and sodium hypochlorite have all the characteristics for becoming the first-choice antiseptics in the management of periodontal diseases. Both agents show excellent antibacterial and antiviral properties, are readily available throughout the world, have been safely used in periodontal therapy for decades, offer significant benefits for individuals with very limited financial resources, and are well accepted by most dental professionals and patients. Four per cent chlorhexidine applied with a toothbrush to the most posterior part to the tongue dorsum can markedly reduce or eliminate halitosis in most individuals. Systemic antibiotics are used to treat periodontopathic bacteria that are not readily reached by topical therapy, such as pathogens within gingival tissue, within furcation defects, at the base of periodontal pockets, and on the tongue, tonsils and buccal mucosae. Valuable antibiotic therapies are amoxicillin-metronidazole (250 mg of amoxicillin and 250 mg of metronidazole, three times daily for 8 days) for young and middle-aged patients, and ciprofloxacin-metronidazole (500 mg of each, twice daily for 8 days) for elderly patients and for patients in developing countries who frequently harbor enteric rods subgingivally. Scaling to remove dental calculus and the prudent

  6. Interlinking Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus by Assessment of Crevicular Visfatin Levels in Health and in Disease Before and After Initial Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shettar, Leena; Bajaj, Mahesh; Math, Abhishek Savir; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Visfatin is a new adipocytokine associated with both chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus independently. Aim We aimed to estimate and compare the changes in the levels of visfatin in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) of healthy subjects and in subjects with periodontitis with or without controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) after administration of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty two subjects were equally divided into Group 1 (healthy), Group 2 (systemically healthy with chronic periodontitis), Group 3 (subjects with chronic periodontitis having controlled T2DM). Defined clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and at one month follow-up period. Visfatin was assessed using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. One way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple post hoc procedures were used. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for correlation. Results Significant increase in the visfatin levels was seen with the highest values observed in diabetes with periodontal disease. Visfatin responded to non-surgical periodontal therapy as observed by significant decrease in levels after one month but even at this period diabetics showed the highest levels. Conclusion Visfatin levels are highest in individuals with both periodontal disease and diabetes even after periodontal therapy. Individuals with T2DM may be at higher risk of developing periodontal disease. PMID:27656567

  7. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimal invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis for the management of infected radicular cystic lesion: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Kamra, Shilpa; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Radicular cyst (RC) is the most common odontogenic cyst of inflammatory origin affecting the jaws; involves the roots of the carious or traumatic non-vital tooth. Different therapeutic modalities, such as nonsurgical endodontic therapy or surgical enucleation with primary closure, decompression etc., were proposed for the management of such lesions. Presenting a case of a 28-year-old otherwise healthy male patient who reported with pain and swelling with respect to tooth #41, 31. Diagnosis of infected RC at a rare location was established on the basis of clinical, radiographical and fine needle aspiration cytological examination. Looking after the clinical characteristics, origin, extension, size of cystic lesion and patient cooperation; nonsurgical endodontic therapy utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis was opted. One year post-operative result suggested that nonsurgical endodontic therapy along with minimally invasive treatment utilizing Bhasker's hypothesis is an effective tool to transform infected radicular cystic lesion to healthy periapical periodontal tissue. PMID:27994430

  8. Regenerative periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Daniel W K; Fiorellini, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    Traditional treatment for loss of bone and attachment due to periodontal disease has focused around repairing the damage induced. However, over the past few decades, clinicians have begun to utilize regenerative techniques to rebuild bone, cementum and the periodontal ligament. Conventional procedures most often involve the use of barrier membranes with bone grafts that foster selective cell repopulation and regrowth of osseous structures. Since the predictability of these techniques may be limited to certain case types, pharmacologically based efforts are underway to investigate the possibility of harnessing osseous regrowth potential. Clinical research has found that proteins are potent biological mediators that promote many of the events in wound healing, and have been shown to promote bone formation in human clinical studies.

  9. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as an Adjunct to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of Linking Research to Clinical Practice is to present evidence based information to clinical dental hygienists so that they can make informed decisions regarding patient treatment and recommendations. Each issue will feature a different topic area of importance to clinical dental hygienists with A BOTTOM LINE to translate the research findings into clinical application.

  10. The effect of systemic metronidazole after non-surgical treatment in moderate and advanced periodontitis in young adults.

    PubMed

    Söder, P O; Frithiof, L; Wikner, S; Wouters, F; Engström, P E; Rubin, B; Nedlich, U; Söder, B

    1990-05-01

    The effect of adjunctive systemic metronidazole was studied in patients with moderate and advanced periodontitis recalcitrant to comprehensive non-surgical treatment. The material originated from a randomly selected part of the population aged 31 to 40 years. After non-surgical treatment of 149 patients, 98 with persisting pathological pockets greater than or equal to 5 mm (52 men and 46 women) became the subjects for the study. Clinical parameters were registered and pocket contents subjected to laboratory analysis. The subjects were randomized into two groups according to a code list known only by the manufacturer and the statistician. The test group took three 400 mg metronidazole tablets daily for 1 week and the control group took placebo tablets. Reassessment 6 months later showed statistically significant clinical improvement, with a reduction in the number of sites greater than or equal to 5 mm in both test and control groups. Complete healing, with no pockets greater than or equal to 5 mm, was noted in 30% of the test group and 9% of the control group. The difference is statistically significant and shows the supplementary effect of adjunctive metronidazole in non-surgical treatment of moderate and advanced periodontitis.

  11. Periodontal therapy for severe chronic periodontitis with periodontal regeneration and different types of prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Kinumatsu, Takashi; Umehara, Kazuhiro; Nagano, Kyosuke; Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with severe chronic periodontitis requiring regenerative periodontal surgery and different types of prosthesis in the maxillary and mandibular regions. The patient was a 57-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of occlusal pain. An initial clinical examination revealed that 73% of sites had a probing depth of ≥4 mm, and 60% of sites exhibiting bleeding on probing. Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone defects in the molar region and widening of the periodontal ligament space around teeth #17 and 24. Initial periodontal therapy was implemented based on a clinical diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. Surgical periodontal therapy was subsequently performed at selected sites. Periodontal regenerative therapy using enamel matrix derivative was performed on #14, 15, and 35-37. Tunnel preparation was performed on #46 as it had a 2-wall vertical bony defect and Degree 3 furcation involvement. Other sites with residual periodontal pockets were treated by modified Widman flap surgery. After a re-evaluation, functional rehabilitation was implemented with a removable maxillary partial denture and a fixed mandibular bridge. No further deterioration was observed in the periodontal condition of most of the teeth during a 2-year period of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). The patient is currently still undergoing SPT and some minor problems remain. However, the results suggest that treatment and subsequent maintenance for severe periodontitis with traumatic occlusion can be successful as long as the appropriate periodontal and prosthodontic treatment is planned and careful SPT carried out.

  12. Dietary therapy is the best option for refractory nonsurgical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Felton, Elizabeth A; Cervenka, Mackenzie C

    2015-09-01

    Ketogenic diet therapies for epilepsy have been described since the fifth century and published in scientific literature since the early 1900s. Since that time, the diet's popularity has waxed and waned as newer drugs and other treatments have been introduced. However, in recent years, dietary therapy for epilepsy has been increasingly accepted by physicians and desired by patients as an alternative to new drugs and neurostimulation. The introduction of less restrictive versions of the classic ketogenic diet, such as the modified Atkins diet (MAD), have led to increased numbers of adult patients with refractory epilepsy who are initiating dietary treatment. Approximately half of adults and children who start a ketogenic diet have a >50% seizure reduction, which is impressive given that these patients typically have medically refractory epilepsy. We believe that ketogenic dietary treatment is the best option for children and adults with refractory nonsurgical epilepsy due to its efficacy, rapid seizure reduction, synergistic effects with other antiseizure treatments, known and treatable side effects, potential to treat comorbid medical conditions, and worldwide availability.

  13. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  14. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  15. Nonsurgical Management of Oral Mucocele by Intralesional Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rupam; Sarkar, Soumyabrata; Kabiraj, Arpita; Maji, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral mucocele is a common lesion resulting from an alteration of minor salivary glands due to mucus accumulation. Rapid appearance, specific location, history of trauma, bluish colour, and consistency help in the diagnosis. Conventional surgical removal is the treatment of choice but has several disadvantages like damage to adjacent ducts with further development of satellite lesions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of intralesional corticosteroid injection (betamethasone) as a nonsurgical treatment procedure in oral mucoceles. Material and Method. A total of 20 cases (males and females, 10–30 years of age) with clinically diagnosed oral mucoceles were given 1 mL of betamethasone intralesionally. All the patients were examined after a period of 7, 14, and 21 days to evaluate the response of the lesion towards treatment and consequently given the 2nd, 3rd, 4th injections. If the lesion resolved after one or two injections, the treatment was discontinued. Results. Out of the 20 cases, 18 of them showed complete regression of the lesion whereas the remaining 2 cases showed decrease in size. All the patients received maximum of 4 consecutive shots in weekly interval. Conclusion. Intralesional corticosteroid therapy can be considered as the first choice in the treatment of oral mucoceles. PMID:27822227

  16. Effects of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and HDL in serum of subjects with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Anne Carolina Eleutério; Carneiro, Valéria Martins de Araújo; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in the sera and its association with body mass index and high density lipoprotein in subjects with severe periodontitis. Methods Sera from 28 subjects (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) with severe periodontitis and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to periodontal therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9-12 months). Oral and systemic parameters such as the number of blood cells, glucose examination, lipid profile, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels accessed by high-sensitivity immunonephelometry assay, were included. Results Before therapy, in the periodontitis group, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was statistically lower than in the control group (P<0.0216). After therapy, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL was significantly higher (65.22%) (P<0.0339). The mean value for body mass index was statistically lower in subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein <0.3 mg/dL (24.63±4.19), compared with those with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >0.3 mg/dL (28.91±6.03) (P<0.0411). High density lipoprotein presented a mean value statistically higher after therapy (P<0.0027). Conclusion In systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis, periodontal therapy was associated with decreased levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and increase of high density lipoprotein in serum. The clinical trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.br/, No. RBR-24T799. PMID:24896165

  17. The effects of photodynamic laser therapy in the treatment of marginal chronic periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifor, Radu; Badea, Iulia; Avram, Ramona; Chifor, Ioana; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy performed during the treatment of deep periodontal disease by using 40 MHz high frequency ultrasonography. The periodontal data recorded during the clinical examination before each treatment session were compared with volumetric changes of the gingiva measured on periodontal ultrasound images. The results show a significant decrease of gingival tissue inflammation proved both by a significant decrease of bleeding on probing as well as by a decrease of the gingival tissues volume on sites where the laser therapy was performed. Periodontal tissues that benefit of laser therapy besides classical non-surgical treatment showed a significant clinical improvement of periodontal status. Based on these findings we were able to conclude that the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy applied on marginal periodontium has important anti-inflamatory effect. The periodontal ultrasonography is a method which can provide useful data for assessing the volume changes of gingival tissues, allowing a precise monitoring of marginal periodontitis.

  18. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air

  19. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  20. Regenerative therapy: a periodontal-endodontic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Chogle, Sami M A; Kinaia, Atheel M; Goodis, Harold E

    2012-07-01

    Periodontal and endodontic diseases are inflammatory responses leading to periodontal and pulpal tissue loss. Regenerative therapies aim to restore the lost structures to vitality and function. Various materials and treatments methods have been used such as bone grafts, guided tissue regeneration, enamel matrix derivatives, growth and differentiation factors, and stem cells. Although the current materials and methods demonstrated adequate clinical results, true and complete biological tissue regeneration is not yet attainable. The current article reviews chronologically the materials and methods used in periodontal and endodontic regeneration highlighting their clinical success and shortcomings, and discussing future directions in regenerative therapy.

  1. Is non-surgical periodontal therapy cost effective?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of Linking Research to Clinical Practice is to present evidence based information to clinical dental hygienists so that they can make informed decisions regarding patient treatment and recommendations. Each issue will feature a different topic area of importance to clinical dental hygienists with a Conclusion to translate the research findings into clinical application.

  2. An evaluation of recruitment methods utilized for a clinical trial with periodontal and diabetes enrollment criteria: the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Hyman, Leslie; Simpson, Leslie Long; Michalowicz, Bryan; Reddy, Michael; Gelato, Marie; Hou, Wei; Engebretson, Steven P; Hytner, Catherine; Lenton, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes and its complications are a major United States public health concern. Methods The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) evaluated whether non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease influenced diabetes management among persons with Type 2 diabetes and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate DPTT’s many recruitment strategies in terms of enrollment success. Results/Conclusion Targeted recruitment strategies were more effective in identifying individuals who met periodontal and diabetes eligibility criteria. Individuals eligible for a baseline visit/enrollment were more often male, had a younger age at diabetes diagnosis, a longer diabetes duration, more often Hispanic and less often African–American. Tracking and evaluating recruitment sources during study enrollment optimized recruitment methods to enroll a diverse participant population based upon gender, race and ethnicity. PMID:25574373

  3. Non-surgical periodontal treatment of peri-implant diseases with the adjunctive use of diode laser: preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Francesco; Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa; Attorresi, Enrica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implant diseases present in two forms: peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant complications is significantly rising. The aim of this study was to compare conventional treatment of inflamed peri-implant tissues with conventional treatment together with diode laser application. Twenty-seven patients (age 36 to 67, 15 women and 12 men, 12 smokers and 15 non-smokers) requiring treatment for mucositis or peri-implantitis were taken into account for this preliminary study. Plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD), and bleeding on probing (BoP) were recorded at baseline evaluation. Patients in control group (CG) received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment. Patients in test group received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment together with diode laser application (810 nm, 30 s, 1 W, 50 Hz, t on = 100 ms, t off = 100 ms, energy density = 24.87 J/cm(2)). Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference in repeated measurements of considered indexes at T 0 and T 1 (1 year) in both groups. A total of 606 sites were taken into account in the test group (TG) and 144 in the CG. PD mean variation in the TG was 2.66 mm ± 1.07, while mean PD variation in the CG was 0.94 ± 1.13 mm. Paired t testing of the variation in PD in CG and TG revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.0001). A reduction of pathological sites from 89 % (T 0) to 14.35 % (T 1) was achieved in the TG, while reduction obtained in the CG was from 75.69 % (T 0) to 50 % (T 1); BoP scores at time T 1 had fallen below 5 % in the TG and decreased to 59.7 %, in the CG. Within the limitations of this study, diode laser seems to be an additional valuable tool for peri-implant disease treatment.

  4. New ideas and advancing technology in prevention and non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, P

    1993-06-01

    Analytical, oral epidemiological studies in adult 'toothbrushing' populations show that the highest prevalence of missing teeth is for molars and maxillary premolars ('key-risk' teeth). The highest prevalence of subgingival microflora, gingivitis (CPITN-1), plaque retentive factors, such as subgingival calculus and restoration overhangs (CPITN-2), and diseased pockets > 3 mm (CPITN-3-4) is found on the approximal surfaces of the same teeth ('key-risk' surfaces). Primary and secondary prevention, as well as treatment of periodontal disease should be focused on these 'key-risk' surfaces. One single, well-executed subgingival scaling and root-planning procedure in deep, diseased periodontal pockets, followed by oral hygiene training and professional mechanical tooth-cleaning (PMTC) at need-related intervals, will prevent further loss of periodontal attachment. However, if the root cementum is removed during instrumentation, and the post-treatment plaque control programme fails, microorganisms will recolonize and invade the rough exposed root dentine, resulting in recurrence of periodontitis and possibly, root caries and pulpitis. Some of these problems may be overcome by the application of new instruments and methods for self-care, PMTC, removal of overhangs, scaling and root-planing without removing 'non-diseased' cementum.

  5. PDT in non-surgical treatment of periodontitis in kidney transplanted patients: a split-mouth, randomized clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Kelly C. T.; Giovani, Elcio M.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate clinical and microbiological effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease in kidney-transplanted patients. Eight kidney transplanted patients treated at Paulista University were arranged in two groups: SRP performed scaling and root planning by ultrasound; SRP+PDT- in the same patient, which was held to PDT in the opposite quadrant, with 0.01% methylene blue and red laser gallium aluminum arsenide, wavelength 660 nm, power 100 mW. There was reduction in probing pocket depth after 45 days and 3 months regardless the group examined; plaque and bleeding index showed improvement over time, regardless the technique used, and bleeding index in the SRP+PDT group was lower when compared with the baseline the other times. There was no difference in the frequency of pathogens. Photodynamic therapy may be an option for treatment of periodontal disease in renal-transplanted patients and its effectiveness is similar to conventional therapy.

  6. Microbiological effects of periodontal therapy plus azithromycin in patients with diabetes: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Juan P; Castrillón, Cesar A; Yepes, Fanny L; Roldan, Natalia; Becerra, María A; Moreno, Sandra M; Consuegra, Jessika; Contreras, Adolfo; Botero, Javier E

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal infection may aggravate diabetes control. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected in patients with diabetes with the use of non-surgical therapy plus azithromycin in a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and five (105) patients with diabetes and chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: subgingival mechanical therapy with azithromycin, subgingival mechanical therapy with placebo and supragingival prophylaxis with azithromycin. Complete periodontal clinical examinations and detection of periodontal pathogens using polymerase chain reaction were carried out at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months after periodontal therapy. The frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected decreased at 3 months in all groups. Tannerella forsythia increased after3 months in all groups. All organisms had similar frequencies at 9 months in all groups. Subgingival mechanical therapy with adjunctive azithromycin had no additional effect on the frequency with which the periodontal pathogens investigated were detected in patients with diabetes.

  7. Sports medicine and platelet-rich plasma: nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    A Cochrane Review was performed to assess the effects of platelet-rich therapies for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Selection criteria were randomized and quasirandomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared platelet-rich therapy with either placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy for people with acute or chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Primary outcomes were functional status, pain, and adverse effects. The investigators found 19 studies that compared platelet-rich therapy with placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy. Disorders included rotator cuff tears (arthroscopic repair; 6 trials); shoulder impingement syndrome surgery (1 trial); elbow epicondylitis (3 trials); anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (4 trials), ACL reconstruction (donor graft site application; 2 trials), patellar tendinopathy (1 trial), Achilles tendinopathy (1 trial), and acute Achilles rupture surgical repair (1 trial). They further subdivided the studies based on type of treatment, including tendinopathies in which platelet-rich therapy injections were the main treatment (5 trials), and surgical augmentation procedures in which platelet-rich therapy was applied during surgery (14 trials). The conclusion was that there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of platelet-rich therapy for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Researchers contemplating RCTs should consider the coverage of currently ongoing trials when assessing the need for future RCTs on specific conditions. There is a need for standardization of PRP preparation methods. At this time, the use of PRP in foot and ankle surgery as an orthobiologic does not have an absolute indication. Many of the studies are lower evidence-based from surgical techniques. Several in vitro studies have shown that growth factors promote the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and tendons. More clinical studies are

  8. Potential for Stem Cell-Based Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Raanan, Justin; Ghaffarigarakani, Sasan; Chung, Jamie; Freire, Marcelo; Andrada, Luciano C; Intini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and are linked to several systemic diseases. The goal of periodontal treatment is to halt the progression of the disease and regenerate the damaged tissue. However, achieving complete and functional periodontal regeneration is challenging because the periodontium is a complex apparatus composed of different tissues, including bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Stem cells may represent an effective therapeutic tool for periodontal regeneration due to their plasticity and their ability to regenerate different tissues. This review presents and critically analyzes the available information on stem cell-based therapy for the regeneration of periodontal tissues and suggests new avenues for the development of more effective therapeutic protocols.

  9. Predictors of Success and Satisfaction of Nonsurgical Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Joseph; Nager, Charles W.; Xiang, Fang; Borello-France, Diane; Bradley, Catherine S.; Wu, Jennifer M.; Mueller, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Zyczynski, Halina; Richter, Holly E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that may predict success and satisfaction in women undergoing nonsurgical therapy for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of women participating in a multicenter randomized trial of pessary, behavioral, or combined therapy for SUI were evaluated for potential predictors of success and satisfaction. Success and satisfaction outcomes were assessed at 3 months and included the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I), stress incontinence subscale of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI), and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors, adjusting for treatment and other important clinical covariates. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and associated P-values are presented. Results Four hundred forty-six women were randomized. College education or higher and no previous UI surgery predicted success based on the stress subscale of the PFDI (AOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.55; p=0.04; AOR=3.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 9.53; p=0.04, respectively). Menopausal status predicted success using the PGI-I (AOR=2.52 postmenopausal vs premenopausal, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.95; AOR=1.32 unsure menopausal status vs pre-menopausal, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.66; p=0.03 across all three groups). Less than 14 incontinence episodes per week predicted satisfaction with the PSQ (AOR=1.97, 1.21 to 3.19; p=0.01). These predictors did not differ across the three treatment groups. Conclusions Menopause, higher education, no previous UI surgery and lower incontinence frequency were found to be predictors of success and satisfaction with nonsurgical therapy for SUI. This information may help better align provider and patient expectations with nonsurgical treatment outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00270998. PMID:22914396

  10. Management of an Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Palatal Radicular Groove: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sooratgar, Aidin; Tabrizizade, Mehdi; Nourelahi, Maryam; Asadi, Yasin; Sooratgar, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The radicular groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth to periodontal break-down. Sometimes the situation becomes more complicated by pulp necrosis and development of a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion which is a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. This report presents the successful management of an endodontic-periodontal lesion in a maxillary lateral incisor that has a developmental palatal radicular groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy and periodontal regenerative techniques. Conclusion: The combination of nonsurgical endodontic and periodontal regenerative treatment is a predictable method in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by palato-gingival groove. PMID:27141225

  11. Non-Surgical Therapy for Peri-Implant Diseases: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Yu, Shan-Huey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this paper was to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy for the treatment of peri-implant diseases including both, mucositis and peri-implantitis lesions. Material and Methods An electronic search in two different databases was performed including MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE from 2011 to 2016. Human studies reporting non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis with more than 10 implants and at least 6 months follow up published in English language were evaluated. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the different methods of decontamination employed in the included investigations. Risk of bias assessment was elaborated for included investigations. Results Twenty-five articles were identified of which 14 were further evaluated and included in the analysis. Due to significant heterogeneity in between included studies, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Instead, a systematic descriptive review was performed. Included investigations reported the used of different methods for implant decontamination, including self-performed cleaning techniques, and professionally delivered treatment such as laser, photodynamic therapy, supra-/sub-mucosal mechanical debridement, and air-abrasive devices. Follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 60 months. Conclusions Non-surgical treatment for peri-implant mucositis seems to be effective while modest and not-predictable outcomes are expected for peri-implantitis lesions. Limitations include different peri-implant diseases definitions, treatment approaches, as well as different implant designs/surfaces and defect characteristics. PMID:27833738

  12. Local drug delivery agents as adjuncts to endodontic and periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Puri, K; Puri, N

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained/controlled drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. The conventional method for the elimination of subgingival microbial infection includes mechanical debridement, irrigation with antimicrobial agents or surgical access. But, the effectiveness of conventional nonsurgical treatment is limited by lack of accessibility to bacteria in deeper periodontal pockets, and/or does not completely eliminate intracanal microorganisms. Surgical intervention may be beneficial but cannot be done in all cases, medically compromised cases and also in patients not willing to be subjected to surgical therapy. Development of local drug delivery systems provides an answer to all such difficulties. This comprehensive review tries to cover the detailed information about the latest advances in the various local drug delivery systems, their indications, contraindications and their advantages over systemic drug therapy. PMID:24868252

  13. Potential for Stem Cell-Based Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Raanan, Justin; Ghaffarigarakani, Sasan; Chung, Jamie; Freire, Marcelo; Andrada, Luciano C.; Intini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and are linked to several systemic diseases. The goal of periodontal treatment is to halt the progression of the disease and regenerate the damaged tissue. However, achieving complete and functional periodontal regeneration is challenging because the periodontium is a complex apparatus composed of different tissues, including bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Stem cell-based regenerative therapy may represent an effective therapeutic tool for periodontal regeneration due to their plasticity and ability to differentiate into different cell lineages. This review presents and critically analyzes the available information on stem cell-based therapy for the regeneration of periodontal tissues and suggests new avenues for the development of more effective therapeutic protocols. PMID:26058394

  14. Modern approaches to non-surgical biofilm management.

    PubMed

    Apatzidou, Danae Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    The subgingival dental plaque is a microbial biofilm consisting of highly variable bacterial microcolonies embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance. In contrast to microorganisms growing in a planktonic state, the inhabitants of a biofilm are effectively protected within this dense structure from host defense mechanisms and from therapeutic agents, including antimicrobials. The mechanical removal of the microbial biofilm and the establishment of meticulous plaque control measures comprise the key elements for the success of non-surgical periodontal treatment. Ultrasonic devices are effective in disrupting the biofilm, and carefully remove soft and hard deposits from a root surface with minimal trauma to the tooth structure. Controversies and modern trends in non-surgical periodontal therapy - such as quadrant-wise treatment modalities versus full-mouth approaches, hand-versus power-driven instrumentation, and the time frame of non-surgical periodontal therapy - are discussed here in depth in order to provide an insight into modern approaches to non-surgical biofilm management. Clinical, microbiological and immunological findings following different treatment protocols, in addition to cost-effective benefits of these clinical modalities, are discussed.

  15. Periodontal considerations in restorative and implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P V; Higginbottom, F L; Wilson, T G

    2001-01-01

    The successful integration of periodontal and restorative dentistry for both natural teeth and implants requires knowledge and application of both mechanical and biological principles. In areas of aesthetic concern, an adequate band of attached gingiva can increase patient comfort, reduce the probability of gingival recession following tooth preparation and simplify restorative procedures. While some restorative margins need to be placed at or below the margin of the free gingiva, this should be considered to be a compromise, and margins should not be placed more than 0.5 mm into a healthy gingival sulcus. Approximately 2-3 mm of healthy, natural supra-alveolar tooth surface is needed for attachment of the gingival tissues to the tooth. This dimension is called the biological width. If adequate biological width does not exist, surgical or orthodontic procedures to expose healthy tooth structure are recommended before final restorations are placed. Retraction of soft tissues for impressions is best accomplished with mechanical methods rather than lasers or electrosurgery because of the potentially harmful effects of these devices to the cementum, bone and soft tissues surrounding the teeth. Implants function best and withstand occlusal forces optimally when loaded in a vertical direction. Therefore, planning implant placement is critical for success. Because of increased proprioception, it is suggested that natural teeth be used to guide the occlusion in partially edentulous patients. Cantilevers should be used with caution and with appropriate attention to occlusal forces. While occlusal trauma does not cause periodontal disease, it may contribute to bone loss around teeth and implants. In the opinion of the authors, provisional restorations are an integral part of dental and periodontal therapy. They can be used to establish aesthetic and physiological contours that can be easily cleaned by patients and they can also be used as a guide for any needed surgical

  16. Benefits of periodontal therapy when preterm birth threatens.

    PubMed

    Radnai, M; Pál, A; Novák, T; Urbán, E; Eller, J; Gorzó, I

    2009-03-01

    There is growing evidence that chronic periodontitis may be a risk factor for pre-term birth. The goal of this intervention study was to determine the effect of periodontal treatment on the pregnancy outcome in women with threatening pre-term birth and initial localized chronic periodontitis. Forty-one women with a singleton pregnancy were enrolled in the study. For this treatment group, oral hygiene instruction and periodontal therapy were provided in the third trimester, while those in the control group (42 persons) did not receive any periodontal treatment. In the treatment group, the mean weight of newborns was 3079.0 g, compared with the control group mean of 2602.4 g. The incidence of pre-term birth and low birthweight in the treatment group was significantly less than in the control group (p = 0.015). Periodontal treatment completed before the 35th week appeared to have a beneficial effect on birth weight and time of delivery.

  17. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  18. Supportive periodontal therapy and periodontal biotype as prognostic factors in implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Aisa, Francisco J.; Estefanía-Fresco, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate bone loss around implants placed in patients with a history of treated chronic periodontitis and who did or did not attend supportive periodontal therapy, after one year in function. Furthermore, the influence of periodontal biotype and level of plaque was also evaluated. Material and Methods: Forty-nine patients participated voluntarily in the study. All subjects had a history of chronic periodontitis, which had been previously treated. After the active treatment, 27 patients attended supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) and the rest did not (No SPT). The O’Leary plaque index and periodontal biotype were recorded for each subject and 246 Astra Tech® OsseospeedTM implants were radiographically analysed (123 placed in SPT patients and 123 in No SPT patients) at the time of loading and one year later, measuring marginal bone loss with the program Dental Studio NX 6.0®. The statistical analysis was performed with Windows SPSS, applying Pearson’s correlation index and the Kruskal-Wallis and U-Mann Whitney non-parametric tests. Results: Six patients were found to have periimplantitis and sixteen mucositis. The survival rate was 99.59% (100% SPT and 99.18% No SPT). Mean bone loss was 0.39 mm (range [-0.71 - 8.05]). Among SPT patients, 95% of the implants had losses less than or equal to the mean (mean bone loss of 0.16 mm) compared to 53.7% for the No SPT group (mean bone loss of 0.62 mm). A statistically significant relationship was demonstrated between bone loss around the implant and the patient’s periodontal biotype and plaque index. Conclusions: The marginal bone loss around implants in patients with treated chronic periodontitis is minimal if they are in a controlled SPT programme and there is individual control of plaque index. Moreover, the presence of a thin periodontal biotype represents a risk factor for additional bone loss. Key words:Peri-implantitis, chronic periodontitis, bacterial plaque, periodontal biotype. PMID:23722147

  19. Wound healing following surgical and regenerative periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Susin, Cristiano; Fiorini, Tiago; Lee, Jaebum; De Stefano, Jamie A; Dickinson, Douglas P; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have evaluated the effect of conventional periodontal surgical therapy. In general, although some clinical gain in tissue support may be attained, these therapies do not support regeneration of the periodontal attachment. Even though the biological possibility of periodontal regeneration has been demonstrated, the clinical application of this intrinsic potential appears difficult to harness; thus also conceptually most intriguing candidate protocols face clinical challenges. In this review, we explore the bioclinical principles, condiciones sine quibus non, that unleash the innate potential of the periodontium to achieve clinically meaningful periodontal regeneration (i.e. space-provision, wound stability and conditions for primary intention healing). Moreover, limiting factors and detrimental practices that may compromise clinical and biological outcomes are reviewed, as is tissue management in clinical settings.

  20. Spontaneous correction of pathologically migrated teeth with periodontal therapy alone

    PubMed Central

    Dadlani, Himanshu; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2013-01-01

    Pathological tooth migration is a characteristic sign of an advanced form of chronic periodontitis. The etiology of pathological tooth migration is complex and multifactorial. Usually treatment of pathological migration includes a multidisciplinary approach. However, in some cases, spontaneous repositioning of the pathologically migrated teeth has been reported following periodontal therapy alone. In the present report, following periodontal surgery, there was a spontaneous repositioning of the migrated teeth and restoration of dento-facial esthetics. The treatment options in cases of pathological tooth migration, based on the severity, are also discussed. PMID:24174739

  1. Challenging Obesity: Patient, Provider, and Expert Perspectives on the Roles of Available and Emerging Nonsurgical Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Ryan, Donna H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adult obesity is recognized as a chronic disease. According to principles of chronic disease management, healthcare professionals should work collaboratively with patients to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies that address overweight and obesity, specifically considering a patient’s disease status in addition to their individual needs, preferences, and attitudes regarding treatment. A central role and responsibility of healthcare professionals in this process is to inform and educate patients about their treatment options. Although current recommendations for the management of adult obesity provide general guidance regarding safe and proper implementation of lifestyle, pharmacological, and surgical interventions, healthcare professionals need awareness of specific evidence-based information that supports individualized clinical application of these therapies. More specifically, healthcare professionals should be up-to-date on approaches that promote successful lifestyle management and be knowledgeable about newer weight loss pharmacotherapies, so they can offer patients with obesity a wide range of options to personalize their treatment. Accordingly, this educational activity has been developed to provide participants with the latest information on treatment recommendations and therapeutic advances in lifestyle intervention and pharmacotherapy for adult obesity management. Design and Methods This supplement is based on the content presented at a live CME symposium held in conjunction with ObesityWeek 2014. Results This supplement provides an expert summary of current treatment recommendations and recent advances in nonsurgical therapies for the management of adult obesity. Patient and provider perspectives on obesity management are highlighted in embedded video clips available via QR codes, and new evidence will be applied using clinically relevant case studies. Conclusions This supplement provides a topical update of obesity management

  2. Oral reconstructive and corrective considerations in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert

    2005-09-01

    This paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. It is intended to provide information for the dental profession and other interested parties. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of oral reconstructive and corrective procedures used in periodontal therapy. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of this subject.

  3. Severe periodontal destruction in alpha-mannosidosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Jagdip S; Auplish, Gita; Johnson, Adele R; Darbar, Ulpee R

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare genetic lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Severe periodontal breakdown in alpha-mannosidosis patients has not previously been reported in the literature. The purposes of this paper are to: present the cases of 2 siblings diagnosed with alpha-mannosidosis, each of whom had varying severity of periodontal destruction; and provide an overview of alpha-mannosidosis, the possible reasons for the periodontal destruction, and the periodontal management in the 2 affected siblings. Both had preventive and nonsurgical periodontal therapy followed by a 5-year period of supportive therapy. Their pattern of bone loss was consistent with those with periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, with the extent of periodontal destruction being related to the severity of the alpha-mannosidosis. Alpha-mannosidosis patients present with social disfigurements and, to prevent tooth loss that can add to this, early periodontal diagnosis is important to optimize management and intervention.

  4. [Cell transplantation for periodontal diseases. A novel periodontal tissue regenerative therapy using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hideaki; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Naohiko; Shiba, Hideki; Nakamura, Shigeo; Hino, Takamune; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Tanaka, Hideo; Kimura, Akiro; Tsuji, Koichiro; Kato, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    A major goal of periodontal therapy is to reconstruct healthy periodontium destroyed by periodontal diseases. Basic studies have revealed that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into periodontal defects promotes regeneration of periodontal tissue. We have developed a novel method for periodontal therapy using MSC. Human bone marrow cells are obtained from the iliac crest and expanded in vitro at Cell and Tissue Engineering Center in Hiroshima University Hospital. MSC are, then, isolated and mixed with Atelocollagen at final concentrations of 2 x 10(7) cells/mL. These MSC in Atelocollagen are transplanted into periodontal osseous defects at the periodontal surgery. The results in all seven patients who received the own MSC transplantation have shown good clinical course. Further basic studies and the continuous clinical trial are needed to prove the effectiveness of the clinical application.

  5. Maintenance periodontal therapy after systemic antibiotic and regenerative therapy of generalized aggressive periodontitis. A case report with 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Sergio Júnior; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Villalpando, Karina Teixeira; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pimentel, Suzana Peres

    2015-05-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction. This case report presents the 10-year results in a subject with generalized AgP treated by a regenerative periodontal therapeutic approach and the adjunctive use of antibiotics, following a systematic maintenance periodontal therapy. The use of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and adjunctive antibiotic therapy to treat AgP yielded improvements in clinical parameters and radiographic bony fill. This combined therapeutic approach following a systematic supportive periodontal therapy supports the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects, demonstrating successful stability after 10-years follow-up. Clinical Relevance: The combined treatment protocol using EMD plus adjunctive antibiotic therapy, associated with a systematic supportive periodontal therapy, benefits the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects in subjects presenting AgP, supporting this approach as an alternative in the treatment of AgP.

  6. Microbiological and Clinical Effects of Sitafloxacin and Azithromycin in Periodontitis Patients Receiving Supportive Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Okui, Takafumi; Ito, Harue; Nakajima, Mayuka; Honda, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Yasuko; Tabeta, Koichi; Akazawa, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Sitafloxacin (STFX) is a newly developed quinolone that has robust antimicrobial activity against periodontopathic bacteria. We previously reported that oral administration of STFX during supportive periodontal therapy was as effective as conventional mechanical debridement under local anesthesia microbiologically and clinically for 3 months. The aim of the present study was to examine the short-term and long-term microbiological and clinical effects of systemic STFX and azithromycin (AZM) on active periodontal pockets during supportive periodontal therapy. Fifty-one patients receiving supportive periodontal therapy were randomly allocated to the STFX group (200 mg/day of STFX for 5 days) or the AZM group (500 mg/day of AZM for 3 days). The microbiological and clinical parameters were examined until 12 months after the systemic administration of each drug. The concentration of each drug in periodontal pockets and the antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates were also analyzed. The proportions of red complex bacteria, i.e., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, which are the representative periodontopathic bacteria, were significantly reduced at 1 month and remained lower at 12 months than those at baseline in both the STFX and AZM groups. Clinical parameters were significantly improved over the 12-month period in both groups. An increase in the MIC of AZM against clinical isolates was observed in the AZM group. These results indicate that monotherapy with systemic STFX and AZM might be an alternative treatment during supportive periodontal therapy in patients for whom invasive mechanical treatment is inappropriate. (This study has been registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network-Clinical Trials Registry [UMIN-CTR] under registration number UMIN000007834.) PMID:26729495

  7. Longitudinal supportive periodontal therapy for severe chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement: a 12-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Tomita, Sachiyo; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Masatake; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case involving a 12-year follow-up after treatment for chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement. A 54-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of hypersensitivity. Clinical examination at the first visit revealed 15% of sites with a probing depth ≥4 mm and 35% of sites with bleeding on probing. Initial periodontal therapy was implemented based on a clinical diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. Surgical periodontal therapy was subsequently performed at selected sites. For #44, regenerative periodontal therapy using enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain(®)) was selected. For #16, which exhibited a 2- to 3-wall vertical bony defect and class III (mesio-distal) furcation involvement, bone graft was scheduled. Other sites with residual periodontal pockets were treated by open flap debridement. For #37, with a gutter-shaped root, odontoplasty was performed. After reevaluation, the patient was placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). During 12 years of SPT, the periodontal condition remained uneventful in most of the teeth. However, bone resorption was observed in the distal aspect of #37, making the prognosis poor. This indicates the need to continuously monitor risk factors, including inflammation and traumatic occlusion, during SPT. Although some problems still remain, severe periodontitis with furcation involvement was successfully maintained longitudinally with an adequate level of patient compliance and careful SPT.

  8. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is called gingivitis, the mildest form of periodontal disease. Ongoing inflammation eventually causes pockets to develop between ... you to a specialist in the treatment of periodontal disease (periodontist). Diagnosis of periodontitis is generally simple. Diagnosis ...

  9. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Schwarz, Frank; Becker, Jurgen; Brecx, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. This review aims to present an overview of evidence-based clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD.

  10. Diabetes and periodontal disease: a two-way relationship.

    PubMed

    Casanova, L; Hughes, F J; Preshaw, P M

    2014-10-01

    Periodontitis and diabetes are common, complex, chronic diseases with an established bidirectional relationship. That is, diabetes (particularly if glycaemic control is poor) is associated with an increased prevalence and severity of periodontitis, and, severe periodontitis is associated with compromised glycaemic control. Periodontal treatment (conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy) has been associated with improvements in glycaemic control in diabetic patients, with reductions in HbA1c of approximately 0.4% following periodontal therapy. For these reasons, management of periodontitis in people with diabetes is particularly important. The dental team therefore has an important role to play in the management of people with diabetes. An emerging role for dental professionals is envisaged, in which diabetes screening tools could be used to identify patients at high risk of diabetes, to enable them to seek further investigation and assessment from medical healthcare providers.

  11. [Magnetic therapy for complex treatment of chronic periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    P'yanzina, A V

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the methodology of magnetic therapy for complex treatment of chronic periodontal disease (CPD). The study included 60 patients aged 35 to 65 years with moderate CPD divided in 2 groups. Patients in group 1 (controls) received impulse carbonate irrigation for 12 min №10, group 2 additionally received magnetic therapy for 5 min №10 in maxillary and mandibular areas.

  12. Resistance of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer to Nonsurgical Treatments. Part II: Photodynamic Therapy, Vismodegib, Cetuximab, Intralesional Methotrexate, and Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Cazaña, T; Salazar, N; Zamarrón, A; Mascaraque, M; Lucena, S R; Juarranz, Á

    2016-11-01

    A wide range of treatments is now available for nonmelanoma skin cancer, including 5-fluorouracil, ingenol mebutate, imiquimod, diclofenac, photodynamic therapy, methotrexate, cetuximab, vismodegib, and radiotherapy. All are associated with high clinical and histologic response rates. However, some tumors do not respond due to resistance, which may be primary or acquired. Study of the resistance processes is a broad area of research that aims to increase our understanding of the nature of each tumor and the biologic features that make it resistant, as well as to facilitate the design of new therapies directed against these tumors. In this second article, having covered the topical treatments of nonmelanoma skin cancer, we review resistance to other nonsurgical treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies against basal and squamous cell carcinomas, intralesional chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiotherapy.

  13. Toll gates to periodontal host modulation and vaccine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central mediators of innate antimicrobial and inflammatory responses and play instructive roles in the development of the adaptive immune response. Thus when stimulated by certain agonists, TLRs serve as adjuvant receptors that link innate and adaptive immunity. However, when excessively activated or inadequately controlled during an infection, TLRs may contribute to immunopathology associated with inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis. Moreover, certain microbial pathogens appear to exploit aspects of TLR signalling in ways that enhance their adaptive fitness. The diverse and important roles played by TLRs suggest that therapeutic manipulation of TLR signalling may have implications in the control of infection, attenuation of inflammation, and the development of vaccine adjuvants for the treatment of periodontitis. Successful application of TLR-based therapeutic modalities in periodontitis would require highly selective and precisely targeted intervention. This would in turn necessitate precise characterization of TLR signalling pathways in response to periodontal pathogens, as well as development of effective and specific agonists or antagonists of TLR function and signalling. This review summarizes the current status of TLR biology as it relates to periodontitis, and evaluates the potential of TLR-based approaches for host-modulation therapy in this oral disease. PMID:19878475

  14. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sabatoski, Claudio Vinicius; Bueno, Regis Claret; Reyes Pacheco, Ariel Adriano; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life. PMID:26587295

  15. Bioactive Polymeric Nanoparticles for Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Rodríguez, Camilo Andrés; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L.; Alaminos, Miguel; Toledano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims to design calcium and zinc-loaded bioactive and cytocompatible nanoparticles for the treatment of periodontal disease. Methods PolymP-nActive nanoparticles were zinc or calcium loaded. Biomimetic calcium phosphate precipitation on polymeric particles was assessed after 7 days immersion in simulated body fluid, by scanning electron microscopy attached to an energy dispersive analysis system. Amorphous mineral deposition was probed by X-ray diffraction. Cell viability analysis was performed using oral mucosa fibroblasts by: 1) quantifying the liberated deoxyribonucleic acid from dead cells, 2) detecting the amount of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme released by cells with damaged membranes, and 3) by examining the cytoplasmic esterase function and cell membranes integrity with a fluorescence-based method using the Live/Dead commercial kit. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results Precipitation of calcium and phosphate on the nanoparticles surfaces was observed in calcium-loaded nanoparticles. Non-loaded nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic in all the assays, calcium and zinc-loaded particles presented a dose dependent but very low cytotoxic effect. Conclusions The ability of calcium-loaded nanoparticles to promote precipitation of calcium phosphate deposits, together with their observed non-toxicity may offer new strategies for periodontal disease treatment. PMID:27820866

  16. Periodontal diseases of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Califano, Joseph V

    Children and adolescents are subject to several periodontal diseases. Although there is a much lower prevalence of destructive periodontal diseases in children than in adults, children can develop severe forms of periodontitis. In some cases, this destructive disease is a manifestation of a known underlying systemic disease. In other young patients, the underlying cause for increased susceptibility and early onset of disease is unknown. These diseases are often familial, suggesting a genetic predisposition for aggressive disease. Current modalities for managing periodontal diseases of children and adolescents may include antibiotic therapy in combination with non-surgical and/or surgical therapy. Since early diagnosis ensures the greatest chance for successful treatment, it is important that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visits.

  17. Evidence-based periodontal therapy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, V.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Sudhakar, Uma

    2008-01-01

    Dentists need to make clinical decisions based on limited scientific evidence. In clinical practice, a clinician must weigh a myriad of evidences every day. The goal of evidence-based dentistry is to help practitioners provide their patients with optimal care. This is achieved by integrating sound research evidence with personal clinical expertise and patient values to determine the best course of treatment. Periodontology has a rich background of research and scholarship. Therefore, efficient use of this wealth of research data needs to be a part of periodontal practice. Evidence-based periodontology aims to facilitate such an approach and it offers a bridge from science to clinical practice. The clinician must integrate the evidence with patient preference, scientific knowledge, and personal experience. Most important, it allows us to care for our patients. Therefore, evidence-based periodontology is a tool to support decision-making and integrating the best evidence available with clinical practice. PMID:20142947

  18. Advanced biomatrix designs for regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Park, C H; Perez, R A; Lee, H Y; Jang, J H; Lee, H H; Wall, I B; Shi, S; Kim, H W

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body's innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices-including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner-which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

  19. Randomized controlled trials of non-medical and non-surgical therapies for palliative care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roger; Wilson, Donna

    2005-09-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of non-medical and non-surgical therapies for palliative care was undertaken to provide guidance for best practice palliative care. Nine databases were searched (ERIC, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AHMED, Psychinfo, HealthStar, Sociological Abstracts, and the Cochrane Library, including Central and Systematic Reviews) for RCTs and systematic reviews. Fifteen RCTs, varied in intervention and outcome measures, were identified. Several studies found positive results but the sample sizes were small, the methodological quality of the RCTs did not meet Cochrane Collaboration criteria, and the conclusions were at high risk of bias. Improved planning of the protocols and execution, with the addition of experienced trialists and statisticians, is required to improve the quality of the evidence collected in future studies.

  20. The effect of conventional mechanical periodontal treatment on red complex microorganisms and clinical parameters in Down syndrome periodontitis patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M H; Rodrigues, T O; Finoti, L S; Teixeira, S R L; Mayer, M P A; Scarel-Caminaga, R M; Giro, E M A

    2015-03-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is induced by a complex microbiota, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola (together called the red complex), which triggers intense inflammatory reaction. Down syndrome (DS) individuals demonstrate a high prevalence of PD compared with those who are otherwise chromosomally normal (euploids). This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment in DS chronic periodontitis patients on clinical and microbiological parameters. Patients with chronic periodontitis, 23 DS and 12 euploids (control group), were submitted to non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment, followed by maintenance for 45 days. Clinical parameters after periodontal treatment were similar in diseased and healthy sites, independent of the genetic background. Diseased sites of DS and control patients harbored similar levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia at baseline, but significantly higher levels of T. denticola were found in DS patients. Increased levels of P. gingivalis at healthy sites were found in DS individuals. Non-surgical periodontal therapy decreased the levels of red complex microorganisms and improved the tested clinical parameters of diseased sites in both groups. However, the levels of red complex bacteria were higher in diseased sites of DS patients after the periodontal treatment. We conclude in this pilot study that, although the mechanical periodontal treatment seemed to be effective in DS subjects over a short-term period, the red complex bacteria levels did not decrease significantly in diseased sites, as occurred in controls. Therefore, for DS patients, it seems that the conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy should be improved by utilizing adjuvants to reduce the presence of periodontopathogens.

  1. Nonsurgical management of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T; Neubrand, M

    1992-01-01

    Nonsurgical management of gallstones has made considerable progress within the past 20 years. More than 95% of all patients with bile duct stones can be treated successfully by peroral endoscopic or percutaneous techniques. In the case of very large or impacted calculi, intracorporeal or extracorporeal lithotripsy is available (Figure 9-10). Mortality from these approaches is low (in the range of 1%) despite the fact that most patients are elderly and frail, and open surgery is rarely required. While nonsurgical management of bile duct stones is commonly accepted, there is disagreement as to whether gallbladder stones should be managed nonsurgically, especially in view of the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. For patients in good general health who are willing to undergo surgery, removal of the gallbladder is the treatment of choice. However, there are some patients in whom a nonsurgical procedure ought to be considered. These are patients with a patent cystic duct, a functioning gallbladder, and symptomatic, radiolucent stones who can be scheduled for elective treatment. In patients with small floating stones, solitary radiolucent stones or even multiple large stones with a CT density lower than 50 HU, the chance of complete clearance of the gallbladder ranges between 80% and 90% using oral dissolution therapy, direct contact dissolution, or a combination of extracorporeal lithotripsy and dissolution. Each method has its ideal candidates (Table 9-1). The overall percentage of patients with gallstones for these nonsurgical therapeutic options is probably not higher than 20%. Therefore, the impact on surgery is still minor. Controlled clinical comparisons of the different therapies are lacking at the moment. However, these approaches have already stimulated further research into the pathogenesis of gallbladder stone disease and will no doubt undergo further improvement. Drugs that, in addition to ursodeoxycholic acid, further reduce cholesterol

  2. Economics of periodontal care: market trends, competitive forces and incentives.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Thomas F; Beikler, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The adoption of new technologies for the treatment of periodontitis and the replacement of teeth has changed the delivery of periodontal care. The objective of this review was to conduct an economic analysis of a mature periodontal service market with a well-developed workforce, including general dentists, dental hygienists and periodontists. Publicly available information about the delivery of periodontal care in the USA was used. A strong trend toward increased utilization of nonsurgical therapy and decreased utilization of surgical periodontal therapy was observed. Although periodontal surgery remained the domain of periodontists, general dentists had taken over most of the nonsurgical periodontal care. The decline in surgical periodontal therapy was associated with an increased utilization of implant-supported prosthesis. Approximately equal numbers of implants were surgically placed by periodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and general dentists. Porter's framework of the forces driving industry competition was used to analyze the role of patients, dental insurances, general dentists, competitors, entrants, substitutes and suppliers in the periodontal service market. Estimates of out-of-pocket payments of self-pay and insured patients, reimbursement by dental insurances and providers' earnings for various periodontal procedures and alternative treatments were calculated. Economic incentives for providers may explain some of the observed shifts in the periodontal service market. Given the inherent uncertainty about treatment outcomes in dentistry, which makes clinical judgment critical, providers may yield to economic incentives without jeopardizing their ethical standards and professional norms. Although the economic analysis pertains to the USA, some considerations may also apply to other periodontal service markets.

  3. Surgical periodontal therapy at Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital: a statistical profile in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hiroki; Ota, Kei; Ida, Atsushi; Fujinami, Koushu; Furusawa, Masahiro; Makiishi, Takemi; Nikaido, Masahiko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Saito, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the profile of surgical periodontal therapy performed at the Suidobashi Hospital of Tokyo Dental College, during the period of April 2010 through March 2011. A total of 112 periodontal surgeries in 69 patients (mean age: 51.4 years; 28 men and 41 women) were registered for the data analysis. The surgical interventions performed by 17 dentists comprised 79 cases of open flap debridement, 27 cases of periodontal regenerative therapy with enamel matrix derivative and 6 cases of periodontal plastic surgery. Eighty percent of the surgical sites were in the molar region and 41 cases had furcation involvement. In these patients, an improvement in oral hygiene status was observed prior to surgery: the mean plaque score of 45% at initial visit was significantly reduced to 31% after initial periodontal therapy (p<0.01). At sites that subsequently received open flap debridement or periodontal regenerative therapy, the mean probing depth and clinical attachment level after initial therapy was 6.4 mm and 7.6 mm, respectively. These values were significantly lower than those at initial visit (p<0.01). Lower prevalence of sites with positive bleeding on probing was observed after initial therapy. The initial periodontal therapy performed was considered to be effective in improving the periodontal condition of the sites prior to surgery. More effort, however, is indicated in improvement of patient oral hygiene status.

  4. Position paper: periodontal diseases of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Califano, Joseph V

    2003-11-01

    Children and adolescents are subject to several periodontal diseases. Although there is a much lower prevalence of destructive periodontal diseases in children than in adults, children can develop severe forms of periodontitis. In some cases, this destructive disease is a manifestation of a known underlying systemic disease. In other young patients, the underlying cause for increased susceptibility and early onset of disease is unknown. These diseases are often familial, suggesting a genetic predisposition for aggressive disease. Current modalities for managing periodontal diseases of children and adolescents may include antibiotic therapy in combination with non-surgical and/or surgical therapy. Since early diagnosis ensures the greatest chance for successful treatment, it is important that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visits.

  5. Systemic Immune Responses in Pregnancy and Periodontitis: Relationship to Pregnancy Outcomes in the Obstetrics and Periodontal Therapy (OPT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Novak, M. John; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Hodges, James S.; Steffen, Michelle J.; Ferguson, James E.; DiAngelis, Anthony; Buchanan, William; Mitchell, Dennis A.; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies reported on the obstetric, periodontal, and microbiologic outcomes of women participating in the Obstetrics and Periodontal Therapy (OPT) Study. This article describes the systemic antibody responses to selected periodontal bacteria in the same patients. Methods Serum samples, obtained from pregnant women at baseline (13 to 16 weeks; 6 days of gestation) and 29 to 32 weeks, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), and Treponema denticola. Results At baseline, women who delivered live preterm infants had significantly lower total serum levels of IgG antibody to the panel of periodontal pathogens (P = 0.0018), to P. gingivalis (P = 0.0013), and to F. nucleatum (P = 0.0200) than women who delivered at term. These differences were not significant at 29 to 32 weeks. Changes in IgG levels between baseline and 29 to 32 weeks were not associated with preterm birth when adjusted for treatment group, clinical center, race, or age. In addition, delivery of low birth weight infants was not associated with levels of antibody at baseline or with antibody changes during pregnancy. Conclusions Live preterm birth is associated with decreased levels of IgG antibody to periodontal pathogens in women with periodontitis when assessed during the second trimester. Changes in IgG antibody during pregnancy are not associated with birth outcomes. PMID:19485826

  6. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your dentist if you have signs of gum disease. Prevention Good oral hygiene is the best way to prevent periodontitis. This includes thorough tooth brushing and flossing, and regular professional dental cleaning. Preventing and treating ... References Amsterdam JT. ...

  7. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K

    2014-05-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  8. Anterior clinoidal mucocele causing optic neuropathy: resolution with nonsurgical therapy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sameer; DeMonte, Franco

    2007-06-01

    The rare occurrence of an inflammatory mucocele in a pneumatized anterior clinoid process is described. The patient, a 20-year-old woman, presented with a severe visual field defect in her right eye associated with abnormality in the right anterior clinoid process identified on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Initially, surgical intervention was recommended for resection of a possible neoplasm. The patient's clinical history, however, was significant for sinusitis accompanied by sore throat and right ear infection that resolved with oral antibiotic therapy. When her condition was evaluated approximately 1 month after the onset of her visual symptoms, the patient had regained full visual acuity in the affected eye. Surgical exploration was not required, and the patient's optic neuropathy reversed with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  9. Clinical outcome of surgical periodontal therapy: a short-term retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hiroki; Fujinami, Koushu; Ida, Atsushi; Furusawa, Masahiro; Nikaido, Masahiko; Yamashita, Shuichiro; Saito, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate retrospectively the outcome of surgical periodontal therapy. Periodontal surgeries implemented at General Dentistry, Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital during the period of April 2010 through March 2012 were subjected to data analysis. After initial periodontal therapy, 17 clinicians performed a total of 138 periodontal surgeries in 80 patients with moderate to advanced periodontitis (31 men and 49 women; mean age 54). Cases (sites) operated were as follows: open flap debridement=102, periodontal regenerative therapy=29 (17 for intrabony defects, 12 for furcation involvements) and periodontal plastic surgery=7. Enamel matrix derivative or bone graft was used for regenerative therapy. Clinical data were analyzed focusing on the comparison between open flap debridement and regenerative therapy. At 5 months after open flap debridement, mean reduction in probing depth (PD) and gain in clinical attachment level (CAL) was 3.9 mm (range -1.0-9.0) and 2.3 mm (range -1.0-9.0), respectively. The corresponding values with regenerative therapy were 4.0 mm (range 0-8.0) and 2.8 mm (-1.0-6.0), respectively. At sites with initial PD≥8 mm, a significantly greater gain in CAL was obtained with the regenerative therapy than with flap surgery (mean CAL gain 4.3 mm vs. 2.9 mm, p<0.05). Periodontal surgery performed in our clinical setting demonstrated a favorable short-term outcome. Our data suggest the efficacy of regenerative therapy, in particular for the treatment of deep pockets.

  10. Imiquimod therapy for extramammary Paget's disease of the vulva: a viable non-surgical alternative.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P; Innamaa, A; Palmer, J; Tidy, J

    2013-07-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepidermal adenocarcinoma that can affect the vulval skin. Surgical excision is the gold-standard treatment, however, recurrence rates are high and extensive excisions can produce long-lasting cosmetic and functional defects. We describe one of the largest case series to-date (n = 6) on the use of topical 5% imiquimod cream as a novel treatment option and discuss our experiences. With the addition of our six cases to the literature, there are now 29 documented cases of vulval EMPD treated with 5% imiquimod cream. Of these, 50% of primary disease cases and 73% of recurrent primary disease cases have achieved clinical resolution with 5% imiquimod therapy alone. These findings suggest that imiquimod provides a viable alternative to surgical excision for vulval EMPD. However, we acknowledge that this is a simple retrospective analysis and that treatment scheduling and follow-up needs investigation in a trial setting.

  11. Low-Level Lasers as an Adjunct in Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Jovanović, Goran; Antić, Slobodan; Brkić, Zlata

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of periodontitis, and severe periodontitis often coexists with severe DM. The proposed dual pathway of tissue destruction suggests that control of chronic periodontal infection and gingival inflammation is essential for achieving long-term control of DM. The purpose this study is to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) by exfoliative cytology in patients with DM and gingival inflammation. Subjects and Methods Three hundred patients were divided in three equal groups: Group 1 consisted of patients with periodontitis and type 1 DM, Group 2 of patients with periodontitis and type 2 DM, and Group 3 of patients with periodontitis (control group). After oral examination, smears were taken from gingival tissue, and afterward all of the patients received oral hygiene instructions, removal of dental plaque, and full-mouth scaling and root planing. A split-mouth design was applied; on the right side of jaws GaAlAs LLLT (670 nm, 5 mW, 14 min/day) (model Mils 94; Optica Laser, Sofia, Bulgaria) was applied for five consecutive days. After the therapy was completed, smears from both sides of jaws were taken. The morphometric analysis was done using the National Institutes of Health Image software program and a model NU2 microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany). Results Investigated parameters were significantly lower after therapy compared with values before therapy. After therapy on the side subjected to LLLT, there was no significantly difference between patients with DM and the control group. Conclusions It can be concluded that LLLT as an adjunct in periodontal therapy reduces gingival inflammation in patients with DM and periodontitis. PMID:22928615

  12. Microbiological changes after periodontal therapy in diabetic patients with inadequate metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Orrico, Silvana Regina Perez; Gonçalves, Daniela; Correa, Fernanda Oliveira Bello; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment (SRP) on the composition of the subgingival microbiota of chronic periodontitis (CP) in individuals with type 2 diabetes (DM2) with inadequate metabolic control and in systemically healthy (SH) individuals. Forty individuals (20 DM2 and 20 SH) with CP underwent full-mouth periodontal examination. Subgingival plaque was sampled from 4 deep sites of each individual and tested for mean prevalence and counts of 45 bacterial taxa by the checkerboard method. Clinical and microbiological assessments were performed before and 3 months after SRP. At baseline, those in the DM2 group presented a significantly higher percentage of sites with visible plaque and bleeding on probing compared with those in the SH group (p<0.01). Those in the DM2 group presented significantly higher levels of C. rectus and P. gingivalis, and lower prevalence of P. micra and S. anginosus, compared with those in the SH group (p≤0.001). At the 3-month visit, both groups showed a significant improvement in all clinical parameters (p<0.01). Those in the DM2 group showed significantly higher prevalence and/or levels of A. gerencseriae, A. naeslundii I, A. oris, A. odontolyticus, C. sputigena, F. periodonticum, and G. morbillorum compared with those in the SH group (p≤0.001). However, those in the DM2 group showed a significant reduction in the levels of P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (p≤0.001) over time. Those in the SRP group showed improved periodontal status and reduced levels of putative periodontal pathogens at 3 months' evaluation compared with those in the DM2 group with inadequate metabolic control.

  13. Antibacterial properties of metal and metalloid ions in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis therapy.

    PubMed

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal diseases like periodontitis and peri-implantitis have been linked with Gram-negative anaerobes. The incorporation of various chemotherapeutic agents, including metal ions, into several materials and devices has been extensively studied against periodontal bacteria, and materials doped with metal ions have been proposed for the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions already used in the treatment of periodontal diseases, as well as the potential use of alternative materials that are currently available for other applications but have been proved to be cytotoxic to the specific periodontal pathogens. The sources of this review included English articles using Google Scholar™, ScienceDirect, Scopus and PubMed. Search terms included the combinations of the descriptors "disease", "ionic species" and "bacterium". Articles that discuss the biocidal properties of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions against the specific periodontal bacteria were included. The articles were independently extracted by two authors using predefined data fields. The evaluation of resources was based on the quality of the content and the relevance to the topic, which was evaluated by the ionic species and the bacteria used in the study, while the final application was not considered as relevant. The present review summarizes the extensive previous and current research efforts concerning the use of metal ions in periodontal diseases therapy, while it points out the challenges and opportunities lying ahead.

  14. [Oxidative stress and antioxitant therapy of chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Y X; Guo, S J; Wu, Y F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a progressive, infectious inflammation disease, caused by the dysbiosis of oral resident flora, leading to the destruction of periodontium. The onset of pathogenic microorganisms is the etiological factor of periodontitis, while the immuno-inflammatory response affects the progression of the disease. Under chronic periodontitis, oxidative stress occurs when excessive reactive oxygen species are produced and exceed the compensative capacity of the organism. Oxidative stress leads to the destruction of periodontium, in a direct way(damaging the biomolecule) or an indirect way(enhancing the produce of inflammatory cytokine and destructive enzymes). Therefore, as the antagonist of the reactive oxygen species, antioxidants may be helpful to treat the chronic periodontitis. This paper reviewed relevant literatures about the destructive role of excessive reactive oxygen species and protective role of antioxidants in chronic periodontitis.

  15. Effects of Periodontal Therapy on Rate of Preterm Delivery A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D.; Jared, Heather L.; Mauriello, Sally M.; Mendoza, Luisto C.; Couper, David J.; Stewart, Dawn D.; Murtha, Amy P.; Cochran, David L.; Dudley, Donald J.; Reddy, Michael S.; Geurs, Nicolaas C.; Hauth, John C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the effects of maternal periodontal disease treatment on the incidence of preterm birth (delivery before 37 weeks of gestation). METHODS The Maternal Oral Therapy to Reduce Obstetric Risk Study was a randomized, treatment-masked, controlled clinical trial of pregnant women with periodontal disease who were receiving standard obstetric care. Participants were assigned to either a periodontal treatment arm, consisting of scaling and root planing early in the second trimester, or a delayed treatment arm that provided periodontal care after delivery. Pregnancy and maternal periodontal status were followed to delivery and neonatal outcomes until discharge. The primary outcome (gestational age less than 37 weeks) and the secondary outcome (gestational age less than 35 weeks) were analyzed using a χ2 test of equality of two proportions. RESULTS The study randomized 1,806 patients at three performance sites and completed 1,760 evaluable patients. At baseline, there were no differences comparing the treatment and control arms for any of the periodontal or obstetric measures. The rate of preterm delivery for the treatment group was 13.1% and 11.5% for the control group (P=.316). There were no significant differences when comparing women in the treatment group with those in the control group with regard to the adverse event rate or the major obstetric and neonatal outcomes. CONCLUSION Periodontal therapy did not reduce the incidence of preterm delivery. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00097656. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE I PMID:19701034

  16. Diabetes and periodontal diseases. Committee on Research, Science and Therapy. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    This position paper on diabetes mellitus was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of The American Academy of Periodontology. It is intended to: 1) update members of the dental profession on the diagnosis and medical management of patients with diabetes mellitus; 2) summarize current knowledge on the relation between diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases; 3) provide an overview of factors in diabetic patients relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases in these subjects; 4) outline special considerations associated with treatment of periodontal diseases in diabetic patients; and 5) discuss possible approaches to the management of diabetic emergencies in the dental office.

  17. Effects of periodontal therapy on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Jen, I-An; Chou, Chyuan; Lei, Yen-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported increased incidence, prevalence and acuity of periodontitis in adults with diabetes and some have also suggested that treating periodontal disease may improve glycemic control in diabetic patients. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of different periodontal therapies on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and periodontal disease. We searched the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (Central) databases up to January 2014 for relevant studies pertaining to periodontal treatments and glycemic control in adults with T2DM. The search terms were periodontal treatment/periodontal therapy, diabetes/diabetes mellitus, periodontitis/periodontal and glycemic control. The primary outcome measure taken from the included studies was glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). We compared differences in patients' pre- and post-intervention HbA1c results between a treatment group receiving scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with administration of oral doxycycline (n=71) and controls receiving SRP alone or SRP plus placebo (n=72). Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. Four trials involving a total of 143 patients with T2DM and periodontal disease were determined to be eligible for analysis. Data of 1 study were not retained for meta-analysis because HbA1c results were recorded as median with IQR. Meta-analysis of the included 3 studies revealed no significant differences in HbA1c results between the periodontal treatment group (n=71) and control group (n=72) (HbA1c SMD=-0.238, 95% CI=-0.616 to 0.140; P=0.217). Systemic doxycycline added to SRP does not significantly improve metabolic control in patients with T2DM and chronic periodontitis. Current evidence is insufficient to support a significant association between periodontal therapy and metabolic control in this patient population. However, evidence

  18. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G.; Galea, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Clinical Features: A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. Intervention: The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. Discussion: This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Summary: Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy. PMID:26816415

  19. Application of transtheoretical model to assess the compliance of chronic periodontitis patients to periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Shilpa; Thomas, Raison; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to assess whether the transtheoretical model for oral hygiene behavior was interrelated in theoretically consistent directions in chronic periodontitis patients and its applicability to assess the compliance of the chronic periodontitis patients to the treatment suggested. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 chronic periodontitis patients were selected for the proposed study. The selected patients were given four questionnaires that were constructed based on transtheoretical model (TTM), and the patients were divided subsequently into five different groups (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance groups) based on their answers to the questionnaires. Then, each patient was given four appointments for their periodontal treatment spaced with a time gap of 10 days. The patients visit for each appointments scheduled to them was documented. The results obtained were assessed using TTM. Results: Higher mean pro scores of decisional balance, self-efficacy, and process of change scores was recorded in maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group, respectively, whereas higher mean cons score was recorded in precontemplation group followed by contemplation group, preparation group, action group, and maintenance group, respectively. The difference scores of TTM constructs were statistically highly significant between all the five groups. Furthermore, the number of appointment attended in were significantly more than maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that transtheoretical model can be successfully applied to chronic periodontitis patients to assess their compliance to the suggested periodontal treatment. PMID:27307663

  20. Tobacco smoke in the development and therapy of periodontal disease: progress and questions.

    PubMed

    Rota, M T; Poggi, P; Baratta, L; Gaeta, E; Boratto, R; Tazzi, A

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological studies have pointed to a significant correlation between cigarette smoke and poor periodontal status. Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for the onset and development of periodontal disease, and an association between reduced healing response subsequent to periodontal therapies and cigarette smoking has been found. The epidemiological studies reported here are also supported by the results of an in vitro study on the cytotoxicity of two of the volatile components of cigarette smoke that we ourselves conducted, in which the investigated compounds were found to damage human gingival fibroblasts. We concluded that this damage would be reflected in periodontal health and could slow down wound healing. Patients should thus be alerted by clinicians to the risks smoking poses to oral and dental health.

  1. Ultramorphology of the root surface subsequent to hand-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation during non-surgical periodontal treatments. An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    D. ASPRIELLO, Simone; PIEMONTESE, Matteo; LEVRINI, Luca; SAURO, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the ultramorphology of the root surfaces induced by mechanical instrumentation performed using conventional curettes or piezoelectric scalers when used single-handedly or with a combined technique. Material and Methods Thirty single-rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 groups: Group A, instrumentation with curettes; Group B instrumentation with titanium nitride coated periodontal tip mounted in a piezoelectric handpiece; Group C, combined technique with curette/ultrasonic piezoelectric instrumentation. The specimens were processed and analyzed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Differences between the different groups of instrumentation were determined using Pearson’s χ 2 with significance predetermined at α=0.001. Results Periodontal scaling and root planing performed with curettes, ultrasonic or combined instrumentation induced several morphological changes on the root surface. The curettes produced a compact and thick multilayered smear layer, while the morphology of the root surfaces after ultrasonic scaler treatment appeared irregular with few grooves and a thin smear layer. The combination of curette/ultrasonic instrumentation showed exposed root dentin tubules with a surface morphology characterized by the presence of very few grooves and slender remnants of smear layer which only partially covered the root dentin. In some cases, it was also possible to observe areas with exposed collagen fibrils. Conclusion The curette-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation may combine the beneficial effects of each instrument in a single technique creating a root surface relatively free from the physical barrier of smear layer and dentin tubules orifices partial occlusion. PMID:21437474

  2. Effect of Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum C-reactive Protein Levels Using ELISA in Both Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharat; Patil, Neha; Yadav, Manoj; Tripathi, Shashank; Sinha, Saurabh; Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can be defined as a local inflammatory process which mediates destruction of periodontal tissues & is triggered by bacterial insult. In periodontal infections, the levels of C reactive proteins are elevated as compared to the levels in a periodontally healthy individual. The study was done to determine the relative levels of serum CRP in aggressive, chronic and periodontally healthy subjects and to evaluate the effect of surgical periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein levels. Materials and Methods Serum samples were collected from 150 participants (50 healthy control patients (non-periodontitis), 50 patients with chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis. Serum C- reactive protein levels were assessed by means of immunoturbidimetric assay at baseline for subjects in all the 3 groups and 3 months after completion of surgical therapy. Results The mean baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in the Groups I, II and III were 1.65±0.57 mg/L, 3.03±2.14 mg/L and 3.09±2.27 mg/L respectively. After treatment, the mean C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Groups II and III reduced from 3.03±1.67 mg/L to 1.46±1.67 mg/L and from 3.09±1.21 to 1.43±1.21 mg/L respectively. Similar results were found for probing depth and all indexes in Group II and III after treatment. Also, the mean attachment loss in Groups II and III reduced, so the results were highly significant. Conclusion Successful periodontal treatment results in significant decrease in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in otherwise healthy subjects. PMID:26557605

  3. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms. PMID:27602399

  4. Imaging Modalities for Assessment of Treatment Response to Nonsurgical Hepatocellular Carcinoma Therapy: Contrast-Enhanced US, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yasunori; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-03-01

    Tumor response and time to progression have been considered pivotal for surrogate assessment of treatment efficacy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent advancements in imaging modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are playing an important role in assessing the therapeutic effects of HCC treatments. According to some HCC clinical guidelines, post-therapeutic evaluation of HCC patients is based exclusively on contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging criteria. The recommended techniques are contrast-enhanced CT or contrast-enhanced MRI. Contrast-enhanced US is employed more in the positive diagnosis of HCC than in post-therapeutic monitoring. Although contrast enhancement is an important finding on imaging, enhancement does not necessarily depict the same phenomenon across modalities. We need to become well acquainted with the characteristics of each modality, including not only contrast-enhanced CT and MRI but also contrast-enhanced US. Many nonsurgical treatment options are now available for unresectable HCC, and accurate assessment of tumor response is essential to achieve favorable outcomes. For the assessment of successful radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the achievement of a sufficient ablation margin as well the absence of tumor vascular enhancement is essential. To evaluate the response to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), enhanced tumor shrinkage is relied on as a measure of antitumor activity. Here, we give an overview of the current status of imaging assessment of HCC response to nonsurgical treatments including RFA and TACE.

  5. Effect of Supragingival Irrigation with Aerosolized 0.5% Hydrogen Peroxide on Clinical Periodontal Parameters, Markers of Systemic Inflammation, and Morphology of Gingival Tissues in Patients with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Žekonis, Gediminas; Žekonis, Jonas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Noreikienė, Viktorija; Balnytė, Ingrida; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Narbutaitė, Julija

    2016-01-01

    Background Various studies have shown that non-surgical periodontal treatment is correlated with reduction in clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide as maintenance therapy followed by non-surgical periodontal treatment on clinical parameters, plasma levels of inflammatory markers, and morphological changes in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods In total, 43 patients with chronic periodontitis were randomly allocated to long-term maintenance therapy. The patients’ periodontal status was assessed using clinical parameters of approximal plaque index, modified gingival index, bleeding index, pocket probing depth, and plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and white blood cell count) at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years. The morphological status of gingival tissues (immediately after supragingival irrigation) was assessed microscopically. Results Complete data were obtained on 34 patients. A highly statistically significant and consistent reduction was observed in all long-term clinical parameters and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Morphological data showed abundant spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. Conclusions 1. The present study showed that non-surgical periodontal treatment with long-term weekly supragingival irrigations with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide improved clinical periodontal status and plasma levels of inflammatory markers and may be a promising method in periodontology. 2. We found that supragingival irrigation with aerosolized 0.5% hydrogen peroxide created large numbers of spherical bubbles in gingival tissues. PMID:27743448

  6. Treatment modalities and evaluation models for periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad; Iqbal, Zeenat; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Sahni, Jasjeet K

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most common localized dental inflammatory disease related with several pathological conditions like inflammation of gums (gingivitis), degeneration of periodontal ligament, dental cementum and alveolar bone loss. In this perspective, the various preventive and treatment modalities, including oral hygiene, gingival irrigations, mechanical instrumentation, full mouth disinfection, host modulation and antimicrobial therapy, which are used either as adjunctive treatments or as stand-alone therapies in the non-surgical management of periodontal infections, have been discussed. Intra-pocket, sustained release systems have emerged as a novel paradigm for the future research. In this article, special consideration is given to different locally delivered anti-microbial and anti inflammatory medications which are either commercially available or are currently under consideration for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The various in vitro dissolution models and microbiological strain investigated to impersonate the infected and inflamed periodontal cavity and to predict the in vivo performance of treatment modalities have also been thrashed out. Animal models that have been employed to explore the pathology at the different stages of periodontitis and to evaluate its treatment modalities are enlightened in this proposed review. PMID:23373002

  7. Long-term effect on tooth vitality of regenerative therapy in deep periodontal bony defects: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Massimo; Goracci, Cecilia; Zucchelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, many authors have investigated the effect of periodontal disease and treatment on pulpal status with controversial results. This study was conducted to verify whether periodontal disease in a deep intrabony defect and complex therapy, including aggressive root planing such as in periodontal regeneration, have an influence on tooth vitality. One hundred thirty-seven patients who fulfilled the requirements were included. The collected data did not support the need for "preventive" root canal treatment in severely compromised teeth that are planned to undergo periodontal regenerative surgery.

  8. Gene therapy with growth factors for periodontal tissue engineering--a review.

    PubMed

    Sood, S; Gupta, S; Mahendra, A

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of oral and periodontal diseases and associated anomalies accounts for a significant proportion of the healthcare burden, with the manifestations of these conditions being functionally and psychologically debilitating. A challenge faced by periodontal therapy is the predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues lost as a consequence of disease. Growth factors are critical to the development, maturation, maintenance and repair of oral tissues as they establish an extra-cellular environment that is conducive to cell and tissue growth. Tissue engineering principles aim to exploit these properties in the development of biomimetic materials that can provide an appropriate microenvironment for tissue development. The aim of this paper is to review emerging periodontal therapies in the areas of materials science, growth factor biology and cell/gene therapy. Various such materials have been formulated into devices that can be used as vehicles for delivery of cells, growth factors and DNA. Different mechanisms of drug delivery are addressed in the context of novel approaches to reconstruct and engineer oral and tooth supporting structure.

  9. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  10. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for periodontal pockets: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribac, Valentin; Todea, Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    The applications of lasers in medicine, both in the field of diagnosis and treatment are gaining momentum. In dentistry in particular, numerous types of lasers with a wide range of characteristics are being utilized in all fields. In consequence, a lot of experience and knowledge has been gained in the last two decades in this domain; this resulted in the development of novel technologies and devices. A brief overview is made in the first part of this article on these topics. The treatment of periodontal disease with laser therapy is pointed out, as well as the photodynamic therapy which is using LLLT for the activation of the sensitizing gel that is introduced in the periodontal pockets. This paper reviews also the application of photodynamic therapy in clinical trials which have different results; a standardization of the protocol utilized for this procedure is concluded to be necessary.

  11. Regenerative periodontal therapy: 30 years of lessons learned and unlearned.

    PubMed

    Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we reflect upon advances and hindrances encountered over the last three decades in the development of strategies for periodontal regeneration. In this soul-searching pursuit we focus on revisiting lessons learned that should guide us in the quest for the reconstruction of the lost periodontium. We also examine beliefs and traditions that should be unlearned so that we can continue to advance the field. This learned/unlearned body of knowledge is consolidated into core principles to help us to develop new therapeutic approaches to benefit our patients and ultimately our society.

  12. [An epidemiological study on dental-periodontal pathology in a sample of the school-age population of the city of Naples. II. Prevention and periodontal therapy].

    PubMed

    Matarasso, S; Dante, G; Cecere, E; Vadalà, R; Epifania, E

    1991-04-01

    The need for periodontal prevention and therapy was quantified according to the prevention of pathologies within the framework of an epidemiological study carried out on a sample population aged between 6 and 18 years. Data were collected using the CPITN method (WHO).

  13. The importance of a coordinated restorative and maintenance program following periodontal therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wolffe, G N; Spanauf, A J; Renggli, H H

    1991-04-01

    The problems arising during the maintenance phase of therapy following a combination of periodontal, orthodontic, and restorative treatment are illustrated by this case report. Emphasis is placed on the combined responsibility of the patient, general dental practitioner, and periodontist to recognize signs of recurrent disease at an early stage, thereby allowing corrective measures to be initiated promptly. By applying these principles, even when disease recurs during the maintenance phase, re-treatment is possible and a satisfactory result can be achieved.

  14. Five-year comparative study on conventional and laser-assisted therapy of periimplantitis and periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Georg; Neckel, Claus P.

    2000-03-01

    Numerous groups have recommended the use of the diode laser to decontaminate infected root and implant surfaces. The aim of this study was to show the outcome after laser assisted and conventional therapy of periimplantitis and periodontitis administering approved treatment protocols. Between 1994 and 1999 a total of 50 patients with periimplantitis (20) and periodontitis (30) were treated in two groups each. Clinical, microbiological and radiographic evaluation was performed before and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after treatment. In addition to the conventional treatment protocol, flap surgery, the tooth or implant surface was decontaminated with a 810 nm diode laser using 1 Watt output for 20 sec (CW mode). All accessible surfaces were decontaminated at the follow up dates. In the periimplantitis group recurrence of the marker bacteria was higher and faster over time for the conventionally operated patients. Also the clinical and radiographic reevaluation showed significantly better results. The laser group of the periodontitis patients also showed significantly better outcome in terms of clinical evaluation, microbiological counts, radiographic evaluation and tooth loss. In comparison to other long term studies our results for the conventional therapy were adequate, the laser assisted therapy brought up significantly better and reproducible results.

  15. Comparison of cisplatinum/paclitaxel with cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil as first-line therapy for nonsurgical locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guofang; Wang, Zhehai; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Qingqing; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liyan; Han, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    group B. Cisplatinum/paclitaxel can be considered a good candidate chemotherapy regimen for patients with locally advanced ESCC who are being treated with nonsurgical therapy. PMID:27445460

  16. Natural History of Periodontitis and a Review of Technologies to Prevent and Treat It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antczak-Bouckoms, Alexia

    1994-01-01

    The classification scheme for periodontal diseases developed in 1989 is discussed, and technologies, both surgical and nonsurgical, for prevention, control, and regeneration of periodontal tissues are described and compared. Research needs are discussed. (MSE)

  17. Impact of Periodontal Therapy on the Subgingival Microbiota of Severe Periodontitis: Comparison between Good Responders and “Refractory” Subjects by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM)

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Ana Paula V.; Bennet, Susan; Cotton, Sean L.; Goodson, J. Max; Kent, Ralph; Haffajee, Anne D.; Socransky, Sigmund S.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Paster, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study compared the changes on the subgingival microbiota of subjects with “refractory” periodontitis (RP) or treatable periodontitis (GR) before and after periodontal therapy by using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Methods Individuals with chronic periodontitis were classified as RP (n=17) based on mean attachment loss (AL) and/or >3 sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after scaling and root planing, surgery and systemically administered amoxicillin and metronidazole or as GR (n=30) based on mean attachment gain and no sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after treatment. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and 15 months after treatment and analyzed for the presence of 300 species by HOMIM analysis. Significant differences in taxa before and after therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon test. Results The majority of species evaluated decreased in prevalence in both groups after treatment; however, only a small subset of organisms was significantly affected. Species that increased or persisted in high frequency in RP but were significantly reduced in GR included Bacteroidetes sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Tannerella forsythia, Dialister spp., Selenomonas spp., Catonella morbi, Eubacterium spp., Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus sp. OT113, Fusobacterium sp. OT203, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Streptococcus intermedius or Streptococcus constellatus and Shuttlesworthia satelles. In contrast, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Cardiobacterium hominis, Gemella haemolysans, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Kingella oralis, Lautropia mirabilis, Neisseria elongata, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus australis and Veillonella spp. were more associated with therapeutic success. Conclusion Persistence of putative and novel periodontal pathogens, as well as low prevalence of beneficial species was associated with chronic “refractory” periodontitis. PMID:22324467

  18. The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID): Validity and Responsiveness to Change in Women Undergoing Non-Surgical Therapies for Treatment of Stress Predominant Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Catherine S.; Rahn, David D.; Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Barber, Matthew D.; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly S.; Siddiqui, Nazema Y.; Abel, Robert B.; Spino, Cathie; Richter, Holly E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID), a 6-item urinary incontinence (UI) symptom questionnaire, was developed and validated to distinguish stress and urge UI. This study’s objective was to evaluate QUID validity and responsiveness when used as a clinical trial outcome measure. Methods Participants enrolled in a multi-center trial of non-surgical therapy (continence pessary, pelvic floor muscle training or combined) for stress-predominant UI completed baseline and 3-month diaries, the Urinary Distress Inventory (UDI) and QUID. Data from all treatment groups were pooled. QUID internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and convergent/discriminant validity (Pearson correlations) were evaluated. Responsiveness to change was assessed with 3-month score outcomes and distribution-based measurements. Results 444 women (mean age 50) were enrolled with stress (N=200) and mixed (N=244) UI; 344 had 3-month data. Baseline QUID Stress and Urge scores (both scaled 0-15, larger values indicating worse UI) were 8.4 ± 3.2 and 4.5 ± 3.3, respectively. Internal consistency of QUID Total, Stress and Urge scores was 0.75, 0.64 and 0.87, respectively. QUID Stress scores correlated moderately with UDI-Stress scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary stress UI episodes (r=0.41, p<0.0001). QUID Urge scores correlated moderately with UDI-Irritative scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary urge UI episodes (r=0.45, p<0.0001). 3-month QUID Stress and Urge scores improved (4.1 ± 3.4 and 2.2 ± 2.7, both p<0.0001). QUID Stress score Effect Size (1.3) and Standardized Response Mean (1.2) suggested a large change after therapy. Conclusion The QUID has acceptable psychometric characteristics and may be used as a UI outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19787711

  19. Effect of local application of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil gel on long pentraxin level used as an adjunctive treatment of chronic periodontitis: A randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Elgendy, Enas Ahmed; Ali, Shereen Abdel-Moula; Zineldeen, Doaa Hussien

    2013-01-01

    Background: Conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy has been proven to be an effective treatment for patients with chronic periodontitis. Tea tree oil (TTO) can be used as adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy in patient with chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adjunctive treatment of TTO on the clinical parameters and the level of pentraxin-3 (PTX3) in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis were divided into two groups, Group I received scaling and root planing (SRP) only, Group II received SRP and TTO gel. Clinical parameters were recorded and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from each subject for measuring PTX3 levels at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Results: In all evaluation periods, there was statistically significant reduction in each of the studied clinical parameters and PTX3 level in Group II as compared with Group I. Conclusions: The local delivery of TTO gel in case of chronic periodontitis may have some beneficial effects to augment the results of the conventional periodontal therapy. Moreover, it places a focus on the value of monitoring GCF levels of PTX3 as a marker of periodontal tissue healing. PMID:24174722

  20. Impaired neutrophil directional chemotactic accuracy in chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Helen M; Ling, Martin R; Insall, Robert; Kalna, Gabriela; Spengler, Julia; Grant, Melissa M; Chapple, Iain LC

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the chemotactic accuracy of peripheral blood neutrophils from patients with chronic periodontitis compared with matched healthy controls, before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Material & Methods Neutrophils were isolated from patients and controls (n = 18) by density centrifugation. Using the Insall chamber and video microscopy, neutrophils were analysed for directional chemotaxis towards N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine [fMLP (10 nM), or CXCL8 (200 ng/ml)]. Circular statistics were utilized for the analysis of cell movement. Results Prior to treatment, neutrophils from patients with chronic periodontitis had significantly reduced speed, velocity and chemotactic accuracy compared to healthy controls for both chemoattractants. Following periodontal treatment, patient neutrophils continued to display reduced speed in response to both chemoattractants. However, velocity and accuracy were normalized for the weak chemoattractant CXCL8 while they remained significantly reduced for fMLP. Conclusions Chronic periodontitis is associated with reduced neutrophil chemotaxis, and this is only partially restored by successful treatment. Dysfunctional neutrophil chemotaxis may predispose patients with periodontitis to their disease by increasing tissue transit times, thus exacerbating neutrophil-mediated collateral host tissue damage. PMID:25360483

  1. Periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tan, A E S

    2009-09-01

    The main goal of periodontal therapy is to establish an oral environment compatible with periodontal health by the physical disruption of the plaque biofilm and adjunctive chemical means if required. Implicit in this objective is the ongoing requirement of detection and interception of new and recurrent disease, which continues at selected intervals for the life of the dentition after the initial ("active") phase of periodontal treatment. This concept of ongoing periodontal maintenance therapy has been embraced as the mandatory requirement for favourable periodontal outcomes based on institutional clinical trials and in practice-based studies in various parts of the world. This review examines the ramifications of periodontal maintenance therapy based upon a multi-level assessment of logistic issues and risk factors at three levels: (1) The patient level - treatment time; patient attendance compliance; and homecare measures, antiseptics/antibiotics and smoking. (2) The level of the individual tooth - tooth loss; and evaluation of success versus survival. (3) The level of each tooth surface ("site") - probing depth, loss of attachment and bleeding on probing; and changes in clinical attachment levels. In spite of the diversity of studies conducted, there is agreement on the efficacy of periodontal maintenance therapy when compared with studies on untreated populations and in treated cases that were not maintained.

  2. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota.

  3. In Situ Anabolic Activity of Periodontal Pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, Ralee; Weigel, Kris M.; Harrison, Peter L.; Lee, KyuLim; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis are fastidious anaerobic bacteria strongly associated with chronic forms of periodontitis. Our understanding of the growth activities of these microorganisms in situ is very limited. Previous studies have shown that copy numbers of ribosomal-RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) of specific pathogen species relative to genomic-DNA (gDNA) of the same species (P:G ratios) are greater in actively growing bacterial cells than in resting cells. The method, so-called steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis, represents a novel culture-independent approach to study bacteria. This study employed this technique to examine the in situ growth activities of oral bacteria in periodontitis before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Sub-gingival paper-point samples were taken at initial and re-evaluation appointments. Pre-rRNA and gDNA levels of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were quantified and compared using reverse-transcriptase qPCR. The results indicate significantly reduced growth activity of P. gingivalis, but not F. alocis, after therapy. The P:G ratios of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were compared and a low-strength, but statistically significant inter-species correlation was detected. Our study demonstrates that steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis can be a valuable culture-independent approach to studying opportunistic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:27642101

  4. Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

  5. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  6. Radiographic assessment of photodynamic therapy as an adjunctive treatment on induced periodontitis in immunosuppressed rats

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, Leandro Araújo; MARTINS, Thiago Marchi; de ALMEIDA, Juliano Milanezi; THEODORO, Letícia Helena; GARCIA, Valdir Gouveia

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess radiographically the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunctive treatment to scaling and root planing (SRP) on induced periodontitis in dexamethasone-induced immunosuppressed rats. Material and Methods The animals were divided into 2 groups: ND group (n=60): saline treatment; D group (n=60): dexamethasone treatment. In both ND and D groups, periodontal disease was induced by the placement of a ligature in the left first mandibular molar. After 7 days, ligature was removed and all animals received SRP, being divided according to the following treatments: SRP: saline and PDT: phenothiazinium dye (TBO) plus laser irradiation. Ten animals per treatment were killed at 7, 15 and 30 days. The distance between the cementoenamel junction and the height of the alveolar bone crest in the mesial surface of the mandibular left first molars was determined in millimeters in each radiograph. The radiographic values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at a p value <0.05. Results Intragroup radiographic assessment (ND and D groups) showed that there was statistically significant less bone loss in the animals treated with PDT in all experimental periods compared to those submitted to SRP. Intergroup radiographic analysis (ND and D groups) demonstrated that there was greater bone loss in the ND group treated with SRP compared to the D group treated with PDT at 7 and 30 days. Conclusion PDT was an effective adjunctive treatment to SRP on induced periodontitis in dexamethasone-induced immunosuppressed rats. PMID:20857000

  7. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Therapy for Chronic Periodontitis in Vivo.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Laura Marise; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Chorilli, Marlus; Giusti, Juçaíra Stella M; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Soukos, Nikolaos S; Amiji, Mansoor M; Fontana, Carla Raquel

    2016-05-20

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is increasingly being explored for treatment of periodontitis. Here, we investigated the effect of aPDT on human dental plaque bacteria in suspensions and biofilms in vitro using methylene blue (MB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles (MB-NP) and red light at 660 nm. The effect of MB-NP-based aPDT was also evaluated in a clinical pilot study with 10 adult human subjects with chronic periodontitis. Dental plaque samples from human subjects were exposed to aPDT-in planktonic and biofilm phases-with MB or MB-NP (25 µg/mL) at 20 J/cm² in vitro. Patients were treated either with ultrasonic scaling and scaling and root planing (US + SRP) or ultrasonic scaling + SRP + aPDT with MB-NP (25 µg/mL and 20 J/cm²) in a split-mouth design. In biofilms, MB-NP eliminated approximately 25% more bacteria than free MB. The clinical study demonstrated the safety of aPDT. Both groups showed similar improvements of clinical parameters one month following treatments. However, at three months ultrasonic SRP + aPDT showed a greater effect (28.82%) on gingival bleeding index (GBI) compared to ultrasonic SRP. The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with MB may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial periodontal treatment.

  8. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Therapy for Chronic Periodontitis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Laura Marise; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Chorilli, Marlus; Giusti, Juçaíra Stella M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Fontana, Carla Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is increasingly being explored for treatment of periodontitis. Here, we investigated the effect of aPDT on human dental plaque bacteria in suspensions and biofilms in vitro using methylene blue (MB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles (MB-NP) and red light at 660 nm. The effect of MB-NP-based aPDT was also evaluated in a clinical pilot study with 10 adult human subjects with chronic periodontitis. Dental plaque samples from human subjects were exposed to aPDT—in planktonic and biofilm phases—with MB or MB-NP (25 µg/mL) at 20 J/cm2 in vitro. Patients were treated either with ultrasonic scaling and scaling and root planing (US + SRP) or ultrasonic scaling + SRP + aPDT with MB-NP (25 µg/mL and 20 J/cm2) in a split-mouth design. In biofilms, MB-NP eliminated approximately 25% more bacteria than free MB. The clinical study demonstrated the safety of aPDT. Both groups showed similar improvements of clinical parameters one month following treatments. However, at three months ultrasonic SRP + aPDT showed a greater effect (28.82%) on gingival bleeding index (GBI) compared to ultrasonic SRP. The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with MB may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial periodontal treatment. PMID:27213356

  9. Efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as an adjuvant in periodontal treatment in Down syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Martins, Fabiana; Simões, Alyne; Oliveira, Marcio; Luiz, Ana Claudia; Gallottini, Marina; Pannuti, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) has characteristics that include mental retardation, a characteristic phenotype, congenital heart defects, immune disorders, and increased risk of periodontal disease (PD). Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is the combined use of photosensitizers associated with low-level laser (LLL) and oxygen, leading to singlet oxygen formation, which contributes to the antibacterial activity of the phagocytes, killing bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aPDT as an adjuvant to conventional periodontal treatment of PD in DS patients. A double-blinded, controlled, randomized, split-mouth study was conducted. A total of 13 DS subjects who were 18 years or older and who presented at least one tooth in each quadrant of the mouth with probing pocket depth (PPD) equal to or greater than 5 mm were included. The patients were evaluated at three different times: at the baseline, PPD were obtained. After 1 week, conventional scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed, and two randomly selected quadrants also received aPDT. One month after SRP, all the patients were reevaluated. Periodontal conditions were improved among all the participants. The PDT-with-SRP group presented a nonsignificant reduction in PPD (mean = 1.27 mm, median = 1.17 mm) relative to that of the SRP group (mean = 1.00 mm, median = 0.95 mm). Changes over time were compared using the Wilcoxon test. A significant reduction in median PPD was observed in both groups (p = 0.001). Both types of periodontal treatment, with and without PDT, were similarly effective and were associated with good clinical response.

  10. Differential diagnosis and treatment planning for the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R G; Sinclair, P M; Goates, L J

    1986-02-01

    Increasing numbers of adult patients are seeking orthodontic care and some, despite significant skeletal malocclusions, elect not to have combined orthodontic-surgical treatment. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the diagnostic and therapeutic principles that can be used in the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient. The importance of realistic goal setting in the face of compromised occlusions is emphasized. Diagnosis should include evaluation of all three dimensions and recognize the limitations of therapy in each dimension for the nongrowing patient. Periodontal considerations, extraction decisions, and retention regimens are of vital importance to the achievement and maintenance of an optimum result. Clinical records will demonstrate four commonly seen problems and their resolution.

  11. Chronic stress enhances progression of periodontitis via α1-adrenergic signaling: a potential target for periodontal disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan

    2014-10-17

    This study assessed the roles of chronic stress (CS) in the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and explored the underlying mechanisms of periodontitis. Using an animal model of periodontitis and CS, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the protein levels of the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were assessed. Furthermore, human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic the process of inflammation. The proliferation of the HPDLFs and the expression of α1-AR and β2-AR were assessed. The inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected after pretreatment with the α1/β2-AR blockers phentolamine/propranolol, both in vitro and in vivo. Results show that periodontitis under CS conditions enhanced the expression of TH, α1-AR and β2-AR. Phentolamine significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore, we observed a marked decrease in HPDLF proliferation and the increased expression of α1-ARfollowing LPS pretreatment. Pretreatment with phentolamine dramatically ameliorated LPS-inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, the blocking of α1-ARsignaling also hindered the upregulation of the inflammatory-related cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. These results suggest that CS can significantly enhance the pathological progression of periodontitis by an α1-adrenergic signaling-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in those patients suffering from concurrent CS.

  12. Indications for laser therapy in diverse models of periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Erina, Stanislava V.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Lepechina, L. I.; Malinovskaya, L. A.; Chitrina, L. L.

    1996-11-01

    Parodontal diseases have an immunological pathogenic mechanism leading to various manifestations and can not be referred to as a common inflammation. The home and foreign research points at active and immunological reaction with the following distraction surrounding tissues of the tooth. Histochemical and biochemical examinations show metabolic disturbances of parodontal tissues. A total sample size of 604 people suffering from average height of chronic generalized parodontitis was examined in the survey. Immunological and histochemical tests were taken before and after a course of laser therapy with the use of helium-neon laser 'YAGODA', an inhibitory and stimulating dosage irradiations and anti-inflammatory dosage irradiations with infrared laser 'UZOR'. We selected a group of patients with the decreased local immunological status on the ground of immunological tests. Histochemical tests shaped the next group with the passive and active forms of parodontitis pathology. The tests data resulted in a method of laser therapy. The investigations confirm that the chronic generalized parodontitis has a shift in tissue immunity of the oral cavity and cell-bound metabolic disturbance of gum epithelium. It is expedient to use the anti-inflammatory dosage irradiations with infrared laser 'UZOR' to correct immunity, and in case of and active process to realize the DNA and RNA synthesis by means of increasing the irradiation with the apparatus 'YAGODA'. The irradiation decreases in case of a passive process.

  13. Diagnosis, nonsurgical management, and prevention of LVAD thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kern, John A

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) thrombosis is a life-threatening complication. Multiple case reports describe successful nonsurgical management with thrombolytics, aggressive antiplatelet therapy, or percutaneous catheter-directed thrombectomy. However, consensus management of LVAD thrombosis has not been established and guidelines are urgently needed. In order to raise awareness of nonsurgical treatment options, we review the current strategies for the clinical diagnosis, management, and prevention of LVAD thrombosis.

  14. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy minimizes the deleterious effect of nicotine in female rats with induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Erivan Clementino; Theodoro, Letícia Helena; Longo, Mariellén; Novaes, Vivian Cristina Noronha; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; Ervolino, Edilson; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of experimentally induced periodontitis in female rats that were systemically treated with or without nicotine. Female rats (n = 180) were divided into two groups: vehicle administration (Veh) and nicotine administration (Nic). Mini-pumps containing either vehicle or nicotine were implanted in the rats 30 days before the induction of experimental periodontitis (EP). EP was induced by placing a cotton ligature around the left mandibular first molar. After 7 days, the ligature was removed, and the rats were randomly divided into three treatment subgroups: SRP (only SRP), DL (SRP plus diode laser), and aPDT (SRP plus aPDT). The aPDT consisted of phenothiazine photosensitizer deposition followed by diode laser irradiation. Ten rats from each subgroup were euthanized at 7, 15, and 30 days after treatment. Alveolar bone loss (ABL) in the furcation region was evaluated using histological, histometric, and immunohistochemical analyses. The rats that were treated with nicotine showed more ABL compared to those treated with vehicle. In both the Veh and Nic groups, SRP plus aPDT treatment resulted in reduced ABL, smaller numbers of both TRAP- and RANKL-positive cells, and higher numbers of PCNA-positive cells compared to SRP treatment alone. aPDT was an effective adjunctive therapy for the treatment of periodontitis in female rats regardless of whether they received nicotine.

  15. Periodontal materials.

    PubMed

    Darby, I

    2011-06-01

    Periodontics is more associated with debridement of periodontal pockets and not generally thought of as using dental materials in the treatment of patients. However, the last 30 years have seen the development of materials used in regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease, guided tissue regeneration, and the use of these materials in bone regeneration more recently, guided bone regeneration. The materials used include bone grafts and membranes, but also growth factors and cells-based therapies. This review provides an overview of the materials currently used and looks at contemporary research with a view to what may be used in the future. It also looks at the clinical effectiveness of these regenerative therapies with an emphasis on what is available in Australia.

  16. Nonsurgical Management of Midsubstance Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Luedke, Lace; Clewley, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most common lower leg conditions. Most patients can recover with nonsurgical treatment that focuses on tendon loading exercises and, when necessary, symptom modulating treatments such as topical, oral, or injected medication, ice, shoe inserts, manual therapy, stretching, taping, or low-level laser. If unresponsive to initial management, a small percentage of patients may consider shockwave or sclerosing treatment and possibly surgery.

  17. A Review of the Nonsurgical Treatment of Oral Leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Adriana Spinola; Salles, Patrícia Ribeiro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the nonsurgical treatment of oral leukoplakia (OL). A medline search from 1983 to 2009 was conducted. The topical or systemic nonsurgical treatments or combination of both was reviewed. The primary outcomes of interest were clinical resolution, malignant transformation, follow-up, and recurrence of OL. Studies showed a rate higher than 50% of clinical resolution with photodynamic therapy, beta-carotene, lycopene, or vitamin A. Few studies reported rates of recurrence from 5 to 67% and of malignant transformation from 8 to 23%. There is a lack of randomized clinical trials that assess the effectiveness of nonsurgical treatment of OL. At this time, randomized controlled trials for nonsurgical treatment of OL demonstrate no evidence of effective treatment in preventing malignant transformation and recurrence. It reinforces that even after clinical resolution, OL should be regularly followed. PMID:20339486

  18. Nonsurgical Interventions for Peyronie's Disease: Update as of 2016

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a debilitating condition of the penis that leads to significant pain, erectile dysfunction, and emotional distress in men. PD is likely underreported due to lack of knowledge of the disease and the absence of well-established available treatments. Surgical treatment can lead to sustained improvements, but is often associated with penile shortening and places the patient at risk for perioperative morbidity. Nonsurgical management has been studied for several years as an alternative to surgery for men with PD. Currently, much of the data on nonsurgical management is conflicting, with only one treatment that has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Significant effort has been devoted to advancing non-surgical treatments for PD that can be implemented outside of the operating room. This review aims to describe the research behind current nonsurgical therapies for PD and to highlight the recent advances that have been made within the last three years. PMID:27574590

  19. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  20. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Untreated periodontal disease leads to tooth loss through destruction of the attachment apparatus and tooth-supporting structures. The goals of periodontal therapy include not only the arrest of periodontal disease progression,but also the regeneration of structures lost to disease where appropriate. Conventional surgical approaches (e.g., flap debridement) continue to offer time-tested and reliable methods to access root surfaces,reduce periodontal pockets, and attain improved periodontal form/architecture. However, these techniques offer only limited potential towards recovering tissues destroyed during earlier disease phases. Recently, surgical procedures aimed at greater and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues and functional attachment close to their original level have been developed, analyzed, and employed in clinical practice. This paper provides a review of the current understanding of the mechanisms, cells, and factors required for regeneration of the periodontium and of procedures used to restore periodontal tissues around natural teeth. Targeted audiences for this paper are periodontists and/or researchers with an interest in improving the predictability of regenerative procedures. This paper replaces the version published in 1993.

  1. The evaluation of chorionic membrane in guided tissue regeneration for periodontal pocket therapy: a clinical and radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Kothiwale, Shaila V

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal regenerative therapy is aimed at reconstruction and to restore the architecture and function of lost or injured tissues. Melcher (J Periodontol 47(5):256-260, 1976) introduced the concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) for osseous reconstructive surgery. The aim of the present innovative clinical and radiographic study was to evaluate the effect of chorionic membrane (CM) in GTR in periodontal pocket therapy. Ten patients with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected in the single blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with periodontal pocket therapy along with CM in study sites and the control sites were treated with periodontal pocket therapy alone. The clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 12 months. The radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Clinical parameters included gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket probing depth (PPD) and relative attachment level (RAL). Digital images were analysed for bone gain (BG) and density. Data were evaluated using t test. Statistical significant differences were found in both sites at 12 months for GI, PI, PPD and RAL. Highly significant reduction was seen in GI 0.40 ± 0.08 (p = 0.0001), PI (0.41 ± 0.18), PPD 2.50 ± 0.53 mm (p = 0.0431) and increased BG 0.86 ± 0.18 (p < 0.0001) were observed in study sites. This shows that CM when used with pocket therapy can have influence on clinical parameters. Radiographic findings from this study demonstrated significant BG and density in sites treated with CM as compared to control sites.

  2. A histological evaluation of a low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Radmila; Kesić, Ljiljana; Mihailović, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan; Jovanović, Goran; Petrović, Aleksandar; Peševska, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. DM has a strong influence on the oral cavity and represents a risk factor for gingivitis and periodontitis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proven effective in the reduction of inflammation and swelling. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT in diabetic periodontitis through histological analysis. A total of 300 diabetics with chronic periodontal disease and teeth indicated for extraction were assigned into six equal groups. In the groups 1 and 4, indicated teeth were extracted before treatment, and in the rest of the groups upon completion of the entire treatment. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and full-mouth conservative periodontal treatment. In groups 3 and 6, LLLT was applied (670 nm, 5 mW, 2 J/cm(2), 16 min, 5 days). Histologic findings of gingival tissue treated with LLLT showed expressed healing, as is evident by the absence of inflammatory cells. Tissue edema could not be seen, and the number of blood vessels was reduced. In the gingival lamina, propria pronounced collagenization and homogenization were present. It can be concluded that LLLT has shown efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis in diabetics. Because of more pronounced alterations of periodontium in diabetics, the use of LLLT is of particular importance.

  3. Commentary: Is There Clinical Benefit From Using a Diode or Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Laser in the Treatment of Periodontitis?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Charles M

    2016-10-01

    Despite a quarter of a century of laser research, there is a persistent debate regarding the efficacy of dental lasers in the treatment of periodontitis or periodontal maintenance therapy. There are many claims and much hyperbole surrounding the use of lasers, either as a monotherapy or adjunctive to scaling and root planing, to treat periodontitis. There is little evidence that using a diode or neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser adds clinical value over and above conventional non-surgical or surgical periodontal treatment. There is a significant need for better designed human clinical trials. Data from such trials should be analyzed according to initial probing depth and characteristics of the treated sites, such as non-molar, molar flat surfaces, and molar furcations, and evaluated for long-term post-treatment results.

  4. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Srividya

    2016-01-01

    As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as “erratic healing,” may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications. PMID:27807485

  5. The Effect of Periodontitis on Expression of Interleukin-21: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mootha, Archana; Malaiappan, Sankari; Jayakumar, N. D.; Varghese, Sheeja S.; Toby Thomas, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Inflammation and tissue breakdown are led by an array of inflammatory destructive mediators associated with initiation and progression of inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Current evidence shows that these inflammatory mediators have a definitive role in the pathogenesis of various systemic diseases with an inflammatory component. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) has been associated with systemic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease that follow a chronic inflammatory cascade. Similarly recent studies have associated Interleukin-21 levels with periodontitis. This systematic review was aimed to assess the levels of IL-21 in subjects with periodontitis. Methods. A complete literature search was done in PubMed, Medline, Science Direct, and Cochrane databases and Google Scholar based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Six relevant articles were procured. Full text was read individually by two reviewers and data extraction was done based on STROBE statement. Results. After data extraction five observational and one interventional study were obtained. All the studies showed an increased expression of IL-21 in periodontitis and the interventional study showed reduction in IL-21 levels after nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSP). Conclusion. Interleukin-21 levels are higher in periodontitis than controls. With this limited evidence further longitudinal studies are required to consider this as a definitive inflammatory marker. PMID:26998377

  6. Azithromycin buccal patch in treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Sajith Abdul; Vandana, K. L.; Thimmashetty, J.; Dalvi, Priyanka Jairaj

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to explore the clinical, microbiological, and biochemical impact of azithromycin (AZM) buccal patch in chronic generalized patients as a monotherapy as well as an adjunct to nonsurgical therapy. Materials and Methods: A parallel design was used forty periodontitis patients were randomly allocated into five groups, namely Group 1 scaling root planing (SRP) alone, Group 2 (SRP + AZM patch group), Group 3 (SRP + AZM tablet group), Group 4 (AZM patch monotherapy), and Group 5 (AZM tablet as monotherapy). Plaque index, gingival bleeding index, modified gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline and 21 and 90 days. Subgingival pooled plaque sample was collected to assess periodontopathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) by anaerobic culture method. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was also evaluated at baseline and 21 days. Periodontal maintenance was performed in Group 1 until 90th day, and clinical parameter was assessed at the end of 90th day. Results: SRP + AZM tablets showed greater reduction in clinical parameters (P < 0.05) AZM as monotherapy did not offer clinical benefits over SRP. Baseline data were compared at the end, i.e., 90th day a significant reduction in plaque scores, gingival bleeding, and PPD was observed however no significant gain in the clinical attachment was observed. Conclusion: The monotherapy resulted in no improvement of periodontal parameters, microbial parameters, and TNF-α level. It is safe to use AZM + SRP as a mode of nonsurgical treatment in periodontitis patients. PMID:27127325

  7. Effect of the lasers used in periodontal therapy on the surfaces of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Mükerrem; Barutcigil, Çağatay; Harorlı, Osman Tolga; Ulug, Bülent

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to reveal potential damage of the lasers, which are used as an alternative to manual instruments in periodontal therapy, might cause to the surface of restorative materials. Four different restorative materials were used: a glass-ionomer cement (GIC), a flowable composite (FC), a universal composite (UC) and an amalgam. Ten cylindrical samples (8 mm × 2 mm) were prepared for each restorative material. Two laser systems were used in subgingival curettage mode; an 940 nm diode laser (Epic Biolase, Irvine, CA) and an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase iPlus, Biolase, Irvine, CA). After laser irradiation, roughness of the sample surfaces was measured using a profilometer. Additionally, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformations of the restorative materials and surfaces. The laser irradiation did not affect the surface roughness of any restorative materials relative to that of the control group (p > 0.05) except for the Er,Cr:YSGG treatment on GIC (p < 0.05). SEM and AFM images verified the results of the surface roughness tests. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that Er,Cr:YSGG and diode lasers, aside from the Er;Cr:YSGG treatment on GIC, caused no harmful surface effects on adjacent restorative materials. SCANNING 38:227-233, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Results From the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) Study: A Pilot Multicentered, Randomized, Controlled Trial to Study Effects of Periodontal Therapy in a Secondary Prevention Model of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D.; Moss, Kevin; Mendoza, Luisito; Paquette, David W.; Barrow, David A.; Couper, David J.; Stewart, Dawn D.; Falkner, Karen L.; Graham, Susan P.; Grossi, Sara; Gunsolley, John C.; Madden, Theresa; Maupome, Gerardo; Trevisan, Maurizio; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background In the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study, periodontal therapy was provided as an intervention in a secondary cardiac event prevention model through five coordinated cardiac– dental centers. Methods Subjects were randomized to either community care or protocol provided scaling and root planing to evaluate effects on periodontal status and systemic levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Results After 6 months, there was a significant reduction in mean probing depth and extent of 4- or 5-mm pockets. However, there were no significant differences in attachment levels, bleeding upon probing, or extent of subgingival calculus comparing subjects assigned to protocol therapy (n = 151) to those assigned to community care (n = 152). Using intent-to-treat analyses, there was no significant effect on serum hs-CRP levels at 6 months. However, 48% of the subjects randomized to community care received preventive or periodontal treatments. Secondary analyses demonstrated that consideration of any preventive or periodontal care (i.e., any treatment) compared to no treatment showed a significant reduction in the percentage of people with elevated hs-CRP (values >3 mg/l) at 6 months. However, obesity nullified the periodontal treatment effects on hs-CRP reduction. The adjusted odds ratio for hs-CRP levels >3 mg/l at 6 months for any treatment versus no treatment among non-obese individuals was 0.26 (95%confidence interval: 0.09 to 0.72), adjusting for smoking, marital status, and gender. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the critical role of considering obesity as well as rigorous preventive and periodontal care in trials designed to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:19186958

  9. Peripheral blood neutrophil cytokine hyper-reactivity in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Martin R; Chapple, Iain L C; Matthews, John B

    2015-10-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine release (IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) by peripheral blood neutrophils, isolated from periodontitis patients (before/after therapy) and matched controls, was determined after 18 h culture in the presence/absence of Escherichia coli LPS, opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, heat-killed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All cultures demonstrated differences in the amounts of each cytokine detected (P < 0.0001), with a clear release pattern (IL-8 > IL-6 > TNF-α = IL-1β). Median cytokine release from unstimulated patient neutrophils was consistently, but non-significantly, higher than from control cells. Stimulated cytokine release from untreated patient neutrophils was also consistently higher than from control cells. This hyper-reactivity was significant for all tested cytokines when data for all stimuli were combined (P < 0.016). In terms of individual stimuli, significant hyper-reactivity was detected with LPS (IL-8), F. nucleatum (IL-8, TNF-α), opsonised S. aureus (IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β) and P. gingivalis (IL-8, IL-1β). Cytokine production by patient neutrophils did not reduce following successful non-surgical periodontal therapy and, except for responses to F. nucleatum, the cytokine hyper-reactivity detected pre-therapy was retained. These data demonstrate that chronic periodontitis is characterised by neutrophils that constitutively exhibit cytokine hyper-reactivity, the effects of which could modulate local and systemic inflammatory-immune responses and influence the risk and severity of periodontitis-associated systemic inflammatory diseases.

  10. The use of autologous growth factors in periodontal surgical therapy: platelet gel biotechnology--case reports.

    PubMed

    de Obarrio, J J; Araúz-Dutari, J I; Chamberlain, T M; Croston, A

    2000-10-01

    The role of polypeptide growth factors in periodontal regeneration has been documented through animal and human studies. Human platelets contain platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in their alpha granules. PDGF has been shown to play a role in periodontal regeneration. It has been demonstrated that TGF-beta has a very potent effect on cells associated with bone. The case reports presented demonstrate a new biotechnology in which platelet gel is used in combination with demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts for the treatment of periodontal osseous defects. The treated teeth presented with severe bone loss and a guarded prognosis. Platelet gel biotechnology was used as a novel treatment modality. A significant reduction in probing depths was noted, and radiographically significant amounts of new bone were visible as early as 2 months postoperative. Results up to 2 years postoperative are presented.

  11. Prognostic factors in periodontal therapy and their association with treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Andreas L; Kotsakis, Georgios A; Hinrichs, James E

    2014-01-01

    During the incipient steps of periodontal treatment, clinicians are usually asked to predict the prognosis of teeth with compromised periodontium. The aim of this literature review was to investigate the association between periodontal Prognosis, Tooth Loss and risk indicators, such as smoking and genetics. Results showed that the definition of good prognosis has much higher predictability than the one for questionable prognosis. Several risk indicators for periodontal prognosis and tooth loss are discussed as well as different definitions of questionable prognosis and their success in predicting tooth loss. In conclusion, the major focus of future studies should be to construct simplified prognostic models with high predictability that will increase the confidence of dentists and periodontists when assigning teeth prognosis. PMID:25516855

  12. Management of Chronic Periodontitis Using Chlorhexidine Chip and Diode Laser-A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ambooken, Majo; Mathew, Jayan Jacob; Issac, Annie Valayil; Kunju, Ajithkumar Parachalil; Parameshwaran, Renjith Athirkandathil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of adjuncts like chlorhexidine local delivery and diode laser decontamination have been found to improve the clinical outcomes of scaling and root planing in non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Aim To evaluate the effects of diode laser and chlorhexidine chip as adjuncts to scaling and root planing in the management of chronic periodontitis. The objective is to evaluate the outcome of chlorhexidine chip and diode laser as adjuncts to scaling and root planing on clinical parameters like Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Study and Design Department of Periodontics. Randomized clinical trial with split mouth design. Materials and Methods Fifteen chronic periodontitis patients having a probing pocket depth of 5mm-7mm on at least one interproximal site in each quadrant of the mouth were included in the study. After initial treatment, four sites in each patient were randomly subjected to scaling and root planing (control), chlorhexidine chip application (CHX chip group), diode laser (810 nm) decontamination (Diode laser group) or combination of both (Diode laser and chip group). Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline, one month and three months. Statistical analysis Results were statistically analysed using paired T test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD test and repeated measure ANOVA. Results Post-treatment, the test and control sites showed a statistically significant reduction in PI, GI, PPD, and CAL. After three months, a mean PPD reduction of 1.47±0.52 mm in control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67±0.62 mm in CHX group, and 2.80± 0.77 mm in combination group was seen. The mean gain in CAL were 1.47±0.52 mm in the control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67± 0.49 mm in CHX group and 2.67± 0.82 mm in combination group respectively. The

  13. Physiological features of periodontal regeneration and approaches for periodontal tissue engineering utilizing periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Bruno Braga; Silvério, Karina Gonzales; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Enílson Antônio; Nociti, Francisco Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the potential of periodontal regeneration seems to be limited by the regenerative capacity of the cells involved. The regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues is mediated by various periodontal cells and is regulated by a vast array of extracellular matrix informational molecules that induce both selective and nonselective responses in different cell lineages and their precursors. In this paper, we first review periodontal ligament tissue and its different cell subpopulations including fibroblasts and paravascular stem cells, and their functions during the development and homeostasis of periodontal tissues. Because conventional periodontal regeneration methods remain insufficient to obtain a complete and reliable periodontal regeneration, the concept of periodontal tissue engineering has been based on the generation of the conditions necessary to improve the healing of periodontal tissues. Additionally, the potential of periodontal ligament cells for use in periodontal tissue engineering to overcome the limitations of conventional periodontal regenerative therapies is discussed, followed by an update of the recent progress and future directions of research utilizing periodontal ligament cells for predictable periodontal regeneration.

  14. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  15. Nonsurgical management of idiopathic clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kenneth J; Richards, B Stephens

    2003-01-01

    Because nonsurgical management was thought not to yield adequate correction and a durable result, most children with idiopathic clubfoot have undergone surgery with extensive posteromedial and lateral release. However, surgical management caused residual deformity, stiffness, and pain in some children; thus, the favorable long-term results with the Ponseti and French methods of nonsurgical management have garnered interest. The Ponseti method consists of manipulation and casting of idiopathic clubfeet; the French method consists of physiotherapy, taping, and continuous passive motion. Careful evaluation of the techniques and results of these two approaches may increase their use and decrease or minimize the use of surgical management and thus the associated morbidity resulting from extensile releases.

  16. Local adjunct effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetics: split-mouth double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Castro Dos Santos, Nídia Cristina; Andere, Naira Maria Rebelatto Bechara; Araujo, Cássia Fernandes; de Marco, Andrea Carvalho; Dos Santos, Lúcio Murilo; Jardini, Maria Aparecida Neves; Santamaria, Mauro Pedrine

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes has become a global epidemic. Its complications can have a significant impact on quality of life, longevity, and public health costs. The presence of diabetes might impair the prognosis of periodontal treatments due to its negative influence on wound healing. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a local approach that can promote bacterial decontamination in periodontal pockets. The aim of this study was to investigate the local effect of adjunct aPDT to ultrasonic periodontal debridement (UPD) and compare it to UD only for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Twenty type 2 diabetic patients with moderate to severe generalized chronic periodontitis were selected. Two periodontal pockets with probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥5 mm received UPD only (UPD group) or UPD plus adjunct aPDT (UPD + aPDT group). Periodontal clinical measures were collected and compared at baseline and 30, 90, and 180 days. After 180 days of follow-up, there were statistically significant reductions in PD from 5.75 ± 0.91 to 3.47 ± 0.97 mm in the UPD group and from 6.15 ± 1.27 to 3.71 ± 1.63 mm in the UPD + aPDT group. However, intergroup analysis did not reveal statistically significant differences in any of the evaluated clinical parameters (p > 0.05). The adjunct application of aPDT to UPD did not present additional benefits for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. The ClinicalTrials.gov identifier of the present study is NCT02627534.

  17. Elevated levels of collagen cross-link residues in gingival tissues and crevicular fluid of teeth with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Søren; Springer, Ingo N G; Buschmann, Andreas; Hedderich, Jürgen; Açil, Yahya

    2003-06-01

    Lysylpyridinoline (LP) and hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) are collagen cross-link residues. Lysylpyridinoline is present in most tissues, whereas LP is present mainly in mineralized tissue. Both are elevated in tissue with increased collagen resorption. The purpose of this investigation was to assess if the concentrations of LP and HP are elevated in gingiva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of teeth with advanced periodontitis (AP). We investigated human gingival biopsies of healthy teeth (n = 19) and teeth with AP (n = 43) in 49 individuals. Samples of GCF from 54 teeth with AP were collected in seven patients and compared with samples from 11 patients with experimentally induced gingivitis. Levels of LP and HP were measured by HPLC and fluorescence detection. Gingival concentrations of HP but not LP around teeth with advanced periodontitis were significantly elevated compared with teeth with healthy periodontium. While significant amounts of HP and LP were measurable in the GCF of teeth with AP, no HP and LP was identified 3 months following non-surgical periodontal therapy of the teeth or in fluid from teeth subjected to experimentally induced gingivitis. Elevated concentrations of HP and LP in GCF may serve as indicators of ongoing destruction of periodontal tissues and alveolar bone in advanced periodontitis.

  18. Periodontal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Small Text Medium Text Large Text Periodontal Diseases Periodontal diseases are disorders of the gums, or gingiva, and other tissues around the teeth. Periodontal diseases vary in severity, from the reversible, recurring mild ...

  19. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  20. Local application of hyaluronan gel in conjunction with periodontal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Dahaba, Moushira A; Aboul-Ela, Shadw; Darhous, Mona S

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid application has been proven to be beneficial in a number of medical disciplines. The aim of the current study was to clinically evaluate the effect of local application of hyaluronan gel in conjunction with periodontal surgery. Fourteen patients with chronic periodontitis having four interproximal intrabony defects (≥3 mm) with probing depth values >5 mm were included in this split-mouth study. Following initial nonsurgical periodontal therapy and re-evaluation, defects were randomly assigned to be treated with modified Widman flap (MWF) surgery in conjunction with either 0.8% hyaluronan gel (test) or placebo gel (control) application. Clinical attachment level (CAL), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), plaque index (PI), and bleeding on probing (BOP) values were taken at baseline and 3 and 6 months. Differences between test and control sites were evaluated using a Wilcoxon signed-rank and a McNemar test. A Friedman and a Cochran test were used to test equal ranks over time. Statistically significant differences were noted for CAL and GR (P < 0.05) in favor of the test sites. No significant differences were found regarding PD, BOP, or PI values (P > 0.05). Hyaluronan gel application in conjunction with periodontal surgery appears to result in significant improvement of CAL and in a reduction in GR. Hyaluronan gel application appears to improve the clinical outcome of MWF surgery.

  1. Evaluation of clinical and metabolic changes after non surgical periodontal treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A clinico biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Praveen; Tabasum, Syeda Tawkhira; Garg, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical and metabolic changes following nonsurgical periodontal therapy of type-2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen nondiabetics and fifteen type-2 diabetics with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected after meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Periodontal pocket probing was performed using a Williams graduated periodontal probe and comparisons of the clinical and biochemical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, glycated hemoglobin, and lipid profile (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein) were done between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. Results: A correlation was observed between clinical and biochemical parameters between and within two groups at baseline and 3 month. The P value of diabetic group was<0.001 in all clinical parameters (plaque index PI, Gingival index GI, and Probing Pocket Depth PPD) in diabetic and nondiabetic group, showed statistically highly significant difference in GI, PI, PPD, <.01 in Glycated Hemoglobulin (HbAlc1) in test group and<0.05 in control group showed statistically significant difference. The P value of test group was >0.05 in Lipid profile (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, serum triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein) that showed no significant difference and in control group<0.05 in total Cholesterol, high density lipoprotein and <0.01 in Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, respectively, showed statistically significant in Total cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein, Very Low Density Lipoprotein, and Serum Triglyceride, not significant in high density lipoprotein. The P value >0.05 showed no statistical significance of correlation between the test and control groups. Conclusion: Both groups of patients showed an improvement in clinical and metabolic

  2. Comparative study of two collagen membranes for guided tissue regeneration therapy in periodontal intrabony defects: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of guided tissue regeneration therapy for human periodontal intrabony defects using two different collagen membranes: a porous nonchemical cross-linking collagen membrane (NC) and a bilayer collagen membrane (BC). Methods Thirty subjects were randomly assigned and divided into the following 3 groups: a test group (NC+BM), in which a NC was used with xenograft bone mineral (BM), a positive control group (BC+BM), in which a BC was used with xenograft BM, and a negative control group (BM), in which only xenograft BM was used. The following clinical measurements were taken at baseline and 3 months after surgery: plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level. Radiographic analysis was performed at baseline, 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Results Membrane exposure was not observed in any cases. Significant probing depth reduction, attachment-level gain and bone fill were observed for both test and control groups compared to baseline at 3 months after surgery (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in clinical improvement and radiographic bone fill between treatment protocols (P>0.05). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that both NC and BC were comparable in terms of clinical and radiographic outcomes for the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects in human subjects. Graphical Abstract PMID:25177521

  3. Position paper: sonic and ultrasonic scalers in periodontics. Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Drisko, C L; Cochran, D L; Blieden, T; Bouwsma, O J; Cohen, R E; Damoulis, P; Fine, J B; Greenstein, G; Hinrichs, J; Somerman, M J; Iacono, V; Genco, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ultrasonic and sonic scalers appear to attain similar results as hand instruments for removing plaque, calculus, and endotoxin. Ultrasonic scalers used at medium power seem to produce less root surface damage than hand or sonic scalers. Due to instrument width, furcations may be more accessible using ultrasonic or sonic scalers than manual scalers. It is not clear whether root surface roughness is more or less pronounced following power-driven scalers or manual scalers. It is also unclear if root surface roughness affects long-term wound healing. Periodontal scaling and root planing includes thorough calculus removal, but complete cementum removal should not be a goal of periodontal therapy. Studies have established that endotoxin is weakly adsorbed to the root surface, and can be easily removed with light, overlapping strokes with an ultrasonic scaler. A significant disadvantage of power-driven scalers is the production of contaminated aerosols. Because ultrasonics and sonics produce aerosols, additional care is required to achieve and maintain good infection control when incorporating these instrumentation techniques into dental practice. Preliminary evidence suggests that the addition of certain antimicrobials to the lavage during ultrasonic instrumentation may be of minimal clinical benefit. However, more randomized controlled clinical trials need to be conducted over longer periods of time to better understand the long-term benefits of ultrasonic and sonic debridement.

  4. A Novel Surgical Procedure for Er:YAG Laser-Assisted Periodontal Regenerative Therapy: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Sakai, Kazuto; Mizutani, Koji; Meinzer, Walter; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an Er:YAG laser (ErL) application for periodontal regenerative surgery in angular bone defects at nine sites in six patients. Debridement was thoroughly performed using a combination of curettage with a Gracey-type curette and ErL irradiation at a panel setting of 70 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz with sterile saline spray. After applying an enamel matrix derivative and autogenous bone grafting, ErL was used to form a blood clot coagulation on the grafted bone surface at 50 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz without water spray for approximately 30 seconds. Twelve months after surgery the mean probing depth had improved from 6.2 mm to 2.0 mm, the mean clinical attachment level had reduced from 7.5 mm to 3.4 mm, and bleeding on probing had improved from (+) to (-). Mean intrabony defect depth decreased from 6.0 mm before surgery to 1.0 mm 12 months after surgery. A novel procedure for periodontal regenerative surgery applying ErL irradiation for thorough decontamination during debridement as well as blood coagulation following autogenous bone grafting seems to have achieved favorable and stable healing of periodontal pockets with significant clinical improvement and desirable regeneration of angular bone defects, including one-wall defects.

  5. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  6. Therapy and treatment with a high-energy laser in case of a periodontal disease treatment instead of physiotherapy or low-level laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerger, Friedhelm R.

    1996-12-01

    Since intensive efforts ofprophylaxis including fluoridisation, better oral hygiene, eating ofless sugar containing foods, reduced the risk ofcaries and the problems ofcaries lesions significantly. But, especially beginning at the age of3O years more than 80 % ofthe population in almost every nation shows signs of periodontal defects. This you can call an epidemic disease. Because people get older and expect a lot concerning their outlook, their esthetic, their phonetic, they have great expectations towards their natural dentition and keep their own teeth. This is a great challenge to periodontal prophylaxis and periodontal therapy. According to the progress ofthe disease different therapies are indicated. Starting with oral hygiene instructions to establish better oral hygiene with all the modem technologies ofmicrobiological investigations, pharmaceutical therapy, physiotherapy, low level laser treatment, periodontal-surgery, like curettage, deepscaling and rootplaning but also more sophisticated teatmentplans with gingivoplasty, gingivectomy, flap-procedures and mucogingival surgeiy including bone fillings, regenerativ technics the whole spectrum oftreatment options has widely expanded during the last years.

  7. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  8. Vital Pulp Therapy of a Mature Molar with Concurrent Hyperplastic Pulpitis, Internal Root Resorption and Periradicular Periodontitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Kemal Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) of permanent mature teeth is continuously ascertaining to be a more reliable endodontic treatment. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful VPT of a mature mandibular left first molar with concurrent hyperplastic pulpitis, internal root resorption and periradicular periodontitis in a 35-year-old male patient. After complete caries removal and access cavity preparation, the dental pulp was removed from the coronal third of the roots. To protect the remaining pulp, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed and adapted into the cavities; the tooth was then restored with amalgam. Six months after VPT, radiographic examination showed evidence of periradicular healing. Clinically, the tooth was functional without signs and symptoms of infection/inflammation. The successful outcome of this case suggests that diseased dental pulp (i.e. irreversible pulpitis) has the potential to heal after pulp protection with CEM biocement. PMID:26523145

  9. Functional Haplotypes in Interleukin 4 Gene Associated with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Rossa, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) is an infectious inflammatory disease that affects tooth-supporting structures and in which dental plaque bacteria, immune mechanisms and genetic predisposition play important roles. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a key anti-inflammatory cytokine with relevant action in imbalances in inflamed periodontal tissue. Individuals carrying the TCI/CCI genotype (S-haplotype) of the IL-4 gene are 5 times more susceptible to CP, whereas the CTI/TTD genotype (P-haplotype) confers protection against CP. Compared with the S-haplotype, subjects with the P-haplotype produce higher levels of the IL-4 protein after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the functionality of IL-4 haplotypes in immune cells to obtain insight into the influence of these genetic variations in regulating immune responses to CP-associated bacteria. Peripheral blood was collected from 6 subjects carrying each haplotype, and their immune cells were challenged with periodontopathogens to compare responses of the different haplotypes with regard to gene expression, protein secretion and the immunophenotype of T helper responses. We found higher IL-4 mRNA and protein levels in the P-haplotype, which also presented higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, cells from S-haplotype subjects responded with higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. S-haplotype individuals exhibited significantly greater polarization toward the Th1 phenotype, whereas the P-haplotype was associated with an attenuated response to periodontopathogens, with suggestive skewing toward Th2/M2 phenotypes. In conclusion, IL-4 genetic variations associated with susceptibility to or protection against chronic periodontitis are directly associated with influencing the response of immune cells to periodontopathogens. PMID:28114408

  10. Effectiveness of Subgingival Irrigation as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gunupati, Sumanth; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Reddy, Bhumanapalli Venkata Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim Subgingival applications of various chemotherapeutic agents have been used as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal treatment and preventive periodontal therapy. Their use in regular clinical practice, however, is less, perhaps due to concerns about clinical success or probably due to a lack of knowledge of their effectiveness or cost. The aim of this systematic review is to obtain overall quantitative estimate of effectiveness of subgingival irrigation (SI) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods A literature search of electronic database was performed for articles published through December 31, 2014, followed by manual search of dental journals. Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) assessing the effect of SI as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis evaluated by changes in the clinical and microbiological outcomes were included. Results This literature search yielded only two randomized, placebo-controlled studies that evaluated the efficacy of SI as an adjunct to SRP in patients with chronic periodontitis. The studies were methodologically not perfect (in terms of mediocre quality) with a risk of bias to come to any final conclusions to be reached. These studies didn’t clearly mention about randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, dosage and formulation of irrigants, severity of periodontal disease, patient-centered outcomes and results data. Conclusion Due to insufficient evidence supporting the efficacy of SI as an adjunct to SRP in treating chronic periodontitis, more rigorous scientific research is required to assess the efficacy of SI as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:26393230

  11. Nonsurgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Parker, William P; Griebling, Tomas Lindor

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in elderly women with significant associated morbidity. Incontinence can by grouped into several types: stress incontinence, urgency incontinence, overflow incontinence, functional incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. Careful evaluation, including history and physical examination, is critical to making the correct diagnosis and guiding therapy. A variety of nonsurgical treatments, including behavioral therapies, pelvic floor muscle exercise, medications, and other treatments, are available; can be successful for many older women; and may preclude the need for surgery. Working closely with the patient, understanding her goals of care, and targeting treatments accordingly are essential for success.

  12. On the reliability of the holographic method for measurement of soft tissue modifications during periodontal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; de Sabata, Aldo; Rominu, Mihai; Ogodescu, Alexandru; Rusu, Darian

    2014-01-01

    Holographic evaluations count among recent measurement tools in orthodontics and prosthodontics. This research introduces holography as an assessment method of 3D variations of gingival retractions. The retraction of gingiva on frontal regions of 5 patients with periodontitis was measured in six points and was evaluated by holographic methods using a He-Ne laser device (1mV, Superlum, Carrigtwohill, Ireland) inside a holographic bank of 200 x 100cm. Impressions were taken during first visit and cast models were manufactured. Six months after the end of periodontal treatment, clinical measurements were repeated and the hologram of the first model was superimposed on a final model cast, by using reference points, while maintaining the optical geometric perimeters. The retractions were evaluated 3D in every point using a dedicated software (Sigma Scan Pro,Systat Software, SanJose, CA, USA). The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the mean recession changes between baseline and six months after treatment, and between values in vivo and the values on hologram. No statistically significant differences between values in vivo and on the hologram were found. In conclusion, holography provides a valuable tool for assessing gingival retractions on virtual models. The data can be stored, reproduced, transmitted and compared at a later time point with accuracy.

  13. Nonsurgical techniques to control massive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Zentai, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Spahn, Donat R; Rossaint, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Significant advancements in nonsurgical and surgical approaches to control bleeding in severely injured patients have also improved the treatment of critical trauma-related coagulopathy. Nonsurgical procedures such as angiographic embolization are progressively considered to terminate arterial bleeding from pelvic fractures. The disturbance of coagulation may aggravate bleeding and hamper surgical procedures. The administration of coagulation factors and factor concentrates may be useful for correcting systemic coagulopathy and reducing the need for fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell transfusions, which are associated with various adverse outcomes. In this review, nonsurgical management of critical trauma bleeding is discussed.

  14. Use of lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Bader, H I

    2000-10-01

    Although lasers have been used in periodontal therapy for 10 or more years, clinicians have barely begun to tap the enormous potential of this form of therapy. The relative lack of pain, ease of use, and site specificity of the laser make it an ideal addition to the periodontist's armamentarium. Applications now are being developed for a broader range of wavelengths that will offer useful, predictable, and comfortable therapy for managing the periodontal patient.

  15. Non-surgical management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Levy, A; Crowley, T; Gingell, C

    2000-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common and distressing medical condition that is now highly amenable to treatment almost irrespective of the cause. Safe, non-surgical treatments with unequivocal efficacy are psychological therapy, intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs, transurethral vasodilators and oral sildenafil, all of which have been reported to have a 50-70% overall response rate. Vacuum constriction devices are acceptable for some, usually older patients and oral yohimbine is thought to have marginal efficacy. Local creams to induce or enhance erectile function are currently being investigated. There is no place for androgen supplementation unless the patient is profoundly hypogonadal. Treatment of hyperprolactinaemia is very effective but is a rare cause of erectile dysfunction. As intercourse may entail an unfamiliar level of physical activity, it is sensible to ensure that the patient is able to climb a flight or two of stairs comfortably without provoking undue breathlessness or chest pain and to provide suitable advice about technique before commencing treatment. Once it is clear to the patients that erectile dysfunction can be satisfactorily overcome, the long-term use of treatments to do so tends to wane. Thus, although the prospect of effective treatment for what had been for many a distressing life sentence has the potential to place new demands on the health service, there is no evidence that restrictions on prescribing will prove economically rational.

  16. Periodontics--tissue engineering and the future.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Gordon L

    2005-03-01

    Periodontics has a long history of utilizing advances in science to expand and improve periodontal therapies. Recently the American Academy of Periodontology published the findings of the Contemporary Science Workshop, which conducted state-of-the-art evidence-based reviews of current and emerging areas in periodontics. The findings of this workshop provide the basis for an evidence-based approach to periodontal therapy. While the workshop evaluated all areas of periodontics, it is in the area of tissue engineering that the most exciting advances are becoming a reality.

  17. Clinical Effects of Subgingivally Delivered Spirulina Gel in Chronic Periodontitis Cases: A Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Mahendra, Little; Muthu, Jananni; John, Libby; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effects of Spirulina in-situ gel as an adjunct to Scaling And Root Planning (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis subjects. Material and Methods: 64 sites were selected with probing pocket depth of ≥5mm and they were divided into 2 groups; 33 sites were treated with SRP along with spirulina gel (Group A) and 31 sites were treated with SRP alone (Group B). Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline before SRP and at 120th day after the treatment therapy. The parameters included Probing Pocket Depth (PPD) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). Results: Both the groups showed significant improvement in the parameters. However, Group A (SRP along with spirulina) showed statistically significant decrease in mean probing pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level after 120 days as compared to Group B SRP alone. Conclusion: Locally delivered spirulina gel, along with scaling and root planning, has been shown to cause a beneficial impact. The efficacy of the product as a local drug delivery system in the non-surgical treatment of periodontitis without any side effects has been proved. Spirulina appears to be promising. It exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects which are closely connected with its antioxidative activity. This study can have a significant impact on the treatment procedures of periodontitis, with the use of blue green algae in the future. PMID:24298522

  18. Videoscope-Assisted Minimally Invasive Periodontal Surgery: One-Year Outcome and Patient Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Harrel, Stephen K; Abraham, Celeste M; Rivera-Hidalgo, Francisco; Shulman, Jay D; Nunn, Martha E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the 1-year clinical outcomes from videoscope-assisted minimally invasive surgery (V-MIS). A sample of 18 patients having sites with residual pocket probing depth (PPD) of at least 5 mm and 2 mm loss in clinical attachment level (CAL) following initial nonsurgical therapy were treated with V-MIS. At 12 months postsurgery, there was a statistically significant improvement (P < .001) in mean PPD (4.11 ± 0.98 mm) and CAL (4.58 ± 1.19 mm) in all surgical sites. A mean improvement in soft tissue height (0.48 ± 0.65 mm, P = .006) was also observed. In most cases, patients reported no postoperative discomfort. The improvements associated with V-MIS appear to be favorable when compared with previously reported results of periodontal regenerative surgery. The lack of postsurgical recession following V-MIS has not been reported with traditional regenerative surgery.

  19. Nonsurgical Management of Osteoarthritis Knee Pain in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nora

    2017-02-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis is a common complaint of many elderly patients in primary care offices. For those unable or unwilling to undergo knee replacement, the primary practitioners' understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the available treatment modalities for pain relief is critical to successful in-office counseling and expectation management. Treatment requires a multimodal approach of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies to achieve a maximal clinical benefit. The focus of this review is on the nonsurgical options for treatment of knee osteoarthritis in patients aged 65 and older.

  20. Prevention of VTE in Nonsurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Susan R.; Lim, Wendy; Dunn, Andrew S.; Cushman, Mary; Dentali, Francesco; Akl, Elie A.; Cook, Deborah J.; Balekian, Alex A.; Klein, Russell C.; Le, Hoang; Schulman, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline addressed VTE prevention in hospitalized medical patients, outpatients with cancer, the chronically immobilized, long-distance travelers, and those with asymptomatic thrombophilia. Methods: This guideline follows methods described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at increased risk of thrombosis, we recommend anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) bid, LDUH tid, or fondaparinux (Grade 1B) and suggest against extending the duration of thromboprophylaxis beyond the period of patient immobilization or acute hospital stay (Grade 2B). For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at low risk of thrombosis, we recommend against the use of pharmacologic prophylaxis or mechanical prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For acutely ill hospitalized medical patients at increased risk of thrombosis who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, we suggest mechanical thromboprophylaxis with graduated compression stockings (GCS) (Grade 2C) or intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) (Grade 2C). For critically ill patients, we suggest using LMWH or LDUH thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). For critically ill patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, we suggest mechanical thromboprophylaxis with GCS and/or IPC at least until the bleeding risk decreases (Grade 2C). In outpatients with cancer who have no additional risk factors for VTE we suggest against routine prophylaxis with LMWH or LDUH (Grade 2B) and recommend against the prophylactic use of vitamin K antagonists (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Decisions regarding prophylaxis in nonsurgical patients should be made after consideration of risk

  1. NONSURGICAL TREATMENT OF CONVERGENT STRABISMUS

    PubMed Central

    Tour, Robert L.

    1959-01-01

    It is generally agreed that surgical treatment of convergent strabismus should be withheld until all other less traumatic approaches have proved ineffectual. There are four categories of nonsurgical treatment. One is psychiatric. Too often psychiatric problems in the causation of convergent strabismus are either overlooked or unrecognized. Another is the proper employment of optical devices. For example, spectacle lenses to eliminate the need for excessive accommodation with its associated convergence excess, and the employment of prisms in the lenses to permit the two eyes to see as a unit even though they may not be properly anatomically oriented. Another kind of treatment is orthoptics, the use of exercises and rather complex optical equipment in a laboratory to train the patient in coordination between the two eyes. Treatment with drugs is based on the fact that certain drugs reduce the effort necessary for accommodation (much as eye-glasses do) and therefore lessen the stimulus toward convergence which may possibly tend toward the development of convergent strabismus. PMID:13662849

  2. Milk as Desensitizing Agent for Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity Following Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentinal hypersensitivity is a commonly observed problem after periodontal treatment procedures in periodontal patients. This further complicates preventive oral hygiene procedures by patients which jeopardize periodontal treatment, or even may aid in periodontal treatment failure. Aims and Objectives The aims and objectives of present study were to assess the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment and selection of cases for evaluation of commercially available milk at room temperature as mouth rinse for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity caused by periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods Patients were selected randomly for nonsurgical periodontal treatment and then were assessed for dentine hypersensitivity. Those having dentine hypersensitivity were assigned in two groups. Group one patients were advised to rinse with commercially available milk at room temperature, group two patients were advised to rinse with luke warm water as control. A four point Verbal Rating Score (VRS) was designed to record the numerical value of dentine hypersensitivity. Results The results show incidence of 42.5% and prevalence of 77.5% for dentine hypersensitivity after periodontal treatment procedures. After rinsing with milk following periodontal treatment procedures, there was found a significant reduction of dentine hypersensitivity with probability by unpaired t-test as 0.0007 and 0.0001 at tenth and fifteenth day post periodontal treatment procedures respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the milk rinse is a suitable, cheaper, fast acting, home-use and easily available solution to the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Milk can be used as desensitizing agent and rinsing with milk for few days is effective in quick reduction of dentine hypersensitivity due to periodontal treatment procedures. PMID:26674005

  3. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Infrabony Periodontal Defects Using Dual-Wavelength Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Francis J.; Wadia, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical management of infrabony defects is an invasive procedure, frequently requiring the use of adjunctive material such as grafts or biologics, which is time-consuming and associated with expense and morbidity to the patient. Lasers in periodontal regeneration have been reported in the literature, with each wavelength having potential benefits through different laser-tissue interactions. The purpose of this case series was to assess the efficacy of a new dual-wavelength protocol in the management of infrabony defects. Materials and Methods. 32 defects (one in each patient) were treated using ultrasonic debridement, followed by flapless application of Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium, Scandium, Gallium, Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (wavelength 2780 nm), and final application of diode laser (wavelength 940 nm). Pocket depths (PD) were measured after 6 months and repeat radiographs taken after one year. Results. The mean baseline PD was 8.8 mm (range 6–15 mm) and 6 months later was 2.4 mm (range 2–4 mm), with mean PD reduction being 6.4 ± 1.7 mm (range 3–12 mm). There was a significant gain in relative linear bone height (apical extent of bone), with mean percentage bone fill of 39.7 ± 41.2% and 53% of sites showing at least 40% infill of bone. Conclusion. The results compare favourably with traditional surgery and require further validation through randomised clinical controlled trials. PMID:27366790

  4. Periodontal disease: an overview for physicians.

    PubMed

    Fenesy, K E

    1998-01-01

    Periodontitis is now seen as resulting from a complex interplay of bacterial infection and host response, often modified by behavioral factors. There has been a fundamental change in the prevailing periodontal disease model of the 1960s, which suggested that the susceptibility to periodontitis increases with age, and that all individuals are susceptible to severe periodontal disease. More recent research has changed the belief in universal susceptibility to the current view that only some 5-20% of any population suffer from severe generalized periodontitis, and that only moderate disease affects a majority of adults. One major risk factor is smoking, as there is now a clear association between smoking and periodontal disease independent of oral hygiene, age, or any other risk factor. In human periodontitis, there is no simple, direct pathogen-disease link. There are three pathogens that have a strong association with progressive periodontal disease: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, spirochetes of acute necrotizing gingivitis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. These pathogens may be the cause of continued loss of periodontal attachment in all periodontal disease classifications despite diligent periodontal therapy. This loss of attachment, or destruction of the periodontal ligament and loss of adjacent supporting bone, is seen in adult periodontitis, as well as in early-onset periodontitis, which affects young persons who otherwise appear healthy. The three forms of early-onset periodontitis are prepubertal periodontitis, localized and generalized juvenile periodontitis, and rapidly progressive periodontitis. They are distinguished from adult periodontitis by the age of onset of the disease, the rapid rate of disease progression, manifestations of defects in host response, and the composition of the subgingival microflora. Prepubertal periodontitis is associated with attachment loss around teeth of the deciduous and/or permanent dentition, and is often associated

  5. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  6. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy.

  7. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  8. Current concepts in periodontal bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Taba, M.; Jin, Q.; Sugai, J.V.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2008-01-01

    Repair of tooth supporting alveolar bone defects caused by periodontal and peri-implant tissue destruction is a major goal of reconstructive therapy. Oral and craniofacial tissue engineering has been achieved with limited success by the utilization of a variety of approaches such as cell-occlusive barrier membranes, bone substitutes and autogenous block grafting techniques. Signaling molecules such as growth factors have been used to restore lost tooth support because of damage by periodontal disease or trauma. This paper will review emerging periodontal therapies in the areas of materials science, growth factor biology and cell/gene therapy. Several different polymer delivery systems that aid in the targeting of proteins, genes and cells to periodontal and peri-implant defects will be highlighted. Results from preclinical and clinical trials will be reviewed using the topical application of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2 and BMP-7) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF) for periodontal and peri-implant regeneration. The paper concludes with recent research on the use of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies via gene therapy vectors encoding growth promoting and inhibiting molecules (PDGF, BMP, noggin and others) to regenerate periodontal structures including bone, periodontal ligament and cementum. PMID:16238610

  9. Adjunctive daily supplementation with encapsulated fruit, vegetable and berry juice powder concentrates and clinical periodontal outcomes: a double-blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Iain L C; Milward, Michael R; Ling-Mountford, Nicola; Weston, Paul; Carter, Kevin; Askey, Keeley; Dallal, Gerard E; De Spirt, Silke; Sies, Helmut; Patel, Dina; Matthews, John B

    2012-01-01

    Aim A double-blind randomized controlled trial to determine whether dietary supplementation with fruit/vegetable/berry juice powder concentrates, simultaneously with non-surgical periodontal therapy, improved 2-month treatment outcomes. Methods Volunteers with chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to one of three groups: fruit/vegetable (FV), fruit/vegetable/berry (FVB) or placebo. Supplements were taken daily during non-surgical debridement and maintenance and outcomes assessed at 2, 5 and 8 months after completion. Primary outcomes were mean probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment gain, % sites bleeding on probing (% BOP) at 2 months. Adherence and plasma β-carotene were determined. Results Sixty-one nutritionally replete (by serum biochemistry) volunteers enrolled and 60 (n = 20 per arm) completed the 2-month review. Clinical outcomes improved in all groups at 2 months, with additional improvement in PPD versus placebo for FV (p < 0.03). Gingival crevicular fluid volumes diminished more in supplement groups than placebo (FVB; p < 0.05) at 2 months, but not at later times. The % BOP (5 months) and cumulative plaque scores (8 months) were lowered more in the FV group (p < 0.05). Conclusions Adjunctive juice powder concentrates appear to improve initial pocket depth reductions in nutritionally replete patients, where plasma micronutrient bioavailability is attainable. Definitive multicentre studies in untreated and treated patients are required to ascertain the clinical significance of such changes. PMID:22093005

  10. Periodontal management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Periodontists are often called upon to provide periodontal therapy for patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires a general understanding of the underlying cardiovascular diseases, their medical management, and necessary modifications to dental/periodontal therapy that may be required. In this informational paper more common cardiovascular disorders will be discussed and dental management considerations briefly described. This paper is intended for the use of periodontists and members of the dental profession.

  11. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  12. The Adjunctive Use of the Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet Laser in Closed Flap Periodontal Therapy. A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Falaki, Rana; Cronshaw, Mark; Parker, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The current periodontal literature has been inconsistent in finding an added advantage to using lasers in periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes following root surface instrumentation alone (NL group), or with adjunctive use of Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (L group). Material and Methods: Patients diagnosed with generalized chronic periodontitis, having a minimum of 1 year follow up were selected by a blinded party for inclusion in a retrospective analysis from patients treated prior to and after integration of laser in a single clinic setting. Probing depths (PD) of all sites ≥5 mm and full mouth bleeding scores were analyzed. Further analysis was carried out on the treatment outcomes of only the molar teeth and of pockets >6mm. Results: 53 patients were included (25 NL,28 L). There was no significant difference between baseline PDs (NL=6.19mm, L=6.27mm, range 5-11mm). The mean PD after one year was 2.83mm (NL) 2.45mm (L), with the mean PD reductions being 3.35mm (NL) and 3.82mm (L) (p<0.002). The mean PD reduction for the molars were 3.32mm (NL) and 3.86mm (L) (p< 0.007), and for ≥7mm group were 4.75mm (NL) compared to 5.14mm (L) (p< 0.009). There was significantly less bleeding on probing in the laser group after one year (p<0.001) Conclusion: Both treatment modalities were effective in treating chronic periodontitis, but the added use of laser may have advantages, particularly in molar tooth sites and deeper pockets. Further research with RCTs is needed to test this hypothesis further. PMID:27350796

  13. [The use of Emdogain in periodontal and osseous regeneration].

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Rathe, Florian; Junker, Rüdiger; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank; Arweiler, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i. e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of an enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in periodontal wound healing. Histological results from experiments in animals and from human case reports have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of the current overview is to present the clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD based on the existing evidence.

  14. Parameter on periodontal maintenance. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on Periodontal Maintenance. Periodontal maintenance is an integral part of periodontal therapy for patients with a history of inflammatory periodontal diseases. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to comply with a periodontal maintenance program may result in recurrence or progression of the disease process. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  15. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  16. Combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment in a patient with aggressive periodontitis: a 9-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Closs, Luciane Quadrado; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Bertoglio, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    A combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment demands a detailed evaluation in both specialties, particularly when the periodontium is reduced. This is especially true for adult patients, but young patients can also suffer from advanced periodontitis. This article describes combined periodontal and orthodontic therapy in a young patient with severe localized and aggressive periodontitis, tooth crown abnormalities, and missing maxillary second premolars. Periodontal treatment was carried out. Once attachment gain and bone stability were confirmed, orthodontic therapy commenced. It lasted 32 months, during which segmented mechanics and only light forces were used. The result of this intervention was satisfactory, and long-term stability (9 years) with periodontal maintenance was achieved.

  17. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  18. Current options for nonsurgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans; Colbert, Agatha; Frydl, Jennifer; Arnall, Elizabeth; Elliot, Molly; Carlson, Nels

    2010-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common of the entrapment neuropathies. Surgical decompression is commonly performed and has traditionally been considered the defnitive treatment for CTS. Conservative treatment options include physical therapy, bracing, steroid injections and alternative medicine. While CTS is often progressive, patients may get better without formal treatment. The resolution of symptoms is not necessarily related to the severity of the clinical findings and self-limited activity is common. The current literature suggests that bracing and corticosteroid injections may be useful in the nonsurgical treatment of CTS, although the benefits may be short term. There is limited evidence regarding the efficacy of other treatments, such as therapy, exercise, yoga, acupuncture, lasers and magnets, and further studies are needed. Surgery is recommended for progressive functional deficits and significant pain. PMID:20490348

  19. Nonsurgical Innovations in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Sadegh; Viera, Martha H.; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of cancer in the United States and represent 75 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Since ultraviolet radiation is implicated in their development, photoprotection is fundamental in their prevention. Additional preventive measures include identifying high-risk individuals for early detection along with using agents, such as retinoids, that are effective in decreasing the risk of premalignant cells further developing into carcinomas. Newer agents achieving this goal include perillyl alcohol, T4 endonuclease 5, DL-α-tocopherol, and α-difluoromethylornithine. Procedural modalities are currently the standard of treatment, but recent evidence has consistently shown that newer (nonsurgical) therapies, such as interferon, imiquimod, retinoids, and 5-fluorouracil, can be used effectively either as monotherapies or as adjuvants to those surgical modalities for the treatment of superficial nonmelanoma skin cancers and premalignant lesions. These newer therapies have achieved significant reductions in morbidity and mortality. Procedural modalities that have been evolving into important tools for the treatment of actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancers include photodynamic therapy and lasers. Nonsurgical therapies currently proving to be effective in clinical trials include ingenol mebutate and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Agents that are showing promising results in early phases of clinical trials include betulinic acid; hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors, such as cyclopamine and GDC-0449; α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone analogs, such as afamelanotide; epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib; anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab; and the 5-fluorouracil prodrug capecitabine. PMID:20725548

  20. Emerging Nonsurgical Treatments for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kurta, Anastasia O; Glaser, Dee Anna

    2016-11-01

    A variety of available treatment options are available for primary focal hyperhidrosis, and some can be combined to obtain maximum effective results. Most treatment options have only been studied in patients with axillary hyperhidrosis, and more studies are needed to develop therapies for other body regions. Several clinical trials are underway with promising preliminary results; however, there is still a large need for new therapies.

  1. Periodontal Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John D

    2017-04-01

    This article provides a review of current information about periodontal bacteria, their activities within dental plaque biofilm, their interactions with the host immune system, and the infections with which they are associated. Periodontal disease, plaque formation, and the host immune response are also discussed, as are antimicrobial measures used to control the bacteria and the disease.

  2. Nonsurgical Cosmetic Procedures For Men: Trends And Technique Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Arisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Once sought nearly exclusively by women, nonsurgical cosmetic procedures are increasingly being sought after by men. Reviewed here are survey data that characterize the spectrum of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures men are preferentially utilizing, the percentage of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures consumers who are men, and how some of these figures are changing with time. while men still comprise a small minority (approximately 10–20%) of those pursuing nonsurgical cosmetic procedures, this sector is growing, in particular for injection of neurotoxins. Practitioners performing nonsurgical cosmetic procedures on male patients need to be aware of anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and psychological factors unique to this demographic. PMID:28210397

  3. Applying risk assessment models in non-surgical patients: effective risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are serious complications of non-surgical patients, but scarcity of data documenting prophylaxis means antithrombotic therapy is rarely used. Prediction of risk is complicated by the variation in the medical conditions associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE), and lack of data defining risk in different groups. Accurate risk assessment is further confounded by inherited or acquired factors for VTE, additional risk due to medical interventions, and interactions between risk factors. Acquired and inherited risk factors may underlie thromboembolic complications in a range of conditions, including pregnancy, ischaemic stroke, myocardial infarction and cancer. Risk stratification may be feasible in non-surgical patients by considering individual risk factors and their cumulative effects. Current risk assessment models require expansion and modification to reflect emerging evidence in the non-surgical field. A large on-going study of prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin in non-surgical patients will clarify our understanding of the components of risk, and assist in developing therapy recommendations.

  4. A phase IIa randomized controlled pilot study evaluating the safety and clinical outcomes following the use of rhGDF-5/β-TCP in regenerative periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Péter; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Molnár, Bálint; Szendröi-Kiss, Dóra; Szilágyi, Emese; Rosta, Péter; Horváth, Attila; Capsius, Björn; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Sculean, Anton

    2012-08-01

    To present the safety profile, the early healing phase and the clinical outcomes at 24 weeks following treatment of human intrabony defects with open flap debridement (OFD) alone or with OFD and rhGDF-5 adsorbed onto a particulate β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) carrier. Twenty chronic periodontitis patients, each with at least one tooth exhibiting a probing depth ≥6 mm and an associated intrabony defect ≥4 mm entered the study. Ten subjects (one defect/patient) were randomized to receive OFD alone (control) and ten subjects OFD combined with rhGDF-5/β-TCP. Blood samples were collected at screening, and at weeks 2 and 24 to evaluate routine hematology and clinical chemistry, rhGDF-5 plasma levels, and antirhGDF-5 antibody formation. Plaque and gingival indices, bleeding on probing, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and radiographs were recorded pre- and 24 weeks postsurgery. Comparable safety profiles were found in the two treatment groups. Neither antirhGDF-5 antibody formation nor relevant rhGDF-5 plasma levels were detected in any patient. At 6 months, treatment with OFD + rhGDF-5/β-TCP resulted in higher but statistically not significant PD reduction (3.7 ± 1.2 vs. 3.1 ± 1.8 mm; p = 0.26) and CAL gain (3.2 ± 1.7 vs. 1.7 ± 2.2 mm; p = 0.14) compared to OFD alone. In the tested concentration, the use of rhGDF-5/β-TCP appeared to be safe and the material possesses a sound biological rationale. Thus, further adequately powered, randomized controlled clinical trials are warranted to confirm the clinical relevance of this new approach in regenerative periodontal therapy. rhGDF-5/β-TCP may represent a promising new techology in regenerative periodontal therapy.

  5. Comparison of the efficacy of subgingival irrigation with 2% povidone-iodine and tetracycline HCl in subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis: A clinico microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Perayil, Jayachandran; Menon, Keerthy S.; Biswas, Raja; Fenol, Angel; Vyloppillil, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to evaluate and compare the clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of subgingival irrigation with tetracycline and povidone-iodine as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis were recruited in this split-mouth study with probing pocket depth of >3 and ≤5 mm and clinical attachment loss of 3-4 mm in relation to 16, 36, and 46. In each subject, three selected periodontal pockets were assigned to receive one out of three irrigants (1) sterile water (control) in 16; (2) tetracycline at 10 mg/ml in 36; (3) 2% povidone-iodine in 46, and these sites were designated as Group A, Group B, and Group C, respectively. Plaque score, gingival score, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment level were evaluated before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to detect Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis which have been implicated as the major risk factors for periodontal disease. Subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and repeated measure ANOVA. Results were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results: Clinical and microbiological parameters were reduced posttreatment, the reduction being significantly higher in Group B compared to Group C. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemical and mechanical therapies were of slight benefit in the treatment of chronic moderate periodontitis, and there was an adjunctive effect of significance when scaling and root planing was combined with a single subgingival irrigation with tetracycline or povidone-iodine in lower concentration. PMID:27076823

  6. PAR-2 expression in the gingival crevicular fluid reflects chronic periodontitis severity.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Henrique; Alves, Vanessa Tubero Euzebio; Carvalho, Verônica Franco de; Ambrósio, Lucas Macedo Batitucci; Eichler, Rosangela Aparecida Dos Santos; Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli de; Saraiva, Luciana; Holzhausen, Marinella

    2017-01-26

    Recent studies investigating protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR-2) suggest an association between the receptor and periodontal inflammation. It is known that gingipain, a bacterial protease secreted by the important periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can activate PAR-2. Previous studies by our group found that PAR-2 is overexpressed in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with moderate chronic periodontitis (MP). The present study aimed at evaluating whether PAR-2 expression is associated with chronic periodontitis severity. GCF samples and clinical parameters, including plaque and bleeding on probing indices, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, were collected from the control group (n = 19) at baseline, and from MP patients (n = 19) and severe chronic periodontitis (SP) (n = 19) patients before and 6 weeks after periodontal non-surgical treatment. PAR-2 and gingipain messenger RNA (mRNA) in the GCF of 4 periodontal sites per patient were evaluated by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR). PAR-2 and gingipain expressions were greater in periodontitis patients than in control group patients. In addition, the SP group presented increased PAR-2 and gingipain mRNA levels, compared with the MP group. Furthermore, periodontal treatment significantly reduced (p <0.05) PAR-2 expression in patients with periodontitis. In conclusion, PAR-2 is associated with chronic periodontitis severity and with gingipain levels in the periodontal pocket, thus suggesting that PAR-2 expression in the GCF reflects the severity of destruction during periodontal infection.

  7. Parameter on chronic periodontitis with advanced loss of periodontal support. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of chronic periodontitis with advanced loss of periodontal supporting tissues. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to appropriately treat chronic periodontitis can result in progressive loss of periodontal supporting tissues, an adverse change in prognosis, and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  8. Parameter on chronic periodontitis with slight to moderate loss of periodontal support. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of chronic periodontitis with slight to moderate loss of periodontal supporting tissues. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to appropriately treat chronic periodontitis can result in progressive loss of periodontal supporting tissues, an adverse change in prognosis, and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  9. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  10. Parameter on periodontitis associated with systemic conditions. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on periodontitis associated with systemic conditions. Patients affected by periodontal disease with concomitant systemic factors should be informed about the significance of the systemic condition(s) to the periodontal disease process. Patients should also be informed of the periodontal disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibilities in treatment. Consequences of no periodontal treatment should be explained. Failure to treat periodontitis appropriately can result in progressive loss of periodontal supporting tissues, an adverse change in prognosis, tooth loss, and compromise of the dentition. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  11. Systemic Antibody Response of Clinically Characterized Patients with Antigens of Eubacterium brachy Initially and Following Periodontal Therapy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-21

    Iderity b, block numb.;_ Eubacterium brach a Gram (+) positive anaerobic rod, has been Implicated by cultura ~stu- es to be associated with the microflora...than V.’ did HS when reactivity with E. brachy artigeus was determined (P < .001). Juvenile perlodontitis (JP) and adult periodontlt is (AP) patients...there was uo specific pattern of bone loss. Forty-nlue patients were classified as juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients, a condition previously

  12. Nonsurgical treatment of recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, O.

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme is surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, generally with temozolomide. However, disease recurs in almost all patients. Diagnosis of progression is complex given the possibility of pseudoprogression. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria increase the sensitivity for detecting progression. Most patients will not be candidates for new surgery or re-irradiation, and anticancer drugs are the most common approach for second-line treatment, if the patient’s condition allows. Antiangiogenics, inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor, nitrosoureas, and re-treatment with temozolomide have been studied in the second line, but a standard therapy has not yet been established. This review considers currently available medical treatment options for patients with glioblastoma recurrence. PMID:26300678

  13. The effect of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein, endothelial function, lipids and proinflammatory biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -C, triglycerides, IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, fibrinogen, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin. These outcomes will be assessed at all time points over 12 months. Flow-mediated dilation will be assessed at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months after periodontal therapy. Discussion This trial will provide new evidence regarding the effect of periodontal treatment on risk markers for recurrence of cardiovascular events in stable coronary artery disease patients. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT01609725 PMID:24010954

  14. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rajesh; Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis.

  15. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  16. Is periodontal disease during orthodontics preventable?

    PubMed

    Vaughan, O B

    1990-01-01

    Periodontal disease during orthodontic therapy is preventable and is controllable and in continuous studies after orthodontic therapy has been completed, it has been shown that under the properly controlled regimen of treatment the destruction to the periodontal tissues of the teeth is not accentuated to a statistically significant degree as greater than that which occurs during the same interim without orthodontic therapy. This encourages us; however, the difficulties cited in the paper above challenges us and our finest professional skills in the proper care of the orthodontic patients with periodontal complications.

  17. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  18. Comparative evaluation of co-enzyme Q10 and Melaleuca alternifolia as antioxidant gels in treatment of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Chetan Purushottam; Sethi, Kunal S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy has been proven to be an effective treatment for patients with chronic periodontitis. Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil (TTO) are known to have potential therapeutic benefits in chronic periodontitis. Aims: The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of Coenzyme Q10 (Perio Q®) and tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided equally into three groups: Group I (Control group): those receiving placebo gel + SRP, Group II (Test group I): those receiving Perio QTM gel + SRP, and Group III (Test group II): those receiving tea tree oil gel + SRP. A total of 15 patients with 45 sites were enrolled in the study. Clinical parameters evaluated were plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was applied using SPSS software. Results: Mean PPD reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.50 ± 0.2, 2.95 ± 0.20, and 2.09 ± 0.15, respectively. Mean CAL reduction for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 0.45 ± 0.22, 2.33 ± 0.04, and 2.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Changes in mean PI scores for Group I, Group II, and Group III were 0.67 ± 017, 1.00 ± 0.11, and 1.08 ± 0.05 and GBI scores were 0.92 ± 0.29, 1.08 ± 0.13, and 0.88 ± 0.28, respectively. Conclusions: Coenzyme Q10 and tea tree oil gel proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27630504

  19. Impact of Periodontal Intervention on Local inflammation, Periodontitis and HIV Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, J.; Sanders, A E; Saladyanant, T; Ramsey, K; Blake, J; Morelli, T; Southerland, J; Quinlivan, E B; Nelson, J; DeParis, K; Webster-Cyriaque, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Periodontal disease resolution was hypothesized to impact systemic HIV measures. Methods In this longitudinal cohort study, 73 HIV-positive subjects received comprehensive dental care. AAP, CDC/AAP and biofilm gingival interface case definitions determined periodontal classification. In a subset, IL-6 was measured. Multivariable binary logistic regression models estimated odds of periodontitis development for comparisons between HIV and NHANES (2009–12) groups. Results In both groups, moderate/severe periodontitis was positively associated with non-white race, smoking, male gender, low income and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Likelihood of HIV periodontitis was higher across demographic variables. Subjects with severe periodontitis on antiretroviral therapy demonstrated high plasma viral loads at baseline (median= 464 co/ml; mean 65,773 co/ml). Post intervention, HIV periodontitis distribution became similar to NHANES and IL-6 levels decreased 2-fold (p=0.07). Subjects with suppressed viral load at baseline demonstrated increased CD4 counts at 12 months post intervention (P=0.027) (n=26). Conclusions Smoking, being non-white and low income were associated with periodontitis in HIV and NHANES. Higher Il-6, higher HIV VL and lower CD4 were associated with moderate/severe periodontal disease. Periodontitis decreased significantly with treatment producing periodontal profiles mirroring the national norm. In a subset of suppressed subjects, decreased oral inflammation, and associated microbial translocation, yielded improved CD4 counts. PMID:27109277

  20. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  1. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus type II: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Kiaani, Sima; Mahdavian, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare developmental anomaly of teeth with complex root canal system morphology. The present case describes a peg shape maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II), necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed with the aim of removing the blind sac with diamond bur under the use of operating surgical microscope. The root canal system was obturated with thermoplastic technique. Final restoration was done using composite. The 20-months clinical and radiological follow up revealed an asymptomatic tooth with healing of the periapical pathology; however, for complete healed periradicular lesion more follow up is needed. This case illustrated that a dens invaginatus malformed teeth with a large periradicular lesion can be managed successfully with nonsurgical root canal therapy (NSRCT). PMID:25878686

  2. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  3. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gum (Periodontal) Disease What Is Gum (Periodontal) Disease? An Infection of the Gums and Surrounding Tissues Gum (periodontal) disease is an infection of the gums and surrounding ...

  4. Healing of human intrabony defects following regenerative periodontal therapy with a bovine-derived xenograft and guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sculean, A; Stavropoulos, A; Windisch, P; Keglevich, T; Karring, T; Gera, I

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with either a bovine-derived xenograft (BDX) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) [BDX + GTR] or a bovine-derived xenograft mixed with collagen (BDX Coll) and GTR [BDX Coll + GTR]. Eight patients with chronic periodontitis and each with one very deep intrabony defect around a tooth scheduled for extraction were treated with either a combination of BDX + GTR (five patients) or with BDX Coll + GTR (three patients). The postoperative healing was uneventful in all eight cases. After a healing period of 6 months, the teeth or roots were extracted together with some of their surrounding soft and hard tissues and subsequently fixed in 10% buffered formalin. Following decalcification in EDTA, the specimens were embedded in paraffin and 8-microm histological sections were cut in the mesio-distal direction, parallel to the long axes of the teeth. The sections were alternatively stained with hematoxylin and eosin, van Giesson's connective tissue stain or with the Ladevig's connective tissue staining method and examined under the light microscope. Generally, formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers was found in seven out of the eight treated cases, whereas in the remaining case (treated with BDX + GTR) the healing was characterized by formation of a long junctional epithelium along the debrided root surface and no formation of cementum or bone. In the specimens demonstrating periodontal regeneration the new cementum was always of a cellular type. In most cases, the graft particles were surrounded by bone. In some areas, the bone tissue around the graft particles was connected by perpendicularly inserting collagen fibers to the newly formed cementum on the root surface. The epithelium downgrowth stopped always at the most coronal part of the newly formed cementum. No remnants of the membrane material were observed in any of the biopsies

  5. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  6. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-05

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis.

  7. Nonsurgical treatment options in Peyronie’s Disease: 2016 update

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Raidh A.; Ibrahim, Mohammed Abdulkareem; Cangüven, Önder

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is an inflammatory condition of penile tunica albuginea which commonly ends with penile curvature and difficulty in vaginal penetration. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology of PD has not been completely understood. In this paper, we will review what is known about the pathophysiology of PD and the nonsurgical medical treatment options that have been trialed as a result. In the last 5 years, commonly used oral medications left their places to intralesional therapies. Clostridium collagenase, which is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatment for PD, is now the most prescribed intralesional therapy in the last years. Clostridium collagenase is advised for patients whose penile curvature is > 30° and < 90°. Because of its side effects, patients should be counseled before intralesional Clostridium collagenase treatment. Until finding best treatment solution for PD, more investigations in regards to the basic science of PD need to be carried out in order to elucidate the exact mechanisms of the fibrosis. PMID:27909612

  8. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Latheef, P; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; MN, Kumuda; Apine, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the periodontium i.e. the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis manifests as progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can cause loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is initiated by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, besides an over -aggressive immune response against these microorganisms. The primary goal of periodontal therapy is to preserve the natural dentition by accomplishing and preserving a healthy functional periodontium. Many treatment modalities have been introduced to improve the therapeutic result of periodontal treatment which may also damage the periodontiumiatrogenically. PMID:26312087

  9. Treatment of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Persson, G Rutger

    2016-10-01

    Within the next 40 years the number of older adults worldwide will more than double. This will impact periodontal treatment needs and presents a challenge to health-care providers and governments worldwide, as severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world. Older adults (≥ 80 years of age) who receive regular dental care retain more teeth than those who do not receive such care, but routine general dental care for these individuals is not sufficient to prevent the progression of periodontitis with the same degree of success as in younger individuals. There is a paucity of data on the efficacy of different periodontal therapies for older individuals. However, considering the higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions seen in older adults, it cannot be assumed that periodontal therapy will yield the same degree of success seen in younger individuals. Furthermore, medications can influence the status of the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. As an example, anticoagulant drugs are common among older patients and may be a contraindication to certain treatments. Newer anticoagulants will, however, facilitate surgical intervention in older patients. Furthermore, prescription medications taken for chronic conditions, such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases, can affect the periodontium in a variety of ways. In summary, consideration of socio-economic factors, general health status and multiple-drug therapies will, in the future, be an important part of the management of periodontitis in older adults.

  10. Peripheral blood monocyte responses in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, S J

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from the interaction of bacteria on the tooth surfaces and the host immune response. Although periodontal pathogens are essential for the initiation and progression of the disease, the tissue damage in periodontitis is primarily mediated by the host immune response. Differences in the susceptibility to the disease and in the clinal outcome of the therapy seem to be less dependent on genetics but more on lifestyle factors, like smoking, overweight, stress and nutrition. It has been shown that these lifestyle factors may modulate the immune response and therefore influence the initiation and progression of the disease. To study the host immune response, whole blood cell cultures (WBCC) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been widely used and they specifically reflect the behaviour of monocytes. It has been shown that peripheral blood monocytes in LPS-stimulated WBCC from non-smoking periodontitis patients display a T-helper 2 (Th2)-promoting phenotype in comparison with controls. After periodontal therapy, this phenotype reversed and was comparable with controls. However, in smoking but treated patients, the Th2-promoting phenotype of monocytes still remained. Therefore, the aberrant phenotype of monocytes in the peripheral blood from periodontitis patients is likely to be a systemic response to exogenous and endogenous danger molecules released or induced by the periodontal infection or by smoking. It can be concluded that periodontal therapy in non-smoking periodontitis patients has beneficial health effects and that smoking cessation should be an integral part of the therapy as well for general health reasons as for the clinical outcome.

  11. Sonic and ultrasonic scalers in periodontal treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, T; Ciçek, Y; Canakçi, C F

    2007-02-01

    Periodontal therapy aims at arresting periodontal infection and maintaining a healthy periodontium. The periodic mechanical removal of subgingival microbial biofilms is essential for controlling inflammatory periodontal disease. Mechanical periodontal therapy consists of scaling, root planing and gingival curettage. The sonic and ultrasonic scalers are valuable tools in the prevention of periodontal disease. The vibration of scaler tips is the main effect to remove the deposits from the dental surface, such as bacterial plaque, calculus and endotoxin. However, constant flushing activity of the lavage used to cool the tips and cavitational activity result in disruption of the weak and unattached subgingival plaque. The aim of the study was to review the safety, efficacy, role and deleterious side-effects of sonic and ultrasonic scalers in mechanical periodontal therapy.

  12. Non-surgical and non-chemical attempts to treat echinococcosis: do they work?

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Vuitton, Lucine; Brunetti, Enrico; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Koch, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) are chronic, complex and neglected diseases. Their treatment depends on a number of factors related to the lesion, setting and patient. We performed a literature review of curative or palliative non-surgical, non-chemical interventions in CE and AE. In CE, some of these techniques, like radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA), were shelved after initial attempts, while others, such as High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, appear promising but are still in a pre-clinical phase. In AE, RFA has never been tested, however, radiotherapy or heavy-ion therapies have been attempted in experimental models. Still, application to humans is questionable. In CE, although prospective clinical studies are still lacking, therapeutic, non-surgical drainage techniques, such as PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) and its derivatives, are now considered a useful option in selected cases. Finally, palliative, non-surgical drainage techniques such as US- or CT-guided percutaneous biliary drainage, centro-parasitic abscesses drainage, or vascular stenting were performed successfully. Recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-associated techniques have become increasingly used to manage biliary fistulas in CE and biliary obstructions in AE. Development of pre-clinical animal models would allow testing for AE techniques developed for other indications, e.g. cancer. Prospective trials are required to determine the best use of PAIR, and associated procedures, and the indications and techniques of palliative drainage. PMID:25531730

  13. Impact of scaling and root planing on C-reactive protein levels in gingival crevicular fluid and serum in chronic periodontitis patients with or without diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study was conducted to evaluate the impact of scaling and root planing (SRP) on the C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM-CP) or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (NDM-CP). Methods Forty-eight human participants were divided into two groups: an experimental (T2DM-CP) group (group I, n=24) comprising chronic periodontitis patients with random blood sugar ≥200 mg/dL and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and control (NDM-CP) group (group II, n=24) of those with chronic periodontitis and random blood sugar <200 without T2DM for the study. All subjects underwent nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) including complete SRP and subgingival debridement. Periodontal health parameters, plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), GCF volume (GCF vol), GCF-CRP, random blood glucose (RBS), glycated hemoglobin, and systemic inflammatory markers, serum CRP, total leukocyte count (TLC), neutrophil count (Neutr) and lymphocyte count (Lymph), were evaluated at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months after SRP. Results NSPT resulted in statistically significant improvement in periodontal health parameters (PI, GI, PPD, CAL, GCF vol), CRP levels in serum as well as GCF of both groups I and II. The mean improvement in periodontal health parameters (PI, GI, PPD, CAL, GCF vol), CRP levels in serum and GCF was greater in group I than group II after NSPT. There was nonsignificant increase in GCF-CRP, TLC, Lymph, and RBS, and a significant increase in Neutr and Serum CRP in group II at 1 month. The Serum CRP level of 20 out of 24 group II patients had also increased at 1 month. Conclusions The CRP levels in both GCF and serum were higher in T2DM-CP patients than in NDM-CP patients. Although there was a significant improvement in both the groups, greater improvement was observed in both GCF and serum samples of T2DM

  14. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2.5 kg), late abortion (14-24 weeks) or abortion (<14 weeks). The results obtained were statistically evaluated according to OR, unpaired t test and paired t test at 5% significance level. Results No significant differences were observed between groups at baseline examination. Periodontal treatment resulted in stabilization of CAL and PI (p>0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001), except for PI. Significant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001). The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  15. Non-Surgical Interventions for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis remain highly controversial. Despite the publication of numerous reviews no explicit methodological evaluation of papers labeled as, or having a layout of, a systematic review, addressing this subject matter, is available. Objectives Analysis and comparison of the content, methodology, and evidence-base from systematic reviews regarding non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Design Systematic overview of systematic reviews. Methods Articles meeting the minimal criteria for a systematic review, regarding any non-surgical intervention for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, with any outcomes measured, were included. Multiple general and systematic review specific databases, guideline registries, reference lists and websites of institutions were searched. The AMSTAR tool was used to critically appraise the methodology, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the Joanna Briggs Institute’s hierarchies were applied to analyze the levels of evidence from included reviews. Results From 469 citations, twenty one papers were included for analysis. Five reviews assessed the effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercise treatments, four assessed manual therapies, five evaluated bracing, four assessed different combinations of interventions, and one evaluated usual physical activity. Two reviews addressed the adverse effects of bracing. Two papers were high quality Cochrane reviews, Three were of moderate, and the remaining sixteen were of low or very low methodological quality. The level of evidence of these reviews ranged from 1 or 1+ to 4, and in some reviews, due to their low methodological quality and/or poor reporting, this could not be established. Conclusions Higher quality reviews indicate that generally there is insufficient evidence to make a judgment on whether non-surgical interventions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are effective. Papers

  16. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Jaya; Kumari, M Meena; Arora, Nupur; Haritha, A

    2009-09-01

    The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision.

  17. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Jaya; Kumari, M. Meena; Arora, Nupur; Haritha, A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision. PMID:20379408

  18. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients’ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment. PMID:20922083

  19. Estimation of prevalence of periodontal disease and oral lesions and their relation to CD4 counts in HIV seropositive patients on antiretroviral therapy regimen reporting at District General Hospital, Raichur

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Jagganatha Rao; Rao, Tuthipat Ramachandra Gururaja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a condition in which the body becomes susceptible to a host of opportunistic infections. This syndrome is a culmination of infection with a lenti virus called Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particularly HIV 1. A cross section of the population including adults and children are affected by HIV infection with estimate of 36.1 million affected by the end of 2014. HIV infection affects the T lymphocytes especially cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) count reducing it drastically jeopardizing the acquired immunity. The advent of Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) has proved as a ray of hope, at least reducing the misery and suffering although not permanently. This study attempts to understand the prevalence of periodontal disease and other oral lesions, further examining their relationship with CD4 counts in the HIV seropositive patients on ART. Materials and Methods: A total of 72 HIV positive patients on ART reporting at ART centre at Raichur District hospital were screened in the study for periodontal status, oral manifestations. The latest CD4 count values were obtained from the hospital records. Results: The study showed a 36.11% of prevalence of periodontal disease; however no statistically significant association was seen with its relation to CD4 counts. Other oral manifestations were seen in 46% of patients with a high prevalence of Oral Candidiasis lesions and a positive association with CD 4 counts was seen. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study no significant association was seen between CD4 counts and prevalence of periodontal disease however candiasis showed a stronger association. As HIV infection gradually becomes a chronic disease the features and course of chronic periodontal disease and other oral manifestations in HIV infected patients require more careful and extensive investigation. PMID:26392694

  20. Application of laser therapy in the surgical treatment of periodontal osseous defects with the Bio-Oss Spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Uzunov, T.; Grozdanova, R.

    2004-06-01

    We have made an investigation on three-wall and four-wall osseous defects on which a surgical treatment was conducted with application of Bio-Oss ( Geistlich ) and laser therapy. After conducting of clinical oral hygiene to the patients and curettage with flap, a Bio-Oss Spongiosa of Geistlich is applied. We have conducted the laser therapy pre- and postoperative scanning with power density of 100 mW/cm2 on scheme. The patients were traced out within 1 year. The obtained results showed that the application of laser therapy gives anaesthetic, anti-inflammatory and regeneration stimulating effect.

  1. Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks - David X. Zhao, MD Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights ...

  2. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  3. Predictors of Outcomes in Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis Treated Initially With Conservative (Nonsurgical) Medical Management: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Zeun, Paul; Gooday, Catherine; Nunney, Ian; Dhatariya, Ketan

    2016-03-01

    The optimal way to manage diabetic foot osteomyelitis remains uncertain, with debate in the literature as to whether it should be managed conservatively (ie, nonsurgically) or surgically. We aimed to identify clinical variables that influence outcomes of nonsurgical management in diabetic foot osteomyelitis. We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive patients with diabetes presenting to a tertiary center between 2007 and 2011 with foot osteomyelitis initially treated with nonsurgical management. Remission was defined as wound healing with no clinical or radiological signs of osteomyelitis at the initial or contiguous sites 12 months after clinical and/or radiological resolution. Nine demographic and clinical variables including osteomyelitis site and presence of foot pulses were analyzed. We identified 100 cases, of which 85 fulfilled the criteria for analysis. After a 12-month follow-up period, 54 (63.5%) had achieved remission with nonsurgical management alone with a median (interquartile range) duration of antibiotic treatment of 10.8 (10.1) weeks. Of these, 14 (26%) were admitted for intravenous antibiotics. The absence of pedal pulses in the affected foot (n = 34) was associated with a significantly longer duration of antibiotic therapy to achieve remission, 8.7 (7.1) versus 15.9 (13.3) weeks (P = .003). Osteomyelitis affecting the metatarsal was more likely to be amputated than other sites of the foot (P = .016). In line with previous data, we have shown that almost two thirds of patients presenting with osteomyelitis healed without undergoing surgical bone resection.

  4. An unusual case of Bjork-Shiley mitral valve dysfunction corrected nonsurgically.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Burke, W; Kotler, M N; Glazier, E E

    1981-10-01

    A case of Bjork-Shiley mitral valve dysfunction is presented. The patient has not responded to anticoagulant therapy and had hypotension, dyspnea, chest pain, and a pulse deficit but normal sinus rhythm. Simultaneous echocardiogram, ECG, and arterial pulse tracing were used as noninvasive means of monitoring. Nonsurgical correction of a clinical emergency restored the patient to prior normal baseline cardiovascular function. This case illustrates the possibility of restoring normal prosthetic function by supporting the patient medically while undertaking diagnostic testing and arranging surgical intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a malfunctioning Bjork-Shiley mitral valve corrected without surgery.

  5. Nonsurgical ablation of breast cancer: future options for small breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has evolved significantly, facilitated by advancements in technology and imaging and improvements in adjuvant therapy. The changes in surgical management have been characterized by equal or improved outcomes with significantly less morbidity. The next step in this evolution is the minimally invasive or noninvasive ablation of breast cancers as an alternative to lumpectomy. In this article, the various modalities for nonsurgical breast cancer ablation and the clinical experience are reviewed, and some of the next steps necessary for their clinical implementation are outlined.

  6. Periodontitis and bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Luigi; Francioni, Edoardo; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Mascitelli, Eleonora; Marco, Leila Brancato; Tonelli, Duvina Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Periodontitis is a plaque induced disease characterized by tissue destruction. The extent of the alveolar bone loss depends on the host response stimulated by bacterial infection. Recently researchers have focused on the role of the immune system, of RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway and of cytokines network. Another recent field of interest is osteoimmunology that try to explain the relationship between immune and bone cells in activating bone resorption. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms allowed a better understanding of the relationship with other diseases like osteoporosis and also to hypothesize new therapies based on modulation of host response (host modulatory therapy - HMT). The purpose of this mini-review is to briefly discuss these topics. PMID:26604945

  7. Nonsurgical treatment options for basal cell carcinoma - focus on advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Gary; Hamid, Omid

    2013-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the world. It is typically slow growing and usually effectively managed with surgery. However, BCCs in some patients are unsuitable for surgery or the patient may prefer a nonsurgical treatment. Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical option for the primary treatment of either low- or high-risk BCCs. It is associated with high cure rates, albeit somewhat lower than those observed with Mohs micrographic surgery for high-risk BCCs. Not all patients with BCCs are suitable for radiotherapy. Superficial therapies for BCC include topical imiquimod or 5- fluorouracil and photodynamic therapy (PDT). These therapies are generally associated with somewhat lower clearance rates and/or higher recurrence rates than surgery or radiotherapy, although they may be suitable in patients with low-risk BCCs when surgery or radiotherapy are impractical or less appropriate. An appealing feature of PDT is excellent cosmesis, but PDT is not currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and regimens are not well standardized. Vismodegib is a first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor and recent addition to the armamentarium for the treatment of advanced BCC.

  8. Short-term clinical outcomes of laser supported periodontal treatment concept using Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm): a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odor, Alin A.; Violant, Deborah; Badea, Victoria; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Backgrounds: Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers can be used adjacent to the conventional periodontal treatment as minimally invasive non-surgical devices. Aim: To describe the short-term clinical outcomes by combining Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode 940 nm lasers in non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients with periodontal disease (mild, moderate, severe) - 233 teeth and 677 periodontal pockets ranging from 4 mm to 12 mm - were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers in adjunct to manual and piezoelectric scaling and root planning (SRP). Periodontal parameters such as mean probing depth (PD), mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and mean bleeding on probing (BOP) were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the laser treatment using an electronic periodontal chart. Results: At baseline, the mean PD was 4.06 ± 1.06 mm, mean CAL was 4.56 ± 1.43 mm, and mean BOP was 43.8 ± 23.84 %. At 6 months after the laser supported periodontal treatments the mean PD was 2.6 ± 0.58 mm (p <0.001), mean CAL was 3.36 ± 1.24 mm (p <0.001) and mean BOP was 17 ± 9.34 % (p <0.001). Also 3 patients showed radiographic signs of bone regeneration. Conclusion: The combination of two laser wavelengths in adjunct to SRP offers significant improvements of periodontal clinical parameters such as PD, CAL and BOP. Keywords: Laser supported periodontal treatment concept, Er,Cr:YSGG and diode 940nm lasers, Scaling and root planning, Minimally invasive non-surgical device

  9. Periodontal disease in HIV-infected adults in the HAART era: Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Gonçalves, Barbara Mulatinho Lopo; Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has decreased the incidence and prevalence of several oral manifestations such as oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients. Regarding periodontal disease the findings are not clear. This disease represents a group of chronic oral diseases characterized by infection and inflammation of the periodontal tissues. These tissues surround the teeth and provide periodontal protection (the gingival tissue) and periodontal support (periodontal ligament, root cementum, alveolar bone). Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects of these diseases, such as linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing periodontal diseases (NPD) (necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis [NUG], necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis [NUP] and necrotizing stomatitis), and chronic periodontitis, have been widely studied in HIV-infected individuals, but without providing conclusive results. The purpose of this review was to contribute to a better overall understanding of the probable impact of HIV-infection on the characteristics of periodontal infections.

  10. Problems associated with the management of periodontal disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Grove, T K

    1990-03-01

    Periodontal disease is caused by poor oral hygiene. It is the most common cause of oral infection and tooth loss in dogs. Simple periodontal therapy such as repeated root planing at strategic intervals can prevent many serious problems. This chapter presents the origin, clinical presentation, and treatment of periodontal disease in a format that is directly applicable to clinical practice.

  11. Using host response modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, M John; Donley, Timothy G

    2002-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of a complex interaction between microbial plaque, the host's inflammatory response to the plaque, and host modifying factors (e.g., smoking, diabetes, genetics) that may have an impact on the disease process. It is known that plaque initiates periodontal disease but that the host response is responsible for the destruction of periodontal tissues. This article describes why host response modifiers may be used to help control inflammation and tissue destruction as part of the initial phase of periodontal therapy in selected patient groups.

  12. Parameter on acute periodontal diseases. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of acute periodontal diseases. Patients should be informed about the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat acute periodontal diseases appropriately can result in progressive loss of periodontal supporting tissues, an adverse change in prognosis, and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  13. Parameter on aggressive periodontitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of aggressive periodontitis. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat aggressive periodontitis appropriately can result in progressive and often rapid loss of periodontal supporting tissues. This may have an adverse effect upon prognosis and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients (or their parents or guardians, as appropriate) should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  14. Localized severe aggressive periodontitis. Disease progression and tooth preservation: a short case report over 14 years.

    PubMed

    Pelka, Matthias; Petschelt, Anselm

    2009-04-01

    A case of a 31-year-old female with aggressive periodontitis over 14 years is presented. From 1993 to 2000, no periodontal therapy occurred; disease development and progression could be reconstructed upon radiographic findings. In 2000, full-mouth disinfection therapy and antibiotic therapy was performed, as well as regenerative surgical treatments. Seven years after surgical treatment, stable periodontal conditions and clear bone regeneration in the surgical areas was evident.

  15. Periodontal treatment reduces chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Siribamrungwong, Monchai; Yothasamutr, Kasemsuk; Puangpanngam, Kutchaporn

    2014-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation, a non traditional risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, is associated with increasing mortality in chronic kidney disease, especially peritoneal dialysis patients. Periodontitis is a potential treatable source of systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Clinical periodontal status was evaluated in 32 stable chronic peritoneal dialysis patients by plaque index and periodontal disease index. Hematologic, blood chemical, nutritional, and dialysis-related data as well as highly sensitive C-reactive protein were analyzed before and after periodontal treatment. At baseline, high sensitive C-reactive protein positively correlated with the clinical periodontal status (plaque index; r = 0.57, P < 0.01, periodontal disease index; r = 0.56, P < 0.01). After completion of periodontal therapy, clinical periodontal indexes were significantly lower and high sensitivity C-reactive protein significantly decreased from 2.93 to 2.21 mg/L. Moreover, blood urea nitrogen increased from 47.33 to 51.8 mg/dL, reflecting nutritional status improvement. Erythropoietin dosage requirement decreased from 8000 to 6000 units/week while hemoglobin level was stable. Periodontitis is an important source of chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Treatment of periodontal diseases can improve systemic inflammation, nutritional status and erythropoietin responsiveness in peritoneal dialysis patients.

  16. Topical tacrolimus and periodontal therapy in the management of a case of oral chronic GVHD characterized by specific gingival localization.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  17. Vitiligo nonsurgical treatment: a review of latest treatment researches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfei; Mooneyan-Ramchurn, Jessini Soranambal; Zuo, Nan; Feng, Yiguo; Xiao, Shengxiang

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmenting acquired disorder affecting about 1-2% of the world population, regardless of race, ethnic background, or gender. It is characterized by the appearance of milky white maculae because of a loss of melanocytes. The disfiguring nature of vitiligo causes high psychosocial morbidity. This is especially pronounced in populations with darker skin tone, likely because of the marked contrast. A variety of nonsurgical treatment regimens are currently employed in vitiligo. We reviewed the latest studies carried out on different nonsurgical treatment modalities used in vitiligo. All nonsurgical treatment aid to repigment or depigmentation the skin, however, many of them require a prolonged treatment course and may yield minimal results as well as carry unwanted side effects. There is a need for further research into the causes of vitiligo and into discovering better treatments.

  18. Comparison of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Isolated from the Periodontium of Healthy Teeth and Periodontitis-Affected Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Soheilifar, Sara; Amiri, Iraj; Bidgoli, Mohsen; Hedayatipanah, Morad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Stem cell (SC) therapy is a promising technique for tissue regeneration. This study aimed to compare the viability and proliferation ability of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) isolated from the periodontium of healthy and periodontitis-affected teeth to obtain an autologous, easily accessible source of SCs for tissue regeneration in periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: The PDLSCs were isolated from the roots of clinically healthy premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes and periodontally involved teeth with hopeless prognosis (with and without phase I periodontal treatment). Cells were cultured and viability and proliferation ability of third passage cells in each group were evaluated using the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay. The results were statistically analyzed using t-test. Results: No SCs could be obtained from periodontitis-affected teeth without phase I periodontal treatment. The viability of cells was 0.86±0.13 OD/540 in healthy group and 0.4±0.25 OD/540 in periodontitis-affected group (P=0.035). The proliferation ability (population doubling time) of cells obtained from healthy teeth was 4.22±1.23 hours. This value was 2.3±0.35 hours for those obtained from periodontitis-affected teeth (P=0.02). Conclusions: Viability and proliferation ability of cells isolated from the periodontium of healthy teeth were significantly greater than those of cells isolated from the periodontitis-affected teeth. PMID:28127319

  19. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist. PMID:21253201

  20. Sexual function before and after non-surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Whitcomb, Emily; Weidner, Alison C.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Brubaker, Linda; Bradley, Catherine S.; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Zhang, Min; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives (1) to describe sexual function in women seeking treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI); (2) to compare the impact on sexual function of three SUI treatments; and (3) to investigate whether non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improved sexual function. Methods Women with SUI were randomized to continence pessary, behavioral therapy (pelvic floor muscle training and continence strategies), or combination therapy. Sexual function was assessed at baseline and 3-months using short forms of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ). Successful treatment of SUI was assessed with a patient global impression of improvement. ANOVA was used to compare scores between groups. Results At baseline, sexual function was worse among women with mixed incontinence compared to those with pure SUI. After therapy, successful treatment of SUI was associated with greater improvement in PISQ-12 score (2.26 ± 3.24 versus 0.48 ± 3.76, p=0.0007), greater improvement in incontinence with sexual activity (0.45 ± 0.84 versus 0.01 ± 0.71, p=0.0002), and greater reduction in restriction in sexual activity related to fear of incontinence (0.32 ± 0.76 versus −0.06 ± 0.78, p=0.0008). Among those successfully treated for SUI, improvement in continence during sexual activity was greater in both the combined therapy group (p=0.019) and the behavioral group (p=0.02) compared to the pessary group. Conclusions Successful non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improvements in incontinence-specific measures of sexual function. Behavioral therapy may be preferred to pessary for treatment of SUI among women whose incontinence interferes with sexual function. PMID:21572534

  1. Prevention and Periodontal Treatment in Down Syndrome Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de Resende, Maria Lúcia Rubo; Sant’Ana, Adriana Campos Passanezi; Damante, Carla Andreotti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate which type of periodontal preventive and therapeutic approaches presents superior outcomes in patients with Down syndrome (DS). Studies reporting different methods of periodontal care from DS patients were considered eligible. Included clinical studies should indicate at least two periodontal parameters in different periods of assessment. Screening of the articles, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. Electronic search according to the PICO search, with both Key-words and MESH terms were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases until March 2016. Manual search was conducted in four journals, namely Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and Special Care in Dentistry and their electronic databases were searched. Electronic and manual search resulted in 763 papers, and of them 744 were excluded after title/abstract assessment. The full text of 19 potentially eligible publications was screened and 9 studies met inclusion criteria. The results demonstrated the importance to introduce youngest DS patients in preventive programs, as well as participation of parents, caregivers or institutional attendants in supervising/performing oral hygiene. In studies with higher frequency of attendance, all age groups presented superior preventive and therapeutic results, irrespective of the therapeutic approach used (surgical/nonsurgical/periodontal care program). The important factors for reducing periodontal parameters were the frequency of the appointments and association with chlorhexidine/plaque disclosing agents as adjuvant treatment. This systematic review demonstrated that early introduction in periodontal care, participation of parents/caregivers/institutional attendants, frequency of attendance and association with chemical adjuvants (independently of the periodontal treatment adopted) seems to

  2. Role of Lycopene in Preventing Oral Diseases as a Nonsurgical Aid of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur; Arora, Vikram; Mehta, Nishant; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Without pigments, we are nothing. Life presents us with a kaleidoscope of colors. From the green grass of home to a forest's ruddy autumn hues, we are surrounded by living colors. Living things obtain their colors, with few exceptions, from natural pigments. In addition to their role in coloration, natural pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. Of the various classes of pigments in nature, the carotenoids are among the most widespread and important ones, especially due to their varied functions. Lycopene is a red plant pigment found in tomatoes, apricots, guavas, watermelons, papayas, and pink grapefruits, with tomatoes being the largest contributor to the dietary intake of humans. Lycopene exhibits higher singlet oxygen quenching ability. Due to its strong color and nontoxicity, it is a useful food coloring agent. Moreover, it plays a multifunctional role as a nonsurgical aid in the treatment of oral diseases like leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and also prevents the destruction of periodontal tissues. This review article focuses mainly on the role of lycopene in the prevention of various oral diseases. PMID:26330986

  3. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease.

  4. How predictable are periodontal regenerative procedures?

    PubMed

    Zohar, Ron; Tenenbaum, Howard C

    2005-10-01

    Periodontal regeneration has become one of the primary objectives of periodontal therapy. The resulting scientific endeavours have elucidated modes of periodontal wound healing, the growth of periodontal cells and their association with the surrounding matrix, and growth-promoting factors. The periodontal regeneration industry is producing better and more expensive devices, but the criteria for evaluating their success have not progressed to the same extent. Although clinical measurements of attachment level and probing depths, along with radiography, are good methods of evaluating tooth survival and prognosis, they do not indicate true biological regeneration. In addition, the regeneration industry may encourage the overuse of allografts and alloplasts which may serve as an impediment to simple wound healing. This review is a critical assessment of the clinical use of various regenerative tools, specifically bone replacements and membranes. The future of the regeneration industry may depend on the merging of various technologies and biological concepts, including the possible use of biological barriers, various bone and periodontal growth inducers, and artificial matrices that will attract or carry the cells necessary for regeneration.

  5. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases. PMID:26491574

  6. Joint intracapsular disorders: diagnostic and nonsurgical management considerations.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews common intracapsular temporomandibular disorders encountered in the dental practice. It begins with a brief review of normal temporomandibular joint anatomy and function followed by a description of the common types of disorders known as internal derangements. The etiology, history, and clinical presentation of each are reviewed. Nonsurgical management is presented based on current long-term scientific evidence.

  7. Dens in dente: A minimally invasive nonsurgical approach!

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek; Morawala, Abdul; Gupta, Abhilasha; Khandwawala, Naqiyaa

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus, also known as dens in dente, is a rare anomaly affecting human dentition. The condition results in invagination of an amelodental structure within the pulp. This case report discusses the current management protocol of dens invaginatus using a minimally invasive and nonsurgical treatment option. As with most conditions, early diagnosis and preventive measures help minimize complications in dens invaginatus cases. PMID:27656073

  8. Periodontitis and Buerger’s Disease: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Pavlic, Verica; Vujic-Aleksic, Vesna; Zubovic, Nina; Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Buerger’s disease (BD) is a relatively rare thrombotic, occlusive and non-atherosclerotic clinical syndrome of unknown etiology. In recent years, numerous epidemiological studies confirmed the strong association between chronic anaerobic periodontal infection and development of cardiovascular diseases, including BD. Therefore, the aim of this study is to clarify association between periodontal pathogens and Buerger’s disease. Confirmation of presence and identification of periopathogens in patients with BD can be considered crucial in developing novel therapies for BD. Further, periodontal therapy will lead to eventual improvement of BD patients’ condition. PMID:24554799

  9. Dental practitioners with a special interest in periodontics: the West Sussex experience.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, P D; Saner, P; Lesley, R; Beckerson, J; Butler, M; Zanjani, B

    2011-02-12

    The experience of a pilot service involving practitioners with a special interest in periodontics is described. The service functioned as a clinical network between the primary and secondary sector and featured consultant outreach. Between June 2006 and May 2007 it experienced 441 referrals. It improved patient access to periodontal care and was successful in targeting specific disease categories and in meeting key performance indicators. The service was non-surgical and emphasised patient self-efficacy. It produced highly effective clinical outcomes. It was well accepted by both patients and referring practitioners. It did not replace the need for a consultant-led service in the eyes of the referring practitioners. The BPE was used to identify suitable patients; audit indicated that there was a tendency for practitioners to underscore the level of periodontal disease.

  10. Parameter on occlusal traumatism in patients with chronic periodontitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on occlusal traumatism in patients with chronic periodontitis. Occlusal therapy is an integral part of periodontal therapy. Patients should be informed about the occlusal problem, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat occlusal traumatism appropriately in patients with chronic periodontitis may result in progressive loss of bone and an adverse change in prognosis, and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  11. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  12. Periodontal disease and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Arias-Herrera, Santiago; Criado-Cámara, Elena; Bascones-Ilundáin, Jaime; Bascones-Ilundáin, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is considered to be a genetically and environmentally based chronic metabolic and vascular syndrome caused by a partial or total insulin deficiency with alteration in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins culminating with different manifestations in different organisms. In humans hyperglycemia is the main consequence of defects in the secretion and/or action of insulin, and its deregulation can produce secondary lesions in various organs, especially kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels and immune systems. Periodontal disease is an entity of localized infection that involves tooth-supporting tissues. The first clinical manifestation of periodontal disease is the appearance of periodontal pockets, which offer a favorable niche for bacterial colonization. The etiology of periodontal disease is multifactorial, being caused by interactions between multiple micro-organisms (necessary but not sufficient primary etiologic factors), a host with some degree of susceptibility and environmental factors. According to current scientific evidence, there is a symbiotic relationship between diabetes and periodontitis, such that diabetes is associated with an increased incidence and progression of periodontitis, and periodontal infection is associated with poor glycaemic control in diabetes due to poor immune systems. Hence, for a good periodontal control it is necessary to treat both periodontal disease and glycaemic control.

  13. Periodontal considerations for children.

    PubMed

    Song, H Jung

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews periodontal disease and gingival disease and also explores issues relating to mucogingival defects such as gingival hyperplasia, gingival recession, and exposure of impacted canines.

  14. Prognosis--the dilemma of modern periodontics.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, B

    2000-10-01

    As periodontics has progressed towards an understanding of the influences of risk factors such as genetics, smoking and stress in the occurrence and severity of periodontal disease, the question of prognosis, so essential to treatment planning, has become even more perplexing to the clinician. A survey of long term clinical practice gives insight into the outcome of therapy relative to initial severity, and modern concepts of bacteria versus host relationships provide directions for greater predictability. However, it is only with observation over time that a more accurate assessment of prognosis can be made, as response to initial therapeutic measures can be determined.

  15. Effect of periodontal treatment on adipokines in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Damrongrungruang, Teerasak; Hori, Sayaka; Nouno, Kaname; Minagawa, Kumiko; Sato, Misuzu; Miyazaki, Hideo

    2014-12-15

    The association between adipokines and inflammatory periodontal diseases has been studied over the last two decades. This review was intended to explore the observation that periodontal therapy may lead to an improvement of adipokines in diabetic patients. In summary, substantial evidence suggests that diabetes is associated with increased prevalence, extent and severity of periodontitis. Numerous mechanisms have been elucidated to explain the impact of diabetes on the periodontium. However, current knowledge concerning the role of major adipokines indicates only some of their associations with the pathogenesis of periodontitis in type 2 diabetes. Conversely, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral inflammation may have positive effects on the diabetic condition, although evidence for this remains somewhat equivocal.

  16. Investigation of hemorheological parameters in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Seringec, Nurten; Guncu, Guliz; Arihan, Okan; Avcu, Nihal; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). On the other hand, occurrence of CVD has also been related with increased blood viscosity. This study was planned to investigate four main hemorheological parameters contributing to blood viscosity - hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity - and also some biochemical parameters (hs-CRP, fibrinogen, globulin etc.) in patients with periodontal disease. We hypothesized that poor periodontal health would be associated with deterioration of hemorheological properties. According to periodontal health status, subjects were divided into three groups as control (healthy), with plaque induced gingivitis and with chronic periodontitis. All groups included 15 males who had not received periodontal therapy in the last six months before the study, were non-smokers, had no systemic diseases and were not on any medication. Erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation were measured with laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Plasma viscosity was measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test and Spearman Correlation Coefficient. Plasma viscosity (1.36 ± 0.01 mPa.s in the control group and 1.43 ± 0.02 mPa.s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), erythrocyte aggregation tendency (aggregation index, amplitude and t½ were 58.82 ± 1.78% , 20.22 ± 0.40 au, 2.80 ± 0.25 s respectively in the control group, and 67.05 ± 1.47% , 22.19 ± 0.50 au, 1.84 ± 0.15 s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), hs-CRP, fibrinogen and globulin levels were significantly higher, whereas HDL level was significantly lower in the chronic periodontitis group (P <  0.05) compared to the control group. All of these conditions may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in people with periodontal disease, via increasing blood viscosity.

  17. Interdisciplinary orthodontic treatment for a patient with generalized aggressive periodontitis: Assessment of IgG antibodies to identify type of periodontitis and correct timing of treatment.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Deguchi, Toru; Honjo, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koji; Kono, Takayuki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a great challenge to clinicians when providing orthodontic treatment because of the potential for progression of periodontal disease. In this article, we report the successful comprehensive orthodontic treatment of bimaxillary protrusion and severe crowding in an adult with generalized aggressive periodontitis. A woman, aged 22 years 7 months, with a chief complaint of incisal crowding was diagnosed with a skeletal Class I malocclusion associated with severe anterior crowding, possibly worsened by generalized aggressive periodontitis. In addition to a periodontal examination, a blood IgG antibody titer analysis and microbiologic examination for periodontal pathogens were used to diagnose the type of periodontal disease and determine the proper timing to initiate orthodontic treatment. The total active treatment period was 28 months, followed by periodontal prostheses and regeneration therapy. Consequently, satisfactory facial profile, occlusion, and periodontal health were maintained for at least 36 months. These results indicate that efficient screening is important for providing successful orthodontic treatment in patients with advanced periodontal disease. This report also demonstrates the diagnostic importance of blood IgG antibody titer assays and microbiologic examinations to detect periodontal pathogens.

  18. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  19. Bovine embryo recovery by filtration of non-surgical flushings.

    PubMed

    Pugh, A; Trounson, A O; Aarts, M H; McPhee, S

    1980-04-01

    A simple filtration system has been developed for the rapid collection of bovine embryos from large fluid volumes such as non-surgical uterine flushings. The technique utilizes a nylon plankton net sieve of 56 mum pore size and was evaluated on the non-surgical flushings of 18 superovulated cows. Approximately 500 ml of flushings from each uterine horn was collected in sedimentation flasks and two aliquots of 20 ml removed from the bottom of the flask after standing for 20 min, and searched for embryos. The remainder of the flushings was passed through the sieve and the sieve examined for embryos. Seven days (Day 7) after insemination, 53.3% (40 75 ) of embryos were found on the sieve or 47.2% of all normal embryos. On Day 12,28% (7 25 ) of eggs were found on the sieve, all of which were unfertilized or degenerate. All embryos were located within 10 min of starting filtration.

  20. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  1. Experimental evaluation of Ethibloc for nonsurgical nephrectomy. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.C.; Bowers, T.; Chuang, V.P.; Tsai, C.C.

    1982-11-01

    Six adult dogs weighing 18-28 kg were used to evaluate a new embolic material, Ethibloc, for nonsurgical nephrectomy. Both acute and chronic studies were performed. Results indicated that Ethibloc is easily administered and neither toxic nor mutagenic (at 9 weeks). However, it exhibits inadequate radiopacity at the dosages used and may require a balloon catheter (which could cause some Ethibloc to be forced through the glomerular capillaries) or repeat embolization to achieve permanent and complete renal infarction.

  2. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K. R.; Dinesh, M.; Pavithran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule. PMID:27366272

  3. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K R; Dinesh, M; Pavithran, K

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule.

  4. Treatment of impotence. 1. Nonsurgical methods.

    PubMed

    Baum, N

    1987-05-15

    Male sexual dysfunction is a problem that is quite prevalent in our society. Until recently, the only treatments for impotence were testosterone injection, sex therapy, and implantation of a penile prosthesis. These methods remain in use when appropriate. However, now that the pathophysiology of erection is better understood, the dopamine agonist, intracorporal injection, and the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor blocker have been added to the treatment list. Gadgets that artificially increase the blood supply to the penis are sometimes used. The withdrawal of drugs that affect sexual function may be sufficient.

  5. Current understanding of the role of microscopic monitoring, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide in the treatment of periodontal disease. Committee on Research, Science and Therapy. The American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    The Keyes technique came to national attention following a reference in The New York Times in the late 1970s. Several lay press articles and discussions on national television served to further focus the interest of patients, general dentists, and periodontists on this potential approach to periodontal therapy. Early evaluations of the data on the technique resulted in an Academy position paper in 1981. Recognizing that there was a lack of well-controlled studies on the technique led to extensive research efforts supported by the National Institute of Dental Research. The results of those efforts have provided substantial new information that serves as the basis of the present position paper. Although this technique is no longer widely used in the United States, some patients and dentists may have not had the benefit of the new data.

  6. Surgical and nonsurgical management of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sherly; Rivero, Haidy G; Erlikh, Irina V; Griffith, Larry F; Kondamudi, Vasantha K

    2014-05-15

    Cholelithiasis, or gallstones, is one of the most common and costly of all the gastrointestinal diseases. The incidence of gallstones increases with age. At-risk populations include persons with diabetes mellitus, persons who are obese, women, rapid weight cyclers, and patients on hormone therapy or taking oral contraceptives. Most patients are asymptomatic; gallstones are discovered incidentally during ultrasonography or other imaging of the abdomen. Asymptomatic patients have a low annual rate of developing symptoms (about 2% per year). Once symptoms appear, the usual presentation of uncomplicated gallstones is biliary colic, caused by the intermittent obstruction of the cystic duct by a stone. The pain is characteristically steady, is usually moderate to severe in intensity, is located in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant of the abdomen, lasts one to five hours, and gradually subsides. If pain persists with the onset of fever or high white blood cell count, it should raise suspicion for complications such as acute cholecystitis, gallstone pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. Ultrasonography is the best initial imaging study for most patients, although additional imaging studies may be indicated. The management of acute biliary colic mainly involves pain control with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or narcotic pain relievers. Oral dissolution therapy is usually minimally successful and used only if the patient cannot undergo surgery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains the surgical choice for symptomatic and complicated gallstones, with a shorter hospital stay and shorter convalescence period than open cholecystectomy. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is an alternative for patients who are critically ill with gallbladder empyema and sepsis.

  7. Development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel injectable smart gels of azithromycin for chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, M P; Kumar, T M Pramod; Avinash, B S; Kumar, G Sheela

    2013-04-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory condition affecting teeth resulting in progressive destruction of periodontal ligaments, resorption of alveolar bone and loss of teeth. Treatment of periodontitis includes surgical and non surgical management. Systemic antibiotics are also used for the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of this research was to formulate smart gel system of azithromycin (AZT) and to evaluate in vitro and in vivo for non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis. Azithromycin dihydrate, used systemically in the treatment of periodontitis, was formulated into smart gels using biodegradable, thermosensitive polymer Pluronic® F-127 (PF-127) and Hydroxy Ethyl Cellulose (HEC) as copolymer. The prepared smart gels were evaluated for sterility, content uniformity, gelation temperature and time, syringeability, rheological behavior, in vitro diffusion and in vivo efficacy in human patients. The prepared smart gels were clear and transparent, sterile, thermoresponsive and injectable. Viscosity of gels increased with increase in concentration of polymer/co-polymer and also with temperature. They gelled in short response time below the body temperature. In vitro release studies showed controlled drug release which was influenced significantly by the properties and concentration of PF-127 and HEC. In vivo efficacy studies showed a significant improvement (p <0.001) in clinical parameters such as gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding index and plaque index. The developed azithromycin smart gel system is a novel approach for the treatment of chronic periodontitis since it reduces the dose and side effects, bypasses the usual surgical procedures and improves patient compliance.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients.

  9. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  10. Integrins in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Larjava, Hannu; Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari

    2014-07-15

    Cell surface integrin receptors mediate cell adhesion, migration and cellular signaling in all nucleated cells. They are activated by binding to extracellular ligands or by intracellular proteins, such as kindlins that engage with their cytoplasmic tails. Cells in the periodontal tissues express several integrins with overlapping ligand-binding capabilities. A distinct phenotype in the periodontium has only been described for knockouts or mutations of three integrin subunits, α11, β6 and β2. Integrin α11β1 appears to have some regulatory function in the periodontal ligament of continuously erupting incisors in mice. Integrin αvβ6 is expressed in the junctional epithelium (JE) of the gingiva. Animals deficient in this receptor develop classical signs of periodontal disease, including inflammation, apical migration of the JE and bone loss, suggesting that it plays a role in the regulation of periodontal inflmmation, likely through activation of transforming growth factor-β1. Lack of integrin activation in the JE is also associated with periodontitis. Patients with kindlin-1 mutations have severe early-onset periodontal disease. Finally, patients with mutations in the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin subunit have severe periodontal problems due to lack of transiting neutrophils in the periodontal tissues.

  11. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  12. Occlusal trauma--periodontal concerns.

    PubMed

    Hallmon, W W

    2001-10-01

    While there is evidence that suggests that occlusal trauma is a risk factor for periodontal destruction, there is no evidence that indicates that occlusal trauma will initiate periodontal destruction. Effective plaque control and compliance with periodontal maintenance recommendations are key and essential factors necessary to assure successful treatment and control of periodontal disease.

  13. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  14. Parameter on systemic conditions affected by periodontal diseases. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on systemic conditions affected by periodontal diseases. It is well known that systemic conditions may affect the onset, progression, and treatment of such diseases (see Parameter on Periodontitis Associated With Systemic Conditions, pages 876-879). The concept of periodontal diseases as localized entities affecting only the teeth and supporting apparatus is increasingly being questioned. Periodontal diseases may have widespread systemic effects. While these effects may be limited in some individuals, periodontal infections may significantly impact systemic health in others, and may serve as risk indicators for certain systemic diseases or conditions. As part of the approach to establishing and maintaining health, patients should be informed of the possible effects of periodontal infection on their overall well-being. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  15. The role of bacteriophages in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Graça; Silva, Maria Daniela; Peddey, Mark; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-10-01

    The human periodontium health is commonly compromised by chronic inflammatory conditions and has become a major public health concern. Dental plaque, the precursor of periodontal disease, is a complex biofilm consisting mainly of bacteria, but also archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses. Viruses that specifically infect bacteria - bacteriophages - are most common in the oral cavity. Despite this, their role in the progression of periodontal disease remains poorly explored. This review aims to summarize how bacteriophages interact with the oral microbiota, their ability to increase bacterial virulence and mediate the transfer of resistance genes and suggests how bacteriophages can be used as an alternative to the current periodontal disease therapies.

  16. A periodontal attachment mechanism without alveolar bone. Case report.

    PubMed

    Novak, M J; Polson, A M; Caton, J; Freeman, E; Meitner, S

    1983-02-01

    A 22-year-old black male was referred for periodontal therapy because of radiographic evidence of advanced bone loss associated with the posterior teeth. Clinical examination revealed gingivitis, normal sulcus depths, and minimal loss of clinical attachment. Complete blood counts, serum chemistry, and neutrophil function were within normal limits. Histological, histochemical and ultrastructural analysis of an extracted tooth revealed no loss of attachment; large areas of the cementum were collagen-poor and, ultrastructurally, resembled afibrillar cementum. It is proposed that the periodontal attachment mechanism present in this case was associated with a localized failure in normal periodontal development.

  17. Periodontal disease in Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Nuti, Niccolò; Ferrari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man suffering from Paget’s disease of bone and periodontal disease was examined in anticipation of bisphosphonate treatment. The previous therapy with clodronate resulted ineffective and markers of bone turnover were markedly elevated. Periodontal disease was correctly approached and treated with an excellent outcome. 5 mg zoledronate iv infusion induced a remarkable reduction of bone markers which persisted on time within the normal range. After zoledronate treatment no signs of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) were observed. A correct management of periodontal disease is mandatory in pagetic patients on bisphosphonate treatment. PMID:26604949

  18. [Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients].

    PubMed

    Krausz, E; Einy, S; Aizenbud, D; Levin, L

    2011-07-01

    Orthodontic treatment poses a significant challenge in patients suffering from periodontal disease. Providing orthodontic treatment to periodontal patients should be carefully planned and performed in a tight collaboration between the orthodontist and periodontist. Resolution and stabilization of the periodontal condition is a pre-requisite for orthodontic treatment initiation. Careful oral hygiene performance and highly frequent recall periodontal visits are also crucial. Pre- or post- orthodontic periodontal surgery might help providing better treatment outcomes.

  19. Clinical, Radiographic and Microbiological Evaluation of High Level Laser Therapy, a New Photodynamic Therapy Protocol, in Peri-Implantitis Treatment; a Pilot Experience

    PubMed Central

    Caccianiga, Gianluigi; Rey, Gerard; Baldoni, Marco; Paiusco, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Endosseous implants are widely used to replace missing teeth but mucositis and peri-implantitis are the most frequent long-term complications related with dental implants. Removing all bacterial deposits on contaminated implant surface is very difficult due to implant surface morphology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal potential of photodynamic therapy by using a new high level laser irradiation protocol associated with hydrogen peroxide in peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. 10 patients affected by peri-implantitis were selected for this study. Medical history, photographic documentation, periodontal examination, and periapical radiographs were collected at baseline and 6 months after surgery. Microbiological analysis was performed with PCR Real Time. Each patient underwent nonsurgical periodontal therapy and surgery combined with photodynamic therapy according to High Level Laser Therapy protocol. Results. All peri-implant pockets were treated successfully, without having any complication and not showing significant differences in results. All clinical parameters showed an improvement, with a decrease of Plaque Index (average decrease of 65%, range 23–86%), bleeding on probing (average decrease of 66%, range 26–80%), and probing depth (average decrease of 1,6 mm, range 0,46–2,6 mm). Periapical radiographs at 6 months after surgery showed a complete radiographic filling of peri-implant defect around implants treated. Results showed a decrease of total bacterial count and of all bacterial species, except for Eikenella corrodens, 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Photodynamic therapy using HLLT appears to be a good adjunct to surgical treatment of peri-implantitis. PMID:27379251

  20. Update on Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Slots, J

    1999-10-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen of periodontitis in young individuals. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen of severe adult periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis can be transmitted from family member to family member and may cause periodontitis in the recipient individual. In the USA, A. actinomycetemcomitans occurs more frequently in Hispanics and Asians than in Caucasians. P. gingivalis is more common in Hispanics, Asians and Blacks than in Caucasians. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis strains differ in genotype, serotype, toxin and enzyme production, and cellular invasiveness. Variation in virulence may help explain differing clinical outcomes of periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis infections. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cannot be eradicated from the great majority of deep periodontal pockets by mechanical debridement alone. A. actinomycetemcomitans may be removed from subgingival sites by adjunctive systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole or other appropriate antibiotic therapies. Subgingival eradication of P. gingivalis may require periodontal surgery as well as antibiotic therapy.

  1. A periodontal case report by Dr. S.L. Clemens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2010-07-01

    Mark Twain provides a humorous and insightful look into the origins of periodontal therapy and anesthesia in "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair". The main character of this story is Dr. John Riggs, the father of periodontics. Dr. Horace Wells, a pioneer in the field of anesthesia, also appears in the story. Twain presents his autobiographical experiences with dentistry in his literary work in a form that can be seen to be similar to a case report in a professional dental journal.

  2. Parameter on "refractory" periodontitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of "refractory " periodontitis. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. No treatment is very likely to result in further progression of the disease and eventual tooth loss. Given this information, patients should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  3. Effectiveness of ozone against periodontal pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Huth, Karin C; Quirling, Martina; Lenzke, Stefanie; Paschos, Ekaterini; Kamereck, Klaus; Brand, Korbinian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2011-06-01

    Ozone has been proposed as an adjunct antiseptic in periodontitis therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effectiveness of gaseous/aqueous ozone, in comparison with that of the established antiseptic chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), against periodontal microorganisms. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Parvimonas micra in planktonic or biofilm cultures were exposed, for 1 min, to gaseous ozone, aqueous ozone, CHX, or phosphate-buffered saline (control). None of the agents was able to substantially reduce the A. actinomycetemcomitans count in biofilm cultures. In contrast, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. micra could be eliminated by 2% CHX or by ozone gas at 53 gm(-3) . Significantly greater antimicrobial effects were observed against planktonic cultures than against biofilm-associated bacteria. The rate of killing was influenced by the species of bacteria, and by the type and concentration of agent. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of aqueous ozone (20 μg ml(-1) ) or gaseous ozone (≥ 4 gm(-3) ) compared with 2% CHX but they were more effective than 0.2% CHX. Therefore, high-concentrated gaseous and aqueous ozone merit further investigation as antiseptics in periodontitis therapy. A safe system for applying gaseous ozone into the periodontal pocket that avoids inhalation still needs to be developed.

  4. Periodontal diseases: microbiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Liébana, José; Castillo, Ana María; Alvarez, Marta

    2004-01-01

    The location of plaque-associated gingivitis at the gingival portion of the tooth plays an essential role in its genesis. However, at times local and other host response modifying factors also have an influence. The pathogeny of periodontitis is more complex. The microorganisms that comprise subgingival plaque are capable of acting directly on periodontal tissues or of modifying the host response, whereas the participation of the plaque per se (normal, decreased, or increased) is as decisive as the action of the bacteria themselves in the emergence of the disease. Different types of periodontitis are associated with specific microorganisms. The most periodontopathogenic are A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and T. forsythensis. Periodontitis as a whole, represent the source of complications such as root caries, endoperiodontal processes and periodontal abscesses. They are associated with various illnesses such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and respiratory infections, amongst others, as well as pathological oral halitosis. The different modalities of PCR are particularly important in the microbiological diagnosis of periodontitis, although on the negative side of things, it must be pointed out that in vitro sensitivity studies cannot be performed using this technique. First line antibiotic treatment of periodontitis includes amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid, metronidazole (associated or not with amoxicillin) and clindamycin.

  5. Effectiveness of alendronate as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of periodontitis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Alendronate has been proposed as a local and systemic drug treatment used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of periodontitis. However, its effectiveness has yet to be conclusively established. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to assess the effectiveness of SRP with alendronate on periodontitis compared to SRP alone. Methods Five electronic databases were used by 2 independent reviewers to identify relevant articles from the earliest records up to September 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing SRP with alendronate to SRP with placebo in the treatment of periodontitis were included. The outcome measures were changes in bone defect fill, probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) from baseline to 6 months. A fixed-effect or random-effect model was used to pool the extracted data, as appropriate. Mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochrane χ2 and I2 tests. Results After the selection process, 8 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with SRP alone, the adjunctive mean benefits of locally delivered alendronate were 38.25% for bone defect fill increase (95% CI=33.05–43.45; P<0.001; I2=94.0%), 2.29 mm for PD reduction (95% CI=2.07–2.52 mm; P<0.001; I2=0.0%) and 1.92 mm for CAL gain (95% CI=1.55–2.30 mm; P<0.001; I2=66.0%). In addition, systemically administered alendronate with SRP significantly reduced PD by 0.36 mm (95% CI=0.18–0.55 mm; P<0.001; I2=0.0%) and increased CAL by 0.39 mm (95% CI=0.11–0.68 mm; P=0.006; I2=6.0%). Conclusions The collective evidence regarding the adjunctive use of alendronate locally and systemically with SRP indicates that the combined treatment can improve the efficacy of non-surgical periodontal therapy on increasing CAL and bone defect fill and reducing PD. However, precautions must be exercised in interpreting these results, and multicenter studies evaluating

  6. Periodontal tissue engineering and regeneration: current approaches and expanding opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2010-04-01

    The management of periodontal tissue defects that result from periodontitis represents a medical and socioeconomic challenge. Concerted efforts have been and still are being made to accelerate and augment periodontal tissue and bone regeneration, including a range of regenerative surgical procedures, the development of a variety of grafting materials, and the use of recombinant growth factors. More recently, tissue-engineering strategies, including new cell- and/or matrix-based dimensions, are also being developed, analyzed, and employed for periodontal regenerative therapies. Tissue engineering in periodontology applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum. It is based on an understanding of the role of periodontal formation and aims to grow new functional tissues rather than to build new replacements of periodontium. Although tissue engineering has merged to create more opportunities for predictable and optimal periodontal tissue regeneration, the technique and design for preclinical and clinical studies remain in their early stages. To date, the reconstruction of small- to moderate-sized periodontal bone defects using engineered cell-scaffold constructs is technically feasible, and some of the currently developed concepts may represent alternatives for certain ideal clinical scenarios. However, the predictable reconstruction of the normal structure and functionality of a tooth-supporting apparatus remains challenging. This review summarizes current regenerative procedures for periodontal healing and regeneration and explores their progress and difficulties in clinical practice, with particular emphasis placed upon current challenges and future possibilities associated with tissue-engineering strategies in periodontal regenerative medicine.

  7. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with advanced periodontal disease: 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Carlos Alberto Estevanell; Allgayer, Susiane; Calvete, Ernani da Silva; Polido, Waldemar Daudt

    2013-09-01

    This case report demonstrates the interdisciplinary treatment of an adult patient with a Class II malocclusion, convex profile, incompetent lips, gummy smile, and advanced periodontal loss. Initial periodontal-endodontic treatment was followed by orthodontic and orthognathic surgical therapies. An esthetic facial profile, a pleasing smile, an appropriate occlusion, and overall good treatment outcomes, including the periodontal condition, remained stable 11 years after active orthodontic treatment.

  8. [Nutrition and periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Indrei, L L

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult ro assess the role of nutrition in the etiology and progression of periodontal disease because many other factors besides the local effect of plaque affect periodontal tissue metabolism. It is clear that nutrition can affect host response to bacterial plaque and it is also apparent that there may be a need for the intake of greater amounts of certain nutrients (such as ascorbic acid, iron etc.). Inadequate nutrient intake or deficiency is significant because of the number of interactions that occur during the assimilation of foods and the effects of stress and medication. Periodontal health cannot be achieved unless nutrient deficiency is corrected along with the other phases of treatment.

  9. Surgical and Non-Surgical Interventions for Obesity in Service of Preserving Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Andreana P.; Alosco, Michael L.; Gunstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to highlight what is currently known about the mechanisms of obesity-related cognitive impairment and weight-loss-related cognitive improvement, and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of available treatments. Methods The manuscript is based on a live debate, presenting the main advantages and disadvantages of exercise interventions and bariatric surgery as related to cognitive functioning. The live debate took place during a one-day conference on Diabetes, Obesity and the Brain, organized by the American Psychosomatic Society in October of 2013. Results While it is well established that bariatric surgery tends to lead to greater weight loss, better glycemic control, and cognitive improvement (effect sizes ranging between 0.61 to 0.78) during the first one to two years post intervention than non-surgical treatments, medical complications are possible, and follow-up data beyond five years is limited. In contrast, non-surgical therapies have been extensively studied in a variety of clinical settings and have proved that they can sustain positive health outcomes up to 10 years later, but their cognitive benefits tend to be more modest (effect sizes ranging from 0.18 to 0.69) and long-term regiment compliance, especially in obese individuals is uncertain. Conclusions Rather than focusing on debating whether surgical or no-surgical interventions for obesity are better, additional research is needed to identify the most efficient and practical combination of approaches to ensure sustained positive health outcomes for the largest number of patients possible. PMID:26163819

  10. New approaches to non-surgical sterilization for dogs and cats: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda

    2016-11-28

    Over the last 40 years, researchers have explored methods to non-surgically suppress fertility in animals. Immunocontraception has been used to control wildlife populations but does not confer long-term immunity. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist deslorelin, formulated as an implant to provide 6-month to 1-year suppression of fertility in male dogs, is available commercially in some countries. Neither of these approaches provide permanent sterility. A single-dose, permanent treatment would be a valuable tool in dog and cat population control. The Michelson Prize and Grants (MPG) programme was initiated "to eliminate shelter euthanasia of healthy, adoptable companion animals and reduce populations of feral and free-roaming cats and dogs" offering a $25 million US prize for a non-surgical sterilant that is effective as a single treatment in both male and female dogs and cats. Michelson Prize and Grants programme has offered US $50 million in grant money for research and has attracted scientists worldwide. Approaches under study include gene therapy, small interfering RNA to inhibit reproductive targets and delivery of cytotoxins to pituitary gonadotrophs or GnRH producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Research in implant technology that could deliver compounds over an animal's lifetime is also underway. Details of funded grants and results to date can be found at: http://www.michelsonprizeandgrants.org/michelson-grants/research-findings. The next steps are translating the most promising research into products. The Alliance for Contraception of Cats and Dogs (ACC&D) is helping to research practical methods of marking sterilized animals to avoid costly retreatment and population modelling that will help guide field workers in use of resources for sterilization programmes.

  11. Detection of Periodontal Markers in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Åsa; Carlén, Anette; Bengtsson, Lisbeth; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare the detection frequency of periodontopathogens by using the Pado Test 4.5 and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique in chronic periodontitis patients. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were tested cross-sectionally with DNA/RNA oligogenomic probe method (IAI Pado Test 4.5) and DNA/DNA whole genomic probe (checkerboard) method. Samples were taken by two paper points at the deepest site in each of the four quadrants and pooled into one sample for each of the two methods. The samples were sent to the two laboratories (IAI, Zuchwil, Switzerland, and Oral Microbiology Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and were analyzed in a routine setting for the presence and amount of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. While Pado Test 4.5 detected the four periodontal pathogens in 11 (36.7%) of the patients, the checkerboard method showed presence in all patients (100%) using the lower score (Score 1 corresponding to 104 bacterial cells) and 16 (53.3%) using a higher treshold (score 3 corresponding to between >105 and 106 cells). The results of the present study showed low agreement for a positive microbiological outcome using the two diagnostic methods. It was also concluded that microbiological analysis in practice should include a larger number of bacterial species to better serve as markers for a diseased associated flora in chronic periodontitis cases. PMID:21769304

  12. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia Furtado; Huang, Hong; McAninley, Suzanna; Alfant, Barnett; Harrison, Peter; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Walker, Clay; Shaddox, Luciana Macchion

    2015-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteinases reported to mediate multiple functions associated with periodontal destruction and inflammation. We have previously reported high MMP levels in African-American children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). However, little is known about MMP reductions in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after therapy. This study aimed to evaluate MMP levels in the GCF following treatment of LAP and to correlate these levels with clinical response. Methods GCF samples were collected from 29 African-American individuals diagnosed with LAP. GCF was collected from one diseased site (pocket depth [PD]>4mm, bleeding on probing [BoP] and clinical attachment level [CAL] ≥2mm) and one healthy site (PD≤3mm, no BoP) from each individual at baseline, 3 and 6 months after periodontal treatment, which consisted of full-mouth SRP and systemic antibiotics. The volume of GCF was controlled using a calibrated gingival fluid meter and levels of MMP-1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 were assessed using fluorometric kits. Results MMP-1, 8, 9 12, and 13 levels were reduced significantly up to 6 months, at which point were comparable with healthy sites. Significant correlations were noted between MMP-2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 levels and % of sites with PD>4mm. MMP-3, 12 and 13 levels also correlated with mean pocket depth of affected sites. Conclusion Treatment of LAP with SRP and systemic antibiotics was effective in reducing the local levels specific MMPs in African-American individuals, which correlated positively with some clinical parameters. PMID:23537121

  13. Combined modality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    Treatment approaches for esophageal cancer include primary treatment (surgical or nonsurgical) or adjuvant treatment (preoperative or postoperative). Primary treatments include surgery alone, radiation therapy alone, and radiation therapy plus chemotherapy (combined modality therapy). Adjuvant therapies include preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy, preoperative chemotherapy, and preoperative combined modality therapy. There is considerable controversy as to the ideal therapeutic approach. This review will examine the results of these approaches as well as combined modality therapy using novel regimens.

  14. Clinical applications of radiofrequency: nonsurgical skin tightening (thermage).

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Darryl J

    2009-04-01

    Thermage is a nonsurgical treatment for sagging skin in the jowl, neck, and eyelids. Abdominal striae, loose upper arm skin and buttock sagging, and improvement of the appearance of cellulite have become amenable to the radiofrequency treatment. Radiofrequency passed through cooled epidermis allows for radiofrequency-induced thermal damage to the dermis and deep dermal collagen (fibrous septae). The remodeling of the collagen leads to clinically discernible improvement in the sagging skin and skin quality; the remodeling of deep dermal collagen (fibrous septae) allows modeling of contours and improvement of the cellulite appearance.

  15. Spontaneous pneumoperitoneum and other nonsurgical causes of intraperitoneal free gas.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N. M.; Watkin, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    Intraperitoneal free gas seen radiologically as air under the diaphragm nearly always indicates a perforated abdominal viscus that requires surgical intervention. Rarely, however, the presence of a pneumoperitoneum may not indicate an intra-abdominal perforation and thus may not require laparotomy. Such a situation is termed spontaneous or nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum. In this review, we explore the aetiological mechanisms and the pathophysiology of the appearance of intra-abdominal free gas. An appreciation of the condition and its likely aetiological factors should improve awareness and possibly reduce the imperative to perform an emergency laparotomy on an otherwise well patient with an unexplained pneumoperitoneum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9373590

  16. Stem cell-delivery therapeutics for periodontal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Sun, Hai-Hua; Lu, Hong; Yu, Qing

    2012-09-01

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts to regenerate the complex system of tooth-supporting apparatus (i.e., the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and root cementum) after loss/damage due to periodontitis have made some progress recently and provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future regenerative therapies. Concentrated efforts have now moved from the use of guided tissue/bone regeneration technology, a variety of growth factors and various bone grafts/substitutes toward the design and practice of endogenous regenerative technology by recruitment of host cells (cell homing) or stem cell-based therapeutics by transplantation of outside cells to enhance periodontal tissue regeneration and its biomechanical integration. This shift is driven by the general inability of conventional therapies to deliver satisfactory outcomes, particularly in cases where the disease has caused large tissue defects in the periodontium. Cell homing and cell transplantation are both scientifically meritorious approaches that show promise to completely and reliably reconstitute all tissue and connections damaged through periodontal disease, and hence research into both directions should continue. In view of periodontal regeneration by paradigms that unlock the body's innate regenerative potential has been reviewed elsewhere, this paper specifically explores and analyses the stem cell types and cell delivery strategies that have been or have the potential to be used as therapeutics in periodontal regenerative medicine, with particular emphasis placed on the efficacy and safety concerns of current stem cell-based periodontal therapies that may eventually enter into the clinic.

  17. Periodontitis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela; Deglovic, Juraj; Varga, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Today's knowledge and studies show a firm correlation between osteoporosis and periodontitis, particularly in postmenopausal women. This review study deals with epidemiological and etiopathogenetic association between chronic periodontitis and an osteoporosis. A special emphasis is put on explanation of possible relations between a premature tooth loss and decrease of length and density of jaw bones, particularly their alveolar prolongations. The second part of the paper deals with principles of treatment in patients suffering of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis reduces density of jaw bones and decreases a number of teeth in jaws, but it does not affect other clinical signs and markers of periodontitis such as inflammation, bleeding and the depth of periodontal pockets and microbial plaque.

  18. [Treatment of advanced periodontal and periapical lesion caused by malformed lingual groove with guided tissue regeneration: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-ming; Sun, Qing-Feng; Yang, Pi-shan

    2005-08-01

    This paper reported one case with severe periodontal lesions caused by malformed lingual groove treated by guided tissue regeneration. The periodontal lesion was exposed palatally after the tooth had been treated with root canal therapy, the alveolar bone and the root surface was prepared, an unabsorbable member of e-PTFE was placed into the wound,and removed after 4 weeks, the patient was followed up for 3 years. The lesion recovered well three years after the operation, all of the periodontal tissue was in a healthy condition. It is advisable that guided periodontal tissue regeneration can be used as a new method to treat periodontal destruction induced by malformed lingual groove.

  19. Pharmacology of Periodontal Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    k 7RD-A157 116 PHARMRCOLOGY’ OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE(U) UNIVERSITY OF i/ I HEALTH SCIENCES/CHICAGO MEDICAL SCHOOL DEPT OF I PHARMACOLOGY S F HOFF 24...University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School Department of 3333 Green Bay Road Telephone Pharmacology North Chicago, Illinois 60064...Region Bethesda, MD 20814-5044 • .RE: Annual Letter Report , ONR Contract #N00014-84-K-0562 " Pharmacology of Periodontal Disease" Dear Capt. Hancock

  20. Comparative molecular analysis of bacterial species associated with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    De Iuliis, V; Ursi, S; Di Tommaso, L M; Caruso, M; Marino, A; D Ercole, S; Caputi, S; Sinjari, B; Festa, F; Macri, M; Martinotti, S; Vitullo, G; Toniato, E

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disorder affecting the supporting teeth structures, including gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing loss of connective tissue, reabsorption of alveolar bone and formation of periodontal pockets. The aim of this study is to find a correlation between bacterial growth and periodontal disease. Fifty-seven patients aged between 21 and 65 years, median age 46 years, were enrolled. According to gingival pocket depth, ranging from 3 to 7 mm, patients were divided into two groups: the first (30 patients, 53%) with deep pockets ³ 5 mm and the second (27 patients, 47%) less than 5 mm. The samples taken were processed for microbiological analysis by absolute quantitative real-time Taq-Man technique. Patients affected by periodontal disease were 32 (56%) and patients with gingival bleeding were 35 (61%). This data showed that the presence, the type and the bacterial load in gingival pockets were strongly correlated with gingival depth, periodontal disease and gingival bleeding. Quantitative microbiological analysis is a key point to improve patient compliance, allowing to choose the specific antibiotic treatment. avoiding antibiotic resistance and ensuring the successful outcome of therapy for periodontal disease.

  1. A comprehensive clinical competency-based assessment in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Shiloah, J; Scarbecz, M; Bland, P S; Hottel, T L

    2017-05-01

    Traditional periodontics clinical examinations in dental education frequently assess a narrow set of clinical skills and do not adequately assess the ability of students to independently manage a periodontal patient. As an alternative, the authors developed a comprehensive periodontics competency case experience (CCCE) for senior dental students and surveyed students regarding their experience with the CCCE. Students challenging the CCCE must treat a patient with moderate periodontitis and must independently decide when a state of periodontal and oral health has been achieved. Students are also required to conduct an oral presentation to periodontology faculty. Dental students who completed the CCCE had a favourable impression of the experience, compared with the traditional clinical examinations taken in the junior year. The majority of students rated all the components of the CCCE as 'somewhat' or 'very helpful'. About 72.4% of students felt that being able to work independently on the examination was very helpful for learning about the clinical management of patients with periodontal disease, followed by 'simulation of care in private practice' (65.5%), and oral photography experience (55.2%). The greatest difficulty reported by students was finding an acceptable patient. About 62.1% of students rated 'finding the right patient' as very difficult. Students reported having to screen a mean of 5.9 patients (SD: 4.5) to find a qualified patient. The results of the survey will be useful in improving the examination as an assessment tool in periodontal therapy.

  2. Pregnancy following nonsurgical donor ovum transfer to a functionally agonadal woman

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.V.; Macaso, T.M.; Ishida, E.H.; Giudice, L.; Marshall, J.R.; Buster, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report this country's first nonsurgical donor ovum transfer pregnancy in a functionally agonadal woman who had received chemotherapy and radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. For women with ovarian failure, nonsurgical uterine lavage and ovum transfer may provide an opportunity for motherhood that was not possible previously.

  3. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  4. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  5. [Non-surgical management after blunt traumatic liver injuries: A review article].

    PubMed

    Noyola-Villalobos, Héctor Faustino; Loera-Torres, Marco Antonio; Jiménez-Chavarría, Enrique; Núñez-Cantú, Olliver; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Arcaute-Velázquez, Fernando Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic trauma is a common cause for admissions in the Emergency Room. Currently, non-surgical management is the standard treatment in haemodynamically stable patients with a success rate of around 85 to 98%. This haemodynamic stability is the most important factor in selecting the appropriate patient. Adjuncts in non-surgical management are angioembolisation, image-guided drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure in non-surgical management is relatively rare but potentially fatal, and needs to be recognised and aggressively treated as early as possible. The main cause of failure in non-surgical management is persistent haemorrhage. The aim of this paper is to describe current evidence and guidelines that support non-surgical management of liver injuries in blunt trauma.

  6. Enhancing periodontal health through regenerative approaches: a commentary on the need for patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Inglehart, Marita R

    2015-02-01

    Starting in the 1970s, social scientists have discussed the importance of assessing subjective indicators of well-being and quality of life. Medical researchers followed this line of reasoning since the 1990s, emphasizing the significance of understanding how disease and its treatment affect patients' quality of life. Since the start of the 21(st) century, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) received increasingly more attention. While research concerning the effects of periodontal disease and its surgical and non-surgical treatment on patients' lives has been considered in numerous studies, research including patient-reported outcomes when assessing how periodontal health can be enhanced through regenerative approaches is largely missing. This commentary proposes to consider 1) OHRQoL and 2) patients' treatment satisfaction as patient-reported outcomes in conjunction with objectively measured patient-centered factors, and discusses the value of such an approach.

  7. Resolution of Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction with Nonsurgical Management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine how often nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO) resolves with 6 months of nonsurgical management in infants aged 6 to <10 months old. Methods As part of a randomized trial evaluating the cost effectiveness of immediate office probing versus observation with deferred probing for unresolved cases, 107 infants aged 6 to <10 months old who had NLDO and no history of prior nasolacrimal duct surgery were prescribed 6 months of nasolacrimal duct massage and topical antibiotics as needed. Resolution of the nasolacrimal duct obstruction was assessed 6 months after study entry and was defined as the absence of all clinical signs of NLDO (epiphora, increased tear lake, or mucous discharge) and not having undergone NLDO surgery. Exploratory analyses assessed whether baseline characteristics including age, gender, laterality, and prior treatment were associated with the probability of NLDO resolving without surgery. Results At the 6-month examination, which was completed for 117 of the 133 eyes (88%), the NLDO had resolved without surgery in 77 eyes (66%, 95% CI = 56% to 74%). None of the baseline characteristics we evaluated were found to be associated with resolution. Discussion In infants 6 to < 10 months of age, more than half of eyes with NLDO resolve within 6 months with nonsurgical management. Knowledge of the rate of NLDO resolution in infancy without surgery will help clinicians and parents effectively discuss treatment options. PMID:22801833

  8. Memory Rehabilitation Strategies in Nonsurgical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Alderighi, Marzia; Martinato, Matteo; Grisafi, Davide; Bosco, Anna; Thompson, Pamela J; Sander, Josemir W; Masiero, Stefano

    2017-02-15

    People with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who have not undergone epilepsy surgery often complain of memory deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation is employed as a remedial intervention in clinical settings, but research is limited and findings concerning efficacy and the criteria for choosing different approaches have been inconsistent. We aimed to appraise existing evidence on memory rehabilitation in nonsurgical individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy and to ascertain the effectiveness of specific strategies. A scoping review was preferred given the heterogeneous nature of the interventions. A comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Scholars Portal/PSYCHinfo, Proceedings First, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses identified articles published in English before February 2016. The search retrieved 372 abstracts. Of 25 eligible studies, six were included in the final review. None included pediatric populations. Strategies included cognitive training, external memory aids, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Selection criteria tended to be general. Overall, there was insufficient evidence to make definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of traditional memory rehabilitation strategies, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. The review suggests that cognitive rehabilitation in nonsurgical TLE is underresearched and that there is a need for a systematic evaluation in this population.

  9. Long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on periodontal health.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, C; BeGole, E A

    1981-08-01

    The periodontal health of a group of ninety-six patients who had received comprehensive fixed-appliance orthodontic treatment during adolescence between 12 and 35 years previously was evaluated. Comparisons were made with a group of 103 adults who were similar with regard to race, sex, age, socioeconomic status, dental awareness, and oral hygiene status but had malocclusions that had not been orthodontically treated. There were no statistically significant differences in the general prevalence of periodontal disease between the two groups. However, more detailed analysis revealed that the orthodontic group had a greater prevalence of mild to moderate periodontal disease in the maxillary posterior and mandibular anterior regions of the mouth, as compared to the control group. The results suggested that orthodontic treatment in adolescence is not a major factor in determining the long-term periodontal health status. No significant amount of either damage or benefit to the periodontal structures could be directly attributed to orthodontic therapy. Conversely, the lack of orthodontic therapy in adolescence does not appear to influence subsequent development or nondevelopment of periodontal disease in adults.

  10. Relative abundance of total subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in salivary microbiota reflects the overall periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Shinya; Takeshita, Toru; Asakawa, Mikari; Shibata, Yukie; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamanaka, Wataru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on evaluating the salivary microbiota as a promising method for monitoring oral health; however, its bacterial composition greatly differs from that of dental plaque microbiota, which is a dominant etiologic factor of oral diseases. This study evaluated the relative abundance of subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in the salivary microbiota and examined a relationship between the abundance and severity of periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis. Four samples (subgingival and supragingival plaques, saliva, and tongue coating) per each subject were collected from 14 patients with a broad range of severity of periodontitis before periodontal therapy. The bacterial composition was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using Ion PGM. Of the 66 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the mean relative abundance of ≥ 1% in any of the four niches, 12 OTUs corresponding to known periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, were characteristically predominant in the subgingival plaque and constituted 37.3 ± 22.9% of the microbiota. The total relative abundance of these OTUs occupied only 1.6 ± 1.2% of the salivary microbiota, but significantly correlated with the percentage of diseased sites (periodontal pocket depth ≥ 4 mm; r = 0.78, P < 0.001), in addition to the abundance of subgingival plaque microbiota (r = 0.61, P = 0.02). After periodontal therapy, the total relative abundance of these 12 OTUs was evaluated as well as before periodontal therapy and reductions of the abundance through periodontal therapy were strongly correlated in saliva and subgingival plaque (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). Based on these results, salivary microbiota might be a promising target for the evaluation of subgingival plaque-derived bacteria representing the present condition of periodontal health.

  11. Relative abundance of total subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in salivary microbiota reflects the overall periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Shinya; Takeshita, Toru; Asakawa, Mikari; Shibata, Yukie; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamanaka, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on evaluating the salivary microbiota as a promising method for monitoring oral health; however, its bacterial composition greatly differs from that of dental plaque microbiota, which is a dominant etiologic factor of oral diseases. This study evaluated the relative abundance of subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in the salivary microbiota and examined a relationship between the abundance and severity of periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis. Four samples (subgingival and supragingival plaques, saliva, and tongue coating) per each subject were collected from 14 patients with a broad range of severity of periodontitis before periodontal therapy. The bacterial composition was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using Ion PGM. Of the 66 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the mean relative abundance of ≥ 1% in any of the four niches, 12 OTUs corresponding to known periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, were characteristically predominant in the subgingival plaque and constituted 37.3 ± 22.9% of the microbiota. The total relative abundance of these OTUs occupied only 1.6 ± 1.2% of the salivary microbiota, but significantly correlated with the percentage of diseased sites (periodontal pocket depth ≥ 4 mm; r = 0.78, P < 0.001), in addition to the abundance of subgingival plaque microbiota (r = 0.61, P = 0.02). After periodontal therapy, the total relative abundance of these 12 OTUs was evaluated as well as before periodontal therapy and reductions of the abundance through periodontal therapy were strongly correlated in saliva and subgingival plaque (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). Based on these results, salivary microbiota might be a promising target for the evaluation of subgingival plaque-derived bacteria representing the present condition of periodontal health. PMID:28369125

  12. Susceptibility and risk factors in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F

    2000-10-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a high prevalence of advanced destruction but also that relatively few individuals in each age group account for most of the advanced periodontal disease. The available data suggest that three quarters of advanced periodontal disease could be prevented by targeting an effective preventive strategy on the 28% of individuals especially at risk. Questions remain regarding: 1) whether an acceptable cost-effective preventive strategy can be devised; and 2) whether it is possible to establish a simple method of identifying the 'at risk' group. The various risk factors are numerous and include systemic diseases, smoking, drug therapy, hormonal disturbances and genetic factors as well as the more mundane factors such as plaque control and socio-economic and education and attitude factors. Aside from these factors, many patients present with periodontal disease and have no discernible predisposition other than possibly genetic, for which we can not currently test, and for the vast majority of patients there would appear to be no other alternative to periodic thorough examination for all patients, early treatment of all periodontal lesions and appropriate dental health education.

  13. Crevicular Fluid Biomarkers and Periodontal Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min; Braun, Thomas M.; Ramseier, Christoph A.; Sugai, Jim V.; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Assess the ability of a panel of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) biomarkers as predictors of periodontal disease progression (PDP). Materials and Methods 100 individuals participated in a 12-month longitudinal investigation and categorized into 4 groups according to their periodontal status. GCF, clinical parameters, and saliva were collected bi-monthly. Sub-gingival plaque and serum were collected bi-annually. For 6 months, no periodontal treatment was provided. At 6-months, patients received periodontal therapy and continued participation from 6-12 months. GCF samples were analyzed by ELISA for MMP-8, MMP-9, OPG, CRP and IL-1β. Differences in median levels of GCF biomarkers were compared between stable and progressing participants using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p=0.05). Clustering algorithm was used to evaluate the ability of oral biomarkers to classify patients as either stable or progressing. Results Eighty-three individuals completed the 6-month monitoring phase. With the exception of GCF C-reactive protein, all biomarkers were significantly higher in the PDP group compared to stable patients. Clustering analysis showed highest sensitivity levels when biofilm pathogens and GCF biomarkers were combined with clinical measures, 74% (95% CI = 61,86). Conclusions Signature of GCF fluid-derived biomarkers combined with pathogens and clinical measures provides a sensitive measure for discrimination of PDP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00277745). PMID:24303954

  14. [Reciprocal relationships between orthodontics and periodontics in esthetic treatments].

    PubMed

    Monnet-Corti, Virginie; Barrin, Arnaud; Goubron, Cyril

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this article is to review various unsightly periodontal defects and the treatments that have previously been used to eliminate them in order to establish guidelines for future therapy. The inter-relationship between orthodontic and periodontal disciplines is well established and needs no defense here. Periodontal tissues change throughout life and the same is true for the smile. The periodontium is an essential component of the appearance of the face as well as the lips. These are dynamic esthetic criteria while the gingiva and the static character of the dentition also contribute to the character of an individual's smile. In order to conduct orthodontic therapy most effectively it is essential that orthodontists and periodontists utilize a coordinated approach. From the beginning, they must establish an etiological diagnosis of any esthetic defects that will insure that their joint therapy is conducted appropriately and at the proper moment.

  15. Tele-periodontics - Oral health care at a grass root level

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Haritha

    2015-01-01

    A new concept of tele-periodontics, which merges the innovative technology of telecommunications and the field of periodontics, is proposed. This new field of tele-periodontics will have an infinite potential where access to a specialist will be provided at a grass root level, enhancing effective delivery of therapy and information to the rural and under privileged areas. It would allow the specialist and the patient to interact either by video conferencing (real time) or through supportive information (store and forward) over geographic distances. Different probabilities of tele-periodontics such as tele consultation, tele training, tele education and tele support are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26644730

  16. Tele-periodontics - Oral health care at a grass root level.

    PubMed

    Avula, Haritha

    2015-01-01

    A new concept of tele-periodontics, which merges the innovative technology of telecommunications and the field of periodontics, is proposed. This new field of tele-periodontics will have an infinite potential where access to a specialist will be provided at a grass root level, enhancing effective delivery of therapy and information to the rural and under privileged areas. It would allow the specialist and the patient to interact either by video conferencing (real time) or through supportive information (store and forward) over geographic distances. Different probabilities of tele-periodontics such as tele consultation, tele training, tele education and tele support are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Management of diabolical diabetes mellitus and periodontitis nexus: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed Central

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is the commonest oral disease affecting population worldwide. This disease is notorious for the devastation of tooth supporting structures, ensuing in the loss of dentition. The etiology for this disease is bacterial biofilm, which accumulates on the teeth as dental plaque. In addition to the biofilm microorganisms, other factors such as environmental, systemic and genetic are also responsible in progression of periodontitis. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is metabolic disorder which has an impact on the global health. DM plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Periodontitis is declared as the “sixth” major complication of DM. Evidence based literature has depicted an enhanced incidence and severity of periodontitis in subjects with DM. A “two way” relationship has been purported between periodontitis and DM. Mutual management of both conditions is necessary. Periodontal therapy (PT) may assist to diminish the progression of DM and improve glycemic control. Various advanced technological facilities may be utilized for the purpose of patient education and disease management. The present paper clarifies the etio-pathogenesis of periodontitis, establishing it as a complication of DM and elaborating the various mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. The role of PT in amelioration of DM and application of digital communication will be discussed. Overall, it is judicious to create an increased patient cognizance of the periodontitis-DM relationship. Conjunctive efforts must be undertaken by the medical and oral health care professionals for the management of periodontitis affected DM patients. PMID:26962409

  18. Management of diabolical diabetes mellitus and periodontitis nexus: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2016-02-25

    Periodontitis is the commonest oral disease affecting population worldwide. This disease is notorious for the devastation of tooth supporting structures, ensuing in the loss of dentition. The etiology for this disease is bacterial biofilm, which accumulates on the teeth as dental plaque. In addition to the biofilm microorganisms, other factors such as environmental, systemic and genetic are also responsible in progression of periodontitis. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is metabolic disorder which has an impact on the global health. DM plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Periodontitis is declared as the "sixth" major complication of DM. Evidence based literature has depicted an enhanced incidence and severity of periodontitis in subjects with DM. A "two way" relationship has been purported between periodontitis and DM. Mutual management of both conditions is necessary. Periodontal therapy (PT) may assist to diminish the progression of DM and improve glycemic control. Various advanced technological facilities may be utilized for the purpose of patient education and disease management. The present paper clarifies the etio-pathogenesis of periodontitis, establishing it as a complication of DM and elaborating the various mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. The role of PT in amelioration of DM and application of digital communication will be discussed. Overall, it is judicious to create an increased patient cognizance of the periodontitis-DM relationship. Conjunctive efforts must be undertaken by the medical and oral health care professionals for the management of periodontitis affected DM patients.

  19. Benefits of additional courses of systemic azithromycin in periodontal disease case report.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Edgard F; Bretz, Walter A

    2007-01-01

    The strong association of subgingival anaerobic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, with destructive periodontal disease has been well documented in the literature. Several double-blind studies have also shown the beneficial use of systemic antimicrobials that are active against these microorganisms in conjunction with conventional periodontal treatment, especially when periodontal abscesses and/or suppuration upon probing are present. Four cases with periodontal abscesses were treated with scaling/root planing in conjunction with systemic azithromycin. Partial improvement led to retreatment with two additional courses of azithromycin. Bone formation was noted on periapical radiographs after the patients took additional courses of azithromycin. In view of the benefits of using additional courses of azithromycin in the treatment of destructive periodontal disease, we conclude that the single course of systemic antimicrobials currently used in periodontal therapy may be insufficient to reach necessary therapeutic levels in infected sites.

  20. Effect of Alendronate with β – TCP Bone Substitute in Surgical Therapy of Periodontal Intra-Osseous Defects: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Vishali; Subbaraya, Dwijendra Kocherlakota; Prasanna, Jammula Surya; Panthula, Veerendranath Reddy; Koduganti, Rekha Rani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate, inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption and also stimulates osteogenesis. Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive graft material which provides a scaffold for bone formation and also a widely used drug delivery vehicle for growth factors and antibiotics. Drug delivery vehicles, like β-TCP, improve the potency of the drugs by specific local site delivery of the drug, optimal release characteristics and easy handling. Aim The aim of the this study was to evaluate the bone formation potential of 400μg ALN delivered in β-TCP in the treatment of periodontal intra-osseous defects. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with periodontal defects were randomly assigned to 400μg ALN + β-TCP + Saline (test) group and β-TCP + Saline (active-control) group. Clinical parameters like Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) gain, Probing Depth (PD) reduction, post-operative Gingival Recession (GR) were assessed from the baseline, 3 months and 6 months recordings. Radiographic parameters like Linear Bone Growth (LBG), Percentage Bone Fill (%BF), and change in alveolar crest height (ACH) were assessed from baseline and 6 months radiographs. Results Mean measurements in the ALN test group for CAL gain (3.4 ± 0.74 mm), PD reduction (4.33 ± 0.82 mm), LBG (2.88 ± 0.88 mm), and %BF (51.98 ± 15.84%) were significantly greater with a p-value <0.05 compared to the mean measurements of CAL gain (2.20 ± 0.86 mm), PD reduction (3.20 ± 1.15 mm), LBG (1.70 ± 0.39 mm), and %BF (30.35 ± 6.88%) of the control group. There was mild alveolar crestal apposition (0.32 ± 0.68 mm) in the ALN test group and mild alveolar crestal resorption (-0.24 ± 0.40 mm) in the control group. Conclusion 400μg ALN combined with β-TCP bone graft material was effective in improving soft tissue parameters, inhibiting alveolar crestal resorption and enhancing bone formation, compared to β-TCP alone. PMID:27656552

  1. [Morphological study of periodontal tissues in the initial stage of periodontal disease. Part 2. Analysis of morphological measurement and status of periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Tawara, H; Yamaguchi, S; Lee, J H; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Nishibori, M; Hirota, Y; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-06-01

    The morphological characteristics of periodontal tissue in periodontal disease have been interpreted differently by a number of clinical observers. Many have reported that the malposition and functional malocclusion of teeth is injurious to the periodontium. We reported in Part I that a system for evaluating periodontal status was developed for the diagnosis and management of the interproximal area at the initial stage of bone resorption. The patient group consisted of 36 adults, from 21 to 55 years of age. The severity score represented the calculated loss of periodontal support tissues: loss of alveolar bone, evaluated roentgenologically, bone level and pattern in vertical and horizontal form, periodontal pocket and gingival inflammation. Because poor oral hygiene and other factors caused swelling by gingival inflammation, we obtained study specimens from patients with chronic periodontal disease after a few tooth brushing instructions, and scalings during initial therapy in order to detect initial and established pathological changes in periodontal tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between periodontal disease status and morphological diagnostic indicators and different degrees of harmony and disharmony in the lower jaw. In all age groups the average percentage of bone loss and intraosseous defects tended to be higher in the groups categorized as Type III and Type F, and in the area that showed a very deep concave Spee curve to the occlusal plane in Pattern D. We considered that these morphological characteristics might be of secondary importance for diagnosis. Oral local factors were the primary extrinsic factor in the pathogenesis of horizontal and vertical interproximal bone absorption in the area of the premolars and molars.

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001). Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and

  3. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed.

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirrielees, Jeffrey; Crofford, Leslie J.; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis influenced levels of salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease. Methods Medical assessments, periodontal examinations, and pain ratings were obtained from 35 rheumatoid arthritis, 35 chronic periodontitis and 35 age and gender-matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix-metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α concentrations. Results The arthritis and healthy groups had significantly less oral disease than the periodontitis group (p<0.0001), with the arthritis group having significantly more sites bleeding on probing (BOP) than matched controls (p=0.012). Salivary levels of MMP-8 and IL-1β were significantly elevated in the periodontal disease group (p≤0.002), and IL-1β was the only biomarker with significantly higher levels in the arthritis group compared with controls (p=0.002). Arthritis patients receiving anti-TNF-α antibody therapy had significantly lower IL-1β and TNF-α levels compared with arthritis patients not on anti-TNF-α therapy (p=0.016, p=0.024) and healthy controls (p<0.001, p=0.011), respectively. Conclusion Rheumatoid arthritis patients have higher levels of periodontal inflammation than healthy controls, ie. increased BOP. Systemic inflammation appears to influence levels of select salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease, and anti-TNF-α antibody-based disease modifying therapy significantly lowers salivary IL-1β and TNF-α levels in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20880053

  5. Photodynamic dosimetry in the treatment of periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. However, the translation of in vitro work to in vivo clinical efficacy has been difficult due to the number of variables present in any given patient. Parameters such as photosensitizer concentration, duration of light therapy and amount of light delivered to the target tissue all play a role in the dose response of PDT in vivo. In this 121 patient study we kept all parameters the same except for light dose which was delivered at either 150 mW or 220 mW. This clearly demonstrated the clinical benefits of a higher light dose in the treatment of periodontitis.

  6. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  7. Bilateral lateral periodontal cyst.

    PubMed

    Govil, Somya; Gupta, Vishesh; Misra, Neeta; Misra, Pradyumna

    2013-05-10

    The bilateral lateral periodontal cyst is a rare nasological entity, which despite clinical and radiological presentation is being diagnosed by histological characteristics. It is asymptomatic in nature and is observed in routine radiography. The aim and objective of this article is to present a rare case of bilateral lateral periodontal cyst in a 14-year-old child. The clinical and radiographical findings, along with its management have been discussed. Enucleation of bilateral cyst without extraction of the adjacent tooth was performed. Lesion samples were sent for histopathological analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed a thin, non keratinised stratified squamous epithelium resembling reduced enamel epithelium. Epithelial plaques were also seen. A clinicopathological correlation incorporating the surgical, radiographical and gold standard histopathological findings was obtained to suggest the final diagnosis of the bilateral lateral periodontal cyst.

  8. Non-surgical treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Romina M; Shah, Adit P; Diyora, Shamil D; Rathva, Vandana J

    2014-04-10

    The incidence of skeletal class III malocclusion has a mean of 3% in the Caucasian population, 5% in African-American adolescents and about 14% in the Asian population. In India, the incidence of class III malocclusion is reported to be 3.4%. A patient having class III malocclusion shows findings ranging from edge-to-edge bite to large reverse overjet, with extreme variations of underlying skeletal jaw bases and craniofacial form. This is a case report of a 20-year-old man having skeletal class III malocclusion with concave profile, anterior crossbite and a negative overjet of 3 mm treated non-surgically with extraction of only one lower left first premolar.

  9. Nonsurgical Treatment of Hemifacial Microsomia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a birth defect involving craniofacial structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Although it is a relatively uncommon malformation, it is the second most common craniofacial birth defect after cleft lip and palate (CL/P). Case Presentation: This is a case report about the successful orthodontic treatment of a patient with mild hemifacial microsomia (HFM), using a non-surgical orthopedic and orthodontic treatment approach. The aim of this approach was to make the best noninvasive modality to treat HFM. A 7-year-old boy with a mild HFM presented with a convex profile and slight chin deviation. Orthopedic treatment performed using a hybrid functional and high pulls headgear. Treatment continued by fixed orthodontic straight wire appliance to achieve perfect occlusion. Conclusions: Excellent esthetic and functional results achieved; total treatment duration was about 72 months. PMID:26734473

  10. The Application of Microencapsulation Techniques in the Treatment of Endodontic and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Asteria Luzardo; Espinar, Francisco Otero; Méndez, José Blanco

    2011-01-01

    In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. Microparticles made from biodegradable polymers have been reported to be an effective means of delivering antibacterial drugs in endodontic and periodontal therapy. The aim of this review article is to assess recent therapeutic strategies in which biocompatible microparticles are used for effective management of periodontal and endodontic diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain microparticle formulations and devices are presented. Future directions in the application of microencapsulation techniques in endodontic and periodontal therapies are discussed. PMID:24310596

  11. EBV infection is common in gingival epithelial cells of the periodontium and worsens during chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Bugnas, Séverine; Vitale, Sébastien; Mouline, Caroline C; Khaali, Wafa; Charbit, Yves; Mahler, Patrick; Prêcheur, Isabelle; Hofman, Paul; Maryanski, Janet L; Doglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    An amplifying role for oral epithelial cells (ECs) in Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection has been postulated to explain oral viral shedding. However, while lytic or latent EBV infections of oro/nasopharyngeal ECs are commonly detected under pathological conditions, detection of EBV-infected ECs in healthy conditions is very rare. In this study, a simple non-surgical tissue sampling procedure was used to investigate EBV infection in the periodontal epithelium that surrounds and attaches teeth to the gingiva. Surprisingly, we observed that the gingival ECs of the periodontium (pECs) are commonly infected with EBV and may serve as an important oral reservoir of latently EBV-infected cells. We also found that the basal level of epithelial EBV-infection is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that undermines the integrity of tooth-supporting tissues. Moreover, the level of EBV infection was found to correlate with disease severity. In inflamed tissues, EBV-infected pECs appear to be prone to apoptosis and to produce larger amounts of CCL20, a pivotal inflammatory chemokine that controls tissue infiltration by immune cells. Our discovery that the periodontal epithelium is a major site of latent EBV infection sheds a new light on EBV persistence in healthy carriers and on the role of this ubiquitous virus in periodontitis. Moreover, the identification of this easily accessible site of latent infection may encourage new approaches to investigate and monitor other EBV-associated disorders.

  12. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  13. Saliva: A diagnostic biomarker of periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Priti Basgauda; Patil, Basgauda Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of disease plays a crucial role in successful therapy. Early diagnosis and management reduces the severity and possible complications of the disease process. To overcome this challenge, medical researchers are devoted to finding molecular disease biomarkers that reveal a hidden lethal threat before the disease becomes complicated. Saliva, an important physiologic fluid, containing a highly complex mixture of substances, is rapidly gaining popularity as a diagnostic tool. Periodontal disease is a chronic disease of the oral cavity comprising a group of inflammatory conditions affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. In the field of periodontology, traditional clinical criteria are often insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Saliva, as a mirror of oral and systemic health, is a valuable source for clinically relevant information because it contains biomarkers specific for the unique physiologic aspects of periodontal diseases. This review highlights the various potentials of saliva as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal diseases. PMID:22368352

  14. The effects of thyroid hormone abnormalities on periodontal disease status.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Talal M; Wang, Bing-Yan; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in the regulation of physiologic processes. Thyroid disease can lead to imbalance in the homeostasis of the body and affect the healing capacity of tissues. However, limited data are available regarding the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance (thyroid disease) and periodontal health. This review is carried out to summarize the relationship between thyroid disease and periodontal status. PUBMED and MEDLINE searches of both human and animal studies were performed to investigate the relationship between thyroid disease, periodontal status, and dental implants. Results suggest that thyroid diseases may affect the status of periodontal diseases, especially in hypothyroid conditions. The duration from disease onset to treatment of thyroid disorders may be critical, since uncontrolled thyroid disease may result in destruction of the periodontium. Further controlled studies are needed to explore the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance and periodontal status. Periodontal therapies, including dental implant placement, appear to be safe with no increase in treatment failure, so long as the status of the thyroid gland is controlled.

  15. Collagen based barrier membranes for periodontal guided bone regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Qureshi, Javairia; Alshahrani, Abdullah M; Nassar, Heba; Ikeda, Yuichi; Glogauer, Michael; Ganss, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Certain cell populations within periodontal tissues possess the ability to induce regeneration, provided they have the opportunity to populate the wound or defect. Guided regeneration techniques have been investigated for regenerating periodontal tissues and such therapies usually utilize barrier membranes. Various natural and synthetic barrier membranes have been fabricated and tested to prevent epithelial and connective tissue cells from invading while allowing periodontal cells to selectively migrate into the defect. This paper focuses on the literature relevant to the use and potential of resorbable collagen membranes in GBR procedures, sites of periodontal and intrabony defects, in cases of socket and alveolar ridge preservation and at implant sites. The results of their use in GBR procedures has shown them to be effective and comparable with non-resorbable membranes with regards to clinical attachment gain, probing depth reduction and defect bone filling. They have also shown to prevent epithelial ingrowth into the defect space during the initial wound healing phase postsurgically. Collagen membranes have also been used for root coverage and GBR procedures and have shown good success rates comparable to subepithelial connective tissue grafts and expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membranes. The future for periodontal tissue engineering is very exciting with the use of barrier membranes expected to continue playing a critical role. However, long-term clinical trials are required to further evaluate and confirm the efficacy of the available collagen barrier membranes for periodontal and bone regeneration use.

  16. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration: a review of ceramics and polymers.

    PubMed

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect.

  17. Periodontal regeneration: a challenge for the tissue engineer?

    PubMed

    Hughes, F J; Ghuman, M; Talal, A

    2010-12-01

    Periodontitis affects around 15 per cent of human adult populations. While periodontal treatment aimed at removing the bacterial cause of the disease is generally very successful, the ability predictably to regenerate the damaged tissues remains a major unmet objective for new treatment strategies. Existing treatments include the use of space-maintaining barrier membranes (guided tissue regeneration), use of graft materials, and application of bioactive molecules to induce regeneration, but their overall effects are relatively modest and restricted in application. The periodontal ligament is rich in mesenchymal stem cells, and the understanding of the signalling molecules that may regulate their differentation has increased enormously in recent years. Applying these principles for the development of new tissue engineering strategies for periodontal regeneration will require further work to determine the efficacy of current experimental preclinical treatments, including pharmacological application of growth factors such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or Wnts, use of autologous stem cell reimplantation strategies, and development of improved biomaterial scaffolds. This article describes the background to this problem, addresses the current status of periodontal regeneration, including the background biology, and discusses the potential for some of these experimental therapies to achieve the goal of clinically predictable periodontal regeneration.

  18. Herbs as an antioxidant arsenal for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Asha; Varghese, Sheeja Saji; Doraiswamy, Jayakumar Nadathur; Malaiappan, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines have long been used as a traditional mode of therapy for various ailments in India. They are being used increasingly as dietary supplements to ward off common diseases. Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the world population. Gingivitis is the mild form whereas periodontitis results in an irreversible loss of supporting structures of the teeth. Even though periodontal pathogens form a crucial component in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting oxidative stress playing a pivotal role in the disease initiation and progression. Studies have shown a direct correlation between increased levels of biomarkers for tissue damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the severity of periodontal disease. Thus, the focus of attention has revolved back to herbal medicines due to their wide spectrum of biological and medicinal activities, lower costs, and higher safety margin. Internet databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched, and the most relevant articles were considered for review. This review briefly describes the various herbs with antioxidant capacity and their potency in the treating periodontal disease.

  19. Systemic endotoxin levels in chronic indolent periodontal infections

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J. L.; Stevens, J.; Steffen, M. J.; Dawson, D.; Novak, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Periodontal disease has been linked with an increased risk of various systemic diseases. A plausible biologic explanation for this link includes the opportunity for oral pathogens to translocate to the circulation as a result of breakdown in integrity of the oral epithelium. This study refined a methodology used to detect endotoxin activity in the serum of subjects with indolent periodontal infections. Material and Methods: The QCL® Kinetic Chromogenic Assay (Cambrex) is a kinetic measure of endotoxin activity. Sera from 211 pregnant women with periodontitis enrolled in the Obstetrics and Periodontal Therapy Trial were used to develop the assay further and to evaluate the detection of endotoxin activity that might accompany a low-level bacteremia in chronic periodontitis. Results: We optimized the system to increase the sensitivity and reproducibility of the assay. The refined system was able to detect endotoxin activity in serum at > 0.0125 EU/mL. At baseline (13–16 wk of gestation), 35.5% of the women were positive for endotoxin activity (1.62 ± 2.21; range: 0.38–15 EU/mL). Conclusion: This report describes a sensitive measure of endotoxin activity in serum. The procedure allowed us to document levels of this microbial virulence factor in serum of individuals with indolent infections such as periodontal disease. PMID:20465752

  20. Serum Inflammatory Mediators in Pregnancy: Changes Following Periodontal Treatment and Association with Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Novak, M. John; Hodges, James S.; DiAngelis, Anthony; Buchanan, William; Papapanou, Panos N.; Mitchell, Dennis A.; Ferguson, James E.; Lupo, Virginia; Bofill, James; Matseoane, Stephen; Steffen, Michelle; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine: 1) if periodontal treatment in pregnant women before 21 weeks of gestation alters levels of inflammatory mediators in serum; and 2) if changes in these mediators are associated with birth outcomes. Methods 823 pregnant women with periodontitis were randomly assigned to receive scaling and root planing before 21 weeks of gestation or after delivery. Serum obtained between 13 weeks and 16 weeks 6 days (study baseline) and 29–32 weeks gestation was analyzed for C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, fibrinogen, endotoxin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Cox regression, multiple linear regression, t-tests, chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to examine associations between the biomarkers, periodontal treatment, and gestational age at delivery and birthweight. Results 796 women had baseline serum data; 620 had baseline and follow-up serum and birth data. Periodontal treatment did not significantly alter the level of any biomarker (P>0.05). Neither baseline levels nor change from baseline in any biomarker was significantly associated with preterm birth or infant birthweight (P>0.05). In treatment subjects, change in endotoxin was negatively associated with change in probing depth (P<0.05). Conclusions Non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment in pregnant women delivered before 21 weeks of gestation did not reduce systemic (serum) markers of inflammation. In pregnant women with periodontitis, levels of these markers at 13–17 weeks and 29–32 weeks gestation were not associated with risk for preterm birth or with infant birthweight. PMID:19905943

  1. Biomaterials in periodontal regenerative surgery: effects of cryopreserved bone, commercially available coral, demineralized freeze-dried dentin, and cementum on periodontal ligament fibroblasts and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Devecioğlu, Didem; Tözüm, Tolga F; Sengün, Dilek; Nohutcu, Rahime M

    2004-10-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is to achieve successful periodontal regeneration. The effects of different biomaterials, allogenic and alloplastic, used in periodontal surgeries to achieve regeneration have been studied in vitro on periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and MC3T3-E1 cells. The materials tested included cryopreserved bone allograft (CBA), coralline hydroxyapatite (CH), demineralized freeze-dried dentin (DFDD), and cementum. CBA and CH revealed an increase in initial PDL cell attachment, whereas CH resulted in an increase in long-term PDL cell attachment. Mineral-like nodule formation was observed significantly higher in DFDD compared to other materials tested for osteoblasts. Based on the results of this in vitro study, we conclude that the materials used are all biocompatible with human PDL cells and osteoblasts, which have pivotal importance in periodontal regeneration.

  2. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Amy WY; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. PMID:24855389

  3. [An interdisciplinary approach to complex orthodontic-periodontal clinical situations in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Zetu, Irina; Ogodescu, Emilia; Zetu, L; Stratul, S I; Rusu, D; Talpoş, S; Ogodescu, A

    2011-01-01

    Between orthodontics and periodontology there are many correlations, especially in the treatment of adults with already-damaged periodontal tissues and malocclusions. Aim of this paper was to emphasize that an interdisciplinary periodontal-orthodontic treatment could be beneficial even in a case that seemed hopelessly. A typical case of an adult patient with extensive bone loss due to periodontal disease, occlusal trauma caused by dental malpositions, spacing due to early loss of teeth in the lateral segments and pathologic tooth migration will be presented. The orthodontic treatment was initiated at 3 months after the stabilization of the periodontal therapy and was done with a fixed appliance. During the orthodontic stage periodontal maintenance visits continued at 2-month intervals. The therapy of"black triangles" occurred due to the loss of interdental gingiva was done by stripping followed by a space-closure procedure. A permanent retainer was applied. Benefits and problems of the comprehensive periodontal-orthodontic therapy and treatment protocols will be presented. In conclusion the interdisciplinary therapy of this patient, with a good compliance, was beneficial, improved esthetics, the periodontal status, the ability of the patient to clean the teeth and also led to best position of the abutments for optimal placement of prosthetic reconstructions.

  4. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-08-17

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus.

  5. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  6. Periodontal disease exacerbates systemic ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Anbinder, Ana Lia; Moraes, Renata M; Lima, Gabriela M G; Oliveira, Felipe E; Campos, Débora R C; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Oliveira, Luciane D; Junqueira, Juliana C; Ma, Yun; Elefteriou, Florent

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal pathogens and/or inflammatory products from periodontitis participate in the development or progression of systemic diseases. In this context, periodontitis acts as a modifying factor to systemic health, including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Osteoporosis is an increasingly prevalent condition in our aging population and considered a risk factor for periodontal disease, but the effect of periodontitis on systemic bone homeostasis is unknown. We thus evaluated the effects of experimental periodontitis (EP) on systemic bone loss and the influence of estrogen deficiency in this context, using a mouse model of combined periodontitis and osteoporosis. Experimental periodontitis (EP) was induced by a ligature insertion around the mandibular first molars and Porphyromonas gingivalis infection. Three-dimensional microcomputed tomographic analyses performed 48days following infection revealed that EP and ovariectomy (OVX) induced a significantly higher femoral and mandibular bone loss compared to EP or OVX alone. EP alone did not induce systemic bone loss. In addition, the EP+OVX and EP groups showed significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α than OVX and control groups at end point. These results suggest that periodontitis could be a risk factor for systemic bone loss, especially in post-menopausal women, and warrant further clinical investigations to confirm this association and propose adapted prophylactic and curative therapies.

  7. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5-minute video) “ ... video in a new window) Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens ...

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Adjunct Diode Laser Application for the Nonsurgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Arıcı, Selahattin Volkan; Topçuoğlu, Nursen; Külekçi, Güven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In this radiographic and microbiologic split-mouth clinical trial, efficacy of a diode laser as an adjunct to conventional scaling in the nonsurgical treatment of peri-implantitis was investigated. Background data: Eradication of pathogenic bacteria and infected sulcular epithelium presents a significant challenge in the nonsurgical treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and methods: Ten patients (mean age, 55.1 years; SD, 11.4) with 48 two piece, rough-surface implants and diagnosed with peri-implantitis were recruited (NCT02362854). In addition to conventional scaling and debridement (control group), crevicular sulci and the corresponding surfaces of 24 random implants were lased by a diode laser running at 1.0 W power at the pulsed mode (λ, 810 nm; energy density, 3 J/cm2; time, 1 min; power density, 400 mW/cm2; energy, 1.5 J; and spot diameter, 1 mm); (laser group). Healing was assessed via periodontal indexes (baseline and after 1 and 6 months after the intervention), microbiologic specimens (baseline and after 1 month), and radiographs (baseline and after 6 months). Results: Baseline mean pocket depths (4.71, SD, 0.67; and 4.38, SD 0.42 mm) and marginal bone loss (2.71, SD 0.11; and 2.88, SD 0.18 mm) were similar (p = 0.09 and p = 0.12) between the control and laser groups, respectively. After 6 months, the laser group revealed higher marginal bone loss (2.79, SD 0.48) than the control groups (2.63, SD 0.53) (p < 0.0001). However, in both groups, the microbiota of the implants was found unchanged after 1 month. Conclusions: In this clinical trial, adjunct use of diode laser did not yield any additional positive influence on the peri-implant healing compared with conventional scaling alone. PMID:26382562

  9. Cell- and gene-based therapeutic strategies for periodontal regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Rios, Hector F; Lin, Zhao; Oh, Bina; Park, Chan Ho; Giannobile, William V

    2011-09-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are a leading cause of tooth loss and are linked to multiple systemic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. Reconstruction of the support and function of affected tooth-supporting tissues represents an important therapeutic endpoint for periodontal regenerative medicine. An improved understanding of periodontal biology coupled with current advances in scaffolding matrices has introduced novel treatments that use cell and gene therapy to enhance periodontal tissue reconstruction and its biomechanical integration. Cell and gene delivery technologies have the potential to overcome limitations associated with existing periodontal therapies, and may provide a new direction in sustainable inflammation control and more predictable tissue regeneration of supporting alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and cementum. This review provides clinicians with the current status of these early-stage and emerging cell- and gene-based therapeutics in periodontal regenerative medicine, and introduces their future application in clinical periodontal treatment. The paper concludes with prospects on the application of cell and gene tissue engineering technologies for reconstructive periodontology.

  10. Evaluation of metronidazole nanofibers in patients with chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Thakur Prasad; Srivastava, Ruchi; Srivastava, Anand Kumar; Gupta, Varun; Verma, Pushpendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Prevention of periodontal disease progression is the primary goal of periodontal therapy. When conventional therapy is found to be inadequate in achieving periodontal health in chronic periodontitis, local antimicrobial agents are used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP), which produces encouraging results. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a low-dose controlled-release delivery system for the treatment of periodontal infections. A new sustained release drug system of poly e-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers containing metronidazole (MET) was successfully electrospun and evaluated clinically for periodontal diseases. The retentive nanofibres were shown to provide a controlled delivery of the drugs. Materials and Methods: Nanofibers were prepared with MET in PCL by electrospinning technique. The drug-coated nanofibers provided sustained effect up to a period of 11 days (264 h) and followed first-order release. Forty sites in seven patients (four females and three males) with chronic periodontitis (5–8 mm probing depth) were allocated in two experimental treatment groups: Group A treated with SRP + MET nanofibers and Group B treated with SRP alone (control group). All these patients were evaluated clinically for probing depth (PD), plaque index (PI), and gingival index (GI). Results: Both the treatment groups were found to be efficacious in the treatment of periodontal disease as demonstrated by improvement in PD, PI, and GI. Conclusion: Combination of SRP + MET nanofibers (Group A) resulted in added benefits, compared to the control group. PMID:23580938

  11. Correlation of Levels of Oncostatin M Cytokine in Crevicular Fluid and Serum in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thorat, ManojKumar; AR, Pradeep; Garg, Garima

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to measure the level of Oncostatin M (OSM) a gp130 cytokine in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of chronic periodontitis patients and to find any correlation between them before and after periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing, SRP). Methodology 60 subjects (age 25–50 years) were enrolled into three groups (n=20 per group), group I (healthy), group II (gingivitis) and group III (chronic periodontitis). Group III subjects were followed for 6–8 weeks after the initial periodontal therapy (SRP) as the group IV (after periodontal therapy). Clinical parameters were assessed as gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and radiographic evidence of bone loss. GCF and serum levels of OSM were measured by using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Results It was found that mean OSM levels had been elevated in both the GCF and serum of chronic periodontitis subjects (726.65 ± 283.56 and 65.59 ± 12.37 pg·mL−1, respectively) and these levels were decreased proportionally after the periodontal therapy (95.50 ± 38.85 and 39.98 ± 16.69 pg·mL−1 respectively). However, OSM was detected in GCF of healthy subjects (66.15 ± 28.10 pg·mL−1) and gingivitis-suffering subjects (128.33 ± 22.96 pg·mL−1) and was found as below the detectable limit (≈0.0 pg·mL−1) in the serum of same subjects. Significant correlation has been found between clinical parameters and GCF-serum levels of OSM. Conclusion Increased OSM level both in the GCF and serum, and the decreased levels after initial periodontal therapy (SRP) may suggest a use as an inflammatory bio-marker in the periodontal disease. PMID:21404969

  12. Comparative bacteriology of juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Palcanis, K G; Ranney, R R

    1985-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of the floras associated with juvenile periodontitis, severe periodontitis, and moderate periodontitis indicated that differences in the bacterial compositions of affected sites in these populations were not statistically significant. The subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was statistically significantly different from the adjacent supragingival flora and from the subgingival floras of people with healthy gingiva and of children with developing (experimental) gingivitis. However, the subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was not significantly different from the flora of sites with gingival index scores of 1 or 2 in adults with developing (experimental) gingivitis. Of 357 bacterial taxa among over 18,000 isolates, 54 non-treponemal species, 2 treponemal species, and mycoplasma were most associated with diseased periodontal sulci. These species comprised an increasing proportion of the flora during developing gingivitis and constituted over half of the cultivable flora of diseased sites. PMID:3988344

  13. Laser Supported Reduction of Specific Microorganisms in the Periodontal Pocket with the Aid of an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, N.; Van Betteray, C.; Ozturan, S.; Vanweersch, L.; Franzen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a radial firing tip of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser as an adjunct to a nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Methods. Twelve patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were treated by conventional periodontal treatment using ultrasonic devices and hand instruments and, additionally, in two quadrants with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A new radial firing tip (RFPT 14-5, Biolase) was used with 1.5 W, 30 Hz, 11% air, 20% water, and pulse duration 140 μs. Microbiological smears were taken before treatment, one day after lasing, and three and six months after lasing. Pocket depths of all periodontal sites were measured before and six months after treatment. Results. The total bacterial load of Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inside the pocket was reduced significantly throughout the whole examination time. Greater pocket depth reductions were observed in all groups. There was a slight higher reduction of pocket depth in the lased group after six months. Conclusions. These results support the thesis that Er,Cr:YSGG laser supported periodontal treatment leads to a significant reduction of periopathogenes and thereby helps the maintenance of periodontal health. PMID:25879057

  14. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, C; Laster, L L; Bodak-Gyovai, L Z

    1978-02-01

    A sample of 54 patients with diabetes mellitus were subjects to detailed assessment of periodontal disease levels using standard indices. In order to determine whether the severity of periodontal disease was related to the severity of diabets mellitus, a series of parameters of the diabetes mellitus population was simultaneously studied. There were no significant relationships between the levels of periodontal disease and the duration of diabetes, the type of treatment and the frequency of systemic complications. Periodontal disease in the diabetic appeared to the affected by the same etiologic factors [plaque, calculus, neglect] as would be expected in nondiabetic patients. Further studies with larger population samples would be appropriate.

  15. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    PubMed

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs.

  16. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 6. Preventive and treatment planning for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Corbet, E; Smales, R

    2012-09-01

    A high level of sustained personal plaque control is fundamental for successful treatment outcomes in patients with active periodontal disease and, hence, oral hygiene instructions are the cornerstone of periodontal treatment planning. Other risk factors for periodontal disease also should be identified and modified where possible. Many restorative dental treatments in particular require the establishment of healthy periodontal tissues for their clinical success. Failure by patients to control dental plaque because of inappropriate designs and materials for restorations and prostheses will result in the long-term failure of the restorations and the loss of supporting tissues. Periodontal treatment planning considerations are also very relevant to endodontic, orthodontic and osseointegrated dental implant conditions and proposed therapies.

  17. Emerging Regenerative Approaches for Periodontal Reconstruction: Practical Applications From the AAP Regeneration Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Hector F.; Bashutski, Jill D.; McAllister, Bradley S.; Murakami, Shinya; Cobb, Charles M.; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Lin, Zhao; Mandelaris, George A.; Cochran, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Focused Clinical Question Can emerging technologies for periodontal regeneration become clinical reality? Summary Emerging technologies are presenting options to hopefully improve the outcomes of regeneration in challenging clinical scenarios. Cellular allografts represent a current technology in which cells and scaffolds are being delivered directly to the periodontal lesion. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 2 and teriparatide (parathyroid 1–34) have each been tested in controlled prospective human randomized clinical trials, and both have been shown to have potential for periodontal regeneration. These examples, as well as other emerging technologies, show promise for continued advancement in the field of periodontal regenerative therapy. Conclusions At present, there are indications that emerging technologies can be used successfully for periodontal regeneration. Case reports and clinical trials are being conducted with a variety of emerging technologies. However, many are yet to be approved by a regulatory agency, or there is a lack of evidence-based literature to validate their expanded use. PMID:26146593

  18. Implant outcomes poorer in patients with history of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Keenan, James R

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline and Embase databases and bibliographies of all included articles and relevant review articles were screened for possible inclusion.Study selectionLongitudinal studies were included reporting on implant survival, success, incidence of peri-implantitis, bone loss and periodontal status and on partially dentate patients with a history of treatment for periodontitis. There were no language restrictions for the included studies.Data extraction and synthesisAuthors independently and in duplicate assessed the studies for eligibility and data extraction. Disagreements were resolved by discussion and consensus. The methodological quality assessment of the included studies was done using an adapted Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Confounding factors such as smoking, systemic disease influencing osseointegration, chemotherapy and radiation were assessed and adjusted in the analysis. Data were organised into tables and grouped in accordance with the study design.ResultsTwenty-four studies reported in 27 publications were included. Implant survival and success rate were higher in periodontally healthy patients.Twelve prospective cohort studies, five case series with a control group, four retrospective cohort studies and three studies with a sub group comparison were included.Bone loss and peri-implantitis were increased in patients with a history of treated periodontitis. More complications were reported in patients presenting with more severe forms of periodontitis. High heterogeneity among the studies in terms of study design, population, therapy, unit of analysis, inconsistent definitions of baseline and outcomes, inadequate reporting and confounding factors meant a meta-analysis could not be performed.Most of the studies showed better implant survival rates for the non-periodontitis group ranging from 91.67% to 100% compared to the treated periodontitis group 79.22% to 100% over a 1.2 to 16 year follow-up.ConclusionsImplants placed in patients treated for

  19. VEGF/VEGFR2 Axis in Periodontal Disease Progression and Angiogenesis: Basic Approach for a New Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Vladau, Mircea; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Balica, Raluca Amalia; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Popovici, Ramona Amina; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal lesions are associated with activation of pathological angiogenesis and a high number of newly-formed blood vessels. Most angiogenic growth factors have been studied in the crevicular fluid or serum, but tissue correlations with vascular density or endothelial proliferation, are very rare, even inexistent. We assessed the VEGF/VEGFR2 axis expression in a multimodal fashion, in both epithelial and stromal compartments, with emphasis to endothelial proliferation and severity of periodontal lesions. Compared to normal gingiva, negative for VEGF/VEGFR2, periodontal lesions had a progressive increase for these markers from low to severe periodontal lesions. The transition from low to moderate periodontal lesions represents the milestone in disease progression and implies an active angiogenesis based on the highest angiogenic parameter variability observed for these lesions. Epithelial vascularization was firstly observed in moderate periodontal lesions and persists during severe periodontal disease. All the parameters used to quantify angiogenesis in periodontal lesions, were significantly increased in severe periodontal lesions dependent on VEGF expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartment. Our results support the use of anti-VEGF/VEGFR2-targeted therapy as adjuvant treatment for severe periodontal lesions.

  20. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  1. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60 years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence

  2. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  3. Designing biomaterials for in situ periodontal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Qu, Tie-Jun; Zhang, Xian-Hua; Yu, Qing; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The regeneration of periodontal tissue poses a significant challenge to biomaterial scientists, tissue engineers and periodontal clinicians. Recent advances in this field have shifted the focus from the attempt to recreate tissue replacements/constructs ex vivo to the development of biofunctionalized biomaterials that incorporate and release regulatory signals in a precise and near-physiological fashion to achieve in situ regeneration. The molecular and physical information coded within the biomaterials define a local biochemical and mechanical niche with complex and dynamic regulation that establishes key interactions with host endogenous cells and, hence, may help to unlock latent regenerative pathways in the body by instructing cell homing and regulating cell proliferation/differentiation. In the future, these innovative principles and biomaterial devices promise to have a profound impact on periodontal reconstructive therapy and are also likely to reconcile the clinical and commercial pressures on other tissue engineering endeavors.

  4. Risk assessment of recurrence of disease during supportive periodontal care. Epidemiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Ainamo, J; Ainamo, A

    1996-03-01

    Although it is accepted that the primary cause of periodontitis is bacterial infection of long duration, there are a number of risk factors which may increase the probability of recurrence of periodontal disease during supportive periodontal care. The risk may in such cases be caused by other factors than poor oral hygiene measures per se. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies show conflicting results concerning age as a risk factor for periodontal disease. The effect of smoking on the periodontal tissues has been discussed for decades and only lately has it been possible to demonstrate that smokers definitely have more periodontal problems than non-smokers. Another important risk factor for periodontitis relates to the insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent forms of diabetes mellitus. Poorly-controlled long-duration diabetics have more periodontitis and tooth loss than well-controlled or non-diabetics. Finally, the issue of compliance deserves attention. The medical literature has suggested that patients with chronic illnesses tend to comply poorly, especially if the disease is not perceived to be particularly threatening, if the therapy is time-consuming, or if the symptoms are non-disturbing. Suggestions for improved compliance are called for.

  5. Design of a Multiple Drug Delivery System Directed at Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, Sharath C.; Thomas, Mark V.; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Puleo, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  6. Laser assisted periodontal treatment: from bactericidal effect to local modification of the host response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurescu, Codruţa.; Teslaru, Silvia; Zetu, Liviu; Ciurescu, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present short-term study is to investigate efficiency of laser therapy as adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Methods. The study protocol included 44 patients (20 males, 24 females; age 45-60) with moderate and advanced chronic periodontitis, recruited in Private Clinic Krondent (Brasov, Romania). The patients were randomly assigned in two groups, one group (test-sites group, 22 patients) treated by ultrasonic scaling and root planning followed by laser therapy (940 nm diode laser and 2780 nm Er:Cr:YAG laser) and second group (control-sites group, 22 patients) treated only by ultrasonic scaling and root planning. All patients were submitted to initial evaluation, recording of bleeding on probing (BOP) and probing of pockets depth (PPD), oral hygiene instruction and motivation. Indices BOP and PPD for the assessed periodontal sites were also recorded at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks after treatment. Results. Periodontal inflammatory parameters PPD (PPD>=4mm) were significantly lower in test-sites group as compared with control-sites group at 2 months (82% vs. 90%), 4 months (42% vs. 62%), and 6 months (11% vs. 30%).Periodontal parameters BOP were lower among patients in control-sites group and test-sites group at 2 months (38% vs. 32%), and significantly lower in test-sites group at 4 months (42% vs.26%), and 6 months (44% vs. 24%). Conclusions. The additional use of laser therapy increases significantly the efficiency of periodontal treatment comparing with conventional periodontal therapy.

  7. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramaniam M; Ugale, Gauri M; Warad, Shivaraj B

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search). All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP. PMID:23626951

  8. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  9. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  10. Exploration of specialty certification for nurse anesthetists: nonsurgical pain management as a test case.

    PubMed

    Wooden, Steven; Docherty, Sharron; Plaus, Karen; Kusek, Anthony; Vacchiano, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Certification is the outcome of the demonstration of knowledge and skills, which is an important link to licensing and credentialing. Considering the essential role that Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists play in the practice of nonsurgical pain management, it is important that a certification process be developed that provides the necessary support to licensing and credentialing at the local, state, and federal levels. The goal of this project was to develop the foundational elements for a specialty certification in nonsurgical pain management. The Delphi method for the systematic solicitation and collation of information was used to query experts in the field of nonsurgical pain management regarding the elements necessary to establish such a specialty certification. Results of the query were compiled, analyzed, and compared to feedback about the elements from a sample of certified registered nurse anesthetists involved in nonsurgical pain management to assess reliability. The results provided identification of a target population for competency evaluation, tools for evaluation, resources for knowledge and skills testing, and a table of specifications for testing. A valid process to develop a specialty certification for nurse anesthetists with demonstration of knowledge and skills will help bridge the gap between continuing education and an actual demonstration that an individual practitioner possesses the necessary knowledge and skills to practice nonsurgical pain management.

  11. Comparison of modified widman and coronally advanced flap surgery combined with Co2 laser root irradiation in periodontal therapy: a 15-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Roberto; Cappare, Paolo; Gherlone, Enrico; Romanos, George E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare modified Widman flap surgery (MW) to coronally advanced flap surgery combined with carbon dioxide laser root conditioning (CAF + CO2) from baseline to 15 years of follow-up. Each of 25 patients participating in this study were treated using a split-mouth design: In one quadrant, the teeth received MW surgery (control), and on the other side, after a full-thickness flap was raised, a CO2 laser was used and the full-thickness flap was repositioned coronally and sutured (CAF + CO2, test). Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level were monitored from baseline to 15 years. For probing depths ⋝ 7 mm, CAF + CO2 sites provided greater pocket reduction (P < .01), and data on clinical attachment level showed a significant difference between control and test sites at 5 to 6 mm (P < .001) and ⋝ 7 mm (P < .001). This study showed that CAF + CO2 therapy resulted in significantly higher improvements than MW surgery.

  12. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akanksha; Kedige, Suresh D; Jain, Kanu

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  13. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics. PMID:26770199

  14. Motivational Interviewing As an Adjunct to Periodontal Therapy—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Svenja L.; Ramseier, Christoph A.; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Woelber, Johan P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Periodontal therapy is highly dependent on a patient's long-term adherence with regard to oral hygiene, diet, and regular check-ups at the dentist. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client-centered, directive method for encouraging a patients' behavioral health change. The aim of this systematic review was to reveal the effects of MI as an adjunct to periodontal therapy. Methods: Three databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) were reviewed for randomized controlled clinical trials. Articles were included when using MI as an adjunct to periodontal therapy and presenting clinical periodontal and oral hygiene related parameters. Two authors independently coded the relevant articles. Results: The search yielded 496 articles. After analysis and exclusion, a total of five papers could be included. The quality of the articles ranged between 72–88%. The two independent raters showed a high inter-rater reliability (Cohens-Kappa = 0.89). In two studies MI showed a significant positive effect on bleeding on probing and plaque values. One study showed improvement of self-efficacy in interdental cleaning. Two studies showed no influence of MI on periodontal parameters of the patients. Conclusion: The use of MI as an adjunct to periodontal therapy might have a positive influence on clinical periodontal parameters (plaque values, gingival, and periodontal inflammation) and psychological factors related to oral hygiene (self-efficacy). Due to the low body of evidence further studies are needed. Future studies should include fidelity measures of the applied MI, a high number of counselors, several MI sessions, and long-term study follow-up to show potential effects. PMID:28293208

  15. Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Elçin, Y Murat; İnanç, Bülend; Elçin, A Eser

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells' (hESCs) unlimited proliferative potential and differentiation capability to all somatic cell types makes them one of the potential cell sources in cell-based tissue engineering strategies as well as various experimental applications in fields such as developmental biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and genetics. Periodontal tissue engineering is an approach to reconstitute the ectomesenchymally derived alveolar bone, periodontal ligament apparatus, and cementum tissues lost as a result of periodontal diseases. Cell-based therapies may offer potential advantage in overcoming the inherent limitations associated with contemporary regenerative procedures, such as dependency on defect type and size and the pool and capacity of progenitor cells resident in the wound area. Further elucidation of developmental mechanisms associated with tooth formation may also contribute to valuable knowledge based upon which the future therapies can be designed. Protocols for the differentiation of pluripotent hESCs into periodontal ligament fibroblastic cells (PDLF) as common progenitors for ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone tissue represent an initial step in developing hESC-based experimental and tissue engineering strategies. The present protocol describes methods associated with the guided differentiation of hESCs by the use of coculture with adult PDLFs and the resulting change of morphotype and phenotype of the pluripotent embryonic stem cells toward fibroblastic and osteoblastic lineages.

  16. Assessment of Streptococcus mutans in healthy versus gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: A clinico-microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Sneha; Prabhu, Ashwin; Chaitra, K. R.; Desai, N. C.; Patil, Sudhir R.; Rajeev, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and periodontal disease are most common oral diseases. Streptococcus mutans are considered to be the major pathogens in initiation of dental caries. Evidence shows that periodontal disease and caries share a number of contributory factors. Thus in view of these findings it would be worthwhile to examine whether Streptococcus mutans persist within the saliva and subgingival environment of the periodontitis patients and to determine whether there is any association between Streptococcus mutans colonization, pH of saliva and sub-gingival plaque pH in periodontal diseases before therapy. Methods: The study comprises of 75 subjects aged between 20-70 years, reporting to department of Periodontology, KLEs Institute of Dental Sciences, Bangalore. Subjects were divided into 3 groups of 25 each. Group 1 – Healthy controls, Group 2 – Gingivitis Group, 3 – Chronic periodontitis. Unstimulated saliva was collected in sterile container and immediately pH was evaluated. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from four deepest periodontal pockets in chronic periodontitis and from first molars in healthy subjects using 4 sterile paper points. In gingivitis subjects samples were collected from areas showing maximum signs of inflammation. All paper points and saliva samples were cultured on mitis salivarius agar culture media with bacitracin for quantification of the Streptococcus mutans colonies. Results: Increased colonization of Streptococcus mutans was seen in chronic periodontitis subjects both in saliva and sub-gingival plaque samples. There was also a positive correlation seen with the periodontal parameters. Conclusion: More severe forms of periodontal disease may create different ecological niches for the proliferation of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:27994423

  17. Non-operative therapies for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Nosher, John L.; Ahmed, Inaya; Patel, Akshar N.; Gendel, Vyacheslav; Murillo, Philip G.; Moss, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Locoregional therapies for colorectal liver metastases complement systemic therapy by providing an opportunity for local control of hepatic spread. The armamentarium for liver-directed therapy includes ablative therapies, embolization, and stereotactic body radiation therapy. At this time, prospective studies comparing these modalities are limited and decision-making relies on a multidisciplinary approach for optimal patient management. Herein, we describe multiple therapeutic non-surgical procedures and an overview of the results of these treatments. PMID:25830041

  18. Orthodontic-periodontics interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K; Reddy, Y Giridhar; Reddy, Vinay P; Nandan, Hemant; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    In this present era, when a significant number of patients seeking orthodontic treatment are adults, importance of multidisciplinary treatment approach cannot be overemphasized. Higher susceptibility of plaque accumulation in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment makes involvement of periodontist almost unavoidable. Also, orthodontic treatment frequently results in undesirable periodontal changes which require immediate attention. More recently, orthodontics has been used as an adjunct to periodontics to increase connective tissue support and alveolar bone height. The purpose of this article is to review the adverse effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal tissues and to discuss the mutually beneficial relationship shared between the two specialties.

  19. Orthodontic–periodontics interdisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, K.; Reddy, Y. Giridhar; Reddy, Vinay P.; Nandan, Hemant; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    In this present era, when a significant number of patients seeking orthodontic treatment are adults, importance of multidisciplinary treatment approach cannot be overemphasized. Higher susceptibility of plaque accumulation in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment makes involvement of periodontist almost unavoidable. Also, orthodontic treatment frequently results in undesirable periodontal changes which require immediate attention. More recently, orthodontics has been used as an adjunct to periodontics to increase connective tissue support and alveolar bone height. The purpose of this article is to review the adverse effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal tissues and to discuss the mutually beneficial relationship shared between the two specialties. PMID:22628956

  20. The Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-α on Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Differentiation and the Related Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaochen; Tan, Guang-Rong; Yu, Mengfei; Cai, Xia; Zhou, Yi; Ding, Huifen; Xie, Han; Qu, Fan; Zhang, Runju; Lam, Carolina Un; Cui, Peng; Fu, Baiping

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration plays an integral role in the treatment of periodontal diseases, with important clinical significance for the preservation and functional recovery of affected teeth. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), which were found in the periodontal ligament tissues possessing properties of pluripotency and self-renewing, could repair damaged periodontium with great promise. However, in a chronic inflammatory micro-environment, these cells suffered from reduced capacity to differentiate and regenerate. There has been a growing appreciation that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in periodontal tissues drives cellular responses to chronic periodontitis. Several new advances, including an increased understanding of the mechanism of interaction between TNF-α and PDLSCs provides insight into inflamed cell regeneration, which in turn reveal strategies to improve the effectiveness of therapy. Here we gave a comprehensive review on the role of TNF-α in chronic periodontitis, its effect on PDLSCs differentiation and periodontal regeneration, related signaling pathways and concluded with future perspectives of research on PDLSCs-based periodontal tissue regeneration.

  1. Relationship between diabetes and periodontal infection

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Arias-Herrera, Santiago; Caffesse, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a high prevalent disease. In the United States 47.2% of adults ≥ 30 years old have been diagnosed with some type of periodontitis. Longitudinal studies have demonstrated a two-way relationship between diabetes and periodontitis, with more severe periodontal tissue destruction in diabetic patients and poorer glycemic control in diabetic subjects with periodontal disease. Periodontal treatment can be successful in diabetic patients. Short term effects of periodontal treatment are similar in diabetic patients and healthy population but, more recurrence of periodontal disease can be expected in no well controlled diabetic individuals. However, effects of periodontitis and its treatment on diabetes metabolic control are not clearly defined and results of the studies remain controversial. PMID:26185600

  2. Adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Innovative developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have yielded various implementation strategies and the possibility of functional tissue regeneration. Technologic advances in the combination of stem cells, biomaterials, and growth factors have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in vivo and in vitro. The therapeutic potential of human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are harvested from bone marrow and adipose tissue, has generated increasing interest in a wide variety of biomedical disciplines. These cells can differentiate into a variety of tissue types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and nerve tissue. Adipose-derived stem cells have some advantages compared with other sources of stem cells, most notably that a large number of cells can be easily and quickly isolated from adipose tissue. In current clinical therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration, several methods have been developed and applied either alone or in combination, such as enamel matrix proteins, guided tissue regeneration, autologous/allogeneic/xenogeneic bone grafts, and growth factors. However, there are various limitations and shortcomings for periodontal tissue regeneration using current methods. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using MSCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because the various secreted growth factors from MSCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissue but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells are especially effective for neovascularization compared with other MSC sources. In this review, the possibility and potential of adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine are introduced. Of particular interest, periodontal tissue regeneration with adipose-derived stem cells is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of an Electronic Periodontal Probe Versus a Manual Probe

    PubMed Central

    Trentzsch, Lars; Schönfelder, Antje; Schwarzenberger, Fabian; Jentsch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosis of periodontal diseases requires reco-rding of clinical and periodontal variables. Possible measurement errors in recording the periodontal findings are dependent on the measurement method. Aim The purpose of the trial was to investigate an electronic, pressure-calibrated probe compared with a standard, manual measurement probe used to take periodontal variables. Materials and Methods The study included 25 subjects suffering from periodontal disease. Their findings were taken by two users on a randomized basis using a standard probe and an electronic, pressure calibrated probe, at an interval of 24 hours. The recorded clinical variables contained Pocket Depth (PD), Attachment Level (AL), Bleeding on Probing (BOP), the complete time needed to take the findings and the sensation of pain experienced by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The data were statistically analyzed using the paired t-test. Results The measurement values (24 patients) for PD (p=0.03) and BOP (p=0.01) indicated a significant difference (paired t test, p>0.05), while there was no statistical difference for AL (p=0.064). A classification of PD into groups of 1-3mm, 4-6mm and ≥7mm showed that the manual method measured higher values than the electronic method (p=0.001). The measurement values did not reveal any significant differences (p>0.05) with respect to the total time needed to take findings and the measurement time for PD/AL. There was a significant difference (Wilcoxon-test, p<0.05) in VAS values (p=0.048) and in terms of the time needed to record the findings for BOP (p=0.004). Conclusion It can be assumed that the electronic probe should mainly be used in the supportive periodontal therapy. Present study showed that the use of a standard manual probe is essential to review conspicuous or unclear measurement values, or when treating deep pockets higher than 7mm. PMID:28050524

  4. Translational research and therapeutic applications of stem cell transplantation in periodontal regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Xie, Cheng; Zhao, Yi-Min; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have received a great deal of interest from the research community as potential therapeutic "tools" for a variety of chronic debilitating diseases that lack clinically effective therapies. Stem cells are also of interest for the regeneration of tooth-supporting tissues that have been lost to periodontal disease. Indeed, substantial data have demonstrated that the exogenous administration of stem cells or their derivatives in preclinical animal models of periodontal defects can restore damaged tissues to their original form and function. As we discuss here, however, considerable hurdles must be overcome before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel clinical therapies. Generally, the application of stem cells for periodontal therapy in clinics will not be realized until the best cell(s) to use, the optimal dose, and an effective mode of administration are identified. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation in the periodontium and to learn how to preciously control stem cell fates in the pathological environment around a tooth. From a translational perspective, we outline the challenges that may vary across preclinical models for the evaluation of stem cell therapy in situations that require periodontal reconstruction and the safety issues that are related to clinical applications of human stem cells. Although clinical trials that use autologous periodontal ligament stem cells have been approved and have already been initiated, proper consideration of the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns may facilitate, rather than inhibit, the clinical translation of new therapies.

  5. Using risk assessment in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Alan J

    2014-08-01

    Risk assessment has become a regular feature in both dental practice and society as a whole, and principles used to assess risk in society are similar to those used in a clinical setting. Although the concept of risk assessment as a prognostic indicator for periodontal disease incidence and activity is well established in the management of periodontitis, the use of risk assessment to manage the practical treatment of periodontitis and its sequelae appears to have less foundation. A simple system of initial risk assessment - building on the use of the Basic Periodontal Examination (BPE), clinical, medical and social factors - is described, linked to protocols for delivering care suited to general dental practice and stressing the role of long-term supportive care. The risks of not treating the patient are considered, together with the possible causes of failure, and the problems of successful treatment are illustrated by the practical management of post-treatment recession.

  6. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  7. Periodontal Stain Test Diagnosis Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    inflammatory loss of attachment and bone in adolescents ; lesions are often associated with incisors and first molars; no evidence of systemic disease . RISK...FACTORS: When determining susceptibility to periodontal disease , patients in the previous classifications should be considered high risk patients if...AD-A247 28411i 11111l l l1113111! Eilli UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL PERIODONTAL STAIN TEST DIAGNOSIS PROGRAM D T IC Prof. E.J. Burkes

  8. Effect of vitamin C administration on hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenlei; Yang, Nanfei; Feng, Xiujing; Sun, Tingzhe; Shen, Pingping; Sun, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease, which is associated with chronic inflammation and leads to significant destruction of periodontal tissues. Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) constitute the largest cell population in PDL tissues and a considerable body of evidence has demonstrated an association between oxidative stress and the progression of periodontitis. However, the effects on PDLCs exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the molecular mechanisms by which H2O2 affects periodontitis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effect of H2O2 and the antioxidative function of vitamin C (Vc) in PDLCs were investigated. The results demonstrated that H2O2 treatment decreased the viability of PDLCs. The decreased PDLC viability was primarily induced by apoptosis, which was evidenced by cleaved caspases-3, caspases-9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Following optimal Vc addition, the proapoptotic effects of H2O2 were partially antagonized. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that H2O2 primarily induced the apoptosis of PDLCs and that these adverse effects were partially rescued following treatment with Vc. These results revealed how H2O2 promotes the progression of periodontitis and provide an improved understanding of the reversal effect of antioxidant treatment. Therefore, optimal Vc administration may provide a potentially effective technique in periodontal therapy.

  9. The use of platelet rich plasma with guided tissue regeneration in defects caused by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Holly, D; Mracna, J

    2009-01-01

    The goal of periodontal treatment in not only the stabilization of disease but also the regeneration of the destructed tissue. In the past few years various procedures have been created to achieve this. The guided tissue regeneration is a surgical procedure developed on the basis of experimental studies. It enables the creation of periodontal tissues affected by periodontitis, the so called reattachment. It stands for formation of new attachment--meaning the regeneration of cementum, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This surgical procedure of the treatment of periodontitis is based on the principle of exclusion of the epithelium and also the gingival connective tissue from the root surface so the precursor cells (desmodontal cells) can occupy the defect and pursue their differentiation. Periodontal ligament containing cells with regenerative potential are the exclusive ones to have the ability to regenerate structures affected by periodontitis. The use of growth factors offer new aspects to the therapy (Fig. 7, Ref. 11). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  10. Enhanced proliferation, attachment and osteopontin expression by porcine periodontal cells exposed to Emdogain.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J C; Xiao, Y; Young, W G; Bartold, P M

    2005-12-01

    Emdogain (EMD) is an enamel matrix derivative extracted from developing porcine teeth with demonstrated periodontal regenerative potential. EMD has been shown to influence a number of properties of periodontal ligament cells including proliferation, cell attachment and matrix synthesis. To date, the effect of EMD on the epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) is unknown. In this study, periodontal ligament fibroblasts, ERM, alveolar bone cells and gingival fibroblasts were obtained from porcine periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. This study investigated, in vitro, the effect of EMD at three concentrations on proliferation, cell attachment and expression of mRNA for two mineralised tissue-related proteins (osteopontin and bone sialoprotein). As for other periodontal cells, the ERM proliferative response was enhanced by EMD. Attachment assays revealed a highly significant increase for ERM and gingival fibroblasts after EMD treatment at all concentrations. This study has also shown that EMD stimulated expression of osteopontin mRNA by ERM and alveolar bone cells. The results from this study provide evidence that EMD enhanced cellular events related with proliferation, attachment and osteopontin mRNA expression by porcine periodontal cells, in a manner consistent with its role in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  11. Effects of malocclusions and orthodontics on periodontal health: evidence from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Anne-Marie

    2008-08-01

    Many patients seek orthodontic treatment for esthetic improvement. These patients mostly present with mal-alignment of the anterior teeth. The positive effects of orthodontic treatment on their appearance and self-esteem are easy to envision. However, does orthodontic treatment provide dental health benefits in addition to the esthetic benefits? Do malocclusions harm the periodontium? Is correcting malocclusions with orthodontic treatment beneficial for periodontal health? The purpose of this study is to present evidence available on this topic. Two systematic reviews were conducted to address these questions: does a malocclusion affect periodontal health, and does orthodontic treatment affect periodontal health? Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established for both reviews, and an electronic search and a hand search were conducted. Several papers were included in both reviews, but the overall quality of the studies was weak. The first review found a correlation between the presence of a malocclusion and periodontal disease. Subjects with greater malocclusion have more severe periodontal disease. This may be dependent on oral health status. One should keep in mind that an association does not necessarily mean causation. The second review identified an absence of reliable evidence on the effects of orthodontic treatment on periodontal health. The existing low-quality evidence suggests that orthodontic therapy results in small detrimental effects to the periodontium. The results of both reviews do not warrant recommendation for orthodontic treatment to prevent future periodontal problems, except for specific unusual malocclusions.

  12. Systemic effects of periodontitis: Lessons learned from research on atherosclerotic vascular disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papapanou, Panos N.

    2015-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past 25 years have focused on the role of periodontitis, an inflammatory condition of microbial etiology that destroys the tooth supporting tissues, as a systemic inflammatory stressor that can act as an independent risk factor of atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVSD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). It has been suggested that periodontitis-associated bacteremias and systemic dissemination of inflammatory mediators produced in the periodontal tissues may result in systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, while bacteria of oral origin may translocate into the feto-placental unit. Epidemiologic studies largely support an association between periodontitis and ASVD / APOs independent of known confounders; indeed, periodontitis has been shown to confer statistically significantly elevated risk for clinical events associated with ASVD and APOs in multivariable adjustments. On the other hand, intervention studies demonstrate that although periodontal therapy reduces systemic inflammation and improves endothelial function, it has no positive effect on the incidence of APOs. Studies of the effects of periodontal interventions on ASVD-related clinical events are lacking. This review summarizes key findings from mechanistic, association and intervention studies and attempts to reconcile the seemingly contradictory evidence that originates from different lines of investigation. PMID:26388299

  13. Using clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short periodontal continuing professional development course.

    PubMed

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Thevissen, Eric; Lindén, Ulf; Klinge, Björn; de Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    A case-based approach was used in a two-day periodontal continuing professional development course as a strategy to stimulate active learning. The present study investigates the outcome of this course format in terms of feasibility, perceived efficiency as a learning approach and reported individual learning goals. The study was performed in five identical courses entitled'risk analysis and treatment in periodontal patients'at Malmö University between 2011-2014. Before the course, clinical cases were used to activate participants' prior knowledge and to attune their focus on the course content. During the course, cases were discussed to synchronise theory with practical application. A pre- and end-course questionnaire were developed to evaluate participants' characteristics (age, clinical expertise, experience and expectations), perceptions on feasibility and instructiveness and emerged individual learning goals. The participants (39 dentists and 78 dental hygienists) reported an average preparation time of 62 minutes (range 2-190) and had positive perceptions on the accessibility, instructiveness and difficulty of cases. Expectations ranged between refreshing, acquiring new knowledge and mastering the course subject. Most reported learning goals were related to daily clinical practice including the development of a treatment plan, when to continue non-surgical treatment or to extract teeth/perform surgery, the approach to periodontitis, how to motivate non-compliant patients and when to refer. Conclusion: The use of clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short-term continuing professional development periodontal course was positively perceived by the dentists and dental hygienists in terms of feasibility and learning potential.

  14. Non-surgical treatment of early breast cancer: techniques on the way.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Alaa; Elrefaey, Shymaa

    2014-08-01

    Trials are still on the way to evaluate different non-surgical techniques to treat early breast cancer with achieving maximum oncological control and aesthetic outcome. Also these techniques can help old patients to bypass surgical and radiation complications and facilitate the treatment of early breast cancer with minimum side effects.

  15. Nonsurgical embryo recovery and transfer in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jeferson F; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria G; Oliveira, Maria Emília F; Leite, Ceci R; Nascimento-Penido, Paula Maria P; Brandão, Felipe Z; Lehloenya, Khoboso C

    2016-07-01

    The embryo transfer techniques used in small ruminants worldwide are based in surgical procedures. These actions are performed under general anesthesia which needs a combination of animal fasting and drugs for secure animal handling and surgery manipulations. Therefore, it involves risks to animal health and life. The major limiting sequels are adhesions formed by the abdominal surgery, in the ovaries, uterus, or between them. These occurrences can both compromise uterus accessing and oocyte capture and are responsible for decreasing success and limiting successive embryo collections. In contrast, nonsurgical embryo procedures can be performed in a relatively simplified way. Nonsurgical embryo recovery does not need animal prolonged starvation, drug retention is minimized, and donors can stay in a standing position. After the end of embryo recovery, donors are promptly restored to their routine housing and feeding. Furthermore, this technique does not need incisions and, therefore, can be used repetitively in superovulated or nonsuperovulated goats and sheep for embryo recovery-a similar procedure done in cattle. In Brazil, promising results are reported using nonsurgical embryo transfer in recipient goats, and studies are currently evaluating similar procedures in sheep. Therefore, this review aimed to present the current panorama of nonsurgical embryo transfer in sheep and goats.

  16. Necrotising periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Fenoll, Ambrosio; Sánchez-Pérez, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Necrotizing gingivitis (NG) or necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is considered to be an acute opportunistic gingival infection caused by bacterial plaque. It appears more frequently in undernurished children and young adults as well as patients with immunodeficiency. In its pathogenesis, there are factors related to the oral microbiota with invasion processes on the one hand, and on the other hand, factors associated with the host, such as signs of capillary and immunological disorders as well as undernurishment. The disease is characterized by pain, bleeding and papillary necrosis with tendency to relapse. Diagnosis is made by a simple clinical examination. However, complementary tests ought to be performed in order to eliminate the possibility of illnesses systemic or immunodeficiency. Early and sustained treatment is strongly recommended. Lesions of the gums (craters in the interdental papillae) as an aftermath of the disease is a possibility, or if there is necrotizing periodontitis there will be loss of attachment tissue.

  17. Effect of Ozonised water on Chronic Periodontitis - A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Katti, Sandeep S; Chava, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to study the clinical effects of ozonated water on periodontal tissues. Materials & Methods: In the present study 30 subjects were selected with age ranging from 20 to 60 yearsand pocket depth of ≥5mm. Two sites were selected in each patient whichwere divided into two groups. Group 1(control group-irrigation with saline) and Group 2(study group-irrigation with ozonized water) and clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, 15 days and 30 days. Results: When the comparison of mean values of Plaque Index and Gingival Index between the groups and at different time intervals were made, statistically significant difference were observed at 30 days at 5% level. When the mean values of clinical attachment level on mesial and distal site was compared between the groups, statistical significance was observed at 5% level and 1% level respectively.Similarly statistical significance at 5% level was observed at 15 and 30 days on buccal site. Conclusion: Subgingival irrigation with ozonized water is beneficial adjunct treatment modality to enhance periodontal health with significant role in periodontal therapy. How to cite this article: Katti SS, Chava VK. Effect of Ozonised water on Chronic Periodontitis - A Clinical Study. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):79-84. PMID:24324309

  18. Long-term periodontal status after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Polson, A M; Subtelny, J D; Meitner, S W; Polson, A P; Sommers, E W; Iker, H P; Reed, B E

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical periodontal status of persons who had completed orthodontic therapy at least 10 years previously (study) and compared the findings to those of adults with untreated malocclusions (control). Subjects in the study (n = 112; 63 female subjects, 49 male subjects; mean age 29.3 +/- 4.2 [SD] years) and control (n = 111; 62 female subjects, 49 male subjects; mean age 32.9 +/- 6.5 years) populations underwent a comprehensive periodontal examination that consisted of measurements taken at six points around the circumference of each tooth: (1) plaque, (2) visual inflammation, (3) bleeding after probing, (4) pocket depth, (5) gingival recession, and (6) loss of connective tissue attachment. Data from the individual measuring points were organized into 14 different combinations of either tooth types or surface locations; each was subjected to a four-way ANOVA partitioned on group (study vs. control), sex, socioeconomic status, and malocclusion type. The results showed that differences in age distribution within the groups were affecting the comparisons between the groups. Consequently, the groups were balanced for age and analyses were done to investigate group differences by means of multiple regression techniques. The comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups for any of the periodontal variables. It was concluded that orthodontic treatment during adolescence had no discernible effect upon later periodontal health.

  19. Evaluation of bone morphogenic proteins in periodontal practice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Supreet; Grover, Vishakha; Kaur, Harkiran; Malhotra, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago Marshal R. Urist discovered a substance in bone matrix that had inductive properties for the development of bone and cartilage, until date, at least 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been identified, some of which have been shown in vitro to stimulate the process of stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts in human and animal models. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of BMPs and to review critically the clinical data currently available on the use of BMPs in various periodontal applications. The literature on BMPs was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal applications were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicates BMPs to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. On the basis of the data provided in the studies that were reviewed BMPs provide revolutionary therapies in periodontal practice. PMID:27134452

  20. Interdisciplinary approach and orthodontic options for treatment of advanced periodontal disease and malocclusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sachiko; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ono, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kimio; Matsui, Tokuo

    2007-09-01

    Patients with a compromised periodontal condition and a breakdown in occlusal support may require periodontal and prosthodontic treatment in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment of these patients is possible and would involve removal of inflammation and occlusal interference and provision of an environment for proper restorative rehabilitation. A different approach to the orthodontic treatment of these patients is required in terms of treatment manner, stabilizing anchorage systems, force systems, retention, and plaque control during treatment. This report describes the case of a 49-year-old woman with severely compromised periodontal tissues, multiple missing teeth, and malocclusion. Highly esthetic and functional results were achieved by treatment with orthodontics as well as periodontal therapy, including guided tissue regeneration and implant restoration with sinus lift.

  1. The relationship between periodontal status and peripheral levels of neutrophils in two consanguineous siblings with severe congenital neutropenia: case reports.

    PubMed

    Tözüm, Tolga Fikret; Berker, Ezel; Ersoy, Fügen; Tezcan, Iihan; Sanal, Ozden

    2003-03-01

    Congenital neutropenia is characterized by a severe reduction in absolute neutrophil counts, resulting in an almost total absence of neutrophils. It is well known that severe neutropenia affects periodontal status. Oral manifestations include ulcerations, gingival desquamation, gingival inflammation, attachment loss, and alveolar bone loss which may result in tooth loss. Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may improve this periodontal condition. This article reports the relationship between periodontal disease status and peripheral neutrophil levels in two consanguineous siblings with severe congenital neutropenia who did not receive routine G-CSF for 2 years prior to examination. Both siblings were given scaling, root planing, and periodontal prophylaxis in regular follow-up visits. This report demonstrates that periodontal therapy supported by adequate oral hygiene may result in restoration of neutrophil counts in siblings with congenital neutropenia.

  2. Effect of 1% Phenytoin Muco-Adhesive Paste on Improvement of Periodontal Status in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Blinded Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian-Ardakani, Ahmad; Nabi-Maybodi, Mohsen; Nasrabadi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Phenytoin (PHT) has been known to promote wound healing in some medical conditions owing to its proliferative as well as anti-inflammatory effects. Yet, its application in oral lesions was less investigated. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in periodontal indices following the topical use of phenytoin in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Method: In this doubled-blind, randomized, split-mouth controlled clinical study, 20 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis referred to Periodontology Department of Shahid Sadoughi Medical University of Yazd in 2014 were selected consecutively. After initial therapy (scaling and root planning and oral hygiene instructions), periodontal indices including bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and modified gingival index (MGI) were recorded. Gingival facial surface of two posterior sextants with at least two teeth with similar conditions, were selected randomly. Then one surface received PHT paste whereas the other side had placebo as control. Patients were received the mucoadhesive pastes under strict control by an examiner, twice a day for a week. Periodontal indices were measured 3 weeks after treatment. Data was analyzed with t-test and paired t-test by using SPSS 21 software. Results: It was observed that periodontal pocket depth was significantly more decreased in phenytoin side in comparison with placebo one (p< 0.05). In addition, inflammatory indices including bleeding on probing and modified gingival index declined more in the phenytoin group (p= 0.001 and p< 0.05 respectively). Conclusion: These encouraging results support the use of 1% phenytoin mucoadhesive paste as an adjunctive in periodontal treatment. PMID:27840838

  3. Effects of different manual periodontal probes on periodontal measurements

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Birte; Alte, Dietrich; Schwahn, Christian; Desvarieux, Moïse; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim To quantify the digit preference effect for three manual periodontal probes and to calculate correction values to enable comparison of studies with equal recording protocols, but different periodontal probes. Material and Methods A prospective in vivo crossover study was conducted with a six-sequence three-period design. Six examiners assessed attachment loss (AL), probing pocket depth (PD) and gingiva height (GH) at four surfaces, full-mouth, in six generally healthy subjects using three manual probes: PCP11 (3-3-3-2 mm increments), PCP2 (2 mm increments), and PCPUNC15 (1 mm increments). Results Distributions of AL, PD and GH differed between probes (p < 0.001). Compared with PCPUNC15, periodontal measurements coinciding with probe markings of PCP11 and PCP2, respectively, were preferentially named by examiners. Digit preference was most pronounced for PD, but less for AL and GH. In multilevel models, PD differed significantly between all three probes (p < 0.05); probe- and examiner-related effects were also observed for AL and GH. Correction values for pairwise combinations of probes were determined. Conclusions We provided empirical evidence and quantified the effect of probe type on periodontal measurements. Differences in probe type should be considered when comparing periodontal data within and between epidemiological studies and appropriate corrections, provided here, should be applied. PMID:22924328

  4. Autologous Stem Cell Application in Periodontal Regeneration Technique (SAI-PRT) Using PDLSCs Directly From an Extracted Tooth···An Insight

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, KL; Desai, Rajendra; Dalvi, Priyanka Jairaj

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration represents the ultimate goal of periodontal therapy. The current regenerative techniques have limited success rates especially in advanced periodontal defects. Currently the research is focused on novel cell-based approaches for periodontal regeneration to overcome the limitations of existing treatment. The human clinical trial on stem cells based periodontal regeneration is promising. The plethora of animal studies provide sound evidence to support the belief that periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) can be used for periodontal regeneration. The direct application of autologous periodontal stem cells in treatment of intrabony defects is attempted for the first time in periodontal literature. Stem cell Application in Periodontal Regeneration Technique (SAI-PRT) using direct PDLSCs has overcome the limitations and concerns of ex- vivo stem cell culture methods like high cost, technique sensitivity, loss of stemness during cell passage, genetic manipulation and tumorigenic potential. Clinical feasibility, success and cost effectiveness over currently available techniques are encouraging. The clinical utility of this novel idea is recommended. PMID:26634072

  5. Periodontal diseases in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Clerehugh, V

    2008-04-26

    Unlike in adults, currently there are no nationally agreed guidelines for the assessment of periodontal diseases in children and adolescents. This paper considers the range of periodontal diseases that can affect youngsters and documents a simple periodontal screening system for the younger age groups. It includes principles of periodontal diagnosis and management for the practitioner to apply to the young patient and considers when to treat in practice and when to refer to a specialist.

  6. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs' potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs' homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs' involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair.

  7. Bone marrow-derived cells homing for self-repair of periodontal tissues: a histological characterization and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Li, Chen; Xie, Han; Lu, Yuwang; Wu, Ying; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease leads to the formation of periodontal defect, can result in tooth loss if left untreated. The therapies to repair/regenerate periodontal tissues have attracted lots of attention these years. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), a group of cells containing heterogeneous stem/progenitor cells, are capable of homing to injured tissues and participating in tissue repair/regeneration. The amplification of autologous BMDCs’ potential in homing for self-repair/regeneration, therefore, might be considered as an alternative therapy except for traditional cell transplantation. However, the knowledge of the BMDCs’ homing and participation in periodontal repair/regeneration is still known little. For the purpose of directly observing BMDCs’ involvement in periodontal repair, chimeric mouse models were established to make their bone marrow cells reconstituted with cells expressing green enhanced fluorescence protein (EGFP) in this study. One month after bone marrow transplantation, periodontal defects were made on the mesial side of bilateral maxillary first molars in chimeric mice. The green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP+) BMDCS in periodontal defect regions were examined by bioluminescent imaging and immunofluorescence staining. GFP+ BMDCs were found to aggregate in the periodontal defect regions and emerge in newly-formed bones or fibers. Some of them also co-expressed markers of fibroblasts, osteoblasts or vascular endothelial cells. These results indicated that BMDCs might contribute to the formation of new fibers, bones and blood vessels during periodontal repair. In conclusion, we speculated that autologous BMDCs were capable of negotiating into the surgical sites created by periodontal operation and participating in tissue repair. PMID:26722424

  8. Lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Ricardo; Teles, Flavia; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Paster, Bruce; Haffajee, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by bacterial species living in polymicrobial biofilms at or below the gingival margin and progress largely as a result of the inflammation initiated by specific subgingival species. In the past few decades, efforts to understand the microbiota of periodontal diseases have led to an exponential increase in information about biofilms associated with periodontal health and disease. In fact, the oral microbiota is one of the best characterized microbiomes that colonize the human body. Despite this increased knowledge, one has to ask if our fundamental concepts of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases have really changed. In this chapter we will review how our comprehension of the structure and function of the subgingival microbiota evolved over the years in search of lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology. More specifically, this review focuses on: 1) how the data obtained through molecular techniques has impacted our knowledge of the etiology of periodontal infections; 2) the potential role of viruses in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases; 3) how concepts of microbial ecology have expanded our understanding of host microbial interactions that might lead to periodontal diseases; 4) the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases; and 5) the impact of these evolving concepts on treatment and preventive approaches to periodontal infections. We will conclude by reviewing how novel systems biology approaches promise to unravel new details of the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of periodontal disease mechanisms. PMID:23574465

  9. Smoking and periodontal disease severity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Canut, P; Lorca, A; Magán, R

    1995-10-01

    This study was performed to assess the influence of smoking on periodontal disease severity. Data concerning periodontal status and smoking habits were collected from 889 periodontal patients: 340 male and 549 female, 21 to 76 years of age, 47.4% being non smokers and 52.6% smokers. Periodontal parameters, recorded by the same examiner (PMC), were: gingival recession (GR), Pocket depth (PD), Probing attachment level (PAL), and mobility (M). The influence of age, sex and tobacco consumption on these periodontal parameters was statistically evaluated using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with covariates. A non-linear effect model was also fitted by taking the natural logarithms of the response variables (GR, PD, PAL) closer to biomedical phenomena. Mobility was analyzed by a chi2-test. The effect of smoking on periodontitis showed no association with age or with sex. Smoking, age and sex were shown to be statistically significant for periodontitis, by performing both univariate (t-test for equal means) and multivariate tests. p-values for smoking and periodontitis were: GR (p=0.000), PD (p=0.000), PAL (p=0.000) and M (P=0.015). Smoking one cigarette per day, up to 10, and up to 20, increased PAL by 0.5%, 5% and 10%, respectively. The impact of tobacco is comparable to the impact resulting from the factor of age in this sample, increasing PAL by 0.7% for each year of life. Comparison between smokers of less than 10 cigarettes per day (PAL mean 3.72 mm +/-0.86) and non-smokers (PAL mean 3.84 +/- 0.89) showed no differences in PAL (p=0.216), while comparison for smokers from 11 to 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.36 +/- 1.23) and for more than 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.50 +/- 1.04) demonstrated significant differences (p=0.000). These findings suggest that: (1) tobacco increases periodontal disease severity; (2) this effect is clinically evident above consumption of a certain quantity of tobacco.

  10. Trauma from occlusion. Periodontal concerns.

    PubMed

    Burgett, F G

    1995-04-01

    Application of the chronic disease model to IPD suggests that to be most effective, programs of prevention and treatment include measures to address as many of the identified risk factors as is possible. It remains to be determined if TO is involved in the initiation of IPD, for example, if individuals with TO are at greater risk for the development of IPD. There is evidence that TO is a risk factor in the progression of IPD. Tooth mobility is associated with and is a risk factor for increased attachment loss and increased bone loss in patients with periodontitis. Tooth mobility can be reduced by occlusal treatment. Clinical trials involving patients with periodontitis clearly establish that a better clinical periodontal attachment level response to treatment is obtained when occlusal adjustment is included as part of the treatment plan. Patients with advanced periodontal involvement benefit from occlusal treatment in terms of increased stability for the teeth and also in terms of oral comfort. Finally, There is no evidence that without occlusal treatment, periodontal patients who are in careful maintenance programs are more likely to suffer recurrence of IPD.

  11. Comparative evaluation of subgingivally delivered xanthan-based chlorhexidine gel and herbal extract gel in the treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, Megha; Rana, Tarun; Prasad, Narayan; Baiju, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Local drug delivery agents can effectively deliver the antimicrobial drugs in bactericidal concentration, and have shown improved clinical outcomes when used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a xanthan-based chlorhexidine gel versus herbal extracts’ gel as an adjunct to periodontal therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 sites, age group of 30-50 years, periodontal pockets measuring 5-8 mm and diagnosed with chronic periodontitis were selected for the study. The selected sites were randomized in five groups: Scaling and root planing (SRP) alone (Group A), SRP + Chlosite gel (Group B), SRP + Herbal gel (Group C), Chlosite gel alone (Group D) and Herbal gel alone (Group E). Clinical parameters such as Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1- and 3-month intervals. Results: After 3 months, there were statistically significant reductions in all the clinical parameters for Groups B and C compared with Group A. There was no significant reduction in all clinical parameters between Group D and E where no mechanical therapy was performed. Conclusion: The results indicate that the local application of herbal gel can be comparably used as chlorhexidine gel in the treatment of chronic periodontitis as an adjunct to mechanical periodontal therapy. PMID:24872624

  12. Sensory outcome with nonsurgical management of esotropia with convergence excess (a high accommodative convergence/accommodation ratio).

    PubMed

    Pratt-Johnson, J A; Tillson, G

    1984-08-01

    Twenty-seven patients with esotropia and convergence excess (a high accommodative convergence/accommodation [AC/A] ratio) managed nonsurgically underwent a final standardized evaluation of their sensory and motor status after a follow-up period of at least 8 years. All had a deviation with distance fixation of less than 10 prism dioptres (PD) of esotropia with full optical correction both initially and throughout the follow-up period. The average spherical-equivalent refractive error was +2.3 D. The AC/A ratio had tended to decrease with age, and most patients had fusion, although only a small proportion had central fusion and stereopsis. Approximately half of the patients had been treated with bifocals, but their sensory outcome did not differ from that of the other patients. Miotics had not been used for more than a few months in any patient, as they were ineffective in reducing the deviation with near fixation to less than 10 PD of esotropia. A study, possibly a multicentre one, involving larger numbers of patients should be designed to find out whether bifocal therapy offers an advantage in the final sensory outcome of such patients.

  13. [Residual pocket depth after periodontal regenerative procedures. Clinical relevance and interpretation of meta-analyses data].

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Hauri, Dimitri; Krähenmann, Michael A; Puhan, Milo A; Attin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analyses allow to combine results systematically and to obtain more precise quantitative results on the efficacy of a therapy. For the clinician, the comparison of two therapy modalities is particularly of interest. Several meta-analyses exist in the field of periodontal regenerative procedures. The problem is that the results are difficult to interpret for the clinician. It is only the clinical effect that can indicate the superiority of a certain treatment modality, e.g. remaining periodontal pockets. The aim of the present systematic review was the re-evaluation of studies of existing meta-analyses and to determine the probability of remaining periodontal pockets of more than 3 respectively 5 mm after active therapy. The probability of remaining periodontal pockets over 3 respectively 5 mm was significantly higher after periodontal flap procedure without regenerative procedures, compared to guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or the use of enamel matrix derivatives. Moreover, the probability of remaining pockets over 3 mm was with GTR on average 57% and with the use of enamel maxtrix derivatives 74%. Using the cut-off value of 5 mm this probability was reduced to 8 and 17%, respectively. A new clinical attachment that was less than 50% of the original level was to be expected in 29% (GTR) and 15% using enamel matrix derivatives. This statistical interpretation permits not only the clinician, but also the patient to compare the efficacy of the different treatment modalities using the probability of primary clinical effect outcomes.

  14. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  15. Periodontics in the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Vandersall, D C

    1998-07-01

    This article prognosticates where periodontology will be in the next millennium. The forecasting of such events is wrought with confusion because such predictions are shadowed by bias, dogmatism, prejudice, experiences, and opinions from either a closed or open mind. The results of the survey from 101 periodontists reflect opinions from varied backgrounds, years of clinical experience, and individual levels of success or failure. The responses cannot be tested for accuracy or duplicated by another survey except to wait out the test of time for the year 2025. Clinicians will be challenged to make decisions on accepting new techniques and concepts as these are brought into the therapeutic fold of periodontics. The clinician will be met with new possibilities as a paradigm shift is inevitable for periodontal practice in the next millennium. After all, who would have thought in the 1960s, the soft tissue augmentation era, that 22 years later in 1982, the regeneration of the lost attachment apparatus (alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament) would become a reality. This survey strongly suggests that by the end of the first quarter of the twenty-first century, local delivery of antimicrobials, growth and differentiation factors, and root biomodification agents will have a major impact on the practice of periodontics. One thing is certain, in the next millennium, considering the responses from this survey, a new era in periodontics will be here. By the year 2025, the research, development, and dissemination of new periodontal knowledge will be beyond the imagination from what was considered usual and customary for the twentieth century.

  16. Critical issues in clinical periodontal research.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, Philip M

    2012-06-01

    As periodontal researchers and clinicians, we are challenged every day to make decisions relating to the clinical management of our patients and about how best to conduct clinical periodontal research. This volume of Periodontology 2000 addresses some of the critical issues in contemporary clinical periodontics and periodontal research that are of direct relevance to clinicians, researchers, teachers and students. The 11 review articles in this volume of Periodontology 2000 focus on aspects of periodontal research methodology and clinical periodontology. In terms of research methodology, the articles aim to inform the reader on topics relating to randomized controlled trials in periodontal research, evidence-based dentistry, calibration of clinical examiners and statistics relevant to periodontal research. The clinical periodontology articles address issues relating to decisions on retaining periodontally compromised teeth or replacing them with implants, periodontal management in the patient with osteoporosis, surgical approaches for root coverage and the emerging science of advanced regenerative technologies, including the use of stem cells, for periodontal regeneration. It is hoped that these critical reviews will address many of the dilemmas that confront us on a regular basis and provide practical guidance to those engaged in both clinical periodontology and clinical periodontal research.

  17. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Maruchi, N; Miyajima, K; Iizuka, T; Inagaki, K; Noguchi, T; Sakai, M

    1990-12-01

    Adults with untreated malocclusions suffer from more periodontal disease than if their malocclusion had been corrected orthodontically. What orthodontists can offer in the management of patients with periodontal disease, how they can help the periodontists and the patients, and how the periodontists can help the orthodontist make treatment safe and purposefully are widely discussed. The purpose of this study is, therefore, to discuss how orthodontic patients with severe periodontitis could be treated and what we should do for these patients during the treatment as well as at their initial visit. One case is presented as an example of treatment for malocclusion with sever periodontitis: The patient was a 23 years 8 months female with a chief complaint of protrusion of upper incisors. Since clinical examination revealed severe periodontitis, periodontal treatment was undertaken for one year prior to orthodontic treatment. From these observations, we are conviced of the importance again of the global approach and the team treatment method in treating malocclusions with periodontitis.

  18. Association between postmenopausal osteoporosis and experimental periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kai; Ma, Souzhi; Guo, Jianbin; Huang, Yongling; Yan, Fuhua; Xiao, Yin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) and the pathogenesis of periodontitis, ovariectomized rats were generated and the experimental periodontitis was induced using a silk ligature. The inflammatory factors and bone metabolic markers were measured in the serum and periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats using an automatic chemistry analyzer, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and immunohistochemistry. The bone mineral density of whole body, pelvis, and spine was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and image analysis. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 statistical software. It was found that ovariectomy could upregulate the expression of interleukin- (IL-)6, the receptor activator of nuclear factor- κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and downregulate IL-10 expression in periodontal tissues, which resulted in progressive alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. This study indicates that changes of cytokines and bone turnover markers in the periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats contribute to the damage of periodontal tissues.

  19. Periodontal status in snow leopards.

    PubMed

    Cook, R A; Stoller, N H

    1986-11-01

    Periodontal examinations were performed on ten 1- to 22-year-old snow leopards (6 males and 4 females), using dentistry methods for determining the plaque and gingival indices. All tooth surfaces were probed, and alveolar bone attachment loss was determined. After subgingival plaque removal, plaque specimens were examined for differential bacterial morphotypes. The small number of leopards evaluated precluded definitive statistical analysis. However, the progression from gingival health to gingivitis to periodontitis was similar to that seen in man. Therefore, the use of plaque index, gingival index, alveolar bone attachment loss, and differential bacterial morphotypes can be used to determine the dental health of snow leopards.

  20. Interrupting Rivaling Access-flow with Nonsurgical Image-guided ligation: the "IRANI" Procedure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Freed, Robert; Liu, Fengyong; Irani, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    The presence of collateral veins is one of the most common causes of fistula failure to mature. The traditional approach to eliminate collateral vessel flow is coil embolization under fluoroscopy or surgical cut down and branch vessel ligation. However, both approaches are expensive and time consuming. Here, we described an image-guided nonsurgical method to ligate collateral veins. The collateral veins were ligated using Hawkins-Akins needle under ultrasound guidance. The average time for one ligation procedure was 17 minutes. There was a significant increase of blood flow in the venous outflow postligation procedure. Four weeks postprocedure ultrasound demonstrated occlusion of the target vessels. This procedure was well tolerated without major complications. In summary, the novel procedure described here offers an image-guided nonsurgical approach for collateral vein occlusion.

  1. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients.

  2. [THE USE OF OZONATED SEA BUCKTHORN OIL IN THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF TOBACCO DEPENDENCE PERIODONTITIS IN THE EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Zubachyk, V; Ilchyshyn, M

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic and prophylactic properties ozonated of sea buckthorn oil in the experiment on the model of generalized periodontitis in Wistar rats induced by action of extracted products of incomplete combustion of tobacco smoke was investigated. It is proved that the proposed method of ozone therapy in combination with fitooil prevents and corrects metabolic disturbances in the periodontal tissues, caused a by high therapeutic effect of the drug.

  3. Cell- and Gene- Based Therapeutics for Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abbayya, Keshava; Zope, Sameer Anil; Naduwinmani, Sanjay; Pisal, Apurva; Puthanakar, Nagraj

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease of the periodontium, characterized by loss of connective tissue attachment and supporting the alveolar bone. Therefore, to regenerate these lost tissues of the periodontium researchers have included a variety of surgical procedures including grafting materials growth factors and the use of barrier membranes, ultimately resulting into regeneration that is biologically possible but clinically unpredictable. Recently a newer approach of delivering DNA plasmids as therapeutic agents is gaining special attention and is called gene delivery method. Gene therapy being considered a novel approach have a potential to channel their signals in a very systematic and controlled manner thereby providing encoded proteins at all stages of tissue regeneration. The aim of this review was to enlighten a view on the application involving gene delivery and tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration.

  4. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Regulate Apoptosis of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Ding, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are promising cell resource for the cell-based therapy for periodontitis and regeneration of bio-root. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDLSCs on neutrophil, a critical constituent of innate immunity, and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of PDLSCs on the proliferation and apoptosis of resting neutrophils and IL-8 activated neutrophils was tested under cell-cell contact culture and Transwell culture, with or without anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody. We found that PDLSCs could promote the proliferation and reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils whether under cell-cell contact or Transwell culture. Anti-IL-6 antibody reduced PDLSCs-mediated inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis. IL-6 at the concentration of 10ng/ml and 20ng/ml could inhibit neutrophil apoptosis statistically. Collectively, PDLSCs could reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils via IL-6.

  5. Bioactive-glass in periodontal surgery and implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Profeta, Andrea Corrado; Prucher, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive-glass (B-G) is a material known for its favorable biological response when in contact with surrounding fibro-osseous tissues, due not only to an osteoconductive property, but also to an osteostimulatory capacity, and superior biocompatibility for use in human body. The objectives of this paper are to review recent studies on B-G in periodontal and implant therapy, describing its basic properties and mechanism of activity as well as discoursing about state of art and future perspective of utilization. From a demonstrated clinical benefit as bone graft for the elimination of osseous defects due to periodontal disease (intrabony/furcation defects) and surgeries (alveolar ridge preservation, maxillary sinus augmentation), to a potential use for manufacturing bioactive dental implants, possibly allowing wider case selection criteria together with improved integration rates even in the more challenging osteoporotic and medically compromised patients, this biomaterial represents an important field of study with high academic, clinical and industrial importance.

  6. Cell- and Gene- Based Therapeutics for Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abbayya, Keshava; Zope, Sameer Anil; Naduwinmani, Sanjay; Pisal, Apurva; Puthanakar, Nagraj

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease of the periodontium, characterized by loss of connective tissue attachment and supporting the alveolar bone. Therefore, to regenerate these lost tissues of the periodontium researchers have included a variety of surgical procedures including grafting materials growth factors and the use of barrier membranes, ultimately resulting into regeneration that is biologically possible but clinically unpredictable. Recently a newer approach of delivering DNA plasmids as therapeutic agents is gaining special attention and is called gene delivery method. Gene therapy being considered a novel approach have a potential to channel their signals in a very systematic and controlled manner thereby providing encoded proteins at all stages of tissue regeneration. The aim of this review was to enlighten a view on the application involving gene delivery and tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration. PMID:26682031

  7. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY in Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Filho, I. S.; Meyer, R.; Olczak, T.; Xavier, M. T.; Trindade, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease, with participation of bacterial, environmental, and host factors. It results from synergistic and dysbiotic multispecies microorganisms, critical “keystone pathogens,” affecting the whole bacterial community. The purpose of this study was to review the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the immunopathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, with special attention paid to HmuY. The host response during periodontitis involves the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. In this proinflammatory process, the ability of P. gingivalis to evade the host immune response and access nutrients in the microenvironment is directly related to its survival, proliferation, and infection. Furthermore, heme is an essential nutrient for development of these bacteria, and HmuY is responsible for its capture from host heme-binding proteins. The inflammatory potential of P. gingivalis HmuY has been shown, including induction of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and CCL2, decreased levels of IL-8, and increased levels of anti-HmuY IgG and IgG1 antibodies in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the HmuY protein might be a promising target for therapeutic strategies and for development of diagnostic methods in chronic periodontitis, especially in the case of patients with chronic periodontitis not responding to treatment, monitoring, and maintenance therapy. PMID:27403039

  8. Effect of Cimetidine on Nitro-Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    CULIC, CARINA; PARVU, ALINA ELENA; ALB, SANDU FLORIN; ALB, CAMELIA; POP, ANGELA

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Periodontitis is a chronic inflammation that involves nitro-oxidative stress with damaging periodontal structural effects. We aimed to evaluate the consequences of low-dose cimetidine on nitro-oxidative stress in periodontitis. Methods A rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis was used. After two weeks, the periodontitis groups were treated with cimetidine, aminoguanidine, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and trolox for one week. On day 21, blood was drawn and the serum analyzed for measurement of total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status, total antioxidant response, and oxidative stress index. Results Cimetidine had an inhibitory effect on the synthesis of nitric oxide (p=0.001), total oxidative status (p=0.01) and oxidative stress index (p=0.01). Total antioxidant reactivity was increased by cimetidine (p=0.01). The effects of cimetidine were almost like those of aminoguanidine, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and trolox. Conclusions Low-dose cimetidine can be used as adjunctive host modulatory therapy in chronic periodontitis because it reduces nitro-oxidative stress. PMID:26528020

  9. [Treatment of localized intrabony periodontal defects with enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain). Case series].

    PubMed

    Szatmári, Péter; Gera, István

    2014-03-01

    The solitary vertical or horisonto-vertical bone lesions are mainly characteristic of aggressive periodontitis. Only a combined conservative-surgical approach can result in predictable healing. From the early 50's basically two surgical techniques were used for correcting vertical bony defects. The so called bone resective techniques combined with apically positioned flap resulted in the flattening of the bone contour by removing substantial amount of alveolar bone but compromising the periodontal support of the neighboring teeth. The other surgical approach was the facilitation of the reformation of new periodontal attachment and bone with or without bone grafting. Since the mid 80's the gold standard in the therapy of deep vertical bony defects is the guided tissue regeneration (GTR), although an alternative approach has also been developed using different growth and differentiation factors promoting periodontal wound healing. Today in the clinical practices both in periodontal osseous and mucogingival surgeries the most widely used biological factor is the amelogenin and its commercially available product the Enamel Matrix Derivative (Emdogain). With the presented five solitary horisonto-vertical bony defects of three patients the possibilities and the late results are presented that could have been achieved with the application of EMD and thorough postoperative follow-up. The clinical results were comparable to the current data presented by articles in peer reviewed periodontal journals.

  10. Are herpes virus associated to aggressive periodontitis? A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Patrícia Maria de Sousa; Teixeira, Ana Luísa; Kustner, Eduardo Chimenos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal Disease includes a wide variety of infectious entities with various clinical manifestations in the oral cavity and responses to treatment. The determinants of clinical manifestations of periodontal disease include the type of infectious agent, the host immune response and environmental factors. Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is defined as a type of inflammation with specific clinical and laboratory features, which distinguish it from other types of periodontitis, with high incidence rates in a sub-group of individuals. Bacteria have been frequently mentioned as the agent inciting gingival inflammation and tissue destruction that underlies the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, recent studies, with some controversial results, have suggested that the herpes family of viruses, including CMV and EBV-1 as well as papillomaviruses, HIV, Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, Torquetenovirus and hepatitis B and C occur with high frequency in active periodontal lesions. There is a lack of information about this disease and the role of herpesviruses in its pathophysiology. This review provides a critical analysis of the scientific evidence linking bacteria and viruses with AP and their potential impact on clinical characteristics, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26980964

  11. Peripheral Blood Leukocytes Interleukin-1 Beta (IL-1β) Cytokine Hyper-Reactivity in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Giedrimiene, Dalia; Gleiznys, Darius; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Gleizniene, Rymante; Vitkauskiene, Astra

    2016-01-01

    Background Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β) released by peripheral blood leukocyte medium (PBLM), isolated from chronic periodontitis patients (P) before therapy and matched to controls, were determined in the presence or absence of non-opsonized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Material/Methods In this investigation, 26 patients with untreated, severe, generalized, chronic periodontitis and 26 healthy subjects (H) were enrolled. Periodontal status was assessed by measuring bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL), probing pocket depth (PPD), and Ramfjord index (PDI). The levels of IL-1β (μg/ml) were assayed by a standard Immunoenzymetric Assay Diasource IL-1β ELISA kit in PBLM. Results Our study showed that the values of IL-1β levels in PBLM of the P group (stimulated with non-opsonized E. coli and S. aureus) were significantly higher than in the analogous medium of H group subjects (P<0.001). All correlations between the cytokine levels of IL-1β in the samples of PBLM (stimulated with non-opsonized E. coli and S. aureus) and clinical parameters such as BOP, PPD, CAL, and PDI were significantly higher in the group of patients with periodontitis. Conclusions Levels of IL-1β secreted by leukocytes may help measure severe, generalized, chronic periodontitis, and can be predictive of future detrimental clinical sequelae associated with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27847385

  12. Non-surgical sterilisation methods may offer a sustainable solution to feral horse (Equus caballus) overpopulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sally Elizabeth; Nixon, Brett; Aitken, R John

    2016-10-05

    Feral horses are a significant pest species in many parts of the world, contributing to land erosion, weed dispersal and the loss of native flora and fauna. There is an urgent need to modify feral horse management strategies to achieve public acceptance and long-term population control. One way to achieve this is by using non-surgical methods of sterilisation, which are suitable in the context of this mobile and long-lived species. In this review we consider the benefits of implementing novel mechanisms designed to elicit a state of permanent sterility (including redox cycling to generate oxidative stress in the gonad, random peptide phage display to target non-renewable germ cells and the generation of autoantibodies against proteins essential for conception via covalent modification) compared with that of traditional immunocontraceptive approaches. The need for a better understanding of mare folliculogenesis and conception factors, including maternal recognition of pregnancy, is also reviewed because they hold considerable potential in providing a non-surgical mechanism for sterilisation. In conclusion, the authors contend that non-surgical measures that are single shot and irreversible may provide a sustainable and effective strategy for feral horse control.

  13. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis I. Diagnostics and nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    More than 120,000 patients are treated annually in Germany to resolve repeated episodes of acute tonsillitis. Therapy is aiming at symptom regression, avoidance of complications, reduction in the number of disease-related absences in school or at work, increased cost-effectiveness and improved quality of life. The purpose of this part of the guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through different conservative treatment options in order to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical management in terms of intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsillectomy (i.e. tonsillotomy) is the subject of part II of this guideline. To estimate the probability of tonsillitis caused by β-hemolytic streptococci, a diagnostic scoring system according to Centor or McIsaac is suggested. If therapy is considered, a positive score of ≥3 should lead to pharyngeal swab or rapid test or culture in order to identify β-hemolytic streptococci. Routinely performed blood tests for acute tonsillitis are not indicated. After acute streptococcal tonsillitis, there is no need to repeat a pharyngeal swab or any other routine blood tests, urine examinations or cardiological diagnostics such as ECG. The determination of the antistreptolysin O-titer (ASLO titer) and other antistreptococcal antibody titers do not have any value in relation to acute tonsillitis with or without pharyngitis and should not be performed. First-line therapy of β-hemolytic streptococci consists of oral penicillin. Instead of phenoxymethylpenicillin-potassium (penicillin V potassium), also phenoxymethlpenicillin-benzathine with a clearly longer half-life can be used. Oral intake for 7 days of one of both the drugs is recommended. Alternative treatment with oral cephalosporins (e.g. cefadroxil, cefalexin) is indicated only in cases of penicillin failure, frequent recurrences, and whenever a more

  14. Gender Differences in Periodontal Status and Oral Hygiene of Non-Diabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Antina; Busse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated gender dependent differences by the comparison of periodontal status and oral hygiene between diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects. Methods: 517 mostly obese subjects (171 non-diabetic, 205 type 2 diabetic with oral and 141 with insulin therapy; mean: 59 years) completed an oral hygiene questionnaire and had a clinical examination, including periodontal screening and recording (PSR), percentage of bleeding teeth (PBT), probing pocket depth (PD), gingivitis index (GI), and number of teeth (Tn). Main parameters were “periodontitis” and “oral hygiene behaviour”, each defined by 5 sub-parameters. For a comparison of all results, each sub-parameter was set 0.2. The “low performance index“ (LoP) was the sum of significantly worse sub-parameters in the compared groups (maximum of low performing = 1.0). Results: Gender comparison: In non-diabetic and diabetic patients with oral medication, males performed worse (LoP: periodontitis 0.6 - 0.8; oral hygiene 0.4 - 0.6). The male insulin group performed worse oral hygiene (LoP: 0.4) than females with insulin therapy, whereas the periodontal status showed no difference. Diabetic and non-diabetic groups: Females: Diabetic groups performed worse than non-diabetics (LoP: periodontitis 0.2 - 1.0; oral hygiene 0.4). Insulin patients had worse periodontal status and showed no difference in oral hygiene when compared to diabetic patients with oral medication (LoP: 0.2). Males: Diabetic group with oral medication had worse periodontal status than non-diabetics (LoP: 0.6). Conclusions: The periodontal status was mainly due to oral hygiene behaviour, which was worse in men. Apparently behaviour and not diabetes is the major determinant of periodontitis. Men apparently need much more advise than women. PMID:27347232

  15. Nonsurgical resolution of caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess in a cat

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Joohyun; CHOI, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    A one-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was admitted with a history of anorexia, regurgitation and pyrexia for two days. Fever and leukocytosis were identified. There were a large soft tissue density oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on thoracic radiographs, a fluid-filled oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on ultrasonography, and left-sided and ventrally displaced and compressed esophagus on esophagram. On esophageal endoscopy, there were no esophageal abnormalities. CT findings with a fluid filled mass with rim enhancement indicated a caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess. The patient was treated with oral antibiotics, because the owner declined percutaneous drainage and surgery. The patient was admitted on emergency with severe respiratory distress; and ruptured abscess and deteriorated pleuropneumonia were suspected. With intensive hospitalization care and additional antibiotic therapy, the patient had full recovery. PMID:25648207

  16. Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Clark, Danielle; Febbraio, Maria; Levin, Liran

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontal disease is an oral health mystery. Our current understanding of this disease is that specific bacteria invade the oral cavity and the host reacts with an inflammatory response leading to mass destruction of the alveolar bone. Aggressive periodontal disease is typically observed in a population under the age of 30 and occurs so rapidly that it is difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the consequence of this disease frequently involves tooth extractions. As a result, the aftermath is chewing disability and damage to self-esteem due to an altered self-image. Furthermore, patients are encumbered by frequent dental appointments which have an economic impact in regards to both personal financial strain and absent days in the workplace. Aggressive periodontal disease has a tremendous effect on patients' overall quality of life and needs to be investigated more extensively in order to develop methods for earlier definitive diagnosis and effective treatments. One of the mysteries of aggressive periodontal disease is the relatively nominal amount of plaque present on the tooth surface in relation to the large amount of bone loss. There seems to be a hidden factor that lies between the response by the patient's immune system and the bacterial threat that is present. A better mechanistic understanding of this disease is essential to provide meaningful care and better outcomes for patients.

  17. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  18. Biomaterials in periodontal osseous defects